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1

Ruminants  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Why do cows chew their cud? This video segment from Secret of Life: Accidents of Creation describes the physical adaptations that have made ruminants some of the most important, and certainly the most efficient, plant eaters on earth.

Foundation, Wgbh E.

2003-09-26

2

Review article Managing helminths of ruminants in organic farming  

E-print Network

Review article Managing helminths of ruminants in organic farming Jacques CABARETa*, Michel in organic farming. This may induce a change in the intensity (no of worms) and diversity (proportions of species) of helminth infection. Helminths remain a major preoccupation in organic sheep farming: high

Boyer, Edmond

3

9 CFR 93.405 - Health certificate for ruminants.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... (2) That the ruminants are not in quarantine in the region of origin; and (3) If the ruminants are from Angola, Argentina, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia,...

2011-01-01

4

9 CFR 93.405 - Health certificate for ruminants.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... (2) That the ruminants are not in quarantine in the region of origin; and (3) If the ruminants are from Angola, Argentina, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia,...

2010-01-01

5

Management effects on colostrogenesis in small ruminants: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Colostrum feeding in small ruminants is crucial during the first hours after birth due to the lack of Ig transfer during pregnancy via the placenta. In addition the immature immune system of the neonate is slow to produce its own Ig during the first weeks of life. Colostrogenesis, i.e. the transfer of Ig from blood into mammary secretions, starts several

N. Castro; J. Capote; R. M. Bruckmaier; A. Argüello

2011-01-01

6

Microbial Fuel Cells and Microbial Ecology: Applications in Ruminant Health and Production Research  

PubMed Central

Microbial fuel cell (MFC) systems employ the catalytic activity of microbes to produce electricity from the oxidation of organic, and in some cases inorganic, substrates. MFC systems have been primarily explored for their use in bioremediation and bioenergy applications; however, these systems also offer a unique strategy for the cultivation of synergistic microbial communities. It has been hypothesized that the mechanism(s) of microbial electron transfer that enable electricity production in MFCs may be a cooperative strategy within mixed microbial consortia that is associated with, or is an alternative to, interspecies hydrogen (H2) transfer. Microbial fermentation processes and methanogenesis in ruminant animals are highly dependent on the consumption and production of H2in the rumen. Given the crucial role that H2 plays in ruminant digestion, it is desirable to understand the microbial relationships that control H2 partial pressures within the rumen; MFCs may serve as unique tools for studying this complex ecological system. Further, MFC systems offer a novel approach to studying biofilms that form under different redox conditions and may be applied to achieve a greater understanding of how microbial biofilms impact animal health. Here, we present a brief summary of the efforts made towards understanding rumen microbial ecology, microbial biofilms related to animal health, and how MFCs may be further applied in ruminant research. PMID:20024685

Osterstock, Jason B.; Pinchak, William E.; Ishii, Shun'ichi; Nelson, Karen E.

2009-01-01

7

Is There an Association Between Rumination and Self-Reported Physical Health? A One-Year Follow-Up in a Young and an Elderly Sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cross-sectional studies have suggested an association between rumination and subjective health. The aim of the present study was to investigate in a longitudinal design whether rumination was related to self-reported physical health. A total of 96 young (age range 20–35) and 110 elderly (age range 70–85) participants completed questionnaires measuring rumination, negative affect, life events, and self-reported physical health at

Dorthe Kirkegaard Thomsen; Mimi Yung Mehlsen; Frede Olesen; Marianne Hokland; Andrus Viidik; Kirsten Avlund; Robert Zachariae

2004-01-01

8

The management of anthelmintic resistance in grazing ruminants in Australasia--strategies and experiences.  

PubMed

In many countries the presence of anthelmintic resistance in nematodes of small ruminants, and in some cases also in those infecting cattle and horses, has become the status quo rather than the exception. It is clear that consideration of anthelmintic resistance, and its management, should be an integral component of anthelmintic use regardless of country or host species. Many years of research into understanding the development and management of anthelmintic resistance in nematodes of small ruminants has resulted in an array of strategies for minimising selection for resistance and for dealing with it once it has developed. Importantly, many of these strategies are now supported by empirical science and some have been assessed and evaluated on commercial farms. In sheep the cost of resistance has been measured at about 10% of the value of the lamb at sale which means that losses due to undetected resistance far outweigh the cost of testing anthelmintic efficacy. Despite this many farmers still do not test for anthelmintic resistance on their farm. Many resistance management strategies have been developed and some of these have been tailored for specific environments and/or nematode species. However, in general, most strategies can be categorised as either; identify and mitigate high risk management practices, maintain an anthelmintic-susceptible population in refugia, choose the optimal anthelmintic (combinations and formulations), or prevent the introduction of resistant nematodes. Experiences with sheep farmers in both New Zealand and Australia indicate that acceptance and implementation of resistance management practices is relatively easy as long as the need to do so is clear and the recommended practices meet the farmer's criteria for practicality. A major difference between Australasia and many other countries is the availability and widespread acceptance of combination anthelmintics as a resistance management tool. The current situation in cattle and horses in many countries indicates a failure to learn the lessons from resistance development in small ruminants. The cattle and equine industries have, until quite recently, remained generally oblivious to the issue of anthelmintic resistance and the need to take pre-emptive action. In Australasia, as in other countries, a perception was held that resistance in cattle parasites would develop very slowly, if it developed at all. Such preconceptions are clearly incorrect and the challenge ahead for the cattle and equine industries will be to maximise the advantages for resistance management from the extensive body of research and experience gained in small ruminants. PMID:24439840

Leathwick, D M; Besier, R B

2014-07-30

9

Electronic monitoring of rumination activity as an indicator of health status and production traits in high-yielding dairy cows.  

PubMed

In view of the demonstrated relationship between rumination time and health status, the general welfare and metabolic condition of ruminants are often assessed by the examination of rumen function. The main goal of this study was to monitor the daily rumination activity (RA) and its connection with actual liveweight (LW), milk yield (MY) and with two diseases (subclinical hyperketonaemia - SHK, uterine disease - UD) in 96 cows on the basis of a total of 1638 observations in Israel. The studied sample gave a highly significant response, showing that the selected diseases had a diminishing impact on RA and LW and no influence on MY. It can be concluded that the change of RA as determined by electronic monitoring, complemented by the change of LW, is a useful general indicator of health status and subclinical disease before the appearance of clinical signs. PMID:25410387

Gáspárdy, András; Efrat, Gingis; Bajcsy, Arpád Csaba; Fekete, Sándor György

2014-12-01

10

Management systems with extended milking intervals in ruminants: Regulation of production and quality of milk1,2  

E-print Network

Management systems with extended milking intervals in ruminants: Regulation of production and quality of milk1,2 P. G. Marnet3 and M. Komara Joint Unit l'Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique/Agrocampus Rennes "Research on milk production", 65 rue de St Brieuc, 35042 Rennes cedex, France ABSTRACT

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

11

Ruminal Prevotella spp. May Play an Important Role in the Conversion of Plant Lignans into Human Health Beneficial Antioxidants  

PubMed Central

Secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), the most abundant lignan in flaxseed, is metabolized by the ruminal microbiota into enterolignans, which are strong antioxidants. Enterolactone (EL), the main mammalian enterolignan produced in the rumen, is transferred into physiological fluids, with potentially human health benefits with respect to menopausal symptoms, hormone-dependent cancers, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis and diabetes. However, no information exists to our knowledge on bacterial taxa that play a role in converting plant lignans into EL in ruminants. In order to investigate this, eight rumen cannulated cows were used in a double 4×4 Latin square design and fed with four treatments: control with no flax meal (FM), or 5%, 10% and 15% FM (on a dry matter basis). Concentration of EL in the rumen increased linearly with increasing FM inclusion. Total rumen bacterial 16S rRNA concentration obtained using Q-PCR did not differ among treatments. PCR-T-RFLP based dendrograms revealed no global clustering based on diet indicating between animal variation. PCR-DGGE showed a clustering by diet effect within four cows that had similar basal ruminal microbiota. DNA extracted from bands present following feeding 15% FM and absent with no FM supplementation were sequenced and it showed that many genera, in particular Prevotella spp., contributed to the metabolism of lignans. A subsequent in vitro study using selected pure cultures of ruminal bacteria incubated with SDG indicated that 11 ruminal bacteria were able to convert SDG into secoisolariciresinol (SECO), with Prevotella spp. being the main converters. These data suggest that Prevotella spp. is one genus playing an important role in the conversion of plant lignans to human health beneficial antioxidants in the rumen. PMID:24709940

Schogor, Ana L. B.; Huws, Sharon A.; Santos, Geraldo T. D.; Scollan, Nigel D.; Hauck, Barbara D.; Winters, Ana L.; Kim, Eun J.; Petit, Helene V.

2014-01-01

12

Ruminant self-medication against gastrointestinal nematodes: evidence, mechanism, and origins?  

PubMed Central

Gastrointestinal helminths challenge ruminants in ways that reduce their fitness. In turn, ruminants have evolved physiological and behavioral adaptations that counteract this challenge. Ruminants display anorexia and avoidance behaviors, which tend to reduce the incidence of parasitism. In addition, ruminants appear to learn to self-medicate against gastrointestinal parasites by increasing consumption of plant secondary compounds with antiparasitic actions. This selective feeding improves health and fitness. Here, we review the evidence for self-medication in ruminants, propose a hypothesis to explain self-medicative behaviors (based on post-ingestive consequences), and discuss mechanisms (e.g., enhanced neophilia, social transmission) that may underlie the ontogeny and spread of self-medicative behaviors in social groups. A better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie and trigger self-medication in parasitized animals will help scientists devise innovative and more sustainable management strategies for improving ruminant health and well-being. PMID:24971486

Villalba, Juan J.; Miller, James; Ungar, Eugene D.; Landau, Serge Y.; Glendinning, John

2014-01-01

13

Management and productivity of small ruminants in the north west province of Cameroon.  

PubMed

A survey showed that in the North West Province of Cameroon 92% of the farmers rear goats as against only 21% who rear sheep. The main constraint on sheep husbandry appeared to be a traditional belief that keeping sheep adversely affects a woman's fertility. Flock sizes are small (three to 48, median seven) but there was some tendency towards larger numbers in mixed flocks. There were considerably more females than males. Six systems for managing small ruminants were identified. The most widely practised was housing at night and tethering in daytime during the cropping season with either tethering or free-range grazing during the daytime in the non-cropping season. The most common housing system was an enclosed shed with walls of sticks, tree fern or bamboo. Floors of planks laid on the earth or slightly raised were used by about 48% of the farmers while 22% constructed raised slatted floors. Most farmers gave their animals salt on a more or less regular basis but otherwise intentional feed supplementation was rare. About 43% of the farmers thought it unnecessary to provide water. Breeding was generally uncontrolled and the progeny of the most active breeding ram or buck was often the main source of replacement males. The overall offtake rates were 20% for sheep and 24% for goats. Several flocks had no offtake while four (three flocks of goats and one of sheep) reported offtake rates of 65 to 80%. PMID:2749905

Ndamukong, K J; Sewell, M M; Asanji, M F

1989-05-01

14

Holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy for the management of urolithiasis in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Obstructive urolithiasis is a common problem in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs. The most common site of urinary tract obstruction in these species is the urethra. Surgical procedures developed to relieve obstructions, in our experience have been effective in approximately 75% of cases. Urethral stricture is a common complication if the mucosa of the urethra is disrupted. The objective of this project was to evaluate endoscopy guided laser lithotripsy as a therapeutic modality to relieve urethral obstructions in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs. The study population consisted of patients presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of California Davis with obstructive urolithiasis. Lithotripsy was performed using a Holmium:YAG laser via a 200-micron low water quartz fiber passed through a flexible mini-endoscope. Two types of urinary calculi were managed with this technique, calcium carbonate and calcium hydroxyphosphate. Laser lithotripsy was effective at relieving obstructions caused by both types of calculi when conventional methods had failed. Laser lithotripsy performed via urethral endoscopy is a safe and effective therapeutic modality for management of obstructive urolithiasis in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs and reduces the risk of post procedural urethral stricture.

Halland, Spring K.; House, John K.; George, Lisle

2001-05-01

15

Intelligent Vehicle Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As a part of the overall goal of developing Integrated Vehicle Health Management systems for aerospace vehicles, the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) at Marshall Space Flight Center has performed a pilot study on IVHM principals which integrates researched IVHM technologies in support of Integrated Intelligent Vehicle Management (IIVM). IVHM is the process of assessing, preserving, and restoring system functionality across flight and ground systems (NASA NGLT 2004). The framework presented in this paper integrates advanced computational techniques with sensor and communication technologies for spacecraft that can generate responses through detection, diagnosis, reasoning, and adapt to system faults in support of INM. These real-time responses allow the IIVM to modify the affected vehicle subsystem(s) prior to a catastrophic event. Furthermore, the objective of this pilot program is to develop and integrate technologies which can provide a continuous, intelligent, and adaptive health state of a vehicle and use this information to improve safety and reduce costs of operations. Recent investments in avionics, health management, and controls have been directed towards IIVM. As this concept has matured, it has become clear the INM requires the same sensors and processing capabilities as the real-time avionics functions to support diagnosis of subsystem problems. New sensors have been proposed, in addition, to augment the avionics sensors to support better system monitoring and diagnostics. As the designs have been considered, a synergy has been realized where the real-time avionics can utilize sensors proposed for diagnostics and prognostics to make better real-time decisions in response to detected failures. IIVM provides for a single system allowing modularity of functions and hardware across the vehicle. The framework that supports IIVM consists of 11 major on-board functions necessary to fully manage a space vehicle maintaining crew safety and mission objectives: Guidance and Navigation; Communications and Tracking; Vehicle Monitoring; Information Transport and Integration; Vehicle Diagnostics; Vehicle Prognostics; Vehicle mission Planning; Automated Repair and Replacement; Vehicle Control; Human Computer Interface; and Onboard Verification and Validation. Furthermore, the presented framework provides complete vehicle management which not only allows for increased crew safety and mission success through new intelligence capabilities, but also yields a mechanism for more efficient vehicle operations. The representative IVHM technologies for computer platform using heterogeneous communication, 3) coupled electromagnetic oscillators for enhanced communications, 4) Linux-based real-time systems, 5) genetic algorithms, 6) Bayesian Networks, 7) evolutionary algorithms, 8) dynamic systems control modeling, and 9) advanced sensing capabilities. This paper presents IVHM technologies developed under NASA's NFFP pilot project and the integration of these technologies forms the framework for IIVM.

Paris, Deidre E.; Trevino, Luis; Watson, Michael D.

2005-01-01

16

Feed resources and feeding techniques of small ruminants under extensive management conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies are discussed of the nutritional ecology of small ruminants under extensive conditions in northeastern Mexico. Spanish range goats selected greater amounts of foliage from shrubs (browse) than forbs and grasses throughout the year. Apparently high levels of the shrub Acacia rigidula (blackbrush) in the diets might have negatively influenced nutrient intake of goats. However, levels of crude protein and

R. G Ramirez

1999-01-01

17

Janet Craig Occupational Health Manager  

E-print Network

of Occupational Safety and Health Emerging trends - Government strategy for Health and Work Service Dame Carol, safety and wellbeing of staff and students · Review and develop Occupational Health support across20/02/2014 1 Janet Craig Occupational Health Manager RGN BSc RSCPHN(OH) 1556 1700 Bauer 1494

Schnaufer, Achim

18

[Health management in private health insurance].  

PubMed

German private health insurance faces new challenges. The classical tools of cost containment are no longer sufficient to keep up with ever increasing expenses for health care, and international competitors with managed care experience from their home markets are on the point of entering business in Germany. Although the American example of managed care is not fully compatible with customer demands and state regulations, some elements of this approach will gradually be introduced. First agreements were signed with networks or individual preferred providers in outpatient care and rehabilitation medicine. Insurance companies become more and more interested in supporting evidence based guidelines and programmes for disease and case management. The pros and cons of various other health management tools are discussed against the specific background of the quite unique German health care system. PMID:10992797

Ziegenhagen, D J; Schilling, M K

2000-09-01

19

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES SERVICES Effective Date: 04/01/01 POLICY: University of Connecticut Health Center (UCHC), Correctional Managed Health Care (CMHC) shall ensure that newly admitted inmates to Connecticut Department

Oliver, Douglas L.

20

The autonomic phenotype of rumination.  

PubMed

Recent studies suggest that ruminative thoughts may be mediators of the prolonged physiological effects of stress. We hypothesized that autonomic dysregulation plays a role in the relation between rumination and health. Rumination was induced by an anger-recall task in 45 healthy subjects. Heart rate variability (HRV), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and baroreflex effectiveness index (BEI) change scores were evaluated to obtain the autonomic phenotype of rumination. Personality traits and endothelial activation were examined for their relation to autonomic responses during rumination. Degree of endothelial activation was assessed by circulating soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1). Vagal withdrawal during rumination was greater for women than men. Larger decreases in the high frequency component of HRV were associated with higher levels of anger-in, depression, and sICAM-1 levels. BRS reactivity was negatively related to trait anxiety. BEI reactivity was positively related to anger-in, hostility, anxiety, and depression. Lower BEI and BRS recovery were associated with lower social desirability and higher anger-out, anxiety, and depression. Findings suggest that the autonomic dysregulation that characterizes rumination plays a role in the relationships between personality and cardiovascular health. PMID:19272312

Ottaviani, Cristina; Shapiro, David; Davydov, Dmitry M; Goldstein, Iris B; Mills, Paul J

2009-06-01

21

Managed consumerism in health care.  

PubMed

The future of market-oriented health policy and practice lies in "managed consumerism," a blend of the patient-centric focus of consumer-driven health care and the provider-centric focus of managed competition. The optimal locus of incentives will vary among health services according to the nature of the illness, the clinical technology, and the extent of discretion in utilization. A competitive market will manifest a variety of comprehensive and limited benefit designs, broad and narrow contractual networks, and single-and multispecialty provider organizations. PMID:16284020

Robinson, James C

2005-01-01

22

Gamification and geospatial health management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sensor and Measurement technologies are rapidly developing for many consumer applications which have the potential to make a major impact on business and society. One of the most important areas for building a sustainable future is in health management. This opportunity arises because of the growing popularity of lifestyle monitoring devices such as the Jawbone UP bracelet, Nike Fuelband and Samsung Galaxy GEAR. These devices measure physical activity and calorie consumption and, when visualised on mobile and portable devices, enable users to take more responsibility for their personal health. This presentation looks at how the process of gamification can be applied to develop important geospatial health management applications that could not only improve the health of nations but also significantly address some of the issues in global health such as the ageing society and obesity.

Wortley, David

2014-06-01

23

Square Pegs and Round Holes: Ruminations on the Relationship between Performance Appraisal and Performance Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Models of comprehensive Performance Management systems include both employee development and evaluative components. The Organizational Behavior Management discipline focuses almost exclusively on the developmental component, while the Industrial and Organizational Psychology discipline is focused on use of performance appraisals. Performance…

Gravina, Nicole E.; Siers, Brian P.

2011-01-01

24

Families, Managed Care, & Children's Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theme issue of a bulletin on family support and children's mental health focuses on managed care and the impact on children who are in need of mental health services. Articles include: "Private Sector Managed Care and Children's Mental Health" (Ira S. Lourie and others); "Just What Is Managed Care?" (Chris Koyanagi); "Managed Behavioral…

McManus, Marilyn C., Ed.

1996-01-01

25

Adolescent rumination syndrome.  

PubMed

Rumination syndrome is the non-purposeful regurgitation of recently ingested food from the stomach to the mouth, where it is either expelled or reswallowed. Adolescent rumination syndrome (ARS) is a rare condition of which many physicians are unaware. Patients often are misdiagnosed or undergo costly testing, and as a result, diagnosis and treatment are often delayed. While ARS is not life-threatening, it does have medical and emotional effects on the patient and the patient's family. Diagnosis of ARS is based upon the Rome III diagnostic criteria. Antroduodenal manometry, while not required for a diagnosis, can be helpful to confirm the diagnosis. The pathogenesis of this disorder is complex and not well understood. However, because of its behavioral component, treatment of ARS requires a multidisciplinary approach that includes both medical management of symptoms and implementation of strategies that address behavioral, psychological, and general quality-of-life components of the disorder. PMID:25064317

Mousa, Hayat M; Montgomery, Mary; Alioto, Anthony

2014-08-01

26

Invited review: effect, persistence, and virulence of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species associated with ruminant udder health.  

PubMed

The aim of this review is to assess the effect of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) species on udder health and milk yield in ruminants, and to evaluate the capacity of CNS to cause persistent intramammary infections (IMI). Furthermore, the literature on factors suspected of playing a role in the pathogenicity of IMI-associated CNS, such as biofilm formation and the presence of various putative virulence genes, is discussed. The focus is on the 5 CNS species that have been most frequently identified as causing bovine IMI using reliable molecular identification methods (Staphylococcus chromogenes, Staphylococcus simulans, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus xylosus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis). Although the effect on somatic cell count and milk production is accepted to be generally limited or nonexistent for CNS as a group, indications are that the typical effects differ between CNS species and perhaps even strains. It has also become clear that many CNS species can cause persistent IMI, contrary to what has long been believed. However, this trait appears to be quite complicated, being partly strain dependent and partly dependent on the host's immunity. Consistent definitions of persistence and more uniform methods for testing this phenomenon will benefit future research. The factors explaining the anticipated differences in pathogenic behavior appear to be more difficult to evaluate. Biofilm formation and the presence of various staphylococcal virulence factors do not seem to (directly) influence the effect of CNS on IMI but the available information is indirect or insufficient to draw consistent conclusions. Future studies on the effect, persistence, and virulence of the different CNS species associated with IMI would benefit from using larger and perhaps even shared strain collections and from adjusting study designs to a common framework, as the large variation currently existing therein is a major problem. Also within-species variation should be investigated. PMID:24952781

Vanderhaeghen, W; Piepers, S; Leroy, F; Van Coillie, E; Haesebrouck, F; De Vliegher, S

2014-09-01

27

Vehicle health management technology needs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Background material on vehicle health management (VHM) and health monitoring/control is presented. VHM benefits are described and a list of VHM technology needs that should be pursued is presented. The NASA funding process as it impacts VHM technology funding is touched upon, and the VHM architecture guidelines for generic launch vehicles are described. An example of a good VHM architecture, design, and operational philosophy as it was conceptualized for the National Launch System program is presented. Consideration is given to the Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group's role in VHM, earth-to-orbit, and space vehicle avionics technology development considerations, and some actual examples of VHM benefits for checkout are given.

Hammond, Walter E.; Jones, W. G.

1992-01-01

28

BSc in Occupational Safety & Health Management  

E-print Network

BSc in Occupational Safety & Health Management UCD School of Public Health, Physiotherapy in Occupational Safety and Health Management is a part-time multidisciplinary undergraduate degree programme, which is designed for Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) professionals, who are both practising

29

Health & Safety Management System Queen's University  

E-print Network

Health & Safety Management System Queen's University December 2003 #12;Queen's University Health & Safety Management System 2 1. Introduction Under Provincial Health and Safety legislation, the Occupational Health and Safety Act, (the OH&S Act), places the onus for compliance with the legislation

Ellis, Randy

30

Agent-based health care management An Agent-based Approach to Health Care Management  

E-print Network

Agent-based health care management 1 An Agent-based Approach to Health Care Management Jun Huang1, London WC2A 3PX, UK. Abbreviated title: Agent-based health care management Complete Mailing Address. London E1 4NS UK #12;Agent-based health care management 2 Abstract The provision of medical care

Mascardi, Viviana

31

Overview of Nurse Managed Health Centers Nurse Managed Health Centers (NMHC) are outpatient facilities that provide health services to the  

E-print Network

Overview of Nurse Managed Health Centers Nurse Managed Health Centers (NMHC) are outpatient, primary care, college health care, school- based care, and occupational health, Pohl, et. al. (2010). A Nurse Managed Health Center can be independently operated, be based in a public school, or University

Firestone, Jeremy

32

Environmental scanning and the health care manager.  

PubMed

Health care managers and supervisors work in an environment of major changes and ongoing turbulence. Basic terms and strategic approaches are described to enable managers and supervisors to better understand the process of environmental scanning in the turbulent health care environment. Drawing from multiple disciplines, the information allows health care managers and supervisors to improve their skills as environmental scanners as they develop and implement strategic plans in this environment. PMID:16131929

Layman, Elizabeth J; Bamberg, Richard

2005-01-01

33

Office of Risk Management Environmental Health Services  

E-print Network

Office of Risk Management Environmental Health Services 141 General Services Fort Collins, Colorado Provost and Director Colorado State University Extension From: Sally Alexander Environmental Health highway, road, or street which physically interferes with the movement of traffic; 5. a dangerous

34

Personal Health Record: Managing Personal Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter presents the work of the TIGER Collaborative on Consumer Empowerment and the Personal Health Record (PHR). The\\u000a entire body of work for the TIGER Collaborative Team #9 is available at http:\\/\\/tigerphr.pbworks.com\\/ The first part of this\\u000a chapter will review the state of the science on the potential of health consumerism as seen through the lens of health literacy

Charlotte Weaver; Rita Zielstorff

35

Medical and Health Services Managers  

MedlinePLUS

... are large enough to need them Manage the finances of the facility, such as patient fees and ... services managers: Nursing home administrators manage staff, admissions, finances, and care of the building, as well as ...

36

Correctional Managed Health Care CMHC ANNUAL REPORT  

E-print Network

The Connecticut Department of Correction (CDOC) historically provided health services to inmates directly, using provide compassionate and clinically appropriate health care to inmates within the DOC correctionalCorrectional Managed Health Care CMHC ANNUAL REPORT July 2011 - June 2012 Introduction Correctional

Oliver, Douglas L.

37

A guide to performance management for the Health Information Manager  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides a summary of human resource management practices that have been identifi ed as being associated with better outcomes in performance management. In general, essential practices include transformational leadership and a coherent program of goal setting, performance monitoring and feedback. Some Health Information Managers may feel they require training assistance to develop the necessary skills in the establishment

Sandra G Leggat

2009-01-01

38

Future developments in health care performance management  

PubMed Central

This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance. PMID:24255600

Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

2013-01-01

39

Concept Development for Software Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report documents the work performed by Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) under NASA contract NNL06AA08B, delivery order NNL07AB06T. The Concept Development for Software Health Management (CDSHM) program was a NASA funded effort sponsored by the Integrated Vehicle Health Management Project, one of the four pillars of the NASA Aviation Safety Program. The CD-SHM program focused on defining a structured approach to software health management (SHM) through the development of a comprehensive failure taxonomy that is used to characterize the fundamental failure modes of safety-critical software.

Riecks, Jung; Storm, Walter; Hollingsworth, Mark

2011-01-01

40

Research collaboration in health management research communities  

PubMed Central

Background This study uses scientometrics methodology to reveal the status quo and emerging issues of collaboration in health management. Methods We searched all the articles with the keyword “health management” in the period 1999–2011 in Web of Knowledge, then 3067 articles were found. Methods such as Social network analysis (SNA), co-authorship, co-word analysis were used in this study. Results Analysis of the past 13 years of research in the field of health management indicates that, whether the production of scientific research, or authors, institutions and scientific research collaboration at the national level, collaboration behavior has been growing steadily across all collaboration types. However, the international scientific research cooperation about health management study between countries needs to be further encouraged. 17 researchers can be seen as the academic leaders in this field. 37 research institutions play a vital role in the information dissemination and resources control in health management. The component analysis found that 22 research groups can be regarded as the backbone in this field. The 8 institution groups consisting of 33 institutions form the core of this field. USA, UK and Australia lie in the center by cohesive subgroup analysis; Based on keywords analysis, 44 keywords with high frequency such as care, disease, system and model were involved in the health management field. Conclusions This study demonstrates that although it is growing steadily, collaboration behavior about health management study needs to be enhanced, especially between different institutions or countries/regions, which would promote the progress and internationalization of health management. Besides, researchers should pay attention to the cooperation of representative scholars and institutions, as well as the hot areas of research, because their experience would help us promote the research development of our nation. PMID:23617236

2013-01-01

41

An assessment of GHG emissions from small ruminants in comparison with GHG emissions from large ruminants and monogastric livestock  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are expected to cause global warming which results in extreme weather changes that could affect crop yields and productivity, food supplies and food prices. It is also expected that climate change will have an impact on animal metabolism and health, reproduction and productivity. On the other hand, the expected increased demand of animal origin products in the coming years will increase the reared animal numbers and consequently GHG emissions. This paper outlines the main GHGs emitted from livestock which are CO2, CH4 and N2O, coming from respiration, enteric fermentation and manure management respectively, with CH4 and N2O having the highest global warming potential. Ruminant livestock has the highest contribution to these GHG emissions with small ruminants share being 12.25% of the total GHG emissions from livestock's enteric and manure CH4, and manure N2O in CO2 equivalent, producing 9.45 kg CO2 equivalent per kg body weight with the respective values for cattle, pigs and poultry being 5.45, 3.97 and 3.25. Since the production systems significantly affect the GHG emissions, the grazing, livestock crop complex, and intensive ones account for 30.5%, 67.29% and 5.51% for total CH4 emission (from enteric fermentation and manure management) and 24.32%, 68.11% and 7.57% for N2O respectively. Taking into account the positive and negative impacts of small ruminant livestock production systems to the environmental aspects in general, it is recommended that a number of potentially effective measures should be taken and the appropriate mitigation technologies should be applied in order to reduce effectively and essentially the GHG emissions to the atmosphere, with no adverse effects on intensification and increased productivity of small ruminants production systems.

Zervas, G.; Tsiplakou, E.

2012-03-01

42

Chasing helminths and their economic impact on farmed ruminants.  

PubMed

Global agriculture will be required to intensify production from a shrinking natural resource base. Helminth infections of ruminants are a major constraint on efficient livestock production. The current challenge is to develop diagnostic methods that detect the production impact of helminth infections on farms in order to target control measures and contribute to the global challenge of preserving food security. We review here our understanding of the effects of helminth infections and control practices on productivity and the diagnostic tools that can inform on this. By combining advances in helminth laboratory diagnostics and animal health economics, sustainable management of helminth infections can be integrated into the whole-farm economic context. PMID:24888669

Charlier, Johannes; van der Voort, Mariska; Kenyon, Fiona; Skuce, Philip; Vercruysse, Jozef

2014-07-01

43

Assessment of time management attitudes among health managers.  

PubMed

These days, working people are finding it difficult to manage their time, get more done at work, and find some balance in their work and personal lives. Successful time management is often suggested to be a product of organizing skills, however, what works for one person may not work for others. Context current competence assessment formats for physicians, health professionals, and managers during their training years reliably test core knowledge and basic skills. However, they may underemphasize some important domains of professional medical practice. Thus, in addition to assessments of basic skills, new formats that assess clinical reasoning, expert judgment, management of ambiguity, professionalism, time management, learning strategies, and teamwork to promise a multidimensional assessment while maintaining adequate reliability and validity in classic health education and health care institutional settings are needed to be worked on. It should be kept in mind that institutional support, reflection, and mentoring must accompany the development of assessment programs. This study was designed to describe the main factors that consume time, effective hours of work, time management opportunities, and attitudes and behaviors of health professionals and managers on time management concept through assessment by the assessment tool Time Management Inquiry Form (TMIQ-F). The study was conducted at the State Hospital, Social Security Hospital, and University Hospital at Kirikkale, Turkey between October 1999 and January 2000, including 143 subjects defined as medical managers and medical specialists. According to the results, a manager should give priority to the concept of planning, which may be counted among the efficient time management techniques, and educate him/herself on time management. PMID:16131933

Sarp, Nilgun; Yarpuzlu, Aysegul Akbay; Mostame, Fariba

2005-01-01

44

Financial management in leading health care systems.  

PubMed

To understand better the financial management practices and strategies of modern health care organizations, we conducted interviews with chief financial officers (CFOs) of several leading health care systems. In this introduction, we present an overview of the project and summary responses on corporate financial structures and strategic challenges facing CFOs. PMID:10845383

Smith, D G; Wheeler, J R; Rivenson, H L; Reiter, K L

2000-01-01

45

Managing complaints in health and social care.  

PubMed

An important aspect of allowing patients to take control of their health care is the introduction of new procedures for dealing with complaints. This article examines the concepts that underpin the new Department of Health regulations on complaints management and what they will mean for health and social care professionals. It also explains why these regulations focus on restorative justice rather than blame when adverse events occur. PMID:20432639

Holmes-Bonney, Kathy

2010-04-01

46

Improving health service management education: the manager speaks.  

PubMed

This paper uses health service manager judgements to discuss educational approaches and environments suitable to the development of required competencies and reports barriers to and opportunities for competency development. Practising managers were found to recognise and value the educational contributions made by academic programs, health service organisations and professional associations to the development of professional competence. Academic programs are seen as the appropriate vehicle for developing conceptual, analytical, problem solving and communication competencies that require considerable maturation time. Health service organisations are seen to have a key role in promoting professional competence through maintaining a culture conductive to encouraging managers to undertake further education, supported by appropriate system strategies. Professional associations are regarded as appropriate sponsors for promoting knowledge and skill update in relation to current issues in management through short courses, conferences and timely educational meetings. Wherever possible, collaboration between professional and educational organisations was seen to be desirable. PMID:10131177

Harris, M G; Harris, R D; Tapsell, L

1993-01-01

47

ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM HEALTH MANAGEMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most critical systems in any aerospace vehicle is the electrical power system. Comprised of energy generation, energy storage, power distribution, and power management, the electrical power system (EPS) is relied upon by every major subsystem for proper operation. In order to meet the safety requirements of aeronautics and space systems - and provide for their reliability, maintainability,

Robert M. Button; Amy Chicatelli

48

Applying e-health to case management.  

PubMed

The healthcare industry is only beginning to understand e-health. E-health can be defined as the use of technology to directly improve healthcare delivery-affording patients the opportunity to participate in their own healthcare management, provider, and institution. The market is changing rapidly, and innovations, partnerships, and mergers are taking place daily. For healthcare institutions, setting a long-term, yet adaptable e-health strategy is of vital importance for the continued success of the organization. For clinicians, an understanding of and familiarity with technologies can significantly improve workflow, organization, and patient interaction. For the patient, technology can be leveraged as a means to take initiative and responsibility for his/her own health. This article defines e-health and explains the implications and benefits of e-health to nurses and their patients. The article also identifies unique opportunities e-health/e-commerce can provide case managers in promoting patient connectivity, care management, and economy in cost of care. PMID:16397993

Adams, J M

2000-01-01

49

Rumination syndrome: a review of current concepts and treatments.  

PubMed

Rumination is a normal and common phenomenon among ruminant animals; but in humans, it is always regarded as symptom indicative of abnormal function of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and understanding of the mechanisms explaining this event are still evolving. Learning-based theories, organic factors such as gastroesophageal reflux disease and psychological disturbances (eg, depression, anxiety) and the role of life stresses have been postulated as potential mechanisms of rumination. In this review, we take the approach that rumination syndrome is a distinct and discrete functional gastroduodenal disorder. We review current concepts of the pathophysiology of this entity and diagnostic approaches, then detail the treatment paradigms that have been pursued in rumination syndrome in adults. Patients with rumination syndrome have a very distinct set of symptoms. It was focused on the immediate postprandial period, but recently, there is an awareness of an expanding spectrum of the clinical presentation. This includes the concept of "conditioned vomiting" occurring in the setting of delayed gastric emptying (gastroparesis). Physicians' awareness of rumination syndrome is essential in the diagnosis and management of this disorder. Stress and psychological aspects in rumination syndrome are invariably in the background and have to be addressed. The crucial steps in the treatment strategy for rumination syndrome rely on reassurance, education and a physiologic explanation to the patient and family that this is not a "disease," followed by behavioral and relaxation programs and addressing stress factors. PMID:24642653

Hejazi, Reza A; McCallum, Richard W

2014-10-01

50

The Implications of Death for Health: A Terror Management Health Model for Behavioral Health Promotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article introduces a terror management health model (TMHM). The model integrates disparate health and social psychology literatures to elucidate how the conscious and nonconscious awareness of death can influence the motivational orientation that is most operative in the context of health decisions. Three formal propositions are presented. Proposition 1 suggests that conscious thoughts about death can instigate health-oriented responses

Jamie L. Goldenberg; Jamie Arndt

2008-01-01

51

Health Data Management top 10 special report.  

PubMed

The top 10 health care information technology companies control only about 30% of the software market. Because these leading companies do not yet dominate the market, observers predict vendors will continue to consolidate. In this in-depth special report, Health Data Management profiles the 10 leading companies, ranked on their 1996 revenues. Each corporate profile offers insights from top company executives about their strategies, as well as comments from stock analysts. PMID:10167252

Bazzoli, F; McCormack, J

1997-05-01

52

Managing the myths of health care.  

PubMed

Myths impede the effective management of health care, for example that the system is failing (indeed, that is a system), and can be fixed by detached social engineering and heroic leadership, or treating it more like a business. This field needs to reframe its management, as distributed beyond the "top"; its strategy as venturing, not planning; its organizing as collaboration beyond control, and especially itself, as a system beyond its parts. PMID:23342753

Mintzberg, Henry

2012-01-01

53

Health care management in workers' compensation.  

PubMed

A high-performing, effective health care delivery system is critical to the recovery of injured workers within a workers' compensation insurance system. Timely and effective health care has the potential to minimize indemnity costs and therefore contribute to the insurer's financial state. While costs remain a concern to insurers, cost-containment initiatives within the health care arena have evolved from a strict "deep discount" approach to more sophisticated health care strategies that follow managed care-style models. In the future, health care strategies are likely to become more integrated within the business operations of workers' compensation insurance systems. The next evolution of health care strategy within workers' compensation will likely include consensus-based contracts with providers that stipulate the role and function of each party while reinforcing a continuous improvement mindset. It is probable that a component of this evolving system will include shared risk and reimbursement that is based on performance. Insurers who begin to evaluate the true impact of a comprehensive health care strategy will find it necessary and advantageous to modify their business relationship with health care providers. Those who are able to articulate a business strategy that capitalizes on the skills of the health care community are likely to gain a competitive advantage. Most importantly, this bridging of intellectual capacity across the insurance and health care domains will result in a delivery system that is valued by, and contributes to, its key participants--the employers and the injured workers. PMID:9589449

Nikolaj, S; Boon, B

1998-01-01

54

75 FR 54804 - Safety and Health Management Programs for Mines  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...comprehensive safety and health management programs at...Academia; safety and health professionals; industry...prevent injuries and illnesses, maintain compliance...Federal Mine Safety and Health Act, safety and health...experience low injury and illness rates and low...

2010-09-09

55

Towards Open Information Management in Health Care  

PubMed Central

The utilization of information technology as tool in health care is increasing. The main benefits stem from the fact that information in electronic form can be transferred to different locations rapidly and from the possibility to automate certain information management tasks. The current technological approach for this automation relies on structured, formally coded representation of information. We discuss the limitations of the current technological approach and present a viewpoint, grounded on previous research and the authors’ own experiences, on how to progress. We present that a bottleneck in the automation of the management of constantly evolving clinical information is caused by the fact that the current technological approach requires the formal coding of information to be static in nature. This inherently hinders the expandability of the information case space to be managed. We present a new paradigm entitled open information management targeting unlimited case spaces. We also present a conceptual example from clinical medicine demonstrating open information management principles and mechanisms. PMID:19415134

Yli-Hietanen, J; Niiranen, S

2008-01-01

56

Learning, changing and managing in mental health.  

PubMed

This paper draws on research which considers the implications for practitioners and managers of implementing new ideas for practice gained from learning and education in mental health in the UK. Using a questionnaire survey followed by eight semi-structured interviews, the research set out to identify the issues facing workers trying to implement change in the workplace as a result of new learning gained from study of an Open University mental health course. The paper argues that much management literature on change within organisations is problematic in this specific context. This is largely because it takes insufficient account of the complexities surrounding work within social care (particularly mental health). Findings show that workers who have undertaken learning in mental health often feel disempowered and isolated when attempting to introduce new ideas for practice into the workplace. The first line manager operates at the intersection of practice and learning and has a key role in enabling and supporting staff through practice as well as service change and professional development. This paper locates the distance learning experience within a wider framework of student/practitioner support, and explores the role of the first line manager in supporting and enabling staff. PMID:11725583

Henderson, J

2001-11-01

57

The health and management of poultry production  

Microsoft Academic Search

The poultry industry in the USA is a fully integrated system of animal agriculture. Each company has control over the bird husbandry and health management aspects of production, including the use of antimicrobial agents. The three segments of the industry—broiler chickens, turkeys, and layer chickens—have few antibiotics available for the therapeutic treatment of bacterial diseases. Prior to approval of the

Charles L. Hofacre

2002-01-01

58

MIS for Health Care Human Resource Management: A Case  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human resources (HR) represent a key resource for the health care system in any coun try. Its development and management are considered vital for establishing a sustain able health system infrastructure. A human resources management information system (MIS) is essential for sound planning and management of a health system. This paper briefly discusses the conceptual development of health care human

Basu Ghosh

2000-01-01

59

Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. It is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this paper, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an intelligent systems ]relevant ISHM capability. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system. Both ground-based (remote) and on-board ISHM capabilities are compared and contrasted. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

2011-01-01

60

Software Health Management with Bayesian Networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Most modern aircraft as well as other complex machinery is equipped with diagnostics systems for its major subsystems. During operation, sensors provide important information about the subsystem (e.g., the engine) and that information is used to detect and diagnose faults. Most of these systems focus on the monitoring of a mechanical, hydraulic, or electromechanical subsystem of the vehicle or machinery. Only recently, health management systems that monitor software have been developed. In this paper, we will discuss our approach of using Bayesian networks for Software Health Management (SWHM). We will discuss SWHM requirements, which make advanced reasoning capabilities for the detection and diagnosis important. Then we will present our approach to using Bayesian networks for the construction of health models that dynamically monitor a software system and is capable of detecting and diagnosing faults.

Mengshoel, Ole; Schumann, JOhann

2011-01-01

61

Promoting transboundary animal disease risk management via a multiple health and husbandry intervention strategies in upland Lao PDR.  

PubMed

Surveys of smallholder farmer knowledge, attitude, practice (KAP) and income were conducted in 2011 and 2012 in five northern provinces of Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR; n = 200 farmers). Participating villages were classified as either from a livelihood development project (LV; n = 80 farmers) or a livestock research project that contained both 'high-intervention' (HI; n = 60 farmers) or 'low-intervention' (LI; n = 60 farmers) villages. Farmer training plus a suite of health and productivity interventions were implemented in HI sites; only vaccination was implemented in LI sites, whilst various interventions and limited vaccination were introduced to LV sites. Farmer interviews were conducted with survey questions on socioeconomic variables and KAP of large ruminant health and disease risk management, enabling determination of quantitative and dichotomous qualitative traits and comparison of results from HI, LI and LV villages. The average farmer income from sales of large ruminants in HI was USD 621, in LI was USD 547 and in LV was USD 225 (p < 0.001). The predicted mean of total knowledge scores (/42) in the 2012 survey in HI was 28, in LI was 22 and in LV was 17 (p < 0.001). We conclude that improved KAP of large ruminant health and production can be achieved by intensive training, although with some farmers yet to apply their knowledge on husbandry and biosecurity practices, continued learning support and closed linkage of research and development projects to improve extension capacity is recommended. This multiple participatory approach promoting biosecurity in addition to vaccination may provide a more sustainable pathway for the advancement of Lao PDR on the Progressive Control Pathway for foot and mouth disease control. PMID:24310441

Nampanya, Sonevilay; Khounsy, Syseng; Rast, Luzia; Windsor, Peter A

2014-02-01

62

The Implications of Death for Health: A Terror Management Health Model for Behavioral Health Promotion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article introduces a terror management health model (TMHM). The model integrates disparate health and social psychology literatures to elucidate how the conscious and nonconscious awareness of death can influence the motivational orientation that is most operative in the context of health decisions. Three formal propositions are presented.…

Goldenberg, Jamie L.; Arndt, Jamie

2008-01-01

63

Creating and managing a paperless health information management department.  

PubMed

Over the last 10 to 15 years, the health care industry has experienced dramatic changes in health care delivery, consumer needs, and demands. The medical record, a recapitulation of the care patients receive, continues to be one of the most vital components of the health care delivery system. It serves as a crucial administrative, clinical, financial, and research tool. Health information managers, striving to meet ever-changing requirements, have turned to electronic record processing to meet these changes. The following article describes one hospital's journey from a cumbersome paper environment to an electronic environment that not only resulted in improved customer service but also provided employees with renewed job satisfaction and increased skill levels. PMID:12402633

Greene, Zelda B

2002-08-01

64

Second discipline in Health Management and Policy HMP 401, US Health Care Systems  

E-print Network

Second discipline in Health Management and Policy Required: HMP 401, US Health Care Systems HMP 501, Epidemiology and Community Medicine HMP 721, Managing Health Care Organizations Either HMP 711, Health Systems] HMP 712, Health Systems Research II Course Descriptions: HMP 401 - United States Health Care Systems

New Hampshire, University of

65

Entrepreneurship management in health services: an integrative model.  

PubMed

This research develops an integrated systems model of entrepreneurship management as a method for achieving health care organizational survival and growth. Specifically, it analyzes current health care environment challenges, identifies roles of managers and discusses organizational theories that are relevant to the health care environment, outlines the role of entrepreneurship in health care, and describes the entrepreneurial manager in the entrepreneurial management process to produce desirable organizational outcomes. The study concludes that as current health care environment continues to show intense competition, entrepreneurial managers are responsible for creating innovations, managing change, investing in resources, and recognizing opportunities in the environment to increase organizational viability. PMID:16583849

Guo, Kristina L

2006-01-01

66

Making Technology Ready: Integrated Systems Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper identifies work needed by developers to make integrated system health management (ISHM) technology ready and by programs to make mission infrastructure ready for this technology. This paper examines perceptions of ISHM technologies and experience in legacy programs. Study methods included literature review and interviews with representatives of stakeholder groups. Recommendations address 1) development of ISHM technology, 2) development of ISHM engineering processes and methods, and 3) program organization and infrastructure for ISHM technology evolution, infusion and migration.

Malin, Jane T.; Oliver, Patrick J.

2007-01-01

67

Towards software health management with bayesian networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

More and more systems such as aircraft, machinery, and cars rely heavily on software, which performs safety-critical operations. Assuring software safety though traditional V&V has become a tremendous, if not impossible task, given the growing size and complexity of the software. We propose that SWHM (SoftWare Health Management) has the potential to increase safety and reliability of high-assurance software systems.

Johann Schumann; Ole J. Mengshoel; Ashok N. Srivastava; Adnan Darwiche

2010-01-01

68

Knowledge Management and E-Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Knowledge management (KM) has made a significant impact on the global healthcare sector. However, it is important to address\\u000a the link between knowledge, information and engineering. This paper discusses how concepts from the established KM field can\\u000a be applied to the area of e-Health. Explicit and tacit modes of knowledge transfer are presented and discussed. We conclude\\u000a by advocating “tacit-to-tacit”

Rajeev K. Bali; M. Chris Gibbons; Vikraman Baskaran; Raouf N. G. Naguib

69

[Veterinary herd health management in swine production].  

PubMed

The paper describes the current tendencies in the field of pork production since the EU single market has come into being. The challenges to the veterinary profession resulting from them are the development of quality assurance systems through the whole production chain and the idea of the Alternative Veterinary Mandatory Alternative Meat Inspection System. The "new" veterinary activities to meet the growing demands are explained with special regard to slaughter checks, preventive veterinary consultation and future herd health management. PMID:8591754

Blaha, T

1995-07-01

70

Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. Management implies storage, distribution, sharing, maintenance, processing, reasoning, and presentation. ISHM is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this chapter, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an ISHM capability relevant to intelligent systems. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system, emphasizing an advance toward an on-board, autonomous capability. Both ground-based and on-board ISHM capabilities are addressed. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

2011-01-01

71

Constructing management practice in the new public management: the case of mental health managers.  

PubMed

There has been a growth in managerialism of professionals in the Public Sector. This paper contributes to this debate by examining perceptions of senior managers in mental health services within Health Authorities, NHS Trusts and Local Authorities' Social Services departments in Wales. The paper explores how different professions responded differently to the growth of managerialism. The results suggest important differences and similarities between management in health and social services settings. PMID:12908995

Connolly, M; Jones, N

2003-08-01

72

ISWHM: Tools and Techniques for Software and System Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation presents status and results of research on Software Health Management done within the NRA "ISWHM: Tools and Techniques for Software and System Health Management." Topics include: Ingredients of a Guidance, Navigation, and Control System (GN and C); Selected GN and C Testbed example; Health Management of major ingredients; ISWHM testbed architecture; and Conclusions and next Steps.

Schumann, Johann; Mengshoel, Ole J.; Darwiche, Adnan

2010-01-01

73

Elimination of small ruminant lentivirus infection from sheep flocks and goat herds aided by health schemes in Great Britain.  

PubMed

Over a period of 11 years, 33 sheep or goat holdings lost their maedi-visna or caprine arthritis-encephalitis accredited status (mean 2.8 per year [0.09 per cent] of the accredited holdings in Great Britain). Of these, 22 sheep flocks and two goat herds eradicated the infection and regained their accredited status. In addition, 10 sheep flocks and two goat herds managed to eradicate infection, having joined the scheme with infected animals. In flocks and herds with a high initial prevalence of infection, the adoption of an indirect ELISA, with greater sensitivity than the agar gel immunodiffusion test, improved success rates. A strategy was devised to interpret the ELISA results depending upon the prevalence of infection at the time. Eighteen of the 33 flocks/herds (54.5 per cent) that had introductions of infection also owned non-accredited stock. PMID:21257509

Synge, B A; Ritchie, C M

2010-11-01

74

Data Management for Meeting Global Health Challenges Tapan S. Parikh  

E-print Network

Data Management for Meeting Global Health Challenges Tapan S. Parikh UC Berkeley School global health challenges are becoming increasingly data driven. Governments and donors are demanding activities, and responding to remote outbreaks of disease. Data challenges in global health intersect

Parikh, Tapan S.

75

NIH POLICY MANUAL 1340 -NIH Occupational Safety and Health Management  

E-print Network

NIH POLICY MANUAL 1340 - NIH Occupational Safety and Health Management Issuing Office: ORS establishes the scope and objectives of the Occupational Safety and Health Program and details a comprehensive and effective Occupational Safety and Health Program and provides the foundation

Bandettini, Peter A.

76

APPLICATION FOR CANDIDACY Environmental Management and Occupational Safety & Health Programs  

E-print Network

APPLICATION FOR CANDIDACY Environmental Management and Occupational Safety & Health Programs Please Program in Occupational Safety and Health (requires Algebra, Trigonometry and Chemistry) B. Verify your of Hazardous Materials. Occupational Safety and Health Certificate ________ I attest that I have successfully

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

77

ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY Risk Management Services, University of Alberta  

E-print Network

ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY Risk Management Services, University of Alberta www planning, assessment and audits Develop and implement health & safety policies, procedures and programs, regulations and standards & health and safety records Review safe work procedures Testing and coordination

Machel, Hans

78

Training evaluation: a case study of training Iranian health managers  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The Ministry of Health and Medical Education in the Islamic Republic of Iran has undertaken a reform of its health system, in which-lower level managers are given new roles and responsibilities in a decentralized system. To support these efforts, a United Kingdom-based university was contracted by the World Health Organization to design a series of courses for health managers

Maye Omar; Nancy Gerein; Ehsanullah Tarin; Christopher Butcher; Stephen Pearson; Gholamreza Heidari

2009-01-01

79

A Distributed Prognostic Health Management Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper introduces a generic distributed prognostic health management (PHM) architecture with specific application to the electrical power systems domain. Current state-of-the-art PHM systems are mostly centralized in nature, where all the processing is reliant on a single processor. This can lead to loss of functionality in case of a crash of the central processor or monitor. Furthermore, with increases in the volume of sensor data as well as the complexity of algorithms, traditional centralized systems become unsuitable for successful deployment, and efficient distributed architectures are required. A distributed architecture though, is not effective unless there is an algorithmic framework to take advantage of its unique abilities. The health management paradigm envisaged here incorporates a heterogeneous set of system components monitored by a varied suite of sensors and a particle filtering (PF) framework that has the power and the flexibility to adapt to the different diagnostic and prognostic needs. Both the diagnostic and prognostic tasks are formulated as a particle filtering problem in order to explicitly represent and manage uncertainties; however, typically the complexity of the prognostic routine is higher than the computational power of one computational element ( CE). Individual CEs run diagnostic routines until the system variable being monitored crosses beyond a nominal threshold, upon which it coordinates with other networked CEs to run the prognostic routine in a distributed fashion. Implementation results from a network of distributed embedded devices monitoring a prototypical aircraft electrical power system are presented, where the CEs are Sun Microsystems Small Programmable Object Technology (SPOT) devices.

Bhaskar, Saha; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai

2009-01-01

80

Structural Health Management for Future Aerospace Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Structural Health Management (SHM) will be of critical importance to provide the safety, reliability and affordability necessary for the future long duration space missions described in America's Vision for Space Exploration. Long duration missions to the Moon, Mars and beyond cannot be accomplished with the current paradigm of periodic, ground based structural integrity inspections. As evidenced by the Columbia tragedy, this approach is also inadequate for the current Shuttle fleet, thus leading to its initial implementation of on-board SHM sensing for impact detection as part of the return to flight effort. However, future space systems, to include both vehicles as well as structures such as habitation modules, will require an integrated array of onboard in-situ sensing systems. In addition, advanced data systems architectures will be necessary to communicate, store and process massive amounts of SHM data from large numbers of diverse sensors. Further, improved structural analysis and design algorithms will be necessary to incorporate SHM sensing into the design and construction of aerospace structures, as well as to fully utilize these sensing systems to provide both diagnosis and prognosis of structural integrity. Ultimately, structural integrity information will feed into an Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) system that will provide real-time knowledge of structural, propulsion, thermal protection and other critical systems for optimal vehicle management and mission control. This paper will provide an overview of NASA research and development in the area of SHM as well as to highlight areas of technology improvement necessary to meet these future mission requirements.

Prosser, W. H.; Allison, S. G.; Woodard, S. E.; Wincheski, R. A.; Cooper, E. G.; Price, D. C.; Hedley, M.; Prokopenko, M.; Scott, D. A.; Tessler, A.

2004-01-01

81

Investigation of Integrated Vehicle Health Management Approaches  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report is to present the work that was performed during the summer in the Advance Computing Application office. The NFFP (NASA Faculty Fellow Program) had ten summer faculty members working on IVHM (Integrated Vehicle Health Management) technologies. The objective of this project was two-fold: 1) to become familiar with IVHM concepts and key demonstrated IVHM technologies; and 2) to integrate the research that has been performed by IVHM faculty members into the MASTLAB (Marshall Avionic Software Test Lab). IVHM is a NASA-wide effort to coordinate, integrate and apply advanced software, sensors and design technologies to increase the level of intelligence, autonomy, and health state of future vehicles. IVHM is an important concept because it is consistent with the current plan for NASA to go to the moon, mars, and beyond. In order for NASA to become more involved in deep exploration, avionic systems will need to be highly adaptable and autonomous.

Paris, Deidre

2005-01-01

82

Outage management and health physics issue, 2006  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles/reports in this issue include: A design with experience for the U.S., by Michael J. Wallace, Constellation Generation Group; Hope to be among the first, by Randy Hutchinson, Entergy Nuclear; Plans to file COLs in 2008, by Garry Miller, Progress Energy; Evolution of ICRP's recommendations, by Lars-Erik Holm, ICRP; European network on education and training in radiological protection, by Michele Coeck, SCK-CEN, Belgium; Outage managment: an important tool for improving nuclear power plant performance, by Thomas Mazour and Jiri Mandula, IAEA, Austria; and Plant profile: Exploring new paths to excellence, by Anne Thomas, Exelon Nuclear.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2006-05-15

83

Sustainability and the health care manager: Part II.  

PubMed

Are there additional costs associated with achieving goals of sustainable health care? Will going green enhance or impede financial performance? These are questions that all health care managers should confront, yet there is little evidence to show that health care sustainability is affordable or profitable. This article considers what is presently known and suggests that health care managers use an assessment framework to determine whether they are ready to achieve health care sustainability. PMID:21808179

Ramirez, Bernardo; Oetjen, Reid M; Malvey, Donna

2011-01-01

84

The implications of death for health: a terror management health model for behavioral health promotion.  

PubMed

This article introduces a terror management health model (TMHM). The model integrates disparate health and social psychology literatures to elucidate how the conscious and nonconscious awareness of death can influence the motivational orientation that is most operative in the context of health decisions. Three formal propositions are presented. Proposition 1 suggests that conscious thoughts about death can instigate health-oriented responses aimed at removing death-related thoughts from current focal attention. Proposition 2 suggests that the unconscious resonance of death-related cognition promotes self-oriented defenses directed toward maintaining, not one's health, but a sense of meaning and self-esteem. The last proposition suggests that confrontations with the physical body may undermine symbolic defenses and thus present a previously unrecognized barrier to health promotion activities. In the context of each proposition, moderators are proposed, research is reviewed, and implications for health promotion are discussed. PMID:18954213

Goldenberg, Jamie L; Arndt, Jamie

2008-10-01

85

Managing the health of the elite athlete: a new integrated performance health management and coaching model  

PubMed Central

Elite athletes endeavour to train and compete even when ill or injured. Their motivation may be intrinsic or due to coach and team pressures. The sports medicine physician plays an important role to risk-manage the health of the competing athlete in partnership with the coach and other members of the support team. The sports medicine physician needs to strike the right ethical and operational balance between health management and optimising performance. It is necessary to revisit the popular delivery model of sports medicine and science services to elite athletes based on the current reductionist multispecialist system lacking in practice an integrated approach and effective communication. Athlete and coach in isolation or with a member of the multidisciplinary support team, often not qualified or experienced to do so, decide on the utilisation of services and how to apply the recommendations. We propose a new Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model based on the UK Athletics experience in preparation for the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Medical and Coaching Teams are managed by qualified and experienced individuals operating in synergy towards a common performance goal, accountable to a Performance Director and ultimately to the Board of Directors. We describe the systems, processes and implementation strategies to assist the athlete, coach and support teams to continuously monitor and manage athlete health and performance. These systems facilitate a balanced approach to training and competing decisions, especially while the athlete is ill or injured. They take into account the best medical advice and athlete preference. This Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model underpinned the Track and Field Gold Medal performances at the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. PMID:24620040

Dijkstra, H Paul; Pollock, N; Chakraverty, R; Alonso, J M

2014-01-01

86

Managing the health of the elite athlete: a new integrated performance health management and coaching model.  

PubMed

Elite athletes endeavour to train and compete even when ill or injured. Their motivation may be intrinsic or due to coach and team pressures. The sports medicine physician plays an important role to risk-manage the health of the competing athlete in partnership with the coach and other members of the support team. The sports medicine physician needs to strike the right ethical and operational balance between health management and optimising performance. It is necessary to revisit the popular delivery model of sports medicine and science services to elite athletes based on the current reductionist multispecialist system lacking in practice an integrated approach and effective communication. Athlete and coach in isolation or with a member of the multidisciplinary support team, often not qualified or experienced to do so, decide on the utilisation of services and how to apply the recommendations. We propose a new Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model based on the UK Athletics experience in preparation for the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Medical and Coaching Teams are managed by qualified and experienced individuals operating in synergy towards a common performance goal, accountable to a Performance Director and ultimately to the Board of Directors. We describe the systems, processes and implementation strategies to assist the athlete, coach and support teams to continuously monitor and manage athlete health and performance. These systems facilitate a balanced approach to training and competing decisions, especially while the athlete is ill or injured. They take into account the best medical advice and athlete preference. This Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model underpinned the Track and Field Gold Medal performances at the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. PMID:24620040

Dijkstra, H Paul; Pollock, N; Chakraverty, R; Alonso, J M

2014-04-01

87

76 FR 64110 - Safety and Health Management Programs for Mines  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...outside of mining, as well as international...other safety and health events. MSHA will...effective safety and health management programs...injuries, and illnesses. In the past year...develop safety and health management programs...OSHA's Injury and Illness Prevention...

2011-10-17

88

Phar 6232: Health System Pharmacy Management Meeting Time and Place  

E-print Network

of health-system pharmacy management. This course uses face-to-face ITV lectures and small group learning. The role of distributive and purchasing functions 6. The basic principles of pharmacy benefits management 7, conflict management, and communication. 3.5 Use health informatics and information technologies to foster

Thomas, David D.

89

Health Care Financial Management: Curriculum Objectives and Bibliography.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Curriculum objectives for health care financial management, a bibliography and examples of financial management curricula are presented. The outline of curriculum objectives identifies a core of knowledge and skills in financial management that health administration students might obtain in their academic training. The outline's content is divided…

Zelman, William N., Ed.; And Others

90

Immunization against Small Ruminant Lentiviruses  

PubMed Central

Multisystemic disease caused by Small Ruminant Lentiviruses (SRLV) in sheep and goats leads to production losses, to the detriment of animal health and welfare. This, together with the lack of treatments, has triggered interest in exploring different strategies of immunization to control the widely spread SRLV infection and, also, to provide a useful model for HIV vaccines. These strategies involve inactivated whole virus, subunit vaccines, DNA encoding viral proteins in the presence or absence of plasmids encoding immunological adjuvants and naturally or artificially attenuated viruses. In this review, we revisit, comprehensively, the immunization strategies against SRLV and analyze this double edged tool individually, as it may contribute to either controlling or enhancing virus replication and/or disease. PMID:23917352

Reina, Ramsés; de Andrés, Damián; Amorena, Beatriz

2013-01-01

91

Health Plans Respond to Parity: Managing Behavioral Health Care in the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program  

PubMed Central

The government often uses the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program as a model for both public and private health policy choices. In 2001, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) implemented full parity, requiring that FEHB carriers offer mental health and substance abuse benefits equal to general medical benefits. OPM instructed carriers to alter their benefit design but permitted them to determine whether they would manage care and what structures or processes they would use. This article reports on the experience of 156 carriers and the government-wide BlueCross and BlueShield Service Benefit Plan. Carriers dropped cost-restraining benefit limits. A smaller percentage also changed the management of the benefit, but these changes affected the care of many enrollees, making the overall parity effect noteworthy. PMID:16529573

Ridgely, M Susan; Burnam, M Audrey; Barry, Colleen L; Goldman, Howard H; Hennessy, Kevin D

2006-01-01

92

Ruminant Nutrition Symposium: Role of fermentation acid absorption in the regulation of ruminal pH.  

PubMed

Highly fermentable diets are rapidly converted to organic acids [i.e., short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and lactic acid] within the rumen. The resulting release of protons can constitute a challenge to the ruminal ecosystem and animal health. Health disturbances, resulting from acidogenic diets, are classified as subacute and acute acidosis based on the degree of ruminal pH depression. Although increased acid production is a nutritionally desired effect of increased concentrate feeding, the accumulation of protons in the rumen is not. Consequently, mechanisms of proton removal and their quantitative importance are of major interest. Saliva buffers (i.e., bicarbonate, phosphate) have long been identified as important mechanisms for ruminal proton removal. An even larger proportion of protons appears to be removed from the rumen by SCFA absorption across the ruminal epithelium, making efficiency of SCFA absorption a key determinant for the individual susceptibility to subacute ruminal acidosis. Proceeding initially from a model of exclusively diffusional absorption of fermentation acids, several protein-dependent mechanisms have been discovered over the last 2 decades. Although the molecular identity of these proteins is mostly uncertain, apical acetate absorption is mediated, to a major degree, via acetate-bicarbonate exchange in addition to another nitrate-sensitive, bicarbonate-independent transport mechanism and lipophilic diffusion. Propionate and butyrate also show partially bicarbonate-dependent transport modes. Basolateral efflux of SCFA and their metabolites has to be mediated primarily by proteins and probably involves the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT1) and anion channels. Although the ruminal epithelium removes a large fraction of protons from the rumen, it also recycles protons to the rumen via apical sodium-proton exchanger, NHE. The latter is stimulated by ruminal SCFA absorption and salivary Na(+) secretion and protects epithelial integrity. Finally, SCFA absorption also accelerates urea transport into the rumen, which via ammonium recycling, may remove protons from rumen to the blood. Ammonium absorption into the blood is also stimulated by luminal SCFA. It is suggested that the interacting transport processes for SCFA, urea, and ammonia represent evolutionary adaptations of ruminants to actively coordinate energy fermentation, protein assimilation, and pH regulation in the rumen. PMID:20952531

Aschenbach, J R; Penner, G B; Stumpff, F; Gäbel, G

2011-04-01

93

'My health is not a job': a qualitative exploration of personal health management and imperatives of the 'new public health'  

PubMed Central

Background There is an increasing push in Western healthcare for people to ‘manage’ their health, a key aspect of what has been called the ‘new public health’. It has been argued that this ‘personal health management’ – informal work done to monitor, inform, or influence one’s health – may be a burden, with potential to contribute to poor health outcomes. However, there is little research actually examining perceptions of personal health management and the ‘burden’ of these activities, particularly for generally healthy individuals. Methods We conducted exploratory qualitative interviews with 30 generally healthy men and women about their perceptions and experiences of personal health management. Questions focused on health behaviours (e.g., information seeking), as well as feelings about these behaviours and perceptions of the time dedicated to health. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed qualitatively using NVivo 10. Where appropriate, quantitative codes were applied and descriptive statistics are reported alongside qualitative findings. Results Participants were generally satisfied with the amount of time spent on their health and few perceived personal health management as a burden. Many participants took issue with the concept of ‘work’ being associated with health and stressed the importance of taking personal responsibility for health. Conclusions Our findings suggest that generally healthy people have internalised the notion of the ‘new public health’ and accepted the imperative of personal health responsibility. On the one hand, this bodes well for healthy individuals; their positive attitude may lead to better health outcomes, and the manageable amount of time spent suggests personal health management is unlikely to cause negative health consequences associated with stress. On the other hand, our findings may indicate that other factors, such as social determinants of health, are ignored in health promotion efforts and that those who cannot manage their own health may fall further behind. Future research should continue to explore the time people spend ‘working’ for their health, and how they perceive and respond to ‘new public health’ imperatives. PMID:25030501

2014-01-01

94

Health Tip: Manage Stress to Keep Diabetes in Check  

MedlinePLUS

... this page, please enable JavaScript. Health Tip: Manage Stress to Keep Diabetes in Check Get regular exercise (* ... Monday, August 25, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Diabetes Stress (HealthDay News) -- Physical and emotional stress can be ...

95

Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health

Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

2013-01-01

96

Rocket Testing and Integrated System Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) describes a set of system capabilities that in aggregate perform: determination of condition for each system element, detection of anomalies, diagnosis of causes for anomalies, and prognostics for future anomalies and system behavior. The ISHM should also provide operators with situational awareness of the system by integrating contextual and timely data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) as needed. ISHM capabilities can be implemented using a variety of technologies and tools. This chapter provides an overview of ISHM contributing technologies and describes in further detail a novel implementation architecture along with associated taxonomy, ontology, and standards. The operational ISHM testbed is based on a subsystem of a rocket engine test stand. Such test stands contain many elements that are common to manufacturing systems, and thereby serve to illustrate the potential benefits and methodologies of the ISHM approach for intelligent manufacturing.

Figueroa, Fernando; Schmalzel, John

2005-01-01

97

World Health Organization's Management of Substance Abuse  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Part of the larger World Health Organization's (WHO) site this section on the management of substance abuse has a variety of useful information for students, teachers and those practicing in the field. Some of the most useful are several resources related to terminology and classifications including the WHO lexicon of alcohol and drug terms. The lexicon, developed in 1994, supplies clinicians, researchers and other users with a set of definitions of terms related to tobacco, alcohol and other drugs. Also available is a Facts and Figures section which provides users with basic information about the use and misuse of alcohol and other drugs worldwide. The Activities pages allow users to get a glimpse into the research that WHO is currently undertaking that is related to substance abuse. Sections on publications, research tools, and other links round out this very useful site.

2006-11-28

98

[Chances for health within the new water management].  

PubMed

The European Water Framework Directive and the Protocol on Water and Health are two legally binding documents, which exist parallel to one another. A multi-disciplinary management of surface waters, which includes the participation of health experts, is necessary if the Protocol on Water and Health is to have an impact on human health rather than randomly promoting the effects of water management within the European Water Framework Directive. PMID:20661847

Schreiber, C; Völker, S; Wienand, I; Kistemann, T

2011-06-01

99

Integrated Systems Health Management for Space Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) is a system engineering discipline that addresses the design, development, operation, and lifecycle management of components, subsystems, vehicles, and other operational systems with the purpose of maintaining nominal system behavior and function and assuring mission safety and effectiveness under off-nominal conditions. NASA missions are often conducted in extreme, unfamiliar environments of space, using unique experimental spacecraft. In these environments, off-nominal conditions can develop with the potential to rapidly escalate into mission- or life-threatening situations. Further, the high visibility of NASA missions means they are always characterized by extraordinary attention to safety. ISHM is a critical element of risk mitigation, mission safety, and mission assurance for exploration. ISHM enables: In-space maintenance and repair; a) Autonomous (and automated) launch abort and crew escape capability; b) Efficient testing and checkout of ground and flight systems; c) Monitoring and trending of ground and flight system operations and performance; d) Enhanced situational awareness and control for ground personnel and crew; e) Vehicle autonomy (self-sufficiency) in responding to off-nominal conditions during long-duration and distant exploration missions; f) In-space maintenance and repair; and g) Efficient ground processing of reusable systems. ISHM concepts and technologies may be applied to any complex engineered system such as transportation systems, orbital or planetary habitats, observatories, command and control systems, life support systems, safety-critical software, and even the health of flight crews. As an overarching design and operational principle implemented at the system-of-systems level, ISHM holds substantial promise in terms of affordability, safety, reliability, and effectiveness of space exploration missions.

Uckun, Serdar

2005-01-01

100

Meeting global health challenges through operational research and management science  

PubMed Central

Abstract This paper considers how operational research and management science can improve the design of health systems and the delivery of health care, particularly in low-resource settings. It identifies some gaps in the way operational research is typically used in global health and proposes steps to bridge them. It then outlines some analytical tools of operational research and management science and illustrates how their use can inform some typical design and delivery challenges in global health. The paper concludes by considering factors that will increase and improve the contribution of operational research and management science to global health. PMID:21897489

2011-01-01

101

Faculty of Medicine Health Research Data and Systems Management (HRDSM)  

E-print Network

Faculty of Medicine Health Research Data and Systems Management (HRDSM) Core Facility Governance technical manager who reports to the Associate Dean, Research. The HRDSM Core Facility is supported by a Users Management Committee that meets at least four times annually. Users Management Committee: Terms

Brownstone, Rob

102

Reducing Health Cost: Health Informatics and Knowledge Management as a Business and Communication Tool  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Health informatics has the potential to improve the quality and provision of care while reducing the cost of health care delivery.\\u000a However, health informatics is often falsely regarded as synonymous with information management (IM). This chapter (i) provides\\u000a a clear definition and characteristic benefits of health informatics and information management in the context of health care\\u000a delivery, (ii) identifies and

Regina Gyampoh-Vidogah; Robert Moreton; David Sallah

2010-01-01

103

Health Management Applications for International Space Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Traditional mission and vehicle management involves teams of highly trained specialists monitoring vehicle status and crew activities, responding rapidly to any anomalies encountered during operations. These teams work from the Mission Control Center and have access to engineering support teams with specialized expertise in International Space Station (ISS) subsystems. Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) applications can significantly augment these capabilities by providing enhanced monitoring, prognostic and diagnostic tools for critical decision support and mission management. The Intelligent Systems Division of NASA Ames Research Center is developing many prototype applications using model-based reasoning, data mining and simulation, working with Mission Control through the ISHM Testbed and Prototypes Project. This paper will briefly describe information technology that supports current mission management practice, and will extend this to a vision for future mission control workflow incorporating new ISHM applications. It will describe ISHM applications currently under development at NASA and will define technical approaches for implementing our vision of future human exploration mission management incorporating artificial intelligence and distributed web service architectures using specific examples. Several prototypes are under development, each highlighting a different computational approach. The ISStrider application allows in-depth analysis of Caution and Warning (C&W) events by correlating real-time telemetry with the logical fault trees used to define off-nominal events. The application uses live telemetry data and the Livingstone diagnostic inference engine to display the specific parameters and fault trees that generated the C&W event, allowing a flight controller to identify the root cause of the event from thousands of possibilities by simply navigating animated fault tree models on their workstation. SimStation models the functional power flow for the ISS Electrical Power System and can predict power balance for nominal and off-nominal conditions. SimStation uses realtime telemetry data to keep detailed computational physics models synchronized with actual ISS power system state. In the event of failure, the application can then rapidly diagnose root cause, predict future resource levels and even correlate technical documents relevant to the specific failure. These advanced computational models will allow better insight and more precise control of ISS subsystems, increasing safety margins by speeding up anomaly resolution and reducing,engineering team effort and cost. This technology will make operating ISS more efficient and is directly applicable to next-generation exploration missions and Crew Exploration Vehicles.

Alena, Richard; Duncavage, Dan

2005-01-01

104

The adoption of mobile health management services: an empirical study.  

PubMed

As their populations age, many countries are facing the increasing economic pressure of providing healthcare to their people. In Taiwan, this problem is exacerbated by an increasing rate of obesity and obesity-related conditions. Encouraging the adoption of personal health management services is one way to maintain current levels of personal health and to efficiently manage the distribution of healthcare resources. This study introduces Mobile Health Management Services (MHMS) and employs the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to explore the intention of students in Executive Master of Business Management programs to adopt mobile health management technology. Partial least squares (PLS) was used to analyze the collected data, and the results revealed that "perceived usefulness" and "attitude" significantly affected the behavioral intention of adopting MHMS. Both "perceived ease of use" and "perceived usefulness," significantly affected "attitude," and "perceived ease of use" significantly affected "perceived usefulness" as well. The results also show that the determinants of intention toward MHMS differed with age; young adults had higher intention to adopt MHMS to manage their personal health. Therefore, relevant governmental agencies may profitably promote the management of personal health among this population. Successful promotion of personal health management will contribute to increases in both the level of general health and the efficient management of healthcare resources. PMID:20878452

Hung, Ming-Chien; Jen, Wen-Yuan

2012-06-01

105

Strengthening health management: experience of district teams in The Gambia.  

PubMed

The lack of basic management skills of district-level health teams is often described as a major constraint to implementation of primary health care in developing countries. To improve district-level management in The Gambia, a 'management strengthening' project was implemented in two out of the three health regions. Against a background of health sector decentralization policy the project had two main objectives: to improve health team management skills and to improve resources management under specially-trained administrators. The project used a problem-solving and participatory strategy for planning and implementing activities. The project resulted in some improvements in the management of district-level health services, particularly in the quality of team planning and coordination, and the management of the limited available resources. However, the project demonstrated that though health teams had better management skills and systems, their effectiveness was often limited by the policy and practice of the national level government and donor agencies. In particular, they were limited by the degree to which decision making was centralized on issues of staffing, budgeting, and planning, and by the extent to which national level managers have lacked skills and motivation for management change. They were also limited by the extent to which donor-supported programmes were still based on standardized models which did not allow for varying and complex environments at district level. These are common problems despite growing advocacy for more devolution of decision making to the local level. PMID:10155879

Conn, C P; Jenkins, P; Touray, S O

1996-03-01

106

Managing Home Health Care (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

Intensive Health Care at Home Kids can need intensive health care at home after they have been in the hospital ... dolls to help you practice different procedures. Home Health Care Assistance The hospital social worker can help families ...

107

Sustainable waste management in the UK: the public health role.  

PubMed

This paper discusses waste management in the UK and its relationship with health. It aims to outline the role of health professionals in the promotion of waste management, and argues for a change in their role in waste management regulation to help make the process more sustainable. The most common definition of sustainable development is that by the Brundtland commission, i.e. "development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs". Managing waste sites in a manner that minimises toxic impacts on the current and future generations is obviously a crucial part of this. Although the management of waste facilities is extremely complex, the Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control regime, which requires the input of public health professionals on the regulation of such sites, means that all waste management installations should now be operating in a fashion that minimises any toxicological risks to human health. However, the impacts upon climate change, resource use and health inequalities, as well as the effects of waste transportation, are currently not considered to be part of public health professionals' responsibilities when dealing with these sites. There is also no requirement for public health professionals to become involved in waste management planning issues. The fact that public health professionals are not involved in any of these issues makes it unlikely that the potential impacts upon health are being considered fully, and even more unlikely that waste management will become more sustainable. This paper aims to show that by only considering direct toxicological impacts, public health professionals are not fully addressing all the health issues and are not contributing towards sustainability. There is a need for a change in the way that health professionals deal with waste management issues. PMID:16962620

Mohan, R; Spiby, J; Leonardi, G S; Robins, A; Jefferis, S

2006-10-01

108

Investigating health management practices of individuals with diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic diseases, endemic in the rapidly aging population, are stretching the capacity of healthcare resources. Increasingly, individuals need to adopt proactive health attitudes and contribute to the management of their own health. We investigate existing diabetes self-management practices and ways in which reflection on prior actions impacts future lifestyle choices. The findings suggest that individuals generate and evaluate hypotheses regarding

Lena Mamykina; Elizabeth D. Mynatt; David R. Kaufman

2006-01-01

109

Needs Assessment for Health Care Management Education in Russia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: For more than 70 years, health care management in the Soviet Union reflected a centralized directive style familiar to the Soviet political system. Market-oriented reform in post-Soviet Russia is pushing practicing physicians and physician-executives to acquire new information and skills regarding health care management. To assist…

Rekhter, Natalia; Togunov, Igor A.

2006-01-01

110

The practical value of health management in space exploration systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a body of evidence, and a group of advocates, supporting the need for integrated system health management for space exploration systems. The advocates include operators responsible for complex and inherently risky decisions, and the technologists working in the domain of health management and looking for application for their products. Others in the decision loops take the view that

William Kahle; Jim Miller

2005-01-01

111

Health management and controls for earth to orbit propulsion systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fault detection and isolation for advanced rocket engine controllers are discussed focusing on advanced sensing systems and software which significantly improve component failure detection for engine safety and health management. Aerojet's Space Transportation Main Engine controller for the National Launch System is the state of the art in fault tolerant engine avionics. Health management systems provide high levels of automated

R. L. Bickford

1992-01-01

112

Managing Evaluation in a Federal Public Health Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author, a federal manager who leads development and maintenance of evaluation for specific public health programs at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, tells the story of developing an evaluation unit in the Office on Smoking and Health. Lessons about managing evaluation, including his practices and related principles, are…

Schooley, Michael W.

2009-01-01

113

Human dimensions of wildlife health management Shauna Hanisch  

E-print Network

in wildlife health management. My research supports the National Fish and Wildlife Health Initiative (NFWHI), a policy framework developed by the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies with the aim of helping fish and wildlife management agencies "conserve, restore, and enhance healthy fish and wildlife resources

114

[The prospective model of human resources' management in health institution].  

PubMed

The article postulates the actuality of developing the concept of the psychological aspects of institution management as projected into health care area where the medical personnel is working in the conditions of higher responsibility, emotional and intellectual overloads under permanent nervous psychological stress. This contingent of medical institutions stuff very often ignore the positive psychological interventions both due to the poor labor management and the corresponding knowledge lacking. The topicality of this research vector is determined by the deficiency of the human resources' management studies in the public health field. The need in searching the investigation prospective directions is ascertained by the unexploredness of personnel management in national health care. PMID:19382656

Rastorgueva, T I; Shchepin, V O

2009-01-01

115

[Essential competences for the management of health care networks].  

PubMed

We suggest that in order to fulfill the health needs of the majority of the Chilean population, which is beneficiary of the public health system, essential organizational skills should be developed for network administration among Self-administered Hospitals, Network Manager and Primary Health Care facilities. Self-administered Hospitals should be competent in managing service options according to their strategy for development, reference and counter-reference mechanisms and waiting lists, to optimize queuing. The Network Manager should be competent in demand management that is regulated, investments management that determines future development in terms of population needs and stakeholders' management, which is a political viability type of management. Finally, the Primary Health Care manager should be competent in demand management as a strategic partner of the Network Manager, community participation and management of interlinked areas, articulating social networks and sanitary impact management. At each level and within levels, there are crossroads that promote synergies. Based on the development of essential skills, a practice with strategic intentions, organization managers will develop team work skills. PMID:23677235

Vergara, Marcos; Bisama, Ligia; Moncada, Patricio

2012-12-01

116

The Impact of School-Based Management on School Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three-year study examines the effects of school-based management (SBM) on the organizational health of 28 elementary schools in Jerusalem using 7 indicators from the Organizational Climate Description Questionnaire and the Organizational Health Inventory. Finds no significant impact of SBM on the schools' organizational health, but finds…

Nir, Adam E.

2002-01-01

117

HCMS: conceptual description of a health content management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health is a hot topic on the Internet. Health websites are unique from other websites because they require a more acute awareness of ethical issues due to potential life threatening risks from misuse of information. We propose and give a high-level description of a Health Content Management System (HCMS) that addresses these issues and other functional needs found in most

Hamman W. Samuel; Osmar R. Zaïane

2011-01-01

118

Environmental Management of Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines for Health Care Providers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These guidelines are the product of a new Pediatric Asthma Initiative aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This document outlines competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma that should be mastered by primary health care providers, and outlines the environmental interventions…

Roberts, James R.; McCurdy, Leyla Erk

2005-01-01

119

Health Advisor An Online Game for Managing Healthcare Delivery  

E-print Network

focused on assessing the impact of information on healthcare delivery strategies and, consequently, health through the healthcare system with a goal of maximizing the value of outcomes ­ the average health stateHealth Advisor An Online Game for Managing Healthcare Delivery Tennenbaum Institute Georgia

120

Children and Managed Health Care. Analysis and Recommendations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the changes managed health care has brought to the delivery and use of medical services and recommends specific steps that will make the existing system more responsive to the needs of children. Systemwide health care reforms must give children stable medical care that emphasizes preventive health and developmental services. (SLD)

Deal, Lisa W.; Shiono, Patricia H.; Behrman, Richard E.

1998-01-01

121

Brief Report: Adolescents' Co-Rumination with Mothers, Co-Rumination with Friends, and Internalizing Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current research examined co-rumination (extensively discussing, rehashing, and speculating about problems) with mothers and friends. Of interest was exploring whether adolescents who co-ruminate with mothers were especially likely to co-ruminate with friends as well as the interplay among co-rumination with mothers, co-rumination with…

Waller, Erika M.; Rose, Amanda J.

2013-01-01

122

The Medicaid Managed Care Program. In To Improve Health and Health Care, vol. IX  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the 1990s, insurance companies and employers began to rely on managed care to control costs, and state governments followed suit by adopting managed care in Medicaid programs. To deal with the challenges associated with developing effective state Medicaid managed care programs, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation developed the Medicaid Managed Care Initiative in 1995 to help states, health plans,

Marsha R. Gold; Justin S. White; Erin Fries Taylor

2005-01-01

123

Supporting cancer patients' unanchored health information management with mobile technology  

E-print Network

, Seattle, WA Abstract Cancer patients often need to manage care-related information when they are away from that HealthWeaver Mobile can help patients to access care-related information from anywhere, to capture. The enhanced ability to manage information, in turn, helps patients to manage their care and to feel more

Anderson, Richard

124

Cognitive Inflexibility Among Ruminators and Nonruminators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dysphoric people who ruminate about their negative mood experience longer and more intense depressive episodes, yet often persist in ruminating. This study investi- gated whether a ruminative coping style would be related to a cognitive style marked by perseveration and inflexibility. We examined the performance of ruminators and nonruminators on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), a measure of cognitive

Robert N. Davis; Susan Nolen-Hoeksema

2000-01-01

125

A diet supplement for captive wild ruminants.  

PubMed

Nutritional husbandry of captive wild ruminants often requires feeding these animals a supplemental diet to enhance their health, reproductive performance, and productivity. Although supplemental diets for wild ruminants are commercially available, few have been evaluated in controlled intake and digestion trials. Voluntary intake, digestive efficiency, nitrogen retention, and gross energy utilization of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mountain sheep (Ovis canadensis), mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), and wapiti (Cervus elaphus) consuming a high-energy, high-protein pelleted supplement were compared. Voluntary intake of dry matter, energy, and nitrogen were similar (P > 0.34) between mountain goats and mountain sheep and consistently lower (P < 0.03) for these species than for pronghorn, mule deer, and wapiti. Differences in digestive efficiency among species were inversely related to dry matter intake rates. Apparent digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, and neutral-detergent fiber was 10-20% higher for mountain goats and mountain sheep than for the other species (P < 0.04). Although these findings suggest a superior digestive efficiency for mountain goats and mountain sheep, species comparisons are inconclusive because of the confounding effects of season and ambient temperature on voluntary intake and digestion. Under the conditions of this experiment, the diet tested was safe, nutritious, and highly palatable. Protein and energy concentrations appear to be sufficient to meet or exceed known nutritional requirements of captive wild ruminants. PMID:9732028

Baker, D L; Stout, G W; Miller, M W

1998-06-01

126

Public health response to striking solid waste management.  

PubMed

In 2009, the City of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, experienced a six-week labor disruption involving 24,000 city workers that included solid waste and public health employees. In an attempt to control illegal dumping and to manage garbage storage across the city during this period, 24 temporary garbage storage sites were established by the city (mostly in local parks) for residents to dispose of their household waste. No other municipality in North America has attempted to operate this many temporary sites for this long a period. Management and nonunion staff from Healthy Environments in Toronto Public Health performed daily inspections, responded to community questions, issued public health orders, and worked closely with Solid Waste Management and the Ministry of the Environment to actively manage the public health concerns associated with these sites. This intensive oversight mitigated public health risks to the community and facilitated an effective, safe solution to the temporary garbage storage problem. PMID:22010330

Murti, Michelle; Ayre, Reg; Shapiro, Howard; de Burger, Ron

2011-10-01

127

Health coaching in diabetes: empowering patients to self-manage.  

PubMed

To effectively manage diabetes mellitus, patients must adhere to treatment recommendations and healthy lifestyle behaviors, but research shows many patients do not do this. Education is effective when combined with self-management support but peer-support programs do not lead to lasting changes. Health coaching, or professional support, can be highly effective if it focuses on developing self-efficacy and skills such as goal-setting, problem-solving and managing cognitive and emotional barriers. This overview discusses the benefits of patient self-management for chronic conditions such as diabetes, core competencies for health coaching, theoretical bases and principles of health coaching interventions, delivery methods and the evidence that health coaching works for diabetes self-management. PMID:24070747

Wong-Rieger, Durhane; Rieger, Francis P

2013-02-01

128

Progressing the health information management and information technology agenda.  

PubMed

Developments and policy direction at a national level may seem far removed from the day-to-day practice of health information management. But there are lots of examples of a national approach to many of the initiatives which we now accept as part of our daily work (e.g., casemix funding, ICD-10-AM, the National Health Information Model and the National Health Data Dictionary). Many of these can be attributed to Commonwealth and State and Territory Governments working collaboratively with expert committees to achieve change or establish a program of innovation. More recently, Australian Health Ministers have established the National Health Information Management Advisory Council (NHIMAC) to bring together private and public sector expertise to progress the health information management and information technology agenda nationally. PMID:10977164

1999-01-01

129

Pesticides and public health: integrated methods of mosquito management.  

PubMed Central

Pesticides have a role in public health as part of sustainable integrated mosquito management. Other components of such management include surveillance, source reduction or prevention, biological control, repellents, traps, and pesticide-resistance management. We assess the future use of mosquito control pesticides in view of niche markets, incentives for new product development, Environmental Protection Agency registration, the Food Quality Protection Act, and improved pest management strategies for mosquito control. PMID:11266290

Rose, R. I.

2001-01-01

130

Sensor Technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Management of Aerospace Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA is focusing considerable efforts on technology development for Integrated Vehicle Health Management systems. The research in this area is targeted toward increasing aerospace vehicle safety and reliability, while reducing vehicle operating and maintenance costs. Onboard, real-time sensing technologies that can provide detailed information on structural integrity are central to such a health management system. This paper describes a number of sensor technologies currently under development for integrated vehicle health management. The capabilities, current limitations, and future research needs of these technologies are addressed.

Prosser, W. H.; Brown, T. L.; Woodard, S. E.; Fleming, G. A.; Cooper, E. G.

2002-01-01

131

Financial coping strategies of mental health consumers: managing social benefits.  

PubMed

Mental health consumers depend on social benefits in the forms of supplemental security income and social security disability insurance for their livelihood. Although these programs pay meager benefits, little research has been undertaken into how this population makes ends meet. Using a qualitative approach, this study asks what are the financial coping strategies of mental health consumers? Seven approaches were identified: subsidies, cost-effective shopping, budgeting, prioritizing, technology, debt management, and saving money. Results illustrate the resourcefulness of mental health consumers in managing meager social benefits and highlight the need to strengthen community mental health efforts with financial capabilities education. PMID:24346222

Caplan, Mary Ager

2014-05-01

132

[Information systems supporting the management work in health].  

PubMed

The article presents some aspects on the relevance of the information systems as tool of support to the management of the work of the health professionals, a time that is a computational resource capable to potential the knowledge search. Know that the information systems available of fast form, easy and insurance the information, allowing that the professionals of the health search knowledge and if become able, creative and competent to inside act with the complexity of the work in health of the Brazilian system of health aiming at to consolidate the politics of the National Health System. It is reflected on what it is the management of the work in health and as the information systems they come contribute for the fortify of action and processes of health in this area. PMID:19597670

Benito, Gladys Amélia Véles; Licheski, Ana Paula

2009-01-01

133

Health literacy in health systems: perspectives on patient self-management in Israel.  

PubMed

Health systems will face new challenges in this millennium. Striking the balance between the best quality of care and optimal use of dwindling resources will challenge health policy makers, managers and practitioners. Increasingly, improvements in the outcomes of interventions for both acute and chronic patients will depend on partnerships between health service providers, the individual and their family. Patient education that incorporates self-management and empowerment has proven to be cost-effective. It is essential that health care providers promote informed decision making, and facilitate actions designed to improve personal capacity to exert control over factors that determine health and improve health outcomes. It is for these reasons that promoting health literacy is a central strategy for improving self-management in health. The different types of health literacy--functional, interactive and critical health literacy--are considered. The potential to improve health literacy at each of these levels has been demonstrated in practice among diabetics and other chronic disease patients in Clalit Health Services (CHS) in Israel is used as an example to demonstrate possibilities. The application of all three types of health literacy is expressed in: (i) developing appropriate health information tools for the public to be applied in primary, secondary and tertiary care settings, and in online and media information accessibility and appropriateness using culturally relevant participatory methods; (ii) training of health professionals at all levels, including undergraduate and in-service training; and (iii) developing and applying appropriate assessment and monitoring tools which include public/patient participatory methods. Health care providers need to consider where their patients are getting information on disease and self-management, whether or not that information is reliable, and inform their patients of the best sources of information and its use. The improved collaboration with patient and consumer groups, whose goals are to promote rights and self-management capabilities and advocate for improved health services, can be very beneficial. PMID:11257858

Levin-Zamir, D; Peterburg, Y

2001-03-01

134

College of Health Sciences HSM Health Services Management  

E-print Network

, medical/moral problems, malpractice, tax laws, contracts, labor law, regulation and institutional.Prereq:Professionalprogramstatus(whichincludesanearnedAssociateDegreeinahealthcaredisciplineandoneyearofpost- degree work in a health care setting) or consent of instructor. (Same as CLM 355.) HSM 450 HOSPITAL

MacAdam, Keith

135

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE  

E-print Network

/Department of Health and Human Services Food Guide Pyramid · The current Recommended Dietary Allowances for appropriate with the provisions of CDOC Administrative Directive 10.18, Food Services. The major therapeutic diet choices

Oliver, Douglas L.

136

Active Social Media Management: The Case of Health Care  

E-print Network

Given the demand for authentic personal interactions over social media, it is unclear how much firms should actively manage their social media presence. We study this question empirically in a health care setting. We show ...

Miller, Amalia R.

137

Managing American Health Network Outpatient Testing Records Franciscan St. Francis Health  

E-print Network

method for the reconciliation of American Health Network medical records, which will also provide more Farmer Problem: Franciscan St. Francis Health now manages the medical records for four American Health Network outpatient diagnostic testing facilities. St. Francis reconciles the medical records with the list

Zhou, Yaoqi

138

Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis, 2014-2015  

E-print Network

Foundations 3 UF 200 Civic and Ethical Foundations 3 DLM MATH 254 Applied Statistics with Computers 3 DLN BIOL Introduction to Health Informatics HLTHST 300 Pathophysiology HLTHST 314 Health Law and Ethics CID HLTHST 382 Accounting ACCT 206 Introduction to Managerial Accounting HLTHST 330 Health Information Management I with lab

Barrash, Warren

139

Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis, 2013-2014  

E-print Network

Foundations 3 UF 200 Civic and Ethical Foundations 3 DLM MATH 254 Applied Statistics with Computers 3 DLN BIOL Introduction to Health Informatics HLTHST 300 Pathophysiology HLTHST 314 Health Law and Ethics CID HLTHST 382 Accounting ACCT 206 Introduction to Managerial Accounting HLTHST 330 Health Information Management I with lab

Barrash, Warren

140

Risk management frameworks for human health and environmental risks.  

PubMed

A comprehensive analytical review of the risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication approaches currently being undertaken by key national, provincial/state, territorial, and international agencies was conducted. The information acquired for review was used to identify the differences, commonalities, strengths, and weaknesses among the various approaches, and to identify elements that should be included in an effective, current, and comprehensive approach applicable to environmental, human health and occupational health risks. More than 80 agencies, organizations, and advisory councils, encompassing more than 100 risk documents, were examined during the period from February 2000 until November 2002. An overview was made of the most important general frameworks for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication for human health and ecological risk, and for occupational health risk. In addition, frameworks for specific applications were reviewed and summarized, including those for (1)contaminated sites; (2) northern contaminants; (3) priority substances; (4) standards development; (5) food safety; (6) medical devices; (7) prescription drug use; (8) emergency response; (9) transportation; (10) risk communication. Twelve frameworks were selected for more extensive review on the basis of representation of the areas of human health, ecological, and occupational health risk; relevance to Canadian risk management needs; representation of comprehensive and well-defined approaches; generalizability with their risk areas; representation of "state of the art" in Canada, the United States, and/or internationally; and extent of usage of potential usage within Canada. These 12 frameworks were: 1. Framework for Environmental Health Risk Management (US Presidential/Congressional Commission on Risk Assessment and Risk Management, 1997). 2. Health Risk Determination: The Challenge of Health Protection (Health and Welfare Canada, 1990). 3. Health Canada Decision-Making Framework for Identifying, Assessing and Managing Health Risks (Health Canada, 2000). 4. Canadian Environmental Protection Act: Human Health Risk Assessment of Priority Substances(Health Canada, 1994). 5. CSA-Q8550 Risk Management: Guidelines for Decision-Makers (Canada Standards Association, 1997). 6. Risk Assessment in the Federal Government: Managing the Process (US National Research Council, 1983). 7. Understanding Risk: Informing Decisions in a Democratic Society (US National Research Council, 1996). 8. Environmental Health Risk Assessment (enHealth Council of Australia, 2002). 9. A Framework for Ecological Risk Assessment (CCME, 1996). 10. Ecological Risk Assessments of Priority Substances Under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (Environment Canada, 1996).11. Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment (US EPA, 1998b). 12. Proposed Model for Occupational Health Risk Assessment and Management (Rampal & Sadhra, 1999). Based on the extensive review of these frameworks, seven key elements that should be included in a comprehensive framework for human health, ecological, and occupational risk assessment and management were identified: 1. Problem formulation stage. 2. Stakeholder involvement. 3. Communication. 4. Quantitative risk assessment components. 5. Iteration and evaluation. 6. Informed decision making. 7. Flexibility. On the basis of this overarching approach to risk management, the following "checklist" to ensure a good risk management decision is proposed: - Make sure you're solving the right problem. - Consider the problem and the risk within the full context of the situation, using a broad perspective. - Acknowledge, incorporate, and balance the multiple dimensions of risk. - Ensure the highest degree of reliability for all components of the risk management process. - Involve interested and effected parties from the outset of the process. - Commit to honest and open communication between all parties. - Employ continuous evaluation throughout the process (formative, process, and outcome evaluation), and be prepared t

Jardine, Cindy; Hrudey, Steve; Shortreed, John; Craig, Lorraine; Krewski, Daniel; Furgal, Chris; McColl, Stephen

2003-01-01

141

Physicians in health care management: 1. Physicians as managers: roles and future challenges.  

PubMed

Physicians are increasingly expected to assume responsibility for the management of human and financial resources in health care, particularly in hospitals. Juggling their new management responsibilities with clinical care, teaching and research can lead to conflicting roles. However, their presence in management is crucial to shaping the future health care system. They bring to management positions important skills and values such as observation, problem-solving, analysis and ethical judgement. To improve their management skills physicians can benefit from management education programs such as those offered by the Physician-Manager Institute and several Canadian universities. To manage in the future environment they must increase their knowledge and skills in policy and political processes, financial strategies and management, human resources management, systems and program quality improvement and organizational design. PMID:8287339

Leatt, P

1994-01-15

142

The modern health care materiel manager.  

PubMed

Today's successful materiel managers must possess a wide range of skills. They must above all be highly adaptable to change and influence others to accept rather than resist change. The role and responsibility of the materiel manager have expanded significantly, requiring higher levels of formal education. In conjunction with this, the quality of communication, both verbal and written, becomes essential. A high degree of human, conceptual, and technical skills must be employed to accommodate the many demands encountered. Finally, the successful materiel manager who feels confident and secure will hire others who do not mirror the manager's style, but rather allow for contrast of expression and technique. PMID:10125276

Spirakes, A L

1993-05-01

143

The research of spacecraft on-orbit health management technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to avoid causing serious aftermath by faults of on-orbit spacecraft, need for timely faults diagnosis and faults prediction to take effective measures to minimize security risks and the impact on the mission. The research of spacecraft on-orbit health management technology is carried out in this paper, the system components of spacecraft on-orbit health management system and a solution

Wang Zhi-gang; Xie Kai-ping

2010-01-01

144

Managed care redux: health plans shift responsibilities to consumers.  

PubMed

Confronted with conflicting pressures to stem double-digit premium increases and provide unfettered access to care, health plans are developing products that shift more financial and care management responsibilities to consumers, according to findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2002-03 site visits to 12 nationally representative communities. Plans are pursuing these strategies in collaboration with employers that want to gain control over rapidly rising premiums while continuing to respond to employee demands for less restrictive managed care practices. Mindful of the managed care backlash, health plans also are stepping up utilization management activities for high-cost services and focusing care management on high-cost patients. While the move toward greater consumer engagement is clear, the impact on costs and consumer willingness to assume these new responsibilities remain to be seen. PMID:15046076

Draper, Debra A; Claxton, Gary

2004-03-01

145

Managing Software Development for Global Health  

E-print Network

. · Safer childbirth and healthy children. · Health equity for women, among the world's most vulnerable--and influential--populations. · The basic protection of vaccines for women and children around the world. 3 · Immunization & vaccine technologies · Diagnostic tests for diseases · Reproductive health technologies

Anderson, Richard

146

Secure e-Health: managing risks to patient health data.  

PubMed

e-Health, as an inter-jurisdictional enterprise, presents risks to patient health data that involve not only technology and professional protocols but also laws, regulations and professional security cultures. The USA Patriot Act is one example of how national laws can shape these concerns. Secure e-Health therefore requires not only national standardization of professional education and protocols but also global interoperability of regulations and laws. Some progress in this regard has been made in the European context; however, even here developments are incomplete, and nothing similar has been accomplished on a global scale. Professional health information organizations must take the lead in developing appropriate high-level principles for professional certification and security protocols and in harmonizing these on a global basis, so that they can provide a firm and consistent foundation for international treaties. Such developments should occur in concert with other health professions, so that coordinated requirements are integrated into revisions of the relevant codes of ethics. This presentation identifies and addresses some of the ethical and legal issues and proposes a series of recommendations. PMID:17084665

Kluge, Eike-Henner W

2007-01-01

147

Managed Mental Health Care: Intentional Misdiagnosis of Mental Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors provide an overview of the effectiveness of managed health care systems and their impact on mental health counselors. They review ethical and legal dilemmas involving informed consent, confidentiality, client autonomy, competence, treatment plans, and termination that had not existed prior to the introduction of…

Braun, Sharon A.; Cox, Jane A.

2005-01-01

148

Correctional Managed Health Care July 2010 -June 2011  

E-print Network

The Connecticut Department of Correction (CDOC) historically provided health services to inmates directly, using care to inmates within the DOC correctional facilities and halfway houses. Our services shallCorrectional Managed Health Care July 2010 - June 2011 CMHC ANNUAL REPORT Introduction Correctional

Kim, Duck O.

149

An Examination of Health Information Management by the Deaf  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is known about how Deaf people perceive, access, and utilize interpersonal and media sources for health information. In light of the scarcity of research on health information management among this group, a two-phase study was conducted that included eight focus groups (N=39) and survey data (N=366) with Deaf participants to determine the…

Karras, Elizabeth

2010-01-01

150

Measuring adverse selection in managed health care.  

PubMed

Health plans paid by capitation have an incentive to distort the quality of services they offer to attract profitable and to deter unprofitable enrollees. We characterize plans' rationing as a "shadow price" on access to various areas of care and show how the profit maximizing shadow price depends on the dispersion in health costs, individuals' forecasts of their health costs, the correlation between use in different illness categories, and the risk adjustment system used for payment. These factors are combined in an empirically implementable index that can be used to identify the services that will be most distorted by selection incentives. PMID:11186848

Frank, R G; Glazer, J; McGuire, T G

2000-11-01

151

Planning By Objectives, Cost Accountability Help Manage Health Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes Oregon's use of the system of Management By Objectives (M.B.O.) to improve the decision-making process and allow better utilization of available resources in the management of public health programs. Included is th Program P.O.M.E., the Daily Activity Report, the Monthly Accomplishments and M.B.O. objectives. (MLB)

Cipolla, John J.

1974-01-01

152

Analysis of EHRs for research, quality management and health politics.  

PubMed

Lifelong electronic health records can supply valuable information for research, quality management and health politics in addition to supporting treatment of patients. Based on experiences with scientific data analysis in a university hospital environment, requirements on cross-institutional analysis of electronic health records in a healthcare system are discussed. The concept of archetypes can play a key role in this context. Archetypes can be utilized in data analysis for visualization, semantic linkage and finally for standardized data transfer. PMID:18487768

Gall, Walter; Grossmann, Wilfried; Duftschmid, Georg; Wrba, Thomas; Dorda, Wolfgang

2008-01-01

153

What passes and fails as health policy and management.  

PubMed

The field of health policy and management (HPAM) faces a gap between theory, policy, and practice. Despite decades of efforts at reforming health policy and health care systems, prominent analysts state that the health system is "stuck" and that models for change remain "aspirational." We discuss four reasons for the failure of current ideas and models for redesigning health care: (1) the dominance of microeconomic thinking; (2) the lack of comparative studies of health care organizations and the limits of health management theory in recognizing the importance of local contexts; (3) the separation of HPAM from the rank and file of health care, particularly physicians; and (4) the failure to expose medical students to issues of HPAM. We conclude with suggestions for rethinking how the field of HPAM might generate more-promising policies for health care providers and managers by abandoning the illusion of context-free theories and, instead, seeking to facilitate the processes by which organizations can learn to improve their own performance. PMID:25037829

Chinitz, David; Rodwin, Victor G

2014-10-01

154

Rumination in eating disorders: literature review.  

PubMed

Rumination is defined as regurgitation of partially digested food that is subsequently re-chewed and then swallowed or ejected by mouth. We report a case of rumination and a review of selected literature to emphasize: 1. Risk factors for rumination in eating disorders are unknown, 2. A history of rumination must be taken routinely because shame prevents patients from volunteering this history, 3. Rumination usually lessens with improvement of the eating disorder, but other methods including behavior modification, breathing techniques, and gum chewing have shown success in individual cases or small case series. There have been no controlled trials published of any treatment for rumination in eating disorders. PMID:17075234

Birmingham, C L; Firoz, T

2006-09-01

155

Texas camelid health and management survey  

E-print Network

A web-based and mail-out survey instrument was created to gather information on camelids in Texas. Information on management, nutrition, diseases, and reproductive problems was collected. The objectives of this research study were: (1) to establish...

Jacklitsch, Brenda Louise

2009-06-02

156

What health care managers do: applying Mintzberg's structured observation method.  

PubMed

Aim The aim of the present study was to explore and describe what characterizes first- and second-line health care managers' use of time. Background Many Swedish health care managers experience difficulties managing their time. Methods Structured and unstructured observations were used. Ten first- and second-line managers in different health care settings were studied in detail from 3.5 and 4 days each. Duration and frequency of different types of work activities were analysed. Results The individual variation was considerable. The managers' days consisted to a large degree of short activities (<9 minutes). On average, nearly half of the managers' time was spent in meetings. Most of the managers' time was spent with subordinates and <1% was spent alone with their superiors. Sixteen per cent of their time was spent on administration and only a small fraction on explicit strategic work. Conclusions The individual variations in time use patterns suggest the possibility of interventions to support changes in time use patterns. Implications for nursing management A reliable description of what managers do paves the way for analyses of what they should do to be effective. PMID:19694915

Arman, Rebecka; Dellve, Lotta; Wikström, Ewa; Törnström, Linda

2009-09-01

157

Investigation of health care waste management in Binzhou District, China  

SciTech Connect

In China, national regulations and standards for health care waste management were implemented in 2003. To investigate the current status of health care waste management at different levels of health care facilities (HCF) after the implementation of these regulations, one tertiary hospital, one secondary hospital, and four primary health care centers from Binzhou District were visited and 145 medical staff members and 24 cleaning personnel were interviewed. Generated medical waste totaled 1.22, 0.77, and 1.17 kg/bed/day in tertiary, secondary, and primary HCF, respectively. The amount of medical waste generated in primary health care centers was much higher than that in secondary hospitals, which may be attributed to general waste being mixed with medical waste. This study found that the level of the HCF, responsibility for medical waste management in departments and wards, educational background and training experience can be factors that determine medical staff members' knowledge of health care waste management policy. Regular training programs and sufficient provision of protective measures are urgently needed to improve occupational safety for cleaning personnel. Financing and administrative monitoring by local authorities is needed to improve handling practices and the implementation of off-site centralized disposal in primary health care centers.

Ruoyan, Gai [Department of Health Policy and Planning, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 1130033 (Japan); Xu Lingzhong; Li Huijuan; Zhou Chengchao; He Jiangjiang [Institute of Social Medicine and Health Services Management, School of Public Health, Shandong University, Wen-hua-xi Road, No. 44, Jinan City, Shandong Province 250012 (China); Yoshihisa, Shirayama [Department of Health Policy and Planning, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 1130033 (Japan); Tang Wei [Institute of Social Medicine and Health Services Management, School of Public Health, Shandong University, Wen-hua-xi Road, No. 44, Jinan City, Shandong Province 250012 (China); University of Tokyo Hospital, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Chushi, Kuroiwa, E-mail: ckuroiw@m.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Health Policy and Planning, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 1130033 (Japan); Institute of Social Medicine and Health Services Management, School of Public Health, Shandong University, Wen-hua-xi Road, No. 44, Jinan City, Shandong Province 250012 (China)

2010-02-15

158

Health and productivity of traditionally managed Djallonke sheep and West African dwarf goats under high and moderate trypanosomosis risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Trypanosome infections, packed red cell volume levels (PCV), body weight and nematode faecal egg counts of village-based small ruminants were monitored in two areas in The Gambia with either moderate or high trypanosomosis risk for 24 and 30 months respectively. Outflows from the flock and new-born animals were recorded and data on housing and management were compiled. Reported mortality rates

S Osaer; B Goossens; S Kora; M Gaye; L Darboe

1999-01-01

159

Managing health(-care systems) using information health technologies.  

PubMed

This study aims to compare and contrast how specific information health technologies (IHTs) have been debated, how they have proliferated, and what they have enabled in Germany’s and England’s healthcare systems. For this a discourse analysis was undertaken that specifically focussed on future-scenarios articulated in policy documents and strategy papers released by relevant actors from both healthcare systems. The study reveals that the way IHTs have been debated and how they have proliferated depends on country-specific regulatory structures, their respective values, actors’ and institutions’ organized interests, and the status of health professionals. These conditions have enabled IHTs to promote a new and similar concept of patienthood in both countries, although they tend to affect practitioners’ practices more dramatically in England. The conclusion is drawn that with the usage of IHTs, healthcare systems reproduced existing patterns of health provision while also enabling a sort of convergence. Future research should investigate whether the new concept of patienthood emerging in both welfare states actually suits patients and professionals needs and requirements. PMID:20390452

Mathar, Thomas

2011-06-01

160

Governance in managing public health resources in Brazilian municipalities.  

PubMed

This study contributes to the health governance discussion by presenting a new data set that allows for comparisons of the management of health resources among Brazilian municipalities. Research on Brazil is particularly important as the provision of health services was decentralized in 1988 and since then municipalities have been given greater responsibilities for the management of fiscal resources for public health service provision. Based on detailed information on corruption practices (such as over-invoicing, illegal procurement and fake receipts) from audit reports of health programmes in 980 randomly selected Brazilian municipalities, this study deepens understanding of the relationship between health governance institutions and the incidence of corruption at the local level by exploring the extent to which horizontal and vertical accountabilities contribute to reducing the propensity of municipal government officials to divert public health resources for private gain. The results of our multiple regression analysis suggest that the experience of health municipal councils is correlated with reductions in the incidence of corruption in public health programmes. This impact is significant over time, with each additional year of health council experience reducing corruption incidence levels by 2.1% from baseline values. The findings reported in this study do not rely on the subjectivity of corruption measures which usually conflate the actual incidence of corruption with its perception by informants. Based on our results, we provide recommendations that can assist policy makers to reduce corruption. PMID:23411119

Avelino, George; Barberia, Lorena G; Biderman, Ciro

2014-09-01

161

ADVANCES IN PLANT HEALTH MANAGEMENT IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY.  

PubMed

Plant health management is the science and practice of understanding and overcoming the succession of biotic and abiotic factors that limit plants from achieving their full genetic potential as crops, ornamentals, timber trees, or other uses. Although practiced as long as agriculture itself, as a science-based concept, plant heath management is even younger than integrated pest management (IPM), and includes and builds upon but is not a replacement for IPM. Probably the greatest collection of success stories for plant health management is the number of diseases managed by cleaning up the planting material. The record for root health management is more mixed, with the loss or phase-out of soil fumigants, and practices such as crop rotation and clean tillage being replaced with more intensive cropping and less or no tillage. Perhaps the greatest scientific and technical advances for plant health management have come from the work aimed at management of the pathogens, pests, and other hazards that arrive by air. Flor's work on flax rust, which produced the gene-for-gene model, is possibly the most significant contribution of plant pathology to the life sciences in the twentieth century. Research aimed at the management of foliar pathogens is also the basis for modern theory on epidemiology, population biology, aerobiology, and disease prediction and decision-support systems. Even IPM arose mainly in response to the need to protect crops from pests that arrive by air. If the definition of biological control includes the plant induced or genetically modified to defend itself, as it should, then biological control has been the most significant approach to plant health management during the twentieth century and promises through modern biotechnology to be even more significant in the twenty-first century. Rather than "reducing losses," the advances are discussed here within the simple framework of achieving the attainable yield by increasing the actual and/or affordable and hence the average yield. Each of these four benchmark yields, as well as the absolute yield for crops, and their significance to the goals and achievements of plant health management are defined. Plant health management is a moving target, which I discuss metaphorically like an American football game, where one team is science and technology and the other is nature, where the S & T team is only beginning to know nature's rules while playing itself with the three sets of rules written to, respectively, satisfy the laws of economics, protect the environment, and gain social acceptance. PMID:11701838

Cook, R. James

2000-01-01

162

Implementing performance management in the Irish Health Sector.  

PubMed

To realize the goals of successive health strategies, managers in the Irish Health Sector will have to proactively facilitate optimal employee performance in line with policy objectives. Along with developing employee and teams' capabilities, these managers have begun to implement performance management to achieve the latter. However, there typically are a variety of foundational organizational characteristics required for the successful implementation of performance management. These include providing top-down support for line management buy-in, providing ongoing managerial and performance management training so that trusting relationships and a culture of consensus and cooperation are developed, and appropriately managing expectations. Agreement on employee role definitions and provision of team-based conflict resolution training is also needed to facilitate performance management. There is a need for negotiated performance indicators that are of various types, specific, measurable, and aligned with strategy objectives. Associated reward systems need to be holistic and imaginative, and personal development plans need to have a broader focus than merely improving current job skills and performance. Performance review needs to be ongoing, conducted in a transparent manner, and allocated sufficient discussion time. Managers also need to be mindful of managing overperformance. PMID:16699325

Byrne, Michael

2006-01-01

163

Managing Software Development for Global Health  

E-print Network

-resource settings, by the people who will use them. · Safer childbirth and healthy children. · Health equity of vaccines for women and children around the world. 3/10/2010 6CSESoftware EngineeringResearchGroup #12;3/12/2010 2 Technology Solutions Primary areas of focus · Immunization & vaccine technologies · Diagnostic

Anderson, Richard

164

Web Application for Managing Electronic Health Records  

Cancer.gov

Technology to empower clinical staff in requesting and designing order sets can be transformative for hospitals and other health care organizations. This software is proving itself vital in building greater order set development efficiencies and in communication among key stakeholders responsible for certain aspects of an order set within an organization.

165

Correctional Managed Health Care Michael Vasquenza, BS  

E-print Network

f 6 t t ith i t t d j il d i tCT is 1 of 6 states with an integrated jail and prison system. 20% of admissions require prompt medical or mental health intervention Hartford Correctional Center (jail) averages

Oliver, Douglas L.

166

9 CFR 98.14 - Health certificate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.14 Health certificate. (a) Ruminant and swine embryos shall not be...

2013-01-01

167

9 CFR 98.14 - Health certificate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.14 Health certificate. (a) Ruminant and swine embryos shall not be...

2010-01-01

168

9 CFR 98.14 - Health certificate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMAL EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos From Regions Where Rinderpest or Foot-and-Mouth Disease Exists § 98.14 Health certificate. (a) Ruminant and swine embryos shall not be...

2011-01-01

169

Occupational Safety, Health, and Environmental Management  

E-print Network

) This course covers concepts used in the Environmental Management courses. The course emphasizes the practi under- stand all material. Reading assignments and testing in class will also help participants prepare. A scientific calculator is required for this course. Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene Social Ecology X496

Stanford, Kyle

170

Confronting Ego Threats with Reappraisal versus Rumination  

E-print Network

, ruminating about the feedback led to poorer evaluations of the source of negative feedback and increased self-enhancement, respectively. These findings suggest that, compared to rumination, cognitive reappraisal helps to minimize defensive responses to ego...

Caskey, Ryan

2010-01-16

171

Promoting diversity in health management: the University of Michigan Experience.  

PubMed

There has been a resurgence in the call for greater racial and ethnic diversity in the health workforce. Researchers in health services have made the "business case" for diverse leadership of healthcare organizations, arguing that this will make these organizations more effective in serving diverse populations. Greater diversity in health management training programs will also have positive effects on their students. This article has three purposes: to discuss the importance of diversity in health management training programs; to describe the University of Michigan's Summer Enrichment Program (SEP), a program to increase the number of students of color who receive graduate training in health management; and to report the results of a survey of SEP alumni, conducted after the program's 15th year, which describe the graduate school and career experiences of 167 SEP alumni. Based upon the survey results, the SEP appears to have been very successful in enlarging the pool of students of color who attend graduate programs in health management and who embark on careers in the field. It has also had a very positive effect on diversity within the University of Michigan program. The implications of the Michigan experience and recent Supreme Court decisions for other graduate programs are discussed. PMID:16206638

Lichtenstein, Richard

2005-01-01

172

Veterinary dairy herd health management in Europe: constraints and perspectives.  

PubMed

The nature of veterinary work in dairy health management in Europe has changed over the past years and will change even more dramatically in the near future. The consumers and the media show increasing concern about animal welfare, safety of products of animal origin and traceability of animal products. Farmers in Europe have to produce under strict, often expensive and laborious regulations, while still commercially competing with farmers outside the EU and not subject to the same rules. Veterinarians should adapt their knowledge and skills to the new challenges and developments of the dairy sector. Dairy farmers nowadays ask for support in areas that go beyond clinical activities: environmental protection, welfare, nutrition, grassland management, economics and business management. Bovine practitioners should be able to advise in many different areas and subjects--that is the challenge to our profession. Veterinary education with regards to cattle health management should start with individual animal clinical work, which constitutes the basis of herd health advisory programmes. The bovine practitioner should then look beyond that and regard the herd as the unit. Each diseased cow or group of cows should be detected early enough to avoid financial losses or such losses should be prevented altogether by detecting and managing risk factors contributing to disease occurrence. Herd health and production management programmes represent the first level to optimise dairy farm performance. Expansions to that should further be considered, comprising both animal health and welfare issues, as well as food safety and public health issues. The latter could be addressed by quality risk management programmes following the HACCP-principles. Cattle veterinarians should follow recent developments and invest in new skills and knowledge in order to maintain their usefulness to the modern dairy farmer. Finally we are convinced that the cattle practitioner should evolve into this direction, otherwise the veterinarian as we know him will miss the train in the next years. PMID:16605158

Cannas da Silva, J; Noordhuizen, J P T M; Vagneur, M; Bexiga, R; Gelfert, C C; Baumgartner, W

2006-03-01

173

Regional governance: strategies and disputes in health region management.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE To analyze the regional governance of the health systemin relation to management strategies and disputes. METHODOLOGICAL PROCEDURES A qualitative study with health managers from 19 municipalities in the health region of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil. Data were drawn from 17 semi-structured interviews of state, regional, and municipal health policymakers and managers; a focus group; observations of the regional interagency committee; and documents in 2012. The political-institutional and the organizational components were analyzed in the light of dialectical hermeneutics. RESULTS The regional interagency committee is the chief regional governance strategy/component and functions as a strategic tool for strengthening governance. It brings together a diversity of members responsible for decision making in the healthcare territories, who need to negotiate the allocation of funding and the distribution of facilities for common use in the region. The high turnover of health secretaries, their lack of autonomy from the local executive decisions, inadequate technical training to exercise their function, and the influence of party politics on decision making stand as obstacles to the regional interagency committee's permeability to social demands. Funding is insufficient to enable the fulfillment of the officially integrated agreed-upon program or to boost public supply by the system, requiring that public managers procure services from the private market at values higher than the national health service price schedule (Brazilian Unified Health System Table). The study determined that "facilitators" under contract to health departments accelerated access to specialized (diagnostic, therapeutic and/or surgical) services in other municipalities by direct payment to physicians for procedure costs already covered by the Brazilian Unified Health System. CONCLUSIONS The characteristics identified a regionalized system with a conflictive pattern of governance and intermediate institutionalism. The regional interagency committee's managerial routine needs to incorporate more democratic devices for connecting with educational institutions, devices that are more permeable to social demands relating to regional policy making. PMID:25210821

Santos, Adriano Maia Dos; Giovanella, Ligia

2014-08-01

174

How does risk sharing between employers and a managed behavioral health organization affect mental health care?  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To study the ways in which allocating the risk for behavioral health care expenses between employers and a managed behavioral health organization affects costs and the use of services. DATA SOURCES: Claims from 87 plans that cover mental health and substance abuse services covering over one million member years in 1996/1997. STUDY DESIGN: Multi-part regression models for health care cost are used. Dependent variables are health care costs decomposed into access to any care, costs per user, any inpatient use, costs per outpatient user, and costs per inpatient user. The study compares full-risk plans, in which the managed care organization provides managed care services and acts as the insurer by assuming the risk for claims costs, with contracts in which the managed care organization only manages care (for a fixed administrative fee) and the employer retains the risk for claims. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Full-risk plans are not statistically significantly different from non-risk plans in terms of any mental health specialty use or hospitalization rates, but costs per user are significantly lower, in particular for inpatients. CONCLUSIONS: Risk contracts do not affect initial access to mental health specialty care or hospitalization rates, but patients in risk contracts have lower costs, either because of lower intensity of care or because they are treated by less expensive providers. PMID:11055447

Sturm, R

2000-01-01

175

Building on Success: Charting the Future of Knowledge Management Within the Academic Health Center  

E-print Network

BUILDING ON SUCCESS: CHARTING THE FUTURE OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT WITHIN THE ACADEMIC HEALTH CENTER AAHSL Charting the Future Task Force ? Association of Academic Health Sciences... Introduction....................................................................................6 Knowledge Management in Clinic Practice ................................9 Knowledge Management in Education ......................................12...

Brewer, Karen; Hohman, J. Michael; Messerle, Judith; Yokote, Gail

2003-01-01

176

Evaluation of computerized health management information system for primary health care in rural India  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Ballabgarh, run by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi has a computerized Health Management Information System (HMIS) since 1988. The HMIS at Ballabgarh has undergone evolution and is currently in its third version which uses generic and open source software. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a

Anand Krishnan; Baridalyne Nongkynrih; Kapil Yadav; Satyavir Singh; Vivek Gupta

2010-01-01

177

Exploring the relationship between work-related rumination, sleep quality, and work-related fatigue.  

PubMed

This study examined the association among three conceptualizations of work-related rumination (affective rumination, problem-solving pondering, and detachment) with sleep quality and work-related fatigue. It was hypothesized that affective rumination and poor sleep quality would be associated with increased fatigue and that problem-solving pondering and detachment would be associated with decreased fatigue. The mediating effect of sleep quality on the relationship between work-related rumination and fatigue was also tested. An online questionnaire was completed by a heterogeneous sample of 719 adult workers in diverse occupations. The following variables were entered as predictors in a regression model: affective rumination, problem-solving pondering, detachment, and sleep quality. The dependent variables were chronic work-related fatigue (CF) and acute work-related fatigue (AF). Affective rumination was the strongest predictor of increased CF and AF. Problem-solving pondering was a significant predictor of decreased CF and AF. Poor sleep quality was predictive of increased CF and AF. Detachment was significantly negatively predictive for AF. Sleep quality partially mediated the relationship between affective rumination and fatigue and between problem-solving pondering and fatigue. Work-related affective rumination appears more detrimental to an individual's ability to recover from work than problem-solving pondering. In the context of identifying mechanisms by which demands at work are translated into ill-health, this appears to be a key finding and suggests that it is the type of work-related rumination, not rumination per se, that is important. PMID:22746369

Querstret, Dawn; Cropley, Mark

2012-07-01

178

[Analysis of rulings by the Brazilian Ministry of Health and reflections on national health policy management].  

PubMed

Ministry of Health rulings and provisions are important policy regulation tools that aim to orient the enforcement of health-related laws passed by the Legislative Branch, under the terms of the 1988 Federal Constitution. Such provisions have played a major role in the health sector, due not only to the number of documents submitted since the late 1990s, but mainly because of this tool's persuasive power in defining health sector policy. The current article aims to foster reflection on both national health policy management in Brazil and the main obstacles to the implementation of health reform operational aspects. The article classified and analyzed Ministry of Health rulings issued from 1990 to 2002. The study highlights the Ministry's centralizing approach and the use of financial and political persuasion tools that subject State and Municipal governments to the system's rules without creating a negotiated and sustained health policy that the country's institutional realities ratify and support. PMID:17334575

Baptista, Tatiana Wargas de Faria

2007-03-01

179

[Esophageal cancer: common health problems and health management].  

PubMed

Esophageal cancer is the 9th leading cause of cancer death in Taiwan. Lack of obvious symptoms or signs during its early stages means that patients are often already in the terminal stage or metastasis at their first diagnosis. A diagnosis of cancer greatly impacts both patients and their families. The purpose of this paper is to explore the current diagnostic methods and treatments used for esophageal cancer. We discuss the effects of physical, psychological and social problems such as dysphagia, fatigue, pain, uncertainty, and social isolation. We also explore the nursing interventions related to these problems. Understanding the health issues related to esophageal cancer will not only help nurses who take care of patients with esophageal cancer provide holistic care, it will also reduce patients' suffering through the treatment and recovery process. By applying interventions that effectively address the physical, psychological, and social realms, healthcare professionals can help patients feel more secure when dealing with related problems. This will improve patients' dignity, value and quality of life through their cancer journey. PMID:23386531

Huang, Mei-Chi; Chang, Wen; Han, Chin-Yen; Wang, Shou-Yu

2013-02-01

180

Program management and health care informatics: defining relationships.  

PubMed

The program management (PM) structure is a relatively well-known organizational model for hospitals. A variation of the matrix structure, it allows for an interdisciplinary team of health care providers to facilitate patient care delivery. However, providing such focused care results in a complex, highly information-dependent operational environment. To meet the information needs of such an environment, careful planning in selecting and implementing technology is required. Along with supporting patient care, the technology will also help in managing costs, human resources, quality and utilization, as well as in monitoring performance and outcomes measurement. Focusing specifically on the information technology environment, this article addresses health care informatics (the diverse categories of information and systems) needed to support clinical program managers, executives and others in a PM organization. Examples from both a university-affiliated and a community-based program managed hospital illustrate their approach to PM and information technology. PMID:10140165

Harber, B W; Miller, S A

1994-01-01

181

Health Management Technology as a General Solution Framework  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Health maintenance and improvement of humans, artifacts, and nature are pressing requirements considering the problems human beings have faced. In this article, the health management technology is proposed by centering cause-effect structure. The important aspect of the technology is evolvement through human-machine collaboration in response to changes of target systems. One of the reasons why the cause-effect structure is centered in the technology is its feature of transparency to humans by instinct point of view. The notion has been spreaded over wide application areas such as quality control, energy management, and healthcare. Some experiments were conducted to prove effectiveness of the technology in the article.

Nakajima, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Yoshifumi; Tasaki, Hiroshi; Iwami, Taro; Tsuchiya, Naoki

182

Health management and controls for earth to orbit propulsion systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fault detection and isolation for advanced rocket engine controllers are discussed focusing on advanced sensing systems and software which significantly improve component failure detection for engine safety and health management. Aerojet's Space Transportation Main Engine controller for the National Launch System is the state of the art in fault tolerant engine avionics. Health management systems provide high levels of automated fault coverage and significantly improve vehicle delivered reliability and lower preflight operations costs. Key technologies, including the sensor data validation algorithms and flight capable spectrometers, have been demonstrated in ground applications and are found to be suitable for bridging programs into flight applications.

Bickford, R. L.

1992-01-01

183

Evaluation of computerized health management information system for primary health care in rural India  

PubMed Central

Background The Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Ballabgarh, run by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi has a computerized Health Management Information System (HMIS) since 1988. The HMIS at Ballabgarh has undergone evolution and is currently in its third version which uses generic and open source software. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerized Health Management Information System in rural health system in India. Methods The data for evaluation were collected by in-depth interviews of the stakeholders i.e. program managers (authors) and health workers. Health Workers from AIIMS and Non-AIIMS Primary Health Centers were interviewed to compare the manual with computerized HMIS. A cost comparison between the two methods was carried out based on market costs. The resource utilization for both manual and computerized HMIS was identified based on workers' interviews. Results There have been no major hardware problems in use of computerized HMIS. More than 95% of data was found to be accurate. Health workers acknowledge the usefulness of HMIS in service delivery, data storage, generation of workplans and reports. For program managers, it provides a better tool for monitoring and supervision and data management. The initial cost incurred in computerization of two Primary Health Centers was estimated to be Indian National Rupee (INR) 1674,217 (USD 35,622). Equivalent annual incremental cost of capital items was estimated as INR 198,017 (USD 4213). The annual savings is around INR 894,283 (USD 11,924). Conclusion The major advantage of computerization has been in saving of time of health workers in record keeping and report generation. The initial capital costs of computerization can be recovered within two years of implementation if the system is fully operational. Computerization has enabled implementation of a good system for service delivery, monitoring and supervision. PMID:21078203

2010-01-01

184

Strategic Health Information Management and Forecast: The Birdwatching Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a To facilitate communication and the exchange of information between patients, nurses, lab technicians, health insurers, physicians,\\u000a policy makers, and existing knowledge-based systems, a set of shared standard terminologies and controlled vocabularies are\\u000a necessary. In modern health information management systems, these vocabularies are defined within formal representations called\\u000a ontologies, where terminologies are only meaningful once linked to a descriptive dataset. When

Arash Shaban-Nejad; Volker Haarslev

2010-01-01

185

Embedding Health Management into Mission Tasking for UAV Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coordinated multi-vehicle autonomous systems can provide incredible functionality, but off-nominal conditions and degraded system components can render this capability ineffective. This paper presents techniques to improve mission-level functional reliability through better system self-awareness and adaptive mission planning. In particular, we extend the traditional definition of health management, which has historically referred to the process of actively monitoring and managing vehicle

Mario Valenti; Brett Bethke; Daniela Pucci de Farias; John Vian

2007-01-01

186

Chemical-management policy: prioritizing children's health.  

PubMed

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that chemical-management policy in the United States be revised to protect children and pregnant women and to better protect other populations. The Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) was passed in 1976. It is widely recognized to have been ineffective in protecting children, pregnant women, and the general population from hazardous chemicals in the marketplace. It does not take into account the special vulnerabilities of children in attempting to protect the population from chemical hazards. Its processes are so cumbersome that in its more than 30 years of existence, the TSCA has been used to regulate only 5 chemicals or chemical classes of the tens of thousands of chemicals that are in commerce. Under the TSCA, chemical companies have no responsibility to perform premarket testing or postmarket follow-up of the products that they produce; in fact, the TSCA contains disincentives for the companies to produce such data. Voluntary programs have been inadequate in resolving problems. Therefore, chemical-management policy needs to be rewritten in the United States. Manufacturers must be responsible for developing information about chemicals before marketing. The US Environmental Protection Agency must have the authority to demand additional safety data about a chemical and to limit or stop the marketing of a chemical when there is a high degree of suspicion that the chemical might be harmful to children, pregnant women, or other populations. PMID:21518722

2011-05-01

187

Test Result Management in Global Health Settings  

PubMed Central

OVERVIEW Across the globe, the ways in which patients' test results are managed are as varied as the many different types of healthcare systems that manage these data. The outcomes, however, are often not too dissimilar: too many clinically significant test results fall through the cracks. The consequences of not following up test results in a timely manner are serious and often devastating to patients: diagnoses are delayed, treatments are not initiated or altered in time, and diseases progress. In resource-poor settings, test results too commonly get filed away within the paper chart in ways that isolate them and prevent passage to future providers caring for a patient. To make matters worse, the onus to act upon these test results often rests on patients who need to return to the clinic within a specified timeframe in order to obtain their results but who may not have the means or are too ill to do so. Even in more developed healthcare settings that use electronic records, clinical data residing in the electronic medical record (EMR) are often stubbornly “static”—key pieces of clinical information are frequently not recognized, retrieved, or shared easily. In this way, EMRs are not unlike paper record systems, and therefore, EMRs alone will not solve this problem. To illustrate this problem, consider the case of a patient newly diagnosed with HIV in 3 different healthcare delivery settings. PMID:24278831

Palazuelos, Daniel; Payne, Jonathan D.

2012-01-01

188

Test result management in global health settings.  

PubMed

Across the globe, the ways in which patients' test results are managed are as varied as the many different types of healthcare systems that manage these data. The outcomes, however, are often not too dissimilar: too many clinically significant test results fall through the cracks. The consequences of not following up test results in a timely manner are serious and often devastating to patients: diagnoses are delayed, treatments are not initiated or altered in time, and diseases progress. In resource-poor settings, test results too commonly get filed away within the paper chart in ways that isolate them and prevent passage to future providers caring for a patient. To make matters worse, the onus to act upon these test results often rests on patients who need to return to the clinic within a specified timeframe in order to obtain their results but who may not have the means or are too ill to do so. Even in more developed healthcare settings that use electronic records, clinical data residing in the electronic medical record (EMR) are often stubbornly "static"-key pieces of clinical information are frequently not recognized, retrieved, or shared easily. In this way, EMRs are not unlike paper record systems, and therefore, EMRs alone will not solve this problem. To illustrate this problem, consider the case of a patient newly diagnosed with HIV in 3 different healthcare delivery settings. PMID:24278831

Palazuelos, Daniel; Payne, Jonathan D; Dalal, Anuj K

2012-09-01

189

Evaluating the impact of the Management Academy for Public Health: developing entrepreneurial managers and organizations.  

PubMed

The Management Academy for Public Health is a management development program with the goals of helping public health managers learn to manage people, data, and finance, to think and plan like entrepreneurs, and to strengthen public health organizations. Managers enroll as teams and develop business plans in the Academy's extensive project-based learning component. Extensive internal and external evaluation shows that the program improves managers' knowledge, skills, and confidence in key curriculum areas; that participants apply many of the skills in their jobs; that many of the business plans receive funding, resulting in new public health programs; that the training experience helped agencies respond and plan after September 11, 2001; and that many participants report beginning to think more like entrepreneurs through activities like teaming, partnering, innovating, negotiating, finding funds, and generating revenue. The program demonstrates that robust training including extensive work-based project work with coaching can help public health managers gain many skills needed for the drive to "reinvent" government. PMID:16912605

Umble, Karl E; Orton, Stephen; Rosen, Benson; Ottoson, Judith

2006-01-01

190

[Financial incentives in workers' health management].  

PubMed

In the countries of the European Union, several million workers meet with an accident every year. In the national economy, the costs of accidents at work and occupational diseases are born by different institutions in different proportions, and they are estimated at several percent of the gross domestic product of each of these countries. The issue concerning economic consequences of occupational diseases and accidents at work has been emphasized in the section on health and safety at work of the Community Strategy for 2007-2012. Bearing this in mind, the need have arose to strengthen the efficiency of legal instruments and economic stimuli to motivate actions aimed at improving work conditions. Economic stimuli and legal instruments complement each other in the process of motivating various institutions. The following kinds of economic stimuli have been distinguished: subsidies, grants and financial assistance of the state and stimuli incorporated into tax and insurance systems. Economic evaluation at the information, allocation and educational levels, being an economic tool, may support policymakers who can use this tool to asses economic efficiency of decisions made in the area of health and safety of workers as well as to asses economic consequences of the functioning of legal instruments. The aim of the project, implemented under the Seventh Framework Program by the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, is to promote the system of economic stimuli understood as an incentive to undertake actions for the improvement of work conditions. Owing to this project the discussion forum, addressed to relevant and interested social partners, will be established, and experts in the field will assist in determining directions of further actions aimed at advancing motivation systems. PMID:19227888

Rydlewska-Liszkowska, Izabela

2008-01-01

191

Roles of managers in academic health centers: strategies for the managed care environment.  

PubMed

This article addresses survival strategies of academic health centers (AHCs) in responding to market pressures and government reforms. Using six case studies of AHCs, the study links strategic changes in structure and management to managerial role performance. Utilizing Mintzberg's classification of work roles, the roles of liaison, monitor, entrepreneur, and resource allocator were found to be used by top-level managers as they implement strategies to enhance the viability of their AHCs. Based on these new roles, the study recommends improving management practices through education and training as well as changing organizational culture to support management decision making and foster the continued growth of managers and their AHCs. PMID:11944815

Guo, Kristina L

2002-03-01

192

Chronic disease self-management — a health management approach for patients in rural and remote communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The Sharing Health Care SA project, a chronic disease self-management (CDSM) strategy for patients in rural and remote communities in South Australia, was designed to develop and demonstrate new approaches to chronic disease self- management within rural and remote communities. It also complemented and promoted the Enhanced Primary Care (EPC) program and utilisation of new Medical Benefits Schedule (MBS)

Peter Harvey; Malcolm Battersby; Gary Misan

193

Meeting new health care challenges with a proven innovation: nurse-managed health care clinics.  

PubMed

Beginning in January 2014, millions of Americans will enroll in health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act. Some of these individuals were obtaining health care in safety net health clinics, emergency departments, or urgent care centers; many were going without needed care and will be new to the health care system. In addition to these newly insured, the ranks of older Americans and persons in need of chronic disease management will be on the rise. The way in which health care is delivered will have to change in order for the health care workforce to meet the demand for their services without sacrificing quality or access. Nurse practitioners and registered nurses have the education and skills to provide health promotion, disease prevention, and chronic disease management services that will make up a sizable portion of the demand. Amending state practice acts so that the authority to practice matches the ability to practice and opening provider panels to advanced practice nurses will provide opportunities to establish or expand sustainable nurse-led primary care practices in health care shortage areas. Along with these changes, models of health care delivery that incorporate differentiated practice roles and shared interprofessional responsibility for providing care will maximize the capacity of the system to provide the health care that people need. PMID:24569758

Link, Denise G; Perry, Diane; Cesarotti, Evelyn L

2014-01-01

194

Petroleum and health care: evaluating and managing health care's vulnerability to petroleum supply shifts.  

PubMed

Petroleum is used widely in health care-primarily as a transport fuel and feedstock for pharmaceuticals, plastics, and medical supplies-and few substitutes for it are available. This dependence theoretically makes health care vulnerable to petroleum supply shifts, but this vulnerability has not been empirically assessed. We quantify key aspects of petroleum use in health care and explore historical associations between petroleum supply shocks and health care prices. These analyses confirm that petroleum products are intrinsic to modern health care and that petroleum supply shifts can affect health care prices. In anticipation of future supply contractions lasting longer than previous shifts and potentially disrupting health care delivery, we propose an adaptive management approach and outline its application to the example of emergency medical services. PMID:21778473

Hess, Jeremy; Bednarz, Daniel; Bae, Jaeyong; Pierce, Jessica

2011-09-01

195

Health insurance in India: need for managed care expertise.  

PubMed

Health insurers in India currently face many challenges, including poor consumer awareness, strict regulations, and inefficient business practices. They operate under a combination of stifling administrative costs and high medical expense ratios which have ensured that insurers operate under steep losses. External factors (eg, onerous regulations, lack of standards, high claims payouts) and internal factors (eg, high administrative costs, dependence on indemnity models that cover inpatient treatment costs only) have forced the health insurance industry into a regressive spiral. To overcome these challenges, health insurers need to innovate in their product offerings and tighten their existing processes and cost structures. But as a long-term strategy, it is imperative that health insurers deploy managed care concepts, which will go a long way toward addressing the systemic issues in the current operational models of health plans. PMID:21473657

Thomas, Thomas K

2011-02-01

196

Risk and risk assessment in health emergency management.  

PubMed

This article considers the critical roles of risk and risk assessment in the management of health emergencies and disasters. The Task Force on Quality Control of Disaster Management (TFQCDM) has defined risk as the "objective (mathematical) or subjective (inductive) probability that something negative will occur (happen)". Risks with the greatest relevance to health emergency management include: (1) the probability that a health hazard exists or will occur; (2) the probability that the hazard will become an event; (3) the probability that the event will lead to health damage; and (4) the probability that the health damage will lead to a health disaster. The overall risk of a health disaster is the product of these four probabilities. Risk assessments are the tools that help systems at risk-healthcare organizations, communities, regions, states, and countries-transform their visceral reactions to threats into rational strategies for risk reduction. Type I errors in risk assessment occur when situations are predicted that do not occur (risk is overestimated). Type II errors in risk assessment occur when situations are not predicted that do occur (risk is underestimated). Both types of error may have serious, even lethal, consequences. Errors in risk assessment may be reduced through strategies that optimize risk assessment, including the: (1) adoption of the TFQCDM definition of risk and other terms; (2) specification of the system at risk and situations of interest (hazard, event, damage, and health disaster); (3) adoption of a best practice approach to risk assessment methodology; (4) assembly of the requisite range of expert participants and information; (5) adoption of an evidence-based approach to using information; (6) exclusion of biased, irrelevant, and obsolete information; and (7) complete characterizations of any underlying fault and event trees. PMID:16018501

Arnold, Jeffrey L

2005-01-01

197

Sensor and system health management simulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The health of a sensor and system is monitored by information gathered from the sensor. First, a normal mode of operation is established. Any deviation from the normal behavior indicates a change. Second, the sensor information is simulated by a main process, which is defined by a step-up, drift, and step-down. The sensor disturbances and spike are added while the system is in drift. The system runs for a period of at least three time-constants of the main process every time a process feature occurs (e.g. step change). The wavelet Transform Analysis is performed on three sets of data. The three sets of data are: the simulated data described above with Poisson distributed noise, real Manifold Pressure data, and real valve data. The simulated data with Poisson distributed noise of SNRs ranging from 10 to 500 were generated. Due to page limitations only the results of SNR of 50 is reported. The data are analyzed using continuous as well as discrete wavelet transforms. The results indicate distinct shapes corresponding to each process.

Amini, Abolfazl M.

2006-04-01

198

Can action research strengthen district health management and improve health workforce performance? A research protocol  

PubMed Central

Introduction The single biggest barrier for countries in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) to scale up the necessary health services for addressing the three health-related Millennium Development Goals and achieving Universal Health Coverage is the lack of an adequate and well-performing health workforce. This deficit needs to be addressed both by training more new health personnel and by improving the performance of the existing and future health workforce. However, efforts have mostly been focused on training new staff and less on improving the performance of the existing health workforce. The purpose of this paper is to disseminate the protocol for the PERFORM project and reflect on the key challenges encountered during the development of this methodology and how they are being overcome. Methods The overall aim of the PERFORM project is to identify ways of strengthening district management in order to address health workforce inadequacies by improving health workforce performance in SSA. The study will take place in three districts each in Ghana, Tanzania and Uganda using an action research approach. With the support of the country research teams, the district health management teams (DHMTs) will lead on planning, implementation, observation, reflection and redefinition of the activities in the study. Taking into account the national and local human resource (HR) and health systems (HS) policies and practices already in place, ‘bundles’ of HR/HS strategies that are feasible within the context and affordable within the districts’ budget will be developed by the DHMTs to strengthen priority areas of health workforce performance. A comparative analysis of the findings from the three districts in each country will add new knowledge on the effects of these HR/HS bundles on DHMT management and workforce performance and the impact of an action research approach on improving the effectiveness of the DHMTs in implementing these interventions. Discussion Different challenges were faced during the development of the methodology. These include the changing context in the study districts, competing with other projects and duties for the time of district managers, complexity of the study design, maintaining the anonymity and confidentiality of study participants as well as how to record the processes during the study. We also discuss how these challenges are being addressed. The dissemination of this research protocol is intended to generate interest in the PERFORM project and also stimulate discussion on the use of action research in complex studies such as this on strengthening district health management to improve health workforce performance. PMID:23996825

Mshelia, C; Huss, R; Mirzoev, T; Elsey, H; Baine, S O; Aikins, M; Kamuzora, P; Bosch-Capblanch, X; Raven, J; Wyss, K; Green, A; Martineau, T

2013-01-01

199

Lifestyle Management Program: Promoting Cardiovascular Health: in Community College Campuses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Lifestyle Management Project is a health promotion project and research study conducted in the spring of 1984 at five Los Angeles junior college campuses. Its goal was to increase knowledge of cardiovascular disease (CHD) risk factors among 400 to 2000 junior college students in each campus. This was done via five risk factor activities: blood…

Castro, Felipe G.; Jichaku, Patrick

200

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center's Community Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents the case of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Health Center's unique community management system in which neighborhood workers have been developed to assume managerial responsibilities and are directing the Center. The Martin Luther King Center experience is instructive because the Center was able to achieve significant community control by focusing primarily on the internal dimension of

Noel M. Tichy; June Irmiger Taylor

1976-01-01

201

Outcomes Assessment in Accredited Health Information Management Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine the use and perceived usefulness of outcomes assessment methods in health information management programs. Additional characteristics of the outcomes assessment practices were recognized. The findings were evaluated for significant differences in results based on age of the program, type of institution,…

Bennett, Dorine

2010-01-01

202

Fish Health Management Considerations in Recirculating Aquaculture Systems -Part 1  

E-print Network

Cir 120 Fish Health Management Considerations in Recirculating Aquaculture Systems - Part 1 Cooperating. Nick T. Place , Dean Introduction Recirculating aquaculture systems, also known as water reuse in Recirculating Aquaculture Systems: Parts 1, 2 and 3 ­ provides basic information that should assist

Watson, Craig A.

203

Demographics, management and health of donkeys in the UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the management and health problems of donkeys on loan to independent carers from The Donkey Sanctuary are characterised, and the demographics of the UK’s donkey population are described using data from a variety of sources. All carers that fostered a donkey from The Donkey Sanctuary between September 2004 and August 2005 (1432 donkeys) were surveyed using a

R. Cox; F. Burden; C. J. Proudman; A. F. Trawford; G. L. Pinchbeck

2010-01-01

204

Concepts for integrated electronic health records management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer systems and communication technologies are making a strong and influential presence in the different fields of medicine. The cornerstone of a functional medical information system represents the electronic health records management system. Due to a very sensitive nature of medical information, such systems are faced with a number of stringent requirements, like security and confidentiality of patients' related data,

Miroslav Kon

205

Health Promotion, Disability Management, and Rehabilitation in the Workplace.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses industry-based efforts to improve the quality of work life through various methods including health promotion programs; early intervention and disability management; and rehabilitation of industrially injured workers. Program models in each of these areas are described. (CB)

Galvin, Donald E.

1986-01-01

206

IMPROVING METHODS FOR MANAGING HEALTH AND EXPOSURE DATA  

EPA Science Inventory

The project in Colorado is evaluating the use of GIS as a tool for studying the potential impacts of exposure to DBPs from different disinfection treatments on reproductive health in populations in Colorado. GIS is a data management and visualization tool that is assisting in stu...

207

Correctional Managed Health Care Contract for Student Experience  

E-print Network

will retain records in accordance with the state of Connecticut's record retention policy. 2. Student1 Correctional Managed Health Care Contract for Student Experience Academic Year 2011 listed below) CMHC student experience with on-site faculty. CMHC student experience with off-site faculty

Oliver, Douglas L.

208

Commercial Aircraft Integrated Vehicle Health Management Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Statistical data and literature from academia, industry, and other government agencies were reviewed and analyzed to establish requirements for fixture work in detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and mitigation for IVHM related hardware and software. Around 15 to 20 percent of commercial aircraft accidents between 1988 and 2003 involved inalftfnctions or failures of some aircraft system or component. Engine and landing gear failures/malfunctions dominate both accidents and incidents. The IVI vl Project research technologies were found to map to the Joint Planning and Development Office's National Research and Development Plan (RDP) as well as the Safety Working Group's National Aviation Safety Strategic. Plan (NASSP). Future directions in Aviation Technology as related to IVHlvl were identified by reviewing papers from three conferences across a five year time span. A total of twenty-one trend groups in propulsion, aeronautics and aircraft categories were compiled. Current and ftiture directions of IVHM related technologies were gathered and classified according to eight categories: measurement and inspection, sensors, sensor management, detection, component and subsystem monitoring, diagnosis, prognosis, and mitigation.

Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Joni K.; Jones, Sharon Monica; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Leone, Karen M.; Sandifer, Carl E.; Thomas, Megan A.

2010-01-01

209

Oceans and Human Health: Linking Ocean, Organism, and Human Health for Sustainable Management of Coastal Ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scientists and policy-makers are increasingly recognizing that sustainable coastal communities depend on healthy and resilient economies, ecosystems, and people, and that the condition or "health" of the coastal ocean and humans are intimately and inextricably connected. A wealth of ecosystem services provided by ocean and coastal environments are crucial for human survival and well being. Nonetheless, the health of coastal communities, their economies, connected ecosystems and ecosystem services, and people are under increasing threats from health risks associated with environmental degradation, climate change, and unwise land use practices, all of which contribute to growing burdens of naturally-occurring and introduced pathogens, noxious algae, and chemical contaminants. The occurrence, frequency, intensity, geographic range, and number and kinds of ocean health threats are increasing, with concomitant health and economic effects and eroding public confidence in the safety and wholesomeness of coastal environments and resources. Concerns in the research and public health communities, many summarized in the seminal 1999 NRC Report, From Monsoons to Microbes and the 2004 final report of the US Commission on Ocean Policy, resulted in establishment of a new "meta-discipline" known as Oceans and Human Health (OHH). OHH brings together practitioners in oceanography, marine biology, ecology, biomedical science, medicine, economics and other social sciences, epidemiology, environmental management, and public health to focus on water- and food-borne causes of human and animal illnesses associated with ocean and coastal systems and on health benefits of seafood and other marine products. It integrates information across multiple disciplines to increase knowledge of ocean health risks and benefits and communicate such information to enhance public safety. Recognizing the need for a comprehensive approach to ocean health threats and benefits, Congress passed the Oceans and Human Health Act of 2004. Major outcomes of the OHH Act of 2004 include: --A national focus on ocean health and its relation to human health and well-being; --Enhanced interagency coordination and cooperation in research, development, and education; --Emphasis on development of a new, interdisciplinary community of practice; --Increased understanding of linkages between marine animal health and human health and the dangers of transmission of zoonotic diseases from the marine environment; --A richer understanding of factors affecting the occurrence and impacts of ocean health threats; --An enhanced ability of the ocean science and public health communities to respond to health-related emergencies; --A strong focus on development of ecological forecasts that are providing early warning of ocean health threats and impacts, thus improving the effectiveness of protection and mitigation actions. Taken together, these outcomes contribute significantly to more sustainable management of coastal resources and communities.

Sandifer, P. A.; Trtanj, J.; Collier, T. K.

2012-12-01

210

Molecular virology of ruminant herpesviruses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molecular virology has served to establish bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) as the prototype member of ruminant herpesviruses. Based on the genomic sequence of the virus, we aim to identify and characterize virus-specified components, to explain their concerted action, and to predict how the chain of events during the lytic and latent phases of the viral life cycle may be interrupted.

Martin Schwyzer; Mathias Ackermann

1996-01-01

211

Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory  

SciTech Connect

Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7 m{sup 3} (288.1 tons) of SHCW are generated monthly by the HCCs in the West Bank. This study concluded that: (i) current HCWM practices do not meet HCWM standards recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or adapted by developed countries, and (ii) immediate attention should be directed towards improvement of HCWM facilities and development of effective legislation. To improve the HCWM in the West Bank, a national policy should be implemented, comprising a comprehensive plan of action and providing environmentally sound and reliable technological measures.

Al-Khatib, Issam A. [Institute of Environmental and Water Studies, Birzeit University, P.O. Box 14, Birzeit, Ramallah, West Bank (Palestinian Territory, Occupied)], E-mail: ikhatib@birzeit.edu; Sato, Chikashi [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho (United States)

2009-08-15

212

Creating an integrated health care system: the health and human risk management model.  

PubMed

This article critiques the current health care system and presents a new conceptual model that offers the potential for an integrated health care system in the future. Health care currently consists of parallel care systems based on the competing conceptual frameworks of the medical model and the psychosocial model. It is argued that psychosocial factors must be included in an integrated system. Research literature is reviewed that documents the need for, the therapeutic effectiveness of, and the medical cost-offset benefits of mental and behavioral health interventions. The Health and Human Risk Management Model is described and illustrated with a case example as well as research outcomes from its implementation at United HealthCare Corporation. PMID:10154064

Bergmark, R E; Dell, P; Attridge, M; Parker, M

1996-01-01

213

A knowledge management tool for public health: health-evidence.ca  

PubMed Central

Background The ultimate goal of knowledge translation and exchange (KTE) activities is to facilitate incorporation of research knowledge into program and policy development decision making. Evidence-informed decision making involves translation of the best available evidence from a systematically collected, appraised, and analyzed body of knowledge. Knowledge management (KM) is emerging as a key factor contributing to the realization of evidence-informed public health decision making. The goal of health-evidence.ca is to promote evidence-informed public health decision making through facilitation of decision maker access to, retrieval, and use of the best available synthesized research evidence evaluating the effectiveness of public health interventions. Methods The systematic reviews that populate health evidence.ca are identified through an extensive search (1985-present) of 7 electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, BIOSIS, and SportDiscus; handsearching of over 20 journals; and reference list searches of all relevant reviews. Reviews are assessed for relevance and quality by two independent reviewers. Commonly-used public health terms are used to assign key words to each review, and project staff members compose short summaries highlighting results and implications for policy and practice. Results As of June 2010, there are 1913 reviews in the health-evidence.ca registry in 21 public health and health promotion topic areas. Of these, 78% have been assessed as being of strong or moderate methodological quality. Health-evidence.ca receives approximately 35,000 visits per year, 20,596 of which are unique visitors, representing approximately 100 visits per day. Just under half of all visitors return to the site, with the average user spending six minutes and visiting seven pages per visit. Public health nurses, program managers, health promotion workers, researchers, and program coordinators are among the largest groups of registered users, followed by librarians, dieticians, medical officers of health, and nutritionists. The majority of users (67%) access the website from direct traffic (e.g., have the health-evidence.ca webpage bookmarked, or type it directly into their browser). Conclusions Consistent use of health-evidence.ca and particularly the searching for reviews that correspond with current public health priorities illustrates that health-evidence.ca may be playing an important role in achieving evidence-informed public health decision making. PMID:20718970

2010-01-01

214

Characterizing the ruminative process in young adolescents.  

PubMed

Rumination involves repeatedly and passively dwelling on negative feelings and brooding about their causes and consequences. Prior work has found that rumination predicts many forms of psychopathology including anxiety, binge eating, binge drinking, self-injury, and especially depression (Nolen-Hoeksema, Wisco, & Lyubomirsky, 2008 ). In the present study, we attempt to characterize the ruminative process in real time in young adolescents, specifically by examining factors that predict rumination following an interpersonal stressor. A community sample of 105 youth ages 9 to 14 (70% girls; 66% Caucasian) completed questionnaires regarding depressive symptoms and trait rumination along with an assessment of selective attention using an emotional faces dot-probe task. Participants then underwent an interpersonal stressor and audio rumination induction in the laboratory during which time thoughts were sampled regularly and coded. Results indicate that negative self-referential thought is a common response to the stressor and is predicted by trait rumination scores. Although most participants were able to disengage from this type of thinking, 10.5% persisted through (i.e., ruminated) until the end of the study. These individuals were characterized by higher depressive symptoms and an attentional bias away from happy (relative to neutral) faces. Differences in attentional processes may characterize rumination in youth. Implications for the measurement of rumination as well as treatment are discussed. PMID:23477416

Hilt, Lori M; Pollak, Seth D

2013-01-01

215

An Attentional Scope Model of Rumination  

PubMed Central

Rumination, defined as repetitive thinking about negative information, has been found to lead to serious maladaptive consequences, including longer and more severe episodes of major depression. In this review, we present and discuss research findings motivated by the formulation that individual differences in cognitive processes that control how information is processed influence the likelihood that thoughts will become repetitive and negative. A number of studies have demonstrated that a tendency to ruminate (i.e., trait rumination) is related to difficulties updating working memory (WM) and disengaging from and forgetting no-longer-relevant information. Other investigators have documented that trait rumination is also associated with an enhanced ability to ignore distracting information and to more stable maintenance of task-relevant information. In contrast to trait rumination, a state of rumination has been found to be related to widespread deficits in cognitive control. In this paper we discuss how the current accounts of control functioning cannot explain this pattern of anomalous control functioning. To explain these findings, including unexpected and contradictory results, we present an attentional scope model of rumination that posits that a constricted array of thoughts, percepts, and actions that are activated in WM or available for selection from LTM affects the control functioning of trait ruminators. This model explains, at a cognitive level, why rumination is particularly likely to arise when individuals are in a negative mood state; it also accounts for a number of findings outside of the rumination-control literature and generates several novel predictions. PMID:23244316

Whitmer, Anson J.; Gotlib, Ian H.

2013-01-01

216

Effects of managed care on the health and health-care of the non-elderly with diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This dissertation attempts to examine the quality effect of managed care plans (as compared with traditional fee-for-service plans, or FFS) on the health outcome and health care use of patients with diabetes. As the number of diabetics is growing rapidly with many of them are relying on managed care plans, knowing better the effects of different plans on health status

Meihua Lu

2011-01-01

217

Effects Of Managed Care On The Health And HealthCare Of The Non-Elderly With Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This dissertation attempts to examine the quality effect of managed care plans (as compared with traditional fee-for-service plans, or FFS) on the health outcome and health care use of patients with diabetes. As the number of diabetics is growing rapidly with many of them are relying on managed care plans, knowing better the effects of different plans on health status

Meihua Lu

2011-01-01

218

Economic Impact of a Medicaid Population Health Management Program  

PubMed Central

Abstract A population health management program was implemented to assess growth in health care expenditures for the disabled segment of Georgia's Medicaid population before and during the first year of a population health outcomes management program, and to compare those expenditures with projected costs based on various cost inflation trend assumptions. A retrospective, nonexperimental approach was used to analyze claims data from Georgia Medicaid claims files for all program-eligible persons for each relevant time period (intent-to-treat basis). These included all non-Medicare, noninstitutionalized Medicaid aged-blind-disabled adults older than 18 years of age. Comparisons of health care expenditures and utilization were made between base year (2003–2004) and performance year one (2006–2007), and of the difference between actual expenditures incurred in the performance year vs. projected expenditures based on various cost inflation assumptions. Demographic characteristics and clinical complexity of the population (as measured by the Chronic Illness and Disability Payment System risk score) actually increased from baseline to implementation. Actual expenditures were less than projected expenditures using any relevant medical inflation assumption. Actual expenditures were less than projected expenditures by $9.82 million when using a conservative US general medical inflation rate, by $43.6 million using national Medicaid cost trends, and by $106 million using Georgia Medicaid's own cost projections for the non-dually eligible disabled segment of Medicaid enrollees. Quadratic growth curve modeling also demonstrated a lower rate of increase in total expenditures. The rate of increase in expenditures was lower over the first year of program implementation compared with baseline. Weighted utilization rates were also lower in high-cost categories, such as inpatient days, despite increases in the risk profile of the population. Varying levels of cost avoidance could be inferred from differences between actual and projected expenditures using each of the health-related inflation assumptions. (Population Health Management 2011;14:215–222) PMID:21506728

Strothers, Harry; Miller, William Johnson; McLaren, Susan; Moore, Barbara; Sambamoorthi, Usha

2011-01-01

219

Depression care management: impact of implementation on health system costs.  

PubMed

This study examined the mental health care costs associated with implementation of a collaborative care management (CCM) of treatment for depression in primary care. A retrospective review of all costs was performed over a 2-year period associated with providing care to adult patients at clinical sites with CCM versus those with usual care, comparing total and mental health per member per month (PMPM) costs for 2008 and 2009 (patient population = 103,000). The mental health-PMPM costs as a percentage of total health care costs at the clinic without CCM were 4.65% in 2008 and 4.5% in 2009 (p = .085). In the clinics with CCM, there was a significant difference between the 2 years with a decrease noted in 2009 of 4.91% compared with 4.36% in 2008 (p < .0001). This study demonstrated that, on a population basis with the implementation of CCM, the metric of mental health-PMPM (using the actual costs of delivering care) suggested that an increased short-term cost of care is not always realized. Collaborative care management treatment for depression may be a more cost-efficient method of care for the population as a whole, even in the short term. PMID:21537138

Angstman, Kurt B; Rasmussen, Norman H; Herman, David C; Sobolik, Jerry J

2011-01-01

220

Applying total quality management concepts to public health organizations.  

PubMed Central

Total quality management (TQM) is a participative, systematic approach to planning and implementing a continuous organizational improvement process. Its approach is focused on satisfying customers' expectations, identifying problems, building commitment, and promoting open decision-making among workers. TQM applies analytical tools, such as flow and statistical charts and check sheets, to gather data about activities within an organization. TQM uses process techniques, such as nominal groups, brainstorming, and consensus forming to facilitate communication and decision making. TQM applications in the public sector and particularly in public health agencies have been limited. The process of integrating TQM into public health agencies complements and enhances the Model Standards Program and assessment methodologies, such as the Assessment Protocol for Excellence in Public Health (APEX-PH), which are mechanisms for establishing strategic directions for public health. The authors examine the potential for using TQM as a method to achieve and exceed standards quickly and efficiently. They discuss the relationship of performance standards and assessment methodologies with TQM and provide guidelines for achieving the full potential of TQM in public health organizations. The guidelines include redefining the role of management, defining a common corporate culture, refining the role of citizen oversight functions, and setting realistic estimates of the time needed to complete a task or project. PMID:1594734

Kaluzny, A D; McLaughlin, C P; Simpson, K

1992-01-01

221

The health plan choices of retirees under managed competition.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of price on the health insurance decisions of Medicare-eligible retirees in a managed competition setting. DATA SOURCE: The study is based on four years of administrative data from the University of California (UC) Retiree Health Benefits Program, which closely resembles the managed competition model upon which several leading Medicare reform proposals are based. STUDY DESIGN: A change in UC's premium contribution policy between 1993 and 1994 created a unique natural experiment for investigating the effect of price on retirees' health insurance decisions. This study consists of two related analyses. First, I estimate the effect of changes in out-of-pocket premiums between 1993 and 1994 on the decision to switch plans during open enrollment. Second, using data from 1993 to 1996, I examine the extent to which rising premiums for fee-for-service Medigap coverage increased HMO enrollment among Medicare-eligible UC retirees. PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Price is a significant factor affecting the health plan decisions of Medicare-eligible UC retirees. However, these retirees are substantially less price sensitive than active UC employees and the non-elderly in other similar programs. This result is likely attributable to higher nonpecuniary switching costs facing older individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Although it is not clear exactly how price sensitive enrollees must be in order to generate price competition among health plans, the behavioral differences between retirees and active employees suggest that caution should be taken in extrapolating from research on the non-elderly to the Medicare program. PMID:11130806

Buchmueller, T C

2000-01-01

222

Errors as allies: error management training in health professions education.  

PubMed

This paper adopts methods from the organisational team training literature to outline how health professions education can improve patient safety. We argue that health educators can improve training quality by intentionally encouraging errors during simulation-based team training. Preventable medical errors are inevitable, but encouraging errors in low-risk settings like simulation can allow teams to have better emotional control and foresight to manage the situation if it occurs again with live patients. Our paper outlines an innovative approach for delivering team training. PMID:23293120

King, Aimee; Holder, Michael G; Ahmed, Rami A

2013-06-01

223

Low level communication management for e-health systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The heterogeneity of e-health systems encourages the use of standards such as Health Level 7 (HL7v3) to ensure interoperability. Many actual implementations address this problem by unoptimized high level programming of top-range portable computing platforms. However, this approach could pose excessive demands on battery-powered mid-range terminals. In this work, we propose low-level support for portable HL7v3-compatible embedded systems in order to better exploit their limited processing and communications capabilities. In particular, we present our experience in mobile communication management through two different approaches, which proves the feasibility of this proposal.

Riva, Guillermo; Zerbini, Carlos; Voos, Javier; Centeno, Carlos; González, Eduardo

2011-12-01

224

Developing Self-Management Tools with Vulnerable Populations for use in Personal Health Information Management Systems.  

PubMed

Vulnerable populations have potential to be significant partners and informants in the development of health information technology. We describe our experience in conducting human-centered participatory design methods with community-dwelling elders in the development of a computer-based falls prevention self-management tool for use in a personal health information management system. Community-dwelling elders contributed significantly to understanding appropriate content and functions; task performance; and graphical representations that should be considered in designing our self-management tool. Design participants should include those who have and have not experienced the clinical condition being considered during the process of system development. Knowledge transfer between system developers and community members about health and personal safety issues can be facilitated through human-centered participatory design methods. PMID:24199096

Lucero, Robert J; Sheehan, Barbara; Yen, Po-Yin; Velez, Olivia; Nobile-Hernandez, Diana L; Tiase, Victoria L; Bakken, Suzanne

2012-01-01

225

Resolving ethical conflicts in a managed health care environment.  

PubMed

The managed health care environment is replete with situations that create ethical conflicts for the professional social worker. This article examines two such conflicts--competing fiduciary relationships and justice versus injustice--as they relate to social work practice and the 1996 revised NASW Code of Ethics. Mechanisms to reduce these ethical conflicts are presented. The obligation for social workers to participate in social action as a method of reducing injustices found in managed care environments is examined through the principle of distributive justice, egalitarianism, and the NASW Code of Ethics. PMID:10505280

Galambos, C

1999-08-01

226

[Economic evaluation and rationale for human health risk management decisions].  

PubMed

The priority task of human health maintenance and improvement is risk management using the new economic concepts based on the assessment of potential and real human risks from exposure to poor environmental factors and on the estimation of cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness ratios. The application of economic tools to manage a human risk makes it possible to assess various measures both as a whole and their individual priority areas, to rank different scenarios in terms of their effectiveness, to estimate costs per unit of risk reduction and benefit increase (damage decrease). PMID:21845769

Fokin, S G; Bobkova, T E

2011-01-01

227

[Economic evaluation and rationale for human health risk management decisions].  

PubMed

The priority task of human health maintenance and improvement is risk management using the new economic concepts based on the assessment of potential and real human risks from exposure to poor environmental factors and on the estimation of cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness ratios. The application of economic tools to manage a human risk makes it possible to assess various measures both as a whole and their individual priority areas, to rank different scenarios in terms of their effectiveness, to estimate costs per unit of risk reduction and benefit increase (damage decrease). PMID:21842745

Bobkova, T E; Fokin, S G

2011-01-01

228

Risk management assessment of Health Maintenance Organisations participating in the National Health Insurance Scheme  

PubMed Central

Background: The National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS), operated majorly in Nigeria by health maintenance organisations (HMOs), took off formally in June 2005. In view of the inherent risks in the operation of any social health insurance, it is necessary to efficiently manage these risks for sustainability of the scheme. Consequently the risk-management strategies deployed by HMOs need regular assessment. This study assessed the risk management in the Nigeria social health insurance scheme among HMOs. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 33 HMOs participating in the NHIS. Results: Utilisation of standard risk-management strategies by the HMOs was 11 (52.6%). The other risk-management strategies not utilised in the NHIS 10 (47.4%) were risk equalisation and reinsurance. As high as 11 (52.4%) of participating HMOs had a weak enrollee base (less than 30,000 and poor monthly premium and these impacted negatively on the HMOs such that a large percentage 12 (54.1%) were unable to meet up with their financial obligations. Most of the HMOs 15 (71.4%) participated in the Millennium development goal (MDG) maternal and child health insurance programme. Conclusions: Weak enrollee base and poor monthly premium predisposed the HMOs to financial risk which impacted negatively on the overall performance in service delivery in the NHIS, further worsened by the non-utilisation of risk equalisation and reinsurance as risk-management strategies in the NHIS. There is need to make the scheme compulsory and introduce risk equalisation and reinsurance.

Campbell, Princess Christina; Korie, Patrick Chukwuemeka; Nnaji, Feziechukwu Collins

2014-01-01

229

Study Protocol for the Fukushima Health Management Survey  

PubMed Central

Background The accidents that occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant after the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011 have resulted in long-term, ongoing anxiety among the residents of Fukushima, Japan. Soon after the disaster, Fukushima Prefecture launched the Fukushima Health Management Survey to investigate long-term low-dose radiation exposure caused by the accident. Fukushima Medical University took the lead in planning and implementing this survey. The primary purposes of this survey are to monitor the long-term health of residents, promote their future well-being, and confirm whether long-term low-dose radiation exposure has health effects. This report describes the rationale and implementation of the Fukushima Health Management Survey. Methods This cohort study enrolled all people living in Fukushima Prefecture after the earthquake and comprises a basic survey and 4 detailed surveys. The basic survey is to estimate levels of external radiation exposure among all 2.05 million residents. It should be noted that internal radiation levels were estimated by Fukushima Prefecture using whole-body counters. The detailed surveys comprise a thyroid ultrasound examination for all Fukushima children aged 18 years or younger, a comprehensive health check for all residents from the evacuation zones, an assessment of mental health and lifestyles of all residents from the evacuation zones, and recording of all pregnancies and births among all women in the prefecture who were pregnant on 11 March. All data have been entered into a database and will be used to support the residents and analyze the health effects of radiation. Conclusions The low response rate (<30%) to the basic survey complicates the estimation of health effects. There have been no cases of malignancy to date among 38 114 children who received thyroid ultrasound examinations. The importance of mental health care was revealed by the mental health and lifestyle survey and the pregnancy and birth survey. This long-term large-scale epidemiologic study is expected to provide valuable data in the investigation of the health effects of low-dose radiation and disaster-related stress. PMID:22955043

Yasumura, Seiji; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Yamashita, Shunichi; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi; Akashi, Makoto; Kodama, Kazunori; Ozasa, Kotaro

2012-01-01

230

Rumination and negative symptoms in schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Rumination is thought to be an important maintaining factor in depression. Depressive symptomatology is also a prominent feature in schizophrenia. However, little is known about the relationship between rumination and symptoms, such as depression and negative symptoms, in schizophrenia. The present study examined associations between rumination and symptoms in a group of 37 stable medicated patients with schizophrenia. All participants were clinically assessed on their symptoms and completed self-reported measures of depression and rumination. The findings showed that negative symptoms, especially emotional withdrawal and stereotyped thinking, but not depressive symptomatology, were associated with rumination in the present sample of patients with schizophrenia. If the findings are replicated, interventions that reduce rumination and rigid thinking might be helpful to reduce some negative symptoms of psychosis. PMID:19752652

Halari, Rozmin; Premkumar, Preethi; Farquharson, Lorna; Fannon, Dominic; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Kumari, Veena

2009-09-01

231

Opportunities for Launch Site Integrated System Health Engineering and Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The launch site processing flow involves operations such as functional verification, preflight servicing and launch. These operations often include hazards that must be controlled to protect human life and critical space hardware assets. Existing command and control capabilities are limited to simple limit checking durig automated monitoring. Contingency actions are highly dependent on human recognition, decision making, and execution. Many opportunities for Integrated System Health Engineering and Management (ISHEM) exist throughout the processing flow. This paper will present the current human-centered approach to health management as performed today for the shuttle and space station programs. In addition, it will address some of the more critical ISHEM needs, and provide recommendations for future implementation of ISHEM at the launch site.

Waterman, Robert D.; Langwost, Patricia E.; Waterman, Susan J.

2005-01-01

232

Managed Care and Provider Satisfaction in Mental Health Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

We assess the satisfaction of mental health providers using four dimensions from the medical practice literature—degree of\\u000a autonomy, relationship with patients, compensation, and administrative burden—and extend current work on professional satisfaction\\u000a to include frontline service providers rather than only psychiatrists or other physicians. In contrast to results reported\\u000a for primary care settings, we find that the impact of managed care

Kimberley R. Isett; Alan R. Ellis; Sharon Topping; Joseph P. Morrissey

2009-01-01

233

Corporate management of quality in employee health plans.  

PubMed

As large companies move their employees into managed care, they must concern themselves with the quality and price of their employees' health care. Based on a survey of Fortune 500 companies, we show that most are integrating several aspects of quality into their purchasing and contracting decisions by focusing on three dimensions--customer service, network composition, and clinical quality. Companies focus on the customer service dimension while the medical community emphasizes clinical quality. PMID:12638371

Maxwell, James; Temin, Peter

2003-01-01

234

Candidate technologies for the Integrated Health Management Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this report is to assess Vehicle Health Management (VHM) technologies for implementation as a demonstration. Extensive studies have been performed to determine technologies which could be implemented on the Atlas and Centaur vehicles as part of a bridging program. This paper discusses areas today where VHM can be implemented for benefits in reliability, performance, and cost reduction. VHM Options are identified and one demonstration is recommended for execution.

Johnson, Neal F.; Martin, Fred H.

1993-01-01

235

Brief report: adolescents' co-rumination with mothers, co-rumination with friends, and internalizing symptoms.  

PubMed

The current research examined co-rumination (extensively discussing, rehashing, and speculating about problems) with mothers and friends. Of interest was exploring whether adolescents who co-ruminate with mothers were especially likely to co-ruminate with friends as well as the interplay among co-rumination with mothers, co-rumination with friends, and anxious/depressed symptoms. Early- to mid-adolescents (N = 393) reported on co-rumination and normative self-disclosure with mothers and friends and on their internalizing symptoms in this cross-sectional study. Co-rumination with mothers (but not normative self-disclosure) was concurrently associated with adolescents' co-rumination with friends. In addition, the relation between co-rumination with mothers and adolescents' anxious/depressed symptoms reported previously (Waller & Rose, 2010) became non-significant when co-rumination with friends was statistically controlled. This suggests that the relation between friendship co-rumination and anxious/depressed symptoms may help explain the relation between mother-child co-rumination and anxious/depressed symptoms. Potential implications for promoting adolescents' well-being are discussed. PMID:23398818

Waller, Erika M; Rose, Amanda J

2013-04-01

236

Factors Influencing Students to Enroll in Health Information Management Programs  

PubMed Central

This nonexperimental quantitative descriptive-correlative research study was performed to describe the sources with the greatest influence on the participants’ decision to enroll in a postsecondary educational program with the intent of working toward a career in health information management. Participants were asked, “Which sources have the greatest influence on an individual's decision to enroll in a postsecondary educational program with the intent of working toward a career in health information management (HIM)?” The study population was composed of matriculated students enrolled in accredited postsecondary schools offering an undergraduate medical billing and coding program at a brick-and-mortar campus in a two-county area of a South Atlantic state. The study found that an environmental source, specifically career job opportunities, was statistically significant as the greatest source of influence for these participants. This research aims to support efforts to provide the health information management subsector of the healthcare industry with a sufficient number of trained professionals to fill the identified need for trained HIM professionals, particularly medical coding specialists. PMID:22783152

Safian, Shelley C.

2012-01-01

237

Factors influencing students to enroll in health information management programs.  

PubMed

This nonexperimental quantitative descriptive-correlative research study was performed to describe the sources with the greatest influence on the participants' decision to enroll in a postsecondary educational program with the intent of working toward a career in health information management. Participants were asked, "Which sources have the greatest influence on an individual's decision to enroll in a postsecondary educational program with the intent of working toward a career in health information management (HIM)?" The study population was composed of matriculated students enrolled in accredited postsecondary schools offering an undergraduate medical billing and coding program at a brick-and-mortar campus in a two-county area of a South Atlantic state. The study found that an environmental source, specifically career job opportunities, was statistically significant as the greatest source of influence for these participants. This research aims to support efforts to provide the health information management subsector of the healthcare industry with a sufficient number of trained professionals to fill the identified need for trained HIM professionals, particularly medical coding specialists. PMID:22783152

Safian, Shelley C

2012-01-01

238

IVHM Framework for Intelligent Integration for Vehicle Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) systems for aerospace vehicles, is the process of assessing, preserving, and restoring system functionality across flight and techniques with sensor and communication technologies for spacecraft that can generate responses through detection, diagnosis, reasoning, and adapt to system faults in support of Integrated Intelligent Vehicle Management (IIVM). These real-time responses allow the IIVM to modify the affected vehicle subsystem(s) prior to a catastrophic event. Furthermore, this framework integrates technologies which can provide a continuous, intelligent, and adaptive health state of a vehicle and use this information to improve safety and reduce costs of operations. Recent investments in avionics, health management, and controls have been directed towards IIVM. As this concept has matured, it has become clear that IIVM requires the same sensors and processing capabilities as the real-time avionics functions to support diagnosis of subsystem problems. New sensors have been proposed, in addition to augment the avionics sensors to support better system monitoring and diagnostics. As the designs have been considered, a synergy has been realized where the real-time avionics can utilize sensors proposed for diagnostics and prognostics to make better real-time decisions in response to detected failures. IIVM provides for a single system allowing modularity of functions and hardware across the vehicle. The framework that supports IIVM consists of 11 major on-board functions necessary to fully manage a space vehicle maintaining crew safety and mission objectives. These systems include the following: Guidance and Navigation; Communications and Tracking; Vehicle Monitoring; Information Transport and Integration; Vehicle Diagnostics; Vehicle Prognostics; Vehicle Mission Planning, Automated Repair and Replacement; Vehicle Control; Human Computer Interface; and Onboard Verification and Validation. Furthermore, the presented framework provides complete vehicle management which not only allows for increased crew safety and mission success through new intelligence capabilities, but also yields a mechanism for more efficient vehicle operations.

Paris, Deidre; Trevino, Luis C.; Watson, Michael D.

2005-01-01

239

Snout Shape in Extant Ruminants  

PubMed Central

Snout shape is a prominent aspect of herbivore feeding ecology, interacting with both forage selectivity and intake rate. Previous investigations have suggested ruminant feeding styles can be discriminated via snout shape, with grazing and browsing species characterised by ‘blunt’ and ‘pointed’ snouts respectively, often with specification of an ‘intermediate’ sub-grouping to represent ambiguous feeding styles and/or morphologies. Snout shape morphology is analysed here using a geometric morphometric approach to compare the two-dimensional profiles of the premaxilla in ventral aspect for a large sample of modern ruminant species, for which feeding modes are known from secondary criteria. Results suggest that, when browsing and grazing ruminants are classified ecologically based on a range of feeding style indicators, they cannot be discriminated unambiguously on the basis of snout profile shape alone. Profile shapes in our sample form a continuum with substantial overlap between groupings and a diverse range of morphologies. Nevertheless, we obtained an 83.8 percent ratio of correct post hoc feeding style categorisations based on the proximity of projected profile shapes to group centroids in the discriminant space. Accordingly, this procedure for identifying species whose feeding strategy is ‘unknown’ can be used with a reasonable degree of confidence, especially if backed-up by additional information. Based on these results we also refine the definitions of snout shape varieties, taking advantage of the descriptive power that geometric morphometrics offers to characterize the morphological disparities observed. The shape variance exhibited by both browsing and grazing ruminants corresponds strongly to body mass, providing further evidence for an interaction between snout shape, feeding style, and body size evolution. Finally, by exploring the role of phylogenetic similarity in snout shape, we find a slight increase in successful categorisation when repeating the analysis with phylogenetic control on the geometric profiles. PMID:25372878

Tennant, Jonathan P.; MacLeod, Norman

2014-01-01

240

Submitted to the International Journal of Health Planning and Management, June 2011 Mental Health in France, Policies and Actors  

E-print Network

1 Submitted to the International Journal of Health Planning and Management, June 2011 Mental Health) ; Nicolas Daumerie (CCOMS, Lille) ; Jean-Luc Roelandt (CCOMS, Lille) SUMMARY : The new mental health care the 2000s: the emphasis is shifting from psychiatry to mental health care. This shift focuses mainly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

241

Regional analysis of functions and demographics of health information managers.  

PubMed

Based on the findings of this study, HIM professionals' tasks or functions tend to vary across regions and in relation to levels of experience. As experience increased for RRAs, the task performed by them tended to be more management related. All other HIM professionals performed tasks that were more related to data collection than management. The most frequent title for the RRA (Director/manager/chief of medical records or HIM) was also more related to management activities while the title for the ART (Coder) was directly related to data collection. The majority of all HIM professionals work in acute care with approximately 3-8 percent working in long term care, ambulatory care, mental health care, and other healthcare settings such as software companies or health departments. The two most important predictors of salary across all regions were years of experience and educational level. When experience and education were controlled for, there was a slight salary advantage for males in the Midwest and West regions. PMID:10163162

Watzlaf, V J; Rudman, W; Abdelhak, M; Anania-Firouzan, P; Rubinstein, E

1996-01-01

242

Managing corporate governance risks in a nonprofit health care organization.  

PubMed

Triggered by corporate scandals, there is increased oversight by governmental bodies and in part by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Corporations are developing corporate governance compliance initiatives to respond to the scrutiny of regulators, legislators, the general public and constituency groups such as investors. Due to state attorney general initiatives, new legislation and heightened oversight from the Internal Revenue Service, nonprofit entities are starting to share the media spotlight with their for-profit counterparts. These developments are changing nonprofit health care organizations as well as the traditional role of the risk manager. No longer is the risk manager focused solely on patients' welfare and safe passage through a complex delivery system. The risk manager must be aware of corporate practices within the organization that could allow the personal objectives of a few individuals to override the greater good of the community in which the nonprofit organization serves. PMID:20200865

Troyer, Glenn T; Brashear, Andrea D; Green, Kelly J

2005-01-01

243

Management of Frontotemporal Dementia in Mental Health and Multidisciplinary Settings  

PubMed Central

Diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in the mental health setting and issues pertaining to longitudinal care of this population in a specialty clinic are reviewed. FTD is often misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder, most commonly as a mood disorder. FTD has features that overlap with those of major depression, mania, obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia. We describe these features and how to differentiate FTD from these psychiatric disorders. This paper also describes practical issues in the management of FTD, specifically the issues that clinicians, patients and their families face in managing this disease. Areas of clinical care along the continuum are explored; FTD care involves collaborative management of symptoms and disability, and assisting patients and families in adapting to the disease. PMID:23611352

Wylie, Mary Anne; Shnall, Adriana; Onyike, Chiadi U.; Huey, Edward D.

2014-01-01

244

Rumination mediates the association between cyber-victimization and depressive symptoms.  

PubMed

The current study examined the 3-week prospective associations between cyber-victimization and both depressive symptoms and rumination. In addition, a mediation model was tested, wherein rumination mediated the association between cyber-victimization and depressive symptoms. Participants (N = 565 college-age young adults) completed online surveys at two time points 3 weeks apart. Results indicated that cyber-victimization was associated with increases in both depressive symptoms and rumination over time. Furthermore, results of the path analysis indicated that cyber-victimization was associated with increases in rumination over time, which were then associated with greater depressive symptoms, providing support for the proposed mediation effect for women, but not men. Findings extend previous correlational findings by demonstrating that cyber-victimization is associated with increases in symptomatology over time. Findings also suggest that the negative consequences of cyber-victimization extend beyond mental health problems to maladaptive emotion regulation. In fact, rumination may be a mechanism through which cyber-victimization influences mental health problems, at least for women. Mental health professionals are encouraged to assess cyber-victimization as part of standard victimization assessments and to consider targeting maladaptive emotion regulation in addition to mental health problems in clients who have experienced cyber-victimization. PMID:24346650

Feinstein, Brian A; Bhatia, Vickie; Davila, Joanne

2014-06-01

245

The importance of human resources management in health care: a global context  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This paper addresses the health care system from a global perspective and the importance of human resources management (HRM) in improving overall patient health outcomes and delivery of health care services. METHODS: We explored the published literature and collected data through secondary sources. RESULTS: Various key success factors emerge that clearly affect health care practices and human resources management.

Stefane M. Kabene; Carole Orchard; John M. Howard; Mark A. Soriano; Raymond Leduc

2006-01-01

246

Health information management using optical storage technology: case studies.  

PubMed

All the health care facilities examined in the case studies addressed several important organizational issues before and during the installation of their systems. All the facilities examined employee commitment. The prudent managers considered how easily their employees adapt to changes in their jobs and work environment. They considered how enthusiastic cooperation can be fostered in the creation of a liberated and reengineered office. This was determined not only by each individual's reaction to change, but also by the health care facility's track record with other system installations. For example, document image, diagnostic image, and coded data processing systems allow the integration of divergent health care information systems within complex institutions. Unfortunately, many institutions are currently struggling with how to create an information management architecture that will integrate their mature systems, such as their patient care and financial systems. Information managers must realize that if optical storage technology-based systems are used in a strategic and planned fashion, these systems can act as focal points for systems integration, not as promises to further confuse the issue. Another issue that needed attention in all the examples was the work environment. The managers considered how the work environment was going to affect the ability to integrate optical image and data systems into the institution. For example, many of these medical centers have created alliances with clinics, HMOs, and large corporate users of medical services. This created a demand for all or part of the health information outside the confines of the original institution. Since the work environment is composed of a handful of factors such as merged medical services, as many work environment factors as possible were addressed before application of the optical storage technology solution in the institutions. And finally, the third critical issue was the organization of work. "Organizations that understand their business processes are having no trouble whatsoever justifying the cost of optical storage-based information management systems," said Thornton May, director of imaging research at Nolan Norton Institute. "It is only confusing to organizations that do not have a feel for what is happening in the flow of work in the company. If an organization has on-line performance measurements with regard to time, cost, quality, error rates, and customer service, the move to optical image and data management technology is a no-brainer."(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:10119028

Kohn, D

1992-05-01

247

Examining the Role of Anxiety and Apathy in Health Consumers' Intentions to Use Patient Health Portals for Personal Health Information Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated college students' attitudes toward and intentions to use personal health portals (PHPs) for managing their personal health information using a survey method. The study also aimed to examine the roles electronic Personal Health Information Management (PHIM) anxiety and apathy play in influencing students' attitudes toward…

Torres, Carlos A.

2011-01-01

248

Developing health informatics as a recognised professional domain supporting clinical and health management activity.  

PubMed

This paper puts forward a case for use of the term "health informatics" to be deployed as a catalyst to collective recognition of the contribution that technology, information handling and decision support can provide to effective health care internationally. It cautions against disregarding the impact that the collective 'health informatics' may have on cohesion and recognition across the specialist clinical areas, management sectors and diverse professions involved in specialist areas. It also recognises that commonality of standards and consistency of protocols can be identified in many of the technical and clinical specialist areas, confirming the basis for a collective term. Having looked at potentially generic factors in the development of both a learned society and professional regulation body in the UK, the paper concludes that without recognition of the collective term "health informatics" there will be an grossy extended time frame before any of those working in this area gain the recognition and respect of a formal discipline. PMID:17396757

Roberts, Jean

2006-01-01

249

Health Management Information System in Leprosy Control Programme.  

PubMed

Health Management Information System was introduced methodically and enforced with ruthless punctuality in Maharashtra State from April 1981. It has paid excellent dividends so far as the implementation of the National Leprosy Control Programme is concerned. Key indicators have been fixed for new case detection, bacteriological examination, regularity of treatment and screening of old patients for activity status. Monitoring of these activities is done regularly and a feed back is provided. Marks are assigned for each kidney indicator and ranking is done based on the achievement of targets by each district, Municipal Corporation, Health Circle etc., every month. The same procedure is adopted at Primary Health Centre and even lower level. This has introduced a spirit of competition and generated a desire to better one's own performance by identifying and removing deficiencies. Maximum assistance is being derived from the Primary Health Care and use is being made of Multi Purpose Workers, Community Health Volunteers and other anciliary agencies in case finding and case holding programmes. The improvement in performance in respect of all key indicators during 1981-82 has been between 40 and 60 percent over the performance during 1980-81. PMID:6384383

Yellapurkar, M V

1984-01-01

250

Health economics of weight management: evidence and cost.  

PubMed

The World Health Organization estimates that around one billion people throughout the world are overweight and that over 300 million of these are obese and if current trends continue, the number of overweight persons will increase to 1.5 billion by 2015. The number of obese adults in Australia is estimated to have risen from 2.0 million in 1992/93 to 3.1 million in 2005. The prevalence of obesity has been increasing due to a convergence of factors--the rise of TV viewing, our preference for takeaway and pre-prepared foods, the trend towards more computer-bound sedentary jobs, and fewer opportunities for sport and physical exercise. Obesity is not only linked to lack of self esteem, social and work discrimination, but also to illnesses such as the metabolic syndrome and hyperinsulinaemia (which increases the risk of developing heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, fatty liver), cancer, asthma, dementia, arthritis and kidney disease. It has been estimated that the cost of obesity in Australia in 2005 was $1,721 million. Of this amount, $1,084 million were direct health costs, and $637 million indirect health costs (due to lost work productivity, absenteeism and unemployment). The prevalence cost per year for each obese adult has been estimated at $554 and the value of an obesity cure is about $6,903 per obese person. Government efforts at reducing the burden remain inadequate and a more radical approach is needed. The Australian government, for example, has made changes to Medicare so that GPs can refer people with chronic illness due to obesity to an exercise physiologist and dietitian and receive a Medicare rebate, but so far these measures are having no perceptible effect on obesity levels. There is a growing recognition that both Public Health and Clinical approaches, and Private and Public resources, need to be brought to this growing problem. Australian health economist, Paul Gross, from the Institute of Health Economics and Technology Assessment claims there is too much reliance on health workers to treat the problem, especially doctors, who have not been given additional resources to manage obesity outside a typical doctor's consultation. Gross has recommended that further changes should be made to Medicare, private health insurance, and workplace and tax legislation to give people financial incentives to change their behaviour because obesity should not just be treated by governments as a public health problem but also as a barrier to productivity and a drain on resources. A Special Report of the WMCACA (Weight Management Code Administration Council of Australia) (www.weightcouncil.org) on the "Health Economics of Weight Management" has been published in the Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition in September 2006. This report explores the cost benefit analysis of weight management in greater detail. PMID:17392129

Kouris-Blazos, Antigone; Wahlqvist, Mark L

2007-01-01

251

Personal health information management system and its application in referral management.  

PubMed

We developed a web-based personal health record (PHR) that can be used by patients to collect and manage their health information (e.g., medical history, past surgeries, medications, and allergies), to request self-referrals, and to store a record of their consultations. The PHR also includes a messaging system that can be structured into the workflow of referral management as well as allowing more general communications. A preliminary study was conducted with 61 patients. Thirty-two patients completed a survey in which 85% of respondents were satisfied with the usability and 94% were satisfied with the overall online referral process. The consulting physicians were satisfied with the content of subjects' personal health information and referral problem descriptions and found the information detailed enough to triage all requested referrals. Patients, physicians, and patient care coordinators reported that their communications were enhanced by the system and found the messaging component convenient to use. PMID:15484434

Wang, Maisie; Lau, Christopher; Matsen, Frederick A; Kim, Yongmin

2004-09-01

252

Rethinking health: ICT-enabled services to empower people to manage their health.  

PubMed

Lifestyle is a key determinant in the prevention and management of chronic diseases. If we would exercise regularly, eat healthy, control our weight, sleep enough, manage stress, not smoke and use alcohol only moderately, 90% of type II diabetes, 80% of coronary heart disease, and 70% of stroke could be prevented. Health statistics show that lifestyle related diseases are increasing at an alarming rate. Public health promotion campaigns and healthcare together are not effective enough to stop this "tsunami". The solution that is offered is to empower people to manage their health with the assistance of ICT-enabled services. A lot of R&D and engineering effort is being invested in Personal Health Systems. Although some progress has been made, the market for such systems has not yet emerged. The aim of this critical review is to identify the barriers which are holding back the growth of the market. It looks into the theoretical foundations of behavior change support, the maturity of the technologies for behavior change support, and the business context in which behavior change support systems are used. PMID:22273795

Honka, Anita; Kaipainen, Kirsikka; Hietala, Henri; Saranummi, Niilo

2011-01-01

253

Agricultural Pesticide Management in Thailand: Situation and Population Health Risk.  

PubMed

As an agricultural country and one of the world's major food exporters, Thailand relies heavily on the use of pesticides to protect crops and increase yields. During the past decade, the Kingdom of Thailand has experienced an approximate four-fold increase in pesticide use. This increase presents a challenge for the Royal Thai Government in effectively managing and controlling pesticide use based upon the current policies and legal infrastructure. We have reviewed several key components for managing agricultural pesticides in Thailand. One of the main obstacles to effective pesticide regulation in Thailand is the lack of a consolidated, uniform system designed specifically for pesticide management. This deficit has weakened the enforcement of existing regulations, resulting in misuse/overuse of pesticides, and consequently, increased environmental contamination and human exposure. This article provides a systematic review of how agricultural pesticides are regulated in Thailand. In addition, we provide our perspectives on the current state of pesticide management, the potential health effects of widespread, largely uncontrolled use of pesticides on the Thai people and ways to improve pesticide management in Thailand. PMID:22308095

Panuwet, Parinya; Siriwong, Wattasit; Prapamontol, Tippawan; Ryan, P Barry; Fiedler, Nancy; Robson, Mark G; Barr, Dana Boyd

2012-03-01

254

Exploring the Model Design Space for Battery Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Battery Health Management (BHM) is a core enabling technology for the success and widespread adoption of the emerging electric vehicles of today. Although battery chemistries have been studied in detail in literature, an accurate run-time battery life prediction algorithm has eluded us. Current reliability-based techniques are insufficient to manage the use of such batteries when they are an active power source with frequently varying loads in uncertain environments. The amount of usable charge of a battery for a given discharge profile is not only dependent on the starting state-of-charge (SOC), but also other factors like battery health and the discharge or load profile imposed. This paper presents a Particle Filter (PF) based BHM framework with plug-and-play modules for battery models and uncertainty management. The batteries are modeled at three different levels of granularity with associated uncertainty distributions, encoding the basic electrochemical processes of a Lithium-polymer battery. The effects of different choices in the model design space are explored in the context of prediction performance in an electric unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) application with emulated flight profiles.

Saha, Bhaskar; Quach, Cuong Chi; Goebel, Kai Frank

2011-01-01

255

Technology management: case study of an integrated health system.  

PubMed

Technology management has assumed a role of vital importance in today's health care environment. Capital reserves and operating income have been stretched by pervasive and expensive technologies, while overall reimbursement has been reduced. It is imperative for hospitals to develop and consistently use technology management processes that begin prior to a technology's introduction in the hospital and continue throughout its life cycle. At Samaritan Health System (SHS), an integrated health care delivery system based in Phoenix, technology management provides tools to improve decision making and assist in the system's integration strategy as well as control expenses. SHS uses a systemwide technology-specific plan to guide acquisition and/or funding decisions. This plan describes how particular technologies can help achieve SHS' organizational goals such as promoting system integration and/or improving patient outcomes while providing good economic value. After technologies are targeted in this systemwide plan they are prioritized using a two-stage capital prioritization process. The first stage of the capital prioritization process considers the quantitative and qualitative factors critical for equitable capital distribution across the system. The second stage develops a sense of ownership among the parties that affect and are affected by the allocation at a facility level. This process promotes an efficient, effective, equitable, and defensible approach to resource allocation and technology decision making. Minimizing equipment maintenance expenditures is also an integral part of technology management at SHS. The keys to reducing maintenance expenditures are having a process in place that supports a routine fiscal evaluation of maintenance coverage options and ensuring that manufacturers are obligated to provide critical maintenance resources at the time of equipment purchase. Maintenance service options under consideration in this report include full-service contracts with the manufacturer, insurance coverage, time and materials, and independent service vendors/in-house support. Careful consideration of all the ramifications of each option is warranted because there are substantial cost differences among these methods. At SHS, technology management efforts resulted in equipment purchases and maintenance negotiations representing savings of more than $1.5 million in a single year. SHS undertakes an intensive review of purchases and maintenance expenditures, using the techniques described in this report, with the objective of reducing expenses by 10% per year. This report describes the technology management methods that SHS uses to achieve these results. PMID:10139509

Dahl, D H; McFarlan, T K

1994-12-01

256

Exploring changes in world ruminant production systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the past 30 years world production of ruminant meat and milk has increased by about 40%, while the global area of grassland has increased by only 4%. This is because most of the increase in ruminant meat and milk production has been achieved by increasing the production in mixed and landless production systems and much less so in pastoral

A. F. Bouwman; K. W. Van der Hoek; B. Eickhout; I. Soenario

2005-01-01

257

Review article Ruminant milk fat plasticity  

E-print Network

Review article Ruminant milk fat plasticity: nutritional control of saturated, polyunsaturated effects of diet on ruminant milk fat composition. Special attention is given to fatty acids that could:5, C22:5 and C22:6, from the duodenum to the milk, is reviewed. The main dietary factors taken

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

258

Lactation physiology: A ruminant animal perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Importance of peripubertal mammary development as a foundation for subsequent mammary growth and milk production was discussed. Morphological differences in peripubertal mammary growth in rodents and ruminants were described. The relevance of tissue interactions and association with hormones and growth factors in mammary development were delineated. Data from specific studies with ruminant mammary parenchyma were outlined for comparison with

R. M. Akers

1990-01-01

259

College of Public Health & Health Professions Department of Health Services Research, Management and Policy  

E-print Network

Cynthia M. Toth, MBA, MHA Work: Independent HealthCare Consultant 6939 SW 107th Avenue Gainesville, FL effectively as a personally accountable member of a professional work team. UF ­ MHA Targeted Competencies 1

Kane, Andrew S.

260

Master's Degree in Agriculture Plant Health Management Option Option Title: Master of Science (MS) in Agriculture: Plant Health  

E-print Network

Master's Degree in Agriculture ­ Plant Health Management Option Option Title: Master of Science (MS) in Agriculture: Plant Health Management Department(s) or Program(s): Supported of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences (CAHNRS) Contact Name: Dr. Kim Kidwell, Director MS

Collins, Gary S.

261

Demographics, management and health of donkeys in the UK.  

PubMed

In this paper, the management and health problems of donkeys on loan to independent carers from The Donkey Sanctuary are characterised, and the demographics of the UK's donkey population are described using data from a variety of sources. All carers that fostered a donkey from The Donkey Sanctuary between September 2004 and August 2005 (1432 donkeys) were surveyed using a postal questionnaire requesting information about the donkey, its premises, daily care, health and preventive medicine. The response rate was 77.8 percent. The mean (sd) age of the donkeys was 20.8 (7.4) years. The majority (92 percent) of the donkeys were kept as pets. Approximately one-third (33.6 percent) of the donkeys were overweight. The most common medical problems were hoof, dermal and oral problems. A total of 86 percent of the donkeys had a dental examination at least every 12 months, and at least 45 percent had at least one dental problem. PMID:20435979

Cox, R; Burden, F; Proudman, C J; Trawford, A F; Pinchbeck, G L

2010-05-01

262

Integrated System Health Management: Foundational Concepts, Approach, and Implementation.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Implementation of integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. It is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive to an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. We present concepts, procedures, and a specific approach as a foundation for implementing a credible ISHM capability. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system. The intent is also to make possible implementation of on-board ISHM capability, in contrast to a remote capability. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems (rocket engine test facilities). The paper will address the following topics: 1. ISHM Model of a system 2. Detection of anomaly indicators. 3. Determination and confirmation of anomalies. 4. Diagnostic of causes and determination of effects. 5. Consistency checking cycle. 6. Management of health information 7. User Interfaces 8. Example implementation ISHM has been defined from many perspectives. We define it as a capability that might be achieved by various approaches. We describe a specific approach that has been matured throughout many years of development, and pilot implementations. ISHM is a capability that is achieved by integrating data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) that might be distributed throughout the system elements (which inherently implies capability to manage DIaK associated with distributed sub-systems). DIaK must be available to any element of a system at the right time and in accordance with a meaningful context. ISHM Functional Capability Level (FCL) is measured by how well a system performs the following functions: (1) detect anomalies, (2) diagnose causes, (3) predict future anomalies/failures, and (4) provide the user with an integrated awareness about the condition of every element in the system and guide user decisions.

Figueroa, Fernando; Schmalzel, John; Walker, Mark; Venkatesh, Meera; Kapadia, Ravi; Morris, Jon; Turowski, Mark; Smith, Harvey

2009-01-01

263

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable waste management practices. The HASP is written to make use of past experience and best management practices to eliminate or minimize hazards to workers or the environment from events such as fires, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release to the environment.

Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

2008-04-21

264

Contrle hormonal du mtabolisme hpatique chez les ruminants  

E-print Network

, France. Summary. Hormonal control of hepatic metabolism in ruminants. Insulin/glucagon control of hepatic messenger molecu- les. Liver uptake of insulin and glucagon mainly accounts for high metabolic clearance rates of these hormones in both ruminants and non-ruminants. Glucagon infusion into ruminants results

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

265

Development of Structural Health Management Technology for Aerospace Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of the overall goal of developing Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) systems for aerospace vehicles, NASA has focused considerable resources on the development of technologies for Structural Health Management (SHM). The motivations for these efforts are to increase the safety and reliability of aerospace structural systems, while at the same time decreasing operating and maintenance costs. Research and development of SHM technologies has been supported under a variety of programs for both aircraft and spacecraft including the Space Launch Initiative, X-33, Next Generation Launch Technology, and Aviation Safety Program. The major focus of much of the research to date has been on the development and testing of sensor technologies. A wide range of sensor technologies are under consideration including fiber-optic sensors, active and passive acoustic sensors, electromagnetic sensors, wireless sensing systems, MEMS, and nanosensors. Because of their numerous advantages for aerospace applications, most notably being extremely light weight, fiber-optic sensors are one of the leading candidates and have received considerable attention.

Prosser, W. H.

2003-01-01

266

Rocket Engine Health Management: Early Definition of Critical Flight Measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA led Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program has established key requirements related to safety, reliability, launch availability and operations cost to be met by the next generation of reusable launch vehicles. Key to meeting these requirements will be an integrated vehicle health management ( M) system that includes sensors, harnesses, software, memory, and processors. Such a system must be integrated across all the vehicle subsystems and meet component, subsystem, and system requirements relative to fault detection, fault isolation, and false alarm rate. The purpose of this activity is to evolve techniques for defining critical flight engine system measurements-early within the definition of an engine health management system (EHMS). Two approaches, performance-based and failure mode-based, are integrated to provide a proposed set of measurements to be collected. This integrated approach is applied to MSFC s MC-1 engine. Early identification of measurements supports early identification of candidate sensor systems whose design and impacts to the engine components must be considered in engine design.

Christenson, Rick L.; Nelson, Michael A.; Butas, John P.

2003-01-01

267

[Results of herd health management in veal calf production].  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to document experience gained with herd health management in veal calf production and to describe the calves' most frequent health problems. Fifteen farms with an 'all-in-all-out' animal flow system and 20 farms with a continuous animal flow system were investigated and data on animal movements, housing, feeding, medical treatments, and management were collected. Cadavers underwent pathological examination, and data were recorded from the carcasses of slaughtered calves. On the 15 'all-in-all-out'-farms, 2'747 calves were clinically examined by the contract-veterinarian upon arrival at the farm, and 71,1 % of the calves showed at least one sign of illness. The main causes of death were with 54,9 % digestive disorders (a perforating abomasal ulcer being the most frequent diagnosis), followed by respiratory diseases (29,6 %, mainly pneumonia). The meat color of 25 % of the carcasses was red. Calves from farms with the continuous animal flow system, which recruit mainly animals originating from the same farm, showed significantly better results regarding antibiotic use, performance and carcass quality than those calves from farms with the 'all-in-all-out'-system. PMID:22753251

Luginbühl, A; Bähler, C; Steiner, A; Kaufmann, Th; Regula, G; Ewy, A

2012-07-01

268

Automation of a Comprehensive County Health Unit Management System  

PubMed Central

This paper describes the conceptualization, development, and implementation of a statewide management system for local health services operations in Florida. It discusses the rationale for a uniform statewide program; the structural organization of programs and services; information linkages between services, clients, providers and service facilities; information flow patterns from the source through automated data processes to production of output reports and analyses; and policies and procedures required to develop and implement the system. Benefits of the system include: 1) a mechanism for service delivery units to monitor and evaluate program effectiveness via measurement of process and outcome objectives, 2) production of accurate and reliable information required for tracking state and federal categorical programs, 3) development of personnel time and service profiles, and 4) initiation of billing and reimbursement processes for specific federal programs. Future plans and expectations include utilization of the system's data base to develop workload and staffing standards and measures, evaluate program impact on the health status of individual clients, develop program expenditure profiles, and develop related management and analytical applications.

Bigler, W. J.; Mittan, J. B.; Wisthuff, R. R.

1981-01-01

269

Integrated System Health Management: Foundational Concepts, Approach, and Implementation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A sound basis to guide the community in the conception and implementation of ISHM (Integrated System Health Management) capability in operational systems was provided. The concept of "ISHM Model of a System" and a related architecture defined as a unique Data, Information, and Knowledge (DIaK) architecture were described. The ISHM architecture is independent of the typical system architecture, which is based on grouping physical elements that are assembled to make up a subsystem, and subsystems combine to form systems, etc. It was emphasized that ISHM capability needs to be implemented first at a low functional capability level (FCL), or limited ability to detect anomalies, diagnose, determine consequences, etc. As algorithms and tools to augment or improve the FCL are identified, they should be incorporated into the system. This means that the architecture, DIaK management, and software, must be modular and standards-based, in order to enable systematic augmentation of FCL (no ad-hoc modifications). A set of technologies (and tools) needed to implement ISHM were described. One essential tool is a software environment to create the ISHM Model. The software environment encapsulates DIaK, and an infrastructure to focus DIaK on determining health (detect anomalies, determine causes, determine effects, and provide integrated awareness of the system to the operator). The environment includes gateways to communicate in accordance to standards, specially the IEEE 1451.1 Standard for Smart Sensors and Actuators.

Figueroa, Fernando

2009-01-01

270

Accelerated life tests for prognostic and health management of MEMS devices  

E-print Network

. These tasks can be performed within Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) framework. This paper presents are then combined and used to monitor the microgripper, assess its health state and estimate its Remaining UsefulAccelerated life tests for prognostic and health management of MEMS devices Haithem Skima, Kamal

Boyer, Edmond

271

MSc/PgDip Global Health and Management Student Information booklet  

E-print Network

an introduction to global health using digital technologies and social media � Students who opt to take the SecondMSc/PgDip Global Health and Management Student Information booklet Work based placements Providing opportunities for MSc Global Health & Management students to engage with organisations to undertake meaningful

Levi, Ran

272

Assurance of Learning Assessment Matrix -MS Health Care Management Learning Goals Learning Objectives Assessment/Assignment  

E-print Network

Assurance of Learning Assessment Matrix - MS Health Care Management Learning Goals Learning Objectives Assessment/Assignment Understand and master core concepts and methods in the health care concepts and tools in the health care management discipline to develop integrated and innovative strategies

Niebur, Ernst

273

Understanding the context of workplace health management as it relates to workplace bullying  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to extend awareness that workplace bullying impacts on the health of individuals both within and outside the workplace and that there are implications for workplace health management. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper contextualises the problem of workplace bullying and workplace health management and introduces the five articles in the special issue. Findings –

Michael Sheehan; John Griffiths

2011-01-01

274

Herd Health Management What are the diseases and parasites that South Florida  

E-print Network

and productivity. Many animal health problems can be controlled with good management, proper nutrition you to Merial Animal Health for sponsoring our 2013 Herd Health Management Program. #12;Registration to control parasites and vaccinate for disease prevention? Many ranchers are asking these questions during

Watson, Craig A.

275

Lessons learned in public health emergency management: personal reflections.  

PubMed

Multiple environmental, ecological, and socio-political forces are converging to increase the occurrence of both natural and technological disasters. Ten forces are of most concern in this regard. These are: 1) global warming, with its consequent weather extremes and climate changes; 2) continued rapid human population growth and concomitant increased urbanization; 3) decreased bio-diversity and consequent ecological fragility; 4) deforestation and loss of natural habitat for animal species, with resultant greater overlap of human and animal habitats, human exposure to animal pathogens, and other ecological perturbations; 5) increased technological development throughout the world (especially in developing countries with their typically immature safety programs); 6) globalization and increased population mobility; 7) sub-national religious and ethnic conflicts, and their potential for conflict escalation and large scale displacement of populations; 8) the collapse of several major countries and consequent unraveling of national identity and social order; 9) the rise of terrorism; and 10) dramatic advances in the science and technology of computing, communications, biotechnology, and genomics. This paper describes 10 lessons learned relative to the public health aspects of emergency management, especially as they pertain to disasters. 1) Planning pays; 2) A bad situation can be made worse by inappropriate responses; 3) Most life saving interventions will occur before the disaster happens and immediately afterwards by local action; 4) Public health emergency management is not a democratic process; 5) Psychological impacts are usually greater than anticipated; 6) Communications and information management are vital, but often are the weak link in the response chain; 7) Collaboration and partnerships are essential; 8) Unsolicited volunteers and aid are inevitable and must be planned for and managed; 9) Never assume anything, and always expect the unexpected; and 10) Post-event evaluation is important, and must be coordinated. The paramount lesson learned from past emergencies is that the untoward impact of these events can be anticipated and significantly ameliorated by appropriate planning and preparation. On the other hand, preparation for emergency events has deteriorated because of health-care financial constraints, and resources to support planning and needed infrastructure have diminished. Given these realities, the major unresolved challenge is how to ensure that planning for the common good is supported and, in fact, gets done. PMID:11227611

Kizer, K W

2000-01-01

276

Project TEAMS (Techniques and Education for Achieving Management Skills): Health Care Administrators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These Project TEAMS (Techniques and Education for Achieving Management Skills) instructional materials consist of five units for use in training health care administrators. Unit 1 contains materials designed to help the health care administrators increase their management skills in regard to self-awareness, time management, problem solving,…

Platte Technical Community Coll., Columbus, NE.

277

The research status of complex system integrated health management system (CSIHM) architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complex system integrated health management (CSIHM) technology is developed from the fault detecting, isolation and reconfiguration (FDIR) technology; which is the integrated application of the advanced reasoning technology, artificial intelligence technology, sensor technology and information management technology. CSIHM can effectively manage the health states of many kinds of complex system for reducing the maintenance cost of an overall system and

Li Yi-bo; Li Bing; Zhang Sen-yue; Gao Yun-hong

2007-01-01

278

Secure Knowledge Management for Health Care Organizations Authors: D.Mundy, D.W.Chadwick  

E-print Network

Secure Knowledge Management for Health Care Organizations Authors: D.Mundy, D.W.Chadwick Abstract As the health care industry enters the era of knowledge management it must place security at the foundation of the transition. Risks are pervasive to every aspect of information and knowledge management. Without secure

Kent, University of

279

Financial Performance of Health Plans in Medicaid Managed Care  

PubMed Central

Objective This study assesses the financial performance of health plans that enroll Medicaid members across the key plan traits, specifically Medicaid dominant, publicly traded, and provider-sponsored. Data and Methods National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) financial data, coupled with selected state financial data, were analyzed for 170 Medicaid health plans for 2009. A mean test compared the mean values for medical loss, administrative cost, and operating margin ratios across these plan traits. Medicaid dominant plans are plans with 75 percent of their total enrollment in the Medicaid line of business. Findings Plans that are Medicaid dominant and publicly traded incurred a lower medical loss ratio and higher administrative cost ratio than multi-product and non-publicly traded plans. Medicaid dominant plans also earned a higher operating profit margin. Plans offering commercial and Medicare products are operating at a loss for their Medicaid line of business. Policy Implications Health plans that do not specialize in Medicaid are losing money. Higher medical cost rather than administrative cost is the underlying reason for this financial loss. Since Medicaid enrollees do not account for their primary book of business, these plans may not have invested in the medical management programs to reduce inappropriate emergency room use and avoid costly hospitalization. PMID:24800142

McCue, Mike

2012-01-01

280

Physicians in health care management: 2. Managing performance: who, what, how and when?  

PubMed

Physicians are becoming more involved in performance management as hospitals restructure to increase effectiveness. Although physicians are not hospital employees, they are subject to performance appraisals because the hospitals are accountable to patients and the community for the quality of hospital services. The performance of a health care professional may be appraised by the appropriate departmental manager, by other professionals in a team or program or by peers, based on prior agreement on expectations. Appraisal approaches vary. They include behavioural approaches such as rating scales, peer rating, ranking or nomination and outcome approaches such as management by objectives and goal setting. Professionals should give and receive timely feedback on a flexible schedule. Feedback can be provided one-on-one, by a group assessing quality of care or through an anonymous survey. PMID:8313260

Lemieux-Charles, L

1994-02-15

281

Physicians in health care management: 2. Managing performance: who, what, how and when?  

PubMed Central

Physicians are becoming more involved in performance management as hospitals restructure to increase effectiveness. Although physicians are not hospital employees, they are subject to performance appraisals because the hospitals are accountable to patients and the community for the quality of hospital services. The performance of a health care professional may be appraised by the appropriate departmental manager, by other professionals in a team or program or by peers, based on prior agreement on expectations. Appraisal approaches vary. They include behavioural approaches such as rating scales, peer rating, ranking or nomination and outcome approaches such as management by objectives and goal setting. Professionals should give and receive timely feedback on a flexible schedule. Feedback can be provided one-on-one, by a group assessing quality of care or through an anonymous survey. PMID:8313260

Lemieux-Charles, L

1994-01-01

282

Assessing the implementation of performance management of health care workers in Uganda  

PubMed Central

Background The performance management concept is relatively new to the Ugandan health sector. Uganda has been implementing health sector reforms for nearly two decades. The reforms included the introduction of the results-oriented management in the public sector and the decentralisation of the management of health care workers from central to local governments. This study examined the implementation of performance management of health care workers in order to propose strategies for improvement. Methods The study was a descriptive survey carried out in the Kumi, Mbale, Sironko and Tororo districts and utilising mixed research methodology. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect quantitative data from the health care workers. A semi-structured interview guide was used to collect qualitative data from the health service managers. The sample for the quantitative method was selected using stratified random sampling. Purposive sampling was used to select health service managers. Quantitative data were analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (version 18.0). Qualitative data were categorised according to the themes and analysed manually. Results The findings show that to some extent performance management is implemented in the health sector; however, there were loopholes in its implementation. There were inadequacies in setting performance targets and performance management planning was hardly done. Although many health care workers had job descriptions, the performance indicators and standards were not clearly defined and known to all workers and managers. Additionally the schedules for performance assessments were not always adhered to. There were limited prospects for career progression, inadequate performance feedback and poor rewarding mechanisms. Conclusions Performance management of health care workers is inadequately done in the districts. Performance management is a key component of attempts to improve health sector outcomes. As a result of this study, suggestions to enhance health sector performance management in the districts have been put forward. The authors are optimistic that if these suggestions are implemented, the performance of health care workers is likely to improve. PMID:24044774

2013-01-01

283

Exploiting parallels between livestock and wildlife: Predicting the impact of climate change on gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants.  

PubMed

Global change, including climate, policy, land use and other associated environmental changes, is likely to have a major impact on parasitic disease in wildlife, altering the spatio-temporal patterns of transmission, with wide-ranging implications for wildlife, domestic animals, humans and ecosystem health. Predicting the potential impact of climate change on parasites infecting wildlife will become increasingly important in the management of species of conservation concern and control of disease at the wildlife-livestock and wildlife-human interface, but is confounded by incomplete knowledge of host-parasite interactions, logistical difficulties, small sample sizes and limited opportunities to manipulate the system. By exploiting parallels between livestock and wildlife, existing theoretical frameworks and research on livestock and their gastrointestinal nematodes can be adapted to wildlife systems. Similarities in the gastrointestinal nematodes and the life-histories of wild and domestic ruminants, coupled with a detailed knowledge of the ecology and life-cycle of the parasites, render the ruminant-GIN host-parasite system particularly amenable to a cross-disciplinary approach. PMID:25197625

Rose, Hannah; Hoar, Bryanne; Kutz, Susan J; Morgan, Eric R

2014-08-01

284

Switching Swiss enrollees from indemnity health insurance to managed care: the effect on health status and stisfaction with care.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES. In 1992, most members of a Swiss indemnity health insurance plan were automatically transferred into a newly created managed care organization. This study examined whether this semivoluntary change affected enrollees' health status and satisfaction with care. METHODS. Three groups of enrollees were compared: 332 plan members who accepted the switch (managed care joiners); 186 plan members who opted to maintain indemnity coverage (non-joiners); and 296 persons continuosly enrolled in another indemnity plan (indemnity plan members). Health status, health related behaviors, and satisfaction with care received in the previous year were surveyed at baseline and 1 year later. RESULTS. Health status remained unchanged in all three groups. Smoking prevalence decreased among managed care joiners but remained constant in the other groups. Satisfaction with insurance coverage increased between baseline and follow-up in managed care joiners, but decreased in nonjoiners and indemnity plan members. The latter groups had higher satisfaction with health care, particularly with continuity of care. CONCLUSIONS. A semivoluntary switch from indemnity health insurance to managed care reduced satisfaction with health care but increased satisfaction with insurance coverage. There were no changes in self-perceived health status. PMID:8604765

Perneger, T V; Etter, J F; Rougemont, A

1996-01-01

285

[The conceptual bases for an entrepreneurial management of local health systems].  

PubMed

Health management has become a fashion and it is now common to talk about strategic or service management, or of total quality management applied to health systems. However, all these elements of business management are being translated to health systems without a previous analysis on the implicit health model and the rationality of the prevalent production functions, which can lead to a higher level of efficiency but with an inadequate use of resources. This paper suggests the importance of integrating the advances in management and health sciences and proposes what are considered to be the conceptual basis for the design of a management tool geared to conduct local health systems with effectiveness, efficiency, quality and equity. PMID:8073335

Yepes, F J; Durán-Arenas, L

1994-01-01

286

Management Knowledge and Skills Required in the Health Care System of the Federation Bosnia and Herzegovina  

PubMed Central

Extremely complex health care organizations, by their structure and organization, operate in a constantly changing business environment, and such situation implies and requires complex and demanding health management. Therefore, in order to manage health organizations in a competent manner, health managers must possess various managerial skills and be familiar with problems in health care. Research, identification, analysis, and assessment of health management education and training needs are basic preconditions for the development and implementation of adequate programs to meet those needs. Along with other specific activities, this research helped to determine the nature, profile, and level of top-priority needs for education. The need for knowledge of certain areas in health management, as well as the need for mastering concrete managerial competencies has been recognized as top-priorities requiring additional improvement and upgrading. PMID:23922519

Slipicevic, Osman; Masic, Izet

2012-01-01

287

POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Public Service Assistant: Integrated Pest Management and Forest Health Program  

E-print Network

POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Public Service Assistant: Integrated Pest Management and Forest Health Program Coordinator - The Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health University of Georgia Position: Twelve month, non- tenure track Public Service Assistant with responsibilities in Integrated Pest

Arnold, Jonathan

288

International Training and Education Center for Health (I-TECH) Tanzania Distance Education Manager  

E-print Network

Experience with developing, implementing, and/or evaluating mobile learning (mLearning) or mobile health (mHealthInternational Training and Education Center for Health (I-TECH) Tanzania Distance Education Manager Background The International Education and Training Centre for Health (I-TECH) is a collaboration between

Mullins, Dyche

289

Oral health management of a patient with 47,XYY syndrome.  

PubMed

The 47,XYY syndrome is an aneuploidy (abnormal number) of sex chromosomes, where a human male receives an extra Y chromosome, making 47 chromosomes instead of the usual 46. Individuals with 47,XYY are usually physically normal and tend to be tall and thin. They are not at increased risk of mental retardation and cardiovascular diseases. They may have speech delay, hyperactivity and normal/decreased IQ level. Behavioural problems are not common in 47,XYY individuals. There have been reports that suggest the tooth-size increase in 47,XYY males is due to a direct genetic effect. The patient presented with multiple over-retained deciduous, unerupted permanent teeth and increased incidence of carious lesions may be attributed to decreased oral hygiene maintenance. The present article describes the medical and dental history along with the clinical management of oral health issues in an 18-year-old male patient with 47,XYY syndrome having normal physical structure and development. PMID:24311410

Shah, Altaf Hussain; Manjunatha, B S; Bindayel, Naif A; Khounganian, Rita

2013-01-01

290

Cyanotoxin management and human health risk mitigation in recreational waters.  

PubMed

The occurrence and severity of harmful cyanobacterial or blue-green algal blooms (HABs) have increased in recent decades, posing a serious threat of illness to humans. In some countries, water contaminated with cyanotoxins that is used for drinking or haemodialysis has posed a particularly serious risk. However, it is now recognized that recreational exposure to natural toxins by skin contact, accidental swallowing of water or inhalation can also cause a wide range of acute or chronic illnesses. In this review, we focus on the importance of cyanotoxin management in recreational waters. The symptoms related with HAB poisonings, the recommended safety concentrations limit for cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins in such waters, as well as early health hazard indicators of their presence and their monitoring are all discussed. We also present in this review an overview of the methods developed in recent decades for eliminating cyanobacteria and the toxic compounds that they produce. PMID:24664523

Koreivien?, Judita; Anne, Olga; Kasperovi?ien?, J?rat?; Burškyt?, Vilma

2014-07-01

291

Integrating complementary and alternative medicine into mainstream healthcare services: the perspectives of health service managers  

PubMed Central

Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasingly included within mainstream integrative healthcare (IHC) services. Health service managers are key stakeholders central to ensuring effective integrative health care services. Yet, little research has specifically investigated the role or perspective of health service managers with regards to integrative health care services under their management. In response, this paper reports findings from an exploratory study focusing exclusively on the perspectives of health service managers of integrative health care services in Australia regarding the role of CAM within their service and the health service managers rational for incorporating CAM into clinical care. Methods Health service managers from seven services were recruited using purposive and snowball sampling. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the health service managers. The services addressed trauma and chronic conditions and comprised: five community-based programs including drug and alcohol rehabilitation, refugee mental health and women’s health; and two hospital-based specialist services. The CAM practices included in the services investigated included acupuncture, naturopathy, Western herbal medicine and massage. Results Findings reveal that the health service managers in this study understand CAM to enhance the holistic capacity of their service by: filling therapeutic gaps in existing healthcare practices; by treating the whole person; and by increasing healthcare choices. Health service managers also identified CAM as addressing therapeutic gaps through the provision of a mind-body approach in psychological trauma and in chronic disease management treatment. Health service managers describe the addition of CAM in their service as enabling patients who would otherwise not be able to afford CAM to gain access to these treatments thereby increasing healthcare choices. Some health service managers expressly align the notion of treating the whole person within a health promotion model and focus on the relevance of diet and lifestyle factors as central to a CAM approach. Conclusions From the perspectives of the health service managers, these findings contribute to our understanding around the rationale to include CAM within mainstream health services that deal with psychological trauma and chronic disease. The broader implications of this study can help assist in the development of health service policy on CAM integration in mainstream healthcare services. PMID:24885066

2014-01-01

292

Advanced Health Management System for the Space Shuttle Main Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Boeing-Canoga Park (BCP) and NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA-MSFC) are developing an Advanced Health Management System (AHMS) for use on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) that will improve Shuttle safety by reducing the probability of catastrophic engine failures during the powered ascent phase of a Shuttle mission. This is a phased approach that consists of an upgrade to the current Space Shuttle Main Engine Controller (SSMEC) to add turbomachinery synchronous vibration protection and addition of a separate Health Management Computer (HMC) that will utilize advanced algorithms to detect and mitigate predefined engine anomalies. The purpose of the Shuttle AHMS is twofold; one is to increase the probability of successfully placing the Orbiter into the intended orbit, and the other is to increase the probability of being able to safely execute an abort of a Space Transportation System (STS) launch. Both objectives are achieved by increasing the useful work envelope of a Space Shuttle Main Engine after it has developed anomalous performance during launch and the ascent phase of the mission. This increase in work envelope will be the result of two new anomaly mitigation options, in addition to existing engine shutdown, that were previously unavailable. The added anomaly mitigation options include engine throttle-down and performance correction (adjustment of engine oxidizer to fuel ratio), as well as enhanced sensor disqualification capability. The HMC is intended to provide the computing power necessary to diagnose selected anomalous engine behaviors and for making recommendations to the engine controller for anomaly mitigation. Independent auditors have assessed the reduction in Shuttle ascent risk to be on the order of 40% with the combined system and a three times improvement in mission success.

Davidson, Matt; Stephens, John

2004-01-01

293

Results of a pilot management-by-objectives program for a community mental health outpatient service.  

PubMed

The challenge of the burgeoning complexity of administering mental health programs calls for increasingly sophisticated management strategies. Management by objectives is an administrative tool that may assist mental health managers in meeting administrative needs as well as service demands in a more efficient fashion. Management by objective is based on the principles of (a) stating objectives in measurable terms, (b) staff participation in decision making, and (c) performance-based rewards. This paper describes results of a pilot management-by-objective project applied to an outpatient service in a community mental health center. PMID:7389299

Garrison, J E; Raynes, A E

1980-01-01

294

Depression, rumination and the default network.  

PubMed

Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been characterized by excessive default-network activation and connectivity with the subgenual cingulate. These hyper-connectivities are often interpreted as reflecting rumination, where MDDs perseverate on negative, self-referential thoughts. However, the relationship between connectivity and rumination has not been established. Furthermore, previous research has not examined how connectivity with the subgenual cingulate differs when individuals are engaged in a task or not. The purpose of the present study was to examine connectivity of the default network specifically in the subgenual cingulate both on- and off-task, and to examine the relationship between connectivity and rumination. Analyses using a seed-based connectivity approach revealed that MDDs show more neural functional connectivity between the posterior-cingulate cortex and the subgenual-cingulate cortex than healthy individuals during rest periods, but not during task engagement. Importantly, these rest-period connectivities correlated with behavioral measures of rumination and brooding, but not reflection. PMID:20855296

Berman, Marc G; Peltier, Scott; Nee, Derek Evan; Kross, Ethan; Deldin, Patricia J; Jonides, John

2011-10-01

295

Depression, rumination and the default network  

PubMed Central

Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been characterized by excessive default-network activation and connectivity with the subgenual cingulate. These hyper-connectivities are often interpreted as reflecting rumination, where MDDs perseverate on negative, self-referential thoughts. However, the relationship between connectivity and rumination has not been established. Furthermore, previous research has not examined how connectivity with the subgenual cingulate differs when individuals are engaged in a task or not. The purpose of the present study was to examine connectivity of the default network specifically in the subgenual cingulate both on- and off-task, and to examine the relationship between connectivity and rumination. Analyses using a seed-based connectivity approach revealed that MDDs show more neural functional connectivity between the posterior-cingulate cortex and the subgenual-cingulate cortex than healthy individuals during rest periods, but not during task engagement. Importantly, these rest-period connectivities correlated with behavioral measures of rumination and brooding, but not reflection. PMID:20855296

Peltier, Scott; Nee, Derek Evan; Kross, Ethan; Deldin, Patricia J.; Jonides, John

2011-01-01

296

Ruminal ciliated protozoa in bison.  

PubMed Central

Ruminal contents from 79 slaughtered bison and 2 ruminally cannulated bison were collected to obtain information on total numbers and species distribution of ciliated protozoa. The bison originated from numerous herds throughout the Great Plains and were grouped into three dietary categories: (i) only forage; (ii) forage with moderate levels of supplementation; and (iii) feedlot concentrate-silage diet. Total ciliate counts were highest in bison receiving grain supplementation (210.1 x 10(4)/g) and lowest in bison consuming only forage (27.1 x 10(4)/g). All protozoan species found in bison have been reported in domestic livestock, although Ophryoscolex sp., a relatively common protozoan in cattle, was detected at low concentrations in only eight bison. The uncommon holotrich Microcetus lappus was present in five bison in concentrations reaching 8.4% of the total ciliate population. Charonina ventriculi, another infrequently observed species, was present in 18 bison, with the highest concentrations in forage-fed animals. Thirty bison possessed a type B protozoan population, characterized by Epidinium sp., Eudiplodinium maggii, and Eudiplodinium bovis. Thirty-eight bison possessed a mixed A-B population, characterized by Polyplastron sp. coexisting with low numbers of Eudiplodinium maggii or Epidinium sp. or both. Thirteen bison possessed populations lacking any remnant type B ciliate species. At least 29 of the bison possessing Polyplastron sp. were known to have been in contact with cattle, whereas all bison isolated from cattle had type B populations. The reduction of type B populations in bison becomes increasingly likely as bison production expands into areas inhabited by domestic livestock. PMID:3145709

Towne, G; Nagaraja, T G; Kemp, K K

1988-01-01

297

On robust methodologies for managing public health care systems.  

PubMed

Authors focus on ontology-based multidimensional data warehousing and mining methodologies, addressing various issues on organizing, reporting and documenting diabetic cases and their associated ailments, including causalities. Map and other diagnostic data views, depicting similarity and comparison of attributes, extracted from warehouses, are used for understanding the ailments, based on gender, age, geography, food-habits and other hereditary event attributes. In addition to rigor on data mining and visualization, an added focus is on values of interpretation of data views, from processed full-bodied diagnosis, subsequent prescription and appropriate medications. The proposed methodology, is a robust back-end application, for web-based patient-doctor consultations and e-Health care management systems through which, billions of dollars spent on medical services, can be saved, in addition to improving quality of life and average life span of a person. Government health departments and agencies, private and government medical practitioners including social welfare organizations are typical users of these systems. PMID:24445953

Nimmagadda, Shastri L; Dreher, Heinz V

2014-01-01

298

Managing health care decisions and improvement through simulation modeling.  

PubMed

Simulation modeling is a way to test changes in a computerized environment to give ideas for improvements before implementation. This article reviews research literature on simulation modeling as support for health care decision making. The aim is to investigate the experience and potential value of such decision support and quality of articles retrieved. A literature search was conducted, and the selection criteria yielded 59 articles derived from diverse applications and methods. Most met the stated research-quality criteria. This review identified how simulation can facilitate decision making and that it may induce learning. Furthermore, simulation offers immediate feedback about proposed changes, allows analysis of scenarios, and promotes communication on building a shared system view and understanding of how a complex system works. However, only 14 of the 59 articles reported on implementation experiences, including how decision making was supported. On the basis of these articles, we proposed steps essential for the success of simulation projects, not just in the computer, but also in clinical reality. We also presented a novel concept combining simulation modeling with the established plan-do-study-act cycle for improvement. Future scientific inquiries concerning implementation, impact, and the value for health care management are needed to realize the full potential of simulation modeling. PMID:21192204

Forsberg, Helena Hvitfeldt; Aronsson, Håkan; Keller, Christina; Lindblad, Staffan

2011-01-01

299

Prognostics Health Management for Advanced Small Modular Reactor Passive Components  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, sustainable nuclear power to promote energy security is a key national energy priority. Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMR), which are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts using non-light-water reactor (LWR) coolants such as liquid metal, helium, or liquid salt may provide a longer-term alternative to more conventional LWR-based concepts. The economics of AdvSMRs will be impacted by the reduced economy-of-scale savings when compared to traditional LWRs and the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs are expected to be dominated by operations and maintenance costs. Therefore, achieving the full benefits of AdvSMR deployment requires a new paradigm for plant design and management. In this context, prognostic health management of passive components in AdvSMRs can play a key role in enabling the economic deployment of AdvSMRs. In this paper, the background of AdvSMRs is discussed from which requirements for PHM systems are derived. The particle filter technique is proposed as a prognostics framework for AdvSMR passive components and the suitability of the particle filter technique is illustrated by using it to forecast thermal creep degradation using a physics-of-failure model and based on a combination of types of measurements conceived for passive AdvSMR components.

Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coble, Jamie B.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Henager, Charles H.

2013-10-18

300

9 CFR 93.416 - Appearance of disease among ruminants in quarantine.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-01-01 false Appearance of disease among ruminants in quarantine. 93... Ruminants § 93.416 Appearance of disease among ruminants in quarantine. If any contagious disease appears among ruminants during...

2011-01-01

301

9 CFR 93.416 - Appearance of disease among ruminants in quarantine.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-01-01 false Appearance of disease among ruminants in quarantine. 93... Ruminants § 93.416 Appearance of disease among ruminants in quarantine. If any contagious disease appears among ruminants during...

2010-01-01

302

Concepts of health and well-being in managers: An organizational study  

PubMed Central

Global changes and new managerial challenges require new concepts of health and well-being in organizational contexts. In the South African context, health and well-being of managers have gained relevance in organizations and in management sciences. International organizations, in particular, attempt to address the increasing demand for health care and the delivery of health services to their managers. Careful and appropriate health management requires research to evaluate context-specific health concepts and strategies. The purpose and aim of this article is to assess managerial concepts on health and well-being that could be used by the organization to contribute to managerial well-being by implementing health promotion according to managerial needs. At the same time, this article contributes to salutogenetic health research that is very rare with regard to the South African organizational management research. This study is a multi-method research study conducted in a selected international organization in South Africa. However, in this article, selected qualitative findings will only be presented. This organizational study presents selected research findings on health concepts and strategies employed by managers. Findings demonstrate that the managerial concepts of health and strategies mainly refer to not only physical but also to mental and spiritual aspects, with a priority on physical health and well-being. The findings presented are based on qualitative research methods and their research criteria. This assessment serves as a foundation for new approaches to health management within the international work context in South Africa. It also contributes to a paradigm shift from pathogenetic to salutogenetic concepts of health and well-being within the South African organizational work context. The article produces new insights into the qualitative health concepts of South African managers and expatriates and contributes to promoting salutogenesis in organization within South Africa. PMID:22028736

Boness, Christian

2011-01-01

303

Ergot alkaloid transport across ruminant gastric tissues.  

PubMed

Ergot alkaloids cause fescue toxicosis when livestock graze endophyte-infected tall fescue. It is generally accepted that ergovaline is the toxic component of endophyte-infected tall fescue, but there is no direct evidence to support this hypothesis. The objective of this study was to examine relative and potential transport of ergoline and ergopeptine alkaloids across isolated gastric tissues in vitro. Sheep ruminal and omasal tissues were surgically removed and placed in parabiotic chambers. Equimolar concentrations of lysergic acid, lysergol, ergonovine, ergotamine, and ergocryptine were added to a Kreb's Ringer phosphate (KRP) solution on the mucosal side of the tissue. Tissue was incubated in near-physiological conditions for 240 min. Samples were taken from KRP on the serosal side of the chambers at times 0, 30, 60, 120, 180, and 240 min and analyzed for ergot alkaloids by competitive ELISA. The serosal KRP remaining after incubation was freeze-dried and the alkaloid species quantified by HPLC. The area of ruminal and omasal tissues was measured and the potential transportable alkaloids calculated by multiplying the moles of transported alkaloids per square centimeter of each tissue type by the surface area of the tissue. Studies were conducted to compare alkaloid transport in reticular, ruminal, and omasal tissues and to determine whether transport was active or passive. Ruminal tissue had greater ergot alkaloid transport potential than omasal tissue (85 vs 60 mmol) because of a larger surface area. The ruminal posterior dorsal sac had the greatest potential for alkaloid transport, but the other ruminal tissues were not different from one another. Alkaloid transport was less among reticular tissues than among ruminal tissues. Transport of alkaloids seemed to be an active process. The alkaloids with greatest transport potential were lysergic acid and lysergol. Ergopeptine alkaloids tended to pass across omasal tissues in greater quantities than across ruminal tissues, but their transport was minimal compared to lysergic acid and lysergol. PMID:11219466

Hill, N S; Thompson, F N; Stuedemann, J A; Rottinghaus, G W; Ju, H J; Dawe, D L; Hiatt, E E

2001-02-01

304

Integrating cost information with health management support system: an enhanced methodology to assess health care quality drivers.  

PubMed

Changes in health care delivery, reimbursement schemes, and organizational structure have required health organizations to manage the costs of providing patient care while maintaining high levels of clinical and patient satisfaction outcomes. Today, cost information, clinical outcomes, and patient satisfaction results must become more fully integrated if strategic competitiveness and benefits are to be realized in health management decision making, especially in multi-entity organizational settings. Unfortunately, traditional administrative and financial systems are not well equipped to cater to such information needs. This article presents a framework for the acquisition, generation, analysis, and reporting of cost information with clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction in the context of evolving health management and decision-support system technology. More specifically, the article focuses on an enhanced costing methodology for determining and producing improved, integrated cost-outcomes information. Implementation issues and areas for future research in cost-information management and decision-support domains are also discussed. PMID:10539425

Kohli, R; Tan, J K; Piontek, F A; Ziege, D E; Groot, H

1999-08-01

305

Giving yourself a good beating: appraisal, attribution, rumination, and counter- factual thinking  

Microsoft Academic Search

How individuals respond to adversity is one component of mental toughness and athletes may manage the adversity of a defeat in very different ways. In this article we focus on four types of cognition (appraisal, attribution, counterfactual think- ing, and rumination) that athletes may exhibit in the immediate aftermath of a competitive defeat. In particular we define each of these

Mark A. Uphill; Katie Dray

2009-01-01

306

Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in small ruminants.  

PubMed

Small ruminants are an important component of the global production systems of meat and wool, and their reproductive biology is well known. However, the incorporation of assisted reproduction techniques (ART) in the production systems of small ruminants is not as well developed as for other domestic species. Normally, production systems that incorporate ARTs are restricted to artificial insemination or in vivo embryo transfer. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is one of the ARTs techniques reported for small ruminants and consists of the injection of spermatozoa inside an oocyte, bypassing the natural process of sperm-oocyte interaction. In goats and sheep, there are few live births by ICSI reported, with no reports from other species of small ruminants. Currently, there has not been intensive research about ICSI in small ruminants. However, ICSI has potentially important applications in animal production systems, primarily its use with semen of valued animals, with epididymal sperm, in the fertilization of prepubertal or cryopreserved oocytes. Other applications include more advanced techniques, such as transgenic-ICSI or its combination with spermatogonial transplantation. In this article, we review the "state of the art" of this technique in small ruminants including its historical development, research needs for its improvement and future applications. PMID:22871330

López-Saucedo, J; Paramio-Nieto, M T; Fierro, R; Piña-Aguilar, R E

2012-08-01

307

College of Health Sciences CLM Clinical Leadership and Management  

E-print Network

a discussion of major health problems and related health care programs. (Same as HHS/HSM 241.) CLM 350 HEALTH POLICY AND POLITICS. (3) This course will address the development of past and current U.S. health groups have had, and continue to have, upon the development of national and state health policies

MacAdam, Keith

308

Health services management in primary schools (Elazig city sample)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Primary school children have low resistance to diseases. In order to live a healthy life, they should be equipped with health literacy skills. Effective primary school health services can only be achieved with the collaboration of related parties. Turkish schools generally do not employ permanent health personnel, and school health services are generally taken to be synonymous with health screening.

I. Bak?r Arabaci

2009-01-01

309

Voices from the inside: managing district health services in Nepal.  

PubMed

Apparent inconsistencies and irrational decisions can be found in all organizations and they often point to underlying attitudes and assumptions among staff, about the organization and the way it works. Concepts such as 'negotiated order' and 'values in use' have been suggested in recent literature on organization theory to describe the important role of individual, and social, needs and expectations upon the functioning of organizations. This article presents the apparently common assumptions made about government service, as encountered during research into the management of district public health services in Nepal. It argues that, when taken together, these form a wide and coherent system of 'values in use', or an 'implicit theory' which appears to guide many of the bureaucracy's actions. The way in which staff are selected and promoted, common attitudes towards work, the shortcomings of the reporting systems, all appear to be part of an 'implicit' theory which is based on the fundamental belief that it is the main purpose of the district public health service to provide incomes for its staff. Thus, most posts do not have job descriptions and staff are recruited to them on the basis of factors other than the skills or knowledge required. Training and supervision are seen commonly as means of earning extra allowances, and service quality is not seen as a priority. This contrasts with the 'official' theory which is that the organization exists to provide health services to the community and that it is the purpose of the staff to provide those services. Such an implicit 'theory', recognized and accepted by staff but never acknowledged, and based on very different values and expectations to those assumed in a 'rational', task-oriented bureaucracy, obviously has implications for the success of development programmes. It explains why training so rarely results in improved performance and why the bureaucracy is so resistant to change which does not satisfy the implicit theory. While the implicit theory described here is specific to Nepal, the phenomenon may be widespread. The failure to take account of such 'theories in use', guiding the actions of staff and hence organizations, could explain the failure of many attempts to improve government health services. PMID:10139511

Aitken, J M

1994-01-01

310

Smart Sensors' Role in Integrated System Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the last decade, there has been a major effort in the aerospace industry to reduce the cost per pond of payload and become competitive in the international market. Competition from Europe, Japan, and China has reduced this cost to almost a third from 1990 to 2000. This cost has leveled in recent years to an average price of around $12,000/pound of payload. One of NASA's goals is to promote the development of technologies to reduce this cost by a factor of 10 or more Exploration of space, specially manned exploration missions, involves very complex launch and flight vehicles, associated ground support systems, and extensive human support during all phases of the mission. When considering the Space Shuttle Program, we can see that vehicle and ground support systems' processing, operation, and maintenance represent a large percentage of the program cost and time. Reducing operating, processing and maintenance costs will greatly reduce the cost of Exploration programs. The Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) concept is one of the technologies that will help reduce these operating, processing and maintenance costs. ISHM is an integrated health monitoring system applicable to both flight and ground systems. It automatically and autonomously acquires information from sensors and actuators and processes that information using the ISHM-embedded knowledge. As a result, it establishes the health of the system based on the acquired information and its prior knowledge. When this concept is fully implemented, ISHM systems shall be able to perform failure prediction and remediation before actual hard failures occurs, preventing its costly consequences. Data sources, sensors, and their associated data acquisition systems, constitute the foundation of the system. A smart sensing architecture is required to support the acquisition of reliable, high quality data, required by the ISHM. A thorough definition of the smart sensor architectures, their embedded diagnostic agents, and communication protocols need to be established and standardized to allow the embedding and exchange of health information among sensors and ISHM. This workshop is aimed to foster the exchange of ideas and lessons learned between government, industry and academia to aid in the establishment of ISHM (and smart sensors) standards and guidelines as well as to identify present technology gaps that will have to be overcome to successfully achieve this goal.

Perotti, Jose M.; Mata, Carlos

2005-01-01

311

Ruminal environment and forage ruminal digestion in milking cows under grazing and zero-grazing  

E-print Network

Ruminal environment and forage ruminal digestion in milking cows under grazing and zero-grazing ML) ; 21NTA, Dpto Prod Animal, Balcarce, CC 276 (7620), Argentina Cows grazing high quality temperate. A trial was run to study the effect of zero grazing on rumen environment and protein and fiber digestion

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

312

Targeted population health management can help a hospital grow market share.  

PubMed

In 2005, St. Luke's Hospital in Chesterfield, Mo., launched the "Passport to Wellness" program to help employers reduce preventable illnesses by providing access to screenings, health education, health coaching, disease management, and healthy lifestyle programs. The program was designed to influence consumer choice of hospitals and physicians and influence health insurance purchasing decisions. St. Luke's program also met goals created by local businesses, including identifying health risks of each employer's workforce and reducing health-related costs. PMID:22734331

Olson, Gary; Talbert, Pearson

2012-06-01

313

Health Care Autonomy in Children with Chronic Conditions: Implications for Self Care and Family Management  

PubMed Central

Synopsis Health care autonomy typically occurs during late adolescence but health care providers and families often expect children with chronic health conditions to master self-care earlier. Few studies have examined the development of health care autonomy as it pertains to self-care and family management. This review will link the three concepts and discuss implications for families and health care providers. Case studies are provided as exemplars to highlight areas where intervention and research is needed. PMID:23659815

Beacham, Barbara L.; Deatrick, Janet A.

2013-01-01

314

Recent developments in altering the fatty acid composition of ruminant-derived foods.  

PubMed

There is increasing evidence to indicate that nutrition is an important factor involved in the onset and development of several chronic human diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease (CVD), type II diabetes and obesity. Clinical studies implicate excessive consumption of medium-chain saturated fatty acids (SFA) and trans-fatty acids (TFA) as risk factors for CVD, and in the aetiology of other chronic conditions. Ruminant-derived foods are significant sources of medium-chain SFA and TFA in the human diet, but also provide high-quality protein, essential micronutrients and several bioactive lipids. Altering the fatty acid composition of ruminant-derived foods offers the opportunity to align the consumption of fatty acids in human populations with public health policies without the need for substantial changes in eating habits. Replacing conserved forages with fresh grass or dietary plant oil and oilseed supplements can be used to lower medium-chain and total SFA content and increase cis-9 18:1, total conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) to a variable extent in ruminant milk. However, inclusion of fish oil or marine algae in the ruminant diet results in marginal enrichment of 20- or 22-carbon PUFA in milk. Studies in growing ruminants have confirmed that the same nutritional strategies improve the balance of n-6/n-3 PUFA, and increase CLA and long-chain n-3 PUFA in ruminant meat, but the potential to lower medium-chain and total SFA is limited. Attempts to alter meat and milk fatty acid composition through changes in the diet fed to ruminants are often accompanied by several-fold increases in TFA concentrations. In extreme cases, the distribution of trans 18:1 and 18:2 isomers in ruminant foods may resemble that of partially hydrogenated plant oils. Changes in milk fat or muscle lipid composition in response to diet are now known to be accompanied by tissue-specific alterations in the expression of one or more lipogenic genes. Breed influences both milk and muscle fat content, although recent studies have confirmed the occurrence of genetic variability in transcript abundance and activity of enzymes involved in lipid synthesis and identified polymorphisms for several key lipogenic genes in lactating and growing cattle. Although nutrition is the major factor influencing the fatty acid composition of ruminant-derived foods, further progress can be expected through the use of genomic or marker-assisted selection to increase the frequency of favourable genotypes and the formulation of diets to exploit this genetic potential. PMID:23031638

Shingfield, K J; Bonnet, M; Scollan, N D

2013-03-01

315

Creative Approaches to Health Education in Higher Education: Wellness Management Option.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Wellness Management has been designed as an option in the health education bachelors program at Plymouth State College of the University System of New Hampshire. The Wellness Management option was created because alumni and employers stated that graduates needed business skills in order to be more marketable and effective as health educators. The…

Burckes-Miller, Mardie E.

316

Care management for older people with mental health problems: from evidence to practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim: To explore the implications of providing intensive care management in a typical old age mental health service in North West England. Methods: The time spent by core groups of specialist mental health and social services staff on a range of activities deemed central to the provision of intensive care management was explored by means of a diary exercise. The

Sue Tucker; Jane Hughes; Caroline Sutcliffe; David Challis

2008-01-01

317

Management of Childhood Illness at Health Facilities in Benin: Problems and Their Causes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. To prepare for the implementation of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) in Benin, we studied the management of ill children younger than 5 years at outpatient health facilities. Methods. We observed a representative sample of consultations; after each consultation, we interviewed caregivers and reexamined children. Health workers' performance was evaluated against IMCI guidelines. To identify determinants of performance,

Alexander K. Rowe; Faustin Onikpo; Marcel Lama; Francois Cokou; Michael S. Deming

318

Work Improvement and Occupational Safety and Health Management Systems: Common Features and Research Needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a growing trend in re-orientating occupational health research towards risk management. Such a trend is accelerated by the increasing attention to occupational safety and health management systems. The trend, also seen in many Asian countries, is offering new opportunities for strengthening primary prevention. Useful examples are provided from recent work improvement projects dealing with technology transfer, small workplaces

Kazutaka KOGI

2002-01-01

319

A Basic Strategy to Manage Global Health with Reference to Livestock Production in Asia  

PubMed Central

Newly emerging infectious diseases (nEIDs) have increased rapidly presenting alarming challenges to global health. We argue that for effective management of global health a basic strategy should include at least three essential tactical forms: actions of a directly focused nature, institutional coordination, and disciplinary integration in approaches to health management. Each level of action is illustrated with examples from the livestock sector in Asia. No clear example of all three tactical forms in place can be found from developing countries where food security is a significant threat although Vietnam is developing a comprehensive strategy. Finally, an ecosystem health approach to global health management is advocated; such an approach moves away from the traditional single disciplinary approach. Stronger guidance is needed to direct ecohealth research and application in the management of global health. PMID:22135772

Hall, David C.; Le, Quynh Ba

2011-01-01

320

A Support Database System for Integrated System Health Management (ISHM)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development, deployment, operation and maintenance of Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) applications require the storage and processing of tremendous amounts of low-level data. This data must be shared in a secure and cost-effective manner between developers, and processed within several heterogeneous architectures. Modern database technology allows this data to be organized efficiently, while ensuring the integrity and security of the data. The extensibility and interoperability of the current database technologies also allows for the creation of an associated support database system. A support database system provides additional capabilities by building applications on top of the database structure. These applications can then be used to support the various technologies in an ISHM architecture. This presentation and paper propose a detailed structure and application description for a support database system, called the Health Assessment Database System (HADS). The HADS provides a shared context for organizing and distributing data as well as a definition of the applications that provide the required data-driven support to ISHM. This approach provides another powerful tool for ISHM developers, while also enabling novel functionality. This functionality includes: automated firmware updating and deployment, algorithm development assistance and electronic datasheet generation. The architecture for the HADS has been developed as part of the ISHM toolset at Stennis Space Center for rocket engine testing. A detailed implementation has begun for the Methane Thruster Testbed Project (MTTP) in order to assist in developing health assessment and anomaly detection algorithms for ISHM. The structure of this implementation is shown in Figure 1. The database structure consists of three primary components: the system hierarchy model, the historical data archive and the firmware codebase. The system hierarchy model replicates the physical relationships between system elements to provide the logical context for the database. The historical data archive provides a common repository for sensor data that can be shared between developers and applications. The firmware codebase is used by the developer to organize the intelligent element firmware into atomic units which can be assembled into complete firmware for specific elements.

Schmalzel, John; Figueroa, Jorge F.; Turowski, Mark; Morris, John

2007-01-01

321

Integrated physical and mental health care at a nurse-managed clinic: report from the trenches.  

PubMed

The Health and Wellness Center (HWC), located in Joliet, Illinois, is a nurse-managed universally accessible primary health care center funded by a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration. The goals of the HWC are to improve access to quality primary health care services for all patients, including those who are uninsured and underserved, and to develop and implement a model of nurse-managed primary health care that integrates both physical and mental health assessment and treatment. After 5 years of developing and using this model, it is clear that integration requires strategic supports from the financial, political, and professional sectors to be considered a cost-effective model of health care delivery. Recommendations for policy and practice change are offered based on the author's experiences of providing integrated health care at the HWC and the health care industry's responses to uninsured or underinsured patients' needs. PMID:21702428

Nardi, Deena

2011-07-01

322

Trolling for Useful Data in an Automated Information Management System: Experiences of Kansas Community Mental Health Managers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The State of Kansas community mental health system uses an automated information management system for state and federal accountability and for local quality improvement. Researchers interviewed 25 of the state's 28 directors of children's community-based mental health services to learn about the automated system's local applications. Two-thirds of the directors used the automated system for either programmatic decision making or

Stephen A. Kapp; Karen Flint Stipp

2010-01-01

323

Human health assessment and management technologies: The scientific basis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The national Health project has set the healthcare system the task of intensifying disease prevention, reducing morbidity, and increasing the lifespan and active longevity of the national population. Population health is the aggregate of the health of individuals. Modern biomedical science considers the quantification of human health to be an extremely complicated and yet unsolved problem. Some researchers [2?4] believe

V. A. Orlov

2008-01-01

324

Health Information and Communication System for Emergency Management in a Developing Country, Iran  

Microsoft Academic Search

Disasters are fortunately rare occurrences. However, accurate and timely information and communication are vital to adequately\\u000a prepare individual health organizations for such events. The current article investigates the health related communication\\u000a and information systems for emergency management in Iran. A mixed qualitative and quantitative methodology was used in this\\u000a study. A sample of 230 health service managers was surveyed using

Seyed Hesam Seyedin; Hamid R. Jamali

325

Focusing on the software of managing health workers: what can we learn from high commitment management practices?  

PubMed

Knowledge of what constitutes best practice in human resource management (HRM) in public-oriented services is limited and the operational aspects of managing health workers at provision level have been poorly studied. The magnet hospital concept offers some insights into HRM practices that are leading to high commitment. These have been shown to lead to superior performance in not only industrial business firms, but also service industries and the public service. The mechanisms that drive these practices include positive psychological links between managers and staff, organizational commitment and trust. Conditions for successful high commitment management (HiCoM) include health service managers with a strong vision and able to transmit this vision to their staff, appropriate decision spaces for healthcare managers and a pool of reasonable well-trained health workers. For this, adequate remuneration is the first condition. Equally important are the issues of cultural fit and of 'commitment'. What would staff expect from management in return for their commitment to the organization? Salary buys indeed time of employees, but other practices ensure their commitment. Only if these drivers are understood will managers be able to make their HRM practices more responsive to the needs and expectations of the health workers. PMID:17624868

Marchal, Bruno; Kegels, Guy

2008-01-01

326

Advanced Health Management System for the Space Shuttle Main Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, Inc., in cooperation with NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), has developed a new Advanced Health Management System (AHMS) controller for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) that will increase the probability of successfully placing the shuttle into the intended orbit and increase the safety of the Space Transportation System (STS) launches. The AHMS is an upgrade o the current Block II engine controller whose primary component is an improved vibration monitoring system called the Real-Time Vibration Monitoring System (RTVMS) that can effectively and reliably monitor the state of the high pressure turbomachinery and provide engine protection through a new synchronous vibration redline which enables engine shutdown if the vibration exceeds predetermined thresholds. The introduction of this system required improvements and modification to the Block II controller such as redesigning the Digital Computer Unit (DCU) memory and the Flight Accelerometer Safety Cut-Off System (FASCOS) circuitry, eliminating the existing memory retention batteries, installation of the Digital Signal Processor (DSP) technology, and installation of a High Speed Serial Interface (HSSI) with accompanying outside world connectors. Test stand hot-fire testing along with lab testing have verified successful implementation and is expected to reduce the probability of catastrophic engine failures during the shuttle ascent phase and improve safely by about 23% according to the Quantitative Risk Assessment System (QRAS), leading to a safer and more reliable SSME.

Davidson, Matt; Stephens, John; Rodela, Chris

2006-01-01

327

Introduction to System Health Engineering and Management in Aerospace  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper provides a technical overview of Integrated System Health Engineering and Management (ISHEM). We define ISHEM as "the paper provides a techniques, and technologies used to design, analyze, build, verify, and operate a system to prevent faults and/or minimize their effects." This includes design and manufacturing techniques as well operational and managerial methods. ISHEM is not a "purely technical issue" as it also involves and must account for organizational, communicative, and cognitive f&ms of humans as social beings and as individuals. Thus the paper will discuss in more detail why all of these elements, h m the technical to the cognitive and social, are necessary to build dependable human-machine systems. The paper outlines a functional homework and architecture for ISHEM operations, describes the processes needed to implement ISHEM in the system life-cycle, and provides a theoretical framework to understand the relationship between the different aspects of the discipline. It then derives from these and the social and cognitive bases a set of design and operational principles for ISHEM.

Johnson, Stephen B.

2005-01-01

328

A structural model decomposition framework for systems health management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Systems health management (SHM) is an important set of technologies aimed at increasing system safety and reliability by detecting, isolating, and identifying faults; and predicting when the system reaches end of life (EOL), so that appropriate fault mitigation and recovery actions can be taken. Model-based SHM approaches typically make use of global, monolithic system models for online analysis, which results in a loss of scalability and efficiency for large-scale systems. Improvement in scalability and efficiency can be achieved by decomposing the system model into smaller local submodels and operating on these submodels instead. In this paper, the global system model is analyzed offline and structurally decomposed into local submodels. We define a common model decomposition framework for extracting submodels from the global model. This framework is then used to develop algorithms for solving model decomposition problems for the design of three separate SHM technologies, namely, estimation (which is useful for fault detection and identification), fault isolation, and EOL prediction. We solve these model decomposition problems using a three-tank system as a case study.

Roychoudhury, I.; Daigle, M.; Bregon, A.; Pulido, B.

329

Controls and Health Management Technologies for Intelligent Aerospace Propulsion Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced controls and health management technologies that will help meet these challenges through the concept of an Intelligent Engine. The key enabling technologies for an Intelligent Engine are the increased efficiencies of components through active control, advanced diagnostics and prognostics integrated with intelligent engine control to enhance component life, and distributed control with smart sensors and actuators in an adaptive fault tolerant architecture. This paper describes the current activities of the Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch in the areas of active component control and propulsion system intelligent control, and presents some recent analytical and experimental results in these areas.

Garg, Sanjay

2004-01-01

330

Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) for Aerospace Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To achieve NASA's ambitious Integrated Space Transportation Program objectives, aerospace systems will implement a variety of new concept in health management. System level integration of IVHM technologies for real-time control and system maintenance will have significant impact on system safety and lifecycle costs. IVHM technologies will enhance the safety and success of complex missions despite component failures, degraded performance, operator errors, and environment uncertainty. IVHM also has the potential to reduce, or even eliminate many of the costly inspections and operations activities required by current and future aerospace systems. This presentation will describe the array of NASA programs participating in the development of IVHM technologies for NASA missions. Future vehicle systems will use models of the system, its environment, and other intelligent agents with which they may interact. IVHM will be incorporated into future mission planners, reasoning engines, and adaptive control systems that can recommend or execute commands enabling the system to respond intelligently in real time. In the past, software errors and/or faulty sensors have been identified as significant contributors to mission failures. This presentation will also address the development and utilization of highly dependable sohare and sensor technologies, which are key components to ensure the reliability of IVHM systems.

Baroth, Edmund C.; Pallix, Joan

2006-01-01

331

Microsensors and mobile laboratory as instruments for computer-based health management  

E-print Network

Microsensors and mobile laboratory as instruments for computer-based health management in a pork. health-control program / pork-production chain / sensor / mobile laboratory Résumé ― Des porcine / capteur/ laboratoire mobile INTRODUCTION Computer-based programs for monitoring health

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

332

Promoting Stress Management: The Role of Comprehensive School Health Programs. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Digest examines how Comprehensive School Health Programs (CSHPs) may promote stress management in children and adolescents. CSHPs contain four key elements. The first element, community participation and focus, can be achieved through school health newsletters, health fairs, local newspaper, radio, and television promotions, and guest…

Massey, Marilyn S.

333

Animal Health and Management and Their Impact on Economic Efficiency1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relationships between animal health and economic efficiency were examined using data from genetic investigations and management studies. Genetic investiga- tions have indicated that cows bred for high production do require more health care, but that increased costs for health care negate only a small fraction of the greater returns from cows that are genet- ically superior for yield traits. These

C. W. Young; V. R. Eidman; J. K. Reneau

1985-01-01

334

Nurse Managed Center: Access to Primary Health Care for Urban Native Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Urban Native Americans represent a small, diverse minority with unique health needs. The purposes of this descriptive retrospective study were to describe (a) the characteristics and primary health problems of urban Native Americans who receive primary health care at an urban nurse managed center (NMC) and (b) the nursing interventions provided at an urban NMC to urban Native Americans. A

Donna Felber Neff; Elizabeth S. Kinion; Christen Cardina

2007-01-01

335

Daniel J. Ortiz, MPH, CSP Manager, Occupational Safety and Health Program Office  

E-print Network

#12;Daniel J. Ortiz, MPH, CSP Manager, Occupational Safety and Health Program Office Associate occupational safety and health training. Our program has grown to offer 43 classes in 2012-2013. In addition) Courses OTI 500: Trainer Course in Occupational Safety and Health Standards for Construction Industry

Bennett, Gisele

336

Consumer-directed health care and case management: Part 1.  

PubMed

Consumer-directed health care (CDH) is here. A quick look at the current health care market shows that CDH is quickly gaining a foothold. Most health plans either already offer some type of a plan or are in the midst of developing one for the next enrollment period. Early adopter health plans have gained significant market traction, gaining new employer clients on the basis of a consumer-directed health care strategy. PMID:16061162

Gupta, Amit

2005-01-01

337

A Resource Management Tool for Public Health Continuity of Operations During Disasters  

PubMed Central

Objective We developed and validated a user-centered information system to support the local planning of public health continuity of operations for the Community Health Services Division, Public Health - Seattle & King County, Washington. Methods The Continuity of Operations Data Analysis (CODA) system was designed as a prototype developed using requirements identified through participatory design. CODA uses open-source software that links personnel contact and licensing information with needed skills and clinic locations for 821 employees at 14 public health clinics in Seattle and King County. Using a web-based interface, CODA can visualize locations of personnel in relationship to clinics to assist clinic managers in allocating public health personnel and resources under dynamic conditions. Results Based on user input, the CODA prototype was designed as a low-cost, user-friendly system to inventory and manage public health resources. In emergency conditions, the system can run on a stand-alone battery-powered laptop computer. A formative evaluation by managers of multiple public health centers confirmed the prototype design’s usefulness. Emergency management administrators also provided positive feedback about the system during a separate demonstration. Conclusions Validation of the CODA information design prototype by public health managers and emergency management administrators demonstrates the potential usefulness of building a resource management system using open-source technologies and participatory design principles. PMID:24618165

Turner, Anne M.; Reeder, Blaine; Wallace, James C.

2014-01-01

338

Mycotoxicoses of ruminants and horses.  

PubMed

In the current study, mycotoxicoses of ruminants and horses are reviewed, with an emphasis on the occurrence of these diseases in South America. The main mycotoxicoses observed in grazing cattle include intoxications by indole-diterpenoid mycotoxins (Paspalum spp. contaminated by Claviceps paspali, Lolium perenne infected by Neotyphodium lolii, Cynodon dactylon infected by Claviceps cynodontis, and Poa huecu), gangrenous ergotism and dysthermic syndrome (hyperthermia) caused by Festuca arundinacea (syn. Festuca elatior) infected by Neotyphodium coenophialum (syn. Acremonium coenophialum), and photosensitization in pastures contaminated by toxigenic Pithomyces chartarum. Other mycotoxicoses in grazing cattle include slaframine toxicity in clover pastures infected by Rhizoctonia leguminicola and diplodiosis in cattle grazing in corn stubbles. The mycotoxicoses caused by contaminated concentrated food or byproducts in cattle include poisoning by toxins of Aspergillus clavatus, which contaminate barley or sugar beetroot by-products, gangrenous ergotism or dysthermic syndrome caused by wheat bran or wheat screenings contaminated with Claviceps purpurea, and acute respiratory distress caused by damaged sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas). The main mycotoxicosis of horses is leukoencephalomalacia caused by the fumonisins B1 and B2 produced by Fusarium spp. Poisoning by C. purpurea and F. elatior infected by N. coenophialum has also been reported as a cause of agalactia and neonatal mortality in mares. Slaframine toxicosis caused by the ingestion of alfalfa hay contaminated by R. leguminicola has also been reported in horses. PMID:24091682

Riet-Correa, Franklin; Rivero, Rodolfo; Odriozola, Ernesto; Adrien, Maria de Lourdes; Medeiros, Rosane M T; Schild, Ana Lucia

2013-11-01

339

Misfit and Match: The Frontline Management Initiative in the Community Services and Health Industry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The application of frontline management training in the community and health services (CS&H) industry in Victoria, Australia, was examined through interviews with managers of 11 user and 11 provider organizations in the public and private sectors. The study focused on the following topics: (1) the appropriateness of the Frontline Management

Roos, Ian; Smith, Chris Selby; Wright, Liz

340

Monitoring Health Care for Children with Chronic Conditions in a Managed Care Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Children with chronic health conditions face special issues in their interactions with managed care. These children often require additional and more varied services than do other children. Managed care plans increasingly include these children, especially with the growth of Medicaid managed care. This article examines the special issues facing children with chronic conditions and develops strategies for monitoring their

James M. Perrin; Karen Kuhlthau; Deborah Klein Walker; Ruth E. K. Stein; Paul W. Newacheck; Steven L. Gortmaker

1997-01-01

341

Ruminant feces harbor diverse uncultured symbiotic actinobacteria.  

PubMed

To isolate actinobacteria from ruminant feces and elucidate their correlations with ruminants, the actinobacterial community in sheep (Ovis aries) and cattle (Bos taurus) feces was determined by cultivation and clone library methods. Most of actinobacteria isolated belonged to Streptomyces, Amycolatopsis, Micromonospora, and Cellulosimicrobium genera. The strains showed above 99 % similarity with the type strains, respectively. All the strains isolated could grow on media containing pectin, cellulose, or xylan as the sole carbon sources. However, most antibacterial and antifungal activities were found in Streptomyces species. Clone library analysis revealed that the genera Mycobacterium, Aeromicrobium, Rhodococcus, Cellulomonas were present in cattle and sheep feces. In contrast, the 16S rRNA genes showed less than 98 % similarity with the type strains. The analysis of actinobacterial community in ruminant feces by clone library and cultivation yielded a total of 10 actinobacterial genera and three uncultured actinobacterial taxa. The ruminant feces harbored diverse actinobacterial community. Ruminants may represent an underexplored reservoir of novel actinomycetes of potential interest for probiotics and drug discovery. PMID:24142428

Tan, Hongming; Deng, Qingli; Cao, Lixiang

2014-03-01

342

Feeding behavior of grazing ruminants experiencing stress.  

PubMed

The mechanisms underlying diet selection of ruminants are less studied than those for monogastrics. However, recent studies have shown that these mechanisms may be more similar in ruminants and monogastrics than previously believed. Food aversion learning is observed in both monogastrics and ruminants, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis appears to be involved in avoidance learning. Using leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula), an introduced weed whose expansion has costly ecological and economic implications in western North America, as a model for underconsumed plant species, we hypothesized that sheep experience increased cortisol levels when they first consume leafy spurge and that this may be related to their reluctance to graze it. We also hypothesized that preexposure to leafy spurge would attenuate the development of a spurge-based aversion. Correspondingly, we hypothesized that preexposed sheep would not experience increased blood cortisol levels with leafy spurge gavage during an aversion trial. None of our hypotheses were disproved by the experiments. Our results lend support to the hypothesis that stress is required for the development of conditioned taste aversions and extend it to ruminants. We suggest that activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is integral to food aversion learning in ruminants. PMID:8295963

Kronberg, S L; Walker, J W; Fitzgerald, J A

1993-12-01

343

A Systematic Review of the Relationship between Rumination and Suicidality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rumination has been persistently implicated in the etiology of hopelessness and depression, which are proximal predictors of suicidality. As a result, researchers have started to examine the role of rumination in suicidality. This systematic review provides a concise synopsis of the current progress in examining the relationship between rumination

Morrison, Rebecca; O'Connor, Rory C.

2008-01-01

344

Rumination and executive function in depression: an experimental study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Major depression is associated with cognitive deficits, particularly those requiring central executive functioning. Depressed patients also tend to focus on and think about their symptoms and problems (“ruminate”) more than non-depressed controls. Although an association has been found between rumination and impaired performance on a central executive processing task, the causal relation between impaired executive functioning and rumination has

E Watkins; R G Brown

2002-01-01

345

State Rumination: Associations with Emotional Stress Reactivity and Attention Biases  

PubMed Central

Within dysphoria, rumination has been identified as a particularly maladaptive emotion regulation strategy linked to prolonged negative affect and the onset of depressive episodes. Until now, the majority of research assessing naturally occurring rumination has utilized trait rumination measures; however, additional information may be obtained by assessing state rumination. The current study examined the association between state rumination and participants’ emotional recovery from stress. In addition, biased attention toward emotional information was investigated as a mechanism that might underlie state rumination. Participants completed the exogenous cuing task to assess attentional engagement and disengagement from emotional facial expressions followed by a psychosocial stressor. State rumination and self-reported sadness were measured during the recovery period. As expected, state rumination was associated with less recovery in sadness scores, even after controlling for trait rumination and depressive symptoms. Moreover, within the high dysphoria group, participants who had more difficulty disengaging from emotional expressions reported higher levels of rumination in response to the stressor. Results highlight an important association between state rumination and individuals’ recovery from stress, and suggest that difficulty disengaging attention from emotional expressions might be one mechanism underlying state rumination in dysphoria.

LeMoult, Joelle; Arditte, Kimberly A.; D’Avanzato, Catherine; Joormann, Jutta

2014-01-01

346

Needs Assessment in Health Research Projects: A New Approach to Project Management in Iran  

PubMed Central

Background The science and technology health plan has defined the outline of health research to the national vision of Iran by 2025. The aim of this study was to focus on the process of needs assessment of health research projects also health research priority setting in Iran. Methods: The project management life cycle has four phases: Initiation, Planning, Execution and Closure. Based on abovementioned points we conducted the study. Results: Focusing on the needs assessment led to systematic implementation of needs assessment of health project in all of the medical sciences universities. Parallel with this achieved strategies health research priority setting was followed through specific process from empowerment to implementation. Conclusion: We should adopt with more systematic progressive methods of health project managements for both our national convenience as well as our international health research programs. PMID:23514981

PEYKARI, Niloofar; OWLIA, Parviz; MALEKAFZALI, Hossein; GHANEI, Mostafa; BABAMAHMOODI, Abdolreza; DJALALINIA, Shirin

2013-01-01

347

Exploring digital divides: an examination of eHealth technology use in health information seeking, communication and personal health information management in the USA.  

PubMed

Recent government initiatives to deploy health information technology in the USA, coupled with a growing body of scholarly evidence linking online heath information and positive health-related behaviors, indicate a widespread belief that access to health information and health information technologies can help reduce healthcare inequalities. However, it is less clear whether the benefits of greater access to online health information and health information technologies is equitably distributed across population groups, particularly to those who are underserved. To examine this issue, this article employs the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) to investigate relationships between a variety of socio-economic variables and the use of the web-based technologies for health information seeking, personal health information management and patient-provider communication within the context of the USA. This study reveals interesting patterns in technology adoption, some of which are in line with previous studies, while others are less clear. Whether these patterns indicate early evidence of a narrowing divide in eHealth technology use across population groups as a result of the narrowing divide in Internet access and computer ownership warrants further exploration. In particular, the findings emphasize the need to explore differences in the use of eHealth tools by medically underserved and disadvantaged groups. In so doing, it will be important to explore other psychosocial variables, such as health literacy, that may be better predictors of health consumers' eHealth technology adoption. PMID:21937464

Lustria, Mia Liza A; Smith, Scott Alan; Hinnant, Charles C

2011-09-01

348

Efficient Management of Health Centres Human Resources in Zambia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study uses Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) to estimate the degree of technical, allocative and cost efficiency in individual public and private health centres in Zambia; and to identify the relative inefficiencies in the use of various inputs among individual health centers. About 83% of the 40 health centres were technically inefficient; and 88% of them were both allocatively and

Felix Masiye; Joses M. Kirigia; Ali Emrouznejad; Luis G. Sambo; Abdou Mounkaila; Davis Chimfwembe; David Okello

2006-01-01

349

Advanced Health Management Algorithms for Crew Exploration Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Achieving the goals of the President's Vision for Exploration will require new and innovative ways to achieve reliability increases of key systems and sub-systems. The most prominent approach used in current systems is to maintain hardware redundancy. This imposes constraints to the system and utilizes weight that could be used for payload for extended lunar, Martian, or other deep space missions. A technique to improve reliability while reducing the system weight and constraints is through the use of an Advanced Health Management System (AHMS). This system contains diagnostic algorithms and decision logic to mitigate or minimize the impact of system anomalies on propulsion system performance throughout the powered flight regime. The purposes of the AHMS are to increase the probability of successfully placing the vehicle into the intended orbit (Earth, Lunar, or Martian escape trajectory), increase the probability of being able to safely execute an abort after it has developed anomalous performance during launch or ascent phases of the mission, and to minimize or mitigate anomalies during the cruise portion of the mission. This is accomplished by improving the knowledge of the state of the propulsion system operation at any given turbomachinery vibration protection logic and an overall system analysis algorithm that utilizes an underlying physical model and a wide array of engine system operational parameters to detect and mitigate predefined engine anomalies. These algorithms are generic enough to be utilized on any propulsion system yet can be easily tailored to each application by changing input data and engine specific parameters. The key to the advancement of such a system is the verification of the algorithms. These algorithms will be validated through the use of a database of nominal and anomalous performance from a large propulsion system where data exists for catastrophic and noncatastrophic propulsion sytem failures.

Davidson, Matt; Stephens, John; Jones, Judit

2005-01-01

350

[Management, quality of health and occupational safety and hospital organization: is integration possible?].  

PubMed

The evolution of the national and European legislation has progressively transformed the working environments into organized environments. Specific models for its management are being proposed, which should be integrated into general management strategies. In the case of hospitals this integration should consider the peculiar organizational complexity, where the management of the occupational risk needs to be integrated with clinical risk management and economic risk management. Resources management should also consider that Occupational Medicine has not a direct monetary benefit for the organisation, but only indirect health consequences in terms of reduction of accidents and occupational diseases. The deep and simultaneous analysis of the current general management systems and the current management methods of occupational safety and health protection allows one to hyphotesise a possible integration between them. For both of them the Top Management is the main responsible of the quality management strategies and the use of specific documents in the managerial process, such as the document of risks evaluation in the occupational management and the quality manual in the general management, is of paramount importance. An integrated management has also the scope to pursue a particular kind of quality management, where ethics and job satisfaction are innovative, as established by recent European guidelines, management systems and national legislations. PMID:21468157

Corrao, Carmela Romana Natalina

2011-01-01

351

Case Management and Client Access to Health and Social Services in Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

A primary goal of case management is to coordinate services across treatment settings and to integrate substance abuse services\\u000a with other types of services offered in the community, including housing, mental health, medical, and social services. However,\\u000a case management is a global construct that consists of several key dimensions, which include extent of case management coverage,\\u000a the degree of management

Jeffrey A. Alexander; Harold Pollack; Tammie Nahra; Rebecca Wells; Christy Harris Lemak

2007-01-01

352

Managing Occupational Health and Safety in Small, Culturally Diverse Workplaces: Issues and Solutions, Sophia Antipolis : France (2011)  

E-print Network

Managing Occupational Health and Safety in Small, Culturally Diverse Workplaces: Issues-00660170,version1-20Sep2012 Author manuscript, published in "Managing Occupational Health and Safety;Managing Occupational Health and Safety in Small, Culturally Diverse Workplaces: Issues and Solutions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

353

Brookhaven National Laboratory/ Photon Sciences Subject: Frequently Asked Questions about Occupational Health and Safety Management System (OHSAS 18001)  

E-print Network

Occupational Health and Safety Management System (OHSAS 18001) Number: PS-ESH-0060 Revision: 2 Effective: 6 Occupational Health and Safety Management System (OHSAS 18001) Background: Everyone benefits from having a safe of accomplishing this objective. Question 1 - What is an Occupational Safety and Health Management System

Homes, Christopher C.

354

Abstract--Health management systems have been gaining substantial attentions in power engineering areas in recent years  

E-print Network

Abstract--Health management systems have been gaining substantial attentions in power engineering will describe a health management system developed in Advanced Diagnosis, Automation, and Control Lab at North Carolina State University. The health management system utilizes several data analysis and decision making

Chow, Mo-Yuen

355

An innovative model of health care delivery: the care management program of the University of Iowa.  

PubMed

The Indigent Patient Care Program (legislatively enacted in 1915) provides comprehensive health care to indigent Iowans without health insurance. The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, a leading academic medical center, was designated as the health care provider for these medically and socially complex patients. The Care Management Program of the University of Iowa (CMPUI) is an innovative care delivery model responsible for total health management of patients enrolled in the indigent program. The CMPUI is a solution to preserve the tripartite missions of an academic medical center while ensuring the preservation of the historic Indigent Patient Care Program in Iowa. PMID:12141016

Muller, Barbara A; Doyle, Cynthia L; Hasselman, Elizabeth; Moore, Pamela S; Powell, Joyce L; Cayner, Jay J

2002-07-01

356

Intrinsic ruminal innervation in ruminants of different feeding types  

PubMed Central

According to their feeding habits, ruminants can be classified as grazers, concentrate selectors and those of intermediate type. The different feeding types are reflected in distinct anatomical properties of the forestomachs. The present study was designed to investigate whether the intrinsic innervation patterns of the rumen (the main part of the forestomach) differ between intermediate types and grazers. Myenteric plexus preparations from the rumen of goats (intermediate type), fallow deer (intermediate type), cattle (grazer) and sheep (grazer) were analysed by immunohistochemical detection of the following antigens: Hu-protein (HuC/D), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), substance P (SP), calbindin (CALB) and somatostatin (SOM). Myenteric ganglia of cattle contained 73 ± 6 neurons per ganglion, whereas the ganglia of sheep were significantly smaller (45 ± 18 neurons per ganglion). The ganglion density of the myenteric plexus was highest in fallow deer (15 ± 3 ganglia per cm2) and lowest in cattle (6 ± 1 ganglia per cm2). All myenteric neurons were either ChAT or NOS positive. The proportion of NOS-positive neurons was significantly lower in sheep (29.5 ± 8.2% of all neurons) than in goats (44.2 ± 9.8%). In all species, additional analysis of the different neuropeptides revealed the following subpopulations in descending order of percentile appearance: ChAT/SP > NOS/VIP/NPY > ChAT/– > NOS/NPY. Expression of CALB was detected in a minority of the ChAT-positive neurons in all species. Somatostatin immunoreactive somata were found only in preparations obtained from fallow deer and sheep. These data suggest that the rumen of grazers is under stronger cholinergic control than the rumen of species belonging to the intermediate type, although most subpopulations of neurons are present in all species. However, whether the strong mixing patterns of low quality roughage during digestion are enabled by the prominent excitatory input of the rumen of grazers requires elucidation in further studies. PMID:18657258

Munnich, Juliane; Gabel, Gotthold; Pfannkuche, Helga

2008-01-01

357

U-Health Service for Managing Chronic Disease: A Case Study on Managing Metabolic Syndrome in a Health Center in South Korea  

PubMed Central

Objectives We were to analyze the effect of managing metabolic syndrome using a u-health service in a health center. Methods We collected biometric data from 316 subjects living in a county (gun) in South Korea before and after the introduction of uhealth services in 2010. Analysis was done by contingency table using SPSS and latent growth model using AMOS. Results We found that regional u-health services affected instance of metabolic syndrome. Further, biometrics and health behavior improved. After six months of u-health services, the number of subjects with three or more factors for metabolic syndrome decreased by 62.5%; 63.3% of regular drinkers stopped drinking; 83.3% of subjects who rarely exercised began to exercise twice a week or more; and 60.9% of smokers stopped smoking. Conclusions U-health services can change health behavior and biometrics to manage metabolic syndrome in rural areas. The usefulness of u-health services is discussed. PMID:22259728

Song, Tae-Min; Lee, Sang Ho

2011-01-01

358

Environmental attributes to respiratory diseases of small ruminants.  

PubMed

Respiratory diseases are the major disease crisis in small ruminants. A number of pathogenic microorganisms have been implicated in the development of respiratory disease but the importance of environmental factors in the initiation and progress of disease can never be overemphasized. They irritate the respiratory tree producing stress in the microenvironment causing a decline in the immune status of the small ruminants and thereby assisting bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections to break down the tissue defense barriers. Environmental pollutants cause acute or chronic reactions as they deposit on the alveolar surface which are characterized by inflammation or fibrosis and the formation of transitory or persistent tissue manifestation. Some of the effects of exposures may be immediate, whereas others may not be evident for many decades. Although the disease development can be portrayed as three sets of two-way communications (pathogen-environment, host-environment, and host-pathogen), the interactions are highly variable. Moreover, the environmental scenario is never static; new compounds are introduced daily making a precise evaluation of the disease burden almost impossible. The present review presents a detailed overview of these interactions and the ultimate effect on the respiratory health of sheep and goat. PMID:24782941

Rahal, Anu; Ahmad, Abul Hasan; Prakash, Atul; Mandil, Rajesh; Kumar, Aruna T

2014-01-01

359

Propulsion Health Management System Development for Affordable and Reliable Operation of Space Exploration Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The constraints of future Exploration Missions will require unique integrated system health management capabilities throughout the mission. An ambitious launch schedule, human-rating requirements, long quiescent periods, limited human access for repair or replacement, and long communication delays, all require an integrated approach to health management that can span distinct, yet interdependent vehicle subsystems, anticipate failure states, provide autonomous remediation and support the Exploration Mission from beginning to end. Propulsion is a critical part of any space exploration mission, and monitoring the health of the propulsion system is an integral part of assuring mission safety and success. Health management is a somewhat ubiquitous technology that encompasses a large spectrum of physical components and logical processes. For this reason, it is essential to develop a systematic plan for propulsion health management system development. This paper provides a high-level perspective of propulsion health management systems, and describes a logical approach for the future planning and early development that are crucial to planned space exploration programs. It also presents an overall approach, or roadmap, for propulsion health management system development and a discussion of the associated roadblocks and challenges.

Melcher, Kevin J.; Maul, William A.; Garg, Sanjay

2007-01-01

360

Public Health Informatics: A CDC Course for Public Health Program Managers  

E-print Network

to the modern practice of public health. Yet today’s public health professionals generally have no formal training in public health informatics—the application of information science and technology to public health practice and research. Responding to this need, the U.S.

unknown authors

361

Intravenous lipopolysaccharide challenge alters ruminal bacterial microbiota and disrupts ruminal metabolism in dairy cattle.  

PubMed

In the present study, three primiparous lactating Holstein cows (260-285 d in lactation) were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design to assess the effects of three doses (0.0, 0.4 and 0.8 ?g/kg body weight) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, Escherichia coli 0111:B4) on changes in ruminal microbiota and ruminal fermentation. Ruminal pH was linearly decreased (P< 0.001) by LPS challenge, and the concentrations of acetate, propionate, butyrate, total volatile fatty acids and amino N increased linearly (P< 0.001) according to the LPS dose. LPS infusion linearly decreased (P< 0.001) the organic matter degradability of alfalfa hay and soyabean meal in the rumen, but did not affect (P>0.10) the gene expression of Na?/K?-ATPase and monocarboxylic acid transporter-1, -2 and -4. A plot of principal coordinate analysis based on unweighted UniFrac values and analysis of molecular variance revealed that the structure of ruminal bacterial communities in the control was distinct from that of the ruminal microbiota in the cattle exposed to LPS. At the phylum level, when compared with the control group, LPS infusion in the tested cows linearly increased (P< 0.05) the abundance of Firmicutes, and linearly decreased (P< 0.05) the percentage of Bacteroidetes, Tenericutes, Spirochaetes, Chlorobi and Lentisphaerae. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report that intravenously LPS challenge altered the ruminal bacterial microbiota and fermentation profiles. The present data suggest that systemic LPS could alter ruminal environment and ruminal microbiota composition, leading to a general decrease in fermentative activity. PMID:24774964

Jing, Longhui; Zhang, Ruiyang; Liu, Yujie; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

2014-07-01

362

In vitro fibrolytic potential of anaerobic rumen fungi from ruminants and non-ruminant herbivores  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study, anaerobic fungi were isolated from different ruminants and non-ruminants; i.e., cattle, buffalo, sheep,\\u000a goats, wild bluebulls, elephants, deer, and zebras; and were identified as Anaeromyces, Orpinomyces, Caecomyces, Piromyces, and Neocallimastix sp., based on their morphological characteristics. These isolates possessed significant in vitro hydrolytic enzyme activities;\\u000a however, an isolate of Caecomyces sp. from elephant was found to

Ravinder NagpalAnil; Anil Kumar Puniya; Jatinder Paul Sehgal; Kishan Singh

2011-01-01

363

[General background and practical implementation of the health management service institution in Korea].  

PubMed

The Korean Occupational Safety and Health Act requires an employer with more than 50 employees to assign a health manager or an occupational physician. However, there are many cases where it is difficult for medium-scale enterprises to perform occupational health practices autonomously because their financial base is weaker than that of large-scale enterprises. The Korean Occupational Safety and Health Act was amended in 1990 so that medium-scale enterprises could entrust a health management service institution with their health management tasks. This system is similar to the outsourcing of medical examinations, occupational physicians, or the measurement of the working environment in Japan, but its legal background and actual activities are korea-specific, and it has some different points. In particular, the quality control of health management service institutions by legal and administrative regulations, and the multidisciplinary provision of services contribute to the development of occupational health in medium-scale enterprises. This will be a good reference for occupational health services in small- and medium-scale enterprises in the future in Japan. PMID:25224714

Okahara, Shintaro; Lee, Byeong-Woo; Ogasawara, Takayuki; Mori, Koji

2014-09-01

364

Academic Health Systems Management: The Rationale Behind Capitated Contracts  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine why hospitals enter into “capitated” contracts, which often generate accounting losses. The authors’ hypothesis is that hospitals coordinate contracts to keep beds full and that in principal, capitated contracts reflect sound capacity management. Summary Background Data In high-overhead industries, different consumers pay different prices for similar services (e.g., full-fare vs. advanced-purchase plane tickets, full tuition vs. financial aid). Some consumers gain access by paying less than total cost. Hospitals, like other high-overhead business enterprises, must optimize the use of their capacity, amortizing overhead over as many patients as possible. This necessity for enhanced throughput forces hospitals and health systems to discount empty beds, sometimes to the point where they incur accounting losses serving some payors. Methods The authors analyzed the cost accounting system at their university teaching hospital to compare hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) lengths of stay (LOS), variable direct costs (VDC), overhead of capitated patients, and reimbursement versus other payors for all hospital discharges (n = 29,036) in fiscal year 1998. The data were analyzed by diagnosis-related groups (DRGs), length of stay (LOS), insurance carrier, proximity to hospital, and discharge disposition. Patients were then distinguished across payor categories based on their resource utilization, proximity to the hospital, DRG, LOS, and discharge status. Results The mean cost for capitated patients was $4,887, less than half of the mean cost of $10,394 for the entire hospitalized population. The mean capitated reimbursement was $928/day, exceeding the mean daily VDC of $616 but not the total cost of $1,445/day. Moreover, the mean total cost per patient day of treating a capitated patient was $400 less than the mean total cost per day for noncapitated patients. The hospital’s capitated health maintenance organization (HMO) patients made up 16.0% of the total admissions but only 9.4% of the total patient days. Both the mean LOS of 3.4 days and the mean ICU LOS of 0.3 days were significantly different from the overall values of 5.8 days and 1 day, respectively, for the noncapitated population. For patients classified with a DRG with complication who traveled from more than 60 miles away, the mean LOS was 10.7 days and the mean total cost was $21,658. This is in contrast to all patients who traveled greater than 60 miles, who had an LOS of 7.2 days and a mean total cost of $12,569. Conclusion The capitated payor directed the bulk of its subscribers to one hospital (other payors transferred their sicker patients). This was reflected in the capitated group’s lower costs and LOS. This stable stream of relatively low-acuity patients enhanced capacity utilization. For capitated patients, the hospital still benefits by recovering the incremental cost (VDC) of treating these patients, and only a portion of the assigned overhead. Thus, in the short run, capitated patients provide a positive economic benefit. Other payors’ higher-acuity patients arrive more randomly, place greater strains on capacity, and generate higher overhead costs. This results in differential reimbursement to cover this incremental overhead. Having a portfolio of contracts allows the hospital to optimize capacity both in terms of patient flows and acuity. One risk of operating near capacity is that capitated patients could displace other higher-paying patients. PMID:10816628

Taheri, Paul A.; Butz, David A.; Greenfield, Lazar J.

2000-01-01

365

CRCHD Geographical Management of Cancer Health Disparities Program (GMaP)  

Cancer.gov

GEOGRAPHICAL MANAGEMENT OF CANCER HEALTH DISPARITIES PROGRAM (GMaP) Overview Developed with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act administrative supplements, GMaP is a national program that links CRCHD’s flagship programs (the Comprehensive Partnership

366

Review of ?Managing Arsenic in the Environment: From Soil to Hman Health?  

EPA Science Inventory

This is a book review of "Managing Arsenic in the Environment: From Soil to Human Health," R. Naidu, E. Smith, G. Owens, P. Bhattacharya, and P. Nadebaum eds., CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne, Australia, 656 pp.,...

367

Web 2.0: what a health care manager needs to know.  

PubMed

Web 2.0 is one of the latest buzzwords for an assortment of emerging technologies on the Web. Health care managers need to know the benefits and drawbacks of these technologies before integrating them into organizational operations. In this article, we first illustrate the differences in health care management style and workflow between the Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 technologies. After defining and explaining some of the representative technologies, we discuss the benefits of Web 2.0 in general and the reasons why a health care manager should know these trends. And lastly, we list some caveats that a health care manager should know before fully embracing the technologies. The keys are to align the technologies with the culture and workflow of the organization and have a clear policy on their usages. PMID:18510145

Zeng, Xiaoming; Bell, Paul D

2008-01-01

368

A Cryogenic Fluid System Simulation in Support of Integrated Systems Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simulations serve as important tools throughout the design and operation of engineering systems. In the context of sys-tems health management, simulations serve many uses. For one, the underlying physical models can be used by model-based health management tools to develop diagnostic and prognostic models. These simulations should incorporate both nominal and faulty behavior with the ability to inject various faults into the system. Such simulations can there-fore be used for operator training, for both nominal and faulty situations, as well as for developing and prototyping health management algorithms. In this paper, we describe a methodology for building such simulations. We discuss the design decisions and tools used to build a simulation of a cryogenic fluid test bed, and how it serves as a core technology for systems health management development and maturation.

Barber, John P.; Johnston, Kyle B.; Daigle, Matthew

2013-01-01

369

Monitoring success of HIV/AIDS health care delivery : balancing donor requirements with internal management needs  

E-print Network

Health care delivery organizations bear the burden of meeting monitoring and evaluation requirements set by numerous external organizations often at the cost of implementing internally defined management needs. Monitoring ...

Hu, Terry

2011-01-01

370

Ruminant organotypic brain-slice cultures as a model for the investigation of CNS listeriosis  

PubMed Central

Central nervous system (CNS) infections in ruminant livestock, such as listeriosis, are of major concern for veterinary and public health. To date, no host-specific in vitro models for ruminant CNS infections are available. Here, we established and evaluated the suitability of organotypic brain-slices of ruminant origin as in vitro model to study mechanisms of Listeria monocytogenes CNS infection. Ruminants are frequently affected by fatal listeric rhombencephalitis that closely resembles the same condition occurring in humans. Better insight into host–pathogen interactions in ruminants is therefore of interest, not only from a veterinary but also from a public health perspective. Brains were obtained at the slaughterhouse, and hippocampal and cerebellar brain-slices were cultured up to 49 days. Viability as well as the composition of cell populations was assessed weekly. Viable neurons, astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes were observed up to 49 days in vitro. Slice cultures were infected with L. monocytogenes, and infection kinetics were monitored. Infected brain cells were identified by double immunofluorescence, and results were compared to natural cases of listeric rhombencephalitis. Similar to the natural infection, infected brain-slices showed focal replication of L. monocytogenes and bacteria were predominantly observed in microglia, but also in astrocytes, and associated with axons. These results demonstrate that organotypic brain-slice cultures of bovine origin survive for extended periods and can be infected easily with L. monocytogenes. Therefore, they are a suitable model to study aspects of host–pathogen interaction in listeric encephalitis and potentially in other neuroinfectious diseases. PMID:22804762

Guldimann, Claudia; Lejeune, Beatrice; Hofer, Sandra; Leib, Stephen L; Frey, Joachim; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Seuberlich, Torsten; Oevermann, Anna

2012-01-01

371

Progress on quality management in the German health system - a long and winding road  

PubMed Central

The interest in quality management in health care has increased in the last decades as the financial crises in most health systems generated the need for solutions to contain costs while maintaining quality of care. In Germany the development of quality management procedures has been closely linked with health care reforms. Starting in the early nineties quality management issues gained momentum in reform legislation only 10 years later. This review summarizes recent developments in medical quality management as related to the federal reform legislation in Germany. It provides an overview on the infrastructure, actors and on the current discussion concerning quality management in medical care. Germany had to catch up on implementing quality management in the health system compared to other countries. Considerable progress has been made, however, it is recognized that the full integration of quality management will require long-term commitment in developing methods, instruments and communication procedures. The most ambitious project at present is the development of a comprehensive comparative quality management system for hospitals at national level, including public reporting. For the time being medical quality management in Germany is dealt with as a technical and professional issue while the aspects of patient orientation and transparency need further advancement. PMID:17550593

Breckenkamp, Juergen; Wiskow, Christiane; Laaser, Ulrich

2007-01-01

372

Libyan National Health Services The Need to Move to Management-by-Objectives.  

PubMed

In the last four decades, there has been a substantial horizontal expansion of health services in Libya. This resulted in improvement in morbidity and mortality, in particularly those related to infectious disease. However, measures such as the national performance gap indicator reveal an underperforming health system. In this article, we discuss aspects related to the Libyan health system and its current status including areas of weakness. Overcoming current failures and further improvement are unlikely to occur spontaneously without proper planning. Defining community health problems, identifying unmet needs, surveying resources to meet them, establishing SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, and realistic and time specific) objectives, and projecting administrative action to accomplish the proposed programs, are a must. The health system should rely on newer approaches such as management-by-objectives and risk-management rather than the prevailing crisis-management attitude. PMID:21499467

El Taguri, A; Elkhammas, Ea; Bakoush, O; Ashammakhi, N; Baccoush, M; Betilmal, I

2008-01-01

373

Findings from an Organizational Network Analysis to Support Local Public Health Management  

PubMed Central

We assessed the feasibility of using organizational network analysis in a local public health organization. The research setting was an urban/suburban county health department with 156 employees. The goal of the research was to study communication and information flow in the department and to assess the technique for public health management. Network data were derived from survey questionnaires. Computational analysis was performed with the Organizational Risk Analyzer. Analysis revealed centralized communication, limited interdependencies, potential knowledge loss through retirement, and possible informational silos. The findings suggested opportunities for more cross program coordination but also suggested the presences of potentially efficient communication paths and potentially beneficial social connectedness. Managers found the findings useful to support decision making. Public health organizations must be effective in an increasingly complex environment. Network analysis can help build public health capacity for complex system management. PMID:18481183

Caldwell, Michael; Rockoff, Maxine L.; Gebbie, Kristine; Carley, Kathleen M.; Bakken, Suzanne

2008-01-01

374

Libyan National Health Services The Need to Move to Management-by-Objectives  

PubMed Central

In the last four decades, there has been a substantial horizontal expansion of health services in Libya. This resulted in improvement in morbidity and mortality, in particularly those related to infectious disease. However, measures such as the national performance gap indicator reveal an underperforming health system. In this article, we discuss aspects related to the Libyan health system and its current status including areas of weakness. Overcoming current failures and further improvement are unlikely to occur spontaneously without proper planning. Defining community health problems, identifying unmet needs, surveying resources to meet them, establishing SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, and realistic and time specific) objectives, and projecting administrative action to accomplish the proposed programs, are a must. The health system should rely on newer approaches such as management-by-objectives and risk-management rather than the prevailing crisis-management attitude. PMID:21499467

El Taguri, A; Elkhammas, EA; Bakoush, O; Ashammakhi, N; Baccoush, M; Betilmal, I

2008-01-01

375

Career stress and female managers' health in Taiwan's hospitals: A multilevel model approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: This study investigates how perception-induced stress (barrier) and social capital (facilitator) affect the health of female managers. Methods and Measurement: On the basis of the responses of 229 valid questionnaires of middle- and high-level female managers in large-scale hospitals, using a multilevel data analysis approach, this study investigates how perception-induced stress and social capital influence self-reported poor health of

Duan-Rung Chen; Yeh-Yun Lin; Kuo-Piao Chung

2008-01-01

376

Deutero-Learning: Implications for Managing Public Health Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to apply an allied health subculture model to clarify key contextual factors that can emerge in the evolution of an allied health subculture as a consequence of deutero-learning. Design/methodology/approach: Two case studies are compared to illustrate these two extreme variations in deutero-learning. Findings:…

Rowe, Patricia A.; Boyce, Rosalie A.

2009-01-01

377

Cassandra: Flexible Trust Management, Applied to Electronic Health Records  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the specication of access control policy in large-scale distributed systems. We present Cassandra, a language and system for expressing policy, and the results of a substantial case study, a security policy for a national Electronic Health Record system, based on the requirements for the ongoing UK National Health Service procurement exercise. Cassandra policies are expressed in a language

Moritz Y. Becker; Peter Sewell

2004-01-01

378

Achieving Organizational Effectiveness through Health Management and Ergonomics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today, organizational effectiveness and employees’ performance will be disrupted even by relatively low level of health problems. The way organizations design their health programmes is an important determinant on how much performance they extract from employees.The physical environment can influence the interface between individuals and organizations. Technology and advancements in the workplaces have their negative impact on the physical environment.

Ramesh G; Naidu Munirathinam T

2011-01-01

379

Cassandra: flexible trust management, applied to electronic health records  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the specification of access control policy in large-scale distributed systems. We present Cassandra, a language and system for expressing policy, and the results of a substantial case study, a security policy for a national electronic health record system, based on the requirements for the ongoing UK National Health Service procurement exercise. Cassandra policies are expressed in a language

Moritz Y. Becker; Peter Sewell

2004-01-01

380

Advanced Vibration Monitoring for Wind Turbine Health Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rotorcraft and wind turbines are both susceptible to critical drive train failure modes involving bearings and gears. The helicopter community has developed sophisticated health and usage monitoring systems (HUMS) to track damage accumulation on critical components and detect incipient faults. Health and usage monitoring systems typically consist of a variety of onboard sensors, data acquisition systems, and signal processing and

Rolf F. Orsagh; Hyungdae Lee; Carl S. Byington

381

Rumination and Impaired Resource Allocation in Depression  

PubMed Central

Depression is characterized by a range of cognitive deficits that theorists posit are due to the resource capturing properties of rumination. The present study was designed to examine the relation between rumination and resource allocation in depression. Twenty-five depressed and 25 nondepressed participants completed a modified dual-task version of the recency-probes task, which assesses the controlled allocation of cognitive resources by comparing performance across low- and high-interference conditions. In low-interference conditions, participants performed either the recency-probes task or a tracking task, which required participants to track specific stimuli across trials (i.e., no dual-task interference). In the high-interference condition, participants performed both the recency-probes task and the tracking task, which required the controlled allocation of resources to resolve dual-task interference. Depressed participants performed significantly worse than did their nondepressed counterparts in only the high-interference condition; performance of the 2 groups was comparable in the low-interference conditions. Furthermore, the degree to which depressed participants were impaired in the high-interference condition was correlated .74 with rumination. These findings suggest that an association between rumination and impairments in resource allocation underlies the cognitive difficulties experienced by depressed individuals. PMID:19899845

Levens, Sara M.; Muhtadie, Luma; Gotlib, Ian H.

2010-01-01

382

Pestivirus infections in ruminants other than cattle.  

PubMed

Pestiviruses infect a wide range of domestic, captive and free-living ruminants. Among domestic livestock, Border disease virus is a well recognised cause of an important congenital disease of sheep in virtually all sheep-rearing countries of the world. The clinical signs, pathogenesis, diagnosis, epidemiology and control of this disease are described in detail. One natural outbreak of Border disease in domestic goats has been described and there is serological and virological evidence that pestiviruses occur widely in this species. A pestivirus has been isolated from a farmed red deer (Cervus elaphus) and there is serological evidence of a widespread low prevalence of infection among this new domestic species. Pestiviruses have been associated also with outbreaks of disease among captive ruminants in zoological collections. Among free-living ruminants, pestiviruses have been recovered from dead roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), fallow deer (Dama dama), African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) and wildebeest (Connochaetes spp.) but in all these instances the contribution of the virus to the cause of the disease was uncertain. Serological surveys have shown that many species of free-living ruminants in North America, Europe and Africa have varying prevalence rates of antibodies to pestiviruses. PMID:1966719

Nettleton, P F

1990-03-01

383

Roles of Conceptus Secretory Proteins in Establishment and Maintenance of Pregnancy in Ruminants  

PubMed Central

Reproduction in ruminant species is a highly complex biological process requiring a dialogue between the developing conceptus (embryo-fetus and associated placental membranes) and maternal uterus which must be established during the peri-implantation period for pregnancy recognition signaling and regulation of gene expression by uterine epithelial and stromal cells. The uterus provide a microenvironment in which molecules secreted by uterine epithelia and transported into the uterine lumen represent histotroph, also known as the secretome, that are required for growth and development of the conceptus and receptivity of the uterus to implantation by the elongating conceptus. Pregnancy recognition signaling as related to sustaining the functional lifespan of the corpora lutea, is required to sustain the functional life-span of corpora lutea for production of progesterone which is essential for uterine functions supportive of implantation and placentation required for successful outcomes of pregnancy. It is within the peri-implantation period that most embryonic deaths occur in ruminants due to deficiencies attributed to uterine functions or failure of the conceptus to develop appropriately, signal pregnancy recognition and/or undergo implantation and placentation. The endocrine status of the pregnant ruminant and her nutritional status are critical for successful establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. The challenge is to understand the complexity of key mechanisms that are characteristic of successful reproduction in humans and animals and to use that knowledge to enhance fertility and reproductive health of ruminant species in livestock enterprises. PMID:25049471

Bazer, Fuller W.; Song, Gwonhwa; Thatcher, William W.

2012-01-01

384

Chronic Disease Self-Management and Health Literacy in Four Ethnic Groups  

PubMed Central

Research from several fields has explored health literacy as a multidimensional construct. The authors’ multimethod study, “The Impact of Cultural Differences on Health Literacy and Chronic Disease Outcomes,” assessed health literacy and chronic disease self-management among 296 patients from four ethnic groups (Vietnamese, African American, White, Latino) at a Massachusetts community health center between 2006 and 2010. Health literacy was assessed using the short form of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA), the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM), and the Short Assessment of Health Literacy for Spanish-speaking Adults (SAHLSA) measures. Qualitative research methods, including in-depth interviews (n = 34), home visits (n = 12), chronic disease diaries (n = 15), and focus groups (n = 47), were completed with a subset of participants. Qualitative interviews indicated a wide range of interpretations of S-TOFHLA questions in which participants substituted their own illness or health care experiences for the abstract examples offered in the instrument, at times leading to incorrect responses. Situating these responses in a broader social and cultural context, this article describes examples of the wide range of chronic disease self-management abilities among participants with limited education and/or low health literacy. It also discusses the culturally variable health beliefs identified among participants interviewed that may play important roles in their chronic disease self-management practices. PMID:23030562

SHAW, SUSAN J.; ARMIN, JULIE; TORRES, CRISTINA HUEBNER; ORZECH, KATHRYN M.; VIVIAN, JAMES

2012-01-01

385

Managing the pursuit of health and wealth: the key challenges  

PubMed Central

This article forms part of a six-part Series on trade and health, and sets the stage for this Series by analysing key aspects of the relationship between trade and health. The Series takes stock of this relation and provides timely analysis of the key challenges facing efforts to achieve an appropriate balance between trade and health across a diverse range of issues. This introductory article reviews how trade and health have risen and expanded on global policy agendas in the past decade in unprecedented ways, describes how trade and health issues are respectively governed in international relations, examines the ongoing search for policy coherence between the two policy spheres, and highlights the topics of the remaining articles in the Series. PMID:19167061

Fidler, David P; Drager, Nick; Lee, Kelley

2009-01-01

386

Self-Management: Taking Charge of Your Health  

MedlinePLUS

... you don’t believe this, you’ll never be motivated to manage your illness effectively. Managing your illness involves ... your goals. Check your confidence level. Ask yourself, “How confident am I that I’ll be able to meet this goal?” If the answer is “Not ...

387

A structured management approach to implementation of health promotion interventions in Head Start.  

PubMed

Improving the health and health literacy of low-income families is a national public health priority in the United States. The federal Head Start program provides a national infrastructure for implementation of health promotion interventions for young children and their families. The Health Care Institute (HCI) at the Anderson School of Management at the University of California, Los Angeles, developed a structured approach to health promotion training for Head Start grantees using business management principles. This article describes the HCI approach and provides examples of implemented programs and selected outcomes, including knowledge and behavior changes among Head Start staff and families. This prevention-focused training platform has reached 60,000 Head Start families in the United States since its inception in 2001. HCI has demonstrated consistent outcomes in diverse settings and cultures, suggesting both scalability and sustainability. PMID:24028835

Herman, Ariella; Nelson, Bergen B; Teutsch, Carol; Chung, Paul J

2013-01-01

388

Nutrition-related health management in a Bangladeshi community.  

PubMed

The British Bangladeshi community is one of the youngest and fastest growing ethnic minority groups in the UK. Many report poor socio-economic and health profiles with the existence of substantial health inequalities, particularly in relation to type 2 diabetes. Although there is compelling evidence for the effectiveness of lifestyle interventions in the prevention of type 2 diabetes, there is little understanding of how best to tailor treatments to the needs of minority ethnic groups. Little is known about nutrition related lifestyle choices in the Bangladeshi community or the factors influencing such decisions. Only by exploring these factors will it be possible to design and tailor interventions appropriately. The Bangladeshi Initiative for the Prevention of Diabetes study explored lay beliefs and attitudes, religious teachings and professional perspectives in relation to diabetes prevention in the Bangladeshi community in Tower Hamlets, London. Contrary to the views of health professionals and previous research, poor knowledge was not the main barrier to healthy lifestyle choices. Rather the desire to comply with cultural norms, particularly those relating to hospitality, conflicted with efforts to implement healthy behaviours. Considerable support from Islamic teachings for diabetes prevention messages was provided by religious leaders, and faith may have an important role in supporting health promotion in this community. Some health professionals expressed outdated views on community attitudes and were concerned about their own limited cultural understanding. The potential for collaborative working between health educators and religious leaders should be explored further, and the cultural competence of health professionals addressed. PMID:21144124

Grace, Clare

2011-02-01

389

Implementation of personal health records by case managers in a VAMC general medicine clinic  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study objective was to determine the feasibility of implementation of personal health records (PHRs) by case managers (CMs) in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) Continuity of Care (COC) Clinic, to ascertain the impact of PHRs on patient access to vital health information, and to assess the effect on provider–patient communication. One hundred and fifty patients and 8 nurse

Joanne K Tobacman; Pamella Kissinger; Marilyn Wells; Joan Prokuski; Mary Hoyer; Patricia McPherson; Julie Wheeler; Joyce Kron-Chalupa; Carol Parsons; Patricia Weller; Bridget Zimmerman

2004-01-01

390

Providing Health Care and Education To Migrant Farmworkers in Nurse-Managed Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Migrant Health Service, Inc., was established to address the health needs of migrant farmworkers and their families. Ten satellite nurse-managed centers and two mobile units use a voucher system to provide financial support for clients. The centers also provide clinical experiences for nursing students. (Contains 22 references.) (JOW)

Guasasco, Charlene; Heuer, Loretta Jean; Lausch, Cheryl

2002-01-01

391

Strategic management of the health workforce in developing countries: what have we learned?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of the health workforce has gained in prominence in recent years, as the dynamic interconnections between human resource issues and health system effectiveness have come into sharper focus. This paper reviews lessons relating to strategic management challenges emerging from the growing literature in this area. Workforce issues are strategic: they affect overall system performance as well as the

Scott A Fritzen

2007-01-01

392

School Nurse Case Management for Children with Chronic Illness: Health, Academic, and Quality of Life Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More children with chronic illnesses are attending school, and some of them struggle academically because of issues related to their health. School-based case management has been suggested as one strategy to improve the academic success of these children. This study tracked the academic, health, and quality of life outcomes for 114 children with…

Engelke, Martha Keehner; Guttu, Martha; Warren, Michelle B.; Swanson, Melvin

2008-01-01

393

Health-Insurer Bargaining Power and Firms' Incentives to Manage Earnings Francesco Bova  

E-print Network

as an important determinant of firms' accounting choices. Key words: Health-insurance premiums; bargaining powerHealth-Insurer Bargaining Power and Firms' Incentives to Manage Earnings Francesco Bova Rotman carriers with strong bargaining power. Using an innovative dataset for a large sample of U.S. firms

Tipple, Brett

394

Enhanced Skills Training and Health Care Management for Older Persons with Severe Mental Illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes a combined skills training (ST) and health management (HM) intervention for older adults with severe mental illness (SMI) and one-year pilot study outcomes. Findings are reported for twelve older persons with SMI (age 60+) who received ST+HM and twelve who received only HM. ST addressed interpersonal and independent living skills. HM included promotion of preventive health care.

Stephen J. Bartels; Brent Forester; Kim T. Mueser; Keith M. Miles; Aricca R. Dums; Sarah I. Pratt; Anjana Sengupta; Christine Littlefield; Sheryl O'Hurley; Patricia White; Lois Perkins

2004-01-01

395

Academic Health Center Management of Chronic Diseases through Knowledge Networks: Project ECHO  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors describe an innovative academic health center (AHC)-led program of health care delivery and clinical education for the management of complex, common, and chronic diseases in underserved areas, using hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a model. The program, based at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, represents a paradigm shift in thinking and funding for the threefold

Sanjeev Arora; Cynthia M. A. Geppert; Summers Kalishman; Denise Dion; Frank Pullara; Barbara Bjeletich; Gary Simpson; Dale C. Alverson; Lori B. Moore; Dave Kuhl; Joseph V. Scaletti

2007-01-01

396

Preventive Interventions under Managed Care: Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. Special Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Programs and services that prevent substance abuse and mental health disorders have the potential to lessen an enormous burden of suffering and to reduce both the cost of future treatment and lost productivity at work and home. The availability and accessibility of these interventions to Americans whose health care is provided by managed care…

Dorfman, Sharon L.

397

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (OSHMS) GUIDELINE COMPLIANCE AMONG MEDICAL LABORATORIES IN KLANG VALLEY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Nowadays, most medical laboratories in Malaysia practice occupational safety and health based on standard operating procedure and sometimes ad-hoc characteristic limited to only internal use. The level of compliance of the national occupational safety and health management system (OSHMS) guidelines among medical laboratories in Malaysia is still largely unexplored. Methods: This study was carried out on 34 medical laboratories

I Anuar; F Zahedi; A Kadir; A. B Mokhtar

398

The Impact of Managed Care on Mental Health Services for Children and Their Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Preliminary results from the Health Care Reform Tracking Project's baseline survey and site visits to 10 states show that managed care has generally improved access to health care for children, but it has made it more difficult for youths with serious emotional disorders, and uninsured children, to obtain care. (SLD)

Stroul, Beth A.; Pires, Sheila A.; Armstrong, Mary I.; Meyers, Judith C.

1998-01-01

399

Community mobilisation and health management committee strengthening to increase birth attendance by trained health workers in rural Makwanpur, Nepal: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Birth attendance by trained health workers is low in rural Nepal. Local participation in improving health services and increased\\u000a interaction between health systems and communities may stimulate demand for health services. Significant increases in birth\\u000a attendance by trained health workers may be affected through community mobilisation by local women's groups and health management\\u000a committee strengthening. We will test the effect

Joanna Morrison; Kirti Man Tumbahangphe; Bharat Budhathoki; Rishi Neupane; Aman Sen; Kunta Dahal; Rita Thapa; Reema Manandhar; Dharma Manandhar; Anthony Costello; David Osrin

2011-01-01

400

Strategic Health Information Management and Forecast: The BirdWatching Approach  

E-print Network

kingdoms with new branches and terminologies [2]. The biomedical classifications and terminologies have. Keywords: Change management, Biomedical ontologies, Multi-agent system, Health information management. 1 was a very simple method of dividing organisms into groups, ranging from the simple species to more complex

Haarslev, Volker

401

Health Care Administrators. Project TEAMS. (Techniques and Education for Achieving Management Skills).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The result of a project to develop short courses to help health care administrators and supervisors in developing practical, up-to-date management skills, this instructional workbook provides information and exercises applicable to on-the-job situations. Unit I covers the following leadership considerations: self-awareness, time management,…

Platte Technical Community Coll., Columbus, NE.

402

Managed mental health care in the United States: A status report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors review managed mental health care in the United States. Six areas are addressed: what is insurable, carve-ins and carve-outs, networks, liability, ethics, and teaching and research. The paper concludes with a list of principles for managing care.

Lloyd I. Sederer; Michael J. Bennett

1996-01-01

403

Mobile phone health apps for diabetes management: Current evidence and future developments  

PubMed Central

Can an app help manage diabetes? We discuss how the advent of mobile health apps in connecting patients to providers is creating new opportunities for the management of diabetes. Although there are promising outcomes, there is still much to be learned about how such technology could be fully exploited. PMID:24106313

Cafazzo, J.A.

2013-01-01

404

Occupational health guidelines for the management of low back pain: an international comparison  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The enormous socioeconomic burden of low back pain emphasises the need for effective management of this problem, especially in an occupational context. To address this, occupational guidelines have been issued in various countries.Aims: To compare available international guidelines dealing with the management of low back pain in an occupational health care setting.Methods: The guidelines were compared regarding generally accepted

J B Staal; H Hlobil; M W van Tulder; G Waddell; A K Burton; B W Koes; W van Mechelen

2003-01-01

405

Designing Health Care Risk Management On-Line: Meeting Regulators' Concerns for Fixed-Hour Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the experience of creating a continuing professional education on-line risk management program that is designed to meet Florida's educational requirements for licensure as a risk manager in health-care settings and details the challenges faced when the in-class didactic program of 15 eight-hour sessions is reformatted as an…

Hyer, Kathryn; Taylor, Heidi H.; Nanni, Kenneth

2004-01-01

406

Mobile phone health apps for diabetes management: current evidence and future developments.  

PubMed

Can an app help manage diabetes? We discuss how the advent of mobile health apps in connecting patients to providers is creating new opportunities for the management of diabetes. Although there are promising outcomes, there is still much to be learned about how such technology could be fully exploited. PMID:24106313

Goyal, S; Cafazzo, J A

2013-12-01

407

Postflood Disaster Management and the Home Health Nurse: Using Theory to Guide Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few frameworks exist to guide home health nurses during the response and recovery phases of disasters such as flooding. The Double ABCX Model of Family Adaptation is offered as an example of a guiding framework for nurses in postflood management. Phases of the model are linked to the nursing process, and management strategies are applied to individuals and families living

Susan M. Hunter Revell; Mary K. McCurry

2010-01-01

408

A demonstration of a helicopter health management information portal for U.S. Army aviation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Army relies heavily on their helicopter fleet to provide close air support, troop transport, reconnaissance and logistics support capabilities for a variety of mission profiles. High operational readiness and availability of the helicopter fleet is critical to achieving their mission objectives. The Army has developed and implemented helicopter health management technology known as the Vibration Management Enhancement Program

J. Banks; T. Bair; K. Reichard; D. Blackstock; D. McCall; J. Berry

2005-01-01

409

Implementation of a quality management system in public health laboratories in the Republic of Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Through a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute and CDC Laboratory Strengthening Department implemented quality management systems (QMS) into the two national public health laboratories in Tbilisi, Georgia. The QMS was based on CLSI's document Quality Management System: A Model for Laboratory Services; Approved Guideline and ISO 15189, Medical

Brandy Greenhill

2012-01-01

410

Life-threatening emergencies management in workplace: needs for collaboration between emergency and occupational health services?  

E-print Network

Life-threatening emergencies management in workplace: needs for collaboration between emergency, in a collaboration between Emergency Medical System and Occupational Health Services to improve management approved the final version of the manuscript. Funding. None. Conflict of interest: None. The authors did

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

411

Health, risk and divergence: lay and institutional strategies for preventing and managing disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rational or 'expert' approach to risk sees it as a technical matter to be tackled with more science and better risk communication. Risk is understood as an objective concept, relating to the management of future uncertainties, through rational action based on calculations of probability. Within this paradigm professional strategies for preventing and managing disease involve health professionals acting as

Annmarie Ruston; Chatham Maritime

412

Improving government health services through contract management: a case from Cambodia.  

PubMed

Most government health facilities in Cambodia perform poorly, due to lack of funds, inadequate management and inefficient use of resources, but mostly due to poor motivation of staff. This paper describes contracting as a possible tool for Ministries of Health to improve health service delivery more rapidly than the more traditional reform approaches. In Cambodia, the Ministry of Health started an experiment with contracting in eight districts, covering 1 million people. Health care management in five districts was sub-contracted to private sector operators, and their results were compared with three control districts. Both internal and external reviews showed that after 3 years of implementation, the utilization of health services in the contracted districts improved significantly, in comparison with the control districts. There was adequate competition in awarding the contracts. A Ministry of Health Project Co-ordinating Unit measured the performance of the contractors, and contributed pro-actively. There was no evidence of rent-seeking practices by either the contracting agency or the contractors. This paper describes in more detail the successes and failures in one of the contracted districts, where HealthNet International applied the contracting approach. Despite significantly increased official user fees, constituting 16% of recurrent costs, the utilization of services was equally increased. Patients thought the fees were reasonable because they were still lower than the fees demanded if government health workers charged informally. They also thought that the services were of better quality than in the unregulated private sector. Another important result was that combining strict monitoring with performance-based incentives demonstrates a decrease in total family health expenditure of some 40% from US dollars 18 to US dollars 11 per capita per year. Innovative and decisive management proved to be essential, which is more likely to be achieved by a contracted manager than by regular government managers with life-long employment. This paper discusses how the contractor addressed the deeply rooted problems of informal private activities of government health workers. The NGO district management experimented with two management systems: first by individual contracts with health workers, and secondly by sub-contracting directly with the health centre chiefs and hospital directors. A reason for concern is that poli-pharmacy and excessive use of injectables continued. Also, the participation of the central level of the Ministry of Health was positive in the contracting process, but the role and participation of the provincial level of the Ministry was more tentative. PMID:12582110

Soeters, Robert; Griffiths, Fred

2003-03-01

413

Health coaching: a new and exciting technique to enhance patient self-management and improve outcomes.  

PubMed

Health coaching is quickly emerging as a new approach of partnering with patients to enhance self-management strategies for the purpose of preventing exacerbations of chronic illness and supporting lifestyle change. Medicare is now pilot testing this approach for patients with congestive heart failure and diabetes. With acute care hospitalization an outcome of great interest to us all, health coaching is an exciting technique worthy of consideration by home health providers. PMID:17426499

Huffman, Melinda

2007-04-01

414

Sustainability and the health care manager: part I.  

PubMed

Given the current operating climate, organizations are coming under pressure to develop and implement sustainability programs and projects, yet few managers truly understand what is meant by sustainability and its implications for managing organizations. This article examines the concept of sustainability and provides a broader definition of the term than going "green." Using a puzzle metaphor, the authors outline and explain the different components of sustainability and provide a checklist for achieving sustainability goals. In addition, resources such as guides and tools are reviewed and offered to assist managers in gaining more insight into the challenges and complexity of sustainability. PMID:21537134

Ramirez, Bernardo; Oetjen, Reid M; Malvey, Donna

2011-01-01

415

THE ROLE OF INDICATORS IN HEALTH AND ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

Assessment of risk to public health or environmental resources requires competent characterization of stressors and the corresponding effects on organisms, populations, and communities. Because of the complexity of most stressor-response relationships, it is impossible to complet...

416

Environmental and health management in small and medium size enterprises  

E-print Network

Workers and employees are increasingly exposed in the workplace to chemical compounds and substances that are potentially toxic; for most of these compounds, no information exist regarding effects on human health. As one ...

Arredondo, Juan C. (Juan Carlos Arredondo Brun), 1974-

2004-01-01

417

Managing and reporting notifiable disease in the sexual health clinic.  

PubMed

Notifiable infections can be and often are transmitted sexually and the process of notification often does not work well in the GUM setting. It is the statutory duty of medical practitioners to report notifiable infections, but there are a number of barriers to reporting in sexual health, in particular concerns that notification may breach confidentiality. In this article, we hope to explain the reporting process and aim to highlight why we need to report and what health protection teams do with the information provided. We hope to make the process simple so that GUM clinics can fulfil their public health obligations and enable timely and appropriate public health action to be taken. PMID:24825917

Herbert, Sophie; Hewitt, Kirsty; Cassell, Jackie A

2014-09-01

418

The use of regional platforms for managing electronic health records for the production of regional public health indicators in France  

PubMed Central

Background In France, recent developments in healthcare system organization have aimed at strengthening decision-making and action in public health at the regional level. Firstly, the 2004 Public Health Act, by setting 100 national and regional public health targets, introduced an evaluative approach to public health programs at the national and regional levels. Meanwhile, the implementation of regional platforms for managing electronic health records (EHRs) has also been under assessment to coordinate the deployment of this important instrument of care within each geographic area. In this context, the development and implementation of a regional approach to epidemiological data extracted from EHRs are an opportunity that must be seized as soon as possible. Our article addresses certain design and organizational aspects so that the technical requirements for such use are integrated into regional platforms in France. The article will base itself on organization of the Rhône-Alpes regional health platform. Discussion Different tools being deployed in France allow us to consider the potential of these regional platforms for epidemiology and public health (implementation of a national health identification number and a national information system interoperability framework). The deployment of the Rhône-Alpes regional health platform began in the 2000s in France. By August 2011, 2.6 million patients were identified in this platform. A new development step is emerging because regional decision-makers need to measure healthcare efficiency. To pool heterogeneous information contained in various independent databases, the format, norm and content of the metadata have been defined. Two types of databases will be created according to the nature of the data processed, one for extracting structured data, and the second for extracting non-structured and de-identified free-text documents. Summary Regional platforms for managing EHRs could constitute an important data source for epidemiological surveillance in the context of epidemic alerts, but also in monitoring a number of indicators of infectious and chronic diseases for which no data are yet available in France. PMID:22471902

2012-01-01

419

BachelorofHealthSciences/BachelorofManagement PublicHealth/GeneralManagementor  

E-print Network

.F.A. (New Media)/B.Mgt., B.H.Sc./B.Mgt., B.Mgt./B.Ed., and Post-Diploma B.Mgt./ B.Ed.) cannot be completed 2700/Sociology 2700 - Health and Society Health Sciences 3260 - Research in Addictions Health Sciences of Psychology Psychology 2800 - Social Psychology Sociology 1000 - Introduction to Sociology One of: *Biology

Seldin, Jonathan P.

420

BachelorofHealthSciences/BachelorofManagement PublicHealth/GeneralManagementor  

E-print Network

Certificates. Combined Degrees programs (B.A./B.Mgt., B.Sc./B.Mgt., B.F.A. (New Media)/B.Mgt., B/Sociology 2700 - Health and Society Health Sciences 3260 - Research in Addictions Health Sciences 3450 Psychology 2800 - Social Psychology Sociology 1000 - Introduction to Sociology One of: *Biology 1010

Seldin, Jonathan P.

421

[REACH: a European programme for renewed management of health risks].  

PubMed

The new European directive REACH constitutes a potential step forward for the prevention of health risks linked to industrial chemical production. The conflicts of interest expressed throughout its development and the compromises resulting from those opposing interest situate this directive at the cross-roads of the multiple rationales operating in the occupational health field. The precautionary principal, risk assessment, prevention, regulation, and corporate responsibility will have a role to play in the practical implementation of REACH. PMID:18773843

Gisquet, Elsa; Goldberg, Stephen; Canet, Christine; Brixi, Omar

2008-01-01

422

[Health management of Saipem workers with projects involving abroad activities].  

PubMed

In remote areas and in developing countries, where adequate health-care structures are few and sparse, Occupational Medicine contributes to guaranteeing workers' health. Companies like Saipem, involved in activities that are carried out in remote, inhospitable areas must ensure the safety and guarantee the health conditions of workers in relation to the risk factors connected with the job as well as with the environment in which it is performed. In such situations, Occupational Medicine addresses both the health aspects of the workplace and of the community, and is the pivot around which revolves the health-care support of workers employed abroad in the sense of protection and enhancement of health. The risks connected with work abroad are of three main types: 1) job-related risks; 2) risks connected with the environment; 3) risks related to the organization of work and the changes in the worker's daily life. The job-related risks are similar to those connected with analogous jobs performed elsewhere. The risks connected with the environment are related to adverse climatic conditions, extreme temperatures and unknown and often dangerous flora and fauna. The occupational physician is called upon to assess the suitability of workers for jobs that are based in remote areas. The main clinical conditions that can prevent issue of the Medical Fitness Certificate to workers for long-stay jobs abroad are discussed. PMID:18409664

Nicosia, V; De Sanctis, S; Mika, F; Consentino, M; Mascheroni, G

2007-01-01

423

GPs' and health visitors' views on the diagnosis and management of postnatal depression: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background In the UK, 8–15% of women suffer from postnatal depression, with long-term consequences for maternal mood and child development. Previous literature suggests that health visitors struggle with their conflicting roles with respect to mother and infant. Current policy is redirecting the emphasis and organisation of health visitor work, but guidelines state that health visitors and GPs should continue to have a major role in the detection and management of postnatal depression. Aim To explore the views of GPs and health visitors on the diagnosis and management of postnatal depression. Design of study A qualitative study nested within a multicentre randomised controlled trial. Setting Nine primary care trusts in Bristol, Manchester, and London. Method In-depth interviews with GPs and health visitors from primary care trusts participating in a randomised controlled trial of antidepressants versus health visitor-delivered non-directive counselling. Interviews were audiotaped and fully transcribed. Thematic analysis with an iterative approach was used to develop conceptual categories from the transcripts. Results Nineteen GPs and 14 health visitors were interviewed. GPs and health visitors described their work in making and negotiating the diagnosis of postnatal depression, the value of a long-term relationship with the woman, and how labelling affects management of women with postnatal depression. Responders described how they viewed others' roles in the management of postnatal depression, and how national policy and local organisational changes had an impact on patient care, so that no one health professional was assuming overall responsibility for the care of women with postnatal depression. Conclusion Ongoing organisational changes within primary care, such as the implementation of corporate working by health visitors, affect care provided to women after birth, which in turn has an impact on the diagnosis and management of postnatal depression. PMID:18399021

Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Chamberlain, Elizabeth; Turner, Katrina; Folkes, Liz; Caulfield, Layne; Sharp, Deborah

2008-01-01

424

Development of a Modelling and Simulation Method Comparison and Selection Framework for Health Services Management  

E-print Network

2003, 6:105-116. 22. Walshe K, Rundall TG: Evidence-based management: from theory to practice in health care. Milbank Quarterly 2001, 79:429-457, IV-V. 23. Haynes RB: What kind of evidence is it that evidence-based medicine advocates want health care... from a definitive tool, if such a tool is indeed possible, but believe that the tool makes a contri- bution in two major ways. The first is to fill a research practice gap in evidence-based health care management [22] by providing a practical support...

Jun, Gyuchan T; Morris, Zoe; Eldabi, Tillal; Harper, Paul; Naseer, Aisha; Patel, Brijesh; Clarkson, John P

2011-05-19

425

Harnessing Health IT for Improved Cardiovascular Risk Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Robyn Whittaker and colleagues argue that IT-based programs can improve cardiovascular disease management and patient empowerment, but must be accompanied by supportive social and political environments and active patient and clinician engagement.

Sue Wells; Robyn Whittaker; Enid Dorey; Chris Bullen

2010-01-01

426

Chronic Disease Management in Children Based on the Five Domains of Health  

PubMed Central

Through a case study of a child with cystic fibrosis, the interactions among various domains of health have been discussed—namely, biomedical, physical, psychological/behavioural, and social. In pediatrics, development is another key domain relevant to the management of a chronic disease. An individualised management plan for this case has been outlined, and consideration of this framework may be worthwhile when managing other paediatric patients with chronic disease. Patient empowerment and parental education, as well as good co-ordination of health service delivery, are imperative to holistic patient care. PMID:23691412

2013-01-01

427

Issues in health care: interventional pain management at the crossroads.  

PubMed

Emerging strategies in health care are extremely important for interventional pain physicians, as well as with the payors in various categories. While most Americans, including the US Congress and Administration, are looking for ways to provide affordable health care, the process of transformation and emerging health care strategies are troubling for physicians in general, and interventional pain physicians in particular. With the new Congress, only new issues rather t