Science.gov

Sample records for ruptured vertebrobasilar fusiform

  1. Tailored PICA Revascularization for Unusual Ruptured Fusiform Vertebro-PICA Origin Aneurysms: Rationale and Case Illustrations.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Andrew P

    2015-11-01

    Ruptured fusiform aneurysms of the vertebral artery involving posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) origin are difficult to manage without sacrificing PICA. In this report, two very unusual cases are described which highlight different revascularization strategies that may be required. The first case initially appeared to be a small saccular PICA origin aneurysm, but detailed angiography showed a serpentine recanalization of a fusiform aneurysm. This was treated with PICA-PICA anastomosis and trapping of the aneurysm. The second case is a dissecting vertebral aneurysm with both PICA and the anterior spinal artery originating from the dome. PICA was found to be a bihemispheric variant, so no in situ bypass was available, and an occipital artery to PICA bypass was performed. The vertebral artery was occluded proximally only and follow-up angiography showed remodeling of the distal vertebral artery with the anterior spinal artery filling by retrograde flow from the distal vertebral artery. These cases illustrate both the anatomic variability of this region as well as the need to be familiar with multiple treatment strategies including revascularization techniques to be able to successfully treat these aneurysms. PMID:26623241

  2. The surgical management of vertebrobasilar insufficiency.

    PubMed

    de los Reyes, R A; Ausman, J I; Diaz, F G; Pak, H; Pearce, J E; Dujovny, M

    1983-01-01

    Vertebrobasilar insufficiency may result from structural lesions anywhere along the vertebrobasilar system. Recently developed techniques in angiography and microsurgery have made the vertebrobasilar system more accessible to surgical therapy. The syndrome of vertebrobasilar insufficiency is discussed, and our experience with the surgical treatment of lesions from the vertebral origin to the distal basilar region is reviewed. PMID:6880877

  3. Research Progress on Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yong-Jie; Xu, Kan; Luo, Qi; Yu, Jin-Lu

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD) is a rare disease characterized by significant expansion, elongation, and tortuosity of the vertebrobasilar arteries. Current data regarding VBD are very limited. Here we systematically review VBD incidence, etiology, characteristics, clinical manifestations, treatment strategies, and prognosis. The exact incidence rate of VBD remains unclear, but is estimated to be 1.3% of the population. The occurrence of VBD is thought to be due to the cooperation of multiple factors, including congenital factors, infections and immune status, and degenerative diseases. The VBD clinical manifestations are complex with ischemic stroke as the most common, followed by progressive compression of cranial nerves and the brain stem, cerebral hemorrhage, and hydrocephalus. Treatment of VBD remains difficult. Currently, there are no precise and effective treatments, and available treatments mainly target the complications of VBD. With the development of stent technology, however, it may become an effective treatment for VBD. PMID:25136259

  4. Vestibular and oculomotor abnormalities in vertebrobasilar insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Corvera, J; Benitez, L D; Lopez-Rios, G; Rabiela, M T

    1980-01-01

    The early diagnosis of vertebrobasilar insufficiency in patients with vertigo as their only symptom was attempted using a battery of vestibulo-oculomotor tests. With this testing procedure, we were able to find abnormal vestibulo-oculomotor mechanisms that could account for the vertigo in 41 of 42 patients. These abnormalities, however, did not fall into an easily recognizable pattern that could be considered characteristic of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. The large intersubject variability probably arises from the very different and widespread lesions that occur at the vestibular and neurological levels as a consequence of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. PMID:6968173

  5. Workflow Optimization in Vertebrobasilar Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kamper, Lars Meyn, Hannes; Nordmeyer, Simone; Kempkes, Udo; Piroth, Werner

    2012-06-15

    Objective: In vertebrobasilar occlusion, rapid recanalization is the only substantial means to improve the prognosis. We introduced a standard operating procedure (SOP) for interventional therapy to analyze the effects on interdisciplinary time management. Methods: Intrahospital time periods between hospital admission and neuroradiological intervention were retrospectively analyzed, together with the patients' outcome, before (n = 18) and after (n = 20) implementation of the SOP. Results: After implementation of the SOP, we observed statistically significant improvement of postinterventional patient neurological status (p = 0.017). In addition, we found a decrease of 5:33 h for the mean time period from hospital admission until neuroradiological intervention. The recanalization rate increased from 72.2% to 80% after implementation of the SOP. Conclusion: Our results underscore the relevance of SOP implementation and analysis of time management for clinical workflow optimization. Both may trigger awareness for the need of efficient interdisciplinary time management. This could be an explanation for the decreased time periods and improved postinterventional patient status after SOP implementation.

  6. Outflow Occlusion with Occipital Artery-Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Bypass for Growing Vertebral Artery Fusiform Aneurysm with Ischemic Onset: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kochi, Ryuzaburo; Endo, Hidenori; Fujimura, Miki; Sato, Kenichi; Sugiyama, Shin-ichiro; Osawa, Shin-ichiro; Tominaga, Teiji

    2015-08-01

    Surgical treatments should be considered for vertebral artery fusiform aneurysms, which become symptomatic due to cerebral ischemia or mass effect. Ischemic complication is one of the major problems after surgical or endovascular trapping, which is associated with unfavorable outcomes. The authors present a case with growing vertebral artery (VA) fusiform aneurysm with ischemic onset successfully treated with outflow occlusion with occipital artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery (OA-PICA) bypass. A 50-year-old woman presented with left PICA territory infarction. Left vertebral angiography (VAG) showed occlusion of the left VA at the proximal V4 segment. Right VAG revealed that the distal part of the left V4 segment with fusiform aneurysmal dilatation was reconstituted through vertebrobasilar junction, and the left PICA was the outlet of the blood flow from the fusiform aneurysm. Although the patient was treated conservatively, enlargement of the left VA fusiform aneurysm was observed 8 months after the initial presentation. Considering the potential risks for future stroke or bleeding, we performed clip occlusion of the origin of the left PICA, which could achieve outflow occlusion of the fusiform aneurysm with preservation of the perforators arising around the aneurysm. We created OA-PICA anastomosis for revascularization of the distal PICA. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the postoperative right VAG revealed occlusion of the fusiform aneurysm. Outflow occlusion instead of trapping is an effective surgical option for VA fusiform aneurysm to achieve obliterate the aneurysm with preservation of the perforator at the blind end. PMID:25979424

  7. Fusiform aneurysm of a persistent trigeminal artery associated with rare intracranial arterial variations and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kimball, David; Ples, Horia; Kimball, Heather; Miclaus, Gratian D; Matusz, Petru; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminal artery is one of four primitive anastomoses between the internal carotid artery and vertebrobasilar system that regresses in the sixth week of fetal development. A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is generally an incidental finding but may also be associated with intracranial vascular pathologies such as aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, and cranial nerve compression syndromes. We present an extremely rare case of a right PTA with an associated bleeding fusiform aneurysm located in the carotidian (lateral) part of the PTA. In addition, this rare anatomic variation was associated with bilateral absence of the posterior communicating arteries, a left posterior cerebral artery originating from the left internal carotid artery, and agenesis of the A1 segment of the left anterior cerebral artery. PMID:25053265

  8. Cognitive problems related to vertebrobasilar circulation.

    PubMed

    Koçer, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by decreased regional cerebral blood flow. Supporting this concept, both cognitive training exercises and physical activity promote blood flow increase and correlate with healthy cognitive aging. The terminal branches of the posterior circulation supply blood to areas of the brain, such as the thalamus, hippocampus, occipital lobe, and cerebellum, involved with important intellectual functions, particularly recent memory, visual-spatial functioning, and visuomotor adaptations. Amnesia and visual agnosia may be a complication of not only posterior circulation infarctions but also vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) without accompanying structural infarcts. The cognitive impairment maybe a manifestation of transient attacks and may persist beyond resolution of symptoms related to ischemia. Early recognition of cognitive deficits in the VBI patient is important because several recent reports show stent placements or medical treatment may improve cognition. PMID:26738337

  9. Auditory evoked potentials in vertebrobasilar transient ischemic attacks.

    PubMed

    Drake, M E; Pakalnis, A; Padamadan, H; Hietter, S A

    1990-04-01

    Brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) are affected by stroke or migraine in the vertebrobasilar arterial system. Some studies have reported BAEP changes in vertebrobasilar transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), but others have shown no alterations. We recorded BAEPs in 35 patients with TIAs in the vertebrobasilar system who did not have a stroke, other neurologic disease or significant hearing loss. Thirty patients were recorded after resolution of symptoms, while five individuals still had some resolving signs or symptoms. TIA patients as a group had longer interpeak latencies, but I-III, III-V, and I-V latencies were not significantly longer than in controls. Wave V was significantly longer in latency and lower in amplitude in TIA patients, however. The patients whose TIAs had resolved at absolute and interpeak latencies were within normal limits, but three of five had interpeak latencies at or above three standard deviations beyond the normal mean in the still symptomatic group. One of these was later tested and found to be within normal limits. BAEPs after subsidence of symptoms may add little to the evaluation of vertebrobasilar ischemia, but further AEP analysis may show more definitive differences of diagnostic use. The occasional BAEP abnormality during the resolving transient ischemia supports the recently suggested continuum between ischemia and infarction in the vertebrobasilar territory. PMID:2335045

  10. Successfully treated symptomatic fusiform basilar artery aneurysm in a patient with hindbrain malformation via inverted Y-stenting.

    PubMed

    Purakal, Alixandra S; Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Lee, Seon-Kyu

    2016-03-01

    A double overlapping reverse Y-stent approach to creating flow diversion using traditional open-cell stent technology was evaluated as a treatment option symptomatic fusiform basilar aneurysms. A 36-year-old man with a complex hindbrain malformation presented with acute ocular dysmotility due to a rapidly enlarging fusiform basilar artery aneurysm. The aneurysm was treated by insertion of two stents into the vertebrobasilar system in an inverted Y-configuration from the basilar tip to the V4 segments of the bilateral vertebral arteries, essentially creating flow diversion without using a dedicated flow diversion device. This resulted in immediate symptomatic improvement. The stents remained patent and the aneurysm was obliterated at 6 months follow-up. Furthermore, the patient remained free of associated symptoms at 10 months follow-up. Thus, the double stenting technique can be used instead of a flow diversion device to effectively create flow diversion, promote aneurysm sac thrombosis, and lead to resolution of symptoms in large fusiform basilar artery aneurysms. PMID:25646132

  11. Time Management in Acute Vertebrobasilar Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kamper, Lars; Mansour, Michael; Winkler, Sven B.; Kempkes, Udo; Haage, Patrick

    2009-03-15

    Acute vertebrobasilar occlusion (VBO) is associated with a high risk of stroke and death. Although local thrombolysis may achieve recanalization and improve outcome, mortality is still between 35% and 75%. However, without recanalization the chance of a good outcome is extremely poor, with mortality rates of 80-90%. Early treatment is a fundamental factor, but detailed studies of the exact time management of the diagnostic and interventional workflow are still lacking. Data on 18 patients were retrospectively evaluated. Time periods between symptom onset, admission to hospital, time of diagnosis, and beginning of intervention were correlated with postinterventional neurological status. The Glasgow Coma Scale and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) were used to examine patients before and after local thrombolysis. Additionally, multivariate statistics were applied to reveal similarities between patients with neurological improvement. Primary recanalization was achieved in 77% of patients. The overall mortality was 55%. Major complications were intracranial hemorrhage and peripheral embolism. The time period from symptom onset to intervention showed a strong correlation with the postinterventional NIHSS as well as the patient's age, with the best results in a 4-h interval. Multivariate statistics revealed similarities among the patients. Evaluation of time management in acute VBO by multivariate statistics is a helpful tool for definition of similarities in this patient group. Similarly to the door-to-balloon time for acute coronary interventions, the chances for a good outcome depend on a short time interval between symptom onset and intervention. While the only manipulable time period starts with hospital admission, our results emphasize the necessity of efficient intrahospital workflow.

  12. Medico-legal aspects of traumatic injury of the vertebrobasilar artery.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, Kouichi; Sato, Taku; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Mizusawa, Ikubumi; Nata, Masayuki; Kodama, Namio

    2005-11-01

    Based on our experiences with medico-legal autopsies, we analyzed traumatic injury of the vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) in traffic accident victims. VBA rupture occurred in six cases with traumatic medullary lesions, but in none with cervical cord injury. A relatively small external force applied to the head or neck can induce isolated traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), which accounts for approximately 11% of fatal head injuries. We examined the relationship between site of impact and site of vascular injury in 16 cases of isolated traumatic SAH. The results showed that the vertebral artery (VA) on the side of impact tended to be longitudinally injured in victims experiencing an external force equivalent to that of a fist punch to the head or face. There was no clear relationship between the site of impact and the site of vascular injury in victims who had sustained an external force greater than that of a fist punch. However, our results suggest that an external force causing rotation of the head was likely to cause tearing of the artery. In cases in which an external force equivalent to that of a fist punch was applied to the head, a raised blood alcohol level was a significant risk factor for artery rupture. Furthermore, a difference in the diameters of the left and right VAs was a risk factor for artery rupture. To determine why the VA, the most frequent site of arterial dissection, is also frequently the site of injury, we histologically examined normal and dissected VBAs. We also discuss medico-legal issues of the causal relationship between external force applied and rupture or dissection of the VA. PMID:16308512

  13. Morphological Characteristics of the Vertebrobasilar Arterial System Are Associated with Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectasia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xi; Li, Yanjun; Huang, Qinghai; Liu, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD) is characterized by abnormal dilation, distortion, and extension of the vertebral artery (VA) and basilar artery (BA). This study investigated whether BA and VA morphological characteristics were factors predicting VBD. MATERIAL AND METHODS Individuals aged ≥18 years undergoing contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) of the head/neck were enrolled in 2012 at Changhai Hospital, Shanghai. Data concerning cardiovascular risk factors were recorded. Bilateral VA diameter and lateral displacement, BA diameter and lateral displacement, VA confluence displacement, and dominant VA (DVA) presence/absence were determined from CE-MRA. VBD was diagnosed using established criteria. DVA and no-DVA groups were compared. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify variables independently associated with VBD. RESULTS Our study included 1153 individuals, of which 614 (53.3%) had DVA. The DVA group had higher mean age, hypertension prevalence (44.6% vs. 37.5%), and VBD prevalence (8.1% vs. 4.5%), and lower smoking prevalence (24.3% vs. 30.6%), than no-DVA patients. Univariate analysis revealed that age, female sex, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, alcohol consumption, and DVA presence were associated with VBD occurrence. Multivariate analysis showed that age and presence of a DVA were independently associated with VBD. CONCLUSIONS Age and presence of DVA are independently associated with VBD. PMID:27206494

  14. Fusiform Correlates of Facial Memory in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Trontel, Haley G.; Duffield, Tyler C.; Bigler, Erin D.; Froehlich, Alyson; Prigge, Molly B.D.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Cooperrider, Jason R.; Cariello, Annahir N.; Travers, Brittany G.; Anderson, Jeffrey S.; Zielinski, Brandon A.; Alexander, Andrew; Lange, Nicholas; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that performance on standardized measures of memory in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is substantially reduced in comparison to matched typically developing controls (TDC). Given reported deficits in face processing in autism, the current study compared performance on an immediate and delayed facial memory task for individuals with ASD and TDC. In addition, we examined volumetric differences in classic facial memory regions of interest (ROI) between the two groups, including the fusiform, amygdala, and hippocampus. We then explored the relationship between ROI volume and facial memory performance. We found larger volumes in the autism group in the left amygdala and left hippocampus compared to TDC. In contrast, TDC had larger left fusiform gyrus volumes when compared with ASD. Interestingly, we also found significant negative correlations between delayed facial memory performance and volume of the left and right fusiform and the left hippocampus for the ASD group but not for TDC. The possibility of larger fusiform volume as a marker of abnormal connectivity and decreased facial memory is discussed. PMID:24761228

  15. Volatile terpenoids from aeciospores of Cronartium fusiforme.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laseter, J. L.; Weete, J. D.; Walkinshaw, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    Identification of the terpenoids present in the volatile fraction from aeciospores of the gall rust fungus Cronartium fusiforme. The major monoterpenoid hydrocarbons found to be present with only traces of camphene include alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, delta(3)-carene, myrcene, linonene, beta-phellandrene, and delta-terpinene. A number of monoterpenoid alcohols, acyclic sesquiterpenes, and aromatic compounds were also present.

  16. Anastomosis of occipital artery to anterior inferior cerebellar artery for vertebrobasilar junction stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ausman, J I; Diaz, F G; de los Reyes, R A; Pak, H; Patel, S; Boulos, R

    1981-08-01

    A new approach to revascularization of the posterior fossa for vertebrobasilar insufficiency due to vertebrobasilar junction stenosis is reported. The procedure involves anastomosing the occipital artery to a branch of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. Rationale for the procedure and surgical technique are discussed. PMID:7280991

  17. Mechanical Removal of Migrated Onyx Due to Microcatheter Rupture During AVM Embolization: A Technical Case Report.

    PubMed

    Senturk, Cagin

    2015-12-01

    We report a case where migrated Onyx could be removed safely with a mechanical thrombectomy device after withdrawal of the damaged microcatheter. A microcatheter was retained in the superior cerebellar artery with attached Onyx fragments on its tip during embolization of a bled cerebellar AVM. During retrieval maneuvers microcatheter shaft was ruptured and Onyx fragments were released into the vertebrobasilar system causing occlusion. Finally, Onyx fragment on tip of the microcatheter could be detached with dimethyl sulfoxide injection and the microcatheter could be withdrawn. A Merci retriever device (Concentric Medical, Mountain View, CA, USA) was successfully used to retrieve most of the dislodged Onyx material and recanalize the vertebrobasilar circulation. PMID:25910968

  18. Pipeline Embolization Device for Large/Giant or Fusiform Aneurysms: An Initial Multi-Center Experience in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yong Sam; Baik, Min Woo; Lee, Deok Hee; Jeon, Pyoung; Baik, Seung Kug; Lee, Tae Hong; Kang, Dong-Hoon; Suh, Sang-il; Byun, Jun Soo; Jung, Jin-Young; Kwon, Kihun; Kim, Dong Joon; Park, Keun Young; Kim, Bum-soo; Park, Jung Cheol; Kim, Seong Rim; Kim, Young Woo; Kim, Hoon; Jo, Kyungil; Yoon, Chang Hyo; Kim, Young Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and early outcomes of the Pipeline device for large/giant or fusiform aneurysms. Materials and Methods The Pipeline was implanted in a total of 45 patients (mean age, 58 years; M:F=10:35) with 47 large/giant or fusiform aneurysms. We retrospectively evaluated the characteristics of the treated aneurysms, the periprocedural events, morbidity and mortality, and the early outcomes after Pipeline implantation. Results The aneurysms were located in the internal carotid artery (ICA) cavernous segment (n=25), ICA intradural segment (n=11), vertebrobasilar trunk (n=8), and middle cerebral artery (n=3). Procedure-related events occurred in 18 cases, consisting of incomplete expansion (n=8), shortening-migration (n=5), transient occlusion of a jailed branch (n=3), and in-stent thrombosis (n=2). Treatment-related morbidity occurred in two patients, but without mortality. Both patients had modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores of 2, but had an improved mRS score of 0 at 1-month follow-up. Of the 19 patients presenting with mass effect, 16 improved but three showed no changes in their presenting symptoms. All patients had excellent outcomes (mRS, 0 or 1) during the follow-up period (median, 6 months; range, 2-30 months). Vascular imaging follow-up (n=31, 65.9%; median, 3 months, range, 1-25 months) showed complete or near occlusion of the aneurysm in 24 patients (77.4%) and decreased sac size in seven patients (22.6%). Conclusion In this initial multicenter study in Korea, the Pipeline seemed to be safe and effective for large/giant or fusiform aneurysms. However, a learning period may be required to alleviate device-related events. PMID:26958407

  19. Multiple fusiform cerebral aneurysms – case report

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Katarzyna; Dołowy, Joanna; Kuśmierska, Małgorzata; Kuniej, Tomasz; Jaźwiec, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: A true aneurysym is a dilation of arterial lumen as a consequence of congenital or acquired abnormalities leading to a reduction of mechanical resistance of vascular wall, most commonly caused by its defected structure in the form of absence or weakening of the muscular and/or elastic layer. From the pathophysiological point of view, cerebral aneurysms can be classified as ‘saccular’ – most commonly occurring, and ‘other types’, including fusiform/dolichoectatic, dissecting, serpentine, posttraumatic, mycotic and giant aneurysms with or without intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. Case Report: We present a rare case of a patient with multiple fusiform dilations of cerebral vessels and giant fusiform aneurysm in supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery. The patient presented to hospital because of sudden, severe vertigo with nausea, impaired balance and disturbed vision. Vascular anomalies were detected on CT scanning without contrast. The diagnostic work-up was complemented by CT angiography, MRI and cerebral angiography. Conclusions: Aneurysm located within the intracranial arteries is one of the most common vascular defects of the brain. The number, size and location of aneurysms are highly variable. Aneurysms can have either supra- or infratentorial location, affecting a single or multiple arteries within one or both brain hemispheres. There is often a correlation between the location of the aneurysm and its etiology, as in case of so-called mirror-image aneurysms. Symmetrically located aneurysms may indicate a defect in vascular structure. Asymmetric location, as in the patient described above, is more likely due to acquired causes, mainly atherosclerosis, but also septic emboli or blood disorders. PMID:22802866

  20. Computed Tomography Angiography of Carotid Arteries and Vertebrobasilar System

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Manuel; Ellmann, Stephan; Allmendinger, Thomas; Eller, Achim; Kammerer, Ferdinand; May, Matthias S.; Baigger, João F.; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Computed tomography angiography (CTA) of carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar system is a standardized procedure with excellent image quality, but radiation exposure remains a matter of concern. The aim of this study is to examine to what extent radiation dose can be lowered in relation to a standard protocol by simulating examinations with lower tube currents applying a dedicated software. Lower tube current was simulated by a dedicated noise insertion and reconstruction software (ReconCT). In a phantom study, true scans were performed with different dose protocols and compared to the results of simulated dose reductions of the same degree, respectively. In a patient study, 30 CTAs of supra-aortic vessels were reconstructed at a level of 100%, 75%, 50%, and 25% of the initial dose. Objective and subjective image analyses were performed. No significant noise differences between true scans and simulated scans of mimicked contrasted vessels were found. In the patient study, the quality scores of the 4 dose groups differed statistically significant; this difference vanished for the comparison of the 100% and 75% datasets after dichotomization into the categories of diagnostic and nondiagnostic image quality (P = .50). This study suggests an easy-to-implement method of simulating CTAs of carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar system with lower tube current for dose reduction by artificially adding noise to the original raw data. Lowering the radiation dose in a moderate extent to 75% of the original dose levels does not significantly alter the diagnostic image quality. PMID:26131822

  1. Acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke due to electric injury.

    PubMed

    Singh Jain, Rajendra; Kumar, Sunil; Suresh, Desai Tushar; Agarwal, Rakesh

    2015-07-01

    Electrical injuries are most commonly due to household accidents.Various factors determine the severity of electric injury, including type of current, amperage, voltage, tissue resistance, pathway of current,and duration of contact with the body. Various types of neurologic damage due to electrical injury have been described in literature. It may manifest as peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord damage, seizures, cerebellarataxia, hypoxic encephalopathy, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Acute ischemic stroke is an infrequent complication of electrical injury. Herein,we report a case of middle-aged man, who accidentally sustained high voltage electrical injury followed by acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed acute infarctin bilateral cerebellar and medial occipital regions. Computed tomographic angiogram of the brain and neck vessels was normal. Possibly,in our patient, the mechanism could be related to direct vascular injury due to electric current. PMID:25684743

  2. Recurrent facial hemiparesis due to dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar artery: an unusual and ignored cause.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vijay Nath; Chaurasia, Rameshwar Nath; Gupta, Shailesh; Joshi, Deepika

    2013-01-01

    Dolichoectatic arteries are elongated tortuous aneurysms of intracranial arteries most commonly of vertebrobasilar tree presenting with ischaemic, haemorrhagic, thromboembolic lesions or with cranial nerve compression. The clinical presentation includes tic douloureux, neuralgia, tinnitus, vertigo, motor or sensory deficits, ataxia, dementia, Parkinsonism, hydrocephalus, headache, migraine, aneurysm, neoplasm, stroke/transient ischaemic attacks, leukoencephalopathy, central sleep apnoea and cerebellar dysfunctions. We present a case of recurrent facial nerve palsy secondary to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia, an interesting and rare condition. PMID:23505276

  3. Endovascular Treatment of Supra-Aortic Extracranial Stenoses in Patients with Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency Symptoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zaytsev, A.Y. Stoyda, A.Y.; Smirnov, V.E.; Scherbyuk, A.N.; Kondrashin, S.A; Artukchina, E.G.; Kikevitch, V.A.

    2006-10-15

    Purpose. Stenoses and thromboses of vessels feeding the vertebrobasilar territory can evoke serious disturbances including ischemic stroke. We present our experience of endovascular interventions for patients with signs of vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) resulted from subclavian, vertebral and brachiocephalic arterial stenoses. Methods. Twenty-one patients (10 men) aged from 35 to 84 years (mean 64.3 years) with symptoms compatible with VBI underwent balloon angioplasty and stenting of subclavian (SA), innominate (IA) and vertebral (VA) arteries. Procedures were done by radiologists experienced in systematic stenting of the lesions. VBI was manifested by persistent signs in 15 patients, and by transitory ischemic attacks in the posterior circulatory territory in 4 (19%). Two patients (10%) experienced ischemic strokes (in the vertebrobasilar circulation in both cases). In 3 patients (14%) VBI was accompanied by upper limb vascular insufficiency symptoms. All cases were resistant to medical treatment. A neurologist assessed complaints, initial VBI signs and their alteration after intervention in all patients. Outcomes were measured with the 5-point scale suggested by Malek et al.: (1) excellent result (asymptomatic, no neurologic deficits and no symptoms of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (2) good (no neurologic deficits, at most one transient episode of vertebrobasilar ischemia over a period of 3 months after treatment); (3) fair (minimal neurologic deficit and at most one transient episode per month of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (4) poor (no improvement compared with neurologic status before treatment and/or persistent symptoms of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (5) death (regardless of cause). Endovascular treatment was performed for SA stenosis in 15 patients, for SA occlusion in 2, for IA stenosis in 2, and for VA stenosis in 2. There were 15 cases of atherosclerosis, 2 of aortoarteritis, 4 of proximal SA kinking. SA and IA stenoses ranged from 60% to 100% (mean 74.5%), VA stenoses were 90% in both cases. Results. Initial technical success was achieved in 96% of cases. There were no postprocedural complications or deaths. During 6-36 months (mean 21.3 months) of follow-up all patients showed improvement in VBI symptoms or upper limb ischemia. Within 36 months after the procedure outcomes were estimated as excellent and good in 13 patients (76%) and poor in 2 (12%), the last being attributed to atherosclerosis progression in other vascular areas. Restenosis in the stented area has developed in 1 patient (6%). Conclusions. Balloon angioplasty and stenting of extracranial vertebrobasilar arterial stenoses appeared to be effective in endovascular treatment of medically resistant VBI. Further investigations are required to clarify the role of subclavian artery kinking in VBI development and indications for various methods of its correction.

  4. Bow hunter's syndrome causing vertebrobasilar insufficiency in a young man with neck muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Joy; Wolfe, Stacey Q; Ching, Brian H; Kellicut, Dwight C

    2014-05-01

    Vertebrobasilar insufficiency is characterized by impaired blood flow within the posterior circulation, producing symptoms of vertigo, nausea, vomiting, visual disturbances, and syncope. Given these nonspecific symptoms, the diagnosis of vertebrobasilar ischemia may be difficult to distinguish from more benign conditions. A healthy 37-year-old man presented to our clinic with near syncope upon turning his head to the left. Dynamic angiography revealed occlusion of the left vertebral artery at C7 with 90 head rotation to the left, consistent with bow hunter's syndrome. No obvious bony abnormalities were identified on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans. Transient rotational vertebral artery syndrome, a rare cause of vertebrobasilar insufficiency, has most often been reported at the C1-2 level, and the majority of cases occur in patients >50 years of age because of degenerative osteophytes and contralateral atherosclerosis. We present the unusual case of a young man with symptoms of vertebrobasilar insufficiency and discuss the potential effects of weightlifting and neck muscle hypertrophy on vertebral artery flow dynamics. PMID:24184499

  5. Rupture disc

    DOEpatents

    Newton, Robert G.

    1977-01-01

    The intermediate heat transport system for a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor includes a device for rapidly draining the sodium therefrom should a sodium-water reaction occur within the system. This device includes a rupturable member in a drain line in the system and means for cutting a large opening therein and for positively removing the sheared-out portion from the opening cut in the rupturable member. According to the preferred embodiment of the invention the rupturable member includes a solid head seated in the end of the drain line having a rim extending peripherally therearound, the rim being clamped against the end of the drain line by a clamp ring having an interior shearing edge, the bottom of the rupturable member being convex and extending into the drain line. Means are provided to draw the rupturable member away from the drain line against the shearing edge to clear the drain line for outflow of sodium therethrough.

  6. Combination of laparoscopy and endoscopy for fusiform choledochal cysts

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Zhang; Shuli, Liu; Zhen, Chen; Zhen, Zhang; Long, Li; Wei, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to elucidate the efficacy of laparoscopy and endoscopy in the treatment of fusiform choledochal cysts (CDC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between June 2006 and June 2012, 18 patients with fusiform CDC were treated in our hospital. All the 18 patients presented abdominal pain, and 13 presented jaundice. 18 patients presented elevated serum and urinary amylase, when abdominal pain appeared. All the patients underwent laparoscopic and endoscopic surgery successfully. The clinical presentation, radiological features and surgical treatment were analyzed. The postoperative symptoms, laboratory examination and bile duct changes were evaluated during follow-up term. RESULTS: Intraoperative cholangiography showed filling defect, dilatation of the common channel and pancreatic ducts visualization in 18 patients, including 9 patients of pancreatic duct dilatation. The protein plugs and/or stones were removed completely under laparoscopy and endoscopy in 18 patients. Patients were followed-up for 3 months to 6 years. The biochemical and ultrasound examination showed no increase in pancreatic amylase and recurrence of the stones in the common channel and pancreatic duct. CONCLUSIONS: The children with congenital fusiform biliary dilatation presented abdominal pain. Patients presented elevated serum and urinary amylase, when abdominal pain occurred. Filling defect and dilatation of the common channel showed by cholangiography. Laparoscopy and endoscopy clearance of the protein plugs and/or stones in the common channel in congenital fusiform biliary dilatation is effective, and the long-term result is good. PMID:27073298

  7. Dolichoectasia in vertebrobasilar arteries presented as transient ischemic attacks: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Mohammad Reza; Toghianifar, Nafiseh; Abdar Esfahani, Morteza; Najafi, Mohammad Amin; Mollakouchakian, Mohammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD) is a rare vasculopathy. The etiology of this disease is unknown. Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) of vertebrobasilar system refer to a transient (< 24 hours) lowering of blood flow in the posterior circulation of the brain. We present a case of dolichoectasia in the vertebrobasilar artery that presented with TIAs. CASE REPORT A hypertensive 54-year-old man with true vertigo, nausea, imbalance, dysarthria, dysmetria, horizontal nystagmus, and gait ataxia was referred to Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. The symptoms improved in the 1st day, but recurred in the 2nd day, lasting for 6-7 hours. According to clinical manifestations, a diagnosis of TIAs in the vertebrobasilar circulation was made. Imaging studies showed vascular anomaly. The vascular anomaly was considered as the cause of the patient’s symptoms. A medical management was started using antiplatelet and antihypertensive drugs. The patient was referred for a more evaluation for other vascular anomalies. CONCLUSION Dolichoectasia usually affects vertebral and basilar arteries and simultaneous involvement of carotid arteries is rare seen in only 0.5% of these patients. The usual symptom of dolichoectasia is ischemia and rarely hemorrhages. The most common type of ischemic stroke is lacunar type. Ischemia evolves from embolic that originate from thrombi or plaques in the walls of the ectatic artery. While hemodynamic effects are the most common cause of the presenting signs and symptoms of the anomaly. We report a case of dolichoectasia that presented with TIAs of the verterbrobasilar artery. VBD is a distinct arteriopathy known as stroke risk. PMID:27114738

  8. Successful Decoding of Famous Faces in the Fusiform Face Area

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, Vadim; Yovel, Galit

    2015-01-01

    What are the neural mechanisms of face recognition? It is believed that the network of face-selective areas, which spans the occipital, temporal, and frontal cortices, is important in face recognition. A number of previous studies indeed reported that face identity could be discriminated based on patterns of multivoxel activity in the fusiform face area and the anterior temporal lobe. However, given the difficulty in localizing the face-selective area in the anterior temporal lobe, its role in face recognition is still unknown. Furthermore, previous studies limited their analysis to occipito-temporal regions without testing identity decoding in more anterior face-selective regions, such as the amygdala and prefrontal cortex. In the current high-resolution functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging study, we systematically examined the decoding of the identity of famous faces in the temporo-frontal network of face-selective and adjacent non-face-selective regions. A special focus has been put on the face-area in the anterior temporal lobe, which was reliably localized using an optimized scanning protocol. We found that face-identity could be discriminated above chance level only in the fusiform face area. Our results corroborate the role of the fusiform face area in face recognition. Future studies are needed to further explore the role of the more recently discovered anterior face-selective areas in face recognition. PMID:25714434

  9. Successful treatment of a giant pediatric fusiform basilar trunk aneurysm with surpass flow diverter.

    PubMed

    Kan, Peter; Mokin, Maxim; Puri, Ajit S; Wakhloo, Ajay K

    2016-06-01

    Fusiform aneurysms present a unique challenge to traditional microsurgical and endovascular treatment because of the lack of a discernible neck and the involvement of parent vessel. Flow diversion has increasingly become the treatment of choice for fusiform aneurysms in the anterior circulation, but its results in the posterior circulation are variable. We report successful treatment of a giant fusiform upper basilar trunk aneurysm with the Surpass flow diverter in an adolescent, and discuss the potential advantages of this emerging technology in the treatment of fusiform posterior circulation aneurysms. PMID:26063795

  10. Hemodynamic Characteristics of the Vertebrobasilar System Analyzed Using MRI-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Wake-Buck, Amanda K.; Gatenby, J. Christopher; Gore, John C.

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrobasilar system (VBS) is unique in human anatomy in that two arteries merge into a single vessel, and it is especially important because it supplies the posterior circulation of the brain. Atherosclerosis develops in this region, and atherosclerotic plaques in the vertebrobasilar confluence can progress with catastrophic consequences, including artery occlusion. Quantitative assessments of the flow characteristics in the VBS could elucidate the factors that influence flow patterns in this confluence, and deviations from normal patterns might then be used to predict locations to monitor for potential pathological changes, to detect early signs of disease, and to evaluate treatment options and efficacy. In this study, high-field MRI was used in conjunction with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to investigate the hemodynamics of subject-specific confluence models (n = 5) and to identify different geometrical classes of vertebrobasilar systems (n = 12) of healthy adult subjects. The curvature of the vessels and their mutual orientation significantly affected flow parameters in the VBS. The basilar artery geometry strongly influenced both skewing of the velocity profiles and the wall shear stress distributions in the VBS. All five subjects modeled possessed varying degrees of vertebral asymmetry, and helical flow was observed in four cases, suggesting that factors other than vertebral asymmetry influence mixing of the vertebral artery flow contributions. These preliminary studies verify that quantitative, MR imaging techniques in conjunction with subject-specific CFD models of healthy adult subjects may be used to characterize VBS hemodynamics and to predict flow features that have been related to the initiation and development of atherosclerosis in large arteries. This work represents an important first step towards applying this approach to study disease initiation and progression in the VBS. PMID:23251503

  11. Puerarin and betahistine treatment of vertebrobasilar ischemia vertigo: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YAN-YAN; CHEN, WEN; ZHANG, QING; LI, HUI; ZHANG, YE-WEN; KANG, QIAN; LAN, YI; WU, QING

    2016-01-01

    The present meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of puerarin co-treatment with betahistine in treating vertebrobasilar ischemia (VBI) vertigo. A total of 6 medical databases were searched, identifying randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of VBI vertigo performed until August 2014 that investigated a combined treatment of puerarin with betahistine or with other conventional drugs. The quality of the literature was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias, and Rev Man 5.0 software was used for statistical analysis and evaluation. The present study included 7 RCTs, involving a total of 664 subjects, and revealed a statistically significant increase in efficacy between the control and the experimental group (odds ratio [OR], 4.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.05 to 8.15). The average blood flow velocity within the vertebrobasilar arteries increased following treatment with puerarin and betahistine compared with that of the control groups (OR, 7.59; 95% CI, 6.19 to 9.00); however, no difference was detected between these groups in the average flow velocity within the left vertebral artery (OR, 6.17; 95% CI, 5.22 to 7.13). The frequency of adverse reactions in the experimental group was lower (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.32 to 1.77) compared with the control group. Combined puerarin and betahistine regimens were more effective in treating VBI vertigo compared with other, conventional drugs; effectively alleviating the associated symptoms, including dizziness and increased average blood flow velocity within the vertebrobasilar arteries, without causing an increased number of serious side effects. However, the efficacy and safety of puerarin and betahistine use in treating VBI vertigo requires additional investigation. PMID:26998036

  12. The anatomical and functional specialization of the fusiform gyrus.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Kevin S; Zilles, Karl

    2016-03-01

    The fusiform gyrus (FG) is commonly included in anatomical atlases and is considered a key structure for functionally-specialized computations of high-level vision such as face perception, object recognition, and reading. However, it is not widely known that the FG has a contentious history. In this review, we first provide a historical analysis of the discovery of the FG and why certain features, such as the mid-fusiform sulcus, were discovered and then forgotten. We then discuss how observer-independent methods for identifying cytoarchitectonical boundaries of the cortex revolutionized our understanding of cytoarchitecture and the correspondence between those boundaries and cortical folding patterns of the FG. We further explain that the co-occurrence between cortical folding patterns and cytoarchitectonical boundaries are more common than classically thought and also, are functionally meaningful especially on the FG and probably in high-level visual cortex more generally. We conclude by proposing a series of alternatives for how the anatomical organization of the FG can accommodate seemingly different theoretical aspects of functional processing, such as domain specificity and perceptual expertise. PMID:26119921

  13. Intradural vertebral endarterectomy with nonautologous patch angioplasty for refractory vertebrobasilar ischemia: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Uschold, Timothy; Abla, Adib A.; Wilson, David A.; McDougall, Cameron G.; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background: The natural history of patients with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischemic symptoms due to chronic bilateral vertebral artery occlusive disease is progressive, and poses significant challenges when refractory to medical therapy. Surgical treatment options depend largely on location and characteristics of the atheroma (s), and generally include percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) with or without stent placement, posterior circulation revascularization (bypass), extracranial vertebral artery reconstruction, or vertebral artery endarterectomy. Case Description: We present the case of a 56-year-old male with progressive vertebrobasilar ischemia due to tandem lesions in the right vertebral artery at the origin and intracranially in the V4 segment. The contralateral vertebral artery was occluded to the level of posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and posterior communicating arteries were absent. Following PTA and stent placement at the right vertebral artery origin, the patient was successfully treated with intradural vertebral artery endarterectomy (V4EA) and patch angioplasty via the far lateral approach. Distal endovascular intervention at the V4 segment proved not technically feasible after multiple attempts. Conclusions: V4EA is an uncommonly performed procedure, but may be considered for carefully selected patients. The authors’ techniques and indications are discussed. Historical outcomes, relevant anatomic considerations, and lessons learned are reviewed from the literature. PMID:25558424

  14. Clinical research of persimmon leaf extract and ginkgo biloba extract in the treatment of vertebrobasilar insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Guo, S G; Guan, S H; Wang, G M; Liu, G Y; Sun, H; Wang, B J; Xu, F

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to compare the curative effects of persimmon leaf extract and ginkgo biloba extract in the treatment of headache and dizziness caused by vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Sixty patients were observed, who underwent therapy with persimmon leaf extract and ginkgo biloba extract based on the treatment of nimodipine and aspirin. After 30 days, 30 patients treated with persimmon leaf extract and 30 patients with ginkgo biloba extract were examined for changes in hemodynamic indexes and symptoms, such as headache and dizziness. The results showed statistically significant differences of 88.3% for the persimmon leaf extract and 73.1% for the ginkgo biloba extract, P < 0.05. Compared to the group of ginkgo biloba extract, the group of persimmon leaf extract had more apparent improvement in the whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, fibrinogen, hematokrit, and platelet adhesion rate, and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Based on these analyses, it can be concluded that persimmon leaf extract is better than ginkgo biloba extract in many aspects, such as cerebral circulation improvement, cerebral vascular expansion, hypercoagulable state lowering and vertebrobasilar insufficiency-induced headache and dizziness relief. PMID:25864752

  15. Computed Tomography Angiography of Carotid Arteries and Vertebrobasilar System: A Simulation Study for Radiation Dose Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Manuel; Ellmann, Stephan; Allmendinger, Thomas; Eller, Achim; Kammerer, Ferdinand; May, Matthias S; Baigger, João F; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    Computed tomography angiography (CTA) of carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar system is a standardized procedure with excellent image quality, but radiation exposure remains a matter of concern. The aim of this study is to examine to what extent radiation dose can be lowered in relation to a standard protocol by simulating examinations with lower tube currents applying a dedicated software.Lower tube current was simulated by a dedicated noise insertion and reconstruction software (ReconCT). In a phantom study, true scans were performed with different dose protocols and compared to the results of simulated dose reductions of the same degree, respectively. In a patient study, 30 CTAs of supra-aortic vessels were reconstructed at a level of 100%, 75%, 50%, and 25% of the initial dose. Objective and subjective image analyses were performed.No significant noise differences between true scans and simulated scans of mimicked contrasted vessels were found. In the patient study, the quality scores of the 4 dose groups differed statistically significant; this difference vanished for the comparison of the 100% and 75% datasets after dichotomization into the categories of diagnostic and nondiagnostic image quality (P = .50).This study suggests an easy-to-implement method of simulating CTAs of carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar system with lower tube current for dose reduction by artificially adding noise to the original raw data. Lowering the radiation dose in a moderate extent to 75% of the original dose levels does not significantly alter the diagnostic image quality. PMID:26131822

  16. Bidirectional communication between amygdala and fusiform gyrus during facial recognition

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, John D.; Taylor, James M.; Grupe, Daniel W.; Curby, Kim M.; Schultz, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    Decades of research have documented the specialization of fusiform gyrus (FG) for facial information processes. Recent theories indicate that FG activity is shaped by input from amygdala, but effective connectivity from amygdala to FG remains undocumented. In this fMRI study, 39 participants completed a face recognition task. 11 participants underwent the same experiment approximately four months later. Robust face-selective activation of FG, amygdala, and lateral occipital cortex were observed. Dynamic causal modeling and Bayesian Model Selection (BMS) were used to test the intrinsic connections between these structures, and their modulation by face perception. BMS results strongly favored a dynamic causal model with bidirectional, face-modulated amygdala-FG connections. However, the right hemisphere connections diminished at time 2, with the face modulation parameter no longer surviving Bonferroni correction. These findings suggest that amygdala strongly influences FG function during face perception, and that this influence is shaped by experience and stimulus salience. PMID:21497657

  17. Bidirectional communication between amygdala and fusiform gyrus during facial recognition.

    PubMed

    Herrington, John D; Taylor, James M; Grupe, Daniel W; Curby, Kim M; Schultz, Robert T

    2011-06-15

    Decades of research have documented the specialization of fusiform gyrus (FG) for facial information processes. Recent theories indicate that FG activity is shaped by input from amygdala, but effective connectivity from amygdala to FG remains undocumented. In this fMRI study, 39 participants completed a face recognition task. 11 participants underwent the same experiment approximately four months later. Robust face-selective activation of FG, amygdala, and lateral occipital cortex were observed. Dynamic causal modeling and Bayesian Model Selection (BMS) were used to test the intrinsic connections between these structures, and their modulation by face perception. BMS results strongly favored a dynamic causal model with bidirectional, face-modulated amygdala-FG connections. However, the right hemisphere connections diminished at time 2, with the face modulation parameter no longer surviving Bonferroni correction. These findings suggest that amygdala strongly influences FG function during face perception, and that this influence is shaped by experience and stimulus salience. PMID:21497657

  18. Dynamic Encoding of Face Information in the Human Fusiform Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Ghuman, Avniel Singh; Brunet, Nicolas M.; Li, Yuanning; Konecky, Roma O.; Pyles, John A.; Walls, Shawn A.; Destefino, Vincent; Wang, Wei; Richardson, R. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Humans’ ability to rapidly and accurately detect, identify, and classify faces under variable conditions derives from a network of brain regions highly tuned to face information. The fusiform face area (FFA) is thought to be a computational hub for face processing, however temporal dynamics of face information processing in FFA remains unclear. Here we use multivariate pattern classification to decode the temporal dynamics of expression-invariant face information processing using electrodes placed directly upon FFA in humans. Early FFA activity (50-75 ms) contained information regarding whether participants were viewing a face. Activity between 200-500 ms contained expression-invariant information about which of 70 faces participants were viewing along with the individual differences in facial features and their configurations. Long-lasting (500+ ms) broadband gamma frequency activity predicted task performance. These results elucidate the dynamic computational role FFA plays in multiple face processing stages and indicate what information is used in performing these visual analyses. PMID:25482825

  19. Rotational vertebrobasilar ischemia due to vertebral artery dynamic stenoses complicated by an ostial atherosclerotic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Natello, Gregory W; Carroll, Christine M; Katwal, Arabindra B

    2009-08-01

    We describe a patient with rotational vertebrobasilar ischemia (RVBI) due to vertebral artery (VA) compressive stenoses during neck rotation, complicated by an ostial atherosclerotic stenosis (OAS). Referred for 'near-syncopal spells', inquiry revealed a symptom-complex consistent with vertebrobasilar transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) provoked by head rotation. VA dynamic angiography with imaging via prevertebral subclavian injections in neck-rotated positions while reproducing symptoms, demonstrated two compressive stenoses not present in the neck-neutral position, establishing the diagnosis of RVBI due to CT-demonstrated cervical spondylosis. There was an occluded contralateral VA, isolated posterior circulation, and absent vertebral collateral flow. Disabling symptoms persisted despite using a cervical collar. Surgical decompression of the dynamic stenoses would not address the OAS, was considered high risk, and absence of a suitable donor artery precluded distal VA reconstruction. RVBI resolved with ostial stent placement by improving perfusion pressure across the compressive stenoses. To our knowledge, this is the first report of RVBI in which the affected VA had an obstructive atherosclerotic stenosis in addition to the characteristic rotation-induced dynamic stenoses, and the first report of stent placement in the culprit artery to treat this disorder. Diagnosis depends on recognizing the association of symptoms with positional neck changes and VA dynamic angiography demonstrating the compressive stenosis while reproducing symptoms. This case illustrates the management complexities when there are coexisting abnormalities, emphasizing the need to individualize treatment. RVBI is a potentially correctable cause of TIAs and particularly relevant due to the aging population which has a significant incidence of both degenerative cervical and atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:19651677

  20. Skill Dependent Audiovisual Integration in the Fusiform Induces Repetition Suppression

    PubMed Central

    McNorgan, Chris; Booth, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Learning to read entails mapping existing phonological representations to novel orthographic representations and is thus an ideal context for investigating experience driven audiovisual integration. Because two dominant brain-based theories of reading development hinge on the sensitivity of the visual-object processing stream to phonological information, we were interested in how reading skill relates to audiovisual integration in this area. Thirty-two children between 8 and 13 years of age spanning a range of reading skill participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Participants completed a rhyme judgment task to word pairs presented unimodally (auditory- or visual-only) and cross-modally (auditory followed by visual). Skill-dependent sub-additive audiovisual modulation was found in left fusiform gyrus, extending into the putative visual word form area, and was correlated with behavioral orthographic priming. These results suggest learning to read promotes facilitatory audiovisual integration in the ventral visual-object processing stream and may optimize this region for orthographic processing. PMID:25585276

  1. Skill dependent audiovisual integration in the fusiform induces repetition suppression.

    PubMed

    McNorgan, Chris; Booth, James R

    2015-02-01

    Learning to read entails mapping existing phonological representations to novel orthographic representations and is thus an ideal context for investigating experience driven audiovisual integration. Because two dominant brain-based theories of reading development hinge on the sensitivity of the visual-object processing stream to phonological information, we were interested in how reading skill relates to audiovisual integration in this area. Thirty-two children between 8 and 13 years of age spanning a range of reading skill participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Participants completed a rhyme judgment task to word pairs presented unimodally (auditory- or visual-only) and cross-modally (auditory followed by visual). Skill-dependent sub-additive audiovisual modulation was found in left fusiform gyrus, extending into the putative visual word form area, and was correlated with behavioral orthographic priming. These results suggest learning to read promotes facilitatory audiovisual integration in the ventral visual-object processing stream and may optimize this region for orthographic processing. PMID:25585276

  2. Evaluation of fusiform rust-resistant loblolly pine families for the South Carolina sandhills region

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, H.R. Jr.

    1981-10-01

    Loblolly pine trees from various geographic sources are being evaluated for resistance to fusiform rust. Reasons for differences in resistance and the mechanisms of rust infection are also being investigated. (ACR)

  3. Immune-modulating activities of polysaccharides extracted from brown algae Hizikia fusiforme.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sang Chul; Jeong, Yong Tae; Lee, Sang Myung; Kim, Jin Hee

    2015-01-01

    The immuno-modulating activities of seaweed (Hizikia fusiforme) extracts on murine macrophage and splenocyte were studied in vitro. Polysaccharide (HFP) exhibited the potential macrophage stimulating effects than water extract (HFW) such as NO production and enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokines on the Raw 264.7 cells and splenocytes. From the mono-sugar composition, HFP-associated fucose based on HFP of H. fusiforme acts as immune modulator. PMID:25744337

  4. Long-Term Experience with Chinese Language Shapes the Fusiform Asymmetry of English Reading

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Leilei; Xue, Gui; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Chuansheng; Wei, Miao; He, Qinghua; Dong, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested differential engagement of the bilateral fusiform gyrus in the processing of Chinese and English. The present study tested the possibility that long-term experience with Chinese language affects the fusiform laterality of English reading by comparing three samples: Chinese speakers, English speakers with Chinese experience, and English speakers without Chinese experience. We found that, when reading words in their respective native language, Chinese and English speakers without Chinese experience differed in functional laterality of the posterior fusiform region (right laterality for Chinese speakers, but left laterality for English speakers). More importantly, compared with English speakers without Chinese experience, English speakers with Chinese experience showed more recruitment of the right posterior fusiform cortex for English words and pseudowords, which is similar to how Chinese speakers processed Chinese. These results suggest that long-term experience with Chinese shapes the fusiform laterality of English reading and have important implications for our understanding of the cross-language influences in terms of neural organization and of the functions of different fusiform subregions in reading. PMID:25598049

  5. Long-term experience with Chinese language shapes the fusiform asymmetry of English reading.

    PubMed

    Mei, Leilei; Xue, Gui; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Chuansheng; Wei, Miao; He, Qinghua; Dong, Qi

    2015-04-15

    Previous studies have suggested differential engagement of the bilateral fusiform gyrus in the processing of Chinese and English. The present study tested the possibility that long-term experience with Chinese language affects the fusiform laterality of English reading by comparing three samples: Chinese speakers, English speakers with Chinese experience, and English speakers without Chinese experience. We found that, when reading words in their respective native language, Chinese and English speakers without Chinese experience differed in functional laterality of the posterior fusiform region (right laterality for Chinese speakers, but left laterality for English speakers). More importantly, compared with English speakers without Chinese experience, English speakers with Chinese experience showed more recruitment of the right posterior fusiform cortex for English words and pseudowords, which is similar to how Chinese speakers processed Chinese. These results suggest that long-term experience with Chinese shapes the fusiform laterality of English reading and have important implications for our understanding of the cross-language influences in terms of neural organization and of the functions of different fusiform subregions in reading. PMID:25598049

  6. Comparative proteomic analysis provides insight into cadmium stress responses in brown algae Sargassum fusiforme.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aiqin; Xu, Tao; Zou, Huixi; Pang, Qiuying

    2015-06-01

    Sargassum fusiforme is one of the most widely consumed seaweeds in China, Korea and Japan. In this work, we performed growth analysis and comparative proteomics to investigate the molecular mechanisms of the response to 1 day and 5 days Cd stress in S. fusiforme. Our results showed a significant decrease in growth rate and an increase in Cd ion content in S. fusiforme in response to Cd treatment. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed 25 and 51 differentially expressed protein spots in S. fusiforme under 1 day and 5 days Cd stress, respectively. A great number of these proteins was metabolic enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and energy metabolism. Many proteins involved in the processing of genetic information showed a decrease in abundance under 1 day Cd stress. In contrast, 9 of the identified protein spots primarily involved in genetic information processing and carbohydrate metabolism were greatly enriched under 5 days Cd stress. Overall, our investigation indicated that Cd stress negatively affects the metabolic activity of S. fusiforme through the down-regulation of key metabolic enzymes. In addition, S. fusiforme may adapt to 5 days Cd stress by promoting consumption of photoassimilates through the up-regulation of glycolysis and the citrate cycle to supply energy for survival. PMID:25827747

  7. Comparison of open and controlled pollinated pine families for susceptibility to air pollution, acid rain, and fusiform rust. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chevone, B.; Powers, H.R. Jr.

    1982-10-01

    Loblolly pine seedlings were fumigated with SO/sub 2/, ozone, and a combination of SO/sub 2/ and ozone to determine the relative susceptibility of different strains to air pollution and to fusiform rust. There seems to be no relationship between susceptibility to air pollution and to fusiform rust, indicating it should be possible to select strains resistant to both fusiform rust and air pollution. (ACR)

  8. Treatment of fenestrated vertebrobasilar junction-related aneurysms with endovascular techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhu, De-Yuan; Fang, Yi-Bin; Wu, Yi-Na; Li, Qiang; Duan, Guo-Li; Liu, Jian-Min; Xu, Yi; Hong, Bo; Zhao, Wen-Yuan; Huang, Qing-Hai

    2016-06-01

    Fenestrated vertebrobasilar junction-related aneurysms (fVBJ-AN) are uncommon and endovascular management strategies have become the first options for the treatment of these lesions. This clinical study aimed to report our experience in the endovascular management of these lesions and to review the literature. We retrospectively reviewed 10 consecutive patients harboring 12 fVBJ-AN between January 2007 and December 2014. The demographic, angiographic and clinical data were reviewed. Additionally, a literature review was performed. Endovascular management strategies were successfully applied in all 10 patients. Post-procedural angiograms indicated total occlusion in eight (66.7%) aneurysms, a residual neck in one (8.3%) aneurysm, and three residual aneurysms (25%). No procedure-related complications were observed. Follow-up angiograms were obtained in eight patients and revealed nine occluded aneurysms and one improved aneurysm; two patients were lost to angiographic follow-up. Clinical follow-ups were obtained in all patients (until July 2015), and the modified Rankin Scale scores at 69.5months (range 17-101months) of follow-up were 0 in eight patients and 1 in two patients. Endovascular management strategies provided a high occlusion rate and an acceptable complication rate and are thus efficacious in the treatment of fVBJ-AN. Further studies are necessary to validate the utility of these treatments due to the low incidence of fVBJ-AN. PMID:26778513

  9. Vertebrobasilar junction giant aneurysm: Lessons learned from a neurosurgical audit and anatomical investigation.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Francesca; Ganau, Mario; Russo, Vittorio Maria; Iacopino, Domenico G; Ulm, Arthur John

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of vascular lesions of the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) remains a challenging task in the neurosurgical practice and the gold standard therapy is still under debate. In this article, the authors report a detailed postmortem study of a VBJ giant aneurysm (GA) previously endovascularly treated. Although the decision-making process for the vast majority of neurosurgical treatment can nowadays be accurately carried out during the preoperative planning (i.e., with the aid of neuroimaging fusion protocols, neuronavigation platforms, etc.) meant to maximize the anatomical understanding of the lesions and minimize possible intraprocedural challenges, this postmortem study represents the ultimate essence of neurosurgical audit as the laboratory investigations allowed to reevaluate the clinical history of VBJ GA, and reassess the multiple strategies available for its treatment with a straightforward anatomical perspective. Specifically, the lessons learned through this clinical and laboratory work uphold a great educational value regarding the complex management of those lesions, including the possible role of combined skull base surgical approaches. PMID:25891495

  10. Orthographic transparency modulates the functional asymmetry in the fusiform cortex: an artificial language training study.

    PubMed

    Mei, Leilei; Xue, Gui; Lu, Zhong-Lin; He, Qinghua; Zhang, Mingxia; Xue, Feng; Chen, Chuansheng; Dong, Qi

    2013-05-01

    The laterality difference in the occipitotemporal region between Chinese (bilaterality) and alphabetic languages (left laterality) has been attributed to their difference in visual appearance. However, these languages also differ in orthographic transparency. To disentangle the effect of orthographic transparency from visual appearance, we trained subjects to read the same artificial script either as an alphabetic (i.e., transparent orthography) or a logographic (i.e., nontransparent orthography) language. Consistent with our previous results, both types of phonological training enhanced activations in the left fusiform gyrus. More interestingly, the laterality in the fusiform gyrus (especially the posterior region) was modulated by the orthographic transparency of the artificial script (more left-lateralized activation after alphabetic training than after logographic training). These results provide an alternative account (i.e., orthographic transparency) for the laterality difference between Chinese and alphabetic languages, and may have important implications for the role of the fusiform in reading. PMID:22434043

  11. Wingspan Stent for High-Grade Symptomatic Vertebrobasilar Artery Atherosclerotic Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jian Zhao Zhenwei Gao Guodong Deng Jianping; Yu Jia; Gao Li; Yuan Yang; Qv Youzhi

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to present the treatment outcomes with Wingspan stent angioplasty of high-grade intracranial vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) stenosis in symptomatic patients. Methods: Between 2007 and 2010, the records of 30 patients with 31 intracranial high-grade VBA stenoses (all{>=}70%) who underwent elective stenting due to the failure of medical therapy were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical evaluation was performed based on the modified Rankin scale and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Results: In all cases, the stent deployment was technically successful. The mean stenosis decreased significantly from 82.28 {+-} 8.02% (range, 72-99%) to 11.18 {+-} 7.28% (range, 0-25%) after stent-assisted angioplasty (P < 0.05). Periprocedure complications occurred in 3 (10%) of 30 patients; there were 2 cases of perforator strokes and 1 case of transient flow insufficiency with stent overlap. Clinical follow-up (mean, 17.81 {+-} 11.49 months; range, 5-40 months) was available for 27 patients, and angiographic follow-up (mean, 9.95 {+-} 5.74 months, range, 5-20 months) was available for 19 patients. Only one case demonstrated recurrent symptoms with restenosis ({>=}50%). There were no recurrent ischemic events and no cases of restenosis in the other patients. Conclusions: According to our data, the Wingspan stent for symptomatic intracranial VBA stenoses is a safe and efficacious treatment alternative in cases with recurrent symptoms despite medical therapy. However, the improvement of outcome requires the reduction in the rate of procedure-related complications and long-term outcomes still have to be demonstrated.

  12. Discriminable spatial patterns of activation for faces and bodies in the fusiform gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Yeon; Lee, Su Mei; Erlendsdottir, Margret C.; McCarthy, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies consistently report that the visual perception of faces and bodies strongly activates regions within ventral occipitotemporal cortex (VOTC) and, in particular, within the mid-lateral fusiform gyrus. One unresolved issue is the degree to which faces and bodies activate discrete or overlapping cortical regions within this region. Here, we examined VOTC activity to faces and bodies at high spatial resolution, using univariate and multivariate analysis approaches sensitive to differences in both the strength and spatial pattern of activation. Faces and bodies evoked substantially overlapping activations in the fusiform gyrus when each was compared to the control category of houses. No discrete regions of activation for faces and bodies in the fusiform gyrus survived a direct statistical comparison using standard univariate statistics. However, multi-voxel pattern analysis differentiated faces and bodies in regions where univariate analysis found no significant difference in the strength of activation. Using a whole-brain multivariate searchlight approach, we also found that extensive regions in VOTC beyond those defined as fusiform face and body areas using standard criteria where the spatial pattern of activation discriminated faces and bodies. These findings provide insights into the spatial distribution of face- and body-specific activations in VOTC and the identification of functionally specialized regions. PMID:25177286

  13. The Left Fusiform Area Is Affected by Written Frequency of Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proverbio, Alice M.; Zani, Alberto; Adorni, Roberta

    2008-01-01

    The recent neuroimaging literature gives conflicting evidence about whether the left fusiform gyrus (FG) might recognize words as unitary visual objects. The sensitivity of the left FG to word frequency might provide a neural basis for the orthographic input lexicon theorized by reading models [Patterson, K., Marshall, J. C., & Coltheart, M.…

  14. Neurons in the Fusiform Gyrus are Fewer and Smaller in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Kooten, Imke A. J.; Palmen, Saskia J. M. C.; von Cappeln, Patricia; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.; Korr, Hubert; Heinsen, Helmut; Hof, Patrick R.; van Engeland, Herman; Schmitz, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Abnormalities in face perception are a core feature of social disabilities in autism. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies showed that patients with autism could perform face perception tasks. However, the fusiform gyrus (FG) and other cortical regions supporting face processing in controls are hypoactive in patients with autism.…

  15. Mapping and morphometric analysis of synapses and spines on fusiform cells in the dorsal cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Rony H.; Chen, Guoyou; Velet, Liliya; Manzoor, Nauman F.; Elkin, Rachel; Kidd, Grahame J.; Coughlin, John; Yurosko, Christopher; Bou-Anak, Stephanie; Azadi, Shirin; Gohlsch, Stephanie; Schneider, Harold; Kaltenbach, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Fusiform cells are the main integrative units of the mammalian dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), collecting and processing inputs from auditory and other sources before transmitting information to higher levels of the auditory system. Despite much previous work describing these cells and the sources and pharmacological identity of their synaptic inputs, information on the three-dimensional organization and utltrastructure of synapses on these cells is currently very limited. This information is essential since an understanding of synaptic plasticity and remodeling and pathologies underlying disease states and hearing disorders must begin with knowledge of the normal characteristics of synapses on these cells, particularly those features that determine the strength of their influence on the various compartments of the cell. Here, we employed serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) followed by 3D reconstructions to map and quantitatively characterize synaptic features on DCN fusiform cells. Our results reveal a relative sparseness of synapses on the somata of fusiform cells but a dense distribution of synapses on apical and basal dendrites. Synapses on apical dendrites were smaller and more numerous than on basal dendrites. The vast majority of axosomatic terminals were found to be linked to other terminals connected by the same axon or different branches of the same axon, suggesting a high degree of divergent input to fusiform cells. The size of terminals was correlated with the number of mitochondria and with the number of active zones, which was highly correlated with the number of postsynaptic densities, suggesting that larger terminals exert more powerful influence on the cell than smaller terminals. These size differences suggest that the input to basal dendrites, most likely those from the auditory nerve, provide the most powerful sources of input to fusiform cells, while those to apical dendrites (e.g., parallel fiber) are weaker but more numerous. PMID:25294990

  16. Outcomes of Endovascular Mechanical Thrombectomy and Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator for the Treatment of Vertebrobasilar Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Cloft, Harry J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Aggressive treatment of posterior-circulation occlusions is important due to the high rates of morbidity and mortality associated with these infarctions. A large administrative database was evaluated to determine the outcomes of mechanical thrombectomy and intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) for the treatment of posterior-circulation (vertebrobasilar) strokes. Outcomes were compared across age groups. Methods The United States Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to evaluate the outcomes of patients treated for posterior-circulation acute ischemic stroke between 2006 and 2010. Patients who underwent endovascular mechanical thrombectomy and IV-tPA were selected. Primary outcomes were discharge status and mortality; secondary outcomes were length of stay, rate of intracranial hemorrhage, tracheostomy, and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy/jejunostomy tube placement. Outcomes were grouped according to age (i.e., <50, 50-64, and ≥65 years). Chi-squared test and Student's t-test were used for comparisons of categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Results During 2006-2010 there were 36,675 patients who had discharge International Classification of Diseases (9th edition) codes indicating posterior-circulation strokes. Of these, 631 (1.7%) underwent mechanical thrombectomy and 1554 (4.2%) underwent IV-tPA. The in-hospital mortality rate for mechanical thrombectomy patients was significantly lower for those aged <50 years than for those aged 50-64 years (30.4% versus 47.4%, p<0.01) and those aged ≥65 years (30.4% versus 43.0%, p≤0.01). Age had no effect on the in-hospital mortality for IV-tPA patients, with an incidence of 22.7% for patients aged <50 years, compared to 25.4% for patients aged 50-64 years (p=0.46) and 23.0% for patients aged ≥65 years (p=0.92). Conclusions Patients requiring IV-tPA and/or mechanical thrombectomy for the treatment of posterior-circulation strokes suffer from high mortality rates. Increased age is associated with significantly higher mortality rates among posterior-circulation stroke patients who require mechanical thrombectomy. PMID:24465258

  17. Endoport-Assisted Microsurgical Treatment of a Ruptured Periventricular Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-Jen; Caruso, James; Buell, Thomas; Crowley, R. Webster; Liu, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Importance. Ruptured periventricular aneurysms in patients with moyamoya disease represent challenging pathologies. The most common methods of treatment include endovascular embolization and microsurgical clipping. However, rare cases arise in which the location and anatomy of the aneurysm make these treatment modalities particularly challenging. Clinical Presentation. We report a case of a 34-year-old female with moyamoya disease who presented with intraventricular hemorrhage. CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography revealed an aneurysm located in the wall of the atrium of the right lateral ventricle. Distal endovascular access was not possible, and embolization risked the sacrifice of arteries supplying critical brain parenchyma. Using the BrainPath endoport system, the aneurysm was able to be accessed. Since the fusiform architecture of the aneurysm prevented clip placement, the aneurysm was ligated with electrocautery. Conclusion. We demonstrate the feasibility of endoport-assisted approach for minimally invasive access and treatment of uncommon, distally located aneurysms. PMID:27195160

  18. Posterior spinal artery aneurysm rupture after 'Ecstasy' abuse.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremiah; Patel, Shnehal; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2015-07-01

    Posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms are a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The commonly abused street drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or 'Ecstasy' has been linked to both systemic and neurological complications. A teenager presented with neck stiffness, headaches and nausea after ingesting 'Ecstasy'. A brain CT was negative for SAH but a CT angiogram suggested cerebral vasculitis. A lumbar puncture showed SAH but a cerebral angiogram was negative. After a spinal MR angiogram identified abnormalities on the dorsal surface of the cervical spinal cord, a spinal angiogram demonstrated a left PSA 2 mm fusiform aneurysm. The patient underwent surgery and the aneurysmal portion of the PSA was excised without postoperative neurological sequelae. 'Ecstasy' can lead to neurovascular inflammation, intracranial hemorrhage, SAH and potentially even de novo aneurysm formation and subsequent rupture. PSA aneurysms may be treated by endovascular proximal vessel occlusion or open surgical excision. PMID:25006043

  19. Posterior spinal artery aneurysm rupture after 'Ecstasy' abuse.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremiah; Patel, Shnehal; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2014-01-01

    Posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms are a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The commonly abused street drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or 'Ecstasy' has been linked to both systemic and neurological complications. A teenager presented with neck stiffness, headaches and nausea after ingesting 'Ecstasy'. A brain CT was negative for SAH but a CT angiogram suggested cerebral vasculitis. A lumbar puncture showed SAH but a cerebral angiogram was negative. After a spinal MR angiogram identified abnormalities on the dorsal surface of the cervical spinal cord, a spinal angiogram demonstrated a left PSA 2 mm fusiform aneurysm. The patient underwent surgery and the aneurysmal portion of the PSA was excised without postoperative neurological sequelae. 'Ecstasy' can lead to neurovascular inflammation, intracranial hemorrhage, SAH and potentially even de novo aneurysm formation and subsequent rupture. PSA aneurysms may be treated by endovascular proximal vessel occlusion or open surgical excision. PMID:24994748

  20. Excess copper induced proteomic changes in the marine brown algae Sargassum fusiforme.

    PubMed

    Zou, Hui-Xi; Pang, Qiu-Ying; Zhang, Ai-Qin; Lin, Li-Dong; Li, Nan; Yan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient for algal growth and development; however, it is also generally considered to be one of the most toxic metals when present at higher levels. Seaweeds are often exposed to low concentrations of metals, including Cu, for long time periods. In cases of ocean outfall, they may even be abruptly exposed to high levels of metals. The physiological processes that are active under Cu stress are largely unknown. In this study, the brown macroalga Sargassum fusiforme was cultured in fresh seawater at final Cu concentrations of 0, 4, 8, 24 and 47 μM. The Cu(2+) concentration and chlorophyll autofluorescence were measured to establish the toxic effects of Cu on this economically important seaweed. The accumulation of Cu by S. fusiforme was also dependent upon the external Cu concentration. Algal growth displayed a general decline with increasing media Cu concentrations, indicating that S. fusiforme was able to tolerate Cu stress at low concentrations, while it was negatively impacted at high concentrations. The term "acute stress" was employed to indicate exposure to high Cu concentrations for 1 day in this study. On the other hand, "chronic stress" was defined as exposure to lower sub-lethal Cu concentrations for 7 days. Proteins were extracted from control and Cu-treated S. fusiforme samples and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Distinct patterns of protein expression in the acute and chronic stress conditions were observed. Proteins related to energy metabolism and photosynthesis were reduced significantly, whereas those related to carbohydrate metabolism, protein destination, RNA degradation and signaling regulation were induced in S. fusiforme in response to acute copper stress. Energy metabolism-related proteins were significantly induced by chronic Cu stress. Proteins from other functional groups, such as those related to membranes and transport, were present in minor quantities. These results suggest that S. fusiforme is sensitive to excess Cu, regardless of the presence of acute or chronic stress. We discuss the possible function of these identified proteins, taking into consideration the information available from other plant models. PMID:25450944

  1. Ruptured intracranial dermoid cysts.

    PubMed

    El-Bahy, K; Kotb, A; Galal, A; El-Hakim, A

    2006-04-01

    Rupture of intracranial dermoid cysts (RICDC) is a rare phenomenon. The mechanism of rupture, pathophysiology of fat in the ventricles and subarachnoid spaces, possible complications, and proper management of such conditions are proposed on the basis of a review of the literature and experience with two cases of ruptured intracranial dermoid cysts (One was in the pineal region, while another was in the fourth ventricle). It is concluded that rupture of intracranial dermoid cysts is usually spontaneous and non-fatal. Persistence of fat in the subarachnoid spaces postoperatively may last asymptomatically for years. Surgery is the only way to deal with these benign lesions. If the capsule is adherent to vital areas, incomplete removal is advised as recurrence and malignant transformation are unlikely to occur. PMID:16437187

  2. Tectonics: Rupture exposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Thomas K.

    2013-01-01

    Great Himalayan earthquakes were thought to rarely rupture the surface. Field analyses in Nepal, however, reveal large surface displacements along the main fault bounding India and Asia during at least two historical earthquakes, in 1255 and 1934.

  3. Lingual and fusiform gyri in visual processing: a clinico-pathologic study of superior altitudinal hemianopia.

    PubMed Central

    Bogousslavsky, J; Miklossy, J; Deruaz, J P; Assal, G; Regli, F

    1987-01-01

    A macular-sparing superior altitudinal hemianopia with no visuo-psychic disturbance, except impaired visual learning, was associated with bilateral ischaemic necrosis of the lingual gyrus and only partial involvement of the fusiform gyrus on the left side. It is suggested that bilateral destruction of the lingual gyrus alone is not sufficient to affect complex visual processing. The fusiform gyrus probably has a critical role in colour integration, visuo-spatial processing, facial recognition and corresponding visual imagery. Involvement of the occipitotemporal projection system deep to the lingual gyri probably explained visual memory dysfunction, by a visuo-limbic disconnection. Impaired verbal memory may have been due to posterior involvement of the parahippocampal gyrus and underlying white matter, which may have disconnected the intact speech areas from the left medial temporal structures. Images PMID:3585386

  4. Structural characterization and effect on anti-angiogenic activity of a fucoidan from Sargassum fusiforme.

    PubMed

    Cong, Qifei; Chen, Huanjun; Liao, Wenfeng; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Peipei; Qin, Yi; Dong, Qun; Ding, Kan

    2016-01-20

    A fucoidan FP08S2 was isolated from the boiling-water extract of Sargassum fusiforme, purified by CaCl2 precipitation and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and Sephacryl S-300. FP08S2 contained fucose, xylose, galactose, mannose, glucuronic acid, and 20.8% sulfate. The sulfate groups were attached to diverse positions of fucose, xylose, mannose, and galactose residues. The backbone of FP08S2 consisted of alternate 1,2-linked α-D-Manp and 1,4-linked β-D-GlcpA. Sugar composition analysis and ESI-MS revealed that the oligosaccharides from branches contained fucose, xylose, galactose, glucuronic acid and sulfate. FP08S2 could significantly inhibit tube formation and migration of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) dose-dependently. These results suggested that the fucoidan FP08S2 from brown seaweeds S. fusiforme could be a potent anti-angiogenic agent. PMID:26572427

  5. Robust and task-independent spatial profile of the visual word form activation in fusiform cortex.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lifei; Jiang, Yi; Bai, Jian'e; Gong, Qiyong; Liu, Haicheng; Chen, Hsuan-Chih; He, Sheng; Weng, Xuchu

    2011-01-01

    Written language represents a special category of visual information. There is strong evidence for the existence of a cortical region in ventral occipitotemporal cortex for processing the visual form of written words. However, due to inconsistent findings obtained with different tasks, the level of specialization and selectivity of this so called visual word form area (VWFA) remains debated. In this study, we examined category selectivity for Chinese characters, a non-alphabetic script, in native Chinese readers. In contrast to traditional approaches of examining response levels in a restricted predefined region of interest (ROI), a detailed distribution of the BOLD signal across the mid-fusiform cortical surface and the spatial patterns of responses to Chinese characters were obtained. Results show that a region tuned for Chinese characters could be consistently found in the lateral part of the left fusiform gyrus in Chinese readers, and this spatial pattern of selectivity for written words was not influenced by top-down tasks such as phonological or semantic modulations. These results provide strong support for the robust spatial coding of category selective response in the mid-fusiform cortex, and demonstrate the utility of the spatial distribution analysis as a more meaningful approach to examine functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. PMID:22022597

  6. Differential development of selectivity for faces and bodies in the fusiform gyrus.

    PubMed

    Peelen, Marius V; Glaser, Bronwyn; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Eliez, Stephan

    2009-11-01

    Viewing faces or bodies activates category-selective areas of visual cortex, including the fusiform face area (FFA), fusiform body area (FBA), and extrastriate body area (EBA). Here, using fMRI, we investigate the development of these areas, focusing on the right FFA and FBA. Despite the overlap of functionally defined FFA and FBA (54%-75% overlap), we found that these regions developed along different trajectories. With age (7-32 years old), the FFA gradually increased in size and selectivity, and was significantly larger and more face-selective in adults than children. By contrast, the size and selectivity of the FBA did not correlate with age, and were equivalent in children and adults. Whereas in adults the FFA and FBA were comparable in size, in children the FBA was on average 70% larger than the FFA. These findings suggest that, in children, the fusiform gyrus is predominantly selective for bodies, with commensurate face-selective responses apparent later in development. Moreover, differences in the development of the FFA and FBA indicate that overlapping functional brain areas, supported by the same anatomical structure, can develop along different trajectories. PMID:19840035

  7. Multivoxel Patterns in Fusiform Face Area Differentiate Faces by Sex and Race

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Juan Manuel; Banaji, Mahzarin R.; Mitchell, Jason P.

    2013-01-01

    Although prior research suggests that fusiform gyrus represents the sex and race of faces, it remains unclear whether fusiform face area (FFA)–the portion of fusiform gyrus that is functionally-defined by its preferential response to faces–contains such representations. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate whether FFA represents faces by sex and race. Participants were scanned while they categorized the sex and race of unfamiliar Black men, Black women, White men, and White women. Multivariate pattern analysis revealed that multivoxel patterns in FFA–but not other face-selective brain regions, other category-selective brain regions, or early visual cortex–differentiated faces by sex and race. Specifically, patterns of voxel-based responses were more similar between individuals of the same sex than between men and women, and between individuals of the same race than between Black and White individuals. By showing that FFA represents the sex and race of faces, this research contributes to our emerging understanding of how the human brain perceives individuals from two fundamental social categories. PMID:23936077

  8. The orthography-specific functions of the left fusiform gyrus: Evidence of modality and category specificity

    PubMed Central

    Tsapkini, Kyrana; Rapp, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    We report on an investigation of the cognitive functions of an individual with a resection of the left fusiform gyrus. This individual and a group of control participants underwent testing to examine the question of whether or not there are neural substrates within the left fusiform gyrus that are dedicated to orthographic processing. We evaluated the modality specificity (written vs. spoken language) and the category specificity (written language vs. other visual categories) of this individual’s impairments. The results clearly reveal deficits affecting lexical processes in both reading and spelling. Specifically, we find disruption of normal, rapid access to meaning from print in reading and of accurate retrieval of the spellings of words from their meaning in writing. These deficits stand in striking contrast with intact processing of spoken language and categories of visual stimuli such as line drawings of objects and faces. The modality and category specificity of the deficits provide clear evidence of neural substrates within the left mid-fusiform gyrus that are specialized and necessary for normal orthographic processing. PMID:19428003

  9. Inter-hemispheric connectivity in the fusiform gyrus supports memory consolidation for faces.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Maximilian J; O'Gorman Tuura, Ruth; Klaver, Peter

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated how changes of functional connectivity over time accompany consolidation of face memories. Based on previous research, it was hypothesized that connectivity changes in networks initially active during face perception and face encoding would be associated with individual recognition memory performance. Resting-state functional connectivity was examined shortly before, shortly after and about 40 min after incidental learning of faces. Memory performance was assessed in a surprise recognition test shortly after the last resting-state session. Results reveal that memory performance-related connectivity between the left fusiform face area and other brain areas gradually changed over the course of the experiment. Specifically, the increase in connectivity with the contralateral fusiform gyrus, the hippocampus, the amygdala and the inferior frontal gyrus correlated with recognition memory performance. As the increase in connectivity in the two final resting-state sessions was associated with memory performance, the present results demonstrate that memory formation is not restricted to the incidental learning phase but continues and increases in the following 40 min. It is discussed that the delayed increase in inter-hemisphere connectivity between the left and right fusiform gyrus is an indicator for memory formation and consolidation processes. PMID:26844811

  10. Equilibrium and Kinetic Studies of Cd2+ Biosorption by the Brown Algae Sargassum fusiforme

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Hui-Xi; Li, Nan; Wang, Li-Hua; Yu, Ping; Yan, Xiu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental investigation of the biosorption of Cd2+ from aqueous solution by the edible seaweed Sargassum fusiforme was performed under batch conditions. The influences of experimental parameters, such as the initial pH, sorption time, temperature, and initial Cd2+ concentration, on Cd2+ uptake by S. fusiforme were evaluated. The results indicated that the biosorption of Cd2+ depended on the initial Cd2+ concentration, as well as the pH. The uptake of Cd2+ could be described by the Langmuir isotherm model, and both the Langmuir biosorption equilibrium constant and the maximum biosorption capacity of the monolayer decreased with increasing temperature, thereby confirming the exothermic character of the sorption process. The biosorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and intraparticle diffusion is the sole rate-limiting step for the entire biosorption period. These fundamental equilibrium and kinetic results can support further studies to the removal of cadmium from S. fusiforme harvested from cadmium-polluted waters. PMID:24736449

  11. Incidence of fusiform rust infection on loblolly pine related to tip moth damage

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, H.R. Jr.; Stone, D.M.

    1985-09-01

    Nantucket pine tip moth (Rhyacionia frustrana) is a common pest over most of the natural range of loblolly pine, causing deformation and growth reduction of seedlings and saplings during the early life of the stand. Fusiform rust (caused by Cronartium quercuum f. sp. fusiforme) is a limiting factor in the production of southern pines throughout a broad area of the southeastern United States, extending from South Carolina to Texas. The target areas on the hosts for both pests are young, succulent shoot tissues. Carbofuran, a systematic insecticide, was used to determine the effect of controlling tip moth on seedlings infected by the fusiform rust organism. Beginning with the 2nd year carbofuran was applied over 4 successive years. The insecticide sharply reduced the incidence of tip moth and increased the height of 5-year-old saplings compared with untreated controls. Usually any treatment that stimulates the growth of pines also results in increased rust infection. However, this was not the case here because untreated saplings had significantly more infection. It is not known whether the increased disease incidence on untreated trees was due to the susceptibility and/or total number of secondary shoots initiated in response to tip dieback caused by the tip moth, or if carbofuran itself has some fungicidal effect resulting in lower infection on treated seedlings. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Radical surgical treatment for recurrent giant fusiform thrombosed vertebral artery aneurysm previously coiled

    PubMed Central

    J-O’Shanahan, Aruma; Noda, Kosumo; Tsuboi, Toshiyuki; Ota, Nakao; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu; Tokuda, Sadahisa; Tanikawa, Rokuya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fusiform aneurysms are rare (<1%) and the underlying pathophysiology is not well known. Endovascular coiling is the standard of treatment; however, a surgical procedure with vascular reconstruction by excluding the pathological segment of the vessel and restoring the blood flow, seems to be the most effective and definitive treatment. Case Description: We report a patient who presented a fusiform vertebral artery aneurysm previously coiled which developed a giant enlargement and a new contralateral fusiform aneurysm. Hemodynamic changes resulting in the formation of contralateral aneurysm might be the result of aneurysm occlusion without revascularization. In addition, continued blood flow to the aneurysmal wall through the vasa vasorum might result in aneurysm recanalization or regrowth. In order to account for these possible sources of complications, we performed a vascular reconstruction with high and low flow bypasses after trapping the aneurysm. Conclusions: We hypothesize that, in this and similar cases, surgical vascular reconstruction should be the first and definitive treatment under experienced cerebrovascular surgeons. PMID:27127714

  13. Complete mitochondrial genome of the brown alga Sargassum fusiforme (Sargassaceae, Phaeophyceae): genome architecture and taxonomic consideration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Pang, Shaojun; Luo, Minbo

    2016-01-01

    Sargassum fusiforme (Harvey) Setchell (=Hizikia fusiformis (Harvey) Okamura) is one of the most important economic seaweeds for mariculture in China. In this study, we present the complete mitochondrial genome of S. fusiforme. The genome is 34,696 bp in length with circular organization, encoding the standard set of three ribosomal RNA genes (rRNA), 25 transfer RNA genes (tRNA), 35 protein-coding genes, and two conserved open reading frames (ORFs). Its total AT content is 62.47%, lower than other brown algae except Pylaiella littoralis. The mitogenome carries 1571 bp of intergenic region constituting 4.53% of the genome, and 13 pairs of overlapping genes with the overlap size from 1 to 90 bp. The phylogenetic analyses based on 35 protein-coding genes reveal that S. fusiforme has a closer evolutionary relationship with Sargassum muticum than Sargassum horneri, indicating Hizikia are not distinct evolutionary entity and should be reduced to synonymy with Sargassum. PMID:24989050

  14. How music alters a kiss: superior temporal gyrus controls fusiform-amygdalar effective connectivity.

    PubMed

    Pehrs, Corinna; Deserno, Lorenz; Bakels, Jan-Hendrik; Schlochtermeier, Lorna H; Kappelhoff, Hermann; Jacobs, Arthur M; Fritz, Thomas Hans; Koelsch, Stefan; Kuchinke, Lars

    2014-11-01

    While watching movies, the brain integrates the visual information and the musical soundtrack into a coherent percept. Multisensory integration can lead to emotion elicitation on which soundtrack valences may have a modulatory impact. Here, dynamic kissing scenes from romantic comedies were presented to 22 participants (13 females) during functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. The kissing scenes were either accompanied by happy music, sad music or no music. Evidence from cross-modal studies motivated a predefined three-region network for multisensory integration of emotion, consisting of fusiform gyrus (FG), amygdala (AMY) and anterior superior temporal gyrus (aSTG). The interactions in this network were investigated using dynamic causal models of effective connectivity. This revealed bilinear modulations by happy and sad music with suppression effects on the connectivity from FG and AMY to aSTG. Non-linear dynamic causal modeling showed a suppressive gating effect of aSTG on fusiform-amygdalar connectivity. In conclusion, fusiform to amygdala coupling strength is modulated via feedback through aSTG as region for multisensory integration of emotional material. This mechanism was emotion-specific and more pronounced for sad music. Therefore, soundtrack valences may modulate emotion elicitation in movies by differentially changing preprocessed visual information to the amygdala. PMID:24298171

  15. Fault rupture segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Kenneth Michael

    A critical foundation to earthquake study and hazard assessment is the understanding of controls on fault rupture, including segmentation. Key challenges to understanding fault rupture segmentation include, but are not limited to: What determines if a fault segment will rupture in a single great event or multiple moderate events? How is slip along a fault partitioned between seismic and seismic components? How does the seismicity of a fault segment evolve over time? How representative are past events for assessing future seismic hazards? In order to address the difficult questions regarding fault rupture segmentation, new methods must be developed that utilize the information available. Much of the research presented in this study focuses on the development of new methods for attacking the challenges of understanding fault rupture segmentation. Not only do these methods exploit a broader band of information within the waveform than has traditionally been used, but they also lend themselves to the inclusion of even more seismic phases providing deeper understandings. Additionally, these methods are designed to be fast and efficient with large datasets, allowing them to utilize the enormous volume of data available. Key findings from this body of work include demonstration that focus on fundamental earthquake properties on regional scales can provide general understanding of fault rupture segmentation. We present a more modern, waveform-based method that locates events using cross-correlation of the Rayleigh waves. Additionally, cross-correlation values can also be used to calculate precise earthquake magnitudes. Finally, insight regarding earthquake rupture directivity can be easily and quickly exploited using cross-correlation of surface waves.

  16. Endovascular Stenting for Restenosis of the Intracranial Vertebrobasilar Artery After Balloon Angioplasty: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyosue, Hiro Okahara, Mika; Yamashita, Masanori; Nagatomi, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Natsuki; Mori, Hiromu

    2004-09-15

    Percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty (PTA) has been used in the treatment of critical stenosis of the intracranial vertebrobasilar artery (VBA). PTA of the intracranial VBA carries the risk of fatal complications such as arterial dissection or acute occlusion as well as postoperative restenosis. The estimated risk of periprocedural complications and restenosis were approximately 20% and 27%. The use of recently developed stents could prevent these problems of PTA. We present two cases of restenosis of the intracranial VBA after PTA which stenoses were successfully retreated with endovascular stenting using flexible coronary stents without any complications. Neither restenosis nor other recurrent symptoms were observed during the 4- and 6-month follow-up period. Reviewing the literature of 33 cases and our 2 cases, the overall complication rates related to stenting and restenosis were 5.6% and 7.8%. Endovascular stenting for the treatment of intracranial VBA can reduce the risk of arterial dissection and restenosis.

  17. Perceptual specificity in visual object priming: functional magnetic resonance imaging evidence for a laterality difference in fusiform cortex.

    PubMed

    Koutstaal, W; Wagner, A D; Rotte, M; Maril, A; Buckner, R L; Schacter, D L

    2001-01-01

    Seeing an object on one occasion may facilitate or prime processing of the same object if it is later again encountered. Such priming may also be found -- but at a reduced level -- for different but perceptually similar objects that are alternative exemplars or 'tokens' of the initially presented object. We explored the neural correlates of this perceptual specificity using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) procedures, contrasting neural activity when participants made object classification decisions (size judgments) regarding previously presented objects (repeated same), alternative exemplars of previously presented objects (repeated different), or entirely new objects (novel). Many frontal regions (including bilateral frontal operculum, bilateral posterior inferior frontal/precentral, left anterior inferior frontal, and superior frontal cortices) and multiple late visual and posterior regions (including middle occipital, fusiform, fusiform-parahippocampal, precuneus, and posterior cingulate, all bilaterally), demonstrated reduced neural activity for repeated compared to novel objects. Greater repetition-induced reductions were observed for same than for different exemplars in several of these regions (bilateral posterior inferior frontal, right precuneus, bilateral middle occipital, bilateral fusiform, bilateral parahippocampal and bilateral superior parietal). Additionally, right fusiform (occipitotemporal) cortex showed significantly less priming for different versus same exemplars than did left fusiform. These findings converge with behavioral evidence from divided visual field studies and with neuropsychological evidence underscoring the key role of right occipitotemporal cortex in processing specific visual form information; possible differences in the representational-functional role of left fusiform are discussed. PMID:11163375

  18. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, Jess; Galli, Melissa; Borchers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Achilles tendon (AT) rupture in athletes is increasing in incidence and accounts for one of the most devastating sports injuries because of the threat to alter or end a career. Despite the magnitude of this injury, reliable risk assessment has not been clearly defined, and prevention strategies have been limited. The purpose of this review is to identify potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes stated in the current literature. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search was conducted on AT rupture, or “injury” and “risk factors” and “athletes” from 1980 to 2011. Emphasis was placed on epidemiology, etiology, and review articles focusing on the risk for lower extremity injury in runners and gymnasts. Thirty articles were reviewed, and 22 were included in this assessment. Results: Aerial and ground athletes share many intrinsic risk factors for AT rupture, including overuse and degeneration of the tendon as well as anatomical variations that mechanically put an athlete at risk. Older athletes, athletes atypical in size for their sport, high tensile loads, leg dominance, and fatigue also may increase risk. Aerial athletes tend to have more extrinsic factors that play a role in this injury due to the varying landing surfaces from heights and technical maneuvers performed at various skill levels. Conclusion: Risk assessment for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes is multivariable and difficult in terms of developing prevention strategies. Quantitative measures of individual risk factors may help identify major contributors to injury. PMID:24427410

  19. Incomplete Cesarean Scar Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Firoozeh; Siahbazi, Shiva; Akhbari, Farnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background Uterine rupture at the site of a previous cesarean scar is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of pregnancy, which is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Case Presentation A 30-year old woman at 24th week of gestation and complaint of pain, contractions and spotting was admitted in Royan Institute in Tehran, Iran. She had a past medical history of an EP and a cesarean section delivery, respectively 4 and 2 years before hospitalization. Herniation of an amniotic membrane into the maternal bladder was found on ultrasound examination. Conclusion Risk factors of cesarean scar rupture should be considered in women undergoing subsequent pregnancies as they need extra care. Ultrasonography can be used to evaluate women with previous cesarean section to assess the risks of scar rupture during subsequent pregnancies. PMID:23926561

  20. Ruptured intracranial dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Oursin, C; Wetzel, S G; Lyrer, P; Bächli, H; Stock, K W

    1999-09-01

    Intradural dermoids are rare congenital tumors representing approximately 0.05% of all intracranial lesions. These benign tumors have a typical appearance on CT and MR due to their lipid components. The complication caused by rupture are the spillage of the fatty material into the cerebrospinal fluid. We report a case of a ruptured dermoid cyst showing fat/fluid levels in both side ventricles and fatty material in the subarachnoid space on CT and MR-imaging and the follow-up over four years after incomplete resection of the tumor. PMID:10817391

  1. Inactivation of murine norovirus-1 in the edible seaweeds Capsosiphon fulvescens and Hizikia fusiforme using gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin Young; Kang, Sujin; Ha, Sang-Do

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of gamma radiation (3-10 kGy) upon the inactivation of murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1), a human norovirus (NoV) surrogate. The edible green and brown algae, fulvescens (Capsosiphon fulvescens) and fusiforme (Hizikia fusiforme), respectively, were experimentally contaminated with 5-6 log10 plaque forming units (PFU)/ml MNV-1. The titer of MNV-1 significantly decreased (P < 0.05) as the dose of gamma radiation increased. MNV-1 titer decreased to 1.16-2.46 log10 PFU/ml in fulvescens and 0.37-2.21 log10 PFU/ml in fusiforme following irradiation. However, all Hunters ('L', 'a' and 'b') and sensory qualities (appearance, color, flavor, texture and overall acceptability) were not significantly (P > 0.05) different in both algae following gamma radiation. The Weibull model was used to generate non-linear survival curves and to calculate Gd values for 1, 2, and 3 log10 reductions of MNV-1 in fulvescens (R(2) = 0.992) and fusiforme (R(2) = 0.988). A Gd value of 1 (90% reduction) corresponded to 2.89 and 3.93 kGy in fulvescens and fusiforme, respectively. A Gd value of 2 (99% reduction) corresponded to 7.75 and 9.02 kGy in fulvescens and fusiforme, respectively, while a Gd value of 3 (99.9% reduction) in fulvescens and fusiforme corresponded with 13.83 and 14.93 kGy of gamma radiation, respectively. A combination of gamma radiation at medium doses and other treatments could be used to inactivate ≥3 log10 PFU/ml NoV in seaweed. The inactivation kinetics due to gamma radiation against NoV in these algae might provide basic information for use in seaweed processing and distribution. PMID:26919820

  2. Electrical stimulation of human fusiform face-selective regions distorts face perception.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Josef; Jacques, Corentin; Foster, Brett L; Witthoft, Nathan; Withoft, Nathan; Rangarajan, Vinitha; Weiner, Kevin S; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2012-10-24

    Face-selective neural responses in the human fusiform gyrus have been widely examined. However, their causal role in human face perception is largely unknown. Here, we used a multimodal approach of electrocorticography (ECoG), high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and electrical brain stimulation (EBS) to directly investigate the causal role of face-selective neural responses of the fusiform gyrus (FG) in face perception in a patient implanted with subdural electrodes in the right inferior temporal lobe. High-resolution fMRI identified two distinct FG face-selective regions [mFus-faces and pFus-faces (mid and posterior fusiform, respectively)]. ECoG revealed a striking anatomical and functional correspondence with fMRI data where a pair of face-selective electrodes, positioned 1 cm apart, overlapped mFus-faces and pFus-faces, respectively. Moreover, electrical charge delivered to this pair of electrodes induced a profound face-specific perceptual distortion during viewing of real faces. Specifically, the subject reported a "metamorphosed" appearance of faces of people in the room. Several controls illustrate the specificity of the effect to the perception of faces. EBS of mFus-faces and pFus-faces neither produced a significant deficit in naming pictures of famous faces on the computer, nor did it affect the appearance of nonface objects. Further, the appearance of faces remained unaffected during both sham stimulation and stimulation of a pair of nearby electrodes that were not face-selective. Overall, our findings reveal a striking convergence of fMRI, ECoG, and EBS, which together offer a rare causal link between functional subsets of the human FG network and face perception. PMID:23100414

  3. Right fusiform response patterns reflect visual object identity rather than semantic similarity.

    PubMed

    Bruffaerts, Rose; Dupont, Patrick; De Grauwe, Sophie; Peeters, Ronald; De Deyne, Simon; Storms, Gerrit; Vandenberghe, Rik

    2013-12-01

    We previously reported the neuropsychological consequences of a lesion confined to the middle and posterior part of the right fusiform gyrus (case JA) causing a partial loss of knowledge of visual attributes of concrete entities in the absence of category-selectivity (animate versus inanimate). We interpreted this in the context of a two-step model that distinguishes structural description knowledge from associative-semantic processing and implicated the lesioned area in the former process. To test this hypothesis in the intact brain, multi-voxel pattern analysis was used in a series of event-related fMRI studies in a total of 46 healthy subjects. We predicted that activity patterns in this region would be determined by the identity of rather than the conceptual similarity between concrete entities. In a prior behavioral experiment features were generated for each entity by more than 1000 subjects. Based on a hierarchical clustering analysis the entities were organised into 3 semantic clusters (musical instruments, vehicles, tools). Entities were presented as words or pictures. With foveal presentation of pictures, cosine similarity between fMRI response patterns in right fusiform cortex appeared to reflect both the identity of and the semantic similarity between the entities. No such effects were found for words in this region. The effect of object identity was invariant for location, scaling, orientation axis and color (grayscale versus color). It also persisted for different exemplars referring to a same concrete entity. The apparent semantic similarity effect however was not invariant. This study provides further support for a neurobiological distinction between structural description knowledge and processing of semantic relationships and confirms the role of right mid-posterior fusiform cortex in the former process, in accordance with previous lesion evidence. PMID:23811413

  4. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture disc is the only pressure relief device on the tank, the rupture disc must— (a) Rupture at a pressure...

  5. Solvothermal synthesis of fusiform hexagonal prism SrCO{sub 3} microrods via ethylene glycol solution

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Liange; Du Fanglin . E-mail: dufanglin@qust.edu.cn

    2007-08-07

    Fusiform hexagonal prism SrCO{sub 3} microrods were prepared by a simple solvothermal route at 120 deg. C, and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. By controlling the content of ethylene glycol (EG), it was found that ethylene glycol (EG) played an important role in the formation of such SrCO{sub 3} microrods. Finally, effects of other solvents on the products, including 1,2-propanediol and glycerin, were also investigated.

  6. Multiple congenital ectatic and fusiform arterial aneurysms associated with lower limb hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Gutierrez, Juan Carlos; Rodríguez, Laura Cadenas; Bret Zurita, Montserrat; Contreras, Cristina Utrilla; Alvarez-Luque, Arturo; Prieto, Consuelo

    2012-08-01

    Aneurysmal disease is uncommon in children, and its presence often leads to suspicion of genetic disorders (Loeys-Dietz syndrome, Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, tuberous sclerosis), trauma, and infection. We describe the case of a newborn boy with generalized left lower limb hypoplasia associated with diffuse areas of arteriectasis combined with areas of stenosis and fusiform aneurysms of the iliac, femoral, and popliteal arteries. No additional vascular territories were affected. The patient was asymptomatic, and no therapeutic intervention has been considered. Numerous complementary imaging and laboratory examinations failed to establish a definitive diagnosis. This collection of findings has not been previously reported. PMID:22572012

  7. Type I persistent proatlantal artery associated with fusiform subclavian artery aneurysm: Report of one case.

    PubMed

    Buljan, Krunoslav; Hegeduš, Ivana; Gilman Kuric, Tihana; Salha, Tamer; Tomić, Svetlana; Butković Soldo, Silva; Buljan, Vesna; Šošić, Đurđica

    2015-08-01

    We report a 61 years old male presenting with a right cerebral infarction, along with a type I persistent left proatlantal artery (PA), which is a form of primitive carotid-basilar anastomosis. The patient had an absence of the ipsilateral vertebral artery (VA) and hypoplasia of the contralateral VA, while the basilar artery was supplied by the PA. Other vascular anomalies present were a fusiform aneurysm of the right subclavian artery, and an A1 segment aplasia of the hypoplastic anterior right cerebral artery, which originated from the anterior communicating artery. To our knowledge these anomalies were not described previously. PMID:26436940

  8. The contribution of the left mid-fusiform cortical thickness to Chinese and English reading in a large Chinese sample.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingxia; Li, Jin; Chen, Chuansheng; Mei, Leilei; Xue, Gui; Lu, Zhonglin; Chen, Chunhui; He, Qinghua; Wei, Miao; Dong, Qi

    2013-01-15

    Previous functional neuroimaging studies have shown that the left mid-fusiform cortex plays a critical role in reading. However, there is very limited research relating this region's anatomical structure to reading performance either in native or second language. Using structural MRI and three reading tasks (Chinese characters, English words, and alphabetic pseudowords) and a non-reading task (visual-auditory learning), this study investigated the contributions of the left mid-fusiform cortical thickness to reading in a large sample of 226 Chinese subjects. Results showed that the cortical thickness in the left mid-fusiform gyrus was positively correlated with performance on all three reading tasks but not with the performance on the non-reading task. Our findings provide structural evidence for the left mid-fusiform cortex as the "gateway" region for reading Chinese and English. The absence of the association between the left mid-fusiform cortical thickness and non-reading performance implied the specific role of this area in reading skills, not in general language skills. PMID:23022094

  9. The Contribution of the Left Mid-fusiform Cortical Thickness to Chinese and English Reading in a Large Chinese Sample

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingxia; Li, Jin; Chen, Chuansheng; Mei, Leilei; Xue, Gui; Lu, Zhonglin; Chen, Chunhui; He, Qinghua; Wei, Miao; Dong, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Previous functional neuroimaging studies have shown that the left mid-fusiform cortex plays a critical role in reading. However, there is very limited research relating this region’s anatomical structure to reading performance either in native or second language. Using structural MRI and three reading tasks (Chinese characters, English words, and alphabetic pseudowords) and a non-reading task (visual-auditory learning), this study investigated the contributions of the left mid-fusiform cortical thickness to reading in a large sample of 226 Chinese subjects. Results showed that cortical thickness in the left mid-fusiform gyrus was positively correlated with performance on all three reading tasks but not with the performance on the non-reading task. Our findings provide structural evidence for the left mid-fusiform cortex as the “gateway” region for reading Chinese and English. The absence of the association between the left mid-fusiform cortical thickness and non-reading performance implied the specific role of this area in reading skills, not in general language skills. PMID:23022094

  10. [Symphysis rupture during partus].

    PubMed

    Nouta, Klaas-Auke; Van Rhee, Marina; Van Langelaan, Evert J

    2011-01-01

    A few hours after the birth of her first child a 36-year-old woman developed anterior pelvic pain. The pain worsened on walking. It proved that during the birth the patient had felt something 'give'. On X-ray a diastasis of 50 mm was seen in the symphysis and symphysis rupture was diagnosed. The patient was treated conservatively with bed rest and pelvic stabilisation. After 17 weeks she was symptom-free. Symphysis rupture during partus is rare. It is characterised by pain around the symphysis and/or the sacro-iliac joints during the first 24 hours post partum. Diagnosis can be made by X-ray. Treatment is predominantly conservative comprising pelvic stabilisation and bed rest. PMID:21426597

  11. Diffuse idiopathic intracranial fusiform aneurysm development. Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Nussbaum, Eric S.; Defillo, Archie; Mcdonald, William; Hanson, Sandra; Zelensky, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fusiform intracranial aneurysms (FIAs) are uncommon lesions representing less than 15% of all intracranial aneurysms in most large series. Their etiology has been linked to a variety of causes including atherosclerosis, fibromuscular dysplasia, cystic medial necrosis, connective tissue disease, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, infection, cardiac myxoma, oral contraceptive use, vasculitis, and lymphoproliferative disorders. The finding of numerous lesions in a single patient is distinctly uncommon. Case Description: We describe the unique case of a 47-year-old female who developed multiple FIAs over a 6-year period without an obvious underlying pathology. The patient's medical history was significant for obesity, migraine headaches, insomnia, breast cancer, and chronic skin rash. Various diagnoses were explored including infectious etiologies, autoimmune vasculopathies, malignancy-related causes, connective tissue disorders, and underlying genetic conditions. However, all investigations, including aneurysm wall and skin biopsies were negative or deemed noncontributory toward making a definitive diagnosis. Conclusion: We report an unusual case of a patient with a normal cerebral angiogram developing numerous, FIAs without obvious underlying etiology over a 6-year period. Close clinical and radiological follow-up is recommended in this case because the natural history of the disease is unclear at this point. The literature regarding potential causes of multiple fusiform intracranial aneuryms is reviewed. PMID:25101202

  12. Fucosterol, a sterol extracted from Sargassum fusiforme, shows antidepressant and anticonvulsant effects.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xing-Hua; Quan, Ying-Chun; Jiang, Hai-Ying; Wen, Zheng-Shun; Qu, You-Le; Guan, Li-Ping

    2015-12-01

    We previously showed that extracts of Sargassum fusiforme significantly reduce immobility time in the forced swim test and tail suspension test, suggesting that these extracts possess antidepressant-like effects. Here, fucosterol extracted from S. fusiforme was evaluated for antidepressant and anticonvulsant activities in mice. Fucosterol (10, 20, 30 and 40mg/kg) significantly shortened immobility time in the forced swim test and tail suspension test for30min after treatment but had no effect on locomotor activity in the open field test. Fucosterol significantly increased serotonin, norepinephrine and the metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in mouse brain, suggesting that the effects of fucosterol may be mediated through these neurotransmitters. As assessed using maximal electroshock, fucosterol (20, 40, 100mg/kg) possessed anticonvulsant activity, whereas rotarod toxicity test results indicated that fucosterol did not induce neurotoxicity at the same dose levels in mice. Thus, fucosterol may be a useful antidepressant adjunct candidate for treating depression in patients with epilepsy. A significant increase in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels was found in the fucosterol 20mg/kg group (P<0.05). Our findings suggested that fucosterol may possess an antidepressant-like effect, which may be mediated by increasing central BDNF levels. PMID:26515446

  13. [Achilles tendon rupture].

    PubMed

    Thermann, H; Hüfner, T; Tscherne, H

    2000-03-01

    The treatment of acute of Achilles tendon rupture experienced a dynamic development in the last ten years. Decisive for this development was the application of MRI and above all the ultrasonography in the diagnostics of the pathological changes and injuries of tendons. The question of rupture morphology as well as different courses of healing could be now evaluated objectively. These advances led consequently to new modalities in treatment concepts and rehabilitation protocols. The decisive input for improvements of the outcome results and particularly the shortening of the rehabilitation period came with introduction of the early functional treatment in contrast to immobilizing plaster treatment. In a prospective randomized study (1987-1989) at the Trauma Dept. of the Hannover Medical School could show no statistical differences comparing functional non-operative with functional operative therapy with a special therapy boot (Variostabil/Adidas). The crucial criteria for therapy selection results from the sonographically measured position of the tendon stumps in plantar flexion (20 degrees). With complete adaptation of the tendons' ends surgical treatment does not achieve better results than non-operative functional treatment in term of tendon healing and functional outcome. Regarding the current therapeutic standards each method has is advantages and disadvantages. Both, the operative and non-operative functional treatment enable a stable tendon healing with a low risk of re-rupture (1-2%). Meanwhile there is consensus for early functional after-treatment of the operated Achilles' tendons. There seems to be a trend towards non-operative functional treatment in cases of adequate sonographical findings, or to minimal invasive surgical techniques. PMID:10798233

  14. Spontaneous rupture of renal pelvis.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Ajay; Prakash, Mahesh; Bhatia, Anmol; Mavuduru, Ravimohan; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-04-01

    Spontaneous urine extravasation from the pelvicalyceal system into the perinephric space is an uncommon condition. It is most commonly seen in the setting of obstructive ureteric calculus. Other rare causes include neoplasms, trauma, and iatrogenic procedures. Most commonly described phenomenon is forniceal rupture, but renal pelvis rupture without forniceal rupture is extremely rare. We present a short series of 3 cases of spontaneous pelvis rupture, each with a different etiology. Diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography. The follow-up and therapeutic approaches are discussed with a short review of literature. PMID:23380093

  15. Induced Resistance in Solanum lycopersicum by Algal Elicitor Extracted from Sargassum fusiforme

    PubMed Central

    Sbaihat, Layth; Takeyama, Keiko; Koga, Takeharu; Takemoto, Daigo; Kawakita, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) production relies heavily on the use of chemical pesticides, which is undesired by health- and environment-concerned consumers. Environment-friendly methods of controlling tomato diseases include agroecological practices, organic fungicides, and biological control. Plants' resistance against pathogens is induced by applying agents called elicitors to the plants and would lead to disease prevention or reduced severity. We investigated the ability of a novel elicitor extracted from the brown sea algae (Sargassum fusiforme) to elicit induced resistance in tomato. The studied elicitor induced hypersensitive cell death and O2− production in tomato tissues. It significantly reduced severities of late blight, grey mold, and powdery mildew of tomato. Taken together, our novel elicitor has not shown any direct antifungal activity against the studied pathogens, concluding that it is an elicitor of induced resistance. PMID:25802893

  16. Arrangement of fusiform bodies to reduce the wave drag at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Morris D; Cohn, Doris

    1955-01-01

    By means of linearized-body theory and reverse-flow theorems, the wave drag of a system of fusiform bodies at zero angle of attack and supersonic speeds is studied to determine the effect of varying the relative location of the component parts. The investigation is limited to two-body and three-body arrangements of Sears-Haack minimum-drag bodies. It is found that in certain arrangements the interference effects are beneficial, and may even result in the two or three-body system having no more wave drag than that of the principal body alone. The most favorable location appears to be one in which the maximum cross-section of the auxiliary body is slightly forward of the Mach cone from the tail of the main body. The least favorable is the region between the Mach cone from the nose and the forecone from the tail of the main body. (author)

  17. Induced resistance in Solanum lycopersicum by algal elicitor extracted from Sargassum fusiforme.

    PubMed

    Sbaihat, Layth; Takeyama, Keiko; Koga, Takeharu; Takemoto, Daigo; Kawakita, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) production relies heavily on the use of chemical pesticides, which is undesired by health- and environment-concerned consumers. Environment-friendly methods of controlling tomato diseases include agroecological practices, organic fungicides, and biological control. Plants' resistance against pathogens is induced by applying agents called elicitors to the plants and would lead to disease prevention or reduced severity. We investigated the ability of a novel elicitor extracted from the brown sea algae (Sargassum fusiforme) to elicit induced resistance in tomato. The studied elicitor induced hypersensitive cell death and O2 (-) production in tomato tissues. It significantly reduced severities of late blight, grey mold, and powdery mildew of tomato. Taken together, our novel elicitor has not shown any direct antifungal activity against the studied pathogens, concluding that it is an elicitor of induced resistance. PMID:25802893

  18. Functional asymmetry between the left and right human fusiform gyrus explored through electrical brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Vinitha; Parvizi, Josef

    2016-03-01

    The ventral temporal cortex (VTC) contains several areas with selective responses to words, numbers, faces, and objects as demonstrated by numerous human and primate imaging and electrophysiological studies. Our recent work using electrocorticography (ECoG) confirmed the presence of face-selective neuronal populations in the human fusiform gyrus (FG) in patients implanted with intracranial electrodes in either the left or right hemisphere. Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) disrupted the conscious perception of faces only when it was delivered in the right, but not left, FG. In contrast to our previous findings, here we report both negative and positive EBS effects in right and left FG, respectively. The presence of right hemisphere language dominance in the first, and strong left-handedness and poor language processing performance in the second case, provide indirect clues about the functional architecture of the human VTC in relation to hemispheric asymmetries in language processing and handedness. PMID:26277460

  19. Fingerspelling, signed language, text and picture processing in deaf native signers: The role of the mid-fusiform gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Dafydd; Campbell, Ruth; Capek, Cheryl M.; Woll, Bencie; David, Anthony S.; McGuire, Philip K.; Brammer, Michael J.; MacSweeney, Mairad

    2007-01-01

    In fingerspelling, different hand configurations are used to represent the different letters of the alphabet. Signers use this method of representing written language to fill lexical gaps in a signed language. Using fMRI, we compared cortical networks supporting the perception of fingerspelled, signed, written, and pictorial stimuli in deaf native signers of British Sign Language (BSL). In order to examine the effects of linguistic knowledge, hearing participants who knew neither fingerspelling nor a signed language were also tested. All input forms activated a left fronto-temporal network, including portions of left inferior temporal and mid-fusiform gyri, in both groups. To examine the extent to which activation in this region was influenced by orthographic structure, two contrasts of orthographic and non-orthographic stimuli were made: one using static stimuli (text vs. pictures), the other using dynamic stimuli (fingerspelling vs. signed language). Greater activation in left and right inferior temporal and mid-fusiform gyri was found for pictures than text in both deaf and hearing groups. In the fingerspelling vs. signed language contrast, a significant interaction indicated locations within the left and right mid-fusiform gyri. This showed greater activation for fingerspelling than signed language in deaf but not hearing participants. These results are discussed in light of recent proposals that the mid-fusiform gyrus may act as an integration region, mediating between visual input and higher-order stimulus properties. PMID:17363278

  20. Misidentification syndromes related to face specific area in the fusiform gyrus.

    PubMed

    Hudson, A J; Grace, G M

    2000-11-01

    The "delusional misidentification syndromes" are a group of uncommon and varied disorders in which, in typical form, the patient thinks that a particular familiar person is someone else or a certain familiar place is a duplicate. Although first identified and considered a memory disorder by Pick, evidence in support of this has been difficult to identify. They have been most often seen in various psychotic and organic brain diseases but lesions have been generally diffuse although the right temporal lobe has been implicated. A patient was investigated who abruptly developed a disorder wherein she misidentified her husband as her deceased sister and claimed that her home was a duplicate of her real home that were typical of Frégoli syndrome and Pick's reduplicative paramnesia, respectively. A discrete area of brain damage, probably ischaemic, in this patient was seen on MRI in the anterior part of the right fusiform gyrus and a smaller area in the nearby anterior middle and inferior temporal gyri with associated parahippocampal and hippocampal atrophy. A high order nervous system function that is devoted to the identification of faces is located in the adjacent midportion of the fusiform gyrus and a similar locus for environmental scenes, termed the parahippocampal place area, is present in the bordering parahippocampal gyrus. The misidentification phenomena in this case can be explained by disruption of the connections of these highly specialised areas with the most anterior inferior and medial part of the right temporal lobe where long term memory and mechanisms for the retrieval of information that are required for the visual recognition of faces and scenes are stored. PMID:11032619

  1. Ruptured Intracranial Dermoid Cyst Associated with Rupture of Cerebral Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Hong

    2011-01-01

    Many tumors have been reported to coexist with cerebral aneurysm. However, intracranial dermoid cysts associated with cerebral aneurysm are very rare. We report a case in which rupture of a cerebral aneurysm resulted in a ruptured dermoid cyst. We present this interesting case and review current literature about the relationship between tumors and aneurysm formation. PMID:22259693

  2. Spontaneous rupture on irregular faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is now know (e.g. Robinson et al., 2006) that when ruptures propagate around bends, the rupture velocity decrease. In the extreme case, a large bend in the fault can stop the rupture. We develop a 2-D finite difference method to simulate spontaneous dynamic rupture on irregular faults. This method is based on a second order leap-frog finite difference scheme on a uniform mesh of triangles. A relaxation method is used to generate an irregular fault geometry-conforming mesh from the uniform mesh. Through this numerical coordinate mapping, the elastic wave equations are transformed and solved in a curvilinear coordinate system. Extensive numerical experiments using the linear slip-weakening law will be shown to demonstrate the effect of fault geometry on rupture properties. A long term goal is to simulate the strong ground motion near the vicinity of bends, jogs, etc.

  3. Spontaneous Iliac Vein Rupture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Hyung Sub; Lee, Taeseung

    2015-06-01

    Spontaneous iliac vein rupture (SIVR) is a rare entity, which usually occurs without a precipitating factor, but can be a life-threatening emergency often requiring an emergency operation. This is a case report of SIVR in a 62-year-old female who presented to the emergency room with left leg swelling. Workup with contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a left leg deep vein thrombosis with May-Thurner syndrome and a hematoma in the pelvic cavity without definite evidence of arterial bleeding. She was managed conservatively without surgical intervention, and also underwent inferior vena cava filter insertion and subsequent anticoagulation therapy for pulmonary thromboembolism. This case shows that SIVR can be successfully managed with close monitoring and conservative management, and anticoagulation may be safely applied despite the patient presenting with venous bleeding. PMID:26217647

  4. Spontaneous Iliac Vein Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Hyung Sub; Lee, Taeseung

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous iliac vein rupture (SIVR) is a rare entity, which usually occurs without a precipitating factor, but can be a life-threatening emergency often requiring an emergency operation. This is a case report of SIVR in a 62-year-old female who presented to the emergency room with left leg swelling. Workup with contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a left leg deep vein thrombosis with May-Thurner syndrome and a hematoma in the pelvic cavity without definite evidence of arterial bleeding. She was managed conservatively without surgical intervention, and also underwent inferior vena cava filter insertion and subsequent anticoagulation therapy for pulmonary thromboembolism. This case shows that SIVR can be successfully managed with close monitoring and conservative management, and anticoagulation may be safely applied despite the patient presenting with venous bleeding. PMID:26217647

  5. Ruptured thought: rupture as a critical attitude to nursing research.

    PubMed

    Beedholm, Kirsten; Lomborg, Kirsten; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce the notion of rupture from the French philosopher Michel Foucault, whose studies of discourse and governmentality have become prominent within nursing research during the last 25 years. We argue that a rupture perspective can be helpful for identifying and maintaining a critical potential within nursing research. The paper begins by introducing rupture as an inheritance from the French epistemological tradition. It then describes how rupture appears in Foucault's works, as both an overall philosophical approach and as an analytic tool in his historical studies. Two examples of analytical applications of rupture are elaborated. In the first example, rupture has inspired us to make an effort to seek alternatives to mainstream conceptions of the phenomenon under study. In the second example, inspired by Foucault's work on discontinuity, we construct a framework for historical epochs in nursing history. The paper concludes by discussing the potential of the notion of rupture as a response to the methodological concerns regarding the use of Foucault-inspired discourse analysis within nursing research. We agree with the critique of Cheek that the critical potential of discourse analysis is at risk of being undermined by research that tends to convert the approach into a fixed method. PMID:24741691

  6. The Faces in Radiological Images: Fusiform Face Area Supports Radiological Expertise.

    PubMed

    Bilalić, Merim; Grottenthaler, Thomas; Nägele, Thomas; Lindig, Tobias

    2016-03-01

    The fusiform face area (FFA) has often been used as an example of a brain module that was developed through evolution to serve a specific purpose-face processing. Many believe, however, that FFA is responsible for holistic processing associated with any kind of expertise. The expertise view has been tested with various stimuli, with mixed results. One of the main stumbling blocks in the FFA controversy has been the fact that the stimuli used have been similar to faces. Here, we circumvent the problem by using radiological images, X-rays, which bear no resemblance to faces. We demonstrate that FFA can distinguish between X-rays and other stimuli by employing multivariate pattern analysis. The sensitivity to X-rays was significantly better in experienced radiologists than that in medical students with limited radiological experience. For the radiologists, it was also possible to use the patterns of FFA activations obtained on faces to differentiate X-ray stimuli from other stimuli. The overlap in the FFA activation is not based on visual similarity of faces and X-rays but rather on the processes necessary for expertise with both kinds of stimulus. Our results support the expertise view that FFA's main function is related to holistic processing. PMID:25452573

  7. Perceived Animacy Influences the Processing of Human-Like Surface Features in the Fusiform Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Sarah; McCarthya, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    While decades of research have demonstrated that a region of the right fusiform gyrus (FG) responds selectively to faces, a second line of research suggests that the FG responds to a range of animacy cues, including biological motion and goal-directed actions, even in the absence of faces or other human-like surface features. These findings raise the question of whether the FG is indeed sensitive to faces or to the more abstract category of animate agents. The current study uses fMRI to examine whether the FG responds to all faces in a category-specific way or whether the FG is especially sensitive to the faces of animate agents. Animate agents are defined here as intentional agents with the capacity for rational goal-directed actions. Specifically, we examine how the FG responds to an entity that looks like an animate agent but that lacks the capacity for goal-directed, rational action. Region-of-interest analyses reveal that the FG activates more strongly to the animate compared with the inanimate entity, even though the surface features of both animate and inanimate entities were identical. These results suggest that the FG does not respond to all faces in a category-specific way, and is instead especially sensitive to whether an entity is animate. PMID:24905285

  8. Perceived animacy influences the processing of human-like surface features in the fusiform gyrus.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Sarah; McCarthy, Gregory

    2014-07-01

    While decades of research have demonstrated that a region of the right fusiform gyrus (FG) responds selectively to faces, a second line of research suggests that the FG responds to a range of animacy cues, including biological motion and goal-directed actions, even in the absence of faces or other human-like surface features. These findings raise the question of whether the FG is indeed sensitive to faces or to the more abstract category of animate agents. The current study uses fMRI to examine whether the FG responds to all faces in a category-specific way or whether the FG is especially sensitive to the faces of animate agents. Animate agents are defined here as intentional agents with the capacity for rational goal-directed actions. Specifically, we examine how the FG responds to an entity that looks like an animate agent but that lacks the capacity for goal-directed rational action. Region-of-interest analyses reveal that the FG activates more strongly to the animate compared with the inanimate entity, even though the surface features of both animate and inanimate entities were identical. These results suggest that the FG does not respond to all faces in a category-specific way, and is instead especially sensitive to whether an entity is animate. PMID:24905285

  9. Is This Car Looking at You? How Anthropomorphism Predicts Fusiform Face Area Activation when Seeing Cars

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Simone; Brick, Timothy R.; Müller, Barbara C. N.; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Anthropomorphism encompasses the attribution of human characteristics to non-living objects. In particular the human tendency to see faces in cars has long been noticed, yet its neural correlates are unknown. We set out to investigate whether the fusiform face area (FFA) is associated with seeing human features in car fronts, or whether, the higher-level theory of mind network (ToM), namely temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) show a link to anthropomorphism. Twenty participants underwent fMRI scanning during a passive car-front viewing task. We extracted brain activity from FFA, TPJ and MPFC. After the fMRI session participants were asked to spontaneously list adjectives that characterize each car front. Five raters judged the degree to which each adjective can be applied as a characteristic of human beings. By means of linear mixed models we found that the implicit tendency to anthropomorphize individual car fronts predicts FFA, but not TPJ or MPFC activity. The results point to an important role of FFA in the phenomenon of ascribing human attributes to non-living objects. Interestingly, brain regions that have been associated with thinking about beliefs and mental states of others (TPJ, MPFC) do not seem to be related to anthropomorphism of car fronts. PMID:25517511

  10. Dynamic representations of race: processing goals shape race decoding in the fusiform gyri

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Christian; Ratner, Kyle G.

    2014-01-01

    People perceive and evaluate others on the basis of social categories, such as race, gender and age. Initial processing of targets in terms of visually salient social categories is often characterized as inevitable. In the current study, we investigated the influence of processing goals on the representation of race in the visual processing stream. Participants were assigned to one of two mixed-race teams and categorized faces according to their group membership or skin color. To assess neural representations of race, we employed multivariate pattern analysis to examined neural activity related to the presentation of Black and White faces. As predicted, patterns of neural activity within the early visual cortex and fusiform gyri (FG) could decode the race of face stimuli above chance and were moderated by processing goals. Race decoding in early visual cortex was above chance in both categorization tasks and below chance in a prefrontal control region. More importantly, race decoding was greater in the FG during the group membership vs skin color categorization task. The results suggest that, ironically, explicit racial categorization can diminish the representation of race in the FG. These findings suggest that representations of race are dynamic, reflecting current processing goals. PMID:23196632

  11. Fusiform Gyrus Laterality in Writing Systems with Different Mapping Principles: An Artificial Orthography Training Study.

    PubMed

    Hirshorn, Elizabeth A; Wrencher, Alaina; Durisko, Corrine; Moore, Michelle W; Fiez, Julie A

    2016-06-01

    Writing systems vary in many ways, making it difficult to account for cross-linguistic neural differences. For example, orthographic processing of Chinese characters activates the mid-fusiform gyri (mFG) bilaterally, whereas the processing of English words predominantly activates the left mFG. Because Chinese and English vary in visual processing (holistic vs. analytical) and linguistic mapping principle (morphosyllabic vs. alphabetic), either factor could account for mFG laterality differences. We used artificial orthographies representing English to investigate the effect of mapping principle on mFG lateralization. The fMRI data were compared for two groups that acquired foundational proficiency: one for an alphabetic and one for an alphasyllabic artificial orthography. Greater bilateral mFG activation was observed in the alphasyllabic versus alphabetic group. The degree of bilaterality correlated with reading fluency for the learned orthography in the alphasyllabic but not alphabetic group. The results suggest that writing systems with a syllable-based mapping principle recruit bilateral mFG to support orthographic processing. Implications for individuals with left mFG dysfunction will be discussed. PMID:26918586

  12. The neural code for face orientation in the human fusiform face area.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Fernando M; Cichy, Radoslaw M; Allefeld, Carsten; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Humans recognize faces and objects with high speed and accuracy regardless of their orientation. Recent studies have proposed that orientation invariance in face recognition involves an intermediate representation where neural responses are similar for mirror-symmetric views. Here, we used fMRI, multivariate pattern analysis, and computational modeling to investigate the neural encoding of faces and vehicles at different rotational angles. Corroborating previous studies, we demonstrate a representation of face orientation in the fusiform face-selective area (FFA). We go beyond these studies by showing that this representation is category-selective and tolerant to retinal translation. Critically, by controlling for low-level confounds, we found the representation of orientation in FFA to be compatible with a linear angle code. Aspects of mirror-symmetric coding cannot be ruled out when FFA mean activity levels are considered as a dimension of coding. Finally, we used a parametric family of computational models, involving a biased sampling of view-tuned neuronal clusters, to compare different face angle encoding models. The best fitting model exhibited a predominance of neuronal clusters tuned to frontal views of faces. In sum, our findings suggest a category-selective and monotonic code of face orientation in the human FFA, in line with primate electrophysiology studies that observed mirror-symmetric tuning of neural responses at higher stages of the visual system, beyond the putative homolog of human FFA. PMID:25186759

  13. Activation of fusiform face area by Greebles is related to face similarity but not expertise.

    PubMed

    Brants, Marijke; Wagemans, Johan; Op de Beeck, Hans P

    2011-12-01

    Some of the brain areas in the ventral temporal lobe, such as the fusiform face area (FFA), are critical for face perception in humans, but what determines this specialization is a matter of debate. The face specificity hypothesis claims that faces are processed in a domain-specific way. Alternatively, the expertise hypothesis states that the FFA is specialized in processing objects of expertise. To disentangle these views, some previous experiments used an artificial class of novel objects called Greebles. These experiments combined a learning and fMRI paradigm. Given the high impact of the results in the literature, we replicated and further investigated this paradigm. In our experiment, eight participants were trained for ten 1-hr sessions at identifying Greebles. We scanned participants before and after training and examined responses in FFA and lateral occipital complex. Most importantly and in contrast to previous reports, we found a neural inversion effect for Greebles before training. This result suggests that people process the "novel" Greebles as faces, even before training. This prediction was confirmed in a postexperimental debriefing. In addition, we did not find an increase of the inversion effect for Greebles in the FFA after training. This indicates that the activity in the FFA for Greebles does not depend on the degree of expertise acquired with the objects but on the interpretation of the stimuli as face-related. PMID:21671738

  14. Dopamine D1 Binding Potential Predicts Fusiform BOLD Activity during Face-Recognition Performance

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Håkan; Rieckmann, Anna; Hubbard, Nicholas A.; Nyberg, Lars; Bäckman, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The importance of face memory in humans and primates is well established, but little is known about the neurotransmitter systems involved in face recognition. We tested the hypothesis that face recognition is linked to dopamine (DA) activity in fusiform gyrus (FFG). DA availability was assessed by measuring D1 binding potential (BP) during rest using PET. We further assessed blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal change while subjects performed a face-recognition task during fMRI scanning. There was a strong association between D1 BP and BOLD activity in FFG, whereas D1 BP in striatal and other extrastriatal regions were unrelated to neural activity in FFG. These results suggest that D1 BP locally modulates FFG function during face recognition. Observed relationships among D1 BP, BOLD activity, and face-recognition performance further suggest that D1 receptors place constraints on the responsiveness of FFG neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The importance of face memory in humans and primates is well established, but little is known about the neurotransmitter systems involved in face recognition. Our work shows a role for a specific neurotransmitter system in face memory. PMID:26538642

  15. Increased BOLD signal in the fusiform gyrus during implicit emotion processing in anorexia nervosa☆

    PubMed Central

    Fonville, Leon; Giampietro, Vincent; Surguladze, Simon; Williams, Steven; Tchanturia, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Background The behavioural literature in anorexia nervosa (AN) has suggested impairments in psychosocial functioning and studies using facial expression processing tasks (FEPT) have reported poorer recognition and slower identification of emotions. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used alongside a FEPT, depicting neutral, mildly happy and happy faces, to examine the neural correlates of implicit emotion processing in AN. Participants were instructed to specify the gender of the faces. Levels of depression, anxiety, obsessive–compulsive symptoms and eating disorder behaviour were obtained and principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to acquire uncorrelated variables. Results fMRI analysis revealed a greater blood-oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response in AN in the right fusiform gyrus to all facial expressions. This response showed a linear increase with the happiness of the facial expression and was found to be stronger in those not taking medication. PCA analysis revealed a single component indicating a greater level of general clinical symptoms. Conclusion Neuroimaging findings would suggest that alterations in implicit emotion processing in AN occur during early perceptual processing of social signals and illustrate greater engagement on the FEPT. The lack of separate components using PCA suggests that the questionnaires used might not be suited as predictive measures. PMID:24501698

  16. Cortical Thickness in Fusiform Face Area Predicts Face and Object Recognition Performance.

    PubMed

    McGugin, Rankin W; Van Gulick, Ana E; Gauthier, Isabel

    2016-02-01

    The fusiform face area (FFA) is defined by its selectivity for faces. Several studies have shown that the response of FFA to nonface objects can predict behavioral performance for these objects. However, one possible account is that experts pay more attention to objects in their domain of expertise, driving signals up. Here, we show an effect of expertise with nonface objects in FFA that cannot be explained by differential attention to objects of expertise. We explore the relationship between cortical thickness of FFA and face and object recognition using the Cambridge Face Memory Test and Vanderbilt Expertise Test, respectively. We measured cortical thickness in functionally defined regions in a group of men who evidenced functional expertise effects for cars in FFA. Performance with faces and objects together accounted for approximately 40% of the variance in cortical thickness of several FFA patches. Whereas participants with a thicker FFA cortex performed better with vehicles, those with a thinner FFA cortex performed better with faces and living objects. The results point to a domain-general role of FFA in object perception and reveal an interesting double dissociation that does not contrast faces and objects but rather living and nonliving objects. PMID:26439272

  17. The contribution of the fusiform gyrus and superior temporal sulcus in processing facial attractiveness: neuropsychological and neuroimaging evidence

    PubMed Central

    Iaria, Giuseppe; Fox, Christopher J; Waite, Christopher T; Aharon, Itzhak; Barton, Jason J S

    2008-01-01

    Current cognitive models suggest that the processing of dynamic facial attributes, including social signals such as gaze direction and facial expression, involves the superior temporal sulcus, whereas the processing of invariant facial structure such as the individuals’ identity involves the fusiform face area. Where facial attractiveness, a social signal that may emerge from invariant facial structure, is processed within this dual–route model of face perception is uncertain. Here, we present two studies. First, we investigated the explicit judgments of facial attractiveness and attractiveness-motivated behaviour in patients with acquired prosopagnosia, a deficit in familiar face recognition usually associated with damage to medial occipitotemporal cortex. We found that both abilities were impaired in these patients, with some weak residual ability for attractiveness judgments found only in those patients with unilateral right occipitotemporal or bilateral anterior temporal lesions. Importantly, deficits in attractiveness perception correlated with the severity of the face recognition deficit. Second, we performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in healthy subjects that included an implicit and explicit processing of facial attractiveness. We found increased neural activity when explicitly judging facial attractiveness within a number of cortical regions including the fusiform face area, but not the superior temporal sulcus, indicating a potential contribution of the fusiform face area to this judgment. Thus, converging neuropsychological and neuroimaging evidence points to a critical role of the inferior occipitotemporal cortex in the processing of facial attractiveness. PMID:18590800

  18. [Achilles tendon ruptures and tibialis anterior tendon ruptures].

    PubMed

    Pagenstert, G; Leumann, A; Frigg, A; Valderrabano, V

    2010-12-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures (ATR) are becoming the most frequent tendon rupture of the lower extremity, whereas less than 100 cases of tibialis anterior tendon ruptures (TATR) have been reported. Common in both tendons are the degenerative causes of ruptures in a susceptible tendon segment, whereas traumatic transections occur at each level. Triceps surae and tibialis anterior muscles are responsible for the main sagittal ankle range of motion and ruptures lead to a distinctive functional deficit. However, diagnosis is delayed in up to 25% of ATR and even more frequently in TATR. Early primary repair provides the best functional results. With progressive retraction and muscle atrophy delayed tendon reconstruction has less favourable functional results. But not all patients need full capacity, power and endurance of these muscles and non-surgical treatment should not be forgotten. Inactive patients with significant comorbidities and little disability should be informed that surgical treatment of TATR is complicated by high rates of rerupture and surgical treatment of ATR can result in wound healing problems rarely necessitating some kind of transplantation. PMID:21110002

  19. Horizontal tuning for faces originates in high-level Fusiform Face Area.

    PubMed

    Goffaux, Valerie; Duecker, Felix; Hausfeld, Lars; Schiltz, Christine; Goebel, Rainer

    2016-01-29

    Recent work indicates that the specialization of face visual perception relies on the privileged processing of horizontal angles of facial information. This suggests that stimulus properties assumed to be fully resolved in primary visual cortex (V1; e.g., orientation) in fact determine human vision until high-level stages of processing. To address this hypothesis, the present fMRI study explored the orientation sensitivity of V1 and high-level face-specialized ventral regions such as the Occipital Face Area (OFA) and Fusiform Face Area (FFA) to different angles of face information. Participants viewed face images filtered to retain information at horizontal, vertical or oblique angles. Filtered images were viewed upright, inverted and (phase-)scrambled. FFA responded most strongly to the horizontal range of upright face information; its activation pattern reliably separated horizontal from oblique ranges, but only when faces were upright. Moreover, activation patterns induced in the right FFA and the OFA by upright and inverted faces could only be separated based on horizontal information. This indicates that the specialized processing of upright face information in the OFA and FFA essentially relies on the encoding of horizontal facial cues. This pattern was not passively inherited from V1, which was found to respond less strongly to horizontal than other orientations likely due to adaptive whitening. Moreover, we found that orientation decoding accuracy in V1 was impaired for stimuli containing no meaningful shape. By showing that primary coding in V1 is influenced by high-order stimulus structure and that high-level processing is tuned to selective ranges of primary information, the present work suggests that primary and high-level levels of the visual system interact in order to modulate the processing of certain ranges of primary information depending on their relevance with respect to the stimulus and task at hand. PMID:26683383

  20. Expert individuation of objects increases activation in the fusiform face area of children.

    PubMed

    James, Thomas W; James, Karin Harman

    2013-02-15

    The role of experience in the development of brain mechanisms for face recognition is intensely debated. Experience with subordinate- and individual-level classification of faces is thought, by some, to be foundational in the development of the specialization of face recognition. Studying children with extremely intense interests (EII) provides an opportunity to examine experience-related changes in non-face object recognition in a population where face expertise is not fully developed. Here, two groups of school-aged children -one group with an EII with Pokémon cards and another group of age-matched controls - underwent fMRI while viewing faces, Pokémon characters, Pokémon objects, and Digimon characters. Pokémon objects were non-character Pokémon cards that experts do not typically individuate during game play and trading. Neither experts nor controls had previous experience with Digimon characters. As expected, experts and controls showed equivalent activation in the fusiform face area (FFA) with face stimuli. As predicted by the expertise hypothesis, experts showed greater activation than controls with Pokémon characters, and showed greater activation with Pokémon characters than Pokémon objects. Experts and controls showed equivalent activation with Digimon characters. However, heightened activation with Digimon characters in both groups suggested that there are other strong influences on the activation of the FFA beyond stimulus characteristics, experience, and classification level. By demonstrating the important role of expertise, the findings are inconsistent with a purely face-specific account of FFA function. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the effects of expertise and categorization level on activation in the FFA in a group of typically developing children. PMID:23153968

  1. Processing deficits for familiar and novel faces in patients with left posterior fusiform lesions

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Daniel J.; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.; Kim, Esther; Tainturier, Marie-Josephe; Beeson, Pelagie M.; Rapcsak, Steven Z.; Woollams, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Pure alexia (PA) arises from damage to the left posterior fusiform gyrus (pFG) and the striking reading disorder that defines this condition has meant that such patients are often cited as evidence for the specialisation of this region to processing of written words. There is, however, an alternative view that suggests this region is devoted to processing of high acuity foveal input, which is particularly salient for complex visual stimuli like letter strings. Previous reports have highlighted disrupted processing of non-linguistic visual stimuli after damage to the left pFG, both for familiar and unfamiliar objects and also for novel faces. This study explored the nature of face processing deficits in patients with left pFG damage. Identification of famous faces was found to be compromised in both expressive and receptive tasks. Discrimination of novel faces was also impaired, particularly for those that varied in terms of second-order spacing information, and this deficit was most apparent for the patients with the more severe reading deficits. Interestingly, discrimination of faces that varied in terms of feature identity was considerably better in these patients and it was performance in this condition that was related to the size of the length effects shown in reading. This finding complements functional imaging studies showing left pFG activation for faces varying only in spacing and frontal activation for faces varying only on features. These results suggest that the sequential part-based processing strategy that promotes the length effect in the reading of these patients also allows them to discriminate between faces on the basis of feature identity, but processing of second-order configural information is most compromised due to their left pFG lesion. This study supports a view in which the left pFG is specialised for processing of high acuity foveal visual information that supports processing of both words and faces. PMID:25837867

  2. Spontaneous splenic rupture in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Elghanmi, Adil; Mohamed, Jou; Khabouz, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Splenic rupture during pregnancy is a rare and can frequently be a misdiagnosed pathology. This rupture is associated with a high maternal and fetal mortality rate. A 26 years old Moroccan woman para II gravida II presented at the third stage of pregnancy with acute onset of severe abdominal pain. She developed immediately a hypovolemic shock. After both a physical and sonographical exam, it was revealed that it was due to a massive hemoperitoneum. Therefore, an emergent laparotomy and cesarean delivery with abdominal exploration were performed; also, an active bleeding was identified at the splenic hilum consistent with splenic rupture. Through this case report, we want to raise awareness of this surgical emergency that requires immediate recognition because any delay can lead to catastrophic consequences PMID:26587160

  3. Vertebrobasilar circulatory disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. Stroke . 2011;42:227-76. PMID: 20966421 www.ncbi.nlm.nih. ... American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. Stroke . 2011;42:517-84. PMID: 21127304 www.ncbi.nlm.nih. ...

  4. Spontaneous Forniceal Rupture in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Upputalla, Roshni; Moore, Robert M.; Jim, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    Forniceal rupture is a rare event in pregnancy. We report a case of a 26-year-old primigravid woman who experienced a forniceal rupture at 23 weeks of gestation with no inciting cause except for pregnancy. Pregnancy is associated with ureteral compression due to increase in pelvic vasculature with the right ureter more dilated due to anatomic reasons. Hormones such as prostaglandins and progesterone render the ureter more distensible to allow for pressure build-up and an obstructive picture at the collecting system. We will discuss physiologic changes in pregnancies that predispose to this uncommon phenomenon and the most up-to-date management strategies. PMID:25648411

  5. Ruptures of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed Central

    Ha'eri, G B

    1980-01-01

    Through the use of improved diagnostic techniques, including arthrography and arthroscopy, ruptures of the rotator cuff that previously might not have been recognized are now being identified more frequently. In most cases the symptoms are relatively mild and respond satisfactorily to rest and therapy. Occasionally, however, there is severe, persistent disability despite treatment. These ruptures require surgical repair. In such cases the data obtained from special investigations help the surgeon select the appropriate surgical approach and repair technique. An imaginative program of physiotherapy before and after the operation contributes greatly to a satisfactory result. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 PMID:7437980

  6. Enzymatically triggered rupture of polymersomes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Woo-Sik; Park, Seung Chul; Reed, Ellen H; Dooley, Kevin P; Wheeler, Samuel F; Lee, Daeyeon; Hammer, Daniel A

    2016-01-20

    Polymersomes are robust vesicles made from amphiphilic block co-polymers. Large populations of uniform giant polymersomes with defined, entrapped species can be made by templating of double-emulsions using microfluidics. In the present study, a series of two enzymatic reactions, one inside and the other outside of the polymersome, were designed to induce rupture of polymersomes. We measured how the kinetics of rupture were affected by altering enzyme concentration. These results suggest that protocells with entrapped enzymes can be engineered to secrete contents on cue. PMID:26616557

  7. Self-Rupturing Hermetic Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Curtis E., Jr.; Sherrit, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    For commercial, military, and aerospace applications, low-cost, small, reliable, and lightweight gas and liquid hermetically sealed valves with post initiation on/off capability are highly desirable for pressurized systems. Applications include remote fire suppression, single-use system-pressurization systems, spacecraft propellant systems, and in situ instruments. Current pyrotechnic- activated rupture disk hermetic valves were designed for physically larger systems and are heavy and integrate poorly with portable equipment, aircraft, and small spacecraft and instrument systems. Additionally, current pyrotechnically activated systems impart high g-force shock loads to surrounding components and structures, which increase the risk of damage and can require additional mitigation. The disclosed mechanism addresses the need for producing a hermetically sealed micro-isolation valve for low and high pressure for commercial, aerospace, and spacecraft applications. High-precision electrical discharge machining (EDM) parts allow for the machining of mated parts with gaps less than a thousandth of an inch. These high-precision parts are used to support against pressure and extrusion, a thin hermetically welded diaphragm. This diaphragm ruptures from a pressure differential when the support is removed and/or when the plunger is forced against the diaphragm. With the addition of conventional seals to the plunger and a two-way actuator, a derivative of this design would allow nonhermetic use as an on/off or metering valve after the initial rupturing of the hermetic sealing disk. In addition, in a single-use hermetically sealed isolation valve, the valve can be activated without the use of potential leak-inducing valve body penetrations. One implementation of this technology is a high-pressure, high-flow-rate rupture valve that is self-rupturing, which is advantageous for high-pressure applications such as gas isolation valves. Once initiated, this technology is self-energizing and requires low force compared to current pyrotechnic-based burst disk hermetic valves. This is a novel design for producing a single-use, self-rupturing, hermetically sealed valve for isolation of pressurized gas and/or liquids. This design can also be applied for single-use disposable valves for chemical instruments. A welded foil diaphragm is fully supported by two mated surfaces that are machined to micron accuracies using EDM. To open the valve, one of the surfaces is moved relative to the other to (a) remove the support creating an unsupported diaphragm that ruptures due to over pressure, and/or (b) produce tension in the diaphragm and rupture it.

  8. Middle cerebral artery fusiform aneurysm presented with stroke and delayed subarachnoid hemorrhage trapping, thrombectomy, and bypass

    PubMed Central

    Mrak, Goran; Duric, Kresimir Sasa; Nemir, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ischemic stroke is a well-described but less frequent consequence of ruptured or unruptured intracranial aneurysms. To date, the optimal form of treatment for patients with a thrombosed cerebral aneurysm has not yet been well-defined. Case Description: Here, we report a case of a 68-year-old female patient presenting with cerebral stroke. Five days poststroke multislice computed tomography (MSCT) and MSCT angiography were performed for the evaluation of clinical deterioration, showing a left M2 middle cerebral artery (MCA) bifurcation aneurysm and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Having in mind the high mortality and morbidity rates after a re-rupture, as well as the digital subtraction angiography features of the aneurysm, urgent surgery was performed consisting of aneurysm trapping and superficial temporal artery (STA) to M3 MCA segment end-to-side anastomosis. The surgery and early postoperative period proceeded uneventfully and the patient gradually recovered from the previously diagnosed expressive dysphasia and cranial and extremity motor deficit. Conclusion: Our case describes a complex aneurysm treatment that consisted of aneurysm trapping, thrombus removal and an STA-M3 MCA branch bypass creation for the protection of the patent M3 insular MCA branch and prevention of further ischemia. This procedure rewarded us with an excellent clinical result. PMID:27127709

  9. Distal biceps and triceps ruptures.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Ballas, Efstathios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2013-03-01

    Biceps and triceps tendon ruptures are rather uncommon injuries and are most commonly diagnosed clinically. Magnetic resonance imaging can help the clinician to differentiate an incomplete tear and define any degeneration of the tendon. Surgical anatomical repair is typically performed in acute complete ruptures whereas nonoperative treatment can be used for partial ruptures, as well as for patients unfit for surgery. Single incision techniques are associated with a higher rate of nerve injuries, while double incision repairs have a higher prevalence of heterotopic ossification. Although various fixation methods have been applied including bone tunnels, interference screws, suture anchors, cortical button fixation, the current evidence does not support the superiority of one method over the other. A well-planned postoperative rehabilitation programme is essential for a good final outcome. As better fixation devices are being used, more aggressive rehabilitation programmes have been applied. Epidemiology, clinical evaluation, diagnosis, surgical and conservative management of these injuries are presented in this review along with the authors' preferred technique for the anatomical repair of acute complete ruptures. PMID:23352149

  10. Quadriceps Tendon Rupture due to Postepileptic Convulsion

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yilmaz; Sahin, Rifat; Keskin, Davut

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of quadriceps tendon (QT) rupture. QT ruptures can occur in all ages. The cause is mostly traumatic in origin. Spontaneous ruptures that are thought to result from predisposing conditions are rare. Post-convulsion QT ruptures lacking traumas in their history can be overlooked in clinical examinations. This should be born in mind by the attending physician, as early diagnosis and treatment of the condition can lead to satisfactory outcomes. PMID:24944977

  11. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  12. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  13. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  14. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  15. Behavior of the edible seaweed Sargassum fusiforme to copper pollution: short-term acclimation and long-term adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Hui-Xi; Pang, Qiu-Ying; Lin, Li-Dong; Zhang, Ai-Qin; Li, Nan; Lin, Yan-Qing; Li, Lu-Min; Wu, Qin-Qin; Yan, Xiu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic agriculture in heavy-metal-polluted coastal areas faces major problems due to heavy metal transfer into aquatic organisms, leading to various unexpected changes in nutrition and primary and/or secondary metabolism. In the present study, the dual role of heavy metal copper (Cu) played in the metabolism of photosynthetic organism, the edible seaweed Sargassum fusiforme, was evaluated by characterization of biochemical and metabolic responses using both 1H NMR and GC-MS techniques under acute (47 µM, 1 day) and chronic stress (8 µM, 7 days). Consequently, photosynthesis may be seriously inhibited by acute Cu exposure, resulting in decreasing levels of carbohydrates, e.g., mannitol, the main products of photosynthesis. Ascorbate may play important roles in the antioxidant system, whose content was much more seriously decreased under acute than that under chronic Cu stress. Overall, these results showed differential toxicological responses on metabolite profiles of S. fusiforme subjected to acute and chronic Cu exposures that allowed assessment of impact of Cu on marine organisms. PMID:25025229

  16. A genomic map enriched for markers linked to Avr1 in Cronartium quercuum f.sp. fusiforme.

    PubMed

    Kubisiak, Thomas L; Anderson, Claire L; Amerson, Henry V; Smith, Jason A; Davis, John M; Nelson, C Dana

    2011-03-01

    A novel approach is presented to map avirulence gene Avr1 in the basidiomycete Cronartium quercuum f.sp. fusiforme, the causal agent of fusiform rust disease in pines. DNA markers tightly linked to resistance gene Fr1 in loblolly pine tree 10-5 were used to classify 10-5 seedling progeny as either resistant or susceptible. A single dikaryotic isolate (P2) heterozygous at the corresponding Avr1 gene was developed by crossing Fr1 avirulent isolate SC20-21 with Fr1 virulent isolate NC2-40. Bulk basidiospore inoculum derived from isolate P2 was used to challenge the pine progeny. The ability to unambiguously marker classify 10-5 progeny as resistant (selecting for virulence) or susceptible (non-selecting) permitted the genetic mapping of the corresponding Avr1 gene by bulked segregant analysis. Using this approach, 14 genetic markers significantly linked to Avr1 were identified and placed within the context of a genome-wide linkage map produced for isolate P2 using samples from susceptible seedlings. PMID:20888926

  17. Behavior of the Edible Seaweed Sargassum fusiforme to Copper Pollution: Short-Term Acclimation and Long-Term Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Dong; Zhang, Ai-Qin; Li, Nan; Lin, Yan-Qing; Li, Lu-Min; Wu, Qin-Qin; Yan, Xiu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic agriculture in heavy-metal-polluted coastal areas faces major problems due to heavy metal transfer into aquatic organisms, leading to various unexpected changes in nutrition and primary and/or secondary metabolism. In the present study, the dual role of heavy metal copper (Cu) played in the metabolism of photosynthetic organism, the edible seaweed Sargassum fusiforme, was evaluated by characterization of biochemical and metabolic responses using both 1H NMR and GC-MS techniques under acute (47 µM, 1 day) and chronic stress (8 µM, 7 days). Consequently, photosynthesis may be seriously inhibited by acute Cu exposure, resulting in decreasing levels of carbohydrates, e.g., mannitol, the main products of photosynthesis. Ascorbate may play important roles in the antioxidant system, whose content was much more seriously decreased under acute than that under chronic Cu stress. Overall, these results showed differential toxicological responses on metabolite profiles of S. fusiforme subjected to acute and chronic Cu exposures that allowed assessment of impact of Cu on marine organisms. PMID:25025229

  18. Functional Characterization and Differential Coactivation Patterns of Two Cytoarchitectonic Visual Areas on the Human Posterior Fusiform Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Caspers, Julian; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    The ventral stream of the human extrastriate visual cortex shows a considerable functional heterogeneity from early visual processing (posterior) to higher, domain-specific processing (anterior). The fusiform gyrus hosts several of those “high-level” functional areas. We recently found a subdivision of the posterior fusiform gyrus on the microstructural level, that is, two distinct cytoarchitectonic areas, FG1 and FG2 (Caspers et al., Brain Structure & Function, 2013). To gain a first insight in the function of these two areas, here we studied their behavioral involvement and coactivation patterns by means of meta-analytic connectivity modeling based on the BrainMap database (www.brainmap.org), using probabilistic maps of these areas as seed regions. The coactivation patterns of the areas support the concept of a common involvement in a core network subserving different cognitive tasks, that is, object recognition, visual language perception, or visual attention. In addition, the analysis supports the previous cytoarchitectonic parcellation, indicating that FG1 appears as a transitional area between early and higher visual cortex and FG2 as a higher-order one. The latter area is furthermore lateralized, as it shows strong relations to the visual language processing system in the left hemisphere, while its right side is stronger associated with face selective regions. These findings indicate that functional lateralization of area FG2 relies on a different pattern of connectivity rather than side-specific cytoarchitectonic features. PMID:24038902

  19. [Uterine rupture. A case of spontaneous rupture in a thirty week primiparous gestation ].

    PubMed

    Bretones, S; Cousin, C; Gualandi, M; Mellier, G

    1997-01-01

    Uterine rupture is one of the major complications of pregnancy. Most spontaneous uterine ruptures occur during labor in parturients with a scarred uterus. Spontaneous rupture where the uterus is unscarred are more rare and occur more frequently in older multiparous patients. Starting from a case of uterine rupture occurring in a 40 year-old primiparous women, we will present a review of the literature concerning cases of rupture in healthy uteri with no obvious cause. PMID:9265057

  20. Oesophageal rupture masquerading as STEMI.

    PubMed

    Skaug, Brian; Taylor, Kenneth R; Chandrasekaran, Somya

    2016-01-01

    A 67-year-old man presented to the emergency department, with acute onset of chest pain. Based on ECG changes suggestive of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), he was taken emergently to the cardiac catheterisation laboratory for coronary angiography. There he was found to have only non-obstructive coronary disease. Subsequent physical examination and review of his chest radiograph revealed subcutaneous emphysema, and CT scan revealed a distal oesophageal rupture and pneumomediastinum. After stabilisation in the intensive care unit (ICU), he was taken to the operating room for thoracotomy, chest tube placement and stenting of his oesophagus. He survived the incident and, after several weeks of ICU stay, recovered to a large extent. His case highlights the importance of considering oesophageal rupture in the differential diagnosis for acute onset of chest pain. PMID:27068730

  1. Spontaneous rupture of the ureter

    PubMed Central

    Eken, Alper; Akbas, Tugana; Arpaci, Taner

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the ureter is a very rare condition and usually results from ureteral obstruction by a calculus. Only theoretical mechanisms have been proposed and no possible explanation has yet been reported in the literature. Intravenous contrast-enhanced computed tomography is the most informative study with high sensitivity. Treatment should be individualised, and depends on the state of the patient. Minimally invasive endourological procedures with double-J catheter placement and percutaneous drainage offer excellent results. Conservative management with analgesics and antibiotic coverage may be an alternative to surgery. Herein, we present a case of spontaneous rupture of the proximal ureter with no evidence of an underlying pathological condition. PMID:25715862

  2. Spontaneous hepatic rupture in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, E W; Archibald, L; Albo, D

    1977-12-01

    Hepatic rupture as a late complication of toxemic pregnancy is a rare yet lethal condition requiring rapid recognition and surgical management. The clinical triad of toxemia, right upper quadrant pain, and sudden hypotension is the diagnostic hallmark of presentation. Most patients present near the time of delivery and are found to have subcapsular hematomas of the right hepatic lobe with free rupture into the peritoneal cavity and resultant exsanguinating hemorrhage. The association of toxemia and disseminated intravascular coagulation with secondary microembolic damage to the liver and other organs has been discussed. Basic surgical principles in the managment of hepatic subcapsular hematomas, and the prolonged postoperative course and frequent complications in these patients have been stressed. PMID:596550

  3. Achilles tendon rupture in badminton.

    PubMed Central

    Kaalund, S; Lass, P; Hgsaa, B; Nhr, M

    1989-01-01

    The typical badminton player with an Achilles tendon rupture is 36 years old and, despite limbering up, is injured at the rear line in a sudden forward movement. He resumes work within three months and has a slight lack of dorsiflexion in the ankle as the main complication. Most patients resume badminton within one year, but some finish their sports career, mainly due to fear of a new injury. The investigation discusses predisposing factors and prophylactic measures. PMID:2605439

  4. Rupture of vertical soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, Emmanuelle

    2014-11-01

    Soap films are ephemeral and fragile objects. They tend to thin under gravity, which gives rise to the fascinating variations of colors at their interfaces but leads systematically to rupture. Even a child can create, manipulate and admire soap films and bubbles. Nevertheless, the reason why it suddenly bursts remains a mystery although the soap chosen to stabilize the film as well as the humidity of the air seem very important. One difficulty to study the rupture of vertical soap films is to control the initial solution. To avoid this problem we choose to study the rupture during the generation of the film at a controlled velocity. We have built an experiment, in which we measure the maximum length of the film together with its lifetime. The generation of the film is due to the presence of a gradient of surface concentration of surfactants at the liquid/air interface. This leads to a Marangoni force directed toward the top of the film. The film is expected to burst only when its weight is not balanced anymore by this force. We will show that this leads to the surprising result that the thicker films have shorter lifetimes than the thinner ones. It is thus the ability of the interface to sustain a surface concentration gradient of surfactants which controls its stability.

  5. Molecular dynamics of interface rupture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1993-01-01

    Several situations have been studied in which a fluid-vapor or fluid-fluid interface ruptures, using molecular dynamics simulations of 3000 to 20,000 Lennard-Jones molecules in three dimensions. The cases studied are the Rayleigh instability of a liquid thread, the burst of a liquid drop immersed in a second liquid undergoing shear, and the rupture of a liquid sheet in an extensional flow. The late stages of the rupture process involve the gradual withdrawal of molecules from a thinning neck, or the appearance and growth of holes in a sheet. In all cases, it is found that despite the small size of the systems studied, tens of angstroms, the dynamics is in at least qualitative accord with the behavior expected from continuum calculations, and in some cases the agreement is to within tens of percent. Remarkably, this agreement occurs even though the Eulerian velocity and stress fields are essentially unmeasurable - dominated by thermal noise. The limitations and prospects for such molecular simulation techniques are assessed.

  6. Effects of Dietary Fermented Seaweed and Seaweed Fusiforme on Growth Performance, Carcass Parameters and Immunoglobulin Concentration in Broiler Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Y. J.; Lee, S. R.; Oh, J-W.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of brown seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida) by-product and seaweed fusiforme (Hizikia fusiformis) by-product supplementation on growth performance and blood profiles including serum immunoglobulin (Ig) in broilers. Fermentation of seaweeds was conducted by Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus oryzae. In a 5-wk feeding trial, 750 one-d-old broiler chicks were divided into 5 groups, and were assigned to the control diet or experimental diets including control+0.5% brown seaweed (BS) by-product, control+0.5% seaweed fusiforme (SF) by-product, control+0.5% fermented brown seaweed (FBS) by-product, and control+0.5% fermented seaweed fusiforme (FSF) by-product. As a consequence, body weight gain (BWG) and gain:feed of seaweed by-product groups were clearly higher, when compared to those of control diet group from d 18 to 35 and the entire experimental period (p<0.05). In mortality rate, seaweed by-product groups were significantly lower when compared to control diet group during entire experimental period (p<0.05). However, Feed Intake of experimental diets group was not different from that of the control group during the entire experimental period. Whereas, Feed Intake of fermented seaweed by-product groups was lower than that of non-fermented seaweed groups (p<0.05). Total organ weights, lipids, and glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) of all treatment groups were not different from those of control group. However, glutamic pyruvate transaminase (GPT) of all treatment groups was higher than that of control group at d 17 (p<0.05). In case of serum Igs concentration, the concentration of IgA antibody in BS, SF, FSF treatment groups was significantly higher than in control group at d 35 (p<0.01). IgA concentration in FBS supplementation groups was negligibly decreased when compared to the control group. IgM concentration in the serums of all treatment groups was significantly higher than in control group (p<0.05) and in fermented seaweed by-product groups were much higher than in non-fermented seaweed groups (p<0.05). On the other hand, IgG concentrations in all treatment groups were lower than in control group (p<0.05). Taken together, our results suggest that by-product dietary supplementation of BS, SF, FBS, and FSF in poultry may provide positive effects of growth performance and immune response. PMID:25050025

  7. Differential neuronal responses to the self and others in the extrastriate body area and the fusiform body area.

    PubMed

    Vocks, Silja; Busch, Martin; Grönemeyer, Dietrich; Schulte, Dietmar; Herpertz, Stephan; Suchan, Boris

    2010-09-01

    The extrastriate body area (EBA) and the fusiform body area (FBA) are selectively activated by viewing human bodies. However, the role of these functionally defined brain areas in self-other discrimination is still unresolved. Thirty-one females were presented with 16 pictures of their own body and another body in a bikini and with scrambled images while fMRI was performed. Moreover, standardized stimulus material was used in order to localize the EBA and FBA. Region-of-interest analysis showed an enhanced BOLD response to the self-images relative to the non-self-images in the right EBA and FBA. The right EBA and FBA are activated differently by viewing oneself and others and might thus play a role in visual self-other discrimination. PMID:20805543

  8. Influence of initial stress and rupture initiation parameters on forbidden zone rupture propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, R. M.; Duan, B.

    2015-04-01

    Well established theoretical and numerical results of 2-D ruptures have been accepted for years to limit the speed of mode II cracks to be below the Rayleigh velocity or above the shear wave speed. However, recent work has numerically produced rupture speeds in this so-called `forbidden zone', that is the region of rupture velocities between the Rayleigh wave speed and the shear wave speed, for 3-D simulations. We verify that finding here and further examine the dependence of that behaviour on initial stress and rupture initiation parameters. Using a 3-D finite element model for dynamic rupture propagation, numerical experiments were performed for different initial stress conditions as well as different size initiation patches and forced rupture velocities. It is shown that the initial stress on the fault has a strong influence on the resulting rupture, specifically with regards to the distance at which the rupture transitions to supershear speeds, the maximum rupture velocity attained on the fault, and how rapidly the rupture passes through the forbidden zone. It is also demonstrated that for the same initial stress, increasing the size of the nucleation patch or the speed of forced rupture can artificially increase the gradient of the rupture velocity within the forbidden zone. This suggests that the rupture is uniquely predetermined by the stress state and material properties of the fault and surrounding medium in these models.

  9. Structural elucidation and protective role of a polysaccharide from Sargassum fusiforme on ameliorating learning and memory deficiencies in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pei; Li, Zhixiong; Chen, Mingcang; Sun, Zhaolin; Ling, Yun; Jiang, Jian; Huang, Chenggang

    2016-03-30

    A fucoidan, Sargassum fusiforme polysaccharide 65 (SFPS65) A, was isolated from a brown alga (S. fusiforme). SFPS65A had an estimated molecular weight of 90kDa and showed αD(20) -74.3288 (c 0.05, H2O). SFPS65A is composed of fucose, galactose, xylose, glucose, glucuronic acid, and mannose in the ratio of 19.23:9.58:6.64:1:6.52:2.57. The structural features of SFPS65A were investigated using composition analysis, methylation analysis, infrared spectrum, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization quadruple time-of-flight tandem mass spectroscopy. Results showed that SFPS65A has a main chain composed of →3)-β-l-Fucp-(1→3,4)-β-l-Fucp-(1→3,4)-β-l-Fucp-(1→ and connected with →3,4)-α-d-GlcAp-(1→, →4)-β-d-Xylp-(1→, →4)-α-d-Galp-(1→, →3,6)-α-d-Manp-(1→ alternately. The branches at O-3 of the fucosyl residue and O-3 of the hexosyl residues may include sulfate, →4)-β-l-Fucp-(1→, β-d-Xylp-(1→, and β-d-Xylp-(1→. SFPS65A exhibited an activity on Alzheimer's disease in vivo in the pharmacological experiments by increasing the cognitive abilities of scopolamine-, ethanol-, and sodium nitrite-treated mice against memory deficits. PMID:26794958

  10. Fusiform Gyrus Dysfunction is Associated with Perceptual Processing Efficiency to Emotional Faces in Adolescent Depression: A Model-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tiffany C.; Zhang, Shunan; Sacchet, Matthew D.; Weng, Helen; Connolly, Colm G.; Henje Blom, Eva; Han, Laura K. M.; Mobayed, Nisreen O.; Yang, Tony T.

    2016-01-01

    While the extant literature has focused on major depressive disorder (MDD) as being characterized by abnormalities in processing affective stimuli (e.g., facial expressions), little is known regarding which specific aspects of cognition influence the evaluation of affective stimuli, and what are the underlying neural correlates. To investigate these issues, we assessed 26 adolescents diagnosed with MDD and 37 well-matched healthy controls (HCL) who completed an emotion identification task of dynamically morphing faces during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We analyzed the behavioral data using a sequential sampling model of response time (RT) commonly used to elucidate aspects of cognition in binary perceptual decision making tasks: the Linear Ballistic Accumulator (LBA) model. Using a hierarchical Bayesian estimation method, we obtained group-level and individual-level estimates of LBA parameters on the facial emotion identification task. While the MDD and HCL groups did not differ in mean RT, accuracy, or group-level estimates of perceptual processing efficiency (i.e., drift rate parameter of the LBA), the MDD group showed significantly reduced responses in left fusiform gyrus compared to the HCL group during the facial emotion identification task. Furthermore, within the MDD group, fMRI signal in the left fusiform gyrus during affective face processing was significantly associated with greater individual-level estimates of perceptual processing efficiency. Our results therefore suggest that affective processing biases in adolescents with MDD are characterized by greater perceptual processing efficiency of affective visual information in sensory brain regions responsible for the early processing of visual information. The theoretical, methodological, and clinical implications of our results are discussed. PMID:26869950

  11. Fusiform Gyrus Dysfunction is Associated with Perceptual Processing Efficiency to Emotional Faces in Adolescent Depression: A Model-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tiffany C; Zhang, Shunan; Sacchet, Matthew D; Weng, Helen; Connolly, Colm G; Henje Blom, Eva; Han, Laura K M; Mobayed, Nisreen O; Yang, Tony T

    2016-01-01

    While the extant literature has focused on major depressive disorder (MDD) as being characterized by abnormalities in processing affective stimuli (e.g., facial expressions), little is known regarding which specific aspects of cognition influence the evaluation of affective stimuli, and what are the underlying neural correlates. To investigate these issues, we assessed 26 adolescents diagnosed with MDD and 37 well-matched healthy controls (HCL) who completed an emotion identification task of dynamically morphing faces during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We analyzed the behavioral data using a sequential sampling model of response time (RT) commonly used to elucidate aspects of cognition in binary perceptual decision making tasks: the Linear Ballistic Accumulator (LBA) model. Using a hierarchical Bayesian estimation method, we obtained group-level and individual-level estimates of LBA parameters on the facial emotion identification task. While the MDD and HCL groups did not differ in mean RT, accuracy, or group-level estimates of perceptual processing efficiency (i.e., drift rate parameter of the LBA), the MDD group showed significantly reduced responses in left fusiform gyrus compared to the HCL group during the facial emotion identification task. Furthermore, within the MDD group, fMRI signal in the left fusiform gyrus during affective face processing was significantly associated with greater individual-level estimates of perceptual processing efficiency. Our results therefore suggest that affective processing biases in adolescents with MDD are characterized by greater perceptual processing efficiency of affective visual information in sensory brain regions responsible for the early processing of visual information. The theoretical, methodological, and clinical implications of our results are discussed. PMID:26869950

  12. Early second trimester uterine scar rupture

    PubMed Central

    Bharatnur, Sunanda; Hebbar, Shripad; G, Shyamala

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous uterine scar rupture can be lethal in pregnant women. A spontaneous uterine scar rupture in the early mid-trimester is rare and difficult to diagnose. This is a case of a 30-year-old woman (G2P1L1) at 19?weeks of gestation and having undergone a previous caesarean section presented with acute abdomen in shock. Laparotomy revealed a uterine scar rupture, which was resutured after evacuation of products of conception. This case merits that the uterine rupture should be considered as a differential diagnosis in pregnant women presenting with acute abdomen. In this case, although there was uterine rupture in the second trimester and a complete placental separation, fetus was alive which is quite unusual in patients presenting with rupture uterus. PMID:24326433

  13. Early second trimester uterine scar rupture.

    PubMed

    Bharatnur, Sunanda; Hebbar, Shripad; Shyamala, G

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous uterine scar rupture can be lethal in pregnant women. A spontaneous uterine scar rupture in the early mid-trimester is rare and difficult to diagnose. This is a case of a 30-year-old woman (G2P1L1) at 19 weeks of gestation and having undergone a previous caesarean section presented with acute abdomen in shock. Laparotomy revealed a uterine scar rupture, which was resutured after evacuation of products of conception. This case merits that the uterine rupture should be considered as a differential diagnosis in pregnant women presenting with acute abdomen. In this case, although there was uterine rupture in the second trimester and a complete placental separation, fetus was alive which is quite unusual in patients presenting with rupture uterus. PMID:24326433

  14. Ruptured "giant" supratentorial dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D G; Stemper, S J; Withers, T K

    2005-02-01

    Intracranial dermoid and epidermoid cysts are rare lesions formed from the inclusion of ectodermal elements during neural tube closure. Although not entirely consistent, imaging characteristics on CT and MRI can aid differentiation of dermoids and epidermoids, as can age at presentation, location and tendency to rupture. The distinction between dermoid and epidermoid lesions is important prognostically and may impact on surgical management as a subtotally resected dermoid is less likely to recur than its epidermoid counterpart. The distinction of large dermoid lesions as "giant" adds little to information regarding the natural history or prognosis of these lesions and should be abandoned. PMID:15749433

  15. Investigation of cryogenic rupture disc design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keough, J. B.; Oldland, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rupture disc designs of both the active (command actuated) and passive (pressure ruptured) types were evaluated for performance characteristics at cryogenic temperatures and for capability to operate in a variety of cryogens, including gaseous and liquid fluorine. The test results, coupled with information from literature and industry searches, were used to establish a statement of design criteria and recommended practices for application of rupture discs to cryogenic rocket propellant feed and vent systems.

  16. Neck curve polynomials in neck rupture model

    SciTech Connect

    Kurniadi, Rizal; Perkasa, Yudha S.; Waris, Abdul

    2012-06-06

    The Neck Rupture Model is a model that explains the scission process which has smallest radius in liquid drop at certain position. Old fashion of rupture position is determined randomly so that has been called as Random Neck Rupture Model (RNRM). The neck curve polynomials have been employed in the Neck Rupture Model for calculation the fission yield of neutron induced fission reaction of {sup 280}X{sub 90} with changing of order of polynomials as well as temperature. The neck curve polynomials approximation shows the important effects in shaping of fission yield curve.

  17. Tendon Ruptures Associated With Corticosteroid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Alan A.; Horowitz, Bruce G.; Nagel, Donald A.

    1977-01-01

    In five patients, tendon ruptures occurred in association with corticosteroid therapy, either systemic or local infiltration. The chronic nature of the pain in all of these patients suggests that what we often call tendinitis may in fact be early or partial ruptures of tendons. Patients who receive local infiltration of corticosteroids should perhaps be advised of the risk of a ruptured tendon. In addition, particularly when the Achilles tendon is involved, immobilization should be utilized initially for a presumed tendinitis or early rupture, to protect the tendon from further injury. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:919538

  18. Traumatic rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Young; Jung, Shin; Jung, Tae-Young; Kang, Sam-Suk; Kim, Tae-Sun

    2008-04-01

    This paper reports the first case in which an intracranial dermoid cyst that underwent traumatic rupture was treated surgically and discusses the importance of the preoperative radiological identification and management of the rupture. For adequate management of a ruptured intracranial dermoid cyst, in addition to early surgery, we emphasize the importance of expeditious identification of the rupture with MRI, including an additional fat-suppression sequence, and prompt management of the accompanying chemical meningitis with intravenous steroid therapy beginning from the pre-operative period. PMID:18258431

  19. Rupture dynamics in model polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Borah, Rupam; Debnath, Pallavi

    2016-05-11

    In this paper we explore the rupture dynamics of a model polymer system to capture the microscopic mechanism during relative motion of surfaces at the single polymer level. Our model is similar to the model for friction introduced by Filippov, Klafter, and Urbakh [Filippov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2004, 92, 135503]; but with an important generalization to a flexible transducer (modelled as a bead spring polymer) which is attached to a fixed rigid planar substrate by interconnecting bonds (modelled as harmonic springs), and pulled by a constant force FT. Bonds are allowed to rupture stochastically. The model is simulated, and the results for a certain set of parameters exhibit a sequential rupture mechanism resulting in rupture fronts. A mean field formalism is developed to study these rupture fronts and the possible propagating solutions for the coupled bead and bond dynamics, where the coupling excludes an exact analytical treatment. Numerical solutions to mean field equations are obtained by standard numerical techniques, and they agree well with the simulation results which show sequential rupture. Within a travelling wave formalism based on the Tanh method, we show that the velocity of the rupture front can be obtained in closed form. The derived expression for the rupture front velocity gives good agreement with the stochastic and mean field results, when the rupture is sequential, while propagating solutions for bead and bond dynamics are shown to agree under certain conditions. PMID:27087684

  20. Second-Trimester Uterine Rupture: Lessons Learnt

    PubMed Central

    F. ABDULWAHAB, Dalia; ISMAIL, Hamizah; NUSEE, Zalina

    2014-01-01

    Uterine rupture is a rare life-threatening complication. It mainly occurs in the third trimester of pregnancy and is rarely seen during the first or second trimesters. Our centre experienced three important cases of uterine rupture. First case: spontaneous uterine rupture at 14 weeks of pregnancy, which was diagnosed at autopsy. It was misled by the ultrasound finding of an intrauterine pregnancy, and searching for other non-gynaecological causes delayed the urgent obstetric surgical management. Second case: ruptured uterus at 24 weeks following medical termination due to foetal anomaly. It was diagnosed only at laparotomy indicated for failed medical termination and chorioamnionitis. Third case: uterine rupture at 21 weeks of pregnancy in a patient with gastroenterology symptoms. In these reports, we have discussed the various risk factors, presentations, course of events and difficulties in diagnosing uterine rupture. The study concludes that the clinical presentation of uterine ruptures varies. It occurs regardless of gestational age. Ultrasound findings of intrauterine pregnancy with free fluid do not exclude uterine rupture or ectopic pregnancy. Searching for non-gynaecological causes in such clinical presentations might delay crucial surgical intervention, which leads to unnecessary morbidity, mortality or loss of obstetrics function. PMID:25977625

  1. Madelung Deformity and Extensor Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Shahcheraghi, Gholam Hossain; Peyman, Maryam; Mozafarian, Kamran

    2015-07-01

    Extensor tendon rupture in chronic Madelung deformity, as a result of tendon attrition on the dislocated distal ulna, is a rare occurrence. It is, however, seen more often in rheumatoid arthritis. There are few case reports in the English-language literature on this issue. We report a case of multiple tendon ruptures in a previously undiagnosed Madelung deformity. PMID:26161772

  2. Papillary muscle rupture after blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Cordovil, Adriana; Fischer, Claudio H; Rodrigues, Ana Clara T; Lira Filho, Edgar B; Vieira, Marcelo L C; Cury, Alexandre F; Naccarato, Gustavo A F; Valente, Carmen; Brandão, Carlos M; Pommerantzeff, Pablo M; Morhy, Samira S

    2006-04-01

    We report a case of anterolateral papillary muscle rupture in a 22-year-old man who had blunt chest trauma caused by a car accident. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed severe mitral regurgitation caused by the rupture. He successfully underwent emergency mitral valve replacement and was discharged 9 days after the surgical correction. PMID:16581491

  3. Ruptured intracranial dermoids: magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Patkar, D; Krishnan, A; Patankar, T; Prasad, S; Shah, J; Limdi, J

    1999-01-01

    Rupture of intracranial dermoids tumour is rare and carries with it the risk of significant morbidity as well as fatality. Three cases that presented with varying symptoms ranging from headache to chiasmatic compression and suspected to have rupture of dermoid tumour are described. The importance of MR imaging in their diagnosis is discussed. PMID:10734333

  4. Do buried-rupture earthquakes trigger less landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes for reverse faults?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chong

    2014-07-01

    Gorum et al. (2013, Geomorphology 184, 127-138) carried out a study on inventory compilation and statistical analyses of landslides triggered by the 2010 Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake. They revealed that spatial distribution patterns of these landslides were mainly controlled by complex rupture mechanism and topography. They also suggested that blind-rupture earthquakes trigger fewer landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes on thrust reverse faults. Although a few lines of evidence indicate that buried-rupture earthquakes might trigger fewer landslides than surface-rupture earthquakes on reverse faults, more careful comparisons and analyses indicate that it is not always true. Instead, some cases show that a buried-rupture earthquake can trigger a larger quantity of landslides that are distributed in a larger area, whereas surface-rupture earthquakes can trigger larger but a fewer landslides distributed in a smaller area.

  5. Changes in wall shear stress magnitude after aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Kono, Kenichi; Tomura, Nagatsuki; Yoshimura, Ryo; Terada, Tomoaki

    2013-08-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies on cerebral aneurysms have attempted to identify surrogate hemodynamic parameters to predict rupture risk. We present a case of bilateral mirror image aneurysms, one of which ruptured soon after imaging. Wall shear stress values of the ruptured aneurysm changed by 20-30% after rupture because of change in the aneurysm shape. Findings from our case suggest that CFD studies comparing unruptured and ruptured aneurysms may not yield valid estimation on aneurysm rupture risk because of changes in aneurysm shape after rupture. Changes in aneurysm shape after rupture should be considered in CFD research. PMID:23715949

  6. Spontaneous rupture of the spleen operated in gynecological unit mistaken for ruptured hemorrhagic ovarian cyst: total splenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Eko, Filbert Eko; Fouelifack, Florent Ymele; de Paul, Elanga Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous splenic rupture is always neglected when consulting acute abdominal pains in gynecological emergencies. It constitutes about 1% of all splenic ruptures and can be managed by abstention, surgery or embolization. We present the case of a young lady who was diagnosed of spontaneous rupture during surgery that was mistaken for ruptured hemorrhagic ovarian cyst and finally treated by total splenectomy. The pre-operative work up was absolute for a rupturred hemorrhagic cyst and secondariy for a ruptured ectopic gestation. PMID:25918564

  7. Neural decoding reveals impaired face configural processing in the right fusiform face area of individuals with developmental prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiedong; Liu, Jia; Xu, Yaoda

    2015-01-28

    Most of human daily social interactions rely on the ability to successfully recognize faces. Yet ∼2% of the human population suffers from face blindness without any acquired brain damage [this is also known as developmental prosopagnosia (DP) or congenital prosopagnosia]). Despite the presence of severe behavioral face recognition deficits, surprisingly, a majority of DP individuals exhibit normal face selectivity in the right fusiform face area (FFA), a key brain region involved in face configural processing. This finding, together with evidence showing impairments downstream from the right FFA in DP individuals, has led some to argue that perhaps the right FFA is largely intact in DP individuals. Using fMRI multivoxel pattern analysis, here we report the discovery of a neural impairment in the right FFA of DP individuals that may play a critical role in mediating their face-processing deficits. In seven individuals with DP, we discovered that, despite the right FFA's preference for faces and it showing decoding for the different face parts, it exhibited impaired face configural decoding and did not contain distinct neural response patterns for the intact and the scrambled face configurations. This abnormality was not present throughout the ventral visual cortex, as normal neural decoding was found in an adjacent object-processing region. To our knowledge, this is the first direct neural evidence showing impaired face configural processing in the right FFA in individuals with DP. The discovery of this neural impairment provides a new clue to our understanding of the neural basis of DP. PMID:25632131

  8. The Left Fusiform Gyrus is a Critical Region Contributing to the Core Behavioral Profile of Semantic Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Junhua; Chen, Keliang; Chen, Yan; Fang, Yuxing; Yang, Qing; Lv, Yingru; Lin, Nan; Bi, Yanchao; Guo, Qihao; Han, Zaizhu

    2016-01-01

    Given that extensive cerebral regions are co-atrophic in semantic dementia (SD), it is not yet known which critical regions (SD-semantic-critical regions) are really responsible for the semantic deficits of SD. To identify the SD-semantic-critical regions, we explored the relationship between the degree of cerebral atrophy in the whole brain and the severity of semantic deficits in 19 individuals with SD. We found that the gray matter volumes (GMVs) of two regions [left fusiform gyrus (lFFG) and left parahippocampal gyrus (lPHG)] significantly correlated with the semantic scores of patients with SD. Importantly, the effects of the lFFG remained significant after controlling for the GMVs of the lPHG. Moreover, the effects of the region could not be accounted for by the total GMV, general cognitive ability, laterality of brain atrophy, or control task performance. We further observed that each atrophic portion of the lFFG along the anterior–posterior axis might dedicate to the loss of semantic functions in SD. These results reveal that the lFFG could be a critical region contributing to the semantic deficits of SD.

  9. Preparation and certification of hijiki reference material, NMIJ CRM 7405-a, from the edible marine algae hijiki (Hizikia fusiforme).

    PubMed

    Narukawa, Tomohiro; Inagaki, Kazumi; Zhu, Yanbei; Kuroiwa, Takayoshi; Narushima, Izumi; Chiba, Koichi; Hioki, Akiharu

    2012-02-01

    A certified reference material, NMIJ CRM 7405-a, for the determination of trace elements and As(V) in algae was developed from the edible marine hijiki (Hizikia fusiforme) and certified by the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). Hijiki was collected from the Pacific coast in the Kanto area of Japan, and was washed, dried, powdered, and homogenized. The hijiki powder was placed in 400 bottles (ca. 20 g each). The concentrations of 18 trace elements and As(V) were determined by two to four independent analytical techniques, including (ID)ICP-(HR)MS, ICP-OES, GFAAS, and HPLC-ICP-MS using calibration solutions prepared from the elemental standard solution of Japan calibration service system (JCSS) and the NMIJ CRM As(V) solution, and whose concentrations are certified and SI traceable. The uncertainties of all the measurements and preparation procedures were evaluated. The values of 18 trace elements and As(V) in the CRM were certified with uncertainty (k = 2). PMID:22159512

  10. Activity in the right fusiform face area predicts the behavioural advantage for the perception of familiar faces.

    PubMed

    Weibert, Katja; Andrews, Timothy J

    2015-08-01

    People are extremely proficient at discriminating the identity of familiar faces, but are significantly worse with unfamiliar faces. Despite this clear behavioural difference in perception, the neural correlates of the advantage for familiar faces remain unclear. Here, we use an individual differences approach to explore the link between neural responses in face-selective regions and the behavioural advantage for the perception of familiar faces. First, we compared performance on an identity matching task with either familiar or unfamiliar faces. We found that participants were significantly better at matching the identity of familiar compared to unfamiliar faces. Next, we used fMRI to measure the response to familiar and unfamiliar faces. Consistent with the behavioural data, there was a significant difference in the neural response to familiar and unfamiliar faces in face-selective regions. Finally, we asked whether interindividual variation in behavioural performance could be predicted by corresponding variation in fMRI response. We found a significant correlation in the right fusiform face area (rFFA) between the difference in response to familiar and unfamiliar faces and corresponding differences on the face-matching task. That is, participants who showed a larger response to familiar compared to unfamiliar faces in the rFFA also matched familiar faces much more accurately than unfamiliar faces. No other face-selective region showed a correlation between neural and matching accuracy. These results provide a link between activity in the rFFA and the perception of familiar faces. PMID:26187507

  11. Age at intracranial aneurysm rupture among generations

    PubMed Central

    Woo, D; Hornung, R; Sauerbeck, L; Brown, R; Meissner, I; Huston, J; Foroud, T; Broderick, J

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have reported intracranial aneurysm (IA) occurring at young ages in subsequent generations. These studies did not correct for duration of follow-up. Second-generation members who would have their ruptured IA late in life may not be detected due to shorter follow-up time than the first generation. We examined families in which ruptured IA occurred in two consecutive generations for the hypothesis that the second generation (F1) was more likely to have a rupture at a younger age than the older generation (F0). Methods: The Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) Study is a multicenter, international study recruiting families of ruptured and unruptured IA. All available family members are interviewed. Cox proportional hazards regression models and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to examine differences by generation. Results: Although we found that the F1 generation was more likely to have an aneurysm rupture at a younger age than the F0 generation, we found that this was largely because of a lack of follow-up time in the F1 generation. The F1 generation had 50% the rupture rate of the prior generation. When analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves, we found a tendency to have a slightly later rupture rate in the F1 generation once time to follow-up was included in the analysis model. Conclusions: Families of ruptured intracranial aneurysm (IA) do not appear to demonstrate “anticipation.” Our finding suggests that genetic epidemiology of ruptured IA should examine all types of variations such as single base-pair changes, deletions, insertions, and other variations that do not demonstrate anticipation. GLOSSARY FIA = familial intracranial aneurysm; IA = intracranial aneurysm; SAH = subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:19237697

  12. CT diagnosis of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, A.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Moore, A.V. Jr.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1984-08-01

    Abdominal computed tomography was performed in six patients with suspected ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm but in whom an alternate clinical diagnosis was seriously considered. In each patient, a large aortic aneurysm was demonstrated in association with a retroperitoneal accumulation of high-density blood. The retroperitoneal blood was primarily confined to the extracapsular perinephric space. In four of the six patients, a focal area of the aortic wall was indistinct on the side of the retroperitoneal hemorrhage at the presumed site of rupture. Five of the six patients underwent emergency surgery, which confirmed the site of aneurysm, presence of rupture and the location of fresh retroperitoneal blood.

  13. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Rupture Following Transarterial Chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Singh Bhinder, Nimarta; Zangan, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    As the incidence of primary and metastatic liver cancer increases, minimally invasive treatment methods such as transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) have gained momentum as their efficacy and safety profile have been validated. Complications of TACE are rare and typically well tolerated. A unique complication is tumor rupture with hemorrhage. Reports of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) rupture after TACE are limited. It is critical to recognize this complication and understand the treatment options, which range from conservative to surgical management. This report describes a case of HCC rupture following TACE successfully managed with coil embolization. PMID:25762848

  14. Ruptured rudimentary horn pregnancy at sixteen weeks.

    PubMed

    Zeqiri, Fehmi; Paçarada, Myrvete; Kongjeli, Niltene; Zeqiri, Vlora; Kongjeli, Gyltene; Krasniqi, Burim

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancy in a non-communicating rudimentary horn is very difficult to diagnose before it ruptures, leading to life -threatening intraperitoneal hemorrhage. A 22-year-old second gravida patient presented at the Emergency Center of the University Clinical Center of Kosova with a 16-week history of amenorrhea and acute onset of severe abdominal pain. She was resuscitated and taken for an emergency laparotomy under general anesthesia. Intraoperatively, there was a massive hemoperitoneum with a ruptured right rudimentary horn Given their rarity, ruptured rudimentary horn pregnancies are of interest. PMID:24591927

  15. Thyroid rupture secondary to blunt neck trauma.

    PubMed

    Sow, Yih-Liang; Aziz, Nora Abdul; Ng, Khoon-Leong

    2013-04-01

    Rupture of the thyroid gland is uncommon in cases of blunt neck trauma. We report a case of thyroid rupture after a motor vehicle accident in a patient without a preexisting goiter. He presented with a painful anterior neck swelling associated with dysphagia and hoarseness of voice. Computed tomographic scans showed lacerations of the right thyroid lobe and isthmus with features suggestive of slow active bleeding. Neck exploration was subsequently performed, and a ruptured right thyroid lobe was found with ongoing venous hemorrhage. A right hemithyroidectomy was performed, and the patient recovered without complications. PMID:23399341

  16. Creep-rupture reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta-Duran, A.; Wirsching, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A probabilistic approach to the correlation and extrapolation of creep-rupture data is presented. Time temperature parameters (TTP) are used to correlate the data, and an analytical expression for the master curve is developed. The expression provides a simple model for the statistical distribution of strength and fits neatly into a probabilistic design format. The analysis focuses on the Larson-Miller and on the Manson-Haferd parameters, but it can be applied to any of the TTP's. A method is developed for evaluating material dependent constants for TTP's. It is shown that optimized constants can provide a significant improvement in the correlation of the data, thereby reducing modelling error. Attempts were made to quantify the performance of the proposed method in predicting long term behavior. Uncertainty in predicting long term behavior from short term tests was derived for several sets of data. Examples are presented which illustrate the theory and demonstrate the application of state of the art reliability methods to the design of components under creep.

  17. Achilles tendon rupture in atypical patient populations.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a significant injury, and the likelihood of a good recovery is directly associated with early diagnosis and appropriate referral. Such injuries are commonly assessed and identified by practitioners working in 'minors' areas of emergency departments or urgent care settings. The literature frequently describes rupture of the Achilles tendon as 'typically sport-related' affecting 'middle-aged weekend warriors', but this aetiology accounts for only about 70% of such injuries. Factors such as the natural ageing process, obesity and use of some commonly prescribed medications, can increase the risk of developing a tendinopathy and subsequent rupture, often from a seemingly insignificant incident. However, research suggests that injuries in this patient population are more likely be missed on first examination. This article describes risk factors that should alert clinicians to the possibility of Achilles tendon rupture in 'atypical' patient populations. PMID:26948227

  18. Acute Iliac Artery Rupture: Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chatziioannou, A.; Mourikis, D.; Katsimilis, J.; Skiadas, V. Koutoulidis, V.; Katsenis, K.; Vlahos, L.

    2007-04-15

    The authors present 7 patients who suffered iliac artery rupture over a 2 year period. In 5 patients, the rupture was iatrogenic: 4 cases were secondary to balloon angioplasty for iliac artery stenosis and 1 occurred during coronary angioplasty. In the last 2 patients, the rupture was secondary to iliac artery mycotic aneurysm. Direct placement of a stent-graft was performed in all cases, which was dilated until extravasation was controlled. Placement of the stent-graft was successful in all the cases, without any complications. The techniques used, results, and mid-term follow-up are presented. In conclusion, endovascular placement of a stent-graft is a quick, minimally invasive, efficient, and safe method for emergency treatment of acute iliac artery rupture, with satisfactory short- and mid-term results.

  19. The diagnosis of ruptured intracranial dermoid cysts.

    PubMed

    Jamjoom, A B; Cummins, B H

    1989-01-01

    We present a case of a spontaneous asymptomatic rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst with CT and MR images. The literature on the subject is reviewed. The potential associated complications are discussed. PMID:2818854

  20. Ruptured celiac artery aneurysm mimicking Boerhaave syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chien-Yu; Yang, Kai-Wei; Chen, Wei-Kung; Huang, Chen-Hsiung

    2013-09-01

    Ruptured celiac artery aneurysm is a rare cause for epigastric pain and is usually detected incidentally. Atypical presentation with postemetic epigastralgia and pleural effusion usually leads physicians to make the diagnosis of Boerhaave syndrome. Herein, we report a 32-year-old woman who was diagnosed with Boerhaave syndrome initially after presenting with acute postemetic epigastralgia and predominant left side pleural effusion. Diagnostic left thoracentesis yielded bloody fluid with similar amylase level to serum. The chest computed tomographic scan showed no evidence of esophageal rupture. However, a ruptured celiac artery aneurysm with retroperitoneal hematoma extending to the posterior mediastinum and bilateral pleural space was found incidentally. Although ruptured celiac artery aneurysm is an uncommon cause for postemetic epigastralgia, acute vascular events such as the previously stated cause should be the first impression rather than Boerhaave syndrome if the patient also presents with isolated pleural effusion containing unelevated amylase. PMID:23773770

  1. Dynamic rupture activation of backthrust fault branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shiqing; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Ampuero, Jean-Paul

    2015-03-01

    We perform dynamic rupture simulations to investigate the possible reactivation of backthrust branches triggered by ruptures along a main thrust fault. Simulations with slip-weakening fault friction and uniform initial stress show that fast propagation speed or long propagation distance of the main rupture promotes reactivation of backthrust over a range of branch angles. The latter condition may occur separately from the former if rupture speed is limited by an increasing slip-weakening distance towards the junction direction. The results suggest a trade-off between the amplitude and duration of the dynamic stress near the main rupture front for backthrust reactivation. Termination of the main rupture by a barrier can provide enhanced loading amplitude and duration along a backthrust rooted near the barrier, facilitating its reactivation especially with a high frictional resistance. The free surface and depth-dependent initial stress can have several additional effects. The sign of the triggered motion along the backthrust can be reversed from thrust to normal if a deeply nucleated main rupture breaks the free surface, while it is preserved as thrust if the main rupture is terminated by a barrier at depth. The numerical results are discussed in relation to several recent megathrust earthquakes in Sumatra, Chile, and Japan, and related topics such as branch feedbacks to the main fault. The dynamic view on backthrust fault branching provided by the study fills a gap not covered by quasi-static models or observations. A specific examined case of antithetic fault branching may be useful for indicating a barrier-like behavior along the main fault.

  2. Describing Soils: Calibration Tool for Teaching Soil Rupture Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seybold, C. A.; Harms, D. S.; Grossman, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Rupture resistance is a measure of the strength of a soil to withstand an applied stress or resist deformation. In soil survey, during routine soil descriptions, rupture resistance is described for each horizon or layer in the soil profile. The lower portion of the rupture resistance classes are assigned based on rupture between thumb and…

  3. MR and CT appearance of ruptured intracranial dermoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, T F; Spitzer, R M

    1987-01-01

    Intracranial dermoid tumors have characteristic MR and CT appearances. Rupture of an intracranial dermoid produces a dramatic MR and CT appearance. Two cases of ruptured intracranial dermoid tumors are presented, one with rupture into the subarachnoid space, another with rupture into the ventricles. MR and CT findings are included. PMID:3436130

  4. Describing Soils: Calibration Tool for Teaching Soil Rupture Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seybold, C. A.; Harms, D. S.; Grossman, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Rupture resistance is a measure of the strength of a soil to withstand an applied stress or resist deformation. In soil survey, during routine soil descriptions, rupture resistance is described for each horizon or layer in the soil profile. The lower portion of the rupture resistance classes are assigned based on rupture between thumb and

  5. Yield Stress Effects on Mucus Plug Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yingying; Bian, Shiyao; Grotberg, John C.; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James B.

    2012-11-01

    Mucus plugs can obstruct airways, resulting in lost gas exchange and inflammation. Yield stress, one of the significant rheological properties of mucus, plays a significant role in plug rupture. We use carbopol 940 gels as mucus simulants to study dynamics of mucus plug rupture in experiments. Yield stress increases with gel concentration increasing (0.1% ~0.3%). The yield stress of the 0.2% gel is about 530 dyn/cm2, which can simulate normal mucus. A 2D PDMS channel is used to simulate a collapsed airway of the 12th generation in a human lung. Plug rupture is driven by a pressure drop of 1.6 104 ~ 2.0 104 dyn/cm2. Initial plug length varies from half to two times the half channel width. A micro-PIV technique is used to acquire velocity fields during rupture, from which wall shear stress is derived. Plug shortening velocity increases with the pressure drop, but decreases with yield stress or the initial plug length. Wall shear stress increases with yield stress, which indicates more potential damage may occur to epithelial cells when pathologic mucus has a high yield stress. Near the rupture moment, a wall shear stress peak appears at the front of the film deposited by the plug during rupture. This work is supported by NIH: HL84370 and HL85156.

  6. Electrical Stimulation of the Left and Right Human Fusiform Gyrus Causes Different Effects in Conscious Face Perception

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Vinitha; Hermes, Dora; Foster, Brett L.; Weiner, Kevin S.; Jacques, Corentin; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies across species have confirmed bilateral face-selective responses in the ventral temporal cortex (VTC) and prosopagnosia is reported in patients with lesions in the VTC including the fusiform gyrus (FG). As imaging and electrophysiological studies provide correlative evidence, and brain lesions often comprise both white and gray matter structures beyond the FG, we designed the current study to explore the link between face-related electrophysiological responses in the FG and the causal effects of electrical stimulation of the left or right FG in face perception. We used a combination of electrocorticography (ECoG) and electrical brain stimulation (EBS) in 10 human subjects implanted with intracranial electrodes in either the left (5 participants, 30 FG sites) or right (5 participants, 26 FG sites) hemispheres. We identified FG sites with face-selective ECoG responses, and recorded perceptual reports during EBS of these sites. In line with existing literature, face-selective ECoG responses were present in both left and right FG sites. However, when the same sites were stimulated, we observed a striking difference between hemispheres. Only EBS of the right FG caused changes in the conscious perception of faces, whereas EBS of strongly face-selective regions in the left FG produced non-face-related visual changes, such as phosphenes. This study examines the relationship between correlative versus causal nature of ECoG and EBS, respectively, and provides important insight into the differential roles of the right versus left FG in conscious face perception. PMID:25232118

  7. Seeing faces with your ears activates the left fusiform face area, especially when you're blind.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Paula; Renier, Laurent; De Volder, Anne; Rauschecker, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Restoring vision in blind people is an important goal and can be achieved in certain cases, for instance by performing cataract surgeries in children. However, reconnecting the visual system alone is not sufficient; the visual cortex needs to be rewired. In order to fully appreciate visual information, a mental representation of the world needs to be created. Here we are presenting fMRI data from the visual cortex of blind people when they were perceiving faces, houses, and geometric shapes encoded into sounds by means of a sensory substitution device (SSD). Specifically, we focused on selective visual brain areas related to this perception: the fusiform face area (FFA), the lateral occipital complex (LOC) and the parahippocampal place area (PPA). Each area was identified in sighted subjects under visual conditions using a functional localizer consisting of pictures of famous persons, visual 2-D geometric shapes and real houses. Then, region-of-interest analyses were performed on the data acquired in both Congenitally Blind (CB) and Sighted Control (SC) subjects when the SSD was used to discriminate schematic drawings of faces, geometric shapes and houses. Our results indicate that the left LOC was activated under all three conditions in both groups, while the left FFA was activated in CB subjects selectively during the SSD-face discrimination condition. No significant brain activity was found in the PPA in CB or SC subjects at the group level. The specific recruitment of the FFA during the perception of sound-encoded faces in CB subjects shows that they can extract visual information from sound-encoded objects and such perception activates the appropriate module in the visual cortex. Our study also represents new evidence about the developmental constraints on functional specialization in the absence of visual inputs. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26325885

  8. Fusiform gyrus responses to neutral and emotional faces in children with autism spectrum disorders: a high density ERP study.

    PubMed

    Apicella, Fabio; Sicca, Federico; Federico, Rosario R; Campatelli, Giulia; Muratori, Filippo

    2013-08-15

    Face processing is a neural mechanism that allows understanding social information and cues conveyed by faces, whose dysfunction has been postulated to underlie some of the behavioral impairments characterizing autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A special region of the cortex, the fusiform gyrus (FG), is believed to be the specific area for processing face features and emotions. However, behavioral, fMRI and ERP studies addressed to investigate the role of FG dysfunction in ASD have led to conflicting results. Using a high-density EEG system, we recorded the face-sensitive ERP to neutral and emotional (happiness and fearful) faces, as a measure of early activity of the FG, in children with high functioning ASD. By controlling a number of experimental and clinical variables that could have biased previous research--such as gaze direction, attention to tasks, stimulus appearance and clinical profiles--we aimed to assess the effective role of the FG in the face emotion processing deficit hypothesized in ASD. No significant differences in early face-sensitive ERP components were found between ASD and neurotypical children. However, a systematic latency delay and amplitude reduction of all early potentials were observed in the ASD group, regardless of the stimulus, although more evident for emotions. Therefore, we can assume a diffuse dysfunction of neural mechanisms and networks in driving and integrating social information conveyed by faces, in particular when emotions are involved, rather than a specific impairment of the FG-related face processing circuit. Nevertheless, there is need of further investigation. PMID:23124137

  9. Structural changes in left fusiform areas and associated fiber connections in children with abacus training: evidence from morphometry and tractography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongxin; Wang, Yunqi; Hu, Yuzheng; Liang, Yurong; Chen, Feiyan

    2013-01-01

    Evidence supports the notion that the fusiform gyrus (FG), as an integral part of the ventral occipitotemporal junction, is involved widely in cognitive processes as perceiving faces, objects, places or words, and this region also might represent the visual form of an abacus in the abacus-based mental calculation process. The current study uses a combined voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis to test whether long-term abacus training could induce structural changes in the left FG and in the white matter (WM) tracts distribution connecting with this region in school children. We found that, abacus-trained children exhibited significant smaller gray matter (GM) volume than controls in the left FG. And the connectivity mapping identified left forceps major as a key pathway connecting left FG with other brain areas in the trained group, but not in the controls. Furthermore, mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values within left forceps major were significantly increased in the trained group. Interestingly, a significant negative correlation was found in the trained group between the GM volume in left FG and the mean FA value in left forceps major, suggesting an inverse effect of the reported GM and WM structural changes. In the control group, a positive correlation between left FG GM volume and tract FA was found as well. This analysis visualized the group level differences in GM volume, FA and fiber tract between the abacus-trained children and the controls, and provided the first evidence that GM volume change in the left FG is intimately linked with the micro-structural properties of the left forceps major tracts. The present results demonstrate the structural changes in the left FG from the intracortical GM to the subcortical WM regions and provide insights into the neural mechanism of structural plasticity induced by abacus training. PMID:23847506

  10. Pre-stimulus pattern of activity in the fusiform face area predicts face percepts during binocular rivalry.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, P-J; Colas, J T; Kanwisher, N G

    2012-03-01

    Visual input is ambiguous, yet conscious experience is unambiguous. In binocular rivalry the two eyes receive conflicting images, but only one of them is consciously perceived at a time. Here we search for the neural sites of the competitive interactions underlying this phenomenon by testing whether neural pattern activity occurring before stimulus presentation can predict the initial dominant percept in binocular rivalry and, if so, where in the brain such predictive activity is found. Subjects were scanned while viewing an image of a face in one eye and an image of a house in the other eye with anaglyph glasses. The rivalrous stimulus was presented briefly for each trial, and the subject indicated which of the two images he or she preferentially perceived. Our results show that BOLD fMRI multivariate pattern activity in the fusiform face area (FFA) before the stimulus is presented predicts which of the two images will be dominant, suggesting that higher extrastriate areas, such as the FFA, are not only correlated with, but may also be involved in determining the initial dominant percept in binocular rivalry. Furthermore, by examining pattern activity before and after trial onset, we found that pre-trial activity in the FFA for the rivalrous face trials is no more similar to the post-trial activity for the non-rivalrous face trials than to that for the non-rivalrous house trials, indicating a dissociation between neural pattern information, which predicts a given state of awareness, and mean responses, which reflect the state of awareness ultimately achieved. PMID:21952195

  11. Surgical Strategies for Acutely Ruptured Arteriovenous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jaime L; Macdonald, R Loch

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are focal neurovascular lesions consisting of abnormal fistulous connections between the arterial and venous systems with no interposed capillaries. This arrangement creates a high-flow circulatory shunt with hemorrhagic risk and hemodynamic abnormalities. While most AVMs are asymptomatic, they may cause severe neurological complications and death. Each AVM carries an annual rupture risk of 2-4%. Intracranial hemorrhage due to AVM rupture is the most common initial manifestation (up to 70% of presentations), and it carries significant morbidity and mortality. This complication is particularly important in the young and otherwise healthy population, in whom AVMs cause up to one-third of all hemorrhagic strokes. A previous rupture is the single most important independent predictor of future hemorrhage. Current treatment modalities for AVM are microsurgery, endovascular embolization, and radiosurgery. In acutely ruptured AVMs, early microsurgical excision is usually avoided. The standard is to wait at least 4 weeks to allow for patient recovery, hematoma liquefaction, and inflammatory reactions to subside. Exceptions to this rule are small, superficial, low-grade AVMs with elucidated angioarchitecture, for which early simultaneous hematoma evacuation and AVM excision is feasible. Emergent hematoma evacuation with delayed AVM excision (unless, as mentioned, the AVM is low grade) is recommended in patients with a decreased level of consciousness due to intracranial hemorrhage, posterior fossa or temporal lobe hematoma of >30 ml, or hemispheric hematoma of >60 ml. The applicability of endovascular techniques for acutely ruptured AVMs is not clear, but feasible options, until a definitive treatment is determined, include occluding intranidal and distal flow-related aneurysms and 'sealing' any rupture site or focal angioarchitectural weakness when one can be clearly identified and safely accessed. Radiosurgery is not performed in acutely ruptured AVMs because its therapeutic effects occur in a delayed fashion. PMID:26587641

  12. Subpatch roughness in earthquake rupture investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, O.; Mai, P. M.

    2016-03-01

    Fault geometric complexities exhibit fractal characteristics over a wide range of spatial scales (<µm to > km) and strongly affect the rupture process at corresponding scales. Numerical rupture simulations provide a framework to quantitatively investigate the relationship between a fault's roughness and its seismic characteristics. Fault discretization, however, introduces an artificial lower limit to roughness. Individual fault patches are planar and subpatch roughness—roughness at spatial scales below fault patch size—is not incorporated. Does negligence of subpatch roughness measurably affect the outcome of earthquake rupture simulations? We approach this question with a numerical parameter space investigation and demonstrate that subpatch roughness significantly modifies the slip-strain relationship—a fundamental aspect of dislocation theory. Faults with subpatch roughness induce less strain than their planar-fault equivalents at distances beyond the length of a slipping fault. We further provide regression functions that characterize the stochastic effect subpatch roughness.

  13. Repair of Chronic Tibialis Anterior Tendon Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Funk, Shawn S; Gallagher, Bethany; Thomson, A Brian

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a novel technique for repair of chronic tibialis anterior tendon ruptures. All chronic tibialis anterior tendon ruptures reviewed were treated with this technique. Patients with chronic tibialis anterior tendon ruptures presenting to the authors' institution from 2006 to 2012 had preoperative and postoperative Foot and Ankle Ability Measure scores. The average follow-up time was 2.1 years. The average Foot and Ankle Ability Measure score was 66.1% preoperatively and 87.1% postoperatively (P=.002). This technique offers theoretical improved strength and may help avoid the need for tendon graft often required by other techniques. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(2):e386-e390.]. PMID:26966943

  14. Postmyomectomic Uterine Rupture Despite Cesarean Section.

    PubMed

    Kacperczyk, Joanna; Bartnik, Paweł; Romejko-Wolniewicz, Ewa; Dobrowolska-Redo, Agnieszka

    2016-03-01

    Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas) are benign smooth muscle tumors of the uterus. Fibroids can develop anywhere within the muscular wall. Leiomyomas may be associated with infertility. Laparoscopic myomectomy is often used to remove symptomatic intramural or subserosal fibroids. Advantages of the procedure include short recovery time and minimal perioperative morbidity. At the same time, the multilayer suture technique is more complicated during laparoscopy. A rare but serious complication of laparoscopic myomectomies is uterine rupture. A brief review of the literature and a clinical example of a 33-year-old woman with history of infertility, laparoscopic myomectomies and uterine rupture followed by peripartum hemorrhage is presented. The treatment of leiomyomas is a challenge not only because of possible recurrence but also due to long-term consequences following successful myomectomy. Management of patients with uterine scars should include careful planning of the route of delivery, as the risk of rupture may be increased. PMID:26976991

  15. Linguine sign in musculoskeletal imaging: calf silicone implant rupture.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Dennis; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle; Frauenhoffer, Elizabeth E; Walker, Eric A

    2015-08-01

    Imaging findings of breast silicone implant rupture are well described in the literature. On MRI, the linguine sign indicates intracapsular rupture, while the presence of silicone particles outside the fibrous capsule indicates extracapsular rupture. The linguine sign is described as the thin, wavy hypodense wall of the implant within the hyperintense silicone on T2-weighted images indicative of rupture of the implant within the naturally formed fibrous capsule. Hyperintense T2 signal outside of the fibrous capsule is indicative of an extracapsular rupture with silicone granuloma formation. We present a rare case of a patient with a silicone calf implant rupture and discuss the MRI findings associated with this condition. PMID:25577259

  16. Gastric rupture after bag-mask-ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Bednarz, Stephan; Filipovic, Miodrag; Schoch, Otto; Mauermann, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    A 42 year old woman underwent bronchoscopy with procedural propofol sedation. During the procedure, the patient suffered respiratory arrest, and bag-mask ventilation was initiated. During forced mask ventilation, abdominal distention occurred. Even after correct placement of an endotracheal and a nasogastric tube, high inspiratory pressures persisted. The abdominal CT scan revealed a high amount of intraperitoneal free air. An emergent laparotomy confirmed a stomach rupture. Immediately after opening of the peritoneal cavity, peak ventilatory pressures decreased. In this case forceful bag-mask ventilation led to air insufflation into the stomach, increasing gastric pressure, and consecutive stomach rupture. PMID:26744639

  17. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria.

    PubMed

    Alajoulin, Omar A; Alsbou, Mohammed S; Ja'afreh, Somayya O; Kalbouneh, Heba M

    2015-12-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inborn metabolic disease characterized by accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Excretion of HGA in urine causes darkening of urine and its deposition in connective tissues causes dark pigmentation (ochronosis), early degeneration of articular cartilage, weakening of the tendons, and subsequent rupture. In this case report, we present a rare case of a patient presented with unilateral spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon due to AKU. The patient developed most of the orthopedic manifestations of the disease earlier than typical presentations. Alkaptonuria patients should avoid strenuous exercises and foot straining especially in patients developing early orthopedic manifestations. PMID:26620992

  18. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Alajoulin, Omar A.; Alsbou, Mohammed S.; Jaafreh, Somayya O.; Kalbouneh, Heba M.

    2015-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inborn metabolic disease characterized by accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Excretion of HGA in urine causes darkening of urine and its deposition in connective tissues causes dark pigmentation (ochronosis), early degeneration of articular cartilage, weakening of the tendons, and subsequent rupture. In this case report, we present a rare case of a patient presented with unilateral spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon due to AKU. The patient developed most of the orthopedic manifestations of the disease earlier than typical presentations. Alkaptonuria patients should avoid strenuous exercises and foot straining especially in patients developing early orthopedic manifestations. PMID:26620992

  19. COMPARISON OF CLADDING CREEP RUPTURE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Macheret

    2000-06-12

    The objective of this calculation is to compare several creep rupture correlations for use in calculating creep strain accrued by the Zircaloy cladding of spent nuclear fuel when it has been emplaced in the repository. These correlations are used to calculate creep strain values that are then compared to a large set of experimentally measured creep strain data, taken from four different research articles, making it possible to determine the best fitting correlation. The scope of the calculation extends to six different creep rupture correlations.

  20. Tendon ruptures: mallet, flexor digitorum profundus.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Peter C; Shin, Steven S

    2012-08-01

    Mallet injuries are the most common closed tendon injury in the athlete. Flexor digitorum profundus ruptures are rare in baseball, but are common injuries in contact sports. The diagnosis for each condition is based on clinical examination, although radiographs should be evaluated for a possible bony component. Treatment for mallet injury depends on the athlete's goals of competition and understanding of the consequences of any treatment chosen. Gripping, throwing, and catching would be restricted or impossible with the injured finger immobilized. Treatment of FDP ruptures is almost always surgical and requires reattachment of the torn tendon to the distal phalanx. PMID:22883898

  1. Ruptured rudimentary horn at 22 weeks.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Hansa

    2012-07-01

    Rudimentary horn is a developmental anomaly of the uterus. Pregnancy in a non-communicating rudimentary horn is very difficult to diagnose before it ruptures. A case of undiagnosed rudimentary horn pregnancy at 22 weeks presented to Nizwa regional referral hospital in shock with features of acute abdomen. Chances of rupture in first or second trimester are increased with catastrophic haemorrhage leading to increased maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Management of such cases is a challenge till today due to diagnostic dilemma. Expertise in ultrasonography and early resort to surgical management is life saving in such cases. PMID:23293421

  2. Modeling rupture segmentations on the Cascadia megathrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Liu, Y.; McGuire, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Cascadia subduction zone has produced a series of large to great earthquakes, most recently in 1700 AD. Paleoseismological studies of submarine turbidites suggest a significant difference in recurrence interval between Northern (~500 year) and Southern (~200-300 year) Cascadia. Whether future large ruptures are segmented is very important for estimating hazard in Pacific Northwest, but remains enigmatic from the interpretations of current locking maps. Our approach is to develop rupture scenarios of Cascadia earthquakes by performing numerical simulations using the finite element software, PyLith. Based on the USGS plate interface model of Cascadia, we have constructed a realistic three-dimensional subduction fault model that stretches from Northern California to Central Vancouver Island. We have performed a number of dynamic rupture simulations using a set of artificial friction parameters and uniform stress distributions on the fault governed by a slip-weakening friction law. Preliminary results show that ruptures have initiated from the nucleation zone with higher shear stress than the ambient fault and have propagated on the realistic three-dimensional fault surface. The increase of dip angle with depth has little effect on the rupture propagation because that is governed mostly by the fault strength. The along-strike bend of the fault beneath Washington state and Vancouver Island has not impeded the rupture propagation given the uniform fault strength. To estimate the possible rupture segmentation, we have converted a slip-deficit rate model derived from GPS data into stress change distributions on the fault assuming the entire slip deficit would be released in the next great earthquake. We are also constructing another initial stress map derived from tidal and leveling data, which shows a significant difference in the locking depth beneath Central Oregon. The other important variable, the spatial variation of frictional parameters, however, has to be determined under certain assumptions. We assume the critical distance, Dc, is proportional to the final slip, thus will be obtained from the slip deficit distribution. By combining the estimated stresses and Dc for the slip-weakening relation, we will investigate how the different interseismic locking profiles could influence possible segmentation for future ruptures on the Cascadia megathrust. This work is supported by FM Global.

  3. Earthquake Stress Drop in Rupture Patches and Rupture Barriers on Gofar Transform Fault, East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, P. A.; Boettcher, M. S.; McGuire, J. J.; Collins, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The largest earthquakes on mid-ocean ridge transform faults (RTFs) exhibit the most systematic behaviors known in seismology. On the fast slipping Gofar transform fault on the East Pacific Rise (EPR), Mw ~6.0 earthquakes occur every ~5 years and repeatedly rupture the same asperities (fault patches), suggesting that the intervening fault segments (rupture barriers) stop the propagation of the largest earthquakes. In 2008, an ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) deployment captured the end of a seismic cycle on Gofar transform fault [McGuire et al., 2012]. We determine stress drop for earthquakes recorded during this experiment to investigate how the source properties of moderate sized earthquakes (3.0 < Mw < 5.5) differ between the rupture patch and rupture barrier fault segments. The OBS experiment on Gofar transform fault recorded an extensive foreshock sequence localized within a 10 km rupture barrier, the Mw 6.0 mainshock and its aftershocks that occurred in a ~10 km rupture patch, and an earthquake swarm that was located in a second rupture barrier adjacent to the ridge-transform intersection. Using waveforms recorded with a sample rate of 50 Hz on the OBS accelerometers, we calculate stress drop using the Madariaga [1976] circular crack model, with the corner frequency derived from an empirical Green's function (EGF) method, and seismic moment obtained by fitting an omega-squared source model to the low frequency amplitude of individual event spectra. Results for ~300 earthquakes in the foreshock, aftershock, and swarm zones have a range of stress drops from 0.2 to 50 MPa. Values for the best constrained 10% of earthquakes show a weighted average stress drop in the aftershock zone that is more than twice the weighted average stress drop in the foreshock zone (3.5 MPa and 1.1 MPa, respectively). These variations in earthquake stress drop reflect systematic differences in along strike fault zone properties between rupture patches and rupture barriers on Gofar transform fault.

  4. Fatigue crack propagation analysis of plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xuan; Wu, Baijian; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2013-10-01

    Rupture of atheromatous plaque is the major cause of stroke or heart attack. Considering that the cardiovascular system is a classic fatigue environment, plaque rupture was treated as a chronic fatigue crack growth process in this study. Fracture mechanics theory was introduced to describe the stress status at the crack tip and Paris' law was used to calculate the crack growth rate. The effect of anatomical variation of an idealized plaque cross-section model was investigated. The crack initiation was considered to be either at the maximum circumferential stress location or at any other possible locations around the lumen. Although the crack automatically initialized at the maximum circumferential stress location usually propagated faster than others, it was not necessarily the most critical location where the fatigue life reached its minimum. We found that the fatigue life was minimum for cracks initialized in the following three regions: the midcap zone, the shoulder zone, and the backside zone. The anatomical variation has a significant influence on the fatigue life. Either a decrease in cap thickness or an increase in lipid pool size resulted in a significant decrease in fatigue life. Comparing to the previously used stress analysis, this fatigue model provides some possible explanations of plaque rupture at a low stress level in a pulsatile cardiovascular environment, and the method proposed here may be useful for further investigation of the mechanism of plaque rupture based on in vivo patient data. PMID:23897295

  5. In vitro analysis of localized aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Romo, Aaron; Badel, Pierre; Duprey, Ambroise; Favre, Jean-Pierre; Avril, Stéphane

    2014-02-01

    In this study, bulge inflation tests were used to characterize the failure response of 15 layers of human ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (ATAA). Full field displacement data were collected during each of the mechanical tests using a digital image stereo-correlation (DIS-C) system. Using the collected displacement data, the local stress fields at burst were derived and the thickness evolution was estimated during the inflation tests. It was shown that rupture of the ATAA does not systematically occur at the location of maximum stress, but in a weakened zone of the tissue where the measured fields show strain localization and localized thinning of the wall. Our results are the first to show the existence of weakened zones in the aneurysmal tissue when rupture is imminent. An understanding these local rupture mechanics is necessary to improve clinical assessments of aneurysm rupture risk. Further studies must be performed to determine if these weakened zones can be detected in vivo using non-invasive techniques. PMID:24406100

  6. Primary obstructive megaureter with ruptured kidney.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Sun, Hsu-Dong; Yang, Den-Kai; Liao, Chun-Hou

    2009-01-01

    A 17-year-old boy presented to the emergency department for severe left flank pain and gross hematuria 1 hour after playing basketball without significant collision. Laboratory tests showed normal renal function and massive hematuria. Abdominal computed tomography scan disclosed a primary megaureter with ruptured kidney. We successfully treated him with ureteral stenting followed by endoscopic ureterotomy and ureteroneocystostomy. PMID:19041564

  7. Surface Rupture in Northwest Saudi Arabia

    Wendy McCausland of the USGS Volcano Disaster Assistance Program and Hani Zahran of the Saudi Geological Survey view the southern end of the surface fault rupture caused by a M5.4 earthquake in the Saudi Arabian desert on May 19, 2009. The ground displacements in the soft sediments of the foreground...

  8. Laparoscopic splenectomy for atraumatic splenic rupture.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Ugo; Crucitti, Antonio; D'Amato, Gerardo; Mazzari, Andrea; Tomaiuolo, Pasquina M C; Cavicchioni, Camillo; Bellantone, Rocco

    2011-01-01

    A traumatic splenic rupture (ASR) is a rare clinical entity. Several underlying benign and malignant conditions have been described as a leading cause. We report on a case of ASR in a 41-year-old man treated with laparoscopic splenectomy. Considering ASR as a life-threatening condition, a prompt diagnosis can be life saving. PMID:21675627

  9. CT and MRI of ruptured intracranial dermoids.

    PubMed

    Wilms, G; Casselman, J; Demaerel, P; Plets, C; De Haene, I; Baert, A L

    1991-01-01

    Two patients with ruptured intracranial dermoids, examined with both CT and MRI are reported. Clinical presentation was transient cerebral ischemia in one patient and acute meningeal signs in the other. CT scan showed typical fat density of the tumor and the subarachnoid space. On MRI both the tumor and the subarachnoid fat, were strongly hyperintense on T1-weighted images. PMID:2046900

  10. [Ruptured intracranial dermoid as an incidental finding].

    PubMed

    Funke, M

    1995-07-01

    This report presents a case of a ruptured intracranial dermoid accidentally found in a 51-year old patient. The tumour appears as a large lesion located in the posterior fossa. The CT and MRI studies identify fatty material into the CSF spaces providing intraventricular fat-fluid levels. These characteristic findings are indicative of the diagnosis. PMID:7548248

  11. Bond-rupture immunosensors--a review.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Evan R; Yuan, Yong J; Xu, W L; Bronlund, J E

    2008-07-15

    It has long been the goal of researchers to develop fast and reliable point-of-care alternatives to existing lab-based tests. A viable point-of-care biosensor is fast, reliable, simple, cost-effective, and detects low concentrations of the target analyte. The target of biosensors is biological such as bacteria or virus and as such, the antibody-antigen bond derived from the real immune response is used. Biosensor applications include lab-based tests for the purposes of diagnostics, drug discovery, and research. Additional applications include environmental, food, and agricultural monitoring. The main merits of the bond-rupture method are quick, simple, and capable of discriminating between specific and non-specific interactions. The separation of specific and non-specific bonds is important for working in real-life complex serums such as blood. The bond-rupture technique can provide both qualitative results, the detection of a target, and quantitative results, the concentration of target. Bond-rupture achieves this by a label-free method requiring no pre-processing of the analyte. A piezoelectric transducer such as the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) shakes the bound particles free from the surface. Other transducers such as Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) are also considered. The rupture of the bonds is detected as electronic noise. This review article links diverse research areas to build a picture of a field still in development. PMID:18343101

  12. [Splenic rupture--a skateboard accident].

    PubMed

    Kruse, P

    1990-03-01

    A 13-year-old boy presented with persisting abdominal pain after a skateboard accident. Primary clinical and laboratory findings disclosed no signs of intra abdominal bleeding. Ultrasound scanning indicated rupture of the spleen which was confirmed by acute exploratory laparotomy. PMID:2321288

  13. Primary gastric rupture in 47 horses (1995–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Winfield, Laramie S.; Dechant, Julie E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective case-control study was to identify factors associated with primary gastric rupture and to investigate if there were differences between etiologies of primary gastric rupture. Compared to the general colic population, Quarter horses were under-represented and Friesians and draft breeds were over-represented in 47 cases of primary gastric ruptures. Horses with primary gastric rupture typically presented with severe clinical and clinicopathological derangements. There were 24 idiopathic gastric ruptures, 20 gastric impaction associated ruptures, and 3 perforating gastric ulcers. Thoroughbred horses were over-represented in the idiopathic gastric rupture group compared to other breeds and etiologies. This study suggests the presence of important breed predispositions for development of gastric rupture. Further study is necessary to identify if these predispositions are associated with management factors or breed-specific disorders. PMID:26345205

  14. Source rupture process of the 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori earthquake: how did the two subparallel faults rupture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Miho; Asano, Kimiyuki; Iwata, Tomotaka; Kubo, Hisahiko

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori earthquake (MW 6.6) occurred about a month after the 2011 Great Tohoku earthquake (MW 9.0), and it is thought to have been induced by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. After the 2011 Hamadori earthquake, two subparallel faults (the Itozawa and Yunodake faults) were identified by field surveys. The hypocenter was located nearby the Itozawa fault, and it is probable that the Itozawa fault ruptured before the Yunodake fault rupture. Here, we estimated the source rupture process of the 2011 Hamadori earthquake using a model with two subparallel faults based on strong motion data. The rupture starting point and rupture delay time of the Yunodake fault were determined based on Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC). The results show that the Yunodake fault started to rupture from the northern deep point 4.5 s after the Itozawa fault started to rupture. The estimated slip distribution in the shallow part is consistent with the surface slip distribution identified by field surveys. Time-dependent Coulomb failure function changes (ΔCFF) were calculated using the stress change from the Itozawa fault rupture in order to evaluate the effect of the rupture on the Yunodake fault. The ΔCFF is positive at the rupture starting point of the Yunodake fault 4.5 s after the Itozawa fault started to rupture; therefore, it is concluded that during the 2011 Hamadori earthquake, the Yunodake fault rupture was triggered by the Itozawa fault rupture.

  15. fMRI activation of the fusiform gyrus and amygdala to cartoon characters but not to faces in a boy with autism.

    PubMed

    Grelotti, David J; Klin, Ami J; Gauthier, Isabel; Skudlarski, Pawel; Cohen, Donald J; Gore, John C; Volkmar, Fred R; Schultz, Robert T

    2005-01-01

    Abnormal hypoactivation in the amygdala and fusiform gyrus, brain areas that participate in face processing and social cognition, has consistently been demonstrated in persons with autism. We investigated activity in these areas in a boy with autism, DD, who had a special interest in "Digimon" cartoon characters. DD individuates Digimon faster than familiar faces and objects, but he individuates familiar faces no faster than objects. In contrast, a typically developing boy with an interest in "Pokemon" cartoon characters is equally fast at individuating faces and Pokemon and faster at individuating faces and Pokemon than objects and Digimon. In addition, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we show that DD activates his amygdala and fusiform gyrus for perceptual discriminations involving Digimon but not for those involving familiar or unfamiliar faces. This pattern of activation is not seen in the typically developing control with an interest in Pokemon or in a second comparison case who has autism but no interest in Digimon. These results have important implications for our understanding of autism, cortical face specialization, and the possible role of the amygdala in the development of perceptual expertise. PMID:15707614

  16. Photo-piezometric study of supershear rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. B.; Schubnel, A. J.; Taddeucci, J.; Vinciguerra, S.; Rao, S.

    2009-12-01

    We combine acoustic emission acquisition and high speed photography in order to characterize the radiation from spontaneous dynamic rupture propagation on laboratory faults in a transparent, hard resin slab. A number of previous photographic experiments document fracture propagation at supershear velocity and the radiation of a mach cone wavefront. Supershear rupture propagation has been also inferred in several large natural earthquakes. However, failure to observe any strong shock wave in the natural events has fired a debate on the amplitude and attenuation expected for the mach wavefront. Here we attempt to characterize the mach front experimentally. In our spontaneously nucleating laboratory faults, transducers detect the wavefield both close and at a distance from the fault, allowing to characterize the amplitude and the decay of (1) mach wavefronts radiated from the supershear fractures and (2) diffractions emitted by stop-and-go jerks in fracture propagation. In the relatively low frequency range, piezoelectric transducers behave essentially like accelerometers. In the high frequency range, the passage of the rupture front (both sub- and supershear) strongly dominates the acoustic emission in the immediate vicinity of the fault, as expected from the theoretically predicted strain fields in 1/√r close to the fracture tip. Thus simple piezoelectric transducers can be used both to track the passage of the rupture front and as miniature accelerometers. By correlating the fracture photographic sequences to the piezograms recorded at some distance from the fault, we find that the signature of the mach wavefront is visible but not dominant. Our interpretation is that the supershear rupture front is weakely coherent in events, as in our case, where fracture is spontaneously nucleated.

  17. Ruptured rectal duplication with urogenital abnormality: Unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M Narendra; Jadhav, Vinay; Shankar, Gowri; Santhanakrishnan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Rectal duplication (RD) accounts for 5% of alimentary tract duplication. A varied presentation and associated anomalies have been described in the literature. Antenatal rupture of the RD is very rare. We present an unusual case of a ruptured RD associated with urogenital abnormalities in newborn male. We are discussing diagnosis, embryology, management and literature review of ruptured RD. PMID:25552833

  18. A case of ruptured infectious anterior cerebral artery aneurysm treated by interposition graft bypass using the superficial temporal artery

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Takatsugu; Endo, Hidenori; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Fujimura, Miki; Endo, Toshiki; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Mika; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Background: To describe the application of an interposition graft bypass using superficial temporal artery (STA) for the treatment of a ruptured anterior cerebral artery (ACA) infectious aneurysm. Case Description: A 30-year-old male suffered from severe headache with high fever. The patient's diagnosis was ruptured infectious ACA aneurysm at the A3 segment with a maximum diameter of 4.5 mm, caused by infectious endocarditis. The patient was initially treated with high-dose intravenous antibiotics. Follow-up digital subtraction angiography (DSA) revealed that the fusiform aneurysm had enlarged to a maximum diameter of 14.0 mm. A left paracentral artery, supplying the motor area of the left lower extremity, originated from the body of this aneurysm. Because the angiographic findings suggested a risk of recurrent bleeding, the patient underwent open surgery. Interposition graft bypass using the STA was performed to reconstruct the left A3 segment in an end-to-side manner (left proximal callosomarginal artery – STA graft – left distal pericallosal artery). Then, the origin of the left paracentral artery was cut and anastomosed to the STA graft in an end-to-side manner. The affected parent artery was trapped, and the aneurysm was resected. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed no ischemic or hemorrhagic complications, and postoperative DSA revealed the patency of the interposition graft. Pathological diagnosis of the resected aneurysm revealed features corresponding to infectious cerebral aneurysm. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged without any neurological deficits. Conclusion: In the treatment of infectious cerebral aneurysms, revascularization should be considered when the affected artery supplies the eloquent area. Interposition graft bypass using the STA is one of the options for revascularization surgery for the treatment of infectious ACA aneurysms. PMID:26862444

  19. Isolated Total Rupture of Extraocular Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingchang; Kang, Ying; Deng, Daming; Shen, Tao; Yan, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Total rupture of extraocular muscles is an infrequent clinical finding. Here we conducted this retrospective study to evaluate their causes of injury, clinical features, imaging, surgical management, and final outcomes in cases of isolated extraocular muscle rupture at a tertiary center in China. Thirty-six patients were identified (24 men and 12 women). Mean age was 34 years (range 2–60). The right eye was involved in 21 patients and the left 1 in 15. A sharp object or metal hook was the cause of this lesion in 16 patients, sinus surgery in 14 patients, traffic accident in 3 patients, orbital surgery in 2 patients, and conjunctive tumor surgery in 1 patient. The most commonly involved muscles were medial (18 patients) and inferior rectus muscles (13 patients). The function of the ruptured muscles revealed a scale of −3 to −4 defect of ocular motility and the amount of deviation in primary position varied from 10 to 140 PD (prism diopter). Computerized tomography (CT) confirmed the presence of ruptured muscles. An end-to-end muscle anastomosis was performed and 3 to 5 mm of muscle was resected in 23 patients. When the posterior border of the injured muscle could not be identified (13 patients), a partial tendon transposition was performed, together with recession of the antagonist in most patients, whereas a recession of the antagonist muscle plus a resection of the involved muscle with or without nasal periosteal fixation was performed in the remaining patients. After an average of 16.42 months of follow-up an excellent result was achieved in 23 patients and results of 13 patients were considered as a failure. In most patients, the posterior border of the ruptured muscle can be identified and an early surgery can be performed to restore function. Alternatively, a partial tendon transposition should be performed. When muscular rupture is suspected, an early orbital CT is required to confirm this possibility, which can then verify the necessity for an early surgical intervention. PMID:26426604

  20. Megathrust Properties and Large Earthquake Rupture Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, T.; Ye, L.; Kanamori, H.

    2014-12-01

    Constraining physical controls on seismic rupture of plate boundary megathrust faults is challenging due to observational limitations, but seismic, geodetic, tsunami, electromagnetic, geologic and hydrologic studies are steadily accumulating data that hold potential of advancing our understanding of subduction fault zones. Very shallow (< 15 km deep) megathrust earthquakes are rare, but intermittently occur as large tsunami earthquakes such as the 2010 Mentawai Mw 7.8 event. This rupture occurred up-dip of prior large interplate ruptures in the Sumatra subduction zone in 2007, and rupture extended all the way to the trench, but with patchy large-slip regions that can only be confidently resolved using tsunami observations. The seismic wave radiation from tsunami earthquakes is now established to be distinct from that of ruptures deeper on the megathrust, but the controlling factors are not well-resolved. Smaller events at shallow depths tend to have diverse rupture processes, but some are also anomalously depleted in short-period radiation, suggesting that the shallow environment has variable scale-lengths of frictional heterogeneity. At the other end of the megathrust, large events deeper than about 35 km tend to have modest enhancement of short-period seismic wave radiation, with somewhat lower slope to their short-period source spectra than typical of shallower events. The controlling process are also not well-resolved for this behavior. These depth-variations of megathrust earthquake source spectra are one class of observations that may relate to pressure- and temperature-dependent evolution of the megathrust from the trench to decoupling depths near 45-50 km. Other attributes of seismic sources, such as static stress drop and moment-scaled radiated energy have large variability, but do not show systematic variations with depth on the megathrust, so some attributes of earthquake processes are not strongly influenced by evolving conditions of the plate boundary. We explore these issues based on a recent seismological study of all large interplate earthquakes from 1990-2014 combined with detailed investigations of several recent large and great earthquakes for which we have unprecedented geophysical data sets.

  1. Dynamic Rupture Processes during Laboratory Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelègue, F. X.; Schubnel, A.; Nielsen, S. B.; Bhat Suresh, H.; Madariaga, R. I.

    2014-12-01

    Since the proposal by Brace and Byerlee [1966] that the mechanism of stick-slip is similar to earthquakes, many experimental studies have been conducted in order to improve the understanding of rupture mechanics. Here, we report the results of macroscopic stick-slip events in saw-cut samples deformed under controlled upper crustal stress conditions in the laboratory. Experiments were conducted under triaxial laoding (σ1>σ2=σ3) at confining pressures ranging from 10 to 100 MPa. Usual a dual gain system, a high frequency monitoring array recorded the microseismicity during stick-slip sequences and the particle accelerations during macroscopic instabilities. While strain, stress and axial shortening were measured until 10 Hz sampling rate, we also recorded for the first time the dynamic stress changes during macroscopic rupture using dynamic strain gages located close to the fault plane (10 MHz sampling rate). We show that increasing the normal stress acting on the fault plane (i) increases the intensity of foreshock activity prior to the main rupture, (ii) increases the friction along the fault plane, (iii) increases the seismic slip, and (iv) induces the transition from sub-Rayleigh to supershear ruptures [Passelègue et al., 2013]. In addition, after demonstrating that our stick-slip instabilities exhibit a purely slip weakening behavior, we estimated the rupture processes parameters including the size of the breakdown zone (R), the slip-weakening distance (Dc), the energy rate (F) and the fracture energy (G). We compare our results with linear elastic fracture mechanics and previous experimental studies. Finally, the dynamic stress drop is almost complete at high normal stresses with dynamic friction drop ranging from 0.4 to 0.6. These results are consistent with the onset of melting, which was confirmed by our post mortem microstructural analysis (XRD, SEM, TEM). These results show that weakening mechanisms are activated after only 80 μm of slip, suggesting that, at least at the scale of asperities, the resulting dynamic stress drop could be much larger than current seismological estimates. In addition, we demonstrate that the radiation efficiency decreases with the dynamic friction coefficient, suggesting that rupture processes become more dispersive under high normal stress conditions.

  2. Rupture Process During the 2015 Illapel, Chile Earthquake: Zigzag-Along-Dip Rupture Episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuwaki, Ryo; Yagi, Yuji; Aránguiz, Rafael; González, Juan; González, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    We constructed a seismic source model for the 2015 M W 8.3 Illapel, Chile earthquake, which was carried out with the kinematic waveform inversion method adopting a novel inversion formulation that takes into account the uncertainty in the Green's function, together with the hybrid backprojection method enabling us to track the spatiotemporal distribution of high-frequency (0.3-2.0 Hz) sources at high resolution by using globally observed teleseismic P-waveforms. A maximum slip amounted to 10.4 m in the shallow part of the seismic source region centered 72 km northwest of the epicenter and generated a following tsunami inundated along the coast. In a gross sense, the rupture front propagated almost unilaterally to northward from the hypocenter at <2 km/s, however, in detail the spatiotemporal slip distribution also showed a complex rupture propagation pattern: two up-dip rupture propagation episodes, and a secondary rupture episode may have been triggered by the strong high-frequency radiation event at the down-dip edge of the seismic source region. High-frequency sources tends to be distributed at deeper parts of the slip area, a pattern also documented in other subduction zone megathrust earthquakes that may reflect the heterogeneous distribution of fracture energy or stress drop along the fault. The weak excitation of high-frequency radiation at the termination of rupture may represent the gradual deceleration of rupture velocity at the transition zone of frictional property or stress state between the megathrust rupture zone and the swarm area.

  3. Rupture Process During the 2015 Illapel, Chile Earthquake: Zigzag-Along-Dip Rupture Episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuwaki, Ryo; Yagi, Yuji; Aránguiz, Rafael; González, Juan; González, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    We constructed a seismic source model for the 2015 M W 8.3 Illapel, Chile earthquake, which was carried out with the kinematic waveform inversion method adopting a novel inversion formulation that takes into account the uncertainty in the Green's function, together with the hybrid backprojection method enabling us to track the spatiotemporal distribution of high-frequency (0.3-2.0 Hz) sources at high resolution by using globally observed teleseismic P-waveforms. A maximum slip amounted to 10.4 m in the shallow part of the seismic source region centered 72 km northwest of the epicenter and generated a following tsunami inundated along the coast. In a gross sense, the rupture front propagated almost unilaterally to northward from the hypocenter at <2 km/s, however, in detail the spatiotemporal slip distribution also showed a complex rupture propagation pattern: two up-dip rupture propagation episodes, and a secondary rupture episode may have been triggered by the strong high-frequency radiation event at the down-dip edge of the seismic source region. High-frequency sources tends to be distributed at deeper parts of the slip area, a pattern also documented in other subduction zone megathrust earthquakes that may reflect the heterogeneous distribution of fracture energy or stress drop along the fault. The weak excitation of high-frequency radiation at the termination of rupture may represent the gradual deceleration of rupture velocity at the transition zone of frictional property or stress state between the megathrust rupture zone and the swarm area.

  4. A review on delayed presentation of diaphragmatic rupture

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Farhan; Chakrabarty, Mallicka M; Singh, Rajeev; Iftikhar, Syed Y

    2009-01-01

    Diaphragmatic rupture is a life-threatening condition. Diaphragmatic injuries are quite uncommon and often result from either blunt or penetrating trauma. Diaphragmatic ruptures are usually associated with abdominal trauma however, it can occur in isolation. Acute traumatic rupture of the diaphragm may go unnoticed and there is often a delay between the injury and the diagnosis. A comprehensive literature search was performed using the terms "delayed presentation of post traumatic diaphragmatic rupture" and "delayed diaphragmatic rupture". The diagnostic and management challenges encountered are discussed, together with strategies for dealing with them. We have focussed on mechanism of injury, duration, presentation and site of injury, visceral herniation, investigations and different approaches for repair. We intend to stress on the importance of delay in presentation of diaphragmatic rupture and to provide a review on the available investigations and treatment methods. The enclosed case report also emphasizes on the delayed presentation, diagnostic challenges and the advantages of laparoscopic repair of delayed diaphragmatic rupture. PMID:19698091

  5. Detection of supershear rupture in 2013 Craig, Alaska, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Seismic ruptures are akin to opening a zipper—a gap in the crust starts in one location and travels along the fault in a particular direction. When a strained fault ruptures in an earthquake, seismic waves also spread out from the epicenter. In some cases, the waves' passage can trigger the initiation of a new rupture ahead of the initial expanding rupture in locked portions of the fault. If the triggered rupture grows successfully, the overall rupture front can then outpace the passage of the shear waves, secondary seismic waves that travel slowly after the earthquake begins and are responsible for the bulk of violent shaking. These earthquakes display what is known as supershear rupture; only seven such earthquakes have previously been recorded.

  6. Creep rupture behavior of Stirling engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Scheuerman, C. M.; Stephens, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine, being investigated jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternate to the internal combustion engine, uses high-pressure hydrogen as the working fluid. The long-term effects of hydrogen on the high temperature strength properties of materials is relatively unknown. This is especially true for the newly developed low-cost iron base alloy NASAUT 4G-A1. This iron-base alloy when tested in air has creep-rupture strengths in the directionally solidified condition comparable to the cobalt base alloy HS-31. The equiaxed (investment cast) NASAUT 4G-A1 has superior creep-rupture to the equiaxed iron-base alloy XF-818 both in air and 15 MPa hydrogen.

  7. Spontaneous splenic rupture in Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Min; Bae, Byung Koo

    2014-01-01

    Malaria can present with various clinical symptoms and complications. While a tertian malaria form that is especially prevalent in Korea is characterized by mild clinical progression, occasional splenic complications are known to occur. A 26-year-old Korean male soldier without prior medical history visited The Armed Forces Capital Hospital with left upper quadrant abdominal pain one day ago. Hemostasis under laparoscopic approach was attempted. The operation was converted into laparotomy due to friable splenic tissue and consequently poor hemostasis. Splenectomy was performed. The patient was discharged at postoperative day 17 without complication. While numerous diseases can result in splenic complications, such as splenic rupture, malarial infection is known as the most common cause. The incidence of malarial infection in Korea is increasing annually, and there are occasional reports of splenic rupture due to the infection, which requires attention. PMID:25025027

  8. Liquid salt environment stress-rupture testing

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Weiju; Holcomb, David E.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2016-03-22

    Disclosed herein are systems, devices and methods for stress-rupture testing selected materials within a high-temperature liquid salt environment. Exemplary testing systems include a load train for holding a test specimen within a heated inert gas vessel. A thermal break included in the load train can thermally insulate a load cell positioned along the load train within the inert gas vessel. The test specimen can include a cylindrical gage portion having an internal void filled with a molten salt during stress-rupture testing. The gage portion can have an inner surface area to volume ratio of greater than 20 to maximize the corrosive effect of the molten salt on the specimen material during testing. Also disclosed are methods of making a salt ingot for placement within the test specimen.

  9. Spontaneous rupture of renal angiomyolipoma during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Mariana Mouraz Lopes; Proena, Sara Marques Soares; Reis, Maria Ins Nunes Pereira de Almeida; Viana, Rui Miguel Almeida Lopes; Martins, Lusa Maria Bernardo; Colao, Joo Manuel dos Reis; Nunes, Filomena Maria Pinheiro

    2014-08-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma is a benign tumor, composed of adipocytes, smooth muscle cells and blood vessels. The association with pregnancy is rare and related with an increased risk of complications, including rupture with massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage. The follow-up is controversial because of the lack of known cases, but the priorities are: timely diagnosis in urgent cases and a conservative treatment when possible. The mode of delivery is not consensual and should be individualized to each case. We report a case of a pregnant woman with 18 weeks of gestation admitted in the emergency room with an acute right low back pain with no other symptoms. The diagnosis of rupture of renal angiomyolipoma was established by ultrasound and, due to hemodynamically stability, conservative treatment with imaging and clinical monitoring was chosen. At 35 weeks of gestation, it was performed elective cesarean section without complications for both mother and fetus. PMID:25184352

  10. [Spontaneous rupture of an intracerebral dermoid cyst].

    PubMed

    el Quessar, A; Chakir, N; Bouyaakoub, F; el Hassani, M R; Jiddane, M; Boukhrissi, N

    1996-01-01

    Dermoid and epidermoid cysts are rare benign tumors arising from ectopic epiblastic inclusions. Dermoid cyst accounts for 0.4 to 1.5% of all tumors. We report the case of a 43-year-old man, who presented with a 6-month history of disturbances of balance and behavioral disorders. X-ray showed two fat-fluid levels in the ventricles. CT scan showed a left frontal mass with fat density, communicating with the left frontal horn. Histological examination after surgical excision confirmed the diagnosis of dermoid cyst. The diagnosis of ruptured intracranial dermoid cyst is based on the finding of an intraventricular and/or subarachnoid space fat-fluid level. MRI and CT scan facilitates the diagnosis of ruptured intracranial dermoid. PMID:9687621

  11. Computational model of retinal photocoagulation and rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Huie, Phil; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    In patterned scanning laser photocoagulation, shorter duration (< 20 ms) pulses help reduce thermal damage beyond the photoreceptor layer, decrease treatment time and minimize pain. However, safe therapeutic window (defined as the ratio of rupture threshold power to that of light coagulation) decreases for shorter exposures. To quantify the extent of thermal damage in the retina, and maximize the therapeutic window, we developed a computational model of retinal photocoagulation and rupture. Model parameters were adjusted to match measured thresholds of vaporization, coagulation, and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) damage. Computed lesion width agreed with histological measurements in a wide range of pulse durations and power. Application of ring-shaped beam profile was predicted to double the therapeutic window width for exposures in the range of 1 - 10 ms.

  12. Recurrent spontaneous scleral rupture in Marfan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turaga, Kiranmaye; Senthil, Sirisha; Jalali, Subhadra

    2016-01-01

    The ocular manifestations of Marfan's syndrome (MS) range from ectopia lentis, microspherophakia, myopia, glaucoma and retinal detachment. Spontaneous scleral rupture is a rare complication and recurrent scleral perforation is extremely rare. We report a rare case of a 26-year-old male with MS who had sequential recurrent spontaneous scleral rupture which required surgical repair. He suffered from a similar problem 4 years later in both eyes in a different location, with overlying thin cystic blebs and hypotony maculopathy. Surgical repair with preserved scleral donor patch graft and conjunctival autograft in one eye, and conjunctival advancement in the other eye was performed. This helped stabilise the eyes, and resulted in complete visual recovery in both eyes. PMID:27199441

  13. An unusual diagnosis of splenic rupture.

    PubMed

    Roche, Matthew; Maloku, Fatmir; Abdel-Aziz, Tarek Ezzat

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old woman presented with a 3-day history of worsening epigastric pain, non-productive cough and vomiting. On examination she was pale and had abdominal tenderness predominant in the right upper quadrant. Abdominal ultrasound excluded the presence of gall stones, but was unable to rule out free fluid in the abdomen. CT demonstrated extensive high-density ascites; however, no source of bleeding could be demonstrated. Clinically the patient's condition deteriorated, and an exploratory laparotomy was performed. In theatre the splenic capsule was found to have detached from the splenic body and emergency splenectomy was performed. Virology serology later demonstrated acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, although tissue microscopy and CMV staining were negative. No other cause of rupture was found. The interesting aspects of this case include the poor correlation between initial presenting symptoms and subsequent diagnosis, the difficulty encountered in making a firm diagnosis and the atypical cause of rupture. PMID:25293683

  14. [A surgical treatment of ruptured arch aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Sakai, H; Nakayama, Y; Naitoh, K; Hotta, K; Ueno, T; Minato, N; Natsuaki, M; Itoh, T; Kuchiki, H

    1994-04-01

    A 83-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of back pain and shock. Her chest X-ray and CT scan demonstrated a large arch aneurysm and hemothorax, suggesting ruptured aortic arch aneurysm. The ruptured aortic arch aneurysm was replaced with a woven Dacron graft under selective cerebral perfusion (SCP). Her postoperative course was uneventful without any neurological deficits. For the past three years, we have utilized SCP in 12 cases of arch aneurysms. There were three early deaths in this series. The cause of death were bleeding in one patient and cerebral accident in two patients. The latter two patients had severe atheromatous changes in the aortic wall. The SCP technique was a useful method of cerebral protection, especially for elderly patient with aortic arch aneurysm. PMID:8152170

  15. Wrapped Wire Detects Rupture Of Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James B.

    1990-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive technique helps protect against damage caused by continuing operation of equipment after rupture or burnout of pressure vessel. Wire wrapped over area on outside of vessel where breakthrough most likely. If wall breaks or burns, so does wire. Current passing through wire ceases, triggering cutoff mechanism stopping flow in vessel to prevent further damage. Applied in other situations in which pipes or vessels fail due to overpressure, overheating, or corrosion.

  16. Functional orthosis post pectoralis muscle rupture.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    This author described her success at fabricating a chest compression orthosis for a patient who underwent repair of a pectoralis major muscle rupture. The repair occurred nine months prior to orthotic fabrication, but the patient continued to experience weakness and pain which limited motion. The design of the orthotic allowed him increased mobility and functional use. - Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. PMID:26043967

  17. Unsuspected paperboard-endophthalmitis in ruptured eye.

    PubMed

    Wolter, J R; Pavilack, M A

    1990-05-01

    The eye of a 3-year-old boy was directly exposed to the explosion of an M-80 firecracker which he had been holding in his hand. The cornea and lens were ruptured. Although not evident on an initial CT scan, pathologic examination revealed a paperboard foreign body lodged in the vitreous. This paperboard, rather than the burnt powder, was likely the central focus of the subacute endophthalmitis that developed. PMID:2381660

  18. Cyclophilin A in Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Lee, Kwo-Whei; Chen, Wei-Liang; Kuo, Chen-Ling; Huang, Ching-Shan; Tseng, Wan-Min; Liu, Chin-San; Lin, Ching-Po

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cyclophilin A (CyPA), an oxidative stress-induced factor, was found to play an important role in the aneurysm formation. Our working hypothesis was that the plasma level of CyPA in ruptured intracranial aneurysm could predict the neurological outcome. From 2011 to 2013, a total of 36 patients with ruptured saccular intracranial aneurysm were recruited in our study. Before coil embolization, we draw blood samples at the orifice of a culprit aneurysm and in the remote peripheral vein for measurements of the CyPA levels. We utilized the modified Rankin scale 30 days after aneurysm rupture as the outcome measure. Generalized linear models were used to estimate the adjusted odds ratios of the poor neurological outcome given the presence of high plasma level of CyPA. The aneurysmal and venous CyPA levels were significantly associated with the initial clinical severity (P = 0.004 and 0.03, respectively) and 30-day outcome (P = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively). The aneurysmal CyPA levels modestly correlated with age and high Fisher grade (ρ = 0.39 and 0.41; P = 0.02 and 0.01, respectively). The aneurysmal CyPA levels strongly correlated with the venous counterpart (ρ = 0.89; P < 0.001). Patients with high levels of aneurysmal CyPA were 15.66 times (95% CI, 1.48–166.24; P = 0.02) more likely to have worse neurological outcome than those with the low levels after adjustment of the age, gender, and the documented confounding factors. High plasma level of CyPA is a significant prognostic biomarker for poor neurological outcome in patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysm. PMID:26426668

  19. Rupture directivity of moderate earthquakes in northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seekins, Linda C.; Boatwright, John

    2010-01-01

    We invert peak ground velocity and acceleration (PGV and PGA) to estimate rupture direction and rupture velocity for 47 moderate earthquakes (3.5≥M≥5.4) in northern California. We correct sets of PGAs and PGVs recorded at stations less than 55–125 km, depending on source depth, for site amplification and source–receiver distance, then fit the residual peak motions to the unilateral directivity function of Ben-Menahem (1961). We independently invert PGA and PGV. The rupture direction can be determined using as few as seven peak motions if the station distribution is sufficient. The rupture velocity is unstable, however, if there are no takeoff angles within 30° of the rupture direction. Rupture velocities are generally subsonic (0.5β–0.9β); for stability, we limit the rupture velocity at v=0.92β, the Rayleigh wave speed. For 73 of 94 inversions, the rupture direction clearly identifies one of the nodal planes as the fault plane. The 35 strike-slip earthquakes have rupture directions that range from nearly horizontal (6 events) to directly updip (5 events); the other 24 rupture partly along strike and partly updip. Two strike-slip earthquakes rupture updip in one inversion and downdip in the other. All but 1 of the 11 thrust earthquakes rupture predominantly updip. We compare the rupture directions for 10 M≥4.0 earthquakes to the relative location of the mainshock and the first two weeks of aftershocks. Spatial distributions of 8 of 10 aftershock sequences agree well with the rupture directivity calculated for the mainshock.

  20. [Muscular rupture of the extensor pollicis longus].

    PubMed

    Towfigh, H

    1984-12-01

    Closed ruptures of the extensor pollicis longus tendon usually appear as a consequence of fractures of the wrist joint or the carpal bones or ensue from polyarthritic changes or result from a process of degeneration. Mechanical injury of the tendon is quite rare but can be observed after direct trauma or after operative treatment of a distal fracture of the radius. Closed traumatic ruptures of the extensor pollicis longus tendon in the absence of pathological changes are--in spite of the frequency of rotation injuries of the forearm--very rare. The patient in the case described is a 45-year-old locksmith whose forearm and hand had been caught in a lathe. This led to sudden, extreme rotation and pronation of the hand. Clinically distinct signs of a rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon could be seen. During operation a tear of the muscular portion of the long extensor tendon of the thumb was found. The function of extension was restored by transfer of the extensor indicis tendon. PMID:6392038

  1. Gas pipeline rupture detection and control

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, E.B.; Morrow, T.B.; Sparks, C.R.; Gregor, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Automatic and remotely controlled main line valves are used in natural gas transmission pipelines to provide early shutoff of gas flow in the event of a pipeline rupture. Operating experience, however, shows that these valves and their associated rupture detection and valve operator systems are not always reliable in sensing a line break and in achieving valve closure. Under sponsorship of the Gas Research Institute (GRI), a technology assessment program was conducted by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) to define the present state of the art of automatic and remotely controlled main line valves, to evaluate their effectiveness in achieving isolation of a ruptured line, and to identify technology improvements that are needed to improve valve reliability. This study was based on a survey of the US natural gas industry`s experience with line break control equipment, and upon computational modeling of typical pipeline systems to simulate the generation and propagation of pressure and flow transients created by a line break. Line break transients were also compared to the transient levels generated by normal pipeline operations (start-up and shutdown of compressors, branch load changes, etc.). Also during this study, a semi-empirical computer mode was developed to calculate pipeline blowdown time as a function of break size, pipeline configuration, and operating conditions, even in cases where valve closure is delayed for some period after the line break occurs. This information can be of value to pipeline engineers and emergency response planners.

  2. Transient gravity perturbations induced by earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, J.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Barsuglia, M.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Montagner, J.-P.; Somala, S. N.; Whiting, B. F.

    2015-06-01

    The static and transient deformations produced by earthquakes cause density perturbations which, in turn, generate immediate, long-range perturbations of the Earth's gravity field. Here, an analytical solution is derived for gravity perturbations produced by a point double-couple source in homogeneous, infinite, non-self-gravitating elastic media. The solution features transient gravity perturbations that occur at any distance from the source between the rupture onset time and the arrival time of seismic P waves, which are of potential interest for real-time earthquake source studies and early warning. An analytical solution for such prompt gravity perturbations is presented in compact form. We show that it approximates adequately the prompt gravity perturbations generated by strike-slip and dip-slip finite fault ruptures in a half-space obtained by numerical simulations based on the spectral element method. Based on the analytical solution, we estimate that the observability of prompt gravity perturbations within 10 s after rupture onset by current instruments is severely challenged by the background microseism noise but may be achieved by high-precision gravity strainmeters currently under development. Our analytical results facilitate parametric studies of the expected prompt gravity signals that could be recorded by gravity strainmeters.

  3. Operative intra-aortic balloon rupture.

    PubMed

    Finegan, B A; Comm, D G

    1988-05-01

    Rupture of an intra-aortic balloon (IAB), inserted to assist in weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass, occurred during attempted intra-aortic administration of protamine in a 71-year-old male who later died. Intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation (IABC) is most commonly utilized to assist in weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) or to augment low-flow states following CPB. In-hospital survival following IAB insertion in these circumstances in patients with coronary artery disease is approximately 60 per cent. Patients with valvular disease have a lower in-hospital survival rate (50 per cent). Complications of IABC are usually of vascular or infectious origin. Balloon rupture is a rare though potentially lethal complication. The effects of balloon rupture may be compounded by the use of helium as a driving gas to inflate the balloon. Intra-aortic administration of protamine has not been shown to be superior to peripheral administration and should be avoided if an IAB is in place. PMID:3383321

  4. Intersonic and Supersonic ruptures in a model of dynamic rupture in a layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Elbanna, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    The velocity structure in the lithosphere is quite complex and is rarely homogeneous. Wave reflection, transmission, and diffraction from the boundaries of the different layers and inclusions are expected to lead to a rich dynamic response and significantly affect rupture propagation on embedded faults. Here, we report our work on modeling dynamic rupture in an elastic domain with an embedded soft (stiff) layer as a first step towards modeling rupture propagation in realistic velocity structures. We use the Finite Element method (Pylith) to simulate rupture on a 2D in-plane fault embedded in an elastic full space. The simulated domain is 30 km wide and 100km long. Absorbing boundary conditions are used around the edges of the domain to simulate an infinite extension in all directions. The fault operates under linear slip-weakening friction law. We initiate the rupture by artificially overstressing a localized region near the left edge of the fault. We consider embedded soft/stiff layers with 20% to 60% reduction/increase of wave velocity respectively. The embedded layers are placed at different distances from the fault surface. We observed that the existence of a soft layer significantly shortens the transition length to supershear propagation through the Burridge-Andrews mechanism. The higher the material contrast, the shorter the transition length to supershear propagation becomes. We also observe that supershear rupture could be generated at pretress values that are lower than what is theoretically predicted for a homogeneous medium. We find that the distance from the lower boundary of the soft layer to the fault surface has a stronger influence on the supershear transition length as opposed to the thickness of the soft layer. In the existence of an embedded stiffer layer we found that rupture could propagate faster than the fault zone P-wave speed. In this case, the propagating rupture generate two Mach cones; one is associated with the shear wave, and the other is associated with the local P-wave speed. This is a signature of supersonic crack tips. We also noted a smooth transition into supershear, with the rupture speed increasing continuously through the so-called 'energetically forbidden zone' (between Rayleigh wave speed and shear wave speed) corresponding to the wave speeds of the background medium.

  5. Liver Hydatid Cyst with Transdiaphragmatic Rupture and Lung Hydatid Cyst Ruptured into Bronchi and Pleural Space

    SciTech Connect

    Ar Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I bas, Bilgin Kadri Dingil, Guerbuez; Koeroglu, Mert; Uenguel, Uemit; Zaral Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , Aliye Ceylan

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this case study is to present effectiveness of percutaneous drainage as a treatment option of ruptured lung and liver hydatid cysts. A 65-year-old male patient was admitted with complicated liver and lung hydatid cysts. A liver hydatid cyst had ruptured transdiaphragmatically, and a lung hydatid cyst had ruptured both into bronchi and pleural space. The patient could not undergo surgery because of decreased respiratory function. Both cysts were drained percutaneously using oral albendazole. Povidone-iodine was used to treat the liver cyst after closure of the diaphragmatic rupture. The drainage was considered successful, and the patient had no recurrence of signs and symptoms. Clinical, laboratory, and radiologic recovery was observed during 2.5 months of catheterization. The patient was asymptomatic after catheter drainage. No recurrence was detected during 86 months of follow-up. For inoperable patients with ruptured liver and lung hydatid cysts, percutaneous drainage with oral albendazole is an alternative treatment option to surgery. The percutaneous approach can be life-saving in such cases.

  6. [Rupture of the pes anserinus superficialis and partial rupture of the patellar ligament. Rare concomitant injures in complex knee injuries].

    PubMed

    Pointinger, H; Munk, P; Poeschl, G P

    1999-01-01

    We present a rare case of combined knee joint lesions in a 25 year old patient. Besides the commonly reported injuries of the knee joint due to directly applied valgus force, forceful quadriceps muscle contraction, external rotation at flexed knee causing combined lesions such as rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament, rupture of the posterior cruciate ligament and rupture of the medial collateral ligament, a rare combination of the above mentioned lesions and a rupture of the lateral meniscus, an osteochondral fracture of the lateral femur condylus, a rupture of the medial patellofemoral retinacula as well as a complete rupture of the superficial pes anserinus and a partial rupture of the patellar ligament was encountered. PMID:10095409

  7. The Energy Budget of Earthquake Rupture: a View From Spontaneous Rupture Modeling and Finite-Source Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, P.; Guatteri, M.

    2003-12-01

    It is a common and frustrating experience of many dynamic modelers to initiate spontaneous rupture calculations that subsequently abort before rupturing to the desired earthquake size [Nielsen and Olsen, 2000; Oglesby and Day, 2002]. Source parameters in such dynamic source models are strongly correlated, but stress drop is the main factor affecting the distribution of the other dynamic rupture parameters. Additionally, the position of the hypocenter exerts a strong influence on the dynamic properties of the earthquake, and certain hypocenter positions are not plausible as those would not lead to spontaneous rupture propagation. To further investigate this last statement, we analyze the energy budget during earthquake rupture using spontaneous dynamic rupture calculations and finite-source rupture models. In describing the energy budget during earthquake rupture, we follow Favreau and Archuleta [2003]. Each point on the fault contributes to the radiated seismic energy Ers = Eel - Efr - Erx, where Eel denotes the elasto-static energy and Efr the fracture energy. In this study we neglect for simplicity the relaxation work Erx spent during the stopping of the earthquake. A rupture can be characterized by locally negative seismic energy density values, but its integral over the fault plane must be positive. The fundamental condition for rupture growth is therefore that the integral of Ers on the rupture area remains always positive during rupture propagation. Based on a simple energy budget calculation, we focus on identifying those target slip/stress distribution in dynamic rupture modeling that for a given hypocenter location fail to rupture spontaneously. Additionally, we study the energy budget of finite-source rupture models by analyzing the integrated seismic energy for the inferred slip maps using also hypocenter positions other than the network location. These results indicate how rupture was promoted for the true hypocenter while randomized hypocenters may not have been able to sustain a large earthquake. Our approach helped us both to speed up the computation of successful spontaneous rupture models, as well as to construct dynamically consistent rupture models for strong motion prediction.

  8. Bilateral patellar tendon rupture associated with statin use

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Marie C.; Singh, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is an uncommon clinical presentation, which generally affects the under 40s who are active in sport. Bilateral rupture of both tendons is much rarer. It occurs most frequently in patients with predisposing factors such as corticosteroid use or systemic diseases. The authors present the case of a 56-year-old male on long-term statin therapy who sustained this injury following a fall on ice. He had no known risk factors for tendon rupture. Surgical treatment involved tendon repair using Krakow suture via bony tunnels in the patella. Statins have previously been associated with tendon ruptures at other sites but there have been no published cases of bilateral patellar tendon rupture linked to statin use. We review the literature regarding the association between statins and tendon rupture. PMID:27165749

  9. Missed Iatrogenic Bladder Rupture Following Normal Vaginal Delivery.

    PubMed

    Baheti, Vidyasagar H; Wagaskar, Vinayak G; Patwardhan, Sujata K

    2015-10-01

    Bladder rupture following caesarian section is well documented complications. Intraperitoneal bladder rupture following normal vaginal delivery is very rare. Hereby, we present a case report of intraperitoneal bladder rupture presented late following normal vaginal delivery. We report a case of spontaneous intraperitoneal urinary bladder rupture following uneventful outlet forceps delivery in a 22-year-old primi gravid woman with gestational diabetes mellitus and fetal macrosomia who presented with large urinary ascites, anuria and renal failure. Emergent exploratory laparotomy with repair of the intraperitoneal bladder rupture helped to prevent its potential complications. Postpartum patients who undergo episiotomy or perineal repair may land up in unnoticed urinary retention which may rarely terminate in spontaneous urinary bladder rupture. Awareness of its manifestations amongst emergency physician would help to initiate appropriate timely management. PMID:26557563

  10. Missed Iatrogenic Bladder Rupture Following Normal Vaginal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Baheti, Vidyasagar H; Patwardhan, Sujata K

    2015-01-01

    Bladder rupture following caesarian section is well documented complications. Intraperitoneal bladder rupture following normal vaginal delivery is very rare. Hereby, we present a case report of intraperitoneal bladder rupture presented late following normal vaginal delivery. We report a case of spontaneous intraperitoneal urinary bladder rupture following uneventful outlet forceps delivery in a 22-year-old primi gravid woman with gestational diabetes mellitus and fetal macrosomia who presented with large urinary ascites, anuria and renal failure. Emergent exploratory laparotomy with repair of the intraperitoneal bladder rupture helped to prevent its potential complications. Postpartum patients who undergo episiotomy or perineal repair may land up in unnoticed urinary retention which may rarely terminate in spontaneous urinary bladder rupture. Awareness of its manifestations amongst emergency physician would help to initiate appropriate timely management. PMID:26557563

  11. Bilateral patellar tendon rupture associated with statin use.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Marie C; Singh, Vinay K

    2016-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is an uncommon clinical presentation, which generally affects the under 40s who are active in sport. Bilateral rupture of both tendons is much rarer. It occurs most frequently in patients with predisposing factors such as corticosteroid use or systemic diseases. The authors present the case of a 56-year-old male on long-term statin therapy who sustained this injury following a fall on ice. He had no known risk factors for tendon rupture. Surgical treatment involved tendon repair using Krakow suture via bony tunnels in the patella. Statins have previously been associated with tendon ruptures at other sites but there have been no published cases of bilateral patellar tendon rupture linked to statin use. We review the literature regarding the association between statins and tendon rupture. PMID:27165749

  12. Dynamic stress changes during earthquake rupture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, S.M.; Yu, G.; Wald, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    We assess two competing dynamic interpretations that have been proposed for the short slip durations characteristic of kinematic earthquake models derived by inversion of earthquake waveform and geodetic data. The first interpretation would require a fault constitutive relationship in which rapid dynamic restrengthening of the fault surface occurs after passage of the rupture front, a hypothesized mechanical behavior that has been referred to as "self-healing." The second interpretation would require sufficient spatial heterogeneity of stress drop to permit rapid equilibration of elastic stresses with the residual dynamic friction level, a condition we refer to as "geometrical constraint." These interpretations imply contrasting predictions for the time dependence of the fault-plane shear stresses. We compare these predictions with dynamic shear stress changes for the 1992 Landers (M 7.3), 1994 Northridge (M 6.7), and 1995 Kobe (M 6.9) earthquakes. Stress changes are computed from kinematic slip models of these earthquakes, using a finite-difference method. For each event, static stress drop is highly variable spatially, with high stress-drop patches embedded in a background of low, and largely negative, stress drop. The time histories of stress change show predominantly monotonic stress change after passage of the rupture front, settling to a residual level, without significant evidence for dynamic restrengthening. The stress change at the rupture front is usually gradual rather than abrupt, probably reflecting the limited resolution inherent in the underlying kinematic inversions. On the basis of this analysis, as well as recent similar results obtained independently for the Kobe and Morgan Hill earthquakes, we conclude that, at the present time, the self-healing hypothesis is unnecessary to explain earthquake kinematics.

  13. Isolated unilateral rupture of the alar ligament.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sui-To; Ernest, Kimberly; Fan, Grace; Zovickian, John; Pang, Dachling

    2014-05-01

    Only 6 cases of isolated unilateral rupture of the alar ligament have been previously reported. The authors report a new case and review the literature, morbid anatomy, and pathogenesis of this rare injury. The patient in their case, a 9-year-old girl, fell head first from a height of 5 feet off the ground. She presented with neck pain, a leftward head tilt, and severe limitation of right rotation, extension, and right lateral flexion of the neck. Plain radiographs and CT revealed no fracture but a shift of the dens toward the right lateral mass of C-1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed signal hyperintensity within the left dens-atlas space on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences and interruption of the expected dark signal representing the left alar ligament, suggestive of its rupture. After 12 weeks of immobilization in a Guilford brace, MRI showed lessened dens deviation, and the patient attained full and painless neck motion. Including the patient in this case, the 7 patients with this injury were between 5 and 21 years old, sustained the injury in traffic accidents or falls, presented with marked neck pain, and were treated with external immobilization. All patients had good clinical outcome. The mechanism of injury is hyperflexion with rotation. Isolated unilateral alar ligament rupture is a diagnosis made by excluding associated fracture, dislocation, or disruption of other major ligamentous structures in the craniovertebral junction. CT and MRI are essential in establishing the diagnosis. External immobilization is adequate treatment. PMID:24679079

  14. Surgical Treatment of Distal Biceps Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Laura E; Huang, Jerry I

    2016-01-01

    Distal biceps ruptures occur from eccentric loading of a flexed elbow. Patients treated nonoperatively have substantial loss of strength in elbow flexion and forearm supination. Surgical approaches include 1-incision and 2-incision techniques. Advances in surgical technology have facilitated the popularity of single-incision techniques through a small anterior incision. Recently, there is increased focus on the detailed anatomy of the distal biceps insertion and the importance of anatomic repair in restoring forearm supination strength. Excellent outcomes are expected with early repair of the distal biceps, with restoration of strength and endurance to near-normal levels with minimal to no loss of motion. PMID:26614933

  15. Complex earthquake rupture and local tsunamis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    In contrast to far-field tsunami amplitudes that are fairly well predicted by the seismic moment of subduction zone earthquakes, there exists significant variation in the scaling of local tsunami amplitude with respect to seismic moment. From a global catalog of tsunami runup observations this variability is greatest for the most frequently occuring tsunamigenic subduction zone earthquakes in the magnitude range of 7 < Mw < 8.5. Variability in local tsunami runup scaling can be ascribed to tsunami source parameters that are independent of seismic moment: variations in the water depth in the source region, the combination of higher slip and lower shear modulus at shallow depth, and rupture complexity in the form of heterogeneous slip distribution patterns. The focus of this study is on the effect that rupture complexity has on the local tsunami wave field. A wide range of slip distribution patterns are generated using a stochastic, self-affine source model that is consistent with the falloff of far-field seismic displacement spectra at high frequencies. The synthetic slip distributions generated by the stochastic source model are discretized and the vertical displacement fields from point source elastic dislocation expressions are superimposed to compute the coseismic vertical displacement field. For shallow subduction zone earthquakes it is demonstrated that self-affine irregularities of the slip distribution result in significant variations in local tsunami amplitude. The effects of rupture complexity are less pronounced for earthquakes at greater depth or along faults with steep dip angles. For a test region along the Pacific coast of central Mexico, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude is calculated for a large number (N = 100) of synthetic slip distribution patterns, all with identical seismic moment (Mw = 8.1). Analysis of the results indicates that for earthquakes of a fixed location, geometry, and seismic moment, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude can vary by a factor of 3 or more. These results indicate that there is substantially more variation in the local tsunami wave field derived from the inherent complexity subduction zone earthquakes than predicted by a simple elastic dislocation model. Probabilistic methods that take into account variability in earthquake rupture processes are likely to yield more accurate assessments of tsunami hazards.

  16. Aortic aneurysm rupture in infantile Marfan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Knirsch, W; Hillebrand, D; Horke, A; Lewin, M A; Rein, J; Uhlemann, F

    2001-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy with early rupture of an aortic aneurysm due to infantile Marfan's syndrome is presented. In an emergency operation we prepared a composite graft using a 17-mm St. Jude prosthesis with an 18-mm vascular conduit. The postoperative period was complicated by pneumothoraces, transient bilateral phrenic nerve paralysis, cerebral convulsion, and supraventricular tachycardia. Four months postop the composite graft was replaced with an aortic homograft due to severe stenosis. His condition after 12 months is excellent. PMID:11178676

  17. Cohesive Zone Length of Gabbro at Supershear Rupture Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, E.; Xu, S.; Mizoguchi, K.; Yamashita, F.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the shear strain field ahead of a supershear rupture. The strain data was obtained during large-scale biaxial friction experiments conducted at NIED in March 2013. We conducted friction experiments using a pair of meter-scale gabbro rock specimens whose simulated fault area was 1.5m x 0.1m. We applied 2.6MPa normal stress and loading velocity of 0.1mm/s. At the long side of the fault edge, which is parallel to the slip direction, 32 2-component semi-conductor strain gauges were installed at an interval of 50mm and 10mm off the fault. The data are conditioned by high frequency strain amplifiers (<0.5MHz) and continuously recorded at an interval of 1MHz with 16-bit resolution. Many stick slip events were observed and a unilateral rupture event was chosen in this analysis that propagated with supershear rupture velocity. One of the reasons for this selection was that the strain field ahead of the supershear rupture was not contaminated by elastic waves. Focusing on the rupture front, stress concentration was observed and sharp stress drop occurred immediately inside the rupture. We found that the stress concentration becomes mild as the rupture propagates and length of the stress concentration area becomes longer. This observation is quite interesting because in this experiment the rupture propagated at a constant speed close to root two times the shear wave velocity and thus a longer stress concentration region suggests more energy dissipation. We could speculate that such longer stress concentration area suggests longer plastic region ahead of the rupture (or longer cohesive distance). I.e. the cohesive zone length becomes longer as the rupture propagates to maintain constant rupture velocity propagation. We empirically obtained the relation Lc = 1.8x10^-5 L for 0.1ruptured length.

  18. Ruptured spinal dermoid cyst with disseminated intracranial fat droplets.

    PubMed

    Cha, J G; Paik, S-H; Park, J-S; Park, S-J; Kim, D-H; Lee, H-K

    2006-02-01

    Fat droplets in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a well-known complication of ruptured intracranial dermoid tumours. We report an unusual case of a ruptured spinal dermoid tumour. MR images showed a tethered spinal cord and an intramedullary fat-containing mass. Fat droplets were revealed in the ventricles and the cisternal spaces on brain CT and brain MR. In the English literature, a ruptured spinal dermoid tumour accompanying a tethered spinal cord is extremely rare. PMID:16489200

  19. Spontaneous Tricuspid Valve Chordal Rupture in Idiopathic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ana Clara Tude; Afonso, Jos E; Cordovil, Adriana; Monaco, Claudia; Piveta, Rafael; Cordovil, Rodrigo; Fischer, Claudio H; Vieira, Marcelo; Lira-Filho, Edgar; Morhy, Samira S

    2016-03-01

    Rupture of tricuspid valve is unusual, occurring mainly in the setting of blunt trauma or endomyocardial biopsy. Spontaneous tricuspid valve chordal rupture is particularly rare. We report herein a case of a patient with severe pulmonary hypertension, on the lung transplantation waiting list, who presented with spontaneous chordal rupture, exacerbation of tricuspid insufficiency and worsening of clinical status. Diagnosis and treatment, along with possible mechanisms for this complication, are discussed. PMID:26660848

  20. A Rare Case of Adductor Longus Muscle Rupture

    PubMed Central

    van de Kimmenade, R. J. L. L.; van Bergen, C. J. A.; van Deurzen, P. J. E.; Verhagen, R. A. W.

    2015-01-01

    An adductor longus muscle rupture is a rare injury. This case report describes a 32-year-old patient with an adductor longus rupture. The trauma mechanism was a hyperabduction movement during a soccer game. Nonoperative treatment was initiated. After a follow-up of 4 years, the patient was without pain but a small swelling was still visible. This report describes the anatomy, pathophysiology, and evidence-based treatment of adductor longus rupture. PMID:25918663

  1. Rupture of non-communicating rudimentary uterine horn pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Hansa

    2008-01-01

    Unicornuate uterus with rudimentary horn is a rare type of uterine malformation associated with obstetrical complications. Rupture of pregnant rudimentary horn is the usual presentation resulting in severe haemoperitoneum with increased maternal morbidity, and at times, mortality. A case of ruptured rudimentary horn pregnancy in a 24-year-old, second gravida, is reported. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a ruptured rudimentary horn pregnancy of 14 weeks gestation with haemoperitoneum. Excision of the rudimentary horn was done and an uneventful recovery followed. PMID:18452672

  2. Surgical repair of a rupture of the pectoralis major muscle.

    PubMed

    Pochini, Alberto De Castro; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Muscle rupture is rarely treated surgically. Few reports of good outcomes after muscular suture have been published. Usually, muscular lesions or partial ruptures heal with few side effects or result in total recovery. We report a case of an athlete who was treated surgically to repair a total muscular rupture in the pectoralis major muscle. After 6 months, the athlete returned to competitive practice. After a 2-year follow-up, the athlete still competes in skateboard championships. PMID:25716033

  3. Capsaicin stimulation of the cochlea and electric stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion mediate vascular permeability in cochlear and vertebro-basilar arteries: a potential cause of inner ear dysfunction in headache.

    PubMed

    Vass, Z; Steyger, P S; Hordichok, A J; Trune, D R; Jancs, G; Nuttall, A L

    2001-01-01

    Trigeminal neurogenic inflammation is one explanation for the development of vascular migraine. The triggers for this inflammation and pain are not well understood, but are probably vasoactive components acting on the blood vessel wall. Migraine-related inner ear symptoms like phonophobia, tinnitus, fluctuation in hearing perception and increased noise sensitivity provide indirect evidence that cochlear blood vessels are also affected by basilar artery migraine. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if a functional connection exists between the cochlea and the basilar artery. Neuronally mediated permeability changes in the cochlea and basilar artery were measured by colloidal silver and Evans Blue extravasation, following orthodromic and antidromic stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion innervating the cochlea. Capsaicin and electrical stimulation induced both dose- and time-dependent plasma extravasation of colloidal silver and Evans Blue from the basilar artery and anterior inferior cerebellar artery. Both orthodromic and antidromic activation of trigeminal sensory fibers also induced cochlear vascular permeability changes and significant quantitative differences between the treated and control groups in spectrophotometric assays. These results characterize a vasoactive connection between the cochlea and vertebro-basilar system through the trigeminal sensory neurons. We propose that vertigo, tinnitus and hearing deficits associated with basilar migraine could arise by excitation of the trigeminal nerve fibers in the cochlea, resulting in local plasma extravasation. In addition, cochlear "dysfunction" may also trigger basilar and cluster headache by afferent input to the trigeminal system. PMID:11311800

  4. Asymptomatic rupture of the uterus: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Alper, M. M.; Dudley, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    Rupture of the gravid uterus is a serious obstetric emergency that threatens maternal and fetal life. In certain cases the classic clinical picture may be absent. Most asymptomatic ruptures are in the lower segment and of minor extent or are really dehiscences of scars. This paper presents a case of massive spontaneous rupture involving the entire corpus diagnosed at elective postpartum sterilization. This unusual event stimulated a review of the causes and clinical presentations of uterine rupture. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:6692194

  5. The prognostic value of ventricular rupture in cerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Constantinovici, A; Savu, C; Ciubotaru, V; Simionescu, N; Carp, N

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of 41 cerebral hemorrhage cases associated or not with intraparenchymatous hematoma and ventricular rupture shows the role played by these associated phenomena in the evaluation and prognosis of these patients. The death rate was 56.25% in simple cerebral hemorrhage, 100% in hemorrhage associated with hematoma, 30.76% in hemorrhage associated with ventricular rupture and 80% in hemorrhage associated with hematoma and ventricular rupture. The authors point out that the mere presence of ventricular rupture is not a really aggravating factor. A particular severity resulting from association of hemorrhage with hematoma seems to be due to the extension of the cerebral lesion produced by the two conditions associated. PMID:2781234

  6. [Aneurysmal rupture complicating aortitis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Yannoutsos, A; Mercier, O; Messas, E; Safar, M E; Blacher, J

    2014-05-01

    Tropical aortitis is a rare and poorly described aortic disease, sometimes confounded with Takayasu's disease, mainly in people from Africa. In this case report, the panaortic aneurysmal disease in a young woman from Haiti, first diagnosed after a work-up on renovascular hypertension, would appear to approach this particular arterial disease with no clinical, radiological or biological argument for an infectious etiology. The initially suspected diagnosis of Takayasu's disease had to be rethought because of the presence of several saccular aneurysms extending from the aortic arch to the infrarenal aorta, rarely described in Takayasu's aortitis. Expert opinions from vascular surgeons and clinicians tagged this aortic disease as similar to tropical aortitis which remained asymptomatic for more than a decade. Hypertension was managed with successful balloon angioplasty of the left renal artery stenosis and anti-hypertensive combination therapy. Surgical management of the extended aortic aneurysms was not proposed because of the stability and asymptomatic nature of the aneurysmal disease and the high risk of surgical morbidity and mortality. More than ten years after diagnosis, the course was marked with inaugural and sudden-onset chest pain concomitant with contained rupture of the descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. This case report underlines the persistent risk of aneurysmal rupture and the importance of an anatomopathological study for the diagnosis of complex aortic disease. PMID:24637031

  7. The repetition of large-earthquake ruptures.

    PubMed Central

    Sieh, K

    1996-01-01

    This survey of well-documented repeated fault rupture confirms that some faults have exhibited a "characteristic" behavior during repeated large earthquakes--that is, the magnitude, distribution, and style of slip on the fault has repeated during two or more consecutive events. In two cases faults exhibit slip functions that vary little from earthquake to earthquake. In one other well-documented case, however, fault lengths contrast markedly for two consecutive ruptures, but the amount of offset at individual sites was similar. Adjacent individual patches, 10 km or more in length, failed singly during one event and in tandem during the other. More complex cases of repetition may also represent the failure of several distinct patches. The faults of the 1992 Landers earthquake provide an instructive example of such complexity. Together, these examples suggest that large earthquakes commonly result from the failure of one or more patches, each characterized by a slip function that is roughly invariant through consecutive earthquake cycles. The persistence of these slip-patches through two or more large earthquakes indicates that some quasi-invariant physical property controls the pattern and magnitude of slip. These data seem incompatible with theoretical models that produce slip distributions that are highly variable in consecutive large events. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 7 Fig. 9 PMID:11607662

  8. Acute Achilles tendon rupture in badminton players.

    PubMed

    Fahlstrm, M; Bjrnstig, U; Lorentzon, R

    1998-01-01

    All patients with badminton-related acute Achilles tendon ruptures registered during 1990 to 1994 at the University Hospital of Ume were retrospectively followed up using a questionnaire. Thirty-one patients (mean age, 36.0 years), 27 men and 4 women, were included. Thirty patients (97%) described themselves as recreational players or beginners. The majority of the injuries (29 of 31, 94%) happened at the middle or end of the planned game. Previous local symptoms had been noticed by five patients (16%). Long-term results showed that patients treated with surgery had a significantly shorter sick leave absence than patients treated without surgery (50 versus 75 days). There was no obvious selection favoring any treatment modality. None of the surgically treated patients had reruptures, but two reruptures occurred in the nonsurgically treated group. There seemed to be fewer remaining symptoms and a higher sports activity level after the injury in the surgically treated group. Our results indicate that local muscle fatigue may interfere with strength and coordination. Preventive measures such as specific treatment of minor injuries and adequate training of strength, endurance, and coordination are important. Our findings also indicate that surgical treatment and careful postoperative rehabilitation is of great importance among badminton players of any age or sports level with Achilles tendon rupture. PMID:9617415

  9. Ruptured aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva.

    PubMed

    Jeyamalar, R; Kannan, P

    1991-12-01

    Aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva are uncommon disorders and are usually congenital in origin. When these aneurysms rupture into an intracardiac chamber, they may be silent initially but later give rise to progressive heart failure due to left or right shunting and aortic regurgitation. The mortality and morbidity in untreated cases is high. We report 13 patients with ruptured aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva who underwent surgical repair. There were seven males and six females with a mean age of 24.5 years. Three patients were asymptomatic and five were in congestive cardiac failure. The majority of patients (61.5%) had insidious onset of symptoms, only 2 cases presenting acutely. The connection was between the right aortic sinus and the right ventricle in 11 cases and the non coronary sinus and the right ventricle in 2 cases. Associated cardiac anomalies included a ventricular septal defect (8 patients) and aortic regurgitation (6 patients). There was 1 post operative death and 1 patient required re-operation three months later for a recurrence of the fistula. All 6 patients with aortic regurgitation required aortic valve replacement. All patients remained well and asymptomatic during follow up ranging from 2 to 19 years. PMID:1840448

  10. Material properties for modeling traumatic aortic rupture.

    PubMed

    Bass, C R; Darvish, K; Bush, B; Crandall, J R; Srinivasan, S C; Tribble, C; Fiser, S; Tourret, L; Evans, J C; Patrie, J; Wang, C

    2001-11-01

    Traumatic aortic rupture is a significant cause of fatalities in frontal automobile crashes. However, such ruptures are difficult to reproduce experimentally in cadaveric surrogates, and it is difficult to observe dynamic aortic response in situ. So, the aortic injury mechanism or mechanisms remains in dispute. This study is a staged investigation of the physical parameters and mechanisms of human aortic rupture. The investigation includes both experimental study of local and global viscoelastic properties and failure properties of aortas using aortic tissue samples, excised aortas in vitro, and whole human aortas in situ in cadaver thoraxes. This study is the first phase in a staged programme to develop a finite element computer model of aorta injury to examine the mechanisms of aorta injury in automobile crashes. The high-rate local biaxial properties of porcine aorta tissue are determined from samples taken from the isthmus region, the most common area of failure in traumatic aorta injury. Using porcine aortas, similar in structure and physical characteristics to human aortic tissue, biaxial oscillatory response is determined at large strains and high strain rates. From this data, a hyperelastic material model with a failure threshold is developed that is in good agreement with local property data determined from oscillatory tests at 20 Hz and 65 Hz. Further, whole aorta tests are performed using pressure application with aortic pressure time histories similar in onset rate to those seen in cadaveric sled testing. These tests establish the ultimate stretch ratio and strain to failure for human aorta specimens. The specimens show no significant difference in response between the in situ tests and the in vitro tests. This indicates either that the internal thoracic boundary conditions may not be important in the stress and strain level of aorta failure or that the number of in situ tests (3) was too small to establish a difference. A Weibull survival analysis of the whole aorta failure tests shows significant dependence of aortic ultimate stretch ratio on age. A 50% risk of failure is 852 kPa in the circumferential direction and 426 kPa in the longitudinal direction. For pressure, the 50% risk of failure for all the tests is approximately 101 kPa. This increases to greater than 120 kPa for subjects below 68 years. PMID:17458743

  11. Forearc Rigidity and Rupture During Great Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, R.; Tassara, A.

    2007-12-01

    Mapping along-strike variations in subduction zone rigidity is useful for understanding great megathrust earthquakes. This is because: 1) the integrated long-term strength of the coupled slab-forearc system, which is reflected in rigidity, should be an important control on earthquake frequency and magnitude distribution; and 2) forearc rigidity is likely to play a role in the generation of great earthquakes through its control on the degree to which the overriding plate can absorb strain accumulated during convergence. Motivated by these factors, we have calculated lithospheric rigidity along circum-Pacific subduction zones using a wavelet-based Bouguer coherence technique. Whilst our results show a general correlation between oceanic plate-age and rigidity -- as expected -- intriguing along-strike rigidity variations are evident. The most interesting along-strike rigidity variations exist in the subduction zones subjected to the four largest recorded earthquakes: the Valdivia (1960, M9.5), Sumatra--Andaman (2004, Mw 9.3), Alaska (1964, 9.2) and Kamchatka (1952, 9.0) earthquakes. For all but the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the extensive rupture associated with these earthquakes tends to initiate in a region of higher rigidity and propagate into regions of lower rigidity. This suggests that rupture dominantly occurs in weakened parts of the plate interface that slip when triggered by rupture in an adjacent area where substantial interseismic strain has accumulated. At least for the Chilean subduction zone, this weakness appears to be linked to the thick sediments that fill the trench. In contrast to the 1960 Valdivia event, maximum slip during the 2004 Sumatra--Andaman earthquake correlates with the most rigid parts of the forearc. In this case, slip is highest where the most inter-seismic strain has accumulated, perhaps where the plate interface is not lubricated by subducting sediments. These results highlight the potential influence of trench sediments on plate coupling in subduction zones, but the influence of other factors (e.g. wedge geometry, forearc elastic properties, thermally induced oceanic plate rigidity variations) also need to be considered.

  12. Forearc Rigidity and Rupture During Great Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, R.; Tassara, A.

    2004-12-01

    Mapping along-strike variations in subduction zone rigidity is useful for understanding great megathrust earthquakes. This is because: 1) the integrated long-term strength of the coupled slab-forearc system, which is reflected in rigidity, should be an important control on earthquake frequency and magnitude distribution; and 2) forearc rigidity is likely to play a role in the generation of great earthquakes through its control on the degree to which the overriding plate can absorb strain accumulated during convergence. Motivated by these factors, we have calculated lithospheric rigidity along circum-Pacific subduction zones using a wavelet-based Bouguer coherence technique. Whilst our results show a general correlation between oceanic plate-age and rigidity -- as expected -- intriguing along-strike rigidity variations are evident. The most interesting along-strike rigidity variations exist in the subduction zones subjected to the four largest recorded earthquakes: the Valdivia (1960, M9.5), Sumatra--Andaman (2004, Mw 9.3), Alaska (1964, 9.2) and Kamchatka (1952, 9.0) earthquakes. For all but the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the extensive rupture associated with these earthquakes tends to initiate in a region of higher rigidity and propagate into regions of lower rigidity. This suggests that rupture dominantly occurs in weakened parts of the plate interface that slip when triggered by rupture in an adjacent area where substantial interseismic strain has accumulated. At least for the Chilean subduction zone, this weakness appears to be linked to the thick sediments that fill the trench. In contrast to the 1960 Valdivia event, maximum slip during the 2004 Sumatra--Andaman earthquake correlates with the most rigid parts of the forearc. In this case, slip is highest where the most inter-seismic strain has accumulated, perhaps where the plate interface is not lubricated by subducting sediments. These results highlight the potential influence of trench sediments on plate coupling in subduction zones, but the influence of other factors (e.g. wedge geometry, forearc elastic properties, thermally induced oceanic plate rigidity variations) also need to be considered.

  13. Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture while playing basketball.

    PubMed

    Shah, M; Jooma, N

    2002-04-01

    Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury in healthy people and only a few cases have been reported in athletes. This is the first report of a patient with simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture incurred while playing basketball. The injury was surgically repaired and the patient had a good functional outcome. PMID:11916903

  14. Ruptured intradiploic dermoid cyst overlying the torcular herophili.

    PubMed

    Gulsen, Salih; Yilmaz, Cem; Serhat, Comert; Altinors, Nur

    2010-01-01

    We present a 22-month-old boy with a ruptured dermoid cyst overlying the torcular herophili. The cyst had caused scalp erosion and a lytic bone lesion and was successfully excised surgically. The general features of these cysts are discussed, along with the surgical procedure and implications of cyst rupture. PMID:20625968

  15. Isolated rupture of teres major in a goalkeeper.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Rafael Almeida; Zogaib, Rodrigo Kallas; Pochini, Alberto De Castro; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    A complete rupture of the teres major is an extremely rare injury and rarely described in the literature. We report the first case of an isolated rupture of the teres major in a professional football goalkeeper. The diagnosis requires a high degree of suspicion and complementation by image examinations. Conservative treatment has a high success rate with early return to sport. PMID:26701915

  16. Ruptured bicornuate uterus mimicking ectopic pregnancy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nisha; Singh, Uma; Verma, Manju Lata

    2013-01-01

    Ruptured uterus presenting in first trimester of pregnancy is extremely uncommon and should raise the suspicion of uterine malformations. We report a case of a 24-year-old primigravida with 10 weeks of gestation presenting with acute abdomen and hemoperitoneum. Laparotomy revealed bicornuate uterus with ruptured rudimentary horn. The incidence, diagnosis and management of such cases is discussed. PMID:22691311

  17. Animal models for plaque rupture: a biomechanical assessment.

    PubMed

    van der Heiden, Kim; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Daemen, Mat J; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2016-02-29

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques is the main cause of acute cardiovascular events. Animal models of plaque rupture are rare but essential for testing new imaging modalities to enable diagnosis of the patient at risk. Moreover, they enable the design of new treatment strategies to prevent plaque rupture. Several animal models for the study of atherosclerosis are available. Plaque rupture in these models only occurs following severe surgical or pharmaceutical intervention. In the process of plaque rupture, composition, biology and mechanics each play a role, but the latter has been disregarded in many animal studies. The biomechanical environment for atherosclerotic plaques is comprised of two parts, the pressure-induced stress distribution, mainly - but not exclusively - influenced by plaque composition, and the strength distribution throughout the plaque, largely determined by the inflammatory state. This environment differs considerably between humans and most animals, resulting in suboptimal conditions for plaque rupture. In this review we describe the role of the biomechanical environment in plaque rupture and assess this environment in animal models that present with plaque rupture. PMID:26607378

  18. Do All Large Strike-slip Earthquakes Have Supershear Ruptures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Mori, J. J.; Koketsu, K.

    2013-12-01

    Studying the rupture speeds of earthquakes is of broad interesting for earthquake research because it has a large effect on the strong near-field shaking that causes damage during earthquakes. Also rupture speed is a key observation for understanding the controlling stresses and friction during an earthquake, yet the speed and its variations are usually difficult to determine. Using only far-field seismic waveforms, which is the only data available for many large earthquakes, there are problems for estimating the rupture speed with standard waveform inversions, due to trade-off between the rupture speed and the slip location. Here we applied a back projection method to estimate the rupture speeds of Mw ≥ 7.5 strike-slip earthquakes since 2001 which could be analyzed using Hi-net in Japan. We found that all events had very fast average rupture speeds of 3.0-6.0 km/s, which are near or greater than the local shear wave velocity (supershear). These values are faster than for thrust and normal faulting earthquakes that generally rupture with speeds of 1.0-3.0 km/s. Considering the depth-dependent shear-wave velocity, the average propagation speeds for all of the strike-slip events are closer to or greater than the shear wave velocity (Figure 1). For large strike-slip events, transition from subshear to supershear usually occurs within distances of 15 to 30 km from the initiation, which is probably the reason for the scarcity of observed supershear earthquakes for smaller magnitudes. Earthquakes with supershear ruptures can cause more damage than events with subshear ruptures because of the concentration of energy in the forward direction of the rupture. Numerical modeling shows strong focusing and other effects of energy at the rupture front which can intensify the ground motions. A recent example is the April 13, 2010 Qinghai, China earthquake (Mw 6.9), where a moderate-size event caused extensive damage in the Yushu region at the southeastern end of the fault. Careful evaluation of long and straight strike-slip faults should be emphasized for predicting strong ground motions due to supershear rupture. a: Average rupture speeds for Mw ≥ 7.5 strike-slip earthquakes. For comparison, dip-slip earthquakes are also shown. The blue dashed line presents the S wave velocity model of PREM for comparison. b: Rupture velocities are shown as ratio to the local S wave velocity, as a function of depth.

  19. A Three Year Clinicopathological Study of Cases of Rupture Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Setu; Swain, Sujata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rupture uterus is a life threatening obstetric complication with serious maternal and fetal side-effects. We report a 3 year (2010-2013) retrospective clinical study of pregnancy with rupture uterus cases attending a tertiary care hospital. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of rupture uterus, incidence as per age, parity, clinical presentations, risk factors, complications and management. Materials and Methods Retrospective data of 74 cases of rupture uterus in SCB Medical college, Cuttack was collected from case records of 26,547 deliveries during a 3 year span (2010-2013). Parameters like cause of rupture, type, site of rupture and outcome were recorded. The collected data was analysed by SPSS software v19. Results Out of 26,547 deliveries during the three year period, there were 74 cases of rupture uterus with an incidence of rupture 1 in 359 (0.28%). The mean age of rupture uterus was 27.4 years. 95.8% were multigravida and majority were referred cases from low socioeconomic status. Only 40.5% had the required minimum of four antenatal visits as recommended by WHO (World Health Organisation). A total of 48.6% of cases with rupture uterus had history of previous Caesarean section. Prolonged labour was present in 75.6% of the cases. Only 12.2% of the cases had history of oxytocin use whereas 9.5% had undergone an operative vaginal delivery. Obstructed labour was the cause in 24.3% of cases, 85.1% had complete rupture. Majority had a rupture in the anterior wall (69%) and 81.1% had rupture in lower segment of uterus. Only 17.6% had broad ligament haematoma, 10.8% colporrhexis and 6.8% had associated bladder injury. Repair was possible in only 39.2% of cases, whereas majority landed up in hysterectomy. Internal iliac ligation was done in 2.7% of cases. Perinatal mortality was 90.5% whereas maternal death was seen in 13.5% cases. One patient developed VVF (vesicovaginal fistula). Duration of hospital stay was upto 14 days in 81.1% cases. Conclusion Education and proper care especially of high risk patients like previous caesarean by competent personnal, proper use of oxytocin and early referral may help to reduce the incidence of “rupture uterus”. PMID:26673858

  20. Relaxing Segmentation: Does It Improve Characterization of Fault Rupture Behavior?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Most faults have not ruptured once historically, let alone repeatedly. Estimating future rupture length of an earthquake source has been a challenge since the 1970s when concepts of full and half fault lengths were employed. In the 1980s paleoseismic event timing and observations of slip, coupled with geometric and other physical fault changes, led to concepts of fault segmentation and it's modeling for hazard. The Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast 3 (UCERF 3, Field et al., 2014) relaxed segmentation, guided by rules in which a separation distance of ≤5km and orientation to Coulomb stress changes at fault junctions are prime factors for allowing fault-to-fault jumps. A set of ~350 fault sections produced ~250K ruptures ranging in length from 15 km-1200 km. An inversion provided the rates of these, which range from 102-108 years. Many of the long ruptures have exceedingly low individual rates within the UCERF 3 geologic model but are sufficient in number to release cumulative moment that brings the long-term (Myr) and historical (since 1850) MFDs for the California region into close agreement. Does UCERF 3 have too many multi-fault ruptures? Since 1850 there have been ~260 surface ruptures worldwide in shallow continental crust. 77% are 0-49km; 6% exceed 150km, and the longest is 1906 San Francisco (435-470 km). In California since 1857 there have been 31 surface ruptures. 77% are shorter than 49 km. The longest are 1906, 1857 Fort Tejon (297km), and 1872 Owens Valley (108 km). Most long historical strike-slip ruptures are continuous and geomorphically well-defined traces with limited geometric changes. In contrast, UCERF3 modeling of the south Hayward, as an example, allows it to participate in ruptures that extend to the south ends of the San Andreas or San Jacinto faults (900 km). These include branching (Hayward-Calaveras, San Andreas-San Jacinto) and jumps (Calaveras-San Andreas) on creeping sections of these faults. 5km is the connectivity threshold in UCERF 3 but only 40% of historical ruptures have negotiated this distance. There are other controls of rupture propagation: frictional properties, rupture dynamics, creep, and, as shown by the 2002 Denali-Totschunda rupture, the timing of the prior event and level of stress accumulation on adjacent fault sections. Time will be the tester.

  1. Rupture of the posterior tibial tendon: CT and surgical findings.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Z S; Jahss, M H; Noto, A M; Shereff, M J; Cheung, Y; Frey, C C; Norman, A

    1988-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 42 patients with 49 clinically suspected tears of the posterior tibial tendon. Twenty-eight of the 49 suspected tears were subsequently surgically explored and repaired. Three patterns of tendon abnormalities were recognized on CT scans: type I-intact, hypertrophied, heterogeneous tendon; type II-attenuated tendon; and type III-absence of a portion of a tendon. Types I and II correlated with partial rupture seen during surgery, and type III correlated with complete rupture of the tendon. CT findings were accurate in 96% of the patients who underwent surgery. In four cases (14%), tendon rupture was seen on CT scans, but the extent of the injury was underestimated and the rupture was misclassified. Reactive periostitis of the distal tibia was seen in 71% of diseased tendons and may represent an important factor in the diagnosis of tendon rupture. PMID:3357960

  2. Material contrast does not predict earthquake rupture propagation direction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.; Day, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Earthquakes often occur on faults that juxtapose different rocks. The result is rupture behavior that differs from that of an earthquake occurring on a fault in a homogeneous material. Previous 2D numerical simulations have studied simple cases of earthquake rupture propagation where there is a material contrast across a fault and have come to two different conclusions: 1) earthquake rupture propagation direction can be predicted from the material contrast, and 2) earthquake rupture propagation direction cannot be predicted from the material contrast. In this paper we provide observational evidence from 70 years of earthquakes at Parkfield, CA, and new 3D numerical simulations. Both the observations and the numerical simulations demonstrate that earthquake rupture propagation direction is unlikely to be predictable on the basis of a material contrast. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Unresponsive primipara after rupture of membranes.

    PubMed

    Buechel, Johanna; Berset, Andreas; Lehmann, Michael A; Lapaire, Olav

    2015-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism, also called anaphylactoid syndrome of pregnancy, is a rare but severe problem in obstetrics. It occurs in 8/100,000 births and the maternal mortality is up to 90%. We report the case of a patient with amniotic fluid embolism who was transferred to our hospital. The initial presentation was an unresponsive patient after spontaneous rupture of the membranes. The massive hypotension and coagulopathy as well as fetal bradycardia of 60 bpm led, after stabilisation of the mother, to an emergency caesarean section. The neonate expired hours later, despite neonatological intensive care. During the operation, we had to deal with massive bleeding due to the coagulopathy. Through interdisciplinary teamwork including Bakri postpartum balloon insertion through the obstetrics team, uterine artery embolism by the interventional radiologists and transfusion of blood products, the maternal life was saved and the patient was discharged 9 days after admission. PMID:25883261

  4. Imaging Atherosclerosis and Risk of Plaque Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Eric A; Jaffer, Farouc A

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis imaging strategies can delineate characteristics of plaques at risk of rupture and thrombosis. Structural plaque imaging identifies high-risk plaque features including lipid pools, thin fibrous caps, and intraplaque hemorrhage, among others. New molecular imaging techniques complement structural imaging approaches by illuminating important features of plaque biology, with a prominent focus on detecting inflammation as a high-risk phenotype. As we unravel the molecular and structural characteristics underlying thrombosis-prone plaques, there is significant promise for eventual early identification and prediction of atherosclerotic plaque complications before they occur. Here we focus on recent imaging insights into high-risk arterial plaques, the etiologic agent of acute myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and sudden cardiac death. PMID:23982263

  5. Multifractal scaling of thermally activated rupture processes.

    PubMed

    Sornette, D; Ouillon, G

    2005-01-28

    We propose a "multifractal stress activation" model combining thermally activated rupture and long memory stress relaxation, which predicts that seismic decay rates after mainshocks follow the Omori law approximately 1/t(p) with exponents p linearly increasing with the magnitude M(L) of the mainshock. We carefully test this prediction on earthquake sequences in the Southern California earthquake catalog: we find power law relaxations of seismic sequences triggered by mainshocks with exponents p increasing with the mainshock magnitude by approximately 0.1-0.15 for each magnitude unit increase, from p(M(L) = 3) approximately 0.6 to p(M(L) = 7) approximately 1.1, in good agreement with the prediction of the multifractal model. PMID:15698332

  6. Uterine rupture during pregnancy after laparoscopic myomectomy.

    PubMed

    Dubuisson, J B; Chavet, X; Chapron, C; Gregorakis, S S; Morice, P

    1995-06-01

    A 31 year old patient presenting with primary infertility underwent an operative laparoscopy for the treatment of bilateral hydrosalpinges, during which a myomectomy was also performed. The uterus was repaired using interrupted sutures. At follow-up laparoscopy seven weeks later, a uterine fistula was diagnosed and was oversewn using a single 'figure of eight' suture. One year later the patient became pregnant through in-vitro fertilization. At 34 weeks gestation, she required an emergency laparotomy for acute abdominal pain and the presence of fetal bradycardia. The operative findings revealed a uterine rupture at the site of the previous myomectomy scar. This was then enlarged with a scalpel and a live baby was delivered. The uterus was repaired in two layers. The postoperative period for both mother and baby was satisfactory. This complication raises the problem of the quality of uterine repair following laparoscopic myomectomy, together with the question of how to prevent this type of life-threatening situation. PMID:7593518

  7. Acute coronary syndromes without coronary plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Siddak S; Stone, Gregg W; Singh, Mandeep; Virmani, Renu; Olin, Jeffrey; Akasaka, Takashi; Narula, Jagat

    2016-05-01

    The latest advances in plaque imaging have provided clinicians with opportunities to treat acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and provide individualized treatment recommendations based not only on clinical manifestations, angiographic characteristics, and biomarker data, but also on the findings of plaque morphology. Although a substantial proportion of ACS events originate from plaques with an intact fibrous cap (IFC), clinicians predominantly equate ACS with plaque rupture arising from thin-cap fibroatheromas. In this Review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of plaque morphology in ACS with IFC, reviewing contemporary data from intravascular imaging. We also explore whether use of such imaging might provide a roadmap for more effective management of patients with ACS. PMID:26911330

  8. Bacterial DNA findings in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Pyysalo, Mikko J; Pyysalo, Liisa M; Pessi, Tanja; Karhunen, Pekka J; Lehtimäki, Terho; Oksala, Niku; Öhman, Juha E

    2016-05-01

    Objective Chronic inflammation has earlier been detected in ruptured intracranial aneurysms. A previous study detected both dental bacterial DNA and bacterial-driven inflammation in ruptured intracranial aneurysm walls. The aim of this study was to compare the presence of oral and pharyngeal bacterial DNA in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The hypothesis was that oral bacterial DNA findings would be more common and the amount of bacterial DNA would be higher in ruptured aneurysm walls than in unruptured aneurysm walls. Materials and methods A total of 70 ruptured (n = 42) and unruptured (n = 28) intracranial aneurysm specimens were obtained perioperatively in aneurysm clipping operations. Aneurysmal sac tissue was analysed using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to detect bacterial DNA from several oral species. Both histologically non-atherosclerotic healthy vessel wall obtained from cardiac by-pass operations (LITA) and arterial blood samples obtained from each aneurysm patient were used as control samples. Results Bacterial DNA was detected in 49/70 (70%) of the specimens. A total of 29/42 (69%) of the ruptured and 20/28 (71%) of the unruptured aneurysm samples contained bacterial DNA of oral origin. Both ruptured and unruptured aneurysm tissue samples contained significantly more bacterial DNA than the LITA control samples (p-values 0.003 and 0.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the amount of bacterial DNA between the ruptured and unruptured samples. Conclusion Dental bacterial DNA can be found using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction in both ruptured and unruptured aneurysm walls, suggesting that bacterial DNA plays a role in the pathogenesis of cerebral aneurysms in general, rather than only in ruptured aneurysms. PMID:26777430

  9. Macroscopic Source Properties from Dynamic Rupture Styles in Plastic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, A.; Ampuero, J. P.; Dalguer, L. A.; Mai, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    High stress concentrations at earthquake rupture fronts may generate an inelastic off-fault response at the rupture tip, leading to increased energy absorption in the damage zone. Furthermore, the induced asymmetric plastic strain field in in-plane rupture modes may produce bimaterial interfaces that can increase radiation efficiency and reduce frictional dissipation. Off-fault inelasticity thus plays an important role for realistic predictions of near-fault ground motion. Guided by our previous studies in the 2D elastic case, we perform rupture dynamics simulations including rate-and-state friction and off-fault plasticity to investigate the effects on the rupture properties. We quantitatively analyze macroscopic source properties for different rupture styles, ranging from cracks to pulses and subshear to supershear ruptures, and their transitional mechanisms. The energy dissipation due to off-fault inelasticity modifies the conditions to obtain each rupture style and alters macroscopic source properties. We examine apparent fracture energy, rupture and healing front speed, peak slip and peak slip velocity, dynamic stress drop and size of the process and plastic zones, slip and plastic seismic moment, and their connection to ground motion. This presentation focuses on the effects of rupture style and off-fault plasticity on the resulting ground motion patterns, especially on characteristic slip velocity function signatures and resulting seismic moments. We aim at developing scaling rules for equivalent elastic models, as function of background stress and frictional parameters, that may lead to improved "pseudo-dynamic" source parameterizations for ground-motion calculation. Moreover, our simulations provide quantitative relations between off-fault energy dissipation and macroscopic source properties. These relations might provide a self-consistent theoretical framework for the study of the earthquake energy balance based on observable earthquake source parameters.

  10. Creep and rupture of an ODS alloy with high stress rupture ductility. [Oxide Dispersion Strengthened

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalarney, M. E.; Arsons, R. M.; Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Baranow, S.

    1982-01-01

    The creep and stress rupture properties of an oxide (Y2O3) dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy, which also is strengthened by gamma-prime precipitates, was studied at 760 and 1093 C. At both temperatures, the alloy YDNiCrAl exhibits unusually high stress rupture ductility as measured by both elongation and reduction in area. Failure was transgranular, and different modes of failure were observed including crystallographic fracture at intermediate temperatures and tearing or necking almost to a chisel point at higher temperatures. While the rupture ductility was high, the creep strength of the alloy was low relative to conventional gamma prime strengthened superalloys in the intermediate temperature range and to ODS alloys in the higher temperature range. These findings are discussed with respect to the alloy composition; the strengthening oxide phases, which are inhomogeneously dispersed; the grain morphology, which is coarse and elongated and exhibits many included grains; and the second phase inclusion particles occurring at grain boundaries and in the matrix. The creep properties, in particular the high stress dependencies and high creep activation energies measured, are discussed with respect to the resisting stress model of creep in particle strengthened alloys.

  11. Stimulus value signals in ventromedial PFC reflect the integration of attribute value signals computed in fusiform gyrus and posterior superior temporal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seung-Lark; O'Doherty, John P; Rangel, Antonio

    2013-05-15

    We often have to make choices among multiattribute stimuli (e.g., a food that differs on its taste and health). Behavioral data suggest that choices are made by computing the value of the different attributes and then integrating them into an overall stimulus value signal. However, it is not known whether this theory describes the way the brain computes the stimulus value signals, or how the underlying computations might be implemented. We investigated these questions using a human fMRI task in which individuals had to evaluate T-shirts that varied in their visual esthetic (e.g., color) and semantic (e.g., meaning of logo printed in T-shirt) components. We found that activity in the fusiform gyrus, an area associated with the processing of visual features, correlated with the value of the visual esthetic attributes, but not with the value of the semantic attributes. In contrast, activity in posterior superior temporal gyrus, an area associated with the processing of semantic meaning, exhibited the opposite pattern. Furthermore, both areas exhibited functional connectivity with an area of ventromedial prefrontal cortex that reflects the computation of overall stimulus values at the time of decision. The results provide supporting evidence for the hypothesis that some attribute values are computed in cortical areas specialized in the processing of such features, and that those attribute-specific values are then passed to the vmPFC to be integrated into an overall stimulus value signal to guide the decision. PMID:23678116

  12. Goal-Directed Actions Activate the Face-Sensitive Posterior Superior Temporal Sulcus and Fusiform Gyrus in the Absence of Human-Like Perceptual Cues

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The conditions under which we identify entities as animate agents and the neural mechanisms supporting this ability are central questions in social neuroscience. Prior studies have focused upon 2 perceptual cues for signaling animacy: 1) surface features representing body forms such as faces, torsos, and limbs and 2) motion cues associated with biological forms. Here, we consider a third cue—the goal-directedness of an action. Regions in the social brain network, such as the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) and fusiform face area (FFA), are activated by human-like motion and body form perceptual cues signaling animacy. Here, we investigate whether these same brain regions are activated by goal-directed motion even when performed by entities that lack human-like perceptual cues. We observed an interaction effect whereby the presence of either human-like perceptual cues or goal-directed actions was sufficient to activate the right pSTS and FFA. Only stimuli that lacked human-like perceptual cues and goal-directed actions failed to activate the pSTS and FFA at the same level. PMID:21768227

  13. Stimulus Value Signals in Ventromedial PFC Reflect the Integration of Attribute Value Signals Computed in Fusiform Gyrus and Posterior Superior Temporal Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seung-Lark; O'Doherty, John P.

    2013-01-01

    We often have to make choices among multiattribute stimuli (e.g., a food that differs on its taste and health). Behavioral data suggest that choices are made by computing the value of the different attributes and then integrating them into an overall stimulus value signal. However, it is not known whether this theory describes the way the brain computes the stimulus value signals, or how the underlying computations might be implemented. We investigated these questions using a human fMRI task in which individuals had to evaluate T-shirts that varied in their visual esthetic (e.g., color) and semantic (e.g., meaning of logo printed in T-shirt) components. We found that activity in the fusiform gyrus, an area associated with the processing of visual features, correlated with the value of the visual esthetic attributes, but not with the value of the semantic attributes. In contrast, activity in posterior superior temporal gyrus, an area associated with the processing of semantic meaning, exhibited the opposite pattern. Furthermore, both areas exhibited functional connectivity with an area of ventromedial prefrontal cortex that reflects the computation of overall stimulus values at the time of decision. The results provide supporting evidence for the hypothesis that some attribute values are computed in cortical areas specialized in the processing of such features, and that those attribute-specific values are then passed to the vmPFC to be integrated into an overall stimulus value signal to guide the decision. PMID:23678116

  14. Presence of two neuropeptides in the fusiform ganglion and reproductive ducts of Octopus vulgaris: FMRFamide and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH).

    PubMed

    Di Cristo, Carlo; Paolucci, Marina; Iglesias, Josè; Sanchez, Javier; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2002-02-15

    We have found evidence of FMRFamide-like and cGnRH-I-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system (CNS) and in the reproductive ducts of both female and male cephalopod Octopus vulgaris. Cell bodies and fibers were immunolocalized in the fusiform ganglion from which the nerves that reach the female and male reproductive ducts arise. FMRFamide-like and cGnRH-I-like immunoreactive nerve endings were present in the oviduct, and in the oviducal gland of the female and in the seminal vesicle of the male. The GnRH-like peptide from the reproductive ducts has been partially characterized by HPLC. The retention time of the Octopus vulgaris GnRH-like peptide was similar to the retention time of cGnRH-I. Based on these observations we suggest that FMRFamide-like and a novel GnRH-like peptide are involved in the control of reproductive ducts of Octopus vulgaris. One possibility is that the peptides affect gamete transport. Another possibility is that they regulate secretory products such as mucus and mucilaginous substances from the oviducal gland and the seminal vesicle. Our data provide further evidence to support the hypothesis of the existence of a central and peripheral peptidergic control of reproduction of Octopus vulgaris. PMID:11857460

  15. Factors Controlling Stress Rupture of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, J. A.; Yun, H. M.

    1999-01-01

    The successful application of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC) depends strongly on maximizing material rupture life over a wide range of temperatures and applied stresses. The objective of this paper is to examine the various intrinsic and extrinsic factors that control the high-temperature stress rupture of CMC for stresses below and above those required for cracking of the 0 C plies (Regions I and II, respectively). Using creep-rupture results for a variety of ceramic fibers and rupture data for CMC reinforced by these fibers, it is shown that in those cases where the matrix carries little structural load, CMC rupture conditions can be predicted very well from the fiber behavior measured under the appropriate test environment. As such, one can then examine the intrinsic characteristics of the fibers in order to develop design guidelines for selecting fibers and fiber microstructures in order to maximize CMC rupture life. For those cases where the fiber interfacial coatings are unstable in the test environment, CMC lives are generally worse than those predicted by fiber behavior alone. For those cases where the matrix can support structural load, CMC life can even be greater provided matrix creep behavior is properly controlled. Thus the achievement of long CMC rupture life requires understanding and optimizing the behavior of all constituents in the proper manner.

  16. Patient specific stress and rupture analysis of ascending thoracic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Olfa; Davis, Frances M; Rodriguez-Matas, Jose F; Duprey, Ambroise; Avril, Stéphane

    2015-07-16

    An ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm (ATAA) is a serious medical condition which, more often than not, requires surgery. Aneurysm diameter is the primary clinical criterion for determining when surgical intervention is necessary but, biomechanical studies have suggested that the diameter criterion is insufficient. This manuscript presents a method for obtaining the patient specific wall stress distribution of the ATAA and the retrospective rupture risk for each patient. Five human ATAAs and the preoperative dynamic CT scans were obtained during elective surgeries to replace each patient's aneurysm with a synthetic graft. The material properties and rupture stress for each tissue sample were identified using bulge inflation tests. The dynamic CT scans were used to generate patient specific geometries for a finite element (FE) model of each patient's aneurysm. The material properties from the bulge inflation tests were implemented in the FE model and the wall stress distribution at four different pressures was estimated. Three different rupture risk assessments were compared: the maximum diameter, the rupture risk index, and the overpressure index. The peak wall stress values for the patients ranged from 28% to 94% of the ATAA's failure stress. The rupture risk and overpressure indices were both only weakly correlated with diameter (ρ=-0.29, both cases). In the future, we plan to conduct a large experimental and computational study that includes asymptomatic patients under surveillance, patients undergoing elective surgery, and patients who have experienced rupture or dissection to determine if the rupture risk index or maximum diameter can meaningfully differentiate between the groups. PMID:25979384

  17. Rupture Synchronicity in Complex Fault Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, K. R.; Jordan, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    While most investigators would agree that the timing of large earthquakes within a fault system depends on stress-mediated interactions among its elements, much of the debate relevant to time-dependent forecasting has been centered on single-fault concepts, such as characteristic earthquake behavior. We propose to broaden this discussion by quantifying the multi-fault concept of rupture synchronicity. We consider a finite set of small, fault-spanning volumes {Vk} within a fault system of arbitrary (fractal) complexity. We let Ck be the catalog of length tmax comprising Nk discrete times {ti(k)} that mark when the kth volume participates in a rupture of magnitude > M. The main object of our analysis is the complete set of event time differences {τij(kk') = ti(k) - tj(k')}, which we take to be a random process with an expected density function ρkk'(t). When k = k', we call this function the auto-catalog density function (ACDF); when k ≠ k', we call it the cross-catalog density function (CCDF). The roles of the ACDF and CCDF in synchronicity theory are similar to those of autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions in time-series analysis. For a renewal process, the ACDF can be written in terms of convolutions of the interevent-time distribution, and many of its properties (e.g., large-t asymptote) can be derived analytically. The interesting information in the CCDF, like that in the ACDF, is concentrated near t = 0. If two catalogs are completely asynchronous, the CCDF collapses to an asymptote given by the harmonic mean of the ACDF asymptotes. Synchronicity can therefore be characterized by the variability of the CCDF about this asymptote. The brevity of instrumental catalogs makes the identification of synchronicity at large M difficult, but we will illustrate potentially interesting behaviors through the analysis of a million-year California catalog generated by the earthquake simulator, RSQSim (Deiterich & Richards-Dinger, 2010), which we sampled at a dozen fault-spanning volumes. At the magnitude threshold M = 7, the ACDF can be well fit by renewal models with fairly small aperiodicity parameters (α < 0.2) for all fault volumes but one (on the San Jacinto fault). At interseismic (Reid) time scales, we observe pairs of fault segments that are tightly locked, such as the Cholame and Carrizo sections of the San Andreas Fault (SAF), where the CCDF and two ACDFs are nearly equal; segments out of phase (Carrizo-SAF/Coachella-SAF and Coachella-SAF/San Jacinto), where the CCDF variation is an odd function of time; and segments where events are in phase with integer ratios of recurrence times (2:1 synchronicity of Coachella-SAF/Mojave-SAF and Carrizo-SAF/Mojave-SAF). At near-seismic (Omori) time scales, we observe various modes of clustering, triggering, and shadowing in RSQSim catalogs; e.g., events on Mojave-SAF trigger Garlock events, and events on Coachella-SAF shut down events on San Jacinto. Therefore, despite its geometrical complexity and multiplicity of time scales, the RSQSim model of the San Andreas fault system exhibits a variety of synchronous behaviors that increase the predictability of large ruptures within the system. A key question for earthquake forecasting is whether the real San Andreas system is equally, or much less, synchronous.

  18. Earthquake rupture in shallow, unconsolidated sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, R. J.; De Paola, N.; Marco, S.; Holdsworth, R.

    2014-12-01

    Faults in shallow, unconsolidated sediment are often associated with aseismic creep, due to the velocity-strengthening behaviour of unconsolidated materials observed during lab experiments. They are expected to appear as broad zones of distributed deformation. However, large seismic ruptures can still propagate to the surface through shallow sediment, causing vast damage and destructive tsunamis. Our understanding of how seismic rupturing of shallow faults in unconsolidated sediment occurs in nature is limited due to the lack of direct observations constraining their structure, deformation patterns and mechanisms, and frictional behaviour. We studied syn-depositional normal faults, which deform unconsolidated, saturated lake sediments of the palaeo-Dead Sea. The sediments belong to the Lisan Formation (~70-18 Ka) and comprise alternating 1-3 mm thick laminae of aragonite and ultrafine-grained detritus. The faults formed at the surface, the only overburden being the overlying water column, and are known to have hosted seismic slip during large events (M ? 6), due to their association with seismites. The faults are discrete, localized structures, which sharply truncate laminae in the host sediment. Slip surfaces are sharp and straight and accompanied by a narrow slip zone, up to 1 cm wide, but often ? 1 mm wide, containing ultrafine-grained gouge. The majority of slip, up to 3 m, is concentrated in these slip zones. Faults can be categorised as having either simple geometry (one continuous fault strand accommodates all the displacement) or complex geometry (two or more fault segments share the overall displacement). Slip profiles constructed for simple geometry faults all have similar shapes, regardless of maximum displacement, whereas those for complex geometry faults are highly variable, due to segment interaction. It is apparent from the slip profiles that these faults grow and interact in the same way as 'brittle' faults in cohesive rocks. We will present results of microstructural analyses of the fault rocks, to constrain the deformation mechanisms occurring during seismic slip in unconsolidated sediment. We will also present results of low- and high-velocity friction experiments, which will constrain the conditions under which brittle deformation and seismic slip occur in these materials.

  19. [Isolated ruptures of the tendon of the biceps femoris muscle].

    PubMed

    Rehm, O; Linke, R; Schweigkofler, U; Hoffmann, R F; Jäger, A

    2009-03-01

    Traumatic ruptures of tendons in the region of the knee joint are often accompanied by substantial degenerative and inflammatory alterations, especially when the patella and quadriceps tendons are affected. Isolated ruptures of the tendon of the distal biceps femoris muscle at the dorsolateral aspect of the knee are rare and result in an acute reduction of flexion capability. However, tears of the biceps femoris tendon are not associated with degenerative changes. This article reports on the diagnosis and treatment of a 27-year-old football player who suffered an acute isolated rupture of the biceps femoris tendon. PMID:19224187

  20. Endovascular Treatment of an Aortic Traumatic Double Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Attinà, Domenico; Buia, Francesco; Russo, Vincenzo; Pilato, Emanuele; Lovato, Luigi; Bartolomeo, Roberto Di; Zompatori, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic thoracic aortic rupture is a life-threatening condition; aortic isthmus is the most common site of rupture, but in rare cases traumatic injury can localize elsewhere, such as at aortic arch or at the level of the diaphragm. In the past few years, endovascular treatment of traumatic aortic injury became a safe procedure, with lower mortality and complication, if compared with open surgery. We report a case of a 40-year-old-man admitted to emergency department after a violent car crash in which an aortic traumatic double rupture was successfully treated with two endovascular stent-grafts coverage. PMID:25859315

  1. The Initial Rupture of the 2000 Western Tottori Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, M.; Umeda, Y.; Mori, J.; Kawakata, H.

    2002-12-01

    Two clear P phases were identified on the seismograms for the 2000 Western Tottori earthquake(M7.3). Following the initial P phase (P1), a larger arrival (P2) several seconds later indicates that the rupture did not grow smoothly, but has at least 2 subevents. Hypocenters corresponding to these two P arrivals were determined using 14 stations within hypocentral distances of 60 km. The initial rupture started from the edge of a region that has had swarm activity, including M5 events, since 1989. The source of the second larger P phase was located 1km deeper and 5km southeast from the initial rupture. The hypocenter of the second rupture was off the fault plane estimated from the mechanism solution of the initial rupture using the P1 phase first motions. The average time interval between the two phases was 2.5 second, which is consistent with an empirical relation between the magnitude and duration time for initial ruptures. According to rupture model of this earthquake determined by Sekiguchi and Iwata, little slip occurred near the starting point, and 3 seconds after, larger slip occurred 5km southeast of the starting point, corresponding to our location of the source of second rupture. In this study, we tried deriving the rupture process for the spatiotemporal slip distribution of the first few seconds of the rupture of this earthquake by using a waveform inversion. We divided the area near the initial hypocenter into 10 x 6 subfaults with dimensions of 250 x 250 m2. For the inversion, we used 3-component data from 12 KiK-net and K-net stations data integrated from acceleration to velocity and bandpassed filtered from 0.1 to 3.0 Hz. Green_fs functions were calculated using a 1-dimensional velocity structure that was determined from the temporary aftershock observations. We used 12 time windows spaced at 0.05 sec intervals Our results show that the area of the initial rupture area was about 0.5 km2 and extended toward the southeast from the initial hypocenter. There does not appear to be much slip in the area between the location of the initial rupture and the location of the sudden increase in slip 2.5 seconds later.

  2. Endovascular treatment of an aortic traumatic double rupture.

    PubMed

    Attinà, Domenico; Buia, Francesco; Russo, Vincenzo; Pilato, Emanuele; Lovato, Luigi; Bartolomeo, Roberto Di; Zompatori, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic thoracic aortic rupture is a life-threatening condition; aortic isthmus is the most common site of rupture, but in rare cases traumatic injury can localize elsewhere, such as at aortic arch or at the level of the diaphragm. In the past few years, endovascular treatment of traumatic aortic injury became a safe procedure, with lower mortality and complication, if compared with open surgery. We report a case of a 40-year-old-man admitted to emergency department after a violent car crash in which an aortic traumatic double rupture was successfully treated with two endovascular stent-grafts coverage. PMID:25859315

  3. Laparoscopic splenectomy for spontaneous rupture of the spleen

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Pinky M.; Philip, Roji; Masurkar, Vishwanath G.; Khadse, Prashant L.; Randive, Nilima U.

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic splenectomy is a gold standard for management of planned benign splenic pathologies. Spontaneous rupture of the spleen (SRS) leading to acute abdomen occurs in only 1% of all splenic ruptures. Laparoscopic splenectomy in traumatic and atraumatic rupture due to intra-splenic pathology is reported. We present the first reported case of laparoscopic splenectomy in a 23-year-old male who presented with hemoperitoneum due to idiopathic or SRS. The procedure was safely accomplished with slight modified technique and minimum usage of advanced gadgets. PMID:26917926

  4. [Spontaneous rupture of intracranial dermoid cyst. Clinical and radiological study].

    PubMed

    Boissonnot, L; Drouineau, J; Roualdes, G; Morin, M; Neau, J P; Bataille, B

    1986-12-01

    A 22 year old woman had a seizure, and the skull X-ray showed an intracranial arched calcification. CT scan permitted diagnosis of dermoid cyst. Rupture of the cyst was testified by low density areas disseminated on the cortical surface and intra-ventricular fat level. Surgical removal confirmed dermoid cyst with rupture and fat fluid inside. Authors underline infrequency of such intra-ventricular fat level. CT scan, with low density of lipidic origin promote considerably such diagnosis both of the real nature of the cyst and of its rupture. PMID:3806479

  5. TachoSil for postinfarction ventricular free wall rupture.

    PubMed

    Pocar, Marco; Passolunghi, Davide; Bregasi, Alda; Donatelli, Francesco

    2012-06-01

    Despite a decline in the last three decades, postinfarction ventricular free wall rupture still complicates more than 3% of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarctions and remains a surgical challenge. TachoSil (Nycomed, Zurich, Switzerland) is an equine collagen patch coated with human fibrinogen and human thrombin, which has recently been used for haemostasis in cardiovascular surgery, but its potential usefulness in free wall rupture has not been reported. Initial clinical experience with an on-pump sutureless technique without cardioplegia, using wide TachoSil patching to achieve free wall rupture repair, has been described. PMID:22419793

  6. Laparoscopic splenectomy for spontaneous rupture of the spleen.

    PubMed

    Thapar, Pinky M; Philip, Roji; Masurkar, Vishwanath G; Khadse, Prashant L; Randive, Nilima U

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic splenectomy is a gold standard for management of planned benign splenic pathologies. Spontaneous rupture of the spleen (SRS) leading to acute abdomen occurs in only 1% of all splenic ruptures. Laparoscopic splenectomy in traumatic and atraumatic rupture due to intra-splenic pathology is reported. We present the first reported case of laparoscopic splenectomy in a 23-year-old male who presented with hemoperitoneum due to idiopathic or SRS. The procedure was safely accomplished with slight modified technique and minimum usage of advanced gadgets. PMID:26917926

  7. Frictional melting during the rupture of the 1994 bolivian earthquake

    PubMed

    Kanamori; Anderson; Heaton

    1998-02-01

    The source parameters of the 1994 Bolivian earthquake (magnitude Mw = 8.3) suggest that the maximum seismic efficiency eta was 0.036 and the minimum frictional stress was 550 bars. Thus, the source process was dissipative, which is consistent with the observed slow rupture speed, only 20% of the local S-wave velocity. The amount of nonradiated energy produced during the Bolivian rupture was comparable to, or larger than, the thermal energy of the 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption and was sufficient to have melted a layer as thick as 31 centimeters. Once rupture was initiated, melting could occur, which reduces friction and promotes fault slip. PMID:9452378

  8. Laparoscopic repair of a bladder rupture in a foal.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R B; Ducharme, N G; Hackett, R P

    1995-01-01

    Ruptured bladder was diagnosed in a 90-day-old Thoroughbred colt that had suffered a open, comminuted tibial fracture 2 days earlier. The bladder rupture was identified by laparoscopic examination of the abdomen and was repaired using a laparoscopic stapling instrument. This technique provided good visualization and allowed repair of the rupture with minimal intervention. Ten months after surgery, the foal was admitted to a referral surgical practice because of colic and stanguria. A urinary calculus was removed from the penile urethra by urethrotomy. Laparoscopic repair of the bladder with nonabsorbable staples may be contraindicated because of possible urolith formation. PMID:7701772

  9. Design procedure prevents PE pipe rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Grigory, S.C.

    1995-12-01

    A rupture prevention design procedure for plastic gas distribution pipe is nearing completion at Southwest Research Institute (SWRI). Given the pipe size, polyethylene (PE) resin, and minimum operating temperature, the maximum safe operating pressure can be determined for which rapid crack propagation (RCP) cannot occur. A computer program, called PFRAC, has been developed for this purpose and uses Charpy energy as the measurement of fracture toughness of PE. Present efforts, however, involve replacing Charpy energy with a dynamic toughness measurement obtained from the Small Scale Steady State (S4) test that is required in ISO 4437. The program is being financed by the Gas Research Institute, Chicago. RCP events in PE pipe have been rare primarily because operating pressures are low and pipe diameters are small in most gas distribution systems. However, controlled RCP experiments in the US and other countries clearly demonstrate that as the gas industry moves toward higher line pressures and larger diameters, the likelihood of an RCP event increases. Recognizing this, ISO includes a requirement for RCP in its ISO 4437 standard for pipe greater than 10 inches in diameter or operating pressures greater than 58 psig. The S4 test may be used on all pipe diameters. A full scale test or the S4 test can be used on pipe greater than 10 inches diameter.

  10. Rupture of the membranes and postpartum infection.

    PubMed

    Novak-Antolic, Z; Pajntar, M; Verdenik, I

    1997-02-01

    The greatest risk of preterm prelabour rupture of membranes (PPROM) is preterm delivery. According to the Perinatal Information System of Slovenia there were 5.92% preterm deliveries in 1994. We studied 809 deliveries of less than 34 weeks of gestation in the Ljubljana Maternity, from 1992 to 1994; 33.7% of these started with PPROM. Risk factors for PPROM were conization, cerclage and use of antibiotics for any reason in current pregnancy. Amnionitis and febrile illness during labour increased with longer duration of PPROM but maternal postpartum infections did not. In neonates, more cases of lower Apgar scores after 1 and 5 min and more cases of suspected sepsis were found with the increased duration of PPROM. In Slovenia, with good facilities for transport in utero and good neonatal care, after PPROM it is best to transport the pregnant women to the third level center and then wait until labour starts or to recur to prompt delivery when maternal or fetal signs so require. From 1987 to 1993 there were 159264 deliveries in gestations equal to or over 34 weeks; 20.8% started with PROM. In our observational study we found the best results when labour was induced. There are, however, many disagreements about the management of (P)PROM. PMID:9138956

  11. Stress-rupture strength of alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.L.; Cao, W.D.; Thomas, W.M.

    1996-03-01

    Alloy 718 is the most widely used of the nickel-base superalloys in aerospace applications such as compressor and turbine disks, cases, compressor blades and fasteners in aircraft gas-turbine engines. Since the development of the superalloy by Inco Alloys International over 30 years ago, researchers have made many slight modifications in chemical composition, and have refined process techniques to achieve further improvements in performance. Relatively little information on the effects of phosphorus has been published, and the available information is contradictory. However, phosphorus in superalloys is generally considered detrimental, and by specification is controlled to a low maximum value (0.015% max, for example, in AMS5662 E). This lack of data is the basis of a study by Teledyne Allvac to determine the effects of the interaction of phosphorus, boron, and carbon on the mechanical properties, processing characteristics, and microstructure of Allvac 718. Results show that a significant improvement in stress-rupture properties over those of a commercial Alloy 718 material is possible by optimizing phosphorus, boron, and carbon additions.

  12. A viscoelastic model for axonal microtubule rupture.

    PubMed

    Shamloo, Amir; Manuchehrfar, Farid; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2015-05-01

    Axon is an important part of the neuronal cells and axonal microtubules are bundles in axons. In axons, microtubules are coated with microtubule-associated protein tau, a natively unfolded filamentous protein in the central nervous system. These proteins are responsible for cross-linking axonal microtubule bundles. Through complimentary dimerization with other tau proteins, bridges are formed between nearby microtubules creating bundles. Formation of bundles of microtubules causes their transverse reinforcement and has been shown to enhance their ability to bear compressive loads. Though microtubules are conventionally regarded as bearing compressive loads, in certain circumstances during traumatic brain injuries, they are placed in tension. In our model, microtubule bundles were formed from a large number of discrete masses. We employed Standard Linear Solid model (SLS), a viscoelastic model, to computationally simulate microtubules. In this study, we investigated the dynamic responses of two dimensional axonal microtubules under suddenly applied end forces by implementing discrete masses connected to their neighboring masses with a Standard Linear Solid unit. We also investigated the effect of the applied force rate and magnitude on the deformation of bundles. Under tension, a microtubule fiber may rupture as a result of a sudden force. Using the developed model, we could predict the critical regions of the axonal microtubule bundles in the presence of varying end forces. We finally analyzed the nature of microtubular failure under varying mechanical stresses. PMID:25835789

  13. Co-existence of a rare dyspnea with pericardial diaphragmatic rupture and pericardial rupture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kargı, Ahmet Bülent; Zeybek, Arife

    2015-01-01

    Pericardial-diaphragmatic rupture is a rare condition which occurs after blunt trauma and involves the herniation of abdominal organs into the pericardium. A 77-year-old female patient presenting with complaints of palpitation and difficulty in breathing was admitted to the emergency room. Left lateral thoracotomy revealed the herniation of abdominal organs into the thorax. A pericardial-diaphragmatic rupture and a pericardial rupture were found to co-exist. The diaphragm and the pericardium were repaired primarily. The case is presented here because herniation of abdominal organs into the pleural cavity through the pericardium is a rare condition. PMID:26336505

  14. Co-existence of a rare dyspnea with pericardial diaphragmatic rupture and pericardial rupture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Öz, Necdet; Kargı, Ahmet Bülent; Zeybek, Arife

    2015-06-01

    Pericardial-diaphragmatic rupture is a rare condition which occurs after blunt trauma and involves the herniation of abdominal organs into the pericardium. A 77-year-old female patient presenting with complaints of palpitation and difficulty in breathing was admitted to the emergency room. Left lateral thoracotomy revealed the herniation of abdominal organs into the thorax. A pericardial-diaphragmatic rupture and a pericardial rupture were found to co-exist. The diaphragm and the pericardium were repaired primarily. The case is presented here because herniation of abdominal organs into the pleural cavity through the pericardium is a rare condition. PMID:26336505

  15. The fusiform face area is not sufficient for face recognition: evidence from a patient with dense prosopagnosia and no occipital face area.

    PubMed

    Steeves, Jennifer K E; Culham, Jody C; Duchaine, Bradley C; Pratesi, Cristiana Cavina; Valyear, Kenneth F; Schindler, Igor; Humphrey, G Keith; Milner, A David; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2006-01-01

    We tested functional activation for faces in patient D.F., who following acquired brain damage has a profound deficit in object recognition based on form (visual form agnosia) and also prosopagnosia that is undocumented to date. Functional imaging demonstrated that like our control observers, D.F. shows significantly more activation when passively viewing face compared to scene images in an area that is consistent with the fusiform face area (FFA) (p < 0.01). Control observers also show occipital face area (OFA) activation; however, whereas D.F.'s lesions appear to overlap the OFA bilaterally. We asked, given that D.F. shows FFA activation for faces, to what extent is she able to recognize faces? D.F. demonstrated a severe impairment in higher level face processing--she could not recognize face identity, gender or emotional expression. In contrast, she performed relatively normally on many face categorization tasks. D.F. can differentiate faces from non-faces given sufficient texture information and processing time, and she can do this is independent of color and illumination information. D.F. can use configural information for categorizing faces when they are presented in an upright but not a sideways orientation and given that she also cannot discriminate half-faces she may rely on a spatially symmetric feature arrangement. Faces appear to be a unique category, which she can classify even when she has no advance knowledge that she will be shown face images. Together, these imaging and behavioral data support the importance of the integrity of a complex network of regions for face identification, including more than just the FFA--in particular the OFA, a region believed to be associated with low-level processing. PMID:16125741

  16. Altered Functional Connectivity of Fusiform Gyrus in Subjects with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Suping; Chong, Tao; Zhang, Yun; Li, Jun; von Deneen, Karen M.; Ren, Junchan; Dong, Minghao; Huang, Liyu

    2015-01-01

    Visual cognition such as face recognition requests a high degree of functional integration between distributed brain areas of a network. It has been reported that the fusiform gyrus (FG) is an important brain area involved in facial cognition; altered connectivity of FG to some other regions may lead to a deficit in visual cognition especially face recognition. However, whether functional connectivity between the FG and other brain areas changes remains unclear in the resting state in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) subjects. Here, we employed a resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) to examine alterations in functional connectivity of left/right FG comparing aMCI patients with age-matched control subjects. Forty-eight aMCI and 38 control subjects from the Alzheimer’s disease Neuroimaging Initiative were analyzed. We concentrated on the correlation between low frequency fMRI time courses in the FG and those in all other brain regions. Relative to the control group, we found some discrepant regions in the aMCI group which presented increased or decreased connectivity with the left/right FG including the left precuneus, left lingual gyrus, right thalamus, supramarginal gyrus, left supplementary motor area, left inferior temporal gyrus, and left parahippocampus. More importantly, we also obtained that both left and right FG have increased functional connections with the left middle occipital gyrus (MOG) and right anterior cingulate gyrus (ACC) in aMCI patients. That was not a coincidence and might imply that the MOG and ACC also play a critical role in visual cognition, especially face recognition. These findings in a large part supported our hypothesis and provided a new insight in understanding the important subtype of MCI. PMID:26379534

  17. Multi-Canister overpack necessity of the rupture disk

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH, K.E.

    1998-11-03

    The Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) rupture disk precludes the MCO from pressurization above the design limit during transport from the K Basins to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility and prior to connection of the CVD process piping. Removal of the rupture disk from the MCO design would: (a) result in unacceptable dose consequences in the event a thermal runaway accident occurred; (b) increase residual risk; and (c) remove a degree of specificity from the dose calculations. The potential cost savings of removing the rupture disk from the MCO design is offset by the cost of design modifications, changes to hazard analyses and safety analyses, and changes to existing documentation. Retaining the rupture disk mitigates the consequences of MCO overpressurization, and considering the overall economic impacts to the SNF Project, is the most cost effective approach.

  18. Spontaneous Posterior Uterine Rupture in Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smid, Marcela C; Waltner-Toews, Rebecca; Goodnight, William

    2016-03-01

    Background The maternal and fetal risks of uterine distension in rapidly progressive twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) in the setting of prior uterine scar are poorly characterized. Case We present the case of a 42-year-old woman, G4P1201, at 21 weeks gestation with stage-1 TTTS who developed a spontaneous posterior uterine rupture necessitating emergent laparotomy and delivery of previable fetuses, possibly due to prior uterine scar from a displaced intrauterine device. Conclusion TTTS may be a risk factor for uterine rupture, including uterine rupture in atypical anatomic locations. Prior unrecognized uterine scars, including perforations, may magnify the risk for atypical uterine rupture in the setting of excessive uterine distension. PMID:26929874

  19. Experimental investigation of creep rupture of reactor vessel lower head

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Tze Yao; Pilch, M.M.; Bentz, J.H.

    1997-12-01

    This paper summarizes experiments on creep rupture of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower heads under the thermal and pressure loads of a core meltdown accident. Lower head failure (LHF) is of importance to accident assessment and accident management.

  20. Free surface effects on the propagation of dynamic rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Stefan B.

    Dynamic rupture of reverse and normal fault intersecting the surface are investigated. In the case of a normal fault nucleating at depth and propagating upwards, coupling of rupture-radiated stress and free boundary conditions at the surface may induce a shallow secondary nucleation anticipating up to a few seconds the arrival of the main rupture front. Indeed, the free surface induces normal stress fluctuations modifying the fault frictional strength. No significant effect on rupture velocity is observed in the case of reverse faulting. These incidences are explained by a stress analysis and illustrated by some numerical simulations in the case of dynamic normal faulting in a homogeneous half-space. The described effects could explain some observations of high frequency radiation close to the surface in documented shallow earthquakes like in Kalamata, 1986 [Bouin, 1994].

  1. Staged Management of a Ruptured Internal Mammary Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, O Young; Kim, Gun Jik; Oh, Tak Hyuk; Lee, Young Ok; Lee, Sang Cjeol; Cho, Jun Yong

    2016-01-01

    The rupture of an internal mammary artery (IMA) aneurysm in a patient with type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF-1) is a rare but life-threatening complication requiring emergency management. A 50-year-old man with NF-1 was transferred to the emergency department of Kyungpook National University Hospital, where an IMA aneurysmal rupture and hemothorax were diagnosed and drained. The IMA aneurysmal rupture and hemothorax were successfully repaired by staged management combining endovascular treatment and subsequent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). The patient required cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation, the staged management of coil embolization, and a subsequent VATS procedure. This staged approach may be an effective therapeutic strategy in cases of IMA aneurysmal rupture. PMID:27066438

  2. Asymptomatic spontaneous rupture of suprasellar dermoid cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, S K; Phadke, R V; Trivedi, P; Bannerji, D

    2002-12-01

    Suprasellar dermoid cysts are uncommon intracranial lesions. CT and MRI findings in a rare case of asymptomatic rupture of suprasellar dermoid cyst with subarachnoid dissemination is described. PMID:12577101

  3. Arterial helium embolism from a ruptured intraaortic balloon.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, J W; Smith, J; Brown, P; Zinetti, C

    1988-12-01

    A 67-year-old man sustained a sudden global neurological deficit immediately following rupture of an intraaortic balloon catheter. Considerable improvement in his neurological function occurred during and after three hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:3196106

  4. Etiology and pathophysiology of tendon ruptures in sports.

    PubMed

    Kannus, P; Natri, A

    1997-04-01

    Of all spontaneous tendon ruptures, complete Achilles tendon tears are most closely associated with sports activities (1-3). Schönbauer (3) reported that 75% of all ruptures of the Achilles tendon are related to sports. In Plecko & Passl (2) the number was 60%. In our material of 430 cases, the number of sports-related Achilles ruptures was very similar (62%), while only 2% of ruptures of other tendons were sports-related (P < 0.001) (1). Also, the majority of Achilles reruptures occurred in sports. The ruptures occurred most often in soccer (34%), track and field (16%) and basketball (14%). The distribution of Achilles ruptures according to different sports varies considerably from country to country, according to the national sport traditions. For example, in northern and middle Europe, soccer, tennis, track and field, indoor ball games, downhill skiing, and gymnastics are the most common; and in North America, football, basketball, baseball, tennis and downhill skiing dominate the statistics (1, 2, 4). In sports, some Achilles ruptures are not spontaneous or degeneration-induced but may occur as a consequence of the remarkably high forces that are involved in the performance (2). Ruptures in the high jump or triple jump are good examples. In such cases, failure in the neuromuscular protective mechanisms due to fatigue or disturbed co-ordination can frequently be found. The spontaneous complete rupture of the supraspinatus tendon of the rotator cuff does not occur very frequently in sports. Those sports that include high-energy throwing movements, such as American and Finnish baseball, American football, rugby and discuss and javelin throwing, may, however, produce this injury. Partial tears and inflammations of the rotator cuff complex are much more frequent in throwing sports. The complete rupture of the proximal long head of the biceps brachii tendon is rare among competitive and recreational athletes. In our material, under 2% of these ruptures were associated with sports activities (5). The rupture (avulsion) of the distal tendon of the biceps muscle is rare. In sports, gymnastics, body building and weight lifting have been said to be able to produce this injury (6). In general, complete ruptures of the quadriceps tendon and the patellar tendon occur most often in older individuals. In our study, the mean age of these patients was 65 years (5). However, these injuries do also occur in younger age groups, especially in athletes. In athletes, the rupture most frequently occurs in high-power sports events, such as high jump, basketball and weight lifting, at the age of 15-30 years. A chronic-patellar apicitis (jumper's knee) may predispose rupture of the tendon (7). As is the case with the rotator cuff complex, overuse inflammation and partial tears of the quadriceps and patellar tendons are one of the most characteristic athletic injuries. Complete spontaneous ruptures of other tendons in sports are rare, although the literature does provide case studies from almost every tendon the human body possesses (8-18). PMID:9211611

  5. [Subcapsular hematoma and rupture of the liver graft].

    PubMed

    Görög, Dénes; Fehérvári, Imre; Doros, Attila; Nemes, Balázs; Máthé, Zoltán; Kóbori, László; Járay, Jeno

    2008-08-01

    Subcapsular hematoma and/or rupture of the graft is uncommon but serious complication of liver transplantation. It may develop spontaneously or following parenchymal injuries or percutaneous transhepatic invasive procedures. This report describes three cases of subcapsular hematoma and/or rupture of the graft with different courses among 350 liver transplantations. In the first case, the patient died due to graft rupture caused by a pseudoaneurysm after biopsy. In the second case, a small injury of the donor liver resulted in a deep rupture, which required partial resection of the graft. The patient died in sepsis later. The third patient presented with a large subcapsular haematoma during transplantation, which was successfully treated. The authors' strategies developed intraoperatively for the management of hematomas. These involve opening and removing of the haematoma, haemostasis with Argon coagulation, which resulted in an adherent Glisson's capsule to the parenchyma and covering with collagen fleece coated with fibrinogen and thrombin. PMID:18799407

  6. Pancreatic rupture in four cats with high-rise syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liehmann, Lea M; Dörner, Judith; Hittmair, Katharina M; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Reifinger, Martin; Dupré, Gilles

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic trauma and rupture are rare after feline high-rise syndrome; however, should it happen, pancreatic enzymes will leak into the abdominal cavity and may cause pancreatic autodigestion and fatty tissue saponification. If not diagnosed and treated, it can ultimately lead to multiorgan failure and death. In this case series, 700 records of high-rise syndrome cats that presented between April 2001 and May 2006 were analysed, and four cats with pancreatic rupture were identified. Clinical signs, diagnosis using ultrasonography and lipase activity in blood and abdominal effusion, and treatment modalities are reported. Three cats underwent surgical abdominal exploration, one cat was euthanased. Rupture of the left pancreatic limb was confirmed in all cases. Two of the operated cats survived to date. High-rise syndrome can lead to abdominal trauma, including pancreatic rupture. A prompt diagnosis and surgical treatment should be considered. PMID:22314089

  7. The 2010 Chile Earthquake - Variations in the Rupture Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, S. L.; Comte, D.; Lay, T.; Kiser, E.; Ishii, M.

    2010-12-01

    The magnitude 8.8, February 27, 2010 Chile, that occurred along the south central Nazca/South American plate boundary was an underthrusting event with an aftershock length of ~600 km along strike, with a bi-lateral rupture that started near Cobquecura and ruptured north to Valparaiso and ruptured 100 km south of Concepcion. This segment of the south central coast of Chile has a long record of damaging underthrusting earthquakes dating back to 1570 that based on intensity and tsunami reports show variations in the rupture mode between earthquake cycles. In light of the recent 2010 Chile earthquake we review the historic earthquake record along this segment of the subduction zone and compare it to the slip distribution determined during the 2010 mainshock. The 2010 earthquake appears to have failed at least 2 segments of the plate boundary that failed previously in multiple earthquakes with different rupture lengths. The southern region of the 2010 rupture last failed in 1835, 1751, 1657 and 1570. The northern segment of the 2010 rupture last failed in 1928 (Ms=8.0), 1751, and in 1730. The 1751 earthquake probably ruptured both the 1928 and 1835 earthquake zones based on intensities and tsunami reports. The 1751 earthquake had intensity 9 in Concepcion, Talcahuano, Chillan, and Talca, and intensity 6 at Valparaiso (Askew and Algermissen, 1985). The northern termination of the 2010 rupture appears to end near 33.5°S to ~34°S which coincides with the southern portion of the 1985 (Mw=8.0) zone that previously ruptured in 1906 (Ms=8.4). Modeling of teleseismic P, SH and R1 waveforms show a bilateral rupture with the largest patch of slip ~ 100 km north and updip of the epicenter with smaller patches of slip to the south and down dip of the epicenter (Lay et al., 2010). As expected the rupture velocity is difficult to constrain with teleseismic data. Recent results from back projecting the P-waves recorded using Transportable Array data in the U.S. also show a bilateral rupture with the location of the highest slip region north of the epicenter. All of these methods show significant mainshock slip in the 1928 rupture zone and lesser amounts of slip in the part of the 1835 rupture zone that did not fail in 1928, despite the longer time since 1835. The aftershocks of the 2010 and 1985 earthquakes overlap but the high slip region of the 2010 earthquakes does not appear to overlap significantly with the high slip region of the 1985 earthquake and the latter may have contributed to the termination of the 2010 earthquake. The 2010 Chile earthquake segment along the south central Chile subduction shows large variations in the rupture mode in previous earthquakes. What controls the size of the earthquake (i.e. how many segments fail in a given event) is still uncertain but important in understanding the potential hazard of the Chile subduction zone.

  8. Acute Patellar Tendon Rupture after Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Seung Joon; Pham, The Hien

    2015-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is a catastrophic complication following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Though revision TKA has been suspected of being a predisposing factor for the occurrence of patellar tendon rupture, there are few reports on patellar tendon rupture after revision TKA. Here, we present a case of acute patellar tendon rupture that occurred after TKA revision. In the patient, the patellar tendon was so thin and could not be repaired, and accordingly was sutured end to end. We used the anterior tibialis tendon allograft to augment the poor quality patellar tendon tissue. Fixation of the allograft was done by using the bone tunnel created through tibial tuberosity and suturing the allograft to the patellar tendon and quadriceps tendon. The patient was instructed to wear a full extension knee splint and was kept non-weight bearing for 6 weeks after operation. Full knee extension could be achieved 6 weeks postoperatively. PMID:26060612

  9. Spontaneous Posterior Uterine Rupture in Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smid, Marcela C.; Waltner-Toews, Rebecca; Goodnight, William

    2015-01-01

    Background The maternal and fetal risks of uterine distension in rapidly progressive twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) in the setting of prior uterine scar are poorly characterized. Case We present the case of a 42-year-old woman, G4P1201, at 21 weeks gestation with stage-1 TTTS who developed a spontaneous posterior uterine rupture necessitating emergent laparotomy and delivery of previable fetuses, possibly due to prior uterine scar from a displaced intrauterine device. Conclusion TTTS may be a risk factor for uterine rupture, including uterine rupture in atypical anatomic locations. Prior unrecognized uterine scars, including perforations, may magnify the risk for atypical uterine rupture in the setting of excessive uterine distension. PMID:26929874

  10. Acoustic investigation of rupture nucleation in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, Alexandre; Brantut, Nicolas; Ougier-Simonin, Audrey; Adeliner, Mathilde; Fortin, Jerome; Gueguen, Yves

    2010-05-01

    Triaxial compression experiments were performed on several materials (Glass, Granite, Basalt, Sandstone, Marble and Gypsum) at confining pressures ranging from 10 to 100MPa, and from room temperature to 70 degrees C. During each of these experiments, acoustic waves radiated from damage accumulation and fast crack propagation were continuously monitored thanks to a fast acoustic recorder, which enables to obtain continuous acoustogram of rupture nucleation and propagation, without the limitations of former trigger systems. In our experiments, rupture does not need to be slowed down, and the transition from quasi-static nucleation to dynamic propagation has now been systematically investigated.Comparing each material, three main observation can be drawn : - First, the amount of damage accumulation before the dynamic rupture propagation varies from material to material, and also depends on the pressure and temperature conditions. For instance, glass, granites and sandstones are typically materials where the nucleation involves a large amount of cracking prior to rupture. In contrast, rupture in basalt at low confinement is not preceded by any damage accumulation. Finally, pre-rupture damage accumulation can also be purely aseismic, which is the case of marble for instance. - Second, the brittle-ductile transition does not exactly overlaps the aseismic-seismic transition, at least in the conditions at which we performed our experiments. For example, marble deforms plastically beyond 50MPa, and although the deformation is ductile, a large amount of crack accumulates in the rock, which tends to make it unstable. In the same way, acoustic emissions decrease in gypsum with increasing pressure and temperatures. - Finally, the time during which rupture propagates depends largely on the rheology. For instance, and in the case of ductile failures such as in marble, dislocation and twin accumulation is such that cracks propagation steps are small and/or slow, and thus the radiated energy release rate remains small at early stages of rupture and increases with rupture speed. Put together, our observations clearly highlight the dependence of the radiated acoustic (and microseismic?) energy during rupture nucleation and early stages of crack propagation not only on the rupture propagation speed and the slip velocity but most importantly on the rock's lithology and rheology.

  11. Laboratory investigation of the radiative energy transfer during rupture nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, A. J.; Brantut, N.; Ougier-Simonin, A.; Adelinet, M.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Triaxial compression experiments were performed on several materials (Glass, Granite, Basalt, Sandstone, Marble and Gypsum) at confining pressures ranging from 10 to 100MPa, and from room temperature to 70 degrees C. During each of these experiments, acoustic waves radiated from damage accumulation and fast crack propagation were continuously monitored thanks to a fast acoustic recorder, which enables to obtain continuous acoustogram of rupture nucleation and propagation, without the limitations of former trigger systems. In our experiments, rupture does not need to be slowed down, and the transition from quasi-static nucleation to dynamic propagation has now been systematically investigated.Comparing each material, three main observation can be drawn : - First, the amount of damage accumulation before the dynamic rupture propagation varies from material to material, and also depends on the pressure and temperature conditions. For instance, glass, granites and sandstones are typically materials where the nucleation involves a large amount of cracking prior to rupture. In contrast, rupture in basalt at low confinement is not preceded by any damage accumulation. Finally, pre-rupture damage accumulation can also be purely aseismic, which is the case of marble for instance. - Second, the brittle-ductile transition does not exactly overlaps the aseismic-seismic transition, at least in the conditions at which we performed our experiments. For example, marble deforms plastically beyond 50MPa, and although the deformation is ductile, a large amount of crack accumulates in the rock, which tends to make it unstable. In the same way, acoustic emissions decrease in gypsum with increasing pressure and temperatures. - Finally, the time during which rupture propagates depends largely on the rheology. For instance, and in the case of ductile failures such as in marble, dislocation and twin accumulation is such that cracks propagation steps are small and/or slow, and thus the radiated energy release rate remains small at early stages of rupture and increases with rupture speed. Put together, our observations clearly highlight the dependence of the radiated acoustic (and microseismic?) energy during rupture nucleation and early stages of crack propagation not only on the rupture propagation speed and the slip velocity but most importantly on the rock’s lithology and rheology.

  12. Atraumatic splenic rupture after coagulopathy owing to a snakebite.

    PubMed

    Kang, Changwoo; Kim, Dong Hoon; Kim, Seong Chun; Kim, Dong Seob; Jeong, Chi-Young

    2014-09-01

    Among the many complications that may follow envenomation by some species of venomous snakes, coagulopathy is common and well known. However, hemoperitoneum induced by coagulopathy after a snakebite is rare. Atraumatic spontaneous splenic rupture is also an uncommon and life-threatening condition. Here, we report a case of presumptive envenomation by Gloydius spp. that resulted in atraumatic splenic rupture as a probable manifestation of coagulopathy, which has not been previously reported. PMID:24882658

  13. Surgical treatment of symptomatic and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Tonev, A; Dimitrov, S; Shkvarla, L; Zahariev, T; Nachev, G

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increased volume of patients undergoing selective reconstruction on the occasion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in the last decades, the number of patients with rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAA) is not significantly decreased. RAAA is catastrophic and life-threatening condition. It remains a challenge to every practitioner. To optimize the surgical practice we studied the literature for the treatment of symptomatic and rupture aneurysm of the abdominal aorta. PMID:24151748

  14. First report of splenic rupture following deep enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Girelli, Carlo Maria; Pometta, Roberta; Facciotto, Corinna; Mella, Roberto; Bernasconi, Giordano

    2016-01-01

    Splenic rupture is a rare complication of diagnostic and therapeutic gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures. Herein, we report for the first time a case of splenic rupture following therapeutic retrograde double-balloon enteroscopy, which occurred in an 85-year-old man who was treated for recurrent mid-intestinal bleeding that resulted from ileal angioectasia. This patient promptly underwent an operation and eventually recovered. PMID:27170840

  15. Ruptured giant dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Dange, Nitin; Mahore, Amit; Goel, Atul

    2010-08-01

    We report a 27-year-old male with a giant dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus that extended into the posterior fossa and ruptured, causing meningitis and hydrocephalus. We also discuss the radiological features, surgical challenges and management difficulties of such a cyst. A giant dermoid cyst of the cavernous sinus that extends into the posterior fossa and subsequently ruptures has not been previously reported. PMID:20483617

  16. Tetraventricular hydrocephalus due to ruptured intracranial dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Karabulut, N; Oguzkurt, L

    2000-01-01

    We present the MR imaging findings in a patient who developed tetraventricular hydrocephalus after massive rupture of dermoid cysts with generalized subarachnoid and ventricular spread of cyst contents. The development of tetraventricular hydrocephalus due to ruptured dermoid is a very unusual complication, and was attributed to cyst contents interfering with passage of cerebrospinal fluid through the arachnoid granulations and fourth ventricular outlet foramina. PMID:11097411

  17. Imaging features of postpartum uterine rupture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Has, Recep; Topuz, Samet; Kalelioglu, Ibrahim; Tagrikulu, Demet

    2008-01-01

    We present a case report on a postpartum uterine rupture with the history of a previous cesarean section. During the diagnosis of rupture, ultrasound, computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging of the uterus were obtained. Ultrasound examination did not result in substantial information. CT and magnetic resonance imaging established the correct diagnosis. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy, and the diagnosis was confirmed. Diagnostic qualifications of these three instruments were compared. PMID:17435984

  18. Traumatic rupture of both peroneal longus and brevis tendons.

    PubMed

    Pelet, Stéphane; Saglini, Marco; Garofalo, Raffaele; Wettstein, Michael; Mouhsine, Elyazid

    2003-09-01

    Injuries of peroneal tendons are rare. Diagnosis of traumatic rupture is often late and presents as chronic ankle instability. A case of a complete traumatic rupture of both peroneal longus and brevis tendons with acute clinical and radiological diagnosis is presented. Surgical repair was performed by direct end-to-end suture on the 4th day after trauma, with excellent functional outcome at 1-year follow-up. PMID:14524524

  19. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm diagnosed through non-contrast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chatra, Priyank S

    2013-01-01

    Rupture of an aneurysm is a rare complication although it is considered a common cause of death. Some of these patients present with the classic triad of symptoms such as abdominal pain, pulsatile abdominal mass and shock. Most symptoms are misleading and will only present as vague abdominal pain. Here we describe one such patient with an unusual presentation of a misleading abdominal mass which was eventually diagnosed as a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm after an emergency MRI. PMID:25003065

  20. A Tuboovarian Abscess Associated with a Ruptured Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jennifer S.; Sheele, Johnathan Michael

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of a tuboovarian abscess complicated by a ruptured spleen. Our patient was a 27-year-old female with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who presented to the emergency department (ED) with complaints of urinary symptoms and diarrhea. After being diagnosed with a tuboovarian abscess (TOA), she received antibiotics and was admitted to the gynecology service. Shortly thereafter she developed hemorrhagic shock, necessitating a splenectomy and salpingooophorectomy from a ruptured spleen. PMID:26904315

  1. Hypocenter locations in finite-source rupture models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mai, P.M.; Spudich, P.; Boatwright, J.

    2005-01-01

    We use a database of more than 80 finite-source rupture models for more than 50 earthquakes (Mw, 4.1-8.1) with different faulting styles occurring in both tectonic and subduction environments to analyze the location of the hypocenter within the fault and to consider the correlation between hypocenter location and regions of large slip. Rupture in strike-slip and crustal dip-slip earthquakes tends to nucleate in the deeper sections of the fault; subduction earthquakes do not show this tendency. Ratios of the hypocentral slip to either the average or the maximum slip show that rupture can nucleate at locations with any level of relative displacement. Rupture nucleates in regions of very large slip (D ??? 2/3 Dmax,) in only 16% of the events, in regions of large slip (1/3 Dmax < D < 2/3 Dmax,) in 35% of the events, and in regions of low slip (D ??? 1/3 Dmax) in 48% of the events. These percentages significantly exceed the percentages of fault area with very large (???7%) and large (???28%) slip. Ruptures that nucleate in regions of low slip, however, tend to nucleate close to regions of large slip and encounter a zone of very large slip within half the total rupture length. Applying several statistical tests we conclude that hypocenters are not randomly located on a fault but are located either within or close to regions of large slip.

  2. The temporal distribution of seismic radiation during deep earthquake rupture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houston, H.; Vidale, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    The time history of energy release during earthquakes illuminates the process of failure, which remains enigmatic for events deeper than about 100 kilometers. Stacks of teleseismic records from regional arrays for 122 intermediate (depths of 100 to 350 kilometers) and deep (depths of 350 to 700 kilometers) earthquakes show that the temporal pattern of short-period seismic radiation has a systematic variation with depth. On average, for intermediate depth events more radiation is released toward the beginning of the rupture than near the end, whereas for deep events radiation is released symmetrically over the duration of the event, with an abrupt beginning and end of rupture. These findings suggest a variation in the style of rupture related to decreasing fault heterogeneity with depth.The time history of energy release during earthquakes illuminates the process of failure, which remains enigmatic for events deeper than about 100 kilometers. Stacks of teleseismic records from regional arrays for 122 intermediate (depths of 100 to 350 kilometers) and deep (depths of 350 to 700 kilometers) earthquakes show that the temporal pattern of short-period seismic radiation has a systematic variation with depth. On average, for intermediate depth events more radiation is released toward the beginning of the rupture than near the end, whereas for deep events radiation is released symmetrically over the duration of the event, with an abrupt beginning and end of rupture. These findings suggest a variation in the style of rupture related to decreasing fault heterogeneity with depth.

  3. Short term creep rupture predictions for tantalum alloy T-111

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, John J.

    1991-01-01

    A knowledge of the short term creep rupture behavior of Tantalum alloy T-111 is necessary to predict device integrity in the heat source section of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) at the end of service life, in the event of a fuel fire. High pressures exist in RTGs near the end of service life, these are caused by gas generation resulting from radioactive decay of the nuclear fuel. The internal pressure exerts a significant hoop stress on the T-111 alloy structural containment member. This paper analyses the short term creep behavior (rupture times up to ˜2×103 hrs.) of cold worked (CW) T-111 alloy, using the existing data of Stephenson (1967). Corellations for the time to rupture, time to 1% strain and minimum creep rate have been obtained from this data using multivariable linear regression analysis. These results are compared to other short term rupture data for T-111 alloy. Finally, at the stress/temperature levels relevant to the RTG fuel fire scenario near the end of service life, the rupture time correlation for T-111 alloy predicts a rupture time of approximately 100 hrs.

  4. Short term creep rupture predictions for Tantalum alloy T-3

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    A knowledge of the short term creep rupture behavior of Tantalum alloy T-111 is necessary to predict device integrity in the heat source section of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG's) at the end of service life, in the event of a fuel fire. High pressures exist in RTG's near the end of service life, these are caused by gas generation resulting from radioactive decay of the nuclear fuel. The internal pressure exerts a significant hoop stress on the T-111 alloy structural containment member. This paper analyses the short term creep behavior (rupture times up to {approximately}2 {times} 10{sup 3} hrs.) of cold worked (CW) T-111 alloy, using the existing data of Stephenson (1967). Corellations for the time to rupture, time to 1% strain and minimum creep rate have been obtained from this data using multivariable linear regression analysis. These results are compared to other short term rupture data for T-111 alloy. Finally, at the stress/temperature levels relevant to the RTG fuel fire scenario near the end of service life, the rupture time correlation for T-111 alloy predicts a rupture time of approximately 100 hrs. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Short term creep rupture predictions for tantalum alloy T-111

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J. )

    1991-01-01

    A knowledge of the short term creep rupture behavior of Tantalum alloy T-111 is necessary to predict device integrity in the heat source section of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) at the end of service life, in the event of a fuel fire. High pressures exist in RTGs near the end of service life, these are caused by gas generation resulting from radioactive decay of the nuclear fuel. The internal pressure exerts a significant hoop stress on the T-111 alloy structural containment member. This paper analyses the short term creep behavior (rupture times up to {similar to}2{times}10{sup 3} hrs.) of cold worked (CW) T-111 alloy, using the existing data of Stephenson (1967). Corellations for the time to rupture, time to 1% strain and minimum creep rate have been obtained from this data using multivariable linear regression analysis. These results are compared to other short term rupture data for T-111 alloy. Finally, at the stress/temperature levels relevant to the RTG fuel fire scenario near the end of service life, the rupture time correlation for T-111 alloy predicts a rupture time of approximately 100 hrs.

  6. Dynamic rupture modeling with laboratory-derived constitutive relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okubo, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory-derived state variable friction constitutive relation is used in the numerical simulation of the dynamic growth of an in-plane or mode II shear crack. According to this formulation, originally presented by J.H. Dieterich, frictional resistance varies with the logarithm of the slip rate and with the logarithm of the frictional state variable as identified by A.L. Ruina. Under conditions of steady sliding, the state variable is proportional to (slip rate)-1. Following suddenly introduced increases in slip rate, the rate and state dependencies combine to produce behavior which resembles slip weakening. When rupture nucleation is artificially forced at fixed rupture velocity, rupture models calculated with the state variable friction in a uniformly distributed initial stress field closely resemble earlier rupture models calculated with a slip weakening fault constitutive relation. Model calculations suggest that dynamic rupture following a state variable friction relation is similar to that following a simpler fault slip weakening law. However, when modeling the full cycle of fault motions, rate-dependent frictional responses included in the state variable formulation are important at low slip rates associated with rupture nucleation. -from Author

  7. Limitations of rupture forecasting exposed by instantaneously triggered earthquake doublet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, E.; Elliott, J. R.; Sloan, R. A.; Craig, T. J.; Funning, G. J.; Hutko, A.; Parsons, B. E.; Wright, T. J.

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake hazard assessments and rupture forecasts are based on the potential length of seismic rupture and whether or not slip is arrested at fault segment boundaries. Such forecasts do not generally consider that one earthquake can trigger a second large event, near-instantaneously, at distances greater than a few kilometres. Here we present a geodetic and seismological analysis of a magnitude 7.1 intracontinental earthquake that occurred in Pakistan in 1997. We find that the earthquake, rather than a single event as hitherto assumed, was in fact an earthquake doublet: initial rupture on a shallow, blind reverse fault was followed just 19 s later by a second rupture on a separate reverse fault 50 km away. Slip on the second fault increased the total seismic moment by half, and doubled both the combined event duration and the area of maximum ground shaking. We infer that static Coulomb stresses at the initiation location of the second earthquake were probably reduced as a result of the first. Instead, we suggest that a dynamic triggering mechanism is likely, although the responsible seismic wave phase is unclear. Our results expose a flaw in earthquake rupture forecasts that disregard cascading, multiple-fault ruptures of this type.

  8. Evidence for Supershear Rupture During the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S.; Beroza, G. C.; Segall, P.

    2005-12-01

    The 1906 San Francisco earthquake is perhaps the single most important event in the history of earthquake science. Measurements taken and analyzed for that event led to the demonstration of elastic rebound. Despite the importance of this earthquake, the two most recently published source models, one based on seismic data and the other based on geodetic data, are sharply discordant. We suggest the two source models can be reconciled if rupture in the 1906 earthquake exceeded the shear wave velocity. Observations of super-shear rupture in recent large strike-slip earthquakes suggests that it is possible and may even be typical of large strike-slip events. We find that we can fit the geodetic data and the envelope of the seismic data provided the rupture exceeds the shear wave speed to the north of Point Arena. We are analyzing non-repeated triangulation measurements and solving the joint slip/rupture velocity inverse problem to test this hypothesis more rigorously. If supershear rupture in large earthquakes is common, it would be of fundamental importance for understanding the hazard posed by large strike-slip faults in general, and for our understanding seismic hazard in northern California in particular, because so much of our characterization of the hazard in that region is based on our understanding of what happened in 1906. The prediction of strong ground motion in future large strike-slip earthquakes will be profoundly different if earthquake rupture velocity is routinely supershear.

  9. Fast rupture propagation for large strike-slip earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dun; Mori, Jim; Koketsu, Kazuki

    2016-04-01

    Studying rupture speeds of shallow earthquakes is of broad interest because it has a large effect on the strong near-field shaking that causes damage during earthquakes, and it is an important parameter that reflects stress levels and energy on a slipping fault. However, resolving rupture speed is difficult in standard waveform inversion methods due to limited near-field observations and the tradeoff between rupture speed and fault size for teleseismic observations. Here we applied back-projection methods to estimate the rupture speeds of 15 Mw ≥ 7.8 dip-slip and 8 Mw ≥ 7.5 strike-slip earthquakes for which direct P waves are well recorded in Japan on Hi-net, or in North America on USArray. We found that all strike-slip events had very fast average rupture speeds of 3.0-5.0 km/s, which are near or greater than the local shear wave velocity (supershear). These values are faster than for thrust and normal faulting earthquakes that generally rupture with speeds of 1.0-3.0 km/s.

  10. Dissecting aneurysm of vertebral artery manifestating as contralateral abducens nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Sue; Lee, Sang Hyung; Son, Young-Je; Chung, Young Seob

    2013-03-01

    Isolated abducens nerve paresis related to ruptured vertebral artery (VA) aneurysm is rare. It usually occurs bilaterally or ipsilaterally to the pathologic lesions. We report the case of a contralateral sixth nerve palsy following ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. A 38-year-old man was admitted for the evaluation of a 6-day history of headache. Abnormalities were not seen on initial computed tomography (CT). On admission, the patient was alert and no signs reflecting neurologic deficits were noted. Time of flight magnetic resonance angiography revealed a fusiform dilatation of the right VA involving origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient suddenly suffered from severe headache with diplopia the day before the scheduled cerebral angiography. Neurologic examination disclosed nuchal rigidity and isolated left abducens nerve palsy. Emergent CT scan showed high density in the basal and prepontine cistern compatible with ruptured aneurismal hemorrhage. Right vertebral angiography illustrated a right VA dissecting aneurysm with prominent displaced vertebrobasilar artery to inferiorly on left side. Double-stent placement was conducted for the treatment of ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. No diffusion restriction signals were observed in follow-up magnetic resonance imaging of the brain stem. Eleven weeks later, full recovery of left sixth nerve palsy was documented photographically. In conclusion, isolated contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with ruptured VA aneurysm may develop due to direct nerve compression by displaced verterobasilar artery triggered by primary thick clot in the prepontine cistern. PMID:23634273

  11. Self-healing pulse-like shear ruptures in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Lykotrafitis, George; Rosakis, Ares J; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2006-09-22

    Models predict that dynamic shear ruptures during earthquake faulting occur as either sliding cracks, where a large section of the interface slides behind a fast-moving rupture front, or self-healing slip pulses, where the fault relocks shortly behind the rupture front. We report experimental visualizations of crack-like, pulse-like, and mixed rupture modes propagating along frictionally held, "incoherent" interfaces separating identical solids, and we describe the conditions under which those modes develop. A combination of simultaneously performed measurements via dynamic photoelasticity and laser interferometry reveals the rupture mode type, the exact point of rupture initiation, the sliding velocity history, and the rupture propagation speed. PMID:16990544

  12. Right ventricular free wall dissection as a rupture tract in left ventricular rupture during acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Takada, Aya; Saito, Kazuyuki; Murai, Tatsuya; Kurosaki, Kunihiko; Kurihara, Katsuyoshi; Hamamatsu, Akihiko

    2015-11-01

    Three rare cases of cardiac rupture with right ventricular wall dissection during acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were reported. The cases comprised 2% among our 148 previously reported postinfarction cardiac ruptures with sudden death. The dissections occurred in hearts with biventricular inferior wall AMI and developed between the superficial layers and the deeper layers of inferior wall of the right ventricle. All had an endocardial tear at the basal septum where it meets the inferior free wall of the left ventricle, and had an epicardial tear on the middle inferior wall of the right ventricle. Based on the evidence of the ages of the thrombi of the rupture tracts, delayed epicardial rupture was found besides that soon after the right ventricular dissection. PMID:26594003

  13. STS-93 SSME Nozzle Tube Rupture Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, W. Dennis

    1999-01-01

    STS-93 was launched on July 23, 1999. There was an anomaly at the end of the launch in that the main engines shut down 0.16 second early because sensors detected a low level of oxidizer in the LOX tank (actually the duct from the tank to the vehicle). This resulted in a cutoff velocity for the vehicle that was 16 ft/sec low. It should have been 25872 ft/sec. The OMS engines were subsequently used to achieve the proper orbit. An investigation was immediately initiated into the cause of this LOX tank low level cutoff. It was noticed during the launch that the turbine temperatures for Main Engine 3 (E2019) were approximately 100 F higher than the preflight prediction. Linear Engine Model matching of the data indicated that a nozzle leak best fit the data. Post launch review of the data showed, that at approximately five seconds into the start, numerous parameters indicated small anomalous shifts. These shifts were all consistent with a rupture of nozzle tubes. Post launch review of the films showed that just after Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) ignition and just prior to liftoff a streak is seen in the exhaust plume of E2019. Just after liftoff the streak can be seen emanating from the nozzle wall. This photo confirmed that a leak was coming from the nozzle tubes. Based on the photo, the axial location of the leak was estimated to be 28 in. from the aft end of the nozzle and in line with nozzle coolant feed line #1. The streak continued to be visible during the launch.

  14. Carotid Atheroma Rupture Observed In Vivo and FSI-Predicted Stress Distribution Based on Pre-rupture Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rayz, Vitaliy L.; Soares, Bruno; Wintermark, Max; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Saloner, David

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis at the carotid bifurcation is a major risk factor for stroke. As mechanical forces may impact lesion stability, finite element studies have been conducted on models of diseased vessels to elucidate the effects of lesion characteristics on the stresses within plaque materials. It is hoped that patient-specific biomechanical analyses may serve clinically to assess the rupture potential for any particular lesion, allowing better stratification of patients into the most appropriate treatments. Due to a sparsity of in vivo plaque rupture data, the relationship between various mechanical descriptors such as stresses or strains and rupture vulnerability is incompletely known, and the patient-specific utility of biomechanical analyses is unclear. In this article, we present a comparison between carotid atheroma rupture observed in vivo and the plaque stress distribution from fluid–structure interaction analysis based on pre-rupture medical imaging. The effects of image resolution are explored and the calculated stress fields are shown to vary by as much as 50% with sub-pixel geometric uncertainty. Within these bounds, we find a region of pronounced elevation in stress within the fibrous plaque layer of the lesion with a location and extent corresponding to that of the observed site of plaque rupture. PMID:20232151

  15. Vortex dynamics in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trylesinski, Gabriel

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are a potentially devastating pathological dilation of brain arteries that affect 1.5-5 % of the population. Causing around 500 000 deaths per year worldwide, their detection and treatment to prevent rupture is critical. Multiple recent studies have tried to find a hemodynamics predictor of aneurysm rupture, but concluded with distinct opposite trends using Wall Shear Stress (WSS) based parameters in different clinical datasets. Nevertheless, several research groups tend to converge for now on the fact that the flow patterns and flow dynamics of the ruptured aneurysms are complex and unstable. Following this idea, we investigated the vortex properties of both unruptured and ruptured cerebral aneurysms. A brief comparison of two Eulerian vortex visualization methods (Q-criterion and lambda 2 method) showed that these approaches gave similar results in our complex aneurysm geometries. We were then able to apply either one of them to a large dataset of 74 patient specific cases of intracranial aneurysms. Those real cases were obtained by 3D angiography, numerical reconstruction of the geometry, and then pulsatile CFD simulation before post-processing with the mentioned vortex visualization tools. First we tested the two Eulerian methods on a few cases to verify their implementation we made as well as compare them with each other. After that, the Q-criterion was selected as method of choice for its more obvious physical meaning (it shows the balance between two characteristics of the flow, its swirling and deformation). Using iso-surfaces of Q, we started by categorizing the patient-specific aneurysms based on the gross topology of the aneurysmal vortices. This approach being unfruitful, we found a new vortex-based characteristic property of ruptured aneurysms to stratify the rupture risk of IAs that we called the Wall-Kissing Vortices, or WKV. We observed that most ruptured aneurysms had a large amount of WKV, which appears to agree with the current hypothesized biological triggers of pathological remodeling of the artery walls. Having a good natural ratio of statuses in our IA cohort (55 unruptured vs. 19 ruptured), we were able to test the statistical significance of our predictor to fortify our findings. We also performed a distribution analysis of our cohort with respect to the number of WKV to strengthen the encouraging statistical analysis result; both analyses provided a clear good separation of the status of the aneurysms based on our predictor. Lastly, we constructed a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to analyze the power different thresholds of WKV had in splitting the data in a binary way (unruptured/ruptured). The number of WKV was efficaciously able to stratify the rupture status, identifying 84.21 % of the ruptured aneurysms (with 25.45 % of false positives, i.e. unruptured IAs tagged as ruptured) when using a threshold value of 2. Our novel work undertaken to study the vortex structures in IAs brought to light interesting characteristics of the flow in the aneurysmal sac. We found that there are several distinct categories in which the aneurysm vortex topologies can be put in without relationship to the aneurysm rupture status. This first finding was in contradiction with available already-published results. Nonetheless, ruptured IAs had a statistically significant larger amount of WKV as opposed to unruptured aneurysms. This new predictor we propose to the community could very well clear a new path among the currently controversial WSS-based parameters. Although it needs to be improved to be more resilient, the first results obtained by the WKV-based parameter are promising when applied to a large dataset of 74 IAs patient-specific transient CFD simulations.

  16. Dynamic rupture at the beginning of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchide, T.

    2012-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake (M 9.0) is characterized by a shallow huge slip more than 40 m, which produced the devastating tsunami. For modeling this earthquake, the stress accumulation and the kinematic rupture process should be understood. Here I focus on the kinematics of this earthquake in the early stage. A couple of studies already came out. Chu et al. (2011) found that the first 4 s of the rupture is equivalent to an Mw 4.9 thrust event. Uchide et al. (AGU, 2011) reported the source process in the first 20 s in detail by the multiscale slip inversion analysis (Uchide and Ide, 2007). Their result implies that rupture propagated eastward until 8 s, and after that the rupture propagated westward. The peak slip rate is around 1 m/s, which implies the dynamic rupture. Hi-net (borehole high-sensitivity seismic network) and KiK-net (borehole strong-motion network) data in Tohoku area shows that the velocity amplitude increases stepwise around 4 s and 16 s. In the first 1 s, the velocity amplitude of the M9 event is comparable to that of nearby M4 events (Mw 4.3 - 4.9). I perform a multiscale slip inversion analysis to focus on the first 10 and 20 s. The multiscale source model is composed of three scales: Scale 1 (smallest) for first 10 s; Scale 2 for first 20 s; and Scale 3 (largest) for the entire source process. The temporal and spatial intervals of grids to discretize the slip-rate distribution history on the fault are 3 km and 1 s for Scale 1, 5 km and 2 s for Scale 2, and 25 km and 10 s for Scale 3. Hi-net data are used for Scales 1 and 2, and KiK-net and F-net strong-motion data are used for Scale 3. Green's functions for Scales 1 and 2 are empirical ones using the observed waveforms of an Mw 4.9 earthquake which occurred at 21:00 on March 9, 2011 (UTC). Those for Scale 3 are calculated assuming a 1D velocity structure. The complex rupture process at the beginning of the Tohoku earthquake is obtained. From the beginning, the peak slip rate is around or more than 1 m/s, which implies dynamic rupture. In the first 14 s, a rupture propagated mainly toward north, and since then, the rupture propagation direction was changed to westward or downward. The change of the rupture propagation direction occurred at the slip area of the M 7.3 foreshock (March 9, 2011) (Ohta et al., 2012). It is probable that, since the stress in the rupture area of the M 7.3 foreshock was already released, the rupture of the mainshock could not propagate north any more. And the prestress on the west was enough high, therefore the rupture changed the propagation direction. Such detailed study on the initial rupture process helps us understand how the M 9 earthquake was initiated. Acknowledgement I used seismic data from Hi-net, KiK-net, and F-net of NIED, and JMA earthquake catalog.

  17. Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress Rupture Lifting Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress rupture failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle s Kevlar-49 (DuPont) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed nonconservative life predictions have been made where stress rupture data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23 percent lower than what had previously been used to predict stress rupture life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress rupture lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress rupture life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.

  18. Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress Rupture Lifing Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress rupture failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle's Kevlar-49 fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed non-conservative life predictions have been made where stress rupture data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic-plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23% lower than what had previously been used to predict stress rupture life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress rupture lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress rupture life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.

  19. Morphological Parameters Associated with Ruptured Posterior Communicating Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Allen; Lin, Ning; Charoenvimolphan, Nareerat; Stanley, Mary; Frerichs, Kai U.; Day, Arthur L.; Du, Rose

    2014-01-01

    The rupture risk of unruptured intracranial aneurysms is known to be dependent on the size of the aneurysm. However, the association of morphological characteristics with ruptured aneurysms has not been established in a systematic and location specific manner for the most common aneurysm locations. We evaluated posterior communicating artery (PCoA) aneurysms for morphological parameters associated with aneurysm rupture in that location. CT angiograms were evaluated to generate 3-D models of the aneurysms and surrounding vasculature. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate morphological parameters including aneurysm volume, aspect ratio, size ratio, distance to ICA bifurcation, aneurysm angle, vessel angles, flow angles, and vessel-to-vessel angles. From 2005–2012, 148 PCoA aneurysms were treated in a single institution. Preoperative CTAs from 63 patients (40 ruptured, 23 unruptured) were available and analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that smaller volume (p = 0.011), larger aneurysm neck diameter (0.048), and shorter ICA bifurcation to aneurysm distance (p = 0.005) were the most strongly associated with aneurysm rupture after adjusting for all other clinical and morphological variables. Multivariate subgroup analysis for patients with visualized PCoA demonstrated that larger neck diameter (p = 0.018) and shorter ICA bifurcation to aneurysm distance (p = 0.011) were significantly associated with rupture. Intracerebral hemorrhage was associated with smaller volume, larger maximum height, and smaller aneurysm angle, in addition to lateral projection, male sex, and lack of hypertension. We found that shorter ICA bifurcation to aneurysm distance is significantly associated with PCoA aneurysm rupture. This is a new physically intuitive parameter that can be measured easily and therefore be readily applied in clinical practice to aid in the evaluation of patients with PCoA aneurysms. PMID:24733151

  20. Downdip landward limit of Cascadia great earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyndman, R. D.

    2013-10-01

    paper examines the constraints to the downdip landward limit of rupture for the Cascadia great earthquakes off western North America. This limit is a primary control for ground motion hazard at near-coastal cities. The studies also provide information on the physical controls of subduction thrust rupture globally. The constraints are (1) "locked/transition" zones from geodetic deformation (GPS, repeated leveling, tide gauges); (2) rupture zone from paleoseismic coastal marsh subsidence, "paleogeodesy"; (3) temperature on the thrust for the seismic-aseismic transition; (4) change in thrust seismic reflection character downdip from thin seismic to thick ductile; (5) fore-arc mantle corner aseismic serpentinite and talc overlying the thrust; (6) updip limit of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) slow slip; (7) rupture area associations with shelf-slope basins; (8) depth limit for small events on the thrust; and (9) landward limit of earthquakes on the Nootka transform fault zone. The most reliable constraints for the limit of large rupture displacement, >10 m, are generally just offshore in agreement with thermal control for this hot subduction zone, but well-offshore central Oregon and near the coast of northern Washington. The limit for 1-2 m rupture that can still provide strong shaking is less well estimated 25-50 km farther landward. The fore-arc mantle corner and the updip extent of ETS slow slip are significantly landward from the other constraints. Surprisingly, there is a downdip gap between the best other estimates for the great earthquake rupture zone and the ETS slow slip. In this gap, plate convergence may occur as continuous slow creep.

  1. Predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm rupture potential

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Caitlin; Sun, Wei; Pham, Thuy; Elefteriades, John

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is a leading cause of death in adults, often taking lives without any premonitory signs or symptoms. Adverse clinical outcomes of aortic aneurysm are preventable by elective surgical repair; however, identifying at-risk individuals is difficult. The objective of this study was to perform a predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm (AsAA) tissue to assess rupture risk on a patient-specific level. AsAA tissues, obtained intra-operatively from 50 patients, were subjected to biaxial mechanical and uniaxial failure tests to obtain their passive elastic mechanical properties. A novel analytical method was developed to predict the AsAA pressure-diameter response as well as the aortic wall yield and failure responses. Our results indicated that the mean predicted AsAA diameter at rupture was 5.6 ± 0.7 cm, and the associated blood pressure to induce rupture was 579.4 ± 214.8 mmHg. Statistical analysis showed significant positive correlation between aneurysm tissue compliance and predicted risk of rupture, where patients with a pressure-strain modulus ≥100 kPa may be nearly twice as likely to experience rupture than patients with more compliant aortic tissue. The mechanical analysis of pre-dissection patient tissue properties established in this study could predict the “future” onset of yielding and rupture in AsAA patients. The analysis results implicate decreased tissue compliance as a risk factor for AsAA rupture. The presented methods may serve as a basis for the development of a pre-operative planning tool for AsAA evaluation, a tool currently unavailable. PMID:23948500

  2. Creep-rupture behavior of candidate Stirling engine iron supperalloys in high-pressure hydrogen. Volume 2: Hydrogen creep-rupture behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Peterman, W.; Hales, C.

    1984-01-01

    The creep rupture behavior of nine iron base and one cobalt base candidate Stirling engine alloys is evaluated. Rupture life, minimum creep rate, and time to 1% strain data are analyzed. The 3500 h rupture life stress and stress to obtain 1% strain in 3500 h are also estimated.

  3. Using Dynamic Rupture Models to Explore Physical Controls on the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, B.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic and geodetic recordings are routinely used to invert for kinematic source models of large earthquakes, which provide us with detailed images of slip distribution and rupture evolution on causative faults. To gain insight into physical conditions that allow a fault to slip and a rupture to propagate in the way they did, we can resort to dynamic source models that obey physical laws in continuum mechanics and rock friction. Published kinematic models of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake reveal several features of the rupture. These features include 1) high static stress drop with large amounts of slip in a small area, 2) a weak initial phase, down-dip rupture for the first 40 seconds, extensive shallow rupture during 60 to 70 seconds, and continuing deeper rupture lasting more than 100 seconds, and 3) systematically down-dip high-frequency radiation with respect to the hypocenter. In this study, we use spontaneous rupture models to explore what physical conditions, including the initial stress state and friction properties on the subducting fault, can reproduce these features, so that we can gain some physical insights into controls on this megathrust earthquake. Dynamic rupture simulations of this shallow dipping megathrust faulting at reasonable spatial and temporal resolutions require parallel computing on supercomputers. Our newly parallelized finite element method algorithm EQdyna allows us to simulate a large suite of spontaneous rupture models to examine the questions. In model setup, we use depth-dependence principal stresses and take into account variations in pore fluid pressure and frictional properties associated with subducted seafloor features such as seamounts. Our preliminary results suggest followings. First, a high strength and high stress drop patch (probably a subducted seamount or seamout chain) just above the hypocenter on the fault plane can delay up-dip rupture and result in a concentrated large slip area. Second, significantly negative stress drop on the shallow portion of the subducting fault associated with the active accretionary prism is needed to reduce the amplitude of shallow slip and to confine shallow slip in a small area near the trench just up-dip of the region of maximum fault slip. Third, heterogeneities in the seismic strength parameter S down-dip of the hypocenter, probably due to both heterogeneous stresses from previous earthquakes and heterogeneous friction properties at the brittle and ductile transition zone, can produce large amounts of high-frequency radiations.

  4. Increased 18F-FDG Uptake Is Predictive of Rupture in a Novel Rat Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture Model

    PubMed Central

    English, Sean J.; Piert, Morand R.; Diaz, Jose A.; Gordon, David; Ghosh, Abhijit; D'Alecy, Louis G.; Whitesall, Steven E.; Sharma, Ashish K.; DeRoo, Elise P.; Watt, Tessa; Su, Gang; Henke, Peter K.; Eliason, Jonathan L.; Ailawadi, Gorav; Upchurch, Gilbert R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) micro–positron emission tomography (micro-PET) can predict abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture. Background An infrarenal AAA model is needed to study inflammatory mechanisms that drive rupture. 18F-FDG PET can detect vascular inflammation in animal models and patients. Methods After exposing Sprague-Dawley rats to intra-aortic porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) (12 U/mL), AAA rupture was induced by daily, subcutaneous, β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN, 300 mg/kg, N = 24) administration. Negative control AAA animals (N = 15) underwent daily saline subcutaneous injection after PPE exposure. BAPN-exposed animals that did not rupture served as positive controls [nonruptured AAA (NRAAA) 14d, N = 9]. Rupture was witnessed using radiotelemetry. Maximum standard uptakes for 18F-FDG micro-PET studies were determined. Aortic wall PAI-1, uPA, and tPA concentrations were determined by western blot analyses. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and MIP-2 were determined by Bio-Plex bead array. Neutrophil and macrophage populations per high-power field were quantified. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activities were determined by zymography. Results When comparing ruptured AAA (RAAA) to NRAAA 14d animals, increased focal 18F-FDG uptakes were detected at subsequent sites of rupture (P = 0.03). PAI-1 expression was significantly less in RAAA tissue (P = 0.01), with comparable uPA and decreased tPA levels (P = 0.02). IL-1β (P = 0.04), IL-6 (P = 0.001), IL-10 (P = 0.04), and MIP-2 (P = 0.02)expression, neutrophil (P = 0.02) and macrophage presence (P = 0.002), and MMP9 (P < 0.0001) activity were increased in RAAA tissue. Conclusions With this AAA rupture model, increased prerupture 18F-FDG uptake on micro-PET imaging was associated with increased inflammation in the ruptured AAA wall. 18F-FDG PET imaging may be used to monitor inflammatory changes before AAA rupture. PMID:24651130

  5. Earthquake Rupture Complexity Evidence from Field Observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudnut, K. W.; Fletcher, J. M.; Rockwell, T. K.; Gonzalez-Garcia, J. J.; Teran, O.; Akciz, S. O.

    2010-12-01

    Field observations provide strong evidence for four intriguing aspects of rupture process complexity for the 4 April 2010 El Mayor - Cucapah - Indiviso earthquake. First, the southern “fork” of the rupture exhibits two splays just to the northwest of the event epicenter, both with nearly pure right-lateral faulting. Teleseismic source modeling by others indicates normal slip on deep fault surface preceded the shallow strike-slip faulting, and our field observations from the fork area indicate that the earliest phase of strike-slip faulting did not involve a significant normal faulting component. Second, as rupture propagated to the northwest along the Pescadores fault, slip ended abruptly on this fault and transferred across a complex zone to the Borrego fault (although the Pescadores fault continues farther and would have seemed an easier route to follow). This stepover is called the Puerta Accommodation Zone (PAZ) which extends 11 km along-strike within an elevated portion of the Cucapah massif and accommodates a left step (transpressional) that measures less than 2 km across-strike. Though partly obscured by rockfalls in the steep terrain here, only discontinuous faulting of up to one meter reached the ground surface, yet imagery differencing by others indicates several meters of continuous subsurface slip throughout this section. This 11 km region of reduced and discontinuous slip is one of the longest surface rupture jumps ever observed, with lengthy and continuous surface faulting on either side. The SE end of the stepover coincides spatially with the Canon Rojo embayment where the M7.2 1892 surface rupture propagated onto a second fault forming an abrupt corner in its surface trace. Hence, the surface rupture and slip distribution pattern in 2010 appears to have been influenced by stress changes induced by the 1892 event. Thirdly, from the NW end of the transition section, the Borrego fault continues to the NNW with strong east-down slip obliquity. Along this same reach of fault, the Laguna Salada fault was re-activated with minor west side down slip. Along the Paso Inferior accommodation zone, splays trending NNW to N had strong east-down slip, with right-lateral oblique motion. It was along this portion of the rupture that an eyewitness observed the rupture propagating from N to S, instead of in the expected S to N direction. Back-rupture may have resulted from triggered slip having raced ahead of the slower main rupture front, or may indicate a place where contiguous deep rupture ran out in front of shallow slip, or may result from the involvement here of the detachment fault system. Finally, in the northwestern portion of the rupture, from Paso Superior to the northwest of Cerro Centinela, a pattern of NE - SW oriented “cross faults” and N-S faults broke at the surface, in a manner similar to rupture that occurred in the Elmore Ranch Fault Zone during the Superstition Hills earthquake sequence of 1987. Unlike the Elmore Ranch event, however, there was no known main shock sub-event or any large aftershock that can be readily associated with the extensive cross-faulting that is observed in this case.

  6. Radiographic Risk Factors for Contralateral Rupture in Dogs with Unilateral Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Connie; Ramaker, Megan A.; Kaur, Sirjaut; Csomos, Rebecca A.; Kroner, Kevin T.; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Schaefer, Susan L.; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Complete cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a common cause of pelvic limb lameness in dogs. Dogs with unilateral CR often develop contralateral CR over time. Although radiographic signs of contralateral stifle joint osteoarthritis (OA) influence risk of subsequent contralateral CR, this risk has not been studied in detail. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a retrospective longitudinal cohort study of client-owned dogs with unilateral CR to determine how severity of radiographic stifle synovial effusion and osteophytosis influence risk of contralateral CR over time. Detailed survival analysis was performed for a cohort of 85 dogs after case filtering of an initial sample population of 513 dogs. This population was stratified based on radiographic severity of synovial effusion (graded on a scale of 0, 1, and 2) and severity of osteophytosis (graded on a scale of 0, 1, 2, and 3) of both index and contralateral stifle joints using a reproducible scoring method. Severity of osteophytosis in the index and contralateral stifles was significantly correlated. Rupture of the contralateral cranial cruciate ligament was significantly influenced by radiographic OA in both the index and contralateral stifles at diagnosis. Odds ratio for development of contralateral CR in dogs with severe contralateral radiographic stifle effusion was 13.4 at one year after diagnosis and 11.4 at two years. Odds ratio for development of contralateral CR in dogs with severe contralateral osteophytosis was 9.9 at one year after diagnosis. These odds ratios were associated with decreased time to contralateral CR. Breed, age, body weight, gender, and tibial plateau angle did not significantly influence time to contralateral CR. Conclusion Subsequent contralateral CR is significantly influenced by severity of radiographic stifle effusion and osteophytosis in the contralateral stifle, suggesting that synovitis and arthritic joint degeneration are significant factors in the disease mechanism underlying the arthropathy. PMID:25254499

  7. Surgical Resection of a Ruptured Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Takei, Tomohide; Sakai, Michihiro; Suzuki, Takuya; Yamamoto, Yuji; Ogasawara, Yasuo; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Imaizumi, Jun; Furuya, Ryosuke; Sekido, Hitoshi; Koizumi, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 71 Final Diagnosis: Rupture of a pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Surgical operation Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Ruptured aneurysms of the pancreaticoduodenal artery result in fatal hemorrhage and high mortality. Therefore, prompt diagnosis and treatment are required, but there are sometimes problems differentiating this specific diagnosis from other abdominal pathologies. Case Report: We encountered a rare case of a ruptured pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm with an atypical clinical presentation that simulated acute pancreatitis. A 71-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with abdominal pain in the left upper quadrant, a slightly elevated level of pancreatic amylase, and cholelithiasis on ultrasonography. With persistent pain and progressively decreasing hemoglobin level, computed tomography with contrast showed fluid collection in the subphrenic space, a retroperitoneal hematoma, and a pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm that appeared to originate from a branch of the SMA. Urgent angiography indicated spontaneous rupture of a pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm. Emergent surgery was undertaken, and a simple aneurysmectomy was successfully performed. The patient’s recovery was unremarkable. The prompt diagnosis of a pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm was difficult because the initial symptoms were vague and misleading in our case. Conclusions: A high level of suspicion, rapid diagnostic capability, and prompt surgical or endovascular intervention, as well as effective teamwork in the emergency department, are critical to avoid the devastating consequences of a ruptured visceral artery aneurysm. PMID:26794823

  8. Maximum magnitude estimation considering the regional rupture character

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbazhagan P.; Bajaj, Ketan; Moustafa, Sayed S. R.; Al-Arifi, Nassir S. N.

    2015-07-01

    The main objective of the paper is to develop a new method to estimate the maximum magnitude ( M max) considering the regional rupture character. The proposed method has been explained in detail and examined for both intraplate and active regions. Seismotectonic data has been collected for both the regions, and seismic study area (SSA) map was generated for radii of 150, 300, and 500 km. The regional rupture character was established by considering percentage fault rupture (PFR), which is the ratio of subsurface rupture length (RLD) to total fault length (TFL). PFR is used to arrive RLD and is further used for the estimation of maximum magnitude for each seismic source. Maximum magnitude for both the regions was estimated and compared with the existing methods for determining M max values. The proposed method gives similar M max value irrespective of SSA radius and seismicity. Further seismicity parameters such as magnitude of completeness ( M c ), " a" and " b " parameters and maximum observed magnitude ( M {max/obs}) were determined for each SSA and used to estimate M max by considering all the existing methods. It is observed from the study that existing deterministic and probabilistic M max estimation methods are sensitive to SSA radius, M c , a and b parameters and M {max/obs} values. However, M max determined from the proposed method is a function of rupture character instead of the seismicity parameters. It was also observed that intraplate region has less PFR when compared to active seismic region.

  9. Prehistoric ruptures of the Gurvan Bulag fault, Gobi Altay, Mongolia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, C.S.; Kendrick, K.; Berryman, K.; Bayasgalan, A.; Ritz, J.F.; Spencer, J.Q.

    2002-01-01

    The 1957 Gobi Altay M8.3 earthquake in southern Mongolia was associated with the simultaneous rupture of several faults, including the Gurvan Bulag reverse fault, which is located about 25 km south of the main strike-slip Bogd fault. Our study of paleoseismic excavations across the Gurvan Bulag fault suggests that the penultimate surface rupture occurred after 6.0 ka, most likely between 2.6 and 4.4 ka, and a possible earlier rupture occurred after 7.3 ka. Our interpretation of the stratigraphic relations in one of the exposures suggests that at least five earthquakes have generated surface rupture of the Gurvan Bulag fault since the abandonment of an ancient alluvial fan surface. Luminescence dating of sediment associated with this surface indicates that it formed either 26.6 ?? 2.1 ka or 16.1 ?? 2.0 ka. These data imply that the recurrence intervals for surface faulting on the Gurvan Bulag and Bogd faults are similar, on the order of several thousands of years, but that the penultimate surface ruptures of the two faults did not occur during the same earthquake.

  10. Mucus Rupture in A Collapsed airway: An Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yingying; Bian, Shiyao; Grotberg, James B.

    2011-11-01

    Mucus plugs can completely obstruct an airway. Difficulty in mucus clearance results in lost gas exchange and inflammation. Non-Newtonian properties of mucus, yielding stress and shear-thinning, play significant roles in mucus clearance. We use aqueous carbopol 940 as a mucus stimulant to study clearance of a mucus plug with properties of yielding stress and shear-thinning in a bench-top experiment. A collapsed airway of the 12th generation in a human lung is simulated in a two-dimensional PDMS channel. A stable pressure drop is set along the plug to drive rupture. A micro-PIV technique is used to acquire velocity fields during the rupture process. A yielding pressure drop (initiating plug yielding) is nearly independent of initial plug length. Plug rupture can occur by focused deformation along the centerline or by total plug propagation where the trailing film is thicker than the precursor film. Maximum velocity appears at the rupture moment, and increases at higher pressure drop or smaller plug length. The wall shear gradient can undergo a rapid reversal when rupture occurs, possibly an injurious event to underlying airway epithelial cells. This work is supported by NIH: HL84370 and HL85156.

  11. Rupture of an evaporating liquid bridge between two grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielniczuk, Boleslaw; El Youssoufi, Moulay; Sabatier, Laurent; Hueckel, Tomasz

    2014-10-01

    The study examines rupture of evaporating liquid bridges between two glass spheres. Evolution of the bridge profile has been recorded with the use of high-speed camera. Geometrical characteristics of the bridge were then used to calculate evolution of the variables during the process: Laplace pressure, capillary force, and surface tension force. For the purpose of reference, the bridge evolution is followed also during kinematic extension. During both processes the diameter of the neck decreases, with an acceleration of about 1-2 ms before the rupture. Two distinct rupture modes are observed, depending on the bridge aspect ratio. After the rupture, the mass of liquid splits, forming two separate oscillating drops attached to the spheres, and a suspended satellite droplet. Just before the rupture, an increasing repulsive Laplace pressure, and decreasing negative surface tension force develop. Capillary force follows the trend of the surface tension force, with an accelerating decline. Duration of the whole process and liquid mass stabilization is from 10 to 60 ms.

  12. Geometrical effects of a subducted seamount on stopping megathrust ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongfeng; Liu, Yajing; Lin, Jian

    2013-05-01

    have numerically simulated dynamic ruptures along a "slip-weakening" megathrust fault with a subducted seamount of realistic geometry, demonstrating that seamounts can act as a barrier to earthquake ruptures. Such barrier effect is calculated to be stronger for increased seamount normal stress relative to the ambient level, for larger seamount height-to-width ratio, and for shorter seamount-to-nucleation distance. As the seamount height increases from 0 to 40% of its basal width, the required increase in the effective normal stress on the seamount to stop ruptures drops by as much as ~20%. We further demonstrate that when a seamount is subducted adjacent to the earthquake nucleation zone, coseismic ruptures can be stopped even if the seamount has a lower effective normal stress than the ambient level. These results indicate that subducted seamounts may stop earthquake ruptures for a wide range of seamount normal stress conditions, including the case of the thrust fault being lubricated by seamount-top fluid-rich sediments, as suggested from observations in the Japan and Sunda Trenches.

  13. Direct visualization of microalgae rupture by ultrasound-driven bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommella, Angelo; Harun, Irina; Pouliopoulos, Antonis; Choi, James J.; Hellgardt, Klaus; Garbin, Valeria

    2015-11-01

    Cell rupture induced by ultrasound is central to applications in biotechnology. For instance, cell disruption is required in the production of biofuels from microalgae (unicellular species of algae). Ultrasound-induced cavitation, bubble collapse and jetting are exploited to induce sufficiently large viscous stresses to cause rupture of the cell membranes. It has recently been shown that seeding the flow with bubbles that act as cavitation nuclei significantly reduces the energy cost for cell processing. However, a fundamental understanding of the conditions for rupture of microalgae in the complex flow fields generated by ultrasound-driven bubbles is currently lacking. We perform high-speed video microscopy to visualize the miscroscale details of the interaction of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii , microalgae of about 10 μm in size, with ultrasound-driven microbubbles of 2-200 μm in diameter. We investigate the efficiency of cell rupture depending on ultrasound frequency and pressure amplitude (from 10 kPa up to 1 MPa), and the resulting bubble dynamics regimes. In particular we compare the efficiency of membrane rupture in the acoustic microstreaming flow induced by linear oscillations, with the case of violent bubble collapse and jetting. V.G. acknowledges partial support from the European Commission (FP7-PEOPLE-2013-CIG), Grant No. 618333.

  14. Influence of hydromechanical heterogeneities of fault zones on earthquake ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, F.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid pressurization, a possible mechanism of fault weakening, exerts a critical control on earthquake rupture in the upper crust. One cause for this control is the presence of high fluid pressures inside the fault zone. However, the precise mechanisms relating high fluid pressures and fault rupture remain unclear. Here we use two-dimensional hydromechanical models to show that effective stress changes induced by a transient pulse of fluid pressure along a fault zone with spatially variable material properties-conditions that are representative of natural faults-can be sufficient to produce large slip in the fault core, and fracturing in the surrounding damage volume. Rupture properties outside the limited source region are examined for ranges of values of the degree of material contrast across the fault. Our results indicate that the slip dimension is highly influenced by the contrasts of permeability and rigidity across the fault zone components, from the fault core through the various subzones of the fractured damage zone and to the less fractured host rock. Moreover, high fluid pressures may also develop locally off the narrow fault core, preferentially into the more permeable and less rigid parts of the damage zone, where the deformation is plastic, highlighting a possible mechanism for off-fault rupture. Finally, on faults with hydromechanical heterogeneities at the scale of the internal structure, the fluid pressure and rupture are highly asymmetric with propagation in a preferred direction, that is the more permeable and compliant material of the fault zones.

  15. [Case report: spontaneous rupture of an asymptomatic intracranial dermoid].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Zensho; Takemura, Sunao; Kuge, Atsushi; Sato, Shinya; Kayama, Takamasa

    2010-05-01

    We report a rare case of spontaneous rupture of an asymptomatic, intracranial dermoid cyst. A 64-year-old man complained of transient dizziness. MRI incidentally disclosed a 20-mm-diameter cystic lesion in the left cerebellopontine angle. Since the cyst was asymptomatic, follow-up MRIs were performed. One year later, sudden headache and left oculomotor palsy occurred. MRI showed niveau formation within the cyst and scattered fat droplets within the cerebrospinal fluid space, which indicated a spontaneous rupture of the dermoid cyst. Since hydrocephalus on MRI and gait disturbance appeared 2 months later, the tumor was resected, and a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was inserted. The patient's symptoms disappeared, and there were no postoperative neurological deficits. The pathological diagnosis was dermoid cyst. Only 48 cases of spontaneous rupture of a dermoid cyst have been reported. All were symptomatic, and MRI showed a large cyst. Of these cases, none was detected incidentally. Therefore, this is the first case report of an incidentally found dermoid cyst that ruptured spontaneously. Although asymptomatic, small dermoid cysts are usually followed up by MRI without surgical intervention. The possibility of spontaneous rupture, which may give rise to hydrocephalus, as in this case, should always be kept in mind. PMID:20522917

  16. Factors affecting formation and rupture of intracranial saccular aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Bacigaluppi, S; Piccinelli, M; Antiga, L; Veneziani, A; Passerini, T; Rampini, P; Zavanone, M; Severi, P; Tredici, G; Zona, G; Krings, T; Boccardi, E; Penco, S; Fontanella, M

    2014-01-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms represent a decisional challenge. Treatment risks have to be balanced against an unknown probability of rupture. A better understanding of the physiopathology is the basis for a better prediction of the natural history of an individual patient. Knowledge about the possible determining factors arises from a careful comparison between ruptured versus unruptured aneurysms and from the prospective observation and analysis of unbiased series with untreated, unruptured aneurysms. The key point is the correct identification of the determining variables for the fate of a specific aneurysm in a given individual. Thus, the increased knowledge of mechanisms of formation and eventual rupture of aneurysms should provide significant clues to the identification of rupture-prone aneurysms. Factors like structural vessel wall defects, local hemodynamic stress determined also by peculiar geometric configurations, and inflammation as trigger of a wall remodeling are crucial. In this sense the study of genetic modifiers of inflammatory responses together with the computational study of the vessel tree might contribute to identify aneurysms prone to rupture. The aim of this article is to underline the value of a unifying hypothesis that merges the role of geometry, with that of hemodynamics and of genetics as concerns vessel wall structure and inflammatory pathways. PMID:24306170

  17. Spontaneous rupture of hepatic hemangiomas: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jr, Marcelo Af Ribeiro; Papaiordanou, Francine; Gonçalves, Juliana M; Chaib, Eleazar

    2010-12-27

    Hepatic hemangiomas are congenital vascular malformations, considered the most common benign mesenchymal hepatic tumors, composed of masses of blood vessels that are atypical or irregular in arrangement and size. Hepatic hemangiomas can be divided into two major groups: capillary hemangiomas and cavernous hemangiomas These tumors most frequently affect females (80%) and adults in their fourth and fifth decades of life. Most cases are asymptomatic although a few patients may present with a wide variety of clinical symptoms, with spontaneous or traumatic rupture being the most severe complication. In cases of spontaneous rupture, clinical manifestations consist of sudden abdominal pain, and anemia secondary to a haemoperitoneum. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy can also occur. Haemodynamic instability and signs of hypovolemic shock appear in about one third of cases. As the size of the hemangioma increases, so does the chance of rupture. Imaging studies used in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas include ultrasonography, dynamic contrast-enchanced computed tomography scanning, magnetic resonance imaging, hepatic arteriography, digital subtraction angiography, and nuclear medicine studies. In most cases hepatic hemangiomas are asymptomatic and should be followed up by means of periodic radiological examination. Surgery should be restricted to specific situations. Absolute indications for surgery are spontaneous or traumatic rupture with hemoperitoneum, intratumoral bleeding and consumptive coagulopathy (Kassabach-Merrit syndrome). In a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain due to unknown abdominal disease, spontaneous rupture of a hepatic tumor such as a hemangioma should be considered as a rare differential diagnosis. PMID:21191518

  18. Stress-rupture behavior of small diameter polycrystalline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Hee Mann; Goldsby, Jon C.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Continuous length polycrystalline alumina fibers are candidates as reinforcement in high temperature composite materials. Interest therefore exists in characterizing the thermomechanical behavior of these materials, obtaining possible insights into underlying mechanisms, and understanding fiber performance under long term use. Results are reported on the time-temperature dependent strength behavior of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Below 1000 C and 100 hours, Nextel 610 with the smaller grain size had a greater fast fracture and rupture strength than Fiber FP. The time exponents for stress-rupture of these fibers were found to decrease from approximately 13 at 900 C to below 3 near 1050 C, suggesting a transition from slow crack growth to creep rupture as the controlling fracture mechanism. For both fiber types, an effective activation energy of 690 kJ/mol was measured for rupture. This allowed stress-rupture predictions to be made for extended times at use temperatures below 1000 C.

  19. Dealing with a penstock rupture: A success story

    SciTech Connect

    Siminski, D.R. )

    1993-08-01

    Speed and safety are important considerations when repairing damaged penstocks. When the Control Gorge penstock in southern California ruptured, quick, successful action prevented complications. In the winter of 1991, a break occurred in the lower portion of the 8-foot-diameter Owens River Gorge penstock. The rupture created a vacuum, which caused about 1,500 feet of the pipe upstream of the break to collapse. Investigations by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) indicate that pressure surges in the penstock caused by rapid opening and closing of a turbine bypass-relief valve at the Control Gorge hydro plant and a defective weld at a manway (a small access that leads into the penstock) led to the rupture. Quick emergency repairs were required owing to the limited bypass capability around the penstock, the need for water flow for fish habitat in the lower sections of the Owens River, and water needs for Los Angeles. Within ten days, LADWP employees had temporarily repaired the penstock. In less than five months, workers had replaced the collapsed and ruptured sections, and returned the penstock to full service. The penstock rupture at Owens Gorge caused LADWP to recognize that older hydro plants may have hidden defects that would not have been left in place with current construction and inspection methods. Therefore, additional care should be taken during operation of these plants to avoid placing any unnecessary stresses on plant equipment.

  20. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Stress Rupture Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard; Flynn, Howard; Forth, Scott; Greene, Nathanael; Kezian, Michael; Varanauski, Don; Yoder, Tommy; Woodworth, Warren

    2009-01-01

    One of the major concerns for the aging Space Shuttle fleet is the stress rupture life of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). Stress rupture life of a COPV has been defined as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress levels and time. To assist in the evaluation of the aging COPVs in the Orbiter fleet an analytical reliability model was developed. The actual data used to construct this model was from testing of COPVs constructed of similar, but not exactly same materials and pressure cycles as used on Orbiter vessels. Since no actual Orbiter COPV stress rupture data exists the Space Shuttle Program decided to run a stress rupture test to compare to model predictions. Due to availability of spares, the testing was unfortunately limited to one 40" vessel. The stress rupture test was performed at maximum operating pressure at an elevated temperature to accelerate aging. The test was performed in two phases. The first phase, 130 F, a moderately accelerated test designed to achieve the midpoint of the model predicted point reliability. The more aggressive second phase, performed at 160 F was designed to determine if the test article will exceed the 95% confidence interval of the model. This paper will discuss the results of this test, it's implications and possible follow-on testing.

  1. Creep rupture testing of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Kathryn Anne

    Carbon fiber is becoming more prevalent in everyday life. As such, it is necessary to have a thorough understanding of, not solely general mechanical properties, but of long-term material behavior. Creep rupture testing of carbon fiber is very difficult due to high strength and low strain to rupture properties. Past efforts have included testing upon strands, single tows and overwrapped pressure vessels. In this study, 1 inch wide, [0°/90°]s laminated composite specimens were constructed from fabric supplied by T.D. Williamson Inc. Specimen fabrication methods and gripping techniques were investigated and a method was developed to collect long term creep rupture behavior data. An Instron 1321 servo-hydraulic material testing machine was used to execute static strength and short term creep rupture tests. A hanging dead-weight apparatus was designed to perform long-term creep rupture testing. The testing apparatus, specimens, and specimen grips functioned well. Collected data exhibited a power law distribution and therefore, a linear trend upon a log strength-log time plot. Statistical analysis indicated the material exhibited slow degradation behavior, similar to previous studies, and could maintain a 50 year carrying capacity at 62% of static strength, approximately 45.7 ksi.

  2. Spontaneous Atraumatic Extensor Pollicis Longus Rupture in the Nonrheumatoid Population

    PubMed Central

    Rada, Erin M.; Shridharani, Sachin M.; Lifchez, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon rupture is a well-described phenomenon in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Mechanisms of EPL tendon rupture in the nonrheumatoid population have also been described and include traumatic rupture, repetitive motion strain, and steroid injection into the tendon. Methods: The operative records for patients undergoing extensor pollicis longus reconstruction by the senior author were reviewed. Patients with a history of trauma to the wrist or inflammatory arthropathy were excluded. Results: We identified 3 patients who presented with spontaneous EPL tendon rupture. These patients reported no risk factors (as listed earlier) or inciting event. All 3 patients had some exposure to local steroids but this exposure was not at the site of subsequent tendon rupture. All patients were operatively repaired and went on to full recovery of EPL function. Discussion: In patients with sudden loss of extension of the thumb interphalangeal joint, a thorough history of steroid exposure including local steroid exposure remote to the affected EPL tendon may be relevant. PMID:23460929

  3. Dynamic Rupture Segmentation Along The Nankai Trough, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hok, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Hashimoto, C.

    2010-12-01

    In southwest Japan, large devastating earthquakes (Mw>8) occurred along the Nankai subduction zone every 100-200 years (e.g. Ando, 1975, Tectonophys.; Ishibashi, 2004, Ann. Geophys.). Historical records revealed the segmented nature of the 600 km long seismogenic zone, producing Nankai and Tonankai earthquakes to occur separately or jointly at each cycle. The intersegment zone which separates Nankai and Tonankai source areas, near the Kii Peninsula, should have some special physical properties. In this study, we investigate the dynamic linkage of the coseismic slips on the Nankai and Tonankai segments, by modeling the spontaneous rupture propagation on the subduction interface. To conduct a reliable modeling, the parameters’ lateral variations along the place interface are introduced by combining several geophysical observation data sets. First, we use a large-scale 3D geometry for the plate interface, inferred from seismicity; we also integrate the slip deficit distribution (Hashimoto et al., 2009, SSJ meeting) obtained by inversion of GPS data, to constrain the distribution of stress drop on the interface. This distribution is not uniform, and explains the 1st order asperities of the subduction zone: Hyuga, Nankai, Tonankai and Tokai areas appear clearly as loaded regions. In addition, a constitutive friction law is required to link fault slip and stress release. We compiled regional geophysical information relevant to the segmentation, to infer the distribution of the frictional parameters at seismogenic depths. We focused on areas where the rupture is known to have stopped. The barriers seem to be related to upper plate structure (Wells et al. 2003, JGR, Rosenau and Oncken 2009, JGR). Uplifted areas show common characteristics: end of seismogenic segments, underplating in the wedge, and higher density of the upper old wedge (granitic intrusions). Following above review, we introduced 3 barrier regions delimiting 2 asperity regions (Nankai and Tonankai). Inside the barrier, the fracture energy changes in regional scale, via a change of the critical slip distance scaling. The strength remains uniform along the interface. Asperities are produced by the initial stress distribution inferred from slip deficit. Using this model setting, we computed a few different spontaneous rupture scenarios, by changing only the location of rupture initiation. Remarkably, we could reproduce the segmentation of the rupture, as observed during the 1940’s sequence, provided that the rupture initiates close to the Kii peninsula barrier area. However, if the rupture initiate far from the Kii peninsula, close to Tokai or west of Muroto cape for instance, the rupture is more likely to break the full plate interface in a single rupture event, consistently with what has been observed in the past. The rupture segmentation appears to be a consequence of the friction properties off-Kii Peninsula, as well as the rupture initiation position. This work provides a reliable way to enlighten the conditional segmentation process, as a consequence of the earthquake dynamic rupture.

  4. A Case of Ruptured Splenic Artery Aneurysm in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Elizabeth K.; Harvey, Scott A.; Sauvage, Lynnae M.; Bohrer, Justin C.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Rupture of a splenic artery aneurysm is rare complication of pregnancy that is associated with a significant maternal and fetal mortality. Case. A multiparous female presented in the third trimester with hypotension, tachycardia, and altered mental status. A ruptured splenic artery aneurysm was discovered at the time of laparotomy and cesarean delivery. The patient made a full recovery following resection of the aneurysm. The neonate survived but suffered severe neurologic impairment. Conclusion. The diagnosis of ruptured splenic artery aneurysm should be considered in a pregnant woman presenting with signs of intra-abdominal hemorrhage. Early intervention by a multidisciplinary surgical team is key to preserving the life of the mother and fetus. PMID:25574408

  5. Spontaneous Rupture of Pancreatic Pseudocyst: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Ricardo; Marinho, Rui; Gomes, António; Sousa, Marta; Pignatelli, Nuno; Carneiro, Carla; Nunes, Vitor

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Pancreatic pseudocysts are a common complication of acute pancreatitis. Pancreatic pseudocyst's natural history ranges between its spontaneous regression and the settlement of serious complications if untreated, such as splenic complications, hemorrhage, infection, biliary complications, portal hypertension, and rupture. The rupture of a pancreatic pseudocyst to the peritoneal cavity is a dangerous complication leading to severe peritonitis and septic conditions. It requires emergent surgical exploration that is often of great technical difficulty and with important morbidity and mortality. Case Study. We present two cases of spontaneous rupture of pancreatic pseudocysts, managed differently according to the local and systemic conditions. Conclusion. The best surgical choice is the internal drainage of the cyst to the GI tract; however, in some conditions, the external drainage is the only choice available. PMID:27088029

  6. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Stress Rupture Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael J.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Leifeste, Mark R.; Yoder, Tommy B.; Keddy, Chris P.; Forth, Scott C.; Russell, Rick W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports stress rupture testing of Kevlar(TradeMark) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) at NASA White Sands Test Facility. This 6-year test program was part of the larger effort to predict and extend the lifetime of flight vessels. Tests were performed to characterize control parameters for stress rupture testing, and vessel life was predicted by statistical modeling. One highly instrumented 102-cm (40-in.) diameter Kevlar(TradeMark) COPV was tested to failure (burst) as a single-point model verification. Significant data were generated that will enhance development of improved NDE methods and predictive modeling techniques, and thus better address stress rupture and other composite durability concerns that affect pressure vessel safety, reliability and mission assurance.

  7. The osmotic rupture hypothesis of intracellular freezing injury.

    PubMed Central

    Muldrew, K; McGann, L E

    1994-01-01

    A hypothesis of the nature of intracellular ice formation is proposed in which the osmotically driven water efflux that occurs in cells during freezing (caused by the increased osmotic pressure of the extracellular solution in the presence of ice) is viewed as the agent responsible for producing a rupture of the plasma membrane, thus allowing extracellular ice to propagate into the cytoplasm. This hypothesis is developed into a mathematical framework and the forces that are present during freezing are compared to the forces which are required to rupture membranes in circumstances unrelated to low temperatures. The theory is then applied to systems which have been previously studied to test implications of the theory on the nature of intracellular ice formation. The pressure that develops during freezing due to water flux is found to be sufficient to cause a rupture of the plasma membrane and the theory gives an accurate description of the phenomenology of intracellular ice formation. PMID:8161706

  8. Repair of patellar tendon rupture using suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, Brandon D; Tennant, Joshua N; Rubright, James H; Creighton, R Alexander

    2008-04-01

    Acute isolated rupture of the patellar tendon traditionally has been repaired via transpatellar suture tunnels. This retrospective study evaluated the demographics and epidemiology of this injury as well as the effectiveness and complication rates of our suture anchor technique. Between 1993 and 2005, a total of 82 cases of patellar tendon disruption in 71 patients were repaired. Fourteen cases involved basic primary repair with suture anchors of an acute isolated rupture of the patellar tendon and had an average follow-up of 29 months (range: 3-112 months). There were 3 (21%) failures of repair. The remaining 11 patients had excellent range of motion and strength and returned to their preoperative level of function. These results are comparable with other reports in the literature. The suture anchor technique thus represents a viable option for repair of patellar tendon ruptures and should be investigated further with a randomized, controlled trial. PMID:18500063

  9. Silent Spontaneous Uterine Rupture at 36 Weeks of Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Woo, J. Y.; Tate, L.; Roth, S.; Eke, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Silent spontaneous rupture of the uterus before term, with extrusion of an intact amniotic sac and delivery of a healthy neonate, with no maternal or neonatal morbidity or mortality is very rare. Very few cases have been reported in literature. Case Presentation. We report a case of silent spontaneous uterine rupture, found during a scheduled repeat cesarean section at 36 weeks of gestation. Patient had history of two prior classical cesarean sections. She underwent cesarean section, with delivery of a healthy male infant. She had a good postoperative recovery and was discharged on postoperative day 3. Conclusion. Silent spontaneous rupture of the uterus before term with extrusion of an intact amniotic sac is rare. A high index of suspicion and good imaging during pregnancy are important in making this diagnosis. PMID:26357580

  10. Primary orthotic treatment of ruptured ankle ligaments: a recommended procedure.

    PubMed

    Zwipp, H; Schievink, B

    1992-04-01

    The results of a study after 1 and 2 years of a prospective randomised trial of operative versus conservative treatment of ankle ligament rupture, demonstrate that purely functional orthotic therapy is the method of choice. This relates both to patient need and economical considerations. The trial demonstrated that without an operation it was possible to achieve a high degree of mechanical stability, a reduction of work disability time down to 3 weeks and full sports capability within 3 months. Consequently, and as a result of the trial, the only remaining surgical indications would seem to be dislocations of the foot and ankle, ankle ligament rupture with additional intra-articular pathology, and second-stage injuries or re-ruptures. The joint-stabilising function of the prototype splint developed in this study was improved on the basis of experimental investigations, using a Y-shaped leather band (designated CALIGAMED), which is available in 6 sizes for right and left ankle. PMID:1584644

  11. Emergency Stenting of a Ruptured Infected Anastomotic Femoral Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Giannopoulos, Athanasios; Tsigris, Chris; Papadopouli, Katerina; Tsiodras, Sotiris; Bastounis, Elias

    2007-11-15

    A 74-year-old man presented with a ruptured infected anastomotic femoral pseudoaneurysm. Due to severe medical comorbidities he was considered unsuitable for conventional surgical management and underwent an emergency endovascular repair with a balloon-expandable covered stent. The pseudoaneurysm was excluded successfully and the patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery with long-term suppressive antimicrobials. He remained well for 10 months after the procedure with no signs of recurrent local or systemic infection and finally died from an acute myocardial infarction. To our knowledge, emergency endovascular treatment of a free ruptured bleeding femoral artery pseudoaneurysm has not been documented before in the English literature. This case illustrates that endovascular therapy may be a safe and efficient alternative in the emergent management of ruptured infected anastomotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysms when traditional open surgery is contraindicated.

  12. A case of dermoid cyst ruptured into the lung.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Jen; Cheng, Yu-Jen; Kang, Wang-Yi; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hwang, Jhi-Jhu

    2007-11-01

    Ruptured cystic teratomas (dermoid cysts) are rare and always symptomatic, presenting as haemothorax, pleural effusion or pericardial effusion. We present an extremely rare case of a 45-year-old woman who, during a routine health assessment was noted to have a well-defined anterior mediastinal tumour with peripheral ground glass opacity on chest CT. The patient was asymptomatic. She underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and a ruptured dermoid cyst was observed and the contents had infiltrated into the right pulmonary parenchyma. There were no complications and no evidence of recurrence 10 months later. Despite most cystic teratomas being asymptomatic and benign, rupture into the pulmonary parenchyma may induce further damage, for which emergency surgical intervention is always necessary. PMID:17986128

  13. Ruptured Mycotic Aortic Aneurysm after Bacille Calmette-Guerin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Floros, Nikolaos; Meletiadis, Konstantinos; Kusenack, Ulrich; Zirngibl, Hubert; Kamper, Lars; Haage, Patrick; Dreger, Nici Markus

    2015-10-01

    To report a case of a ruptured mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm (MAA) after intravesical Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) therapy because of bladder carcinoma. A 57-year-old male patient was admitted to our hospital for follow-up computed tomography 14 months after transurethral resection of a papillary carcinoma of the bladder and intravesical BCG therapy. The CT scan revealed a ruptured MAA aneurysm and the patient underwent an endovascular repair with an aorto-bi-iliac stent graft. A ruptured MAA is a rare but lethal complication after BCG instillation therapy. The standard therapy is the open reconstruction but according to the literature an endovascular therapy in combination with long-term antibiotics should be considered as a bridging or a definite solution. PMID:26119640

  14. Synchronous hybrid repair for ruptured aneurysm of bovine aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Sidharth; Savlania, Ajay; Agrawal, Vivek; Parameshwarappa, Shashidhar Kallapa; Raman, Kapilamoorthy Tirur; Madathipat, Unnikrishnan

    2015-05-01

    Rupture of an aortic arch aneurysm is a life-threatening emergency with the risk of mortality escalating by the hour. We describe the successful hybrid repair of a ruptured bovine aortic arch aneurysm in a 75-year-old man, which involved aortic arch debranching by ascending aorta-bicarotid bypass followed by relining of the aortic lumen with a stent-graft. The procedure was not only lifesaving but also resulted in an active gentleman at 2-year follow-up. Considering the morbidity and mortality of open surgery using circulatory arrest, state-of-the-art synchronous hybrid repair seems to be an effective alternative for ruptured aortic arch aneurysms. PMID:24887906

  15. Evaluating fault rupture hazard for strike-slip earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.; Cao, T.; Dawson, Tim; Frankel, A.; Wills, C.; Schwartz, D.

    2004-01-01

    We present fault displacement data, regressions, and a methodology to calculate in both a probabilistic and deterministic framework the fault rupture hazard for strike-slip faults. To assess this hazard we consider: (1) the size of the earthquake and probability that it will rupture to the surface, (2) the rate of all potential earthquakes on the fault (3) the distance of the site along and from the mapped fault, (4) the complexity of the fault and quality of the fault mapping, (5) the size of the structure that will be placed at the site, and (6) the potential and size of displacements along or near the fault. Probabilistic fault rupture hazard analysis should be an important consideration in design of structures or lifelines that are located within about 50m of well-mapped active faults.

  16. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Spontaneous Rupture of the Omental Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Yamagami, Takuji; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Iida, Shigeharu; Tazoe, Jun; Asai, Shunsuke; Masui, Koji; Ikeda, Jun; Nagata, Akihiro; Sato, Osamu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2011-02-15

    We encountered a rare case of spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. A 25-year-old man without any episode of abdominal trauma or bleeding disorders came to the emergency unit with left upper abdominal pain. Hematoma with extravasation of the greater omentum and a hemoperitoneum was confirmed on abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Bleeding from the omental artery was suspected based on these findings. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed after extravasation of the omental artery, which arises from the left gastroepiploic artery, was confirmed on arteriography. Partial ometectomy was performed 10 days after transcatheter arterial embolization, revealing that the hematoma measured 10 cm in diameter in the greater omentum. Pathological examination showed rupture of the branch of an omental artery without abnormal findings, such as an aneurysm or neoplasm. Thus, we diagnosed him with spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. The patient recovered and was discharged from the hospital 10 days after the surgery, with a favorable postoperative course.

  17. Rupture of maternal splenic artery aneurysm and fetal demise.

    PubMed

    Le Tinier, B; Jungo-Nançoz, C; McCarey, C; Jastrow, N

    2015-01-01

    Splenic artery aneurysm (SAA) is the third most common intra-abdominal aneurysm. This condition, which occurs predominantly in young women, is generally asymptomatic and frequently discovered during pregnancy upon rupture. Reported maternal and fetal mortality are respectively 75% and 72.5-95%. A 40-year-old woman gravida 4 para 3 was referred to the obstetrical emergencies at term for loss of consciousness, nausea, vomiting, and hypotension. At admission, the patient had developed upper abdominal pain. Fetal demise and hemoperitoneum were diagnosed. An abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan revealed SAA rupture. An emergency hemostatic splenectomy was performed followed by a cesarean section with a favorable subsequent outcome. SAA rupture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain during pregnancy. Prompt multidisciplinary management is essential for patient's survival. PMID:26152017

  18. Clinical Characteristics and Surgical Problems of Ruptured Globe Injury☆

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Hongsheng; Cui, Yan; Li, Yang; Wang, Xingrong; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Background Ocular trauma is a major cause of vision loss, especially in the young patients, and is the leading cause of unilateral blind in China. Objective The aims of this report are to analyze ciliary and choroidal lesion characteristics and outcomes of a group of patients with ruptured globe injuries and discuss finding a more effective treatment protocol. Here we report our experience treating ruptured globe injuries. Methods Seventy-five patients (75 eyes) with a diagnosis of ruptured globe injuries were selected from 264 patients with open globe injuries at the Shierming Eye Hospital of Shandong Province between January 2009 and December 2011. General information and clinical characteristics such as ciliary and choroidal lesion features were reviewed. Results Of the 75 patients, 85.3% were men, and the average age of the patients was 37.2 years (range, 6–63 years). The right eye was injured in 52.0%; enucleation was performed in 9 patients. There was no light perception, in the final corrected visual acuity in another 3 patients. The ratio of better visual acuity (better than 0.1) increased from 0 preoperatively to 16.0% postoperatively. Among the 75 patients with ruptured globe injuries, 13 had ciliary injury and 47 (62.7%) had choroidal injuries. Both ciliary and choroidal injuries were detected in 15 patients. Retinal tissue incarceration during sclera suturing was usually the vital point leading to unfavorable results. Conclusions Ruptured globe injury usually results in severe visual acuity damage. Active treatment could help to restore visual acuity in patients to some degree. Some effective treatment protocols for ruptured globe injuries could be followed. Some unsuitable procedures in primary treatment should be avoided to achieve a better prognosis. PMID:24385006

  19. Damage-enhanced creep and creep rupture in fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, W.A.; Fabeny, B.; Iyengar, N.

    1995-12-31

    Creep in fiber composites at high temperatures is an important phenomenon that can lead to accelerated failure in several different ways. For systems with matrix creep rates larger than those of the fibers, creep transfers load onto the fibers and the fibers undergo progressive damage under the increasing load. This leads to enhanced composite creep rates, relative to non-breaking fibers, in both ceramic and metal matrix composites. In metal composites, creep rupture can then occur by excessive damage accumulation even in the absence of explicit high-temperature fiber degradation mechanisms. In ceramic composites, creep rupture occurs following fiber degradation such as slow crack growth, a process accelerated by the enhanced stress on the fibers. Here, these phenomena are discussed within the framework of the composite model of Curtin, which is generalized to include creep and creep rupture. The model generally accounts for the statistical evolution of fiber damage and for the interfacial slip between fibers and matrix that occur in both CMC and MMC materials, both of which can be functions of time at elevated temperatures. Application of the theory to creep rupture in titanium matrix composites reinforced with SiC fibers shows good agreement with experimental results for creep rates and failure times versus applied load. Application to creep rupture in ceramic matrix composites in which the fibers undergo slow crack growth demonstrates the dependence of lifetime on load and crack growth rate. A much longer lifetime for composites, as compared to the lifetime of individual fibers tested in the laboratory, is demonstrated; this is a result of the small effective gauge length of fibers in the composite relative to the typical gauge lengths tested in single fiber stress rupture tests.

  20. Rapid aneurysm growth and rupture in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Graffeo, Christopher S.; Tanweer, Omar; Nieves, Cesar Fors; Belmont, H. Michael; Izmirly, Peter M.; Becske, Tibor; Huang, Paul P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to intracranial aneurysm rupture is a major neurosurgical emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Rapid aneurysm growth is associated with rupture. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-system autoimmune disorder whose complications can include cerebral vasculitis and vasculopathy. Intracranial aneurysms are not known to occur more frequently in SLE patients than the general population; however, aneurysm growth rates have not been studied in SLE. Case Description: We present a 43-year-old female with SLE on prednisone, hydroxychloroquine, and azathioprine with moderate disease activity who presented with severe, acute-onset headache and was found to have Hunt and Hess grade II SAH due to rupture of an 8 mm saccular anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm. The patient developed severe vasospasm, re-ruptured, and was taken for angiography and embolization, which was challenging due to a high degree of vasospasm and arterial stenosis. Review of imaging from less than 2 years prior demonstrated a normal ACoA complex without evidence of an aneurysm. Conclusion: We review the literature and discuss the risk factors and pathophysiology of rapid aneurysm growth and rupture, as well as the pathologic vascular changes associated with SLE. Although SLE patients do not develop intracranial aneurysm at an increased rate, these changes may predispose them to higher incidence of growth and rupture. This possibility-coupled with increased morbidity and mortality of SAH in SLE-suggests that SAH should be considered in SLE patients presenting with headache, and advocates for more aggressive treatment of SLE patients with unruptured aneurysms. PMID:25657862

  1. Hybrid Simulation of Dynamic Rupture and Seismic Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aochi, H.; Olsen, K. B.; Fukuyama, E.; Madariaga, R.

    We have developed a hybrid method for flexible and efficient modeling of the entire earthquake process, from dynamic rupture propagation to the radiation in a hetero- geneous three-dimensional medium. The dynamic rupture propagation is computed using the boundary integral equation method (BIEM), and the wave propagation out- side the fault is carried out by a fourth-order finite-difference method (FDM). Thus, our method combines the flexibility of the BIEM to compute spontaneous rupture propagation on non-planar or multi-segmented fault geometries using a wide range of friction laws with the efficiency of the FDM to compute wave propagation in arbitrar- ily heterogeneous crustal models. The method has several important applications. The effects of fault segmentation and curvature on dynamic rupture propagation and its dynamic radiation can be analyzed in detail. The presence of any significant signature in ground motion patterns from dynamic effects for rupture propagation on non-planar fault geometries can be used to develop guidelines to improve future kinematic (prescribed) simulations. In addition, the statistics of recurrent ruptures on multiple, arbitrarily-shaped fault systems can be computed and used to increase our knowledge of earthquake occurrence. Here, we present details of the implementation of the hybrid method and the interface between the BIEM and FDM. We also show preliminary results for hybrid simulations of the 1992 M7.3 Landers, California, and the 1999 M7.4 Izmit, Turkey, earthquakes. Both earthquakes were associated with complex fault geometry on vertical fault sys- tem in the simulations. For the two events, we compute the ground motion for different fault geometry models and compare synthetic seismograms to strong motion data.

  2. Determine Earthquake Rupture Directivity Using Taiwan TSMIP Strong Motion Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kaiwen; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Lai, Ying-Ju; Gung, YuanCheng

    2013-04-01

    Inverting seismic waveforms for the finite fault source parameters is important for studying the physics of earthquake rupture processes. It is also significant to image seismogenic structures in urban areas. Here we analyze the finite-source process and test for the causative fault plane using the accelerograms recorded by the Taiwan Strong-Motion Instrumentation Program (TSMIP) stations. The point source parameters for the mainshock and aftershocks were first obtained by complete waveform moment tensor inversions. We then use the seismograms generated by the aftershocks as empirical Green's functions (EGFs) to retrieve the apparent source time functions (ASTFs) of near-field stations using projected Landweber deconvolution approach. The method for identifying the fault plane relies on the spatial patterns of the apparent source time function durations which depend on the angle between rupture direction and the take-off angle and azimuth of the ray. These derived duration patterns then are compared with the theoretical patterns, which are functions of the following parameters, including focal depth, epicentral distance, average crustal 1D velocity, fault plane attitude, and rupture direction on the fault plane. As a result, the ASTFs derived from EGFs can be used to infer the ruptured fault plane and the rupture direction. Finally we used part of the catalogs to study important seismogenic structures in the area near Chiayi, Taiwan, where a damaging earthquake has occurred about a century ago. The preliminary results show a strike-slip earthquake on 22 October 1999 (Mw 5.6) has ruptured unilaterally toward SSW on a sub-vertical fault. The procedure developed from this study can be applied to other strong motion waveforms recorded from other earthquakes to better understand their kinematic source parameters.

  3. A Rare Case of Bilateral Patellar Tendon Ruptures: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tarazi, Nadim; O'loughlin, Padhraig; Amin, Amin; Keogh, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon ruptures are rare. The majority of case reports describing bilateral patellar tendon ruptures have occurred in patients with predisposing factors to tendinopathy. We describe a case of bilateral patellar tendon rupture sustained following minimal trauma by a patient with no systemic disease or history of steroid use. Due to the rarity of this injury, clinical suspicion is low. It is reported that 38% of patellar tendon ruptures are misdiagnosed initially. Therefore careful history taking and physical examination is integral in ensuring a diagnosis is achieved for early primary repair. We discuss the aetiology of spontaneous tendon rupture and report a literature review of bilateral patellar tendon ruptures. PMID:27200200

  4. [Insurance expert assessment of traumatic Achilles tendon rupture. A case report].

    PubMed

    König, D P; Porsch, M; Zirbes, T; Schmidt, J

    1999-06-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are among of the most frequent tendon ruptures. Usually middle aged men with infrequent sports activity are involved. In most cases histopathology reveals degenerative changes within the tendon. Unusual rupture location and physical signs of trauma should lead one to consider a traumatic origin of the rupture. Traumatic origin can be confirmed by the accident history and physical signs as well as with the histopathology of the rupture site and possibly a tissue section far away the rupture site. This information can be helpful in insurance inquiries. PMID:10420839

  5. Rare presentation of ruptured syphilitic aortic aneurysm with pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Feitosa, Israel Nilton; Dantas Leite Figueiredo, Magda; de Sousa Belem, Lucia; Evelin Soares Filho, Antônio Wilon

    2015-11-01

    We report the interesting case of a rare form of presentation of rupture of the ascending aorta with formation of a pseudoaneurysm, diagnosed following the development of a large mass on the surface of the chest over a period of about eight months. Serological tests were positive for syphilis. Echocardiography and computed tomography angiography were essential to confirm the diagnosis and therapeutic management. Cardiovascular syphilis is a rare entity since the discovery of penicillin. Rupture of an aortic aneurysm with formation of a pseudoaneurysm is a potentially fatal complication. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient was discharged from hospital within days of surgery. PMID:26481180

  6. Transvenous Embolization of a Ruptured Deep Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, V.M.; Marcos-Gonzalez, A.; Radovanovic, I.; Bijlenga, P.; Narata, A.P.; Moret, J.; Schaller, K.; Lovblad, K.O.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Ruptured cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) usually require treatment to avoid re-bleeding. Depending on the angioarchitecture and center strategy, the treatment can be surgical, endovascular, radiosurgical or combined methods. The classic endovascular approach is transarterial, but sometimes it is not always applicable. The transvenous approach has been described as an alternative for the endovascular treatment of small AVMs when arterial access or another therapeutic method is not possible. This approach can be considered when the nidus is small and if there is a single draining vein. We present a technical note on a transvenous approach for the treatment of a ruptured AVM in a young patient. PMID:23472720

  7. Ruptured and unruptured mycotic superior mesenteric artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gaurav; Semel, Marcus E; McGillicuddy, Edward A; Ho, Karen J; Menard, Matthew T; Gates, Jonathan D

    2014-11-01

    Aneurysms of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and branches thereof are uncommon but have a high rate of rupture and mortality relative to other visceral artery aneurysms. Historically, the predominant etiology has been infectious; with a renewed rise in intravenous drug abuse rates in the last decade, we hypothesize a resurgence in septic embolic complications may occur in the coming years. Here, we describe the presentation and management of 2 cases of intravenous drug users presenting with infectious endocarditis and SMA main trunk and branch aneurysms, one of which was ruptured. In addition, we review the literature on these rare clinical entities. PMID:25017769

  8. Presumed Testicular Rupture During a College Baseball Game

    PubMed Central

    Freehill, Michael T.; Gorbachinsky, Ilya; Lavender, John D.; Davis, Ronald L.; Mannava, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Scrotal rupture during athletic competition is considered a rare occurrence; however, blunt trauma to the scrotum is relatively common. Protective athletic cups are strongly recommended for both children and adults engaging in contact sports as they likely limit the amount of serious injury to the scrotal contents. Nonetheless, should the on-field assessment by the athletic trainer, coach, or team physician indicate that the athlete has increased pain, ecchymosis, swelling, and tenderness to palpation after blunt trauma, testicular rupture should be suspected and prompt ultrasound and urologic assessment should be undertaken, as early operative intervention is necessary for testicular preservation. This report reviews testicular trauma during athletic competition. PMID:25984265

  9. Deflate-gate: Conservative Management of a Large Ruptured Hydrocele

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Viktor X.; Wallen, Jared J.; Martinez, Danny R.; Carrion, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    A hydrocele is a common cause of intrascrotal swelling that results when fluid accumulates between the parietal and visceral layers of the tunica vaginalis. Over time, fluid may collect to form a massive hydrocele and result in significant discomfort for the patient. In this case report, we present a rare event of a 28-year-old gentleman with a documented massive hydrocele measuring 14.1 × 8.9 cm who ruptured his hydrocele during sexual intercourse. We expectantly managed the patient's ruptured hydrocele and encountered no complications throughout the course of his recovery. PMID:26793551

  10. Spontaneous Extraperitoneal Bladder Rupture Because of Chronic Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Morganstern, Bradley A.; Viviano, Robert; Elsamra, Sammy

    2013-01-01

    A 62-year-old man presented to the emergency department with an episode of syncope after 2-3 weeks of diffuse abdominal pain, now complaining of a severe increase in pain concurrent with >24 hours of no urine output. His workup showed an idiopathic extraperitoneal rupture of the bladder on computed tomography, which was handled conservatively with Foley insertion. Repeated follow-up and imaging showed no resolution or etiology over 2 months. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy that showed an elongated appendix with a chronic tip appendicitis that had induced bladder rupture by chronic inflammatory changes. After repair, the patient had no further complaints.

  11. [Placenta percreta and uterine rupture. Apropos of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Attieh, E; Abboud, J; Chalhoub, S; Riachi, M

    1993-01-01

    The authors present two cases of uterine rupture by placenta percreta at 27 and 36 weeks of gestation. Conservative treatment was used in the first case, and radical in the second. Concerning placenta percreta, an overview is presented. The pathophysiology is unclear, but a perturbation in the equilibrium between the trophoblast and the caduque is accepted. Many factors, maternal uterine and placental, contributes to this situation. Clinical presentations are hemorrhage, uterine inversion or rupture. The disappearance of the retroplacental anechogenic zone is the recent ultrasound's contribution to the early diagnosis. The treatment is either radical which is the treatment of choice or conservative and the methotrexate could be an interested option. PMID:8263297

  12. Spontaneous splenic rupture in a patient with congenital afibrinogenemia

    PubMed Central

    Arcagök, Baran Cengiz; Özdemir, Nihal; Tekin, Ayşe; Özcan, Rahşan; Eliçevik, Mehmet; Şenyüz, Osman Faruk; Çam, Halit; Celkan, Tiraje

    2014-01-01

    Afibrinogenemia is a rare bleeding disorder which is observed with an incidence of 1:1 000 000. It is an autosomal recessive disease and occurs as a result of mutation in one of the three genes which code the three polypeptide chains of fibrinogen. Basic clinical findings include spontaneous bleeding, bleeding after minor trauma or due to surgery. Splenic rupture in afibrinogenemia has been reported only in 6 cases so far. In this article, we present a 15-year old congenital afibrinogenemia patient with spontaneous splenic rupture. PMID:26078670

  13. Ruptured Valsalva Sinus Aneurysm to Pericardium Simulated Aortic Root Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Davarpasand, Tahereh; Hosseinsabet, Ali; Abassi, Kumars; Arzhan, Sorya

    2014-01-01

    Ruptured valsalva sinus aneurysm to pericardium is a rare condition. Here, we described a case presented with tamponade. Initially, hemopericardium was partially drained and then, imaging evaluations were done. Transesophageal echocardiography showed limited dissection of aortic sinus and CT angiography of the ascending aorta showed deformed dilated right coronary sinus. Besides, surgery showed that windsock tract of the right coronary sinus had ruptured into the pericardium with avulsed right coronary aortic cusp. This case indicated a rare cause of cardiac tamponade and insufficiency of imaging modalities for making an accurate diagnosis. PMID:24936486

  14. Intra-Aortic Balloon Pump Rupture and Entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Jahollari, Artan; Sarac, Atilla; Ozal, Ertugrul

    2014-01-01

    Intra-aortic balloon pump is used frequently to support a failing myocardium in cardiac patients. Due to the invasive nature of this device, usage is accompanied by consistent risk of complications. Balloon rupture, although it occurs rarely, may lead to entrapment if diagnosis delays. A 78-year male who underwent cardiac surgery experienced balloon rupture and entrapment in the right femoral artery during the postoperative follow-up. Surgical extraction under local anesthesia was performed and the patient had an uneventful course. Fast and gentle solution of the problem is necessary to prevent further morbidity or mortality related to a retained balloon catheter in these delicate patients. PMID:24707435

  15. Ruptured malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ditsatham, Chagkrit; Somwangprasert, Areewan; Watcharachan, Kirati; Wongmaneerung, Phanchaporn

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor or cystosarcoma phyllodes is a rare disease and is usually seen in middle-aged patients. Ruptured phyllodes tumor is a very rare condition. Our study reports patient presentation, diagnosis method, and treatment of an unusual case. A 58-year-old premenopausal female was diagnosed with a phyllodes tumor and presented with a rapidly growing mass for 2 months that ruptured 1 month later. She underwent simple mastectomy at the left side of her breast and received adjuvant radiotherapy. No recurrence was found 4 months after operation.

  16. Rapid Mapping of Surface Rupture from the South Napa Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trexler, C. C.; Morelan, A. E., III; Oskin, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid documentation (<1 day) of co-seismic surface rupture location and slip is essential for scientific and emergency response. We demonstrate how social media (text messaging and Twitter) and the emerging 3D data collection technique known as Structure from Motion (SfM), used in conjunction with traditional field reconnaissance, enabled us to rapidly locate and document surface ruptures from the Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake. On the morning of the event, our field team used information available on social media to identify locations with potential surface rupture. Preliminary observations of surface rupture (measurements and geo-tagged photographs) were texted to the office-based team member who created digital maps of the rupture trace and shared them online via Twitter in near-real time. We documented many ephemeral features (such as offset roads, curbs, and driveways) along the rupture trace within 12 hours of the event, before these features were destroyed by road and infrastructure repair. We were able to return to most sites again within several days, allowing us to document continuing slip and create time-series datasets of offset features. After the collection and re-collection of data at selected sites, we made detailed measurements remotely using 3D models constructed with SfM. The ability to quantitatively project features into the fault plane using these models allows for accurate measurements of small features often difficult to observe and quantify in the field. Traditionally, even preliminary maps of rupture extent and offset magnitudes are not available for several days after an event because office-based processing and compilation is required. Because we were able to compile our data in real time, we distributed our results while they were still valuable for ongoing scientific response. Our work helped other science teams efficiently target fieldwork and instrument deployment; for example, one geodetic survey team used our surface rupture map to adjust their field deployment plans in an effort to capture rapidly-decaying postseismic movement. With social media and rapid, inexpensive data collection methods like SfM in mind, scientific response to future events has the potential to be more efficient and coordinated than ever before.

  17. Ruptured ectopic pregnancy in rudimentary horn of the uterus.

    PubMed

    Tufail, Amber; Hashmi, Haleema A

    2007-02-01

    Rudimentary horn is one of the rarest congenital uterine anomalies and consists of a relatively normal appearing uterus on one side with a rudimentary horn on the other side. It is difficult to diagnose before surgery and hazardous to maternal life as rupture of pregnant horn result in severe hemoperitoneum. Case of rudimentary horn pregnancy is reported in a lady with history of habitual abortion and signs and symptoms of acute adnexal pathology. Exploratory laparotomy revealed ruptured rudimentary horn pregnancy. Excision of accessory horn was done. PMID:17288859

  18. Rupture process of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake.

    PubMed

    Ammon, Charles J; Ji, Chen; Thio, Hong-Kie; Robinson, David; Ni, Sidao; Hjorleifsdottir, Vala; Kanamori, Hiroo; Lay, Thorne; Das, Shamita; Helmberger, Don; Ichinose, Gene; Polet, Jascha; Wald, David

    2005-05-20

    The 26 December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake initiated slowly, with small slip and a slow rupture speed for the first 40 to 60 seconds. Then the rupture expanded at a speed of about 2.5 kilometers per second toward the north northwest, extending 1200 to 1300 kilometers along the Andaman trough. Peak displacements reached approximately 15 meters along a 600-kilometer segment of the plate boundary offshore of northwestern Sumatra and the southern Nicobar islands. Slip was less in the northern 400 to 500 kilometers of the aftershock zone, and at least some slip in that region may have occurred on a time scale beyond the seismic band. PMID:15905393

  19. Spontaneous Liver Rupture After Treatment With Drug-Eluting Beads

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, C. O.; Wartenberg, M.; Mottok, A.; Steger, U.; Goltz, J. P.; Hahn, D.; Kickuth, R.

    2012-02-15

    Spontaneous rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is a rare and life-threatening complication. Pathophysiologic mechanisms are not yet fully known; it is suggested that rupture is preceded by reactive tissue edema and intratumerous bleeding, leading to a rapid expansion of tumour mass with risk of extrahepatic bleeding in the case of subcapsular localisation. This case report discusses a sudden, unexpected lethal complication in a 74 year-old male patient treated with TACE using DC Bead loaded with doxorubicin (DEBDOX) in a progressive multifocal HCC.

  20. [Complete rupture of the peroneal nerve by knee distortion].

    PubMed

    Ackermann, O; Jagobi, A; Lahner, M; Eckert, K

    2015-12-01

    This report describes a case of complete rupture of the peroneal nerve as a consequence of low velocity trauma. A 54-year-old physically fit patient suffered a complex trauma with complete nerve discontinuity as a result of knee joint distortion without external force. The initial medical findings were unremarkable, in particular neither the accident medical history nor the initial sensitivity impairment suggested the presence of serious knee damage; however, during clinical diagnostics a complex trauma with rupture of the peroneal nerve was found. Accordingly, an extensive revision with nerve suturing was carried out. PMID:25986768

  1. The Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, Version 2 (UCERF 2)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2007 Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities

    2008-01-01

    California?s 35 million people live among some of the most active earthquake faults in the United States. Public safety demands credible assessments of the earthquake hazard to maintain appropriate building codes for safe construction and earthquake insurance for loss protection. Seismic hazard analysis begins with an earthquake rupture forecast?a model of probabilities that earthquakes of specified magnitudes, locations, and faulting types will occur during a specified time interval. This report describes a new earthquake rupture forecast for California developed by the 2007 Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities (WGCEP 2007).

  2. Spleen rupture due to primary angiosarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Koutelidakis, Ioannis M; Tsiaousis, Panagiotis Z; Papaziogas, Basilios Th; Patsas, Aristeides G; Atmatzidis, Stefanos K; Atmatzidis, Konstantinos S

    2007-01-01

    A case of a 79-year-old female with rupture of the spleen due to primary angiosarcoma is presented. Symptoms were non-specific. Diagnosis was based on histology postoperatively. Primary angiosarcoma of the spleen is a very rare and aggressive neoplasm with a high metastatic rate and almost uniformly fatal. Due to small number of reported cases, there are no guidelines concerning adjuvant or palliative treatment or any beneficial protocols of chemotherapy or radiotherapy up to date. Splenectomy prior to rupture seems to have a positive impact on long-term survival. PMID:19016352

  3. Coil treatment of a fusiform upper basilar trunk aneurysm with a combination of "kissing" neuroform stents, TriSpan-, 3D- and fibered coils, and permanent implantation of the microguidewires.

    PubMed

    Henkes, H; Kirsch, M; Mariushi, W; Miloslavski, E; Brew, S; Kühne, D

    2004-06-01

    Endovascular coil occlusion of fusiform intracranial aneurysms without sacrifice of the parent artery can be technically challenging. Bridging of wide aneurysm necks with stents is common practice for side-wall aneurysms but is less frequently used for bifurcation aneurysms. We describe the technical aspects of the successful coil occlusion of a fusiform aneurysm of the upper basilar trunk, with preservation of the parent vessel. The procedure comprised the following steps: (a) stenting of the left V1- and proximal V2 segments; (b) simultaneous deployment of two Neuroform stents from both P1 segments down to the basilar artery ("kissing" stents) (c) using a TriSpan device to hold (d) three-dimensional electrolytically detachable coils in place and (e) filling the aneurysmal lumen mainly with fibered electrolytically detachable coils; and finally (f) cutting the extracorporeal part of both microguidewires below the skin level in both groins, leaving the microguidewires as they were used for the deployment of the stents in place, thus reaching from both P2 segments down to the basilar artery and further proximally. PMID:15103433

  4. Coupling a geodynamic seismic cycling model to rupture dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Alice; van Dinther, Ylona

    2014-05-01

    The relevance and results of dynamic rupture scenarios are implicitly linked to the geometry and pre-existing stress and strength state on a fault. The absolute stresses stored along faults during interseismic periods, are largely unquantifiable. They are, however, pivotal in defining coseismic rupture styles, near-field ground motion, and macroscopic source properties (Gabriel et al., 2012). Obtaining these in a physically consistent manner requires seismic cycling models, which directly couple long-term deformation processes (over 1000 year periods), the self-consistent development of faults, and the resulting dynamic ruptures. One promising approach to study seismic cycling enables both the generation of spontaneous fault geometries and the development of thermo-mechanically consistent fault stresses. This seismo-thermo-mechanical model has been developed using a methodology similar to that employed to study long-term lithospheric deformation (van Dinther et al., 2013a,b, using I2ELVIS of Gerya and Yuen, 2007). We will innovatively include the absolute stress and strength values along physically consistent evolving non-finite fault zones (regions of strain accumulation) from the geodynamic model into dynamic rupture simulations as an initial condition. The dynamic rupture simulations will be performed using SeisSol, an arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) scheme (Pelties et al., 2012). The dynamic rupture models are able to incorporate the large degree of fault geometry complexity arising in naturally evolving geodynamic models. We focus on subduction zone settings with and without a splay fault. Due to the novelty of the coupling, we first focus on methodological challenges, e.g. the synchronization of both methods regarding the nucleation of events, the localization of fault planes, and the incorporation of similar frictional constitutive relations. We then study the importance of physically consistent fault stress, strength, and geometry input for dynamic rupture propagation in terms of rupture path and dynamics. On the other hand, it will provide the opportunity to compare slow earthquake akin events developing in quasi-static geodynamic model to fully dynamic ruptures in terms of coseismic displacements and stress changes. Gabriel, A.-A. (2012), J.-P. Ampuero, L. A. Dalguer, and P. M. Mai, The transition of dynamic rupture modes in elastic media, J. Geophys. Res., 117(B9), 01480227. Gerya, T., and D. Yuen (2007), Robust characteristics method for modelling multiphase visco-elasto-plastic thermo-mechanical problems, Phys. Earth Planet In., 163(1-4), 83-105. Pelties, C. (2012), J. De la Puente, J.-P. Ampuero, G. B. Brietzke, and M. Käser Three-Dimensional Dynamic Rupture, Simulation with a High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Method on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes, J. Geophys. Res., 117(B2), B02309. van Dinther, Y. (2013a), T.V. Gerya, L.A. Dalguer, F. Corbi, F. Funiciello, and P.M. Mai, The seismic cycle at subduction thrusts: 2. Dynamic implications of geodynamic simulations validated with laboratory models, J. Geophys. Res., 118(4), 1502-1525. van Dinther, Y. (2013b), T.V. Gerya, L.A. Dalguer, P.M. Mai, G. Morra, and D. Giardini, The seismic cycle at subduction thrusts: insights from seismo-thermo-mechanical models, J. Geophys. Res., 118, 6183-6202.

  5. "The Little Gray Book": Pedagogy, Discourse and Rupture in 1937

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milewski, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    In 1937, the Ministry of Education in Ontario published a document entitled "Programme of Studies for Grades 1 to VI of Public and Separate Schools" that became known amongst teachers as the "little gray book". The curriculum and pedagogy in the document enunciated a rupture or mutation in pedagogical discourse that broke with previously existing…

  6. Characterization of rupture of abdominal artery aneurysm in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Catherine G; Guard, Charles L; Erb, Hollis N; Njaa, Bradley L

    2007-05-01

    In this retrospective study, the authors describe the gross and histologic changes associated with rupture of an abdominal artery aneurysm in 33 mature female Holstein cattle between January 1980 and June 2005 from 29 farms in upstate New York and northern Pennsylvania. Over this period, there was an increase in the number of cases submitted for necropsy per year, and a seasonal trend did not exist. Affected animals ranged from 2.5 to 5.5 years of age. Grossly affected cattle exhibited marked hemoabdomen. There was marked dilation and rupture of the abdominal aorta or one of its branches, including the mesenteric, left gastric, celiac artery, right ruminal artery, or left ruminal artery. Histologically, the tunica media of the affected arteries was often thin and irregular in width with disrupted, fragmented, and coiled elastin. Granulation tissue and hemorrhage was localized at the site of rupture. There was mild-to-marked hyperplasia of the tunica intima that was irregular and disorderly with adjacent smooth-muscle hyperplasia within the tunica media. In addition, in a fraction of cases, there was mild-to-moderate mucinous change (48%) and mineralization (30%) within the tunica media. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of the gross and histologic changes in Holstein cows with abdominal artery aneurysm and rupture. PMID:17459856

  7. Theory of time-dependent rupture in the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, S.; Scholz, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is used to develop a theory of earthquake mechanism which includes the phenomenon of subcritical crack growth. The following phenomena are predicted: slow earthquakes, multiple events, delayed multiple events (doublets), postseismic rupture growth and afterslip, foreshocks, and aftershocks. The theory predicts a nucleation stage prior to an earthquake, and suggests a physical mechanism by which one earthquake may 'trigger' another.

  8. Creep and creep rupture of strongly reinforced metallic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.; Binienda, W. K.; Miti-Kavuma, M.

    1990-01-01

    A creep and creep damage theory is presented for metallic composites with strong fibers. Application is to reinforced structures in which the fiber orientation may vary throughout but a distinct fiber direction can be identified locally (local transverse isotropy). The creep deformation model follows earlier work and is based on a flow potential function that depends on invariants reflecting stress and the material symmetry. As the focus is on the interaction of creep and damage, primary creep is ignored. The creep rupture model is an extension of continuum damage mechanics and includes an isochronous damage function that depends on invariants specifying the local maximum transverse tension and the maximum longitudinal shear stress. It is posited that at high temperature and low stress, appropriate to engineering practice, these stress components damage the fiber/matrix interface through diffusion controlled void growth, eventually causing creep rupture. Experiments are outlined for characterizing a composite through creep rupture tests under transverse tension and longitudinal shear. Application is made to a thin-walled pressure vessel with reinforcing fibers at an arbitrary helical angle. The results illustrate the usefulness of the model as a means of achieving optimal designs of composite structures where creep and creep rupture are life limiting.

  9. Stress Rupture Life Reliability Measures for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Thesken, John C.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie

    2007-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are often used for storing pressurant gases onboard spacecraft. Kevlar (DuPont), glass, carbon and other more recent fibers have all been used as overwraps. Due to the fact that overwraps are subjected to sustained loads for an extended period during a mission, stress rupture failure is a major concern. It is therefore important to ascertain the reliability of these vessels by analysis, since the testing of each flight design cannot be completed on a practical time scale. The present paper examines specifically a Weibull statistics based stress rupture model and considers the various uncertainties associated with the model parameters. The paper also examines several reliability estimate measures that would be of use for the purpose of recertification and for qualifying flight worthiness of these vessels. Specifically, deterministic values for a point estimate, mean estimate and 90/95 percent confidence estimates of the reliability are all examined for a typical flight quality vessel under constant stress. The mean and the 90/95 percent confidence estimates are computed using Monte-Carlo simulation techniques by assuming distribution statistics of model parameters based also on simulation and on the available data, especially the sample sizes represented in the data. The data for the stress rupture model are obtained from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) stress rupture testing program, carried out for the past 35 years. Deterministic as well as probabilistic sensitivities are examined.

  10. Complex rupture during the 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, G. P.; Briggs, R. W.; Sladen, A.; Fielding, E. J.; Prentice, C.; Hudnut, K.; Mann, P.; Taylor, F. W.; Crone, A. J.; Gold, R.; Ito, T.; Simons, M.

    2010-11-01

    Initially, the devastating Mw 7.0, 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake seemed to involve straightforward accommodation of oblique relative motion between the Caribbean and North American plates along the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone. Here, we combine seismological observations, geologic field data and space geodetic measurements to show that, instead, the rupture process may have involved slip on multiple faults. Primary surface deformation was driven by rupture on blind thrust faults with only minor, deep, lateral slip along or near the main Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone; thus the event only partially relieved centuries of accumulated left-lateral strain on a small part of the plate-boundary system. Together with the predominance of shallow off-fault thrusting, the lack of surface deformation implies that remaining shallow shear strain will be released in future surface-rupturing earthquakes on the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone, as occurred in inferred Holocene and probable historic events. We suggest that the geological signature of this earthquake-broad warping and coastal deformation rather than surface rupture along the main fault zone-will not be easily recognized by standard palaeoseismic studies. We conclude that similarly complex earthquakes in tectonic environments that accommodate both translation and convergence-such as the San Andreas fault through the Transverse Ranges of California-may be missing from the prehistoric earthquake record.

  11. Preterm Delivery in the Setting of Left Calyceal Rupture.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Brent; Tabbarah, Rami

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the renal collecting system is a rare but serious complication of pregnancy. We report a case of nontraumatic left renal calyceal rupture in a pregnancy which ultimately progressed to preterm delivery. A 29-year-old primigravida with a remote history of urolithiasis presented with left flank pain, suprapubic pain, and signs of preterm labor at 33 weeks of gestation. The patient was believed to have urolithiasis, although initial renal ultrasound failed to demonstrate definitive calculi. After a temporary improvement in flank pain with medication, the patient experienced acute worsening of her left flank pain. Urology was consulted and further imaging was obtained. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was consistent with bilateral hydronephrosis and rupture of the left renal calyx. Given the patient's worsening pain in the setting of left calyceal rupture, the urology team planned for placement of a left ureteral stent. However, before the patient could receive her stent, she progressed to active labor and delivered a viable female infant vaginally. Following delivery, the patient's flank pain resolved rapidly and spontaneously, so no surgical intervention was performed. A summary of the literature and the details of this specific clinical situation are provided. PMID:26483981

  12. A rare knee extensor mechanism injury: Vastus intermedius tendon rupture

    PubMed Central

    Cetinkaya, Engin; Aydin, Canan Gonen; Akman, Yunus Emre; Gul, Murat; Arikan, Yavuz; Aycan, Osman Emre; Kabukcuoglu, Yavuz Selim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Quadriceps tendon injuries are rare. There is a limited number of studies in the literature, reporting partial quadriceps tendon ruptures. We did not find any study reporting an isolated vastus intermedius tendon injury in the literature. Presentation of case A 22 years old professional rugby player with the complaints of pain in the right lower limb, decreased range of motion in right knee and a mass in the mid-anterior of the right thigh applied following an overloading on his hyperflexed knee during a rugby match. T2 sequence magnetic resonance images revealed discontinuity in the vastus intermedius tendon and intramuscular hematoma. The patient has been conservatively treated. Discussion Quadriceps tendon ruptures generally occur after the 4th decade in the presence of degenerative changes. Our case is a young professional rugby player. Isolated vastus intermedius tendon rupture is unusual. Conservative treatment is performed as the intermedius tendon is in the deepest layer of the quadriceps muscle. Conclusion We report the first case of isolated rupture of the vastus intermedius tendon in the literature and we claim that disorder may be succesfully treated with conservative treatment and adequate physiotheraphy. PMID:26298093

  13. Spontaneous Postpartum Rupture of an Intact Uterus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mavromatidis, George; Karavas, George; Margioula-Siarkou, Chrysoula; Petousis, Stamatios; Kalogiannidis, Ioannis; Mamopoulos, Apostolos; Rousso, David

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of uterus is an obstetrical complication characterized by a breach in the uterine wall and the overlying serosa. We report an unusual case of spontaneous rupture of an unscarred uterus in a 33-year-old woman, a day after her third successful vaginal delivery. A 33-year-old pregnant woman, gravid 3, para 3, was referred to our department at 39 gestational week because of rupture of membranes. Despite tocolysis administration, her pregnancy was delivered vaginally after 2 days, giving birth to a male neonate of 3,020 g with normal Apgar scores at first and fifth minute. Her uterus was intact and gynecological examination after delivery was normal without any potential signs or symptoms of pathology. However, the day following her labor, patient complained of left iliac fossa pain. Her blood tests revealed a CRP value at 27.6 mg/L, whereas the X-rays revealed an extensive impacted fecal mass in the colon. MRI revealed that the left lower myometrial part of the uterus was depicted abrupt, with simultaneous presence of hemorrhagic stuff. The decision of laparotomy was therefore made in order to further evaluate rupture of uterus and properly treat patient. And subtotal hysterectomy was performed. Postoperative follow-up period was not characterized by any complications and patient was finally discharged 4 days after hysterectomy. PMID:25368704

  14. Surgical Resection of a Ruptured Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Takei, Tomohide; Sakai, Michihiro; Suzuki, Takuya; Yamamoto, Yuji; Ogasawara, Yasuo; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Imaizumi, Jun; Furuya, Ryosuke; Sekido, Hitoshi; Koizumi, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ruptured aneurysms of the pancreaticoduodenal artery result in fatal hemorrhage and high mortality. Therefore, prompt diagnosis and treatment are required, but there are sometimes problems differentiating this specific diagnosis from other abdominal pathologies. CASE REPORT We encountered a rare case of a ruptured pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm with an atypical clinical presentation that simulated acute pancreatitis. A 71-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with abdominal pain in the left upper quadrant, a slightly elevated level of pancreatic amylase, and cholelithiasis on ultrasonography. With persistent pain and progressively decreasing hemoglobin level, computed tomography with contrast showed fluid collection in the subphrenic space, a retroperitoneal hematoma, and a pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm that appeared to originate from a branch of the SMA. Urgent angiography indicated spontaneous rupture of a pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm. Emergent surgery was undertaken, and a simple aneurysmectomy was successfully performed. The patient's recovery was unremarkable. The prompt diagnosis of a pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm was difficult because the initial symptoms were vague and misleading in our case. CONCLUSIONS A high level of suspicion, rapid diagnostic capability, and prompt surgical or endovascular intervention, as well as effective teamwork in the emergency department, are critical to avoid the devastating consequences of a ruptured visceral artery aneurysm. PMID:26794823

  15. Characterization of earthquake rupture characteristics using hydroacoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot-Hedlin, C.

    2006-12-01

    Hydroacoustic signals (T-waves) generated by the 2004 Great Sumatra earthquake were recorded by a network of 5 small hydroacoustic arrays located in the Indian Ocean at distances of 2800 to 7000 km from the epicenter. The array configurations allow for accurate determination of the receiver to source azimuth given coherent arrivals. Analysis of a series of short time windows within the T-wave coda shows that the receiver to source azimuth varies smoothly as a function of time, suggesting a non-stationary T-wave source. The data indicate that the rupture proceeded in two distinct phases; initially it progressed northwest at approximately 2.4 km/s along the Sunda trench. At 600km from the epicenter the rupture slowed to approximately 1.5 km/s. However, T-waves generated by small earthquakes are also generated over a wide range of azimuths, reflecting seismic to acoustic over a broad expanse of the seafloor. Although the azimuthal variations for the great Sumatra event are shown to be inconsistent with a small-scale source, it is difficult in general to distinguish between azimuthal variations associated with the physics of T-wave excitation and those associated with an extended rupture zone. A method of determining rupture length based on the apparent motion of the T-wave source location is presented here and applied to several events, including the Great Sumatra earthquake of Dec 26, 2004 and the magnitude 8.6 event of March 28, 2005.

  16. Preterm Delivery in the Setting of Left Calyceal Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Brent; Tabbarah, Rami

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the renal collecting system is a rare but serious complication of pregnancy. We report a case of nontraumatic left renal calyceal rupture in a pregnancy which ultimately progressed to preterm delivery. A 29-year-old primigravida with a remote history of urolithiasis presented with left flank pain, suprapubic pain, and signs of preterm labor at 33 weeks of gestation. The patient was believed to have urolithiasis, although initial renal ultrasound failed to demonstrate definitive calculi. After a temporary improvement in flank pain with medication, the patient experienced acute worsening of her left flank pain. Urology was consulted and further imaging was obtained. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was consistent with bilateral hydronephrosis and rupture of the left renal calyx. Given the patient's worsening pain in the setting of left calyceal rupture, the urology team planned for placement of a left ureteral stent. However, before the patient could receive her stent, she progressed to active labor and delivered a viable female infant vaginally. Following delivery, the patient's flank pain resolved rapidly and spontaneously, so no surgical intervention was performed. A summary of the literature and the details of this specific clinical situation are provided. PMID:26483981

  17. Percutaneous and Endovascular Embolization of Ruptured Hepatic Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Little, Andrew F.; Lee, Wai Kit

    2002-06-15

    A 72-year-old woman presented with an intraperitoneal hemorrhage from a ruptured intrahepatic arteryaneurysm, with an associated pseudoaneurysm developing a high-flow arteriovenous fistula. Persistent coagulopathy and a median arcuate ligament stenosis of the celiac axis further complicated endovascular management. Aneurysm thrombosis required percutaneous embolization with coils, a removable core guidewire and polyvinyl alcohol particles.

  18. Progressive visual loss following rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Mascitelli, Justin R; Steinberger, Jeremy M; Weiss, Nirit

    2014-01-01

    A 51-year-old man with several months of headache and progressive visual decline was found to have bilateral optic disc pallor with significant impairment of visual acuity. Despite a thorough ophthalmologic evaluation, the cause of visual loss could not be elucidated. MRI of the brain revealed a lesion in the left anterior Sylvian fissure as well as disseminated foci of subarachnoid fat consistent with a diagnosis of a ruptured dermoid cyst. The decision for open surgical resection was chosen to minimize the risk of cyst re-rupture and further visual or neurologic decline. The diagnosis of dermoid cyst was confirmed at the time of surgery. Vasospasm-induced ischemia of the optic nerves, optic chiasm or bilateral optic tracts secondary to the inflammatory reaction following cyst rupture is the most likely mechanism of visual loss in this patient. To the authors' knowledge, this report represents the first reported case of visual loss secondary to rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst not related to mass effect of the tumor on the optic apparatus, visual pathways or visual cortex. PMID:23896550

  19. Transcatheter closure of ruptured sinus of valsalva to left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Devi A; Lahiri, Anandaroop; George, Oommen K

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of ruptured right sinus of valsalva into the left ventricle (LV). Transthoracic echocardiography showed a marked turbulent flow from the right aortic sinus to the LV. We describe a novel technique of closure of this defect with duct occluder, involving the formation of an arterio-arterial loop, without resorting to the usual arteriovenous loop. PMID:27011698

  20. Mapping the rupture process of moderate earthquakes by inverting accelerograms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hellweg, M.; Boatwright, J.

    1999-01-01

    We present a waveform inversion method that uses recordings of small events as Green's functions to map the rupture growth of moderate earthquakes. The method fits P and S waveforms from many stations simultaneously in an iterative procedure to estimate the subevent rupture time and amplitude relative to the Green's function event. We invert the accelerograms written by two moderate Parkfield earthquakes using smaller events as Green's functions. The first earthquake (M = 4.6) occurred on November 14, 1993, at a depth of 11 km under Middle Mountain, in the assumed preparation zone for the next Parkfield main shock. The second earthquake (M = 4.7) occurred on December 20, 1994, some 6 km to the southeast, at a depth of 9 km on a section of the San Andreas fault with no previous microseismicity and little inferred coseismic slip in the 1966 Parkfield earthquake. The inversion results are strikingly different for the two events. The average stress release in the 1993 event was 50 bars, distributed over a geometrically complex area of 0.9 km2. The average stress release in the 1994 event was only 6 bars, distributed over a roughly elliptical area of 20 km2. The ruptures of both events appear to grow spasmodically into relatively complex shapes: the inversion only constrains the ruptures to grow more slowly than the S wave velocity but does not use smoothness constraints. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Spontaneous postpartum rupture of an intact uterus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mavromatidis, George; Karavas, George; Margioula-Siarkou, Chrysoula; Petousis, Stamatios; Kalogiannidis, Ioannis; Mamopoulos, Apostolos; Rousso, David

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of uterus is an obstetrical complication characterized by a breach in the uterine wall and the overlying serosa. We report an unusual case of spontaneous rupture of an unscarred uterus in a 33-year-old woman, a day after her third successful vaginal delivery. A 33-year-old pregnant woman, gravid 3, para 3, was referred to our department at 39 gestational week because of rupture of membranes. Despite tocolysis administration, her pregnancy was delivered vaginally after 2 days, giving birth to a male neonate of 3,020 g with normal Apgar scores at first and fifth minute. Her uterus was intact and gynecological examination after delivery was normal without any potential signs or symptoms of pathology. However, the day following her labor, patient complained of left iliac fossa pain. Her blood tests revealed a CRP value at 27.6 mg/L, whereas the X-rays revealed an extensive impacted fecal mass in the colon. MRI revealed that the left lower myometrial part of the uterus was depicted abrupt, with simultaneous presence of hemorrhagic stuff. The decision of laparotomy was therefore made in order to further evaluate rupture of uterus and properly treat patient. And subtotal hysterectomy was performed. Postoperative follow-up period was not characterized by any complications and patient was finally discharged 4 days after hysterectomy. PMID:25368704

  2. [Sudden deaths due to non-traumatic aortic aneurysms rupture].

    PubMed

    Bury, Anna; Meissner, Ewa; Szram, Stefan; Berent, Jarosław

    2011-01-01

    In this work we review two cases of ruptured aortic aneurysms which arose from congenital abnormalities of the aortic wall structure. In the first case, a 16-year old, previously untreated boy died, with no previous symptoms of an aortic aneurysm. The boy was suspected of taking drugs and even of committing suicide. A young couple found the boy's body in the wood close to the bus stop. There were no signs of violence on the corpse and the body was fully and properly dressed. The autopsy revealed enlarged (true aneurysm) and ruptured ascending aorta with about 700 ml of blood in the pericardial sac. Toxicological examination was negative. Histopathology showed abnormalities in the structure of the wall of aorta in the place of the rupture. All other body organs and vessels seemed to be normal and properly developed except the thoracic aorta, and no other morphologic abnormalities were present. In the second case, the corpse of a 30-year-old man was found in his apartment (he lived with his parents). The parents claimed he did not use drugs or alcohol. The autopsy, as in the previous case, revealed a ruptured true aneurysm of the ascending aorta with 370 g of blood in the pericardial sac. The concaved thoracic cavity was also observed. After the autopsy, the man's parents reported that in childhood, their son was diagnosed to suffer from Marfan syndrome. PMID:22715682

  3. Ruptured liver cavernous hemangioma – rare cause of hemoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Goidescu, OC; Patrascu, T

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 70-year-old patient admitted with strong abdominal pains and operated in our service for hemorrhagic acute abdomen. Intraoperative hepatic cavernous hemangioma was found with capsular rupture and hemoperitoneum. Due to liver cirrhosis, and no proper technical equipment we chose to perform simple hemostasis. Postoperative evolution was favorable. PMID:25914743

  4. Peritonitis Caused by Rupture of Infected Retroperitoneal Teratoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Retroperitoneal teratomas are usually asymptomatic, though there have been isolated reports of retroperitoneal teratomas presenting as intra-abdominal abscesses and peritonitis in adults. A 7-year-old girl who had presented with acute abdomen due to ruptured retroperitoneal teratoma is reported. PMID:22953296

  5. Probing voltage induced bond rupture in a molecular junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haixing; Su, Timothy; Kim, Nathaniel; Darancet, Pierre; Leighton, James; Steigerwald, Michael; Nuckolls, Colin; Venkataraman, Latha

    We use scanning tunneling microscope break junction to study electric field breakdown at the single molecule level. We investigate breakdown phenomena in atomic chains composed of Si--Si, Si--O, Si--C, Ge--Ge and C--C bonds that are commonly found in the low- κ dielectric material. We see different bond rupture behaviors in a range of molecular backbones, and use the results from a statistically large number of measurements to determine which bond breaks. We find that Si--Si and Ge--Ge bonds rupture above a 1V bias. We also find that the Si--C bond is more robust than Si--O or Si--Si bond at above 1V. Finally, we illustrate how an additional conductance pathway in parallel to the Si--Si bond changes bond rupture behavior under an electric field. We carry out ab initio calculations on these systems and demonstrate that the mechanism for bond rupture under electric field involves ``heating'' of the molecule through electron-vibrational mode coupling. Haixing Li is supported by Semiconductor Research Corporation and New York CAIST program. We thank the NSF for the support of these studies under Grant No. CHE-1404922.

  6. Mechanics of shear rupture applied to earthquake zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Victor C.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanics of shear slippage and rupture in rock masses are reviewed. The essential ideas in fracture mechanics are summarized emphasizing the interpretation and relation among the fracture parameters in shear cracks. The slip-weakening model is described. The general formulation of the problem of nonuniform slip distribution in a continuum is covered.

  7. A ruptured superficial femoral artery aneurysm: A case report.

    PubMed

    Naouli, H; Jiber, H; Bouarhroum, A

    2016-02-01

    True atherosclerotic aneurysms of superficial femoral artery (SFA) are rare and often associated with other peripheral or aortic aneurysms. We are reporting the case of a 78-year-old man who has been admitted with a ruptured superficial femoral artery aneurysm associated with bilateral popliteal artery aneurysm. The patient underwent successful aneurysm resection and bypass grafting. PMID:26526762

  8. Consequence analysis for a steam generator tube rupture accident

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C.F.

    1983-01-01

    Radioiodine release to the environment following a PWR steam generator tube rupture accident is studied. The objective is to develop a realistic model which may be used to examine the rupture flow of primary coolant and the transport process of leaked primary coolant in the steam generator. Estimated radioiodine release from the model is first compared with past accident data. The result indicates that NRC staff and the licensee may have underestimated the actual releases in the Prairie Island steam generator tube rupture accident. Results also show that a tube rupture without offsite power available may yield a radioiodine release of 8 times larger than the value given in the SAR analysis. Possible modification of recovery operation and equipment design are recommended in order to mitigate the radioiodine release. They are (1) trip reactor as soon as possible, (2) maintain reactor coolant pumps operation, (3) depressurize primary system as quickly as possible, (4) maintain feedwater flow properly, (5) actuate safety injection to draw borated water sooner, (6) do not isolate the faulty loop too early, and (7) modify the steam dryer design to include horizontal zig-zag plates.

  9. Consequence analysis of a steam generator tube rupture accident

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.M.; Chuang, C.F.

    1984-12-01

    A flashing droplet model was developed to examine the rupture flow of reactor coolant and its transport phenomena through the stream generator during a steam generator tube rupture accident. The model includes flashing flow; droplet formation; droplet removal by tube bundles, bubble scrubbing, steam separators, and steam dryers; and droplet size change by evaporation and condensation. The calculation follows the actual sequence of events during the accident. Those reactor coolant droplets escaping from the steam generator are used to estimate the radioactivity released into the environment. The steam generator tube rupture accident that occurred at the Prairie Island Plant on October 2, 1979, was studied using the model. The model estimated a release of 204 ..mu..Ci of /sup 131/I equivalent activity. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission estimated a 210-..mu..Ci release, assuming an iodine partition factor of 1/100 in the steam-generator. The model was also used to analyze a hypothetical steam generator tube rupture accident coupled with loss of off-site power in a large 1100-MW (electric) Westinghouse four-loop plant. The model estimated that 45 Ci of /sup 131/I equivalent activity could be released through the relief valves, which were stuck open for 30 min. The number is eight times higher than the estimate from the Westinghouse safety analysis report using a uniform mixing model.

  10. Anthrax toxin-induced rupture of artificial lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nablo, Brian J.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L.; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes rupture artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm.

  11. Axial creep-rupture time of boron-aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Koichi; Hamada, Jun`ichi

    1995-11-01

    Axial creep tests of a 10vol% boron-aluminum hotpressed monolayer composite were carried out under several constant loads at 300 C in air. The composite behaved with slight primary creep, but did not show appreciable secondary creep. Several specimens encountered a momentary increase of strain during the creep test which separated the creep curve into two regions, because of the individual fiber breaks in the composite. And then, almost all the specimens suddenly fractured without tertiary creep. From the viewpoint of reliability engineering the statistical properties of the creep-rupture time were investigated. The average creep-rupture time decreased with an increase in the applied stress, and the relatively large coefficient of variation was estimated in every case, being around 1,000%. However, these scatters were estimated to be smaller than the scatter of creep-rupture time in the boron fiber itself. That means, the reliability of the fiber`s creep-rupture time is improved by compositing with matrix material.

  12. Complex rupture during the 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, G.P.; Briggs, R.W.; Sladen, A.; Fielding, E.J.; Prentice, C.; Hudnut, K.; Mann, P.; Taylor, F.W.; Crone, A.J.; Gold, R.; Ito, T.; Simons, M.

    2010-01-01

    Initially, the devastating Mw 7.0, 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake seemed to involve straightforward accommodation of oblique relative motion between the Caribbean and North American plates along the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone. Here, we combine seismological observations, geologic field data and space geodetic measurements to show that, instead, the rupture process may have involved slip on multiple faults. Primary surface deformation was driven by rupture on blind thrust faults with only minor, deep, lateral slip along or near the main Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone; thus the event only partially relieved centuries of accumulated left-lateral strain on a small part of the plate-boundary system. Together with the predominance of shallow off-fault thrusting, the lack of surface deformation implies that remaining shallow shear strain will be released in future surface-rupturing earthquakes on the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone, as occurred in inferred Holocene and probable historic events. We suggest that the geological signature of this earthquakeg-broad warping and coastal deformation rather than surface rupture along the main fault zoneg-will not be easily recognized by standard palaeoseismic studies. We conclude that similarly complex earthquakes in tectonic environments that accommodate both translation and convergenceg-such as the San Andreas fault through the Transverse Ranges of Californiag-may be missing from the prehistoric earthquake record. ?? 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  13. Traumatic ruptured globe eye injuries in a large urban center

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Eitan S; Lazzaro, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine patient characteristics and outcomes in a group of consecutive patients with ruptured globe eye injuries at Kings County Hospital Center, a large, urban, level 1 trauma center. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed to identify all patients with ruptured globe eye injuries seen between January 2009 and October 2011. Thirty-eight patients who sustained ruptured globe eye injuries from all causes were investigated for etiology and final visual outcomes Results Eight eyes in which vision could be assessed were evaluated as having no light perception at presentation and three of these eyes required primary enucleation. Of the 38 eyes, orbit fractures were found in 15 eyes and an intraocular foreign body was found in six eyes. Discussion Our cohort revealed a 37.5% rate of primary enucleation in eyes with no light perception, which we believe to be a reflection of the severity of injury. All three cases were secondary to a gunshot wound. Further, our sample, although small in size, revealed a very high percentage of eyes that were ruptured secondary to violent causes compared with other studies. PMID:23493627

  14. Rupture Loop Annex (RLA) ion exchange vault entry and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.E.

    1996-01-04

    This engineering report documents the entry and characterization of the Rupture Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located near the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns were found in the vault. Some of which contained transuranics, Cs 137, and Co 60. The characterization information is necessary for future vault cleanout and column disposal.

  15. Unusual simultaneous multifocal rupture of oesophagus, stomach and diaphragm after blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Wojciech; Witkowski, Zbigniew; Lasek, Jerzy; Deja, Włodzimierz; Stasiak, Mariusz; Kurowski, Krzysztof; Zapaśnik, Adam; Golabek-Dropiewska, Katarzyna

    2010-01-01

    An unusual case of simultaneous multifocal rupture of the oesophagus, stomach and diaphragm after blunt trauma is described. The characteristic computed tomography scans (with intraluminal contrast application) of the ruptured oesophagus are shown, and successful management is presented. PMID:22242058

  16. Rupture termination at restraining bends: The last great earthquake on the Altyn Tagh Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Austin J.; Oskin, Michael E.; Liu-Zeng, Jing; Shao, Yanxiu

    2015-04-01

    Strike-slip rupture propagation falters where changes in fault strike increase Coulomb failure stress. Numerical models of this phenomenon offer predictions of rupture extent based on bend geometry, but have not been verified with field data. To test model predictions of rupture barriers, we examine rupture extent along a section of the sinistral Altyn Tagh Fault punctuated by three major double bends. We measure 3-8 m offsets and map >95 km of continuous scarps that define the most recent surface rupture. We document the eastern terminus of this rupture within the Aksay bend, where an undeformed Pleistocene alluvial fan we mapped and dated overlaps the fault. We conclude, based on this geomorphologic evidence, that multiple Holocene ruptures have stopped in the Aksay bend. Our field data validate model predictions of rupture termination at a >18° restraining bend and support use of geometric parameters to define expected earthquake sizes in seismic hazard models.

  17. Seismic waves radiated during dynamic rupture of granite laboratory samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mclaskey, G.; Kilgore, B. D.; Lockner, D. A.; Beeler, N. M.

    2013-12-01

    Using arrays of piezoelectric sensors, we analyze the way that seismic waves are radiated during dynamic rupture of saw-cut faults in granite laboratory samples. We compare stick-slip events generated on a on a 0.15 m-long fault in a triaxial apparatus at 70 to 200 MPa normal stress with those on a 2 m-long fault in a large-scale biaxial apparatus at 1 to 7 MPa normal stress. The two machines have different values of unloading stiffness and produce stick-slip events with significantly different properties. Events on the triaxial apparatus have greater overall slip (400 to 1600 ?m) and larger sample-average shear stress changes (25 to 110 MPa) but shorter overall slip duration (200 to 400 ?s) compared to those on the large biaxial apparatus (50 to 150 ?m slip, 0.1 to 0.4 MPa stress changes, and 2 to 4 ms overall slip duration). As a result, the average slip speeds are much larger for events on the triaxial apparatus (2 to 4 m/s) compared to those on the large biaxial apparatus (15 to 75 mm/s). To explore the consequences of these differences, and how they relate to differences in dynamic rupture modes and seismic radiation, each sample is instrumented with at least 15 piezoelectric sensors which are used to study the timing, location, amplitude, and frequency content of radiated seismic waves. In addition, an array of strain gages on the 2 m samples allows us to explore how the local distribution of shear stress along the fault affects the way that fault rupture occurs. We find that at low stress levels fault slip along the 2 m fault occurs as brief bursts of rapid, seismic slip followed by slowly expanding (5 to 200 m/s) fronts of largely aseismic afterslip (80 to 500 ?m/s slip rates). Higher stress levels on the same fault produce ruptures that propagate close to the shear wave speed and continuously radiate seismic waves near the rupture front. In some cases we observe the rapid termination of seismic radiation on the 2 m fault when a rupture front propagates into a low stress region. Finally, we evaluate which of our observations are controlled by the boundary conditions and elastic properties of the apparatus and which are controlled by the elastic and frictional properties of the rocks and are most relevant to dynamic rupture processes that generate natural earthquakes.

  18. Slip compensation at fault damage zones along earthquake surface ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Kim, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Surface ruptures associated with earthquake faulting commonly comprise a number of segments, and the discontinuities form tip and linking damage zones, which are deformed regions consisting of secondary features. Stress transferring or releasing, when seismic waves pass through the discontinuities, could produce different slip features depending on rupture propagation or termination. Thus, slip patterns at fault damage zones can be one of the key factors to understand fault kinematics, fault evolution and, hence, earthquake hazard. In some previous studies (e.g. Peacock and Sanderson, 1991; Kim and Sanderson, 2005), slip distribution along faults to understand the connectivity or maturity of segmented faults system have commonly been analyzed based on only the main slip components (dip-slip or strike-slip). Secondary slip components, however, are sometimes dominant at fault damage zones, such as linkage and tip zones. In this study, therefore, we examine slip changes between both main and secondary slip components along unilaterally propagated coseismic strike-slip ruptures. Horizontal and vertical components of slip and the slip compensation patterns at tip and linking damage zones are various from slip deficit (decrease in both slip components) through slip compensation (increase of vertical slip with horizontal slip decrease) to slip neutral. Front and back tip zones, which are classified depending on main propagation direction of earthquake ruptures, show different slip patterns; slip compensation is observed at the frontal tip whilst slip deficit occurs at the back tip zone. Average values of the two slip components and their compensative patterns at linking damage zones are closely related with the ratio of length to width (L/W) of linkage geometry; the horizontal slip is proportional to the ratio of L/W, whilst the vertical slip shows little dependence on the value L/W. When the L/W is greater than ~2, average values of two slip components are almost similar to those of the main traces. In contrast, when the L/W < 2, the vertical slip is either increased or decreased as the horizontal slip is decreased, depending on the maturity of the linking zone. Thus, we argue that slip patterns at linking damage zones may be controlled by the LW-ratio of linking damage zones and hence structural maturities of the segmented fault systems. In conclusion, slip patterns at fault damage zones along earthquake surface ruptures are various depending on the maturity of linkage zones and/or the rupture propagation direction. Therefore, the consideration of slip compensation as well as damage structures along surface ruptures must be very useful to understand fault evolution and, hence, to assess seismic hazards around active fault systems.

  19. A New Surgical Repair Technique for Ischemic Total Papillary Muscle Rupture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Kwang; Heo, Woon; Min, Ho-Ki; Kang, Do Kyun; Jun, Hee Jae; Hwang, Youn-Ho

    2015-11-01

    Papillary muscle (PM) rupture is an emergency surgical condition that may occur after acute myocardial infarction. In patients with compete rupture of the PM, mitral valve replacement is preferred or recommended generally because of unstable vital signs or technical difficulties with successful repair, as compared with patients with partial PM rupture. This case report describes the successful repair of a complete anterolateral PM rupture by using the single PM formation technique with subsequent ring annuloplasty. PMID:26522535

  20. Improved Data Set for the Frequency of Gaps and Steps in Ground Ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasi, G. P.; Wesnousky, S. G.; Morelan, A. E., III

    2014-12-01

    Observations of actual ground ruptures from moderate and large earthquakes show a wide range of behaviors, including fault-to-fault jumps, branching topologies, and rupture traces with multi-kilometer gaps between them. Seismic hazard assessments have responded to these observations by including increasingly sophisticated scenarios of possible ruptures in their earthquake rate forecasts. The largest of these to date has been the Uniform California Earthquake Forecast 3 (UCERF3), which explicitly included ruptures with fault-to-fault jumps in its rupture rate estimates. High-level site-specific seismic source characterizations such as for the Diablo Canyon Power Plant have also begun including complicated rupture geometries. Systematic collection of observations from ground rupturing earthquakes provide one way to evaluate these seismic source models. We have expanded an initial collection by Wesnousky (2008) with events post-dating that collection and events for which new information is available. New events increase the strike-slip and normal event set by 50% and reverse events by 35%. New data allow us to revise previous estimates for strike-slip rupture of the probability that a step of 1 km or more in width will arrest rupture. Observationally, 65% of strike-slip ruptures include at least one step of 1 km or greater. The number of steps through which ruptures are observed to rupture through can be modeled by a geometric distribution in which steps are crossed about 59% of the time. Steps are slightly more effective at arresting rupture in normal and reverse faulting cases, being crossed 56% and 50%, respectively. New events were also systematically examined for gaps in the mapped rupture trace. We find gaps of 1 km or more in about half of the ruptures of the new event set. These empirical data will compliment new research into rupture propagation across gaps, exemplified by the 2010 El Mayor Cucapah earthquake, which included a gap measured variously at 7 or 15 km in length.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of an anterior communicating artery ruptured during angiography.

    PubMed

    Hodis, Simona; Uthamaraj, Susheil; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Kallmes, David F; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    We present a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of the hemodynamic environment of an anterior communicating artery that spontaneously ruptured immediately following three-dimensional rotational angiography. Subsequent digital subtraction angiography allowed for the localization of the point of rupture within the aneurysm dome. CFD analysis demonstrated a concentrated jet that impinged directly at the site of rupture. Peak systolic pressure and wall shear stress were both maximal near the rupture location. PMID:23475991

  2. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of an anterior communicating artery ruptured during angiography.

    PubMed

    Hodis, Simona; Uthamaraj, Susheil; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Kallmes, David F; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2014-03-01

    We present a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of the hemodynamic environment of an anterior communicating artery that spontaneously ruptured immediately following three-dimensional rotational angiography. Subsequent digital subtraction angiography allowed for the localization of the point of rupture within the aneurysm dome. CFD analysis demonstrated a concentrated jet that impinged directly at the site of rupture. Peak systolic pressure and wall shear stress were both maximal near the rupture location. PMID:23493342

  3. Graphene mechanics: II. Atomic stress distribution during indentation until rupture.

    PubMed

    Costescu, Bogdan I; Gräter, Frauke

    2014-06-28

    Previous Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments found single layers of defect-free graphene to rupture at unexpectedly high loads in the micronewton range. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we modeled an AFM spherical tip pressing on a circular graphene sheet and studied the stress distribution during the indentation process until rupture. We found the graphene rupture force to have no dependency on the sheet size and a very weak dependency on the indenter velocity, allowing a direct comparison to experiment. The deformation showed a non-linear elastic behavior, with a two-dimensional elastic modulus in good agreement with previous experimental and computational studies. In line with theoretical predictions for linearly elastic sheets, rupture forces of non-linearly elastic graphene are proportional to the tip radius. However, as a deviation from the theory, the atomic stress concentrates under the indenter tip more strongly than predicted and causes a high probability of bond breaking only in this area. In turn, stress levels decrease rapidly towards the edge of the sheet, most of which thus only serves the role of mechanical support for the region under the indenter. As a consequence, the high ratio between graphene sheets and sphere radii, hitherto supposed to be necessary for reliable deformation and rupture studies, could be reduced to a factor of only 5-10 without affecting the outcome. Our study suggests time-resolved analysis of forces at the atomic level as a valuable tool to predict and interpret the nano-scale response of stressed materials beyond graphene. PMID:24834440

  4. [Delayed spontaneous rupture of the bladder following augmentation enterocystoplasty].

    PubMed

    Leibovitch, I; Ramon, J; Ben Chaim, J; Goldwasser, B

    1990-08-01

    Delayed spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder following augmentation enterocystoplasty is a serious life-threatening complication of uncertain etiology. Multiple factors are believed to contribute to the mechanism of bladder perforation. Ruptured augmented bladders share a common urodynamic pattern of high leak point pressure of the urethra, with sensory and mechanical tolerance of high filling pressure. This combination seems to be the main predisposing factor for spontaneous perforation. Other risk factors, including catheter trauma during intermittent self-catheterization, urinary retention due to mucus retention or noncompliance with the catheterization protocol, chronic infection, and decreased sensation of bladder filling, may play roles in the mechanism of rupture. Clinically, patients present with sepsis, abdominal pain and distension, ileus, fever, oliguria and peritoneal irritation. The diagnosis is made on low pressure cystography, although failure of cystography to demonstrate extravasation is not unusual. Aggressive surgical treatment consists of immediate exploration, primary repair of the perforation, drainage of the perivesical space, suprapubic cystostomy and broad-spectrum antibiotics. Longterm management includes a strict intermittent catheterization schedule, anticholinergic therapy and urodynamic evaluation. Failure to achieve a low pressure storage reservoir by conservative means entails an increased risk of recurrent perforation. In such cases further surgical intervention should be considered. We present a 21-year-old paraplegic man 5 months after augmentation enterocystoplasty who required operation because of spontaneous rupture of the augmented bladder. Spontaneous delayed rupture of the bladder should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen in patients after augmentation enterocystoplasty. Early surgical treatment and subsequent monitoring of the low pressure reservoir are recommended. PMID:2227670

  5. Dynamic Rupture Benchmarking of the ADER-DG Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelties, C.; Gabriel, A.

    2012-12-01

    We will verify the arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) method in various test cases of the 'SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise' benchmark suite (Harris et al. 2009). The ADER-DG scheme is able to solve the spontaneous rupture problem with high-order accuracy in space and time on three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Strong mesh coarsening or refinement at areas of interest can be applied to keep the computational costs feasible. Moreover, the method does not generate spurious high-frequency contributions in the slip rate spectra and therefore does not require any artificial damping as demonstrated in previous presentations and publications (Pelties et al. 2010 and 2012). We will show that the mentioned features hold also for more advanced setups as e.g. a branching fault system, heterogeneous background stresses and bimaterial faults. The advanced geometrical flexibility combined with an enhanced accuracy will make the ADER-DG method a useful tool to study earthquake dynamics on complex fault systems in realistic rheologies. References: Harris, R.A., M. Barall, R. Archuleta, B. Aagaard, J.-P. Ampuero, H. Bhat, V. Cruz-Atienza, L. Dalguer, P. Dawson, S. Day, B. Duan, E. Dunham, G. Ely, Y. Kaneko, Y. Kase, N. Lapusta, Y. Liu, S. Ma, D. Oglesby, K. Olsen, A. Pitarka, S. Song, and E. Templeton, The SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise, Seismological Research Letters, vol. 80, no. 1, pages 119-126, 2009 Pelties, C., J. de la Puente, and M. Kaeser, Dynamic Rupture Modeling in Three Dimensions on Unstructured Meshes Using a Discontinuous Galerkin Method, AGU 2010 Fall Meeting, abstract #S21C-2068 Pelties, C., J. de la Puente, J.-P. Ampuero, G. Brietzke, and M. Kaeser, Three-Dimensional Dynamic Rupture Simulation with a High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Method on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes, JGR. - Solid Earth, VOL. 117, B02309, 2012

  6. Dynamic Rupture Benchmarking of the ADER-DG Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Alice; Pelties, Christian

    2013-04-01

    We will verify the arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) method in various test cases of the 'SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise' benchmark suite (Harris et al. 2009). The ADER-DG scheme is able to solve the spontaneous rupture problem with high-order accuracy in space and time on three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Strong mesh coarsening or refinement at areas of interest can be applied to keep the computational costs feasible. Moreover, the method does not generate spurious high-frequency contributions in the slip rate spectra and therefore does not require any artificial damping as demonstrated in previous presentations and publications (Pelties et al. 2010 and 2012). We will show that the mentioned features hold also for more advanced setups as e.g. a branching fault system, heterogeneous background stresses and bimaterial faults. The advanced geometrical flexibility combined with an enhanced accuracy will make the ADER-DG method a useful tool to study earthquake dynamics on complex fault systems in realistic rheologies. References: Harris, R.A., M. Barall, R. Archuleta, B. Aagaard, J.-P. Ampuero, H. Bhat, V. Cruz-Atienza, L. Dalguer, P. Dawson, S. Day, B. Duan, E. Dunham, G. Ely, Y. Kaneko, Y. Kase, N. Lapusta, Y. Liu, S. Ma, D. Oglesby, K. Olsen, A. Pitarka, S. Song, and E. Templeton, The SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise, Seismological Research Letters, vol. 80, no. 1, pages 119-126, 2009 Pelties, C., J. de la Puente, and M. Kaeser, Dynamic Rupture Modeling in Three Dimensions on Unstructured Meshes Using a Discontinuous Galerkin Method, AGU 2010 Fall Meeting, abstract #S21C-2068 Pelties, C., J. de la Puente, J.-P. Ampuero, G. Brietzke, and M. Kaeser, Three-Dimensional Dynamic Rupture Simulation with a High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Method on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes, JGR. - Solid Earth, VOL. 117, B02309, 2012

  7. Advances in the surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Darling, R C; Cordero, J A; Chang, B B; Shah, D M; Paty, P S; Lloyd, W E; Leather, R P

    1996-12-01

    Over the past two decades, the mortality rate for elective repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms has improved to an acceptable level (< 5%). However, surgical results of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms have remained fairly constant with about 50% in hospital mortality rates. Growing experience with the use of the left retroperitoneal exposure for elective aortic surgery allowed the authors to extend the use of this technique to the repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. The extended left retroperitoneal approach using a posterolateral exposure through the 10th intercostal space allowed the surgeon expeditiously and reliably to obtain supraceliac aortic control by dividing the left crus of the diaphragm in all patients. In total, 104 aortic replacements were performed for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm during the past 7 years. Of these patients, 87 were men and 17 women; mean(range) age was 72(52-95) years. Hemodynamic instability (as defined by a systolic blood pressure of < 90 mmHg) was present before surgery in 41% (43/104) of patients. The operative mortality rate was 27.9% (29/104). Preoperative hemodynamic instability, time of operative delay and aortic cross-clamp time did not correlate with operative mortality. The median duration of intensive care unit stay was 4 (range 1-60) days and hospital stay 11 (range 6-175) days. The results of this series identified that a change in the operative technique for the repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm beneficially affected patient survival. The authors suggest that expeditious supraceliac control without thoracotomy is an excellent alternative and offers an advantage in the surgical management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. PMID:9012998

  8. Creep-rupture of polymer-matrix composites. [graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, H. F.; Griffith, W. I.; Morris, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    An accelerated characterization method for resin matrix composites is reviewed. Methods for determining modulus and strength master curves are given. Creep rupture analytical models are discussed as applied to polymers and polymer matrix composites. Comparisons between creep rupture experiments and analytical models are presented. The time dependent creep rupture process in graphite epoxy laminates is examined as a function of temperature and stress level.

  9. Ruptured intracranial dermoid tumor secondary to closed head trauma. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Phillips, W E; Martinez, C R; Cahill, D W

    1994-07-01

    A patient with an intracranial dermoid tumor that ruptured secondary to closed head trauma is described. Intracranial dermoid tumors (cysts) have been reported to rupture spontaneously during or following surgery. To the authors' knowledge, rupture of a dermoid cyst following closed head trauma has not been reported. PMID:8061386

  10. Spontaneous Rupture of the Superficial Femoral Artery Treated with Endovascular Stent-Grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Ramus, James R. Gibson, Matthew; Magee, Timothy; Torrie, Peter

    2007-09-15

    Spontaneous rupture of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) is rare. It may occur in the presence of an SFA aneurysm or in a nonaneurysmal, but usually atherosclerotic, artery. Previously these ruptures have been treated by surgical exclusion, often with bypass grafting. We report a case of spontaneous rupture of a nonaneurysmal SFA treated successfully with endovascular stent-grafting.

  11. Complex rupture processes at the Brarbunga caldera, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesca, Simone; Heimann, Sebastian; Hensch, Martin; Hjrleifsdttir, Vala; Holohan, Eoghan; Dahm, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    The unrest of the Brarbunga volcanic system in summer 2014 has been accompanied by a significant increase in seismicity, which was localized both at the caldera rim and along segments of a major, laterally-propagated dyke. The seismic activity was exceptional for the region, with more than 60 events of magnitude Ml larger than 5.0 recorded in the first three months of activity, which is still ongoing. Our aim here is to provide an explanation of the sustained seismicity at the caldera rim. We rely on regional broadband recordings to perform an inversion of source parameters and to model the source processes for the largest events (above Ml 5.0) in the sequence. Full moment tensor inversion and moment tensor clustering reveal that most events can be classified in two types, which can be well modeled by the superposition of a common sub-vertical compensated linear vector dipole (CLVD) and a normal faulting, which has a different orientation for the two types of events. The analysis of the earthquake source is further extended to smaller magnitudes, by using a waveform correlation approach; this confirms similar rupture processes for weaker events. An apparent discrepancy among seismological observations at local and regional distances, in terms of origin times and radiation patterns, suggest a complex rupture process, composed of different phases. Whereas local data are useful to track the nucleation phase, characterised by a shear failure, regional data can be used to assess the mechanism responsible for the most energetic signal, where the non-DC component becomes more relevant. The combined analysis of local and regional data revealed that, at least during the first phase of the sequence, the type of rupture is conditioned by the location of the rupture nucleation. When the rupture is initiated at the northern rim, the normal faulting component of the moment tensor strikes almost North-South; instead, if the rupture starts at the southern rim, the normal faulting component has an East-West striking. Our analysis is here used to simulate, test and discuss different proposed complex collapse models.

  12. Acoustic-Friction Networks and the Evolution of Precursor Rupture Fronts in Laboratory Earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, H. O.; Young, R. P.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of shear rupture fronts in laboratory earthquakes is analysed with the corresponding functional networks, constructed over acoustic emission friction-patterns. We show that the mesoscopic characteristics of functional networks carry the characteristic time for each phase of the rupture evolution. The classified rupture fronts in network states–obtained from a saw-cut fault and natural faulted Westerly granite - show a clear separation into three main groups, indicating different states of rupture fronts. With respect to the scaling of local ruptures' durations with the networks' parameters, we show that the gap in the classified fronts could be related to the possibility of a separation between slow and regular fronts.

  13. Barrier-induced supershear ruptures on a slip-weakening fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Huihui; Huang, Jinshui; Yang, Hongfeng

    2015-06-01

    Here we investigate the effects of a patch with elevated effective normal stress (barrier) on two-dimensional in-plane supershear rupture propagation on a planar fault from numerical experiments. Our results confirm that the barrier may slow down or stop coseismic ruptures but may also induce supershear ruptures. We demonstrate that the supershear rupture may emerge in a region that is delineated by two approximate linear boundaries. If the barrier size is below the lower boundary, ruptures can overcome the barrier and propagate at subshear speeds. If the barrier size is larger than the upper boundary, ruptures are always stopped by the barrier. Furthermore, we find that the barrier-induced supershear ruptures may eventually slow down into subshear speed, depending on the size and the location of the barrier. The duration of supershear ruptures increases as the barrier sizes grow from the lower to the upper boundary, which are proportional to the reduction in rupture speeds caused by the barrier. These results indicate that a barrier on the fault may not stop coseismic ruptures. Rather, the barrier may induce ruptures propagating at supershear speeds that play important roles in near-field ground shaking and damage.

  14. Predictor and Prognosis of Procedural Rupture during Coil Embolization for Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Min; Jo, Kyung Il; Jeon, Pyoung; Kim, Keon Ha; Kim, Jong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study was to determine the incidence and outcomes of procedural rupture (PR) during coil embolization of unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA) and to explore potential risk factors. Methods This retrospective study evaluated 1038 patients treated with coil embolization between January 2001 and May 2013 in a single tertiary medical institute. PR was defined as evidence of rupture during coil embolization or post procedural imaging. The patient's medical records were reviewed including procedure description, image findings and clinical outcomes. Results Twelve of 1038 (1.1%) patients showed PR. Points and time of rupture were parent artery rupture during stent delivery (n=2), aneurysm rupture during filling stage (n=9) and unknown (n=1). Two parent artery rupture and one aneurysm neck rupture showed poor clinical outcomes [modified Rankin Scale (mRs) >2] Nine aneurysm dome rupture cases showed favorable outcomes (mRS ≤2). Location (anterior cerebral artery) of aneurysm was associated with high procedural rupture rate (p<0.05). Conclusion The clinical course of a patientwith procedural aneurysm rupture during filling stage seemed benign. Parent artery and aneurysm neck rupture seemed relatively urgent, serious and life threatening. Although the permanent morbidity rate was low, clinicians should pay attention to prevent PR, especially when confronting the anterior cerebral artery aneurysm. PMID:26885280

  15. Fracture mechanics determine the lengths of interface ruptures that mediate frictional motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, Elsa; Svetlizky, Ilya; Fineberg, Jay

    2016-02-01

    The transition from static to sliding friction is mediated by rapid interfacial ruptures propagating through the solid contacts forming a frictional interface. While propagating, these ruptures correspond to true shear cracks. Frictional sliding is initiated only when a rupture traverses the entire interface; however, arrested ruptures can occur at applied shears far below the transition to frictional motion. Here we show, by measuring the real contact area and strain fields near rough frictional interfaces, that fracture mechanics quantitatively describe rupture arrest and therefore determine the onset of overall frictional sliding. Our measurements reveal both the local dissipation and the global elastic energy released by the rupture. The balance of these quantities entirely determines rupture lengths, whether finite or system-wide. These results confirm a fracture-mechanics-based paradigm for describing frictional motion and shed light on the selection of an earthquake’s magnitude.

  16. Prediction of Severe Eye Injuries in Automobile Accidents: Static and Dynamic Rupture Pressure of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Eric A.; Voorhies, Katherine D.; Herring, Ian P.; Rath, Amber L.; Duma, Stefan M.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine the static and dynamic rupture pressures of 20 human and 20 porcine eyes. This study found the static test results show an average rupture pressure for porcine eyes of 1.00 ± 0.18 MPa while the average rupture pressure for human eyes was 0.36 ± 0.20 MPa. For dynamic loading, the average porcine rupture pressure was 1.64 ± 0.32 MPa, and the average rupture pressure for human eyes was 0.91 ± 0.29 MPa. Significant differences are found between average rupture pressures from all four groups of tests (p = 0.01). A risk function has been developed and predicts a 50% risk of globe rupture at 1.02 MPa, 1.66 MPa, 0.35 MPa, and 0.90 MPa internal pressure for porcine static, porcine dynamic, human static, and human dynamic loading conditions, respectively. PMID:15319124

  17. The Difficult Diagnosis of Ischaemic Papillary Muscle Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Christian T.; Ricklin, Meret E.; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K.

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of severe ischaemic papillary muscle rupture in a 67-year-old male patient who was admitted to the Emergency Department of the University Hospital Bern, Switzerland, in November 2013 with acute chest pain. On admission, the patient’s blood pressure was 60/40 mm/Hg, his pulse was 110 beats per minute and his respiratory rate was 20 breaths per minute. An electrocardiogram was normal and focused assessment with sonography in trauma was negative. Transthoracic echocardiography showed possible thickening of the mitral valve leaflet with no indications of severe mitral insufficiency or wall motion abnormalities. Triple-rule-out computed tomography angiography revealed no pulmonary emboli or aortic dissection, although coronary atherosclerosis was present. Finally, severe insufficiency of the mitral valve with rupture of the papillary muscle, likely due to ischaemia, was observed via transoesophageal echocardiography. The patient underwent a successful surgical intervention and was discharged 10 days later in stable condition. PMID:27226917

  18. Spontaneous Uterine Rupture in a Preterm Pregnancy following Myomectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Claire; Standen, Prue; Acton, Jade; Griffin, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    A 44-year-old nulliparous woman was transferred to a tertiary obstetric hospital for investigation of acute onset abdominal pain. She was at gestation of 32 weeks and 2 days with a history of previous laparoscopic fundal myomectomy. An initial bedside ultrasound demonstrated oligohydramnios. Following an episode of increased pain early the following morning, a formal ultrasound diagnosed a uterine rupture with the fetal arm extending through a uterine rent. An uncomplicated classical caesarean section was performed and the neonate was delivered in good condition but with a bruised and oedematous right arm. The neonate was transferred to the Special Care Nursery for neonatal care. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course and was discharged home three days following delivery. This is an unusual presentation of uterine rupture following myomectomy where the fetal arm had protruded through the uterine wall. PMID:26925275

  19. Atriocaval Rupture After Right Atrial Isthmus Ablation for Atrial Flutter.

    PubMed

    Vloka, Caroline; Nelson, Daniel W; Wetherbee, Jule

    2016-06-01

    A patient with symptomatic typical atrial flutter (AFL) underwent right atrial isthmus ablation with an 8-mm catheter. Eight months later, his typical AFL recurred. Ten months later, he underwent a repeat right atrial isthmus ablation with an irrigated tip catheter and an 8-mm tip catheter. Six weeks after his second procedure, while performing intense sprint intervals on a treadmill, he developed an abrupt onset of chest pain, hypotension, and cardiac tamponade. He underwent emergency surgery to repair an atriocaval rupture and has done well since. Our report suggests that an association of multiple radiofrequency ablations with increased risk for delayed atriocaval rupture occurring 1 to 3 months after ablation. In conclusion, although patients generally were advised to limit exercise for 1 to 2 weeks after AFL ablation procedures in the past, it may be prudent to avoid intense exercise for at least 3 months after procedure. PMID:27112285

  20. Endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Hassoun, Heitham T; White, Laura E; Cheema, Faisal; Reardon, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Management of acute pathology remains one of the most challenging clinical entities, with a persistently high mortality rate both prior to and upon arrival to a hospital. Responding to the distinct advantages of endovascular approaches to aortic disease, many high-volume cardiovascular centers have focused on endovascular therapies for managing patients with ruptured or leaking aortic aneurysms and other acute aortic syndromes. Nonetheless, similar to outcomes for other surgical emergencies, time and efficiency are critical in managing these conditions. Early diagnosis, transport to an appropriate acute care facility, rapid institution of optimal medical management, availability of cardiovascular anesthesia and intensive care, and appropriate and timely surgical intervention continue to be the keys to success. This article discusses the endovascular approach to ruptured abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms. PMID:21979121

  1. Endotension-related aortic sac rupture treated by endograft relining.

    PubMed

    Filippi, F; Tirotti, C; Stella, N; Rizzo, L; Taurino, M

    2013-04-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair is an effective alternative to open surgical repair in high risk patient. Endotension is an unpredictable late and rare complication of EVAR. Clinical significance and choice of technique for treatment are controversial. At present, there are no cases of endotension-related aneurysmal sac rupture reported in literature, altough it is frequently associated with late surgical conversion. In this case report is described a case of a patient treated with a first generation Gore Excluder(TM) endograft for abdominal aortic aneurysm, with late aneurysmal sac enlargement without evidence of endoleak and subsequent contained rupture without anemia and shock. We have successfully treated the patient by endovascular procedure, through bilateral percutaneous femoral approach, with relining technique. Three years CT scan follow-up showed the endograft patency and size sac reduction. PMID:23526100

  2. Creep and creep-rupture behavior of Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, C.R.; Booker, M.K.; Ding, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Data obtained from creep and creep-rupture tests conducted on 18 heats of Alloy 718 were used to formulate models for predicting high temperature time dependent behavior of this alloy. Creep tests were conducted on specimens taken from a number of commercial product forms including plate, bar, and forgoing material that had been procured and heat treated in accordance with ASTM specifications B-670 or B-637. Data were obtained over the temperature range of 427 to 760{degree}C ad at test times to about 87,000 h. Comparisons are given between experimental data and the analytical models. The analytical models for creep-rupture included one based on lot-centering regression analysis and two based on the Minimum Commitment Method. A master'' curve approach was used to develop and equation for estimating creep deformation up to the onset of tertiary creep. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  3. Thoracoscopy in diagnosis of ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Sokouti, Mohsen; Nazemieh, Massoud

    2008-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with dyspnoea and pneumothorax diagnosed by chest radiography. He had previously presented with a massive right hydropneumothorax on his chest x ray 6 months ago, which was followed by 2 weeks of intercostal tube drainage resulting in a partial improvement of his symptoms. He was referred for a thoracoscopy to investigate the possible causes of the non-resolving pneumothorax, during which a large ruptured, crumpled hydatid cyst in the right pleural space, without empyema, was found. With a limited right thoracotomy, the crumpled laminated membrane of the hydatid cyst was removed. After extraction of the remaining particle of the laminated membrane of the same hydatid cyst in the right lower lobe and suturing of the bronchial opening, the pericyst layer was capitonnaged. Apart from common causes of pneumothorax in endemic areas, ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst should be considered in pneumothoraces with an unusual clinical course. PMID:21716817

  4. A ruptured large aneurysm of the ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, S; Hirose, K; Ohyagi, A

    1987-01-01

    A 60 year old man was admitted with acute back pain followed by hoarseness. An aneurysm of the ductus arteriosus Botalli was diagnosed and an operation was recommended because of the high risk of complications such as rupture, embolism, or infection. The patient and his family refused surgery, however. The patient died suddenly of a rupture of the aneurysm a year later; necropsy confirmed the diagnosis. Several diagnostic methods were used and enhanced computed tomography gave the best representation of the aneurysm as it was seen at necropsy. This case indicates that enhanced computed tomography is probably the most useful investigation in patients with this type of aneurysm and it confirms the importance of an aneurysmectomy. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:3566989

  5. Hemoperitoneum caused by spontaneous rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lugito, Nata P Hardjo; Kurniawan, Andree; Yaruntradhani, Rizki; Rachman, Andhika

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting a male, 46 years old came to emergency unit with a chief complaint of abdominal tenderness since 1 day prior to admission. No history of abdominal trauma. He often felt abdominal discomfort for the last 5 years. Physical examination revealed decreased consciousness, shock, pale conjungtiva, distended abdomen, with tenderness of the whole abdomen on palpation, and no bowel movement. Laboratory examination found anemia, leucocytosis, normal amilase and lipase. FAST (focus assissted Sonography on trauma) found massive ascites. Patient underwent cito laparotomic exploration that found blood on abdominal cavity, nodular liver, and actively bleeding tumour of liver. During hospitalization, patient recovered and discharged. In the case of acute abdomen, spontaneous ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of differential diagnosis, considering high incidence of HCC in South East Asia, especially Indonesia. Confirming diagnosis of generalized peritonitis requires abdominal CT scan and ultrasonography, to rule out ruptured HCC. PMID:25948769

  6. Statistical mechanics of DNA rupture: Theory and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, S.; Modi, T.; Mishra, R. K.; Giri, D.; Mandal, B. P.; Kumar, S.

    2013-10-01

    We study the effects of the shear force on the rupture mechanism on a double stranded DNA. Motivated by recent experiments, we perform the atomistic simulations with explicit solvent to obtain the distributions of extension in hydrogen and covalent bonds below the rupture force. We obtain a significant difference between the atomistic simulations and the existing results in the literature based on the coarse-grained models (theory and simulations). We discuss the possible reasons and improve the coarse-grained model by incorporating the consequences of semi-microscopic details of the nucleotides in its description. The distributions obtained by the modified model (simulations and theoretical) are qualitatively similar to the one obtained using atomistic simulations.

  7. Single event gate rupture in thin gate oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, F.W.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Dodd, P.E.; Hash, G.L.

    1997-06-01

    As integrated circuit densities increase with each new technology generation, both the lateral and vertical dimensions shrink. Operating voltages, however, have not scaled as aggressively as feature size, with a resultant increase in the electric fields within advanced geometry devices. Oxide electric fields are in fact increasing to greater than 5 MV/cm as feature size approaches 0.1 {micro}m. This trend raises the concern that single event gate rupture (SEGR) may limit the scaling of advanced integrated circuits (ICs) for space applications. The dependence of single event gate rupture (SEGR) critical field on oxide thickness is examined for thin gate oxides. Critical field for SEGR increases with decreasing oxide thickness, consistent with an increasing intrinsic breakdown field.

  8. Effect of heating method on stress-rupture life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizon, P. T.; Calfo, F. D.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of radiant(furnace), resistance(electric current), burner(hot gas stream), and a combination of resistance and burner heating on intermediate time (100 to 300 hr) stress-rupture life and reduction of area was evaluated. All heating methods were studied using the nickel-based alloy Udimet 700 while all but burner heating were evaluated with the cobalt-based alloy Mar-M 509. Limited test results of eight other superalloys were also included in this study. Resistance heated specimens had about 20 to 30 percent of the stress-rupture life of radiant heated specimens. The limited burner heating data showed about a 50 percent life reduction as compared to the radiant heated tests. A metallurgical examination gave no explanation for these reductions.

  9. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Inconel 702 tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Seamless Inconel 702 tubes with 0.375-in. outside diameter and 0.025-in. wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1390 to 1575 F and internal helium pressures from 700 to 1800 psi. Lifetimes ranged from 29 to 1561 hr. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was about 70 percent lower than that of sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  10. Single cell measurements of vacuolar rupture caused by intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    Keller, Charlotte; Mellouk, Nora; Danckaert, Anne; Simeone, Roxane; Brosch, Roland; Enninga, Jost; Bobard, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Shigella flexneri are pathogenic bacteria that invade host cells entering into an endocytic vacuole. Subsequently, the rupture of this membrane-enclosed compartment allows bacteria to move within the cytosol, proliferate and further invade neighboring cells. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is phagocytosed by immune cells, and has recently been shown to rupture phagosomal membrane in macrophages. We developed a robust assay for tracking phagosomal membrane disruption after host cell entry of Shigella flexneri or Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The approach makes use of CCF4, a FRET reporter sensitive to β-lactamase that equilibrates in the cytosol of host cells. Upon invasion of host cells by bacterial pathogens, the probe remains intact as long as the bacteria reside in membrane-enclosed compartments. After disruption of the vacuole, β-lactamase activity on the surface of the intracellular pathogen cleaves CCF4 instantly leading to a loss of FRET signal and switching its emission spectrum. This robust ratiometric assay yields accurate information about the timing of vacuolar rupture induced by the invading bacteria, and it can be coupled to automated microscopy and image processing by specialized algorithms for the detection of the emission signals of the FRET donor and acceptor. Further, it allows investigating the dynamics of vacuolar disruption elicited by intracellular bacteria in real time in single cells. Finally, it is perfectly suited for high-throughput analysis with a spatio-temporal resolution exceeding previous methods. Here, we provide the experimental details of exemplary protocols for the CCF4 vacuolar rupture assay on HeLa cells and THP-1 macrophages for time-lapse experiments or end points experiments using Shigella flexneri as well as multiple mycobacterial strains such as Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium bovis, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:23792688

  11. Single Cell Measurements of Vacuolar Rupture Caused by Intracellular Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Danckaert, Anne; Simeone, Roxane; Brosch, Roland; Enninga, Jost; Bobard, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Shigella flexneri are pathogenic bacteria that invade host cells entering into an endocytic vacuole. Subsequently, the rupture of this membrane-enclosed compartment allows bacteria to move within the cytosol, proliferate and further invade neighboring cells. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is phagocytosed by immune cells, and has recently been shown to rupture phagosomal membrane in macrophages. We developed a robust assay for tracking phagosomal membrane disruption after host cell entry of Shigella flexneri or Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The approach makes use of CCF4, a FRET reporter sensitive to β-lactamase that equilibrates in the cytosol of host cells. Upon invasion of host cells by bacterial pathogens, the probe remains intact as long as the bacteria reside in membrane-enclosed compartments. After disruption of the vacuole, β-lactamase activity on the surface of the intracellular pathogen cleaves CCF4 instantly leading to a loss of FRET signal and switching its emission spectrum. This robust ratiometric assay yields accurate information about the timing of vacuolar rupture induced by the invading bacteria, and it can be coupled to automated microscopy and image processing by specialized algorithms for the detection of the emission signals of the FRET donor and acceptor. Further, it allows investigating the dynamics of vacuolar disruption elicited by intracellular bacteria in real time in single cells. Finally, it is perfectly suited for high-throughput analysis with a spatio-temporal resolution exceeding previous methods. Here, we provide the experimental details of exemplary protocols for the CCF4 vacuolar rupture assay on HeLa cells and THP-1 macrophages for time-lapse experiments or end points experiments using Shigella flexneri as well as multiple mycobacterial strains such as Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium bovis, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:23792688

  12. Analysis of uterine rupture at university teaching hospital Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Nousheen; Yousfani, Sajida

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the risk factors, management modalities, fetomaternal outcome of uterine rupture cases at University teaching hospital in Pakistan. Methods: This retrospective descriptive study was conducted at the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences (LUMHS) for a period of one year from January 1st to December 31st 2012. Main outcome measures were frequency, age, parity, booking status, risk factors, management modalities, fetal and maternal mortality associated with uterine rupture. The data was collected on pre-designed proforma analysed using SPSS Version 16 statistical package. Results: The frequency of ruptured uteri was calculated to be 0.67%, giving a ratio of 1:148 deliveries. Highest incidence was found in age group 25-30 (44.26%) with mean age of 30.36 years. and parity group 2-3 (57.37%) with mean parity 4.08. The risk factors for ruptured uterus include Caesarean section 43(70.49%), injudicious use of oxytocin 33(54.09%), obstructed labour 15 (24.59%) and multiparty 18 (29.50%). Repair of uterus was performed in 47(77.04%) cases. Maternal case fatality was 5(8.19%), while foetal wastage was 51 (83.60%). Conclusion: This study confirms the existence of a serious preventable obstetric problem, with significant maternal mortality and foetal wastage. Integrated efforts include Health education, focused antenatal care, skilled attendance, avoidance of injudicious use of oxytocin, and need of hospital based deliveries in patients with caesarean section which should be intensified to reduce this drastic obstetrical complication. PMID:26430430

  13. Depth Variations in Large Megathrust Earthquake Rupture Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, T.; Ye, L.; Kanamori, H.

    2014-12-01

    Large earthquakes on plate boundary megathrust faults exhibit substantial variations in rupture characteristics determined from seismic wave observations. There is significant scatter in stress drop, moment-scaled energy release, earthquake source spectrum, and rupture duration. We analyze 113 earthquakes with Mw ≥ 7.0 identified as being on megathrust faults on the basis of their locations and focal mechanisms, analyzing far-field P and S wave observations supplemented by very long-period seismic wave inversions (W-phase, global centroid moment tensor), examining the source scaling behavior, spatial patterns, and depth-dependence of the source parameters. Depth-dependent characteristics have previously been recognized in the occurrence of shallow tsunami earthquakes with depleted short-period source spectra and unusually long source durations, and in enhanced coherent short-period energy release from the deeper portions of megathrusts that fail in huge ruptures. Analysis of the large number of intermediate size events demonstrates that there is little depth-dependence of stress drop or total radiated energy release for megathrust events that are not tsunami earthquakes, but there is systematic increase in relative short-period energy content in the source spectra for deeper events. This is manifested in reduced high-frequency fall-off slope of the source spectra as depth increases. In some cases this is possibly related to compound nature of the ruptures with varying scale-lengths of heterogeneity, but in some cases it is very smooth behavior. Isolating this as a source effect is challenging, as systematic reduction of average attenuation factor with increasing depth can account for some of the systematic pattern. There are some correlations with estimated average megathrust temperature, with higher spectral decay rate correlating with higher slab surface temperature at 30 km depth. We consider the implications of the new source parameter data set for mechanisms operating in the megathrust environment.

  14. Cyclophilin A in Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm: A Prognostic Biomarker.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Lee, Kwo-Whei; Chen, Wei-Liang; Kuo, Chen-Ling; Huang, Ching-Shan; Tseng, Wan-Min; Liu, Chin-San; Lin, Ching-Po

    2015-09-01

    Cyclophilin A (CyPA), an oxidative stress-induced factor, was found to play an important role in the aneurysm formation. Our working hypothesis was that the plasma level of CyPA in ruptured intracranial aneurysm could predict the neurological outcome. From 2011 to 2013, a total of 36 patients with ruptured saccular intracranial aneurysm were recruited in our study. Before coil embolization, we draw blood samples at the orifice of a culprit aneurysm and in the remote peripheral vein for measurements of the CyPA levels. We utilized the modified Rankin scale 30 days after aneurysm rupture as the outcome measure. Generalized linear models were used to estimate the adjusted odds ratios of the poor neurological outcome given the presence of high plasma level of CyPA. The aneurysmal and venous CyPA levels were significantly associated with the initial clinical severity (P = 0.004 and 0.03, respectively) and 30-day outcome (P = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively). The aneurysmal CyPA levels modestly correlated with age and high Fisher grade (ρ = 0.39 and 0.41; P = 0.02 and 0.01, respectively). The aneurysmal CyPA levels strongly correlated with the venous counterpart (ρ = 0.89; P < 0.001). Patients with high levels of aneurysmal CyPA were 15.66 times (95% CI, 1.48-166.24; P = 0.02) more likely to have worse neurological outcome than those with the low levels after adjustment of the age, gender, and the documented confounding factors. High plasma level of CyPA is a significant prognostic biomarker for poor neurological outcome in patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysm. PMID:26426668

  15. Earthquake rupture process recreated from a natural fault surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Minasian, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    What exactly happens on the rupture surface as an earthquake nucleates, spreads, and stops? We cannot observe this directly, and models depend on assumptions about physical conditions and geometry at depth. We thus measure a natural fault surface and use its 3D coordinates to construct a replica at 0.1 m resolution to obviate geometry uncertainty. We can recreate stick-slip behavior on the resulting finite element model that depends solely on observed fault geometry. We clamp the fault together and apply steady state tectonic stress until seismic slip initiates and terminates. Our recreated M~1 earthquake initiates at contact points where there are steep surface gradients because infinitesimal lateral displacements reduce clamping stress most efficiently there. Unclamping enables accelerating slip to spread across the surface, but the fault soon jams up because its uneven, anisotropic shape begins to juxtapose new high-relief sticking points. These contacts would ultimately need to be sheared off or strongly deformed before another similar earthquake could occur. Our model shows that an important role is played by fault-wall geometry, though we do not include effects of varying fluid pressure or exotic rheologies on the fault surfaces. We extrapolate our results to large fault systems using observed self-similarity properties, and suggest that larger ruptures might begin and end in a similar way, though the scale of geometrical variation in fault shape that can arrest a rupture necessarily scales with magnitude. In other words, fault segmentation may be a magnitude dependent phenomenon and could vary with each subsequent rupture.

  16. Traumatic right ventricular rupture following a horse kick.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Richard; Nuttall, Stuart Myles

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade is a life-threatening and time-critical emergency that requires early recognition and prompt management often alongside other resuscitation considerations. The use of ultrasound in the primary survey greatly assists in the early diagnosis allowing preparations for early definitive management to be made. An unusual case of right ventricular rupture following blunt trauma to the chest from a horse kick is discussed. PMID:23175003

  17. Earthquake rupture process recreated from a natural fault surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Tom; Minasian, Diane L.

    2015-11-01

    What exactly happens on the rupture surface as an earthquake nucleates, spreads, and stops? We cannot observe this directly, and models depend on assumptions about physical conditions and geometry at depth. We thus measure a natural fault surface and use its 3-D coordinates to construct a replica at 0.1 m resolution to obviate geometry uncertainty. We can recreate stick-slip behavior on the resulting finite element model that depends solely on observed fault geometry. We clamp the fault together and apply steady state tectonic stress until seismic slip initiates and terminates. Our recreated M ~ 1 earthquake initiates at contact points where there are steep surface gradients because infinitesimal lateral displacements reduce clamping stress most efficiently there. Unclamping enables accelerating slip to spread across the surface, but the fault soon jams up because its uneven, anisotropic shape begins to juxtapose new high-relief sticking points. These contacts would ultimately need to be sheared off or strongly deformed before another similar earthquake could occur. Our model shows that an important role is played by fault-wall geometry, although we do not include effects of varying fluid pressure or exotic rheologies on the fault surfaces. We extrapolate our results to large fault systems using observed self-similarity properties and suggest that larger ruptures might begin and end in a similar way, although the scale of geometrical variation in fault shape that can arrest a rupture necessarily scales with magnitude. In other words, fault segmentation may be a magnitude-dependent phenomenon and could vary with each subsequent rupture.

  18. Hemoperitoneum due to spontaneous rupture of ovarian adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Casal Rodriguez, Anton X; Sanchez Trigo, Sabela; Ferreira Gonzalez, Lucia; Brage Gomez, Soledad

    2011-06-01

    We report the case of a 65-year-old woman who was treated with low-molecular-weight heparin and suffered spontaneous rupture of an ovarian cystadenocarcinoma. We present the computed tomography findings and make a review of the literature. Spontaneous hemoperitoneum is an infrequent complication of ovarian neoplasms and, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first-described case report of peritoneal bleeding secondary to a cystadenocarcinoma in the recent English literature. PMID:21221696

  19. Management of hepatocellular carcinoma rupture in the caudate lobe

    PubMed Central

    Hong, De-Fei; Liu, Ying-Bin; Peng, Shu-You; Pang, Jin-Zhong; Wang, Zhi-Fei; Cheng, Jian; Shen, Guo-Liang; Zhang, Yuan-Biao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate that caudate lobectomy is a valid treatment in cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) rupture in the caudate lobe based on our experience with the largest case series reported to date. METHODS: A retrospective study of eight patients presenting with spontaneous rupture and hemorrhage of HCC in the caudate lobe was conducted. Two patients underwent ineffective transarterial embolization preoperatively. Caudate lobectomy was performed in all eight patients. Bilateral approach was taken in seven cases for isolated complete caudate lobectomy. Left-sided approach was employed in one case for isolated partial caudate lobectomy. Transarterial chemoembolization was performed postoperatively in all patients. RESULTS: Caudate lobectomy was successfully completed in all eight cases. The median time delay from the diagnosis to operation was 5 d (range: 0.25-9). Median operating time was 200 min (range: 120-310) with a median blood loss of 900 mL (range: 300-1500). Five patient remained in long-term follow-up, with one patient becoming lost to follow-up at 3 years and two patients currently alive at 7 and 19 mo. One patient required reoperation due to recurrence. Gamma knife intervention was performed for brain metastasis in another case. Two patients survived for 10 and 84 mo postoperatively, ultimately succumbing to multiple organ metastases. CONCLUSION: Caudate lobectomy is the salvage choice for HCC rupture in the caudate lobe. Local anatomy and physiologic features of the disease render caudate lobectomy a technically difficult operation. Postponement of surgical intervention is thus recommended while the rupture remains hemodynamically stable until an experienced surgeon becomes available. Prognosis is confounded by numerous factors, but long-term survival can be expected in the majority of cases. PMID:26185390

  20. Ruptured Baker's cyst with compartment syndrome: an extremely unusual complication.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, Mark; Galanopoulos, Ilias; Mahale, Avinash; Ashwood, Neil

    2012-01-01

    A 69-year-old man presented with sudden onset of pain with acute tense swelling of his left leg. Initially he was treated empirically with antibiotics for cellulitis while the possibility of deep vein thrombosis was ruled out. His symptoms gradually worsened with progressive distal neurological deficit and increasing pain. Further investigations suggested that he had a ruptured Baker's cyst in the calf with development of compartment syndrome. PMID:23264161