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1

Stroke in patients with fusiform vertebrobasilar aneurysms.  

PubMed

We studied seven patients with brainstem infarction and large fusiform vertebrobasilar (VB) aneurysms to clarify the clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features. All presented with pontine infarcts; one also had a cerebellar infarct. VB TIAs preceded brainstem infarction in four patients. Angiography and CT documented VB fusiform aneurysmal dilatation. Four had intraluminal thrombi and one had severe basilar artery stenosis. Two distinct clinical pictures emerged: unilateral pontine infarcts with favorable outcome, presumably related to obstruction of a pontine penetrating artery at its origin from the posterior wall of the aneurysmal basilar artery, and major fatal bilateral pontine infarcts from basilar artery occlusion. Two patients came to autopsy. One had thrombus in the dilated basilar artery and a posterior cerebral artery branch embolus with hemorrhagic occipital infarction; the other had basilar artery thrombus with aneurysmal rupture and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Fusiform VB aneurysms caused brainstem stroke by intraluminal thrombus, local embolism, atherostenosis, and obstruction of paramedian penetrating arteries. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is an uncommon complication. PMID:2909908

Pessin, M S; Chimowitz, M I; Levine, S R; Kwan, E S; Adelman, L S; Earnest, M P; Clark, D M; Chason, J; Ausman, J I; Caplan, L R

1989-01-01

2

Rupture of giant vertebrobasilar aneurysm following flow diversion: mechanical stretch as a potential mechanism for early aneurysm rupture.  

PubMed

A patient with a giant symptomatic vertebrobasilar aneurysm was treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy for obstructive hydrocephalus followed by treatment of the aneurysm by flow diversion using a Pipeline Embolization Device. After an uneventful procedure and initial periprocedural period, the patient experienced an unexpected fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage 1?week later. Autopsy demonstrated extensive subarachnoid hemorrhage and aneurysm rupture (linear whole wall rupture). The patent Pipeline Embolization Device was in its intended location, as was the persistent coil occlusion of the distal left vertebral artery. The aneurysm appeared to rupture in a linear manner and contained a thick large expansile clot that seemed to disrupt or rupture the thin aneurysm wall directly opposite the basilar artery/Pipeline Embolization Device. We feel the pattern of aneurysm rupture in our patient supports the idea that the combination of flow diversion and the resulting growing intra-aneurysmal thrombus can create a mechanical force with the potential to cause aneurysm rupture. PMID:25355741

Fox, Benjamin; Humphries, William Edward; Doss, Vinodh T; Hoit, Daniel; Elijovich, Lucas; Arthur, Adam S

2014-01-01

3

Rupture of giant vertebrobasilar aneurysm following flow diversion: mechanical stretch as a potential mechanism for early aneurysm rupture.  

PubMed

A patient with a giant symptomatic vertebrobasilar aneurysm was treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy for obstructive hydrocephalus followed by treatment of the aneurysm by flow diversion using a Pipeline Embolization Device. After an uneventful procedure and initial periprocedural period, the patient experienced an unexpected fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage 1?week later. Autopsy demonstrated extensive subarachnoid hemorrhage and aneurysm rupture (linear whole wall rupture). The patent Pipeline Embolization Device was in its intended location, as was the persistent coil occlusion of the distal left vertebral artery. The aneurysm appeared to rupture in a linear manner and contained a thick large expansile clot that seemed to disrupt or rupture the thin aneurysm wall directly opposite the basilar artery/Pipeline Embolization Device. We feel the pattern of aneurysm rupture in our patient supports the idea that the combination of flow diversion and the resulting growing intra-aneurysmal thrombus can create a mechanical force with the potential to cause aneurysm rupture. PMID:25361560

Fox, Benjamin; Humphries, William Edward; Doss, Vinodh T; Hoit, Daniel; Elijovich, Lucas; Arthur, Adam S

2014-10-31

4

Pathological examination of a ruptured fusiform aneurysm of the middle cerebral artery  

PubMed Central

Background: Little is known about the pathogenesis and clinical course of fusiform compared with saccular aneurysms. The case of a ruptured fusiform aneurysm accompanied by dissection at the M2 portion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) is reported, along with pathological findings. Case Description: A 41-year-old female presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage was revealed to have a ruptured fusiform aneurysm at the M2 portion of the right MCA on angiography. She was treated with superficial temporal artery-MCA anastomosis and trapping of the aneurysm. The aneurysm consisted of a whitish fusiform dilatation with a thickened wall of the MCA and two red protrusions on it. Pathological examinations revealed disruption and fragmentation of the internal elastic lamina and intimal thickening in the fusiform lesion. There were two aneurysmal protrusions on the main fusiform dilatation. In one protruded lesion, a dissection of the intima was observed. Conclusion: We propose that a dissection and saccular aneurysm additionally developed on the wall of a preexisting segmental ectasia of the MCA in our case. In this report, we discuss the etiology of fusiform aneurysms of the MCA. PMID:25422790

Kinoshita, Masashi; Kida, Shinya; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Yamashita, Junkoh; Nomura, Motohiro

2014-01-01

5

Workflow Optimization in Vertebrobasilar Occlusion  

SciTech Connect

Objective: In vertebrobasilar occlusion, rapid recanalization is the only substantial means to improve the prognosis. We introduced a standard operating procedure (SOP) for interventional therapy to analyze the effects on interdisciplinary time management. Methods: Intrahospital time periods between hospital admission and neuroradiological intervention were retrospectively analyzed, together with the patients' outcome, before (n = 18) and after (n = 20) implementation of the SOP. Results: After implementation of the SOP, we observed statistically significant improvement of postinterventional patient neurological status (p = 0.017). In addition, we found a decrease of 5:33 h for the mean time period from hospital admission until neuroradiological intervention. The recanalization rate increased from 72.2% to 80% after implementation of the SOP. Conclusion: Our results underscore the relevance of SOP implementation and analysis of time management for clinical workflow optimization. Both may trigger awareness for the need of efficient interdisciplinary time management. This could be an explanation for the decreased time periods and improved postinterventional patient status after SOP implementation.

Kamper, Lars, E-mail: lars.kamper@helios-kliniken.de; Meyn, Hannes [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal (Germany); Rybacki, Konrad [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany); Nordmeyer, Simone [St. Josef-Hospital Oberhausen, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy (Germany); Kempkes, Udo; Piroth, Werner [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal (Germany); Isenmann, Stefan [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Department of Neurology, HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal (Germany); Haage, Patrick [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal (Germany)

2012-06-15

6

Pure midbrain ischemia and hypoplastic vertebrobasilar circulation.  

PubMed

Isolated midbrain infarction is rare and little is known about etiology and patient's long-term follow up. We aimed to describe the clinical features, the causative diseases and the outcome of patients with isolated midbrain infarction who were admitted to our center, focusing on vascular abnormalities of posterior circulation. All patients with first acute ischemic stroke limited to the midbrain were included and their demographic features, neurological symptoms, neuroimaging data, and cardiovascular risk factors were recorded. Functional outcome, using modified Rankin scale, was assessed at discharge and at the 3 month follow up evaluation. We found nine patients with acute isolated midbrain infarction, representing 0.61 % of all ischemic stroke admitted to our center. The most common cause of stroke was small-vessel disease (88.8 %). At stroke onset, none of the patients had consciousness disturbances, and four patients (44.4 %) had gait impairment, five patients (55.5 %) presented with diplopia due to involvement of the third nerve or fascicular type of third-nerve palsy, seven patients (77.7 %) had vascular anomalies of vertebrobasilar circulation: the most frequent was vertebral artery hypoplasia [four patients (44.4 %)]. At follow up evaluation, seven patients (77.7 %) had a good functional outcome and no patients experienced recurrence of cerebrovascular events. As isolated midbrain infarction is uncommon, specific ocular motor signs, mainly third-nerve palsy, may help to identify and localize the mesencephalic infarct. Abnormalities in vertebrobasilar circulation, such as hypoplastic basilar or vertebral artery, are frequently associated with isolated midbrain ischemia. The hypoplastic vertebrobasilar system may predispose to posterior ischemic stroke. PMID:23852316

Gilberti, Nicola; Gamba, Massimo; Costa, Angelo; Vergani, Veronica; Spezi, Raffaella; Pezzini, Alessandro; Volonghi, Irene; Mardighian, Dikran; Gasparotti, Roberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Magoni, Mauro

2014-02-01

7

Risk of Vertebrobasilar Stroke and Chiropractic Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Study Design  Population-based, case-control and case-crossover study.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective  To investigate associations between chiropractic visits and vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) stroke and to contrast this with\\u000a primary care physician (PCP) visits and VBA stroke.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Summary of Background Data  Chiropractic care is popular for neck pain and headache, but may increase the risk for VBA dissection and stroke. Neck pain\\u000a and headache are common symptoms of

J. David Cassidy; Eleanor Boyle; Pierre Côté; Yaohua He; Sheilah Hogg-Johnson; Frank L. Silver; Susan J. Bondy

2008-01-01

8

Fusiform aneurysm of a persistent trigeminal artery associated with rare intracranial arterial variations and subarachnoid hemorrhage.  

PubMed

The trigeminal artery is one of four primitive anastomoses between the internal carotid artery and vertebrobasilar system that regresses in the sixth week of fetal development. A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is generally an incidental finding but may also be associated with intracranial vascular pathologies such as aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, and cranial nerve compression syndromes. We present an extremely rare case of a right PTA with an associated bleeding fusiform aneurysm located in the carotidian (lateral) part of the PTA. In addition, this rare anatomic variation was associated with bilateral absence of the posterior communicating arteries, a left posterior cerebral artery originating from the left internal carotid artery, and agenesis of the A1 segment of the left anterior cerebral artery. PMID:25053265

Kimball, David; Ples, Horia; Kimball, Heather; Miclaus, Gratian D; Matusz, Petru; Loukas, Marios

2015-01-01

9

Endovascular treatment of fusiform A2 aneurysm with parent artery occlusion  

PubMed Central

Background: A2 aneurysms are rare with a reported incidence of <1% of the intracranial aneurysms. These aneurysms are located between the anterior communicating artery and genu of the corpus callosum. Fusiform aneurysms in this location are even rarer and we present one such case of fusiform A2 aneurysm treated with endovascular technique. Case Description: In this report, we present a case of ruptured fusiform A2 or proximal pericallosal artery aneurysm in a middle-aged female who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. She subsequently underwent endovascular parent artery occlusion, and post-procedure angiogram showed good pial collaterals filling the distal territory. She developed transient lower limb weakness which improved over the next 24 h with supportive inotrope management to maintain adequate cerebral flow. Conclusion: We report a rare unique case of ruptured fusiform proximal pericallosal artery aneurysm. Endovascular treatment of this type of aneurysm is a feasible method and can be considered as an effective alternative to surgical technique. PMID:25184100

Alurkar, Anand; Karanam, Lakshmi Sudha Prasanna; Oak, Sagar; Nayak, Suresh

2014-01-01

10

Successfully treated symptomatic fusiform basilar artery aneurysm in a patient with hindbrain malformation via inverted Y-stenting.  

PubMed

A double overlapping reverse Y-stent approach to creating flow diversion using traditional open-cell stent technology was evaluated as a treatment option symptomatic fusiform basilar aneurysms. A 36-year-old man with a complex hindbrain malformation presented with acute ocular dysmotility due to a rapidly enlarging fusiform basilar artery aneurysm. The aneurysm was treated by insertion of two stents into the vertebrobasilar system in an inverted Y-configuration from the basilar tip to the V4 segments of the bilateral vertebral arteries, essentially creating flow diversion without using a dedicated flow diversion device. This resulted in immediate symptomatic improvement. The stents remained patent and the aneurysm was obliterated at 6 months follow-up. Furthermore, the patient remained free of associated symptoms at 10 months follow-up. Thus, the double stenting technique can be used instead of a flow diversion device to effectively create flow diversion, promote aneurysm sac thrombosis, and lead to resolution of symptoms in large fusiform basilar artery aneurysms. PMID:25628314

Purakal, Alixandra S; Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Lee, Seon-Kyu

2015-01-01

11

Transcranial Doppler validation of hemodynamic vertebrobasilar insufficiency diagnosis.  

PubMed

Transcranial Doppler (TCD) can be useful in the diagnosis and validation of surgical treatment of vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI). A case is reported in which TCD confirmed the diagnosis of vertebrobasilar insufficiency and validated the indication of surgery by detecting a bidirectional flow in a stenotic and compressed vertebral artery. In the postoperative period and at late follow-up TCD demonstrated a restored antegrade flow, as a consequence of a well functioning revascularization. Surgical indication of VBI is rare and TCD can be proposed as part of routine patients' study before a surgical decision is taken. PMID:9177624

Illuminati, G; Caliò, F G; Bertagni, A; Vietri, F; Martinelli, V

1996-01-01

12

Time Management in Acute Vertebrobasilar Occlusion  

SciTech Connect

Acute vertebrobasilar occlusion (VBO) is associated with a high risk of stroke and death. Although local thrombolysis may achieve recanalization and improve outcome, mortality is still between 35% and 75%. However, without recanalization the chance of a good outcome is extremely poor, with mortality rates of 80-90%. Early treatment is a fundamental factor, but detailed studies of the exact time management of the diagnostic and interventional workflow are still lacking. Data on 18 patients were retrospectively evaluated. Time periods between symptom onset, admission to hospital, time of diagnosis, and beginning of intervention were correlated with postinterventional neurological status. The Glasgow Coma Scale and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) were used to examine patients before and after local thrombolysis. Additionally, multivariate statistics were applied to reveal similarities between patients with neurological improvement. Primary recanalization was achieved in 77% of patients. The overall mortality was 55%. Major complications were intracranial hemorrhage and peripheral embolism. The time period from symptom onset to intervention showed a strong correlation with the postinterventional NIHSS as well as the patient's age, with the best results in a 4-h interval. Multivariate statistics revealed similarities among the patients. Evaluation of time management in acute VBO by multivariate statistics is a helpful tool for definition of similarities in this patient group. Similarly to the door-to-balloon time for acute coronary interventions, the chances for a good outcome depend on a short time interval between symptom onset and intervention. While the only manipulable time period starts with hospital admission, our results emphasize the necessity of efficient intrahospital workflow.

Kamper, Lars, E-mail: lars.kamper@helios-kliniken.d [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal (Germany); Rybacki, Konrad [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany); Mansour, Michael; Winkler, Sven B.; Kempkes, Udo; Haage, Patrick [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal (Germany)

2009-03-15

13

Fusiform superior cerebellar artery aneurysm treated with STA-SCA bypass and trapping  

PubMed Central

Background: Fusiform aneurysms of cerebellar arteries are rare. Different surgical techniques to address these challenging lesions have been described, and their application depends on whether the goal is to maintain the flow in the parent vessel or to occlude it. Case Description: The authors reported a case of a fusiform aneurysm located in the lateral pontomesencephalic segment of the superior cerebellar artery (SCA) in a 32-year-old man who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. The patient was subjected to aneurysm trapping followed by a bypass between the superficial temporal artery (STA) and SCA and had an uneventful recovery. Conclusions: Although only a few cases of fusiform aneurysms in the supracerebellar artery have been reported in the literature, the treatment strategies adopted were diverse. In selected cases of patients in good neurological condition with ruptured fusiform aneurysms at the proximal segments of SCA and who have poor evidence of collateral supply, the possibility of a STA-SCA bypass with aneurysm trapping must be considered. A review of the current treatment modalities of this pathology is also presented. PMID:25071936

Lamis, Fabricio C.; De Paiva Neto, Manoel A.; Cavalheiro, Sergio

2014-01-01

14

Volatile terpenoids from aeciospores of Cronartium fusiforme.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Identification of the terpenoids present in the volatile fraction from aeciospores of the gall rust fungus Cronartium fusiforme. The major monoterpenoid hydrocarbons found to be present with only traces of camphene include alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, delta(3)-carene, myrcene, linonene, beta-phellandrene, and delta-terpinene. A number of monoterpenoid alcohols, acyclic sesquiterpenes, and aromatic compounds were also present.

Laseter, J. L.; Weete, J. D.; Walkinshaw, C. H.

1973-01-01

15

Giant Fusiform Aneurysm of the Cerebral Arteries  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Giant fusiform aneurysm of the cerebral arteries was found in 11 patients during a 20-year period. The 7 males and 4 females ranged in age from 9 to 68 years (mean: 49 years). The supraclinoid seg- ment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the M-1 segment of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) were the most frequently inrolred arteries.

JOHN R. LITTLE; PHILLIP S. T. LOUIS; MEREDITH WEINSTEIN; DONALD F. DOHN

16

On (ab)normality: Einstein's fusiform gyrus.  

PubMed

Recently, Hines (2014) wrote an evocative paper challenging findings from both histological and morphological studies of Einstein's brain. In this discussion paper, I extend Hines' theoretical point and further discuss how best to determine 'abnormal' morphology. To do so, I assess the sulcal patterning of Einstein's fusiform gyrus (FG) for the first time. The sulcal patterning of the FG was unconsidered in prior studies because the morphological features of the mid-fusiform sulcus have only been clarified recently. On the one hand, the sulcal patterning of Einstein's FG is abnormal relative to averages of 'normal' brains generated from two independent datasets (N=39 and N=15, respectively). On the other hand, within the 108 hemispheres used to make these average brains, it is not impossible to find FG sulcal patterns that resemble those of Einstein. Thus, concluding whether a morphological pattern is normal or abnormal heavily depends on the chosen analysis method (e.g. group average vs. individual). Such findings question the functional meaning of morphological 'abnormalities' when determined by comparing an individual to an average brain or average frequency characteristics. These observations are not only important for analyzing a rare brain such as that of Einstein, but also for comparing macroanatomical features between typical and atypical populations. PMID:25562419

Weiner, Kevin S

2015-03-01

17

Elevated vertebrobasilar artery resistance in neonatal spontaneously hypertensive rats  

PubMed Central

There is a strong correlation between increased vertebral artery resistance and arterial blood pressure in humans. The reasons for this increased resistance at high systemic pressure remain unknown, but may include raised sympathetic activity. With the recent finding that prehypertensive spontaneously hypertensive (PHSH) rats, which have raised sympathetic nerve activity, but a blood pressure comparable to normotensive rat strains, we hypothesized that its vertebrobasilar vascular resistance would already be raised and, as a consequence, would exhibit a more responsive Cushing response (e.g., brain ischemia evoked sympathoexcitation and a pressor response). We report that PHSH rats exhibited a remodeling of the basilar artery (i.e., increased wall thickness and lower lumen-to-wall thickness ratio) that occurred before the onset of hypertension. In a novel in vitro vascularly isolated, arterially perfused brain stem preparation of PHSH rats of 4–5 wk of age, brain stem vascular resistance was raised by ?35% relative to age- and sex-matched normotensive rats (P < 0.05). In the in situ arterial perfused working heart-brain stem preparation, occlusion of both vertebral arteries in the PHSH rat resulted in a significantly greater increase in sympathetic activity (57 vs. 20%, PHSH vs. control; P < 0.01) that triggered a greater increase in arterial perfusion pressure (8 vs. 3 mmHg, PHSH vs. control; P < 0.01) compared with normotensive rats. These data indicate raised vertebrobasilar artery resistance before the onset of hypertension in the PHSH rat. With the raised responsiveness of the Cushing response in the PHSH rat, we discuss the possibility of brain stem perfusion as a central nervous system determinant of the set point of vasomotor sympathetic tone in the hypertensive condition. PMID:21493719

Cates, Matthew J.; Steed, Peter W.; Abdala, Ana P. L.; Langton, Philip D.

2011-01-01

18

Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm Associated with Vertebrobasilar Artery  

PubMed Central

Objective Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is considered as a reversible pathophysiological condition mainly induced by continuous vascular compression of the facial nerve root exit zone (REZ) at the cerebellopontine angle. As an offending vessel, vertebrobasilar artery tends to compress much more heavily than others. The authors analyzed HFS caused by vertebrobasilar artery and described the relationships between microsurgical findings and clinical courses. Methods Out of 1,798 cases treated with microvascular decompression (MVD) from Jan. 1980 to Dec. 2004, the causative vessels were either vertebral artery or basilar artery in 87 patients. Seventy-nine patients were enrolled in this study. Preoperatively, computed tomography (CT) or brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with 3-dimentional short range MR technique was performed and CT was checked immediately or 2-3 days after anesthetic recovery. The authors retrospectively analyzed the clinical features, the compression patterns of the vessels at the time of surgery and treatment outcomes. Results There were 47 were male and 32 female patients. HFS developed on the left side in 52 cases and on the right side in 27. The mean age of onset was 52.3 years (range 19-60) and the mean duration of symptoms was 10.7 years. Many patients (39 cases; 49.1%) had past history of hypertension. HFS caused only by the vertebral artery was 8 cases although most of the other cases were caused by vertebral artery (VA) in combination with its branching arteries. Most frequently, the VA and the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) were the simultaneous causative blood vessels comprising 32 cases (40.5%), and in 27 cases (34.2%) the VA and the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) were the offenders. Facial symptoms disappeared in 61 cases (77.2%) immediately after the operation and 68 cases (86.1%) showed good outcome after 6 months. Surgical outcome just after the operation was poor in whom the perforators arose from the offending vessels concurrently (p<0.05). Conclusion In case where the vertebral artery is a cause of HFS, commonly branching arteries associated with main arterial compression on facial REZ requires more definite treatment for proper decompression because of its relatively poor results compared to the condition caused by other vascular compressive origins. PMID:19096662

Kim, Joo Pyung; Choi, Seok Keun; Rhee, Bong Arm; Lim, Young Jin

2008-01-01

19

Normal Body Perception despite the Loss of Right Fusiform Gyrus.  

PubMed

Human extrastriate cortex contains functional regions that are selective for particular categories such as faces, bodies, and places, but it is unclear whether these category-selective regions are necessary for normal perception of their preferred stimuli. One of these regions is the right fusiform body area (FBA), which is selectively involved in body perception. Do loss of the right fusiform gyrus and the absence of the right FBA necessarily lead to deficits in body perception? Here we report the performance of Galen, a brain-damaged patient who lost the right fusiform gyrus and has no right FBA, on eight tasks of body perception. Despite his lesion, Galen showed normal performance on all tasks. Galen's results demonstrate that damage to the right fusiform gyrus and the lack of the right FBA do not necessarily lead to persisting deficits in body perception. PMID:25313655

Susilo, Tirta; Yang, Hua; Potter, Zachary; Robbins, Rachel; Duchaine, Bradley

2015-03-01

20

Isolated Upgaze Palsy in a Patient with Vertebrobasilar Artery Dolichoectasia; a Case Report  

PubMed Central

Purpose To report isolated upgaze palsy in a patient with a dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar artery. Case Report We report a 48-year-old man who showed upgaze palsy and convergence insufficiency. The left vertebral artery and basilar artery were shown to be greatly expanded, elongated and tortuous in cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The vertebrobasilar artery runs along the sulcus basilaris superior to the pontomesencephalic junction. Conclusion A dolichoectatic basilar artery may result in compression of midbrain structures related to vertical gaze. PMID:24982741

Ortak, Huseyin; Tas, Ufuk; Aksoy, Durdane Bekar; Ayan, Erdo?an

2014-01-01

21

Bilobed Wide Neck Posterior Cerebral Artery Aneurysm Associated with Fusiform Basilar Aneurysm, Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Chronic Renal Failure  

PubMed Central

Summary A 56 year-old woman presented with a ruptured bilobed wide neck aneurysm of the P2 segment of the PCA, atherosclerotic fusiform basilar artery aneurysm, subarachnoid bleeding with negative CT scan and chronic renal failure. She was managed by a cooperative approach involving neurosurgeons, neuroradiologist, neurointensivist, emergency room physicians, nurses and technicians. She underwent operation by proximal clipping for the aneurysm of the PCA. Postoperative neurological deficits include homonymous hemianopsia and ipsilateral third nerve palsy. The operation was performed through asubtemporal approach. At surgery, the aneurysm was located in the distal of the P2 segment of PCA, bilobed up and down, no definitive neck with small distal branches, and was treated by proximal clipping of the PCA aneurysm. The fusiform basilar artery aneurysm was severely atherosclerotic and left untouched. This is a rare case which required a high index of suspicion to detect subarachnoid bleeding from ruptured posterior fossa aneurysm, accurate prediction of the site of bleeding and the location of aneurysm location by conventional angiogram, MRI and MRA, and careful planned surgical strategy with the right approach for the P2 segment of the PCA aneurysm, complicated post operative care with airway management, triple H therapy, nutrition, additional measures and multiple hemodialysis. PMID:20591269

Siauw Koan, Tan

2003-01-01

22

Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Associated with Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectasia and Pontine Ischemic Stroke.  

PubMed

Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a heterogeneous, common, neurocutaneous disorder presenting different complications during a life span, including cerebrovascular dysplasia. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of NF1 associated with vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia and pontine ischemic stroke. We describe a 57-year-old man with NF1 who presented an acute onset right-sided facial palsy and hemiplegia, dysarthria, and gait imbalance. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an acute left paramedian pontine infarct and a hypoplastic right vertebral artery. Brain Computed Tomography Angiography revealed the occurrence of vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia. Co-occurrence of VBD and NF1 might not be merely casual and it may significantly heighten the mortality rate in this multisystem disorder. We suggest a possible role of VBD in the genesis of our patient's clinical-radiological features and prompt the early detection of asymptomatic arteriopathy in individuals with NF1 in order to ameliorate patients' quality of life and life expectancy. PMID:25230986

Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Frisullo, Giovanni; Pilato, Fabio; Profice, Paolo; Morosetti, Roberta; Di Lella, Giuseppe; Zampino, Giuseppe; Marca, Giacomo Della

2014-09-18

23

Cuneus and fusiform cortices thickness is reduced in trigeminal neuralgia  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic pain disorders are presumed to induce changes in brain grey and white matters. Few studies have focused CNS alterations in trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Methods The aim of this study was to explore changes in white matter microstructure in TN subjects using diffusion tensor images (DTI) with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS); and cortical thickness changes with surface based morphometry. Twenty-four patients with classical TN (37-67 y-o) and 24 healthy controls, matched for age and sex, were included in the study. Results Comparing patients with controls, no diffusivity abnormalities of brain white matter were detected. However, a significant reduction in cortical thickness was observed at the left cuneus and left fusiform cortex in the patients group. The thickness of the fusiform cortex correlated negatively with the carbamazepine dose (p?=?0.023). Conclusions Since the cuneus and the fusiform gyrus have been related to the multisensory integration area and cognitive processing, as well as the retrieval of shock perception conveyed by A? fibers, our results support the role of these areas in TN pathogenesis. Whether such changes occurs as an epiphenomenon secondary to daily stimulation or represent a structural predisposition to TN in the light of peripheral vascular compression is a matter of future studies. PMID:24661349

2014-01-01

24

Staged Endovascular Management of a Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm  

PubMed Central

Summary The goal of treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms is the exclusion of the aneurysm from the intracranial circulation. Recently endovascular techniques have provided an alternative to open surgery in selected patients. Herein, we present a patient who underwent staged endovascular procedures to achieve definitive treatment of an intracranial fusiform vertebral artery aneurysm. Definitive immediate therapy for the aneurysm was not possible at first presentation because of the aneurysm location and configuration, and because of absence of collateral circulation. The first stage involved coiling a daughter bleb suspected of being the source of haemorrhage. This provided acute protection against rebleeding without sacrificing the parent artery. The second and more definitive stage, delayed for 31 days, involved balloon occlusion of a fusiform aneurysm by sacrificing the parent vessel. PMID:20670490

Morris, P.; Bednar, M.; Gross, C.

1999-01-01

25

Wingspan Stent for High-Grade Symptomatic Vertebrobasilar Artery Atherosclerotic Stenosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  This study was designed to present the treatment outcomes with Wingspan stent angioplasty of high-grade intracranial vertebrobasilar\\u000a artery (VBA) stenosis in symptomatic patients.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Between 2007 and 2010, the records of 30 patients with 31 intracranial high-grade VBA stenoses (all?70%) who underwent elective\\u000a stenting due to the failure of medical therapy were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical evaluation was performed based on the

Jian Li; Zhen-Wei Zhao; Guo-Dong Gao; Jian-Ping Deng; Jia Yu; Li Gao; Yang Yuan; You-Zhi Qv

26

Selectivity for the Human Body in the Fusiform Gyrus Marius V. Peelen and Paul E. Downing  

E-print Network

Report Selectivity for the Human Body in the Fusiform Gyrus Marius V. Peelen and Paul E. Downing in final form 3 August 2004 Peelen, Marius V. and Paul E. Downing. Selectivity for the human body that the mid-fusiform gyrus responds with nearly the same level of selectivity to images of human bodies

Downing, Paul

27

Intradural vertebral endarterectomy with nonautologous patch angioplasty for refractory vertebrobasilar ischemia: Case report and literature review  

PubMed Central

Background: The natural history of patients with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischemic symptoms due to chronic bilateral vertebral artery occlusive disease is progressive, and poses significant challenges when refractory to medical therapy. Surgical treatment options depend largely on location and characteristics of the atheroma (s), and generally include percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) with or without stent placement, posterior circulation revascularization (bypass), extracranial vertebral artery reconstruction, or vertebral artery endarterectomy. Case Description: We present the case of a 56-year-old male with progressive vertebrobasilar ischemia due to tandem lesions in the right vertebral artery at the origin and intracranially in the V4 segment. The contralateral vertebral artery was occluded to the level of posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and posterior communicating arteries were absent. Following PTA and stent placement at the right vertebral artery origin, the patient was successfully treated with intradural vertebral artery endarterectomy (V4EA) and patch angioplasty via the far lateral approach. Distal endovascular intervention at the V4 segment proved not technically feasible after multiple attempts. Conclusions: V4EA is an uncommonly performed procedure, but may be considered for carefully selected patients. The authors’ techniques and indications are discussed. Historical outcomes, relevant anatomic considerations, and lessons learned are reviewed from the literature.

Uschold, Timothy; Abla, Adib A.; Wilson, David A.; McDougall, Cameron G.; Nakaji, Peter

2014-01-01

28

Microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm secondary to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia: Surgical strategies, technical nuances and clinical outcomes.  

PubMed

Hemifacial spasm (HFS) due to direct compression of the facial nerve by a dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar artery is rare. Vessels are often non-compliant and tethered by critical brainstem perforators. We set out to determine surgical strategies and outcomes for this challenging disease. All patients undergoing surgery for HFS secondary to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia were reviewed. Hospital records, clinic notes and radiographic imaging were collected for outcome measures. Seventeen patients (eight males, nine females) were identified. Sixteen patients (94%) were treated with Teflon pledgets (DuPont, Wilmington, DE, USA) and one (6%) patient had a vascular sling placed around a severely diseased vertebral artery. All patients had significant reduction in symptoms and 82% of patients had complete resolution of symptoms (average follow-up: 41.4months). One patient suffered persistent facial nerve paresis and swallowing difficulty. Two other patients suffered a 1 point decrease in the House-Brackmann facial nerve grading scale. Four patients (23%) required re-operation (infection, cerebrospinal fluid leak, and two patients with delayed recurrence of HFS). Of the latter, one patient required repositioning of a Teflon pledget and another patient underwent a sling decompression. There were no perioperative strokes or death. Excellent relief of symptoms with acceptable preoperative morbidity can be achieved using Teflon pledgets alone in most cases. In recalcitrant cases, sling transposition can be used to further augment the decompression. Careful attention must be paid to prevent vascular kinking and preserve brainstem perforators. PMID:25510536

Zaidi, Hasan A; Awad, Al-Wala; Chowdhry, Shakeel A; Fusco, David; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F

2015-01-01

29

[Cognitive functions and treatment of their impairment in elderly patients with the vertebrobasilar issufficiensy].  

PubMed

Authors studied impairment of cognitive functions in 180 patients, aged 56-74 years, with chronic blood flow deficiency in the vertebrobasilar territory. Along with neurological examination, we used MRI of the brain and the cervical spine, MRI-angiography, ultrasound Doppler method, EEG, ECG, clinical and biochemical blood testing. Cognitive functions were assessed using standard neuropsychological tests (a word retrieval test, the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Frontal Assessment battery, the Schulte test, the Landolt test, Wechsler tests, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and others). Neuropsychological performance was assessed before and after treatment with cavinton (25 mg intravenous during 10 days and then 10 mg 3 times daily during 3 months). The treatment improved cognitive function and the effect remained for more than 3 months. PMID:23739435

Skoromets, A A; Aliev, K T; Lalayan, T V; Pugachova, E L; Smolko, D G

2013-01-01

30

Gamma knife radiosurgery to the trigeminal ganglion for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia secondary to vertebrobasilar ectasia  

PubMed Central

Background: We report the result obtained using Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery on the trigeminal ganglion (TG) in a patient with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) secondary to vertebrobasilar ectasia (VBE). Case Description: Retrospective review of medical records corresponding to one patient with VBE-related trigeminal pain treated with radiosurgery. Because of the impossibility of visualization of the entry zone or the path of trigeminal nerve through the pontine cistern, we proceeded with stereotactic radiosurgery directed to the TG. The maximum radiation dose was 86 Gy with a 8-mm and a 4-mm collimator. The follow-up period was 24 months. The pain disappeared in 15 days, passing from Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) grade V to BNI grade IIIa in 4 months and then to grade I. The patient did not experience noticeable subjective facial numbness. Conclusions: This experience showed that Gamma knife radiosurgery was effective in the management of VBE-related trigeminal pain, using the TG as radiosurgical target. PMID:25593782

Somaza, Salvador; Hurtado, Wendy; Montilla, Eglee; Ghaleb, Jose

2014-01-01

31

Ultrastructure of cell division in the fusiform cells of the vascular cambium of Robinia pseudoacacia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ultrastructure of periclinally dividing fusiform cells was studied in the vascular cambium of Robinia pseudoacacia. Fusiform cell division begins in April at Madison, Wisconsin, when the cambial cells still have many characteristics of\\u000a a dormant cambium. Soon afterward, the cambial cells acquire the appearance typical of an active cambium. Sequential phases\\u000a of the microtubule cycle were documented: cortical microtubules

J. J. Farrar; Ray F. Evert

1997-01-01

32

Skill dependent audiovisual integration in the fusiform induces repetition suppression.  

PubMed

Learning to read entails mapping existing phonological representations to novel orthographic representations and is thus an ideal context for investigating experience driven audiovisual integration. Because two dominant brain-based theories of reading development hinge on the sensitivity of the visual-object processing stream to phonological information, we were interested in how reading skill relates to audiovisual integration in this area. Thirty-two children between 8 and 13years of age spanning a range of reading skill participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Participants completed a rhyme judgment task to word pairs presented unimodally (auditory- or visual-only) and cross-modally (auditory followed by visual). Skill-dependent sub-additive audiovisual modulation was found in left fusiform gyrus, extending into the putative visual word form area, and was correlated with behavioral orthographic priming. These results suggest learning to read promotes facilitatory audiovisual integration in the ventral visual-object processing stream and may optimize this region for orthographic processing. PMID:25585276

McNorgan, Chris; Booth, James R

2015-02-01

33

Vertebrobasilar Flow Evaluation and Risk of Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke (VERiTAS) Study: Rationale and Design  

PubMed Central

Background Over one third of ischemic strokes occur in the posterior circulation, a leading cause of which is atherosclerotic vertebrobasilar disease (VBD). Symptomatic VBD carries a high annual recurrent stroke risk, averaging 10–15% per year. Endovascular angioplasty and stenting are increasingly employed, but carry risks, and the benefit remains unproven. Determining stroke predictors in this population is critical to identifying high risk patients for future trials of intervention. Preliminary studies indicate that stroke risk in VBD is strongly related to hemodynamic compromise, which can be measured noninvasively using quantitative magnetic resonance angiography (QMRA). Methods/Study Design The VERiTAS Study, a prospective multi-center NIH funded observational study of symptomatic vertebrobasilar stenosis (? 50%) or occlusion, is designed to test the hypothesis that patients demonstrating compromised blood flow as assessed by QMRA are at higher stroke risk. The study will recruit 80 patients at 6 sites in North America over four years. Upon enrollment, subjects will undergo hemodynamic assessment with blinded QMRA to assess large vessel flow in the vertebrobasilar territory, and be prospectively designated as compromised or normal flow. Patients will be reimaged with QMRA at 6, 12 and 24 months, and followed for 12 to 24 months for the primary endpoint of stroke in the vertebrobasilar territory. Conclusion VERiTAS is the first prospective study of hemodynamics and stroke risk in the posterior circulation. The results may impact the selection criteria for interventional candidates and also define a low risk population in whom the risks of invasive interventions would be unnecessary. PMID:21050408

Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Rose-Finnell, Linda; Richardson, DeJuran; Ruland, Sean; Pandey, Dilip; Thulborn, Keith R.; Liebeskind, David S.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Kramer, Jeffrey; Silver, Frank L.; Kasner, Scott E.; Caplan, Louis R.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Gorelick, Philip B; Charbel, Fady T.

2010-01-01

34

The Effect of Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm Caused by Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectasia  

PubMed Central

Objective Hemifacial spasm (HFS) caused by vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD) is very rare, and in theses cases, it is difficult to decompress the nerve from its vascular compression. The objective of this study was to investigate the outcome of microvascular decompression (MVD) for HFS caused by VBD. Methods There were 10 patients of HFS caused by VBD at our hospital between September 1978 and September 2008. We evaluated magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and time of flight magnetic resonance imaginge (TOF MRI) findings using the criteria for VBD. We compared the clinical outcomes of MVD for the 10 patients with VBD with the overall outcomes of the total 2058 MVDs performed for HFS. Results The results of MVD for HFS caused by VBD were successful in 90.9% of cases. The postoperative complication rate in VBD was 45.5%. Offending vessels in patients with VBD were identified visually during surgery. Adverse effects after MVD were found in 4 patients. We found that the diameter of VBD was significantly greater in patients with complications than in those with no complications (p=0.028). Conclusion Our data shows that MVD may be a good treatment modality for HFS caused by VBD but care must be taken to avoid adverse effects from the procedure. It is important to detach the dolichoectatic artery from its surrounding structures sufficiently to allow it to be easily movable. In addition, attempts should be made to lessen the retraction of the cerebellum during release of the dolichoectatic artery. PMID:23091664

Kang, Jeong-Han; Kang, Dong-Wan; Chung, Sang Sup

2012-01-01

35

The impact of laser irradiation on global stability in patients with vertebrobasilar insufficiency: A clinical report  

PubMed Central

Summary Background The purpose of our experiment was to determine whether laser stimulation can improve microcirculation in the posterior regions of the brain in patients with vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI). Material/Methods We studied 25 patients (20 female, 5 male, mean age 64) diagnosed with chronic VBI. All were evaluated using the De Klyn test, followed by qualitative assessment of stability using a Berg Balance Scale and evaluation of global stability using an electronic balance platform. A CTL-1100 low power laser was used with standard parameters. We established a protocol for laser irradiation at 5 points along the vertebral artery in the cervical region bilaterally. Irradiation was performed 10 times over two weeks. Results Significant improvement occurred after therapy in headache (p=0.0005), vertigo (p<0.0000), and tinnitus (p=0.0387). No significant differences were observed in nausea or nystagmus caused by head rotation. The Berg Balance Scale results showed significant differences in almost all features. There was a tendency towards improved stability in all parameters, and statistically significant differences in the total surface of support and the spread surface of support for the left foot. Conclusions Laser stimulation as applied in this study can be useful in the treatment of patients with VBI. The main reason for improvement in global stability, balance, and other VBI symptoms is better blood perfusion. PMID:21873949

Lukowicz, Malgorzata; Zalewski, Pawel; Bulatowicz, Irena; Buszko, Katarzyna; Klawe, Jacek J.

2011-01-01

36

Glass rupture disk  

DOEpatents

A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

Glass, S. Jill (Albuquerque, NM); Nicolaysen, Scott D. (Albuquerque, NM); Beauchamp, Edwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01

37

Shape memory polymer stent with expandable foam: a new concept for endovascular embolization of fusiform aneurysms.  

PubMed

We demonstrate a new concept for endovascular embolization of nonnecked fusiform aneurysms. A device prototype consisting of a stent augmented with expandable foam, both made from shape memory polymer, was fabricated and deployed in an in vitro model. Visual observation indicated that the foam achieved embolization of the aneurysm while the stent maintained an open lumen in the parent artery. The shape memory polymer stent-foam device is a potential tool for treatment of nonnecked fusiform aneurysms, as well as an alternative to stent- and balloon-assisted coil embolization of wide-necked aneurysms. PMID:17549908

Small, Ward; Buckley, Patrick R; Wilson, Thomas S; Benett, William J; Hartman, Jonathan; Saloner, David; Maitland, Duncan J

2007-06-01

38

Hemispheric Asymmetries for Whole-Based and Part-Based Face Processing in the Human Fusiform Gyrus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Behavioral studies indicate a right hemisphere advantage for processing a face as a whole and a left hemisphere superiority for processing based on face features. The present PET study identifies the anatomical localization of these effects in well-defined regions of the middle fusiform gyri of both hemispheres. The right middle fusiform gyrus, previously described as a face-specific region, was found

Bruno Rossion; Laurence Dricot; Anne Devolder; Jean-Michel Bodart; Marc Crommelinck; Beatrice de Gelder; Richard Zoontjes

2000-01-01

39

Supersonic Rupture of Rubber  

E-print Network

The rupture of rubber differs from conventional fracture. It is supersonic, and the speed is determined by strain levels ahead of the tip rather than total strain energy as for ordinary cracks. Dissipation plays a very important role in allowing the propagation of ruptures, and the back edges of ruptures must toughen as they contract, or the rupture is unstable. This article presents several levels of theoretical description of this phenomenon: first, a numerical procedure capable of incorporating large extensions, dynamics, and bond rupture; second, a simple continuum model that can be solved analytically, and which reproduces several features of elementary shock physics; and third, an analytically solvable discrete model that accurately reproduces numerical and experimental results, and explains the scaling laws that underly this new failure mode. Predictions for rupture speed compare well with experiment.

M Marder

2005-04-24

40

Activation of the fusiform gyrus when individuals with autism spectrum disorder view faces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prior imaging studies have failed to show activation of the fusiform gyrus in response to emotionally neutral faces in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) [Critchley et al., Brain 124 (2001) 2059; Schultz et al., Arch. Gen. Psychiatry 57 (2000) 331]. However, individuals with ASD do not typically exhibit the striking behavioral deficits that might be expected to result from

Nouchine Hadjikhani; Robert M. Joseph; Josh Snyder; Christopher F. Chabris; Jill Clark; Shelly Steele; Lauren McGrath; Mark Vangel; Itzhak Aharon; Eric Feczko; Gordon J Harris; Helen Tager-Flusberg

2004-01-01

41

The Fusiform Face Area: A Module in Human Extrastriate Cortex Specialized for Face Perception  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we found an area in the fusiform gyrus in 12 of the 15 subjects tested that was significantly more active when the subjects viewed faces than when they viewed assorted common objects. This face activation was used to define a specific region of interest individually for each subject, within which several new tests of

Nancy Kanwisher; Josh McDermott; Marvin M. Chun

1997-01-01

42

The effect of face inversion on the human fusiform face area  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inversion severely impairs the recognition of greyscale faces and the ability to see the stimulus as a face in two-tone Mooney images. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study the effect of face inversion on the human fusiform face area (FFA). MR signal intensity from the FFA was reduced when greyscale faces were presented upside-down, but this effect was

Nancy Kanwisher; Frank Tong; Ken Nakayama

43

The effect of face inversion on the human fusiform face area  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inversion severely impairs the recognition of greyscale faces and the ability see the stimulus as a face in two-tone Mooney images. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study the effect of face inversion on the human fusiform face area (FFA). MR signal intensity from the FFA was reduced when greyscale faces were presented upside-down, but this effect was small

Nancy Kanwisher; Frank Tong; Ken Nakayama

1998-01-01

44

Shape Memory Polymer Stent With Expandable Foam: A New Concept for Endovascular Embolization of Fusiform Aneurysms  

Microsoft Academic Search

We demonstrate a new concept for endovascular embolization of nonnecked fusiform aneurysms. A device prototype consisting of a stent augmented with expandable foam, both made from shape memory polymer, was fabricated and deployed in an in vitro model. Visual observation indicated that the foam achieved embolization of the aneurysm while the stent maintained an open lumen in the parent artery.

Ward Small; Patrick R. Buckley; Thomas S. Wilson; William J. Benett; Jonathan Hartman; David Saloner; Duncan J. Maitland

2007-01-01

45

Cerebral Asymmetry in the Fusiform Areas Predicted the Efficiency of Learning a New Writing System  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are great individual differences in learning abilities, but their neural bases, especially among normal populations, are not well understood. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging and a training paradigm, the present study investigated individual differences in cerebral asymmetry in fusiform regions when processing a new writing system and their correlation to subsequent visual character learning. Twelve Chinese adults underwent a

Gui Xue; Chuansheng Chen; Zhen Jin; Qi Dong

2006-01-01

46

Neurons in the Fusiform Gyrus are Fewer and Smaller in Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Abnormalities in face perception are a core feature of social disabilities in autism. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies showed that patients with autism could perform face perception tasks. However, the fusiform gyrus (FG) and other cortical regions supporting face processing in controls are hypoactive in patients with autism.…

van Kooten, Imke A. J.; Palmen, Saskia J. M. C.; von Cappeln, Patricia; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.; Korr, Hubert; Heinsen, Helmut; Hof, Patrick R.; van Engeland, Herman; Schmitz, Christoph

2008-01-01

47

Posterior spinal artery aneurysm rupture after 'Ecstasy' abuse.  

PubMed

Posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms are a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The commonly abused street drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or 'Ecstasy' has been linked to both systemic and neurological complications. A teenager presented with neck stiffness, headaches and nausea after ingesting 'Ecstasy'. A brain CT was negative for SAH but a CT angiogram suggested cerebral vasculitis. A lumbar puncture showed SAH but a cerebral angiogram was negative. After a spinal MR angiogram identified abnormalities on the dorsal surface of the cervical spinal cord, a spinal angiogram demonstrated a left PSA 2?mm fusiform aneurysm. The patient underwent surgery and the aneurysmal portion of the PSA was excised without postoperative neurological sequelae. 'Ecstasy' can lead to neurovascular inflammation, intracranial hemorrhage, SAH and potentially even de novo aneurysm formation and subsequent rupture. PSA aneurysms may be treated by endovascular proximal vessel occlusion or open surgical excision. PMID:24994748

Johnson, Jeremiah; Patel, Shnehal; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Yavagal, Dileep R

2014-01-01

48

Posterior spinal artery aneurysm rupture after 'Ecstasy' abuse.  

PubMed

Posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms are a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The commonly abused street drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or 'Ecstasy' has been linked to both systemic and neurological complications. A teenager presented with neck stiffness, headaches and nausea after ingesting 'Ecstasy'. A brain CT was negative for SAH but a CT angiogram suggested cerebral vasculitis. A lumbar puncture showed SAH but a cerebral angiogram was negative. After a spinal MR angiogram identified abnormalities on the dorsal surface of the cervical spinal cord, a spinal angiogram demonstrated a left PSA 2?mm fusiform aneurysm. The patient underwent surgery and the aneurysmal portion of the PSA was excised without postoperative neurological sequelae. 'Ecstasy' can lead to neurovascular inflammation, intracranial hemorrhage, SAH and potentially even de novo aneurysm formation and subsequent rupture. PSA aneurysms may be treated by endovascular proximal vessel occlusion or open surgical excision. PMID:25006043

Johnson, Jeremiah; Patel, Shnehal; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Yavagal, Dileep R

2014-07-01

49

Neuronal fiber pathway abnormalities in autism: an initial MRI diffusion tensor tracking study of hippocampo-fusiform and amygdalo-fusiform pathways.  

PubMed

MRI diffusion-tensor tracking (DTT) was performed in 17 high-functioning adolescents/adults with autism and 17 pairwise-matched controls. White matter pathways involved in face processing were examined due to the relevance of face perception to the social symptoms of autism, and due to known behavioral and functional imaging findings in autism. The hippocampo-fusiform (HF) and amygdalo-fusiform (AF) pathways had normal size and shape but abnormal microstructure in the autism group. The right HF had reduced across-fiber diffusivity (D-min) compared with controls, opposite to the whole-brain effect of increased D-min. In contrast, left HF, right AF, and left AF had increased D-min and increased along-fiber diffusivity (D-max), more consistent with the whole-brain effect. There was a general loss of lateralization compared with controls. The right HF D-min was markedly low in the autism subgroup with lower Benton face recognition scores, compared with the lower-Benton control subgroup, and compared with the higher-Benton autism subgroup. Similar behavioral relationships were found for performance IQ. Such results suggest an early functionally-significant pathological process in right HF consistent with small-diameter axons (with correspondingly slower neural transmission) and/or higher packing density. In left AF and HF, changes were interpreted as secondary, possibly reflecting axonal loss and/or decreased myelination. PMID:18954474

Conturo, Thomas E; Williams, Diane L; Smith, Charles D; Gultepe, Eren; Akbudak, Erbil; Minshew, Nancy J

2008-11-01

50

Equilibrium and kinetic studies of Cd²? biosorption by the brown algae Sargassum fusiforme.  

PubMed

A fundamental investigation of the biosorption of Cd2+ from aqueous solution by the edible seaweed Sargassum fusiforme was performed under batch conditions. The influences of experimental parameters, such as the initial pH, sorption time, temperature, and initial Cd2+ concentration, on Cd2+ uptake by S. fusiforme were evaluated. The results indicated that the biosorption of Cd2+ depended on the initial Cd2+ concentration, as well as the pH. The uptake of Cd2+ could be described by the Langmuir isotherm model, and both the Langmuir biosorption equilibrium constant and the maximum biosorption capacity of the monolayer decreased with increasing temperature, thereby confirming the exothermic character of the sorption process. The biosorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and intraparticle diffusion is the sole rate-limiting step for the entire biosorption period. These fundamental equilibrium and kinetic results can support further studies to the removal of cadmium from S. fusiforme harvested from cadmium-polluted waters. PMID:24736449

Zou, Hui-Xi; Li, Nan; Wang, Li-Hua; Yu, Ping; Yan, Xiu-Feng

2014-01-01

51

How music alters a kiss: superior temporal gyrus controls fusiform-amygdalar effective connectivity.  

PubMed

While watching movies, the brain integrates the visual information and the musical soundtrack into a coherent percept. Multisensory integration can lead to emotion elicitation on which soundtrack valences may have a modulatory impact. Here, dynamic kissing scenes from romantic comedies were presented to 22 participants (13 females) during functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. The kissing scenes were either accompanied by happy music, sad music or no music. Evidence from cross-modal studies motivated a predefined three-region network for multisensory integration of emotion, consisting of fusiform gyrus (FG), amygdala (AMY) and anterior superior temporal gyrus (aSTG). The interactions in this network were investigated using dynamic causal models of effective connectivity. This revealed bilinear modulations by happy and sad music with suppression effects on the connectivity from FG and AMY to aSTG. Non-linear dynamic causal modeling showed a suppressive gating effect of aSTG on fusiform-amygdalar connectivity. In conclusion, fusiform to amygdala coupling strength is modulated via feedback through aSTG as region for multisensory integration of emotional material. This mechanism was emotion-specific and more pronounced for sad music. Therefore, soundtrack valences may modulate emotion elicitation in movies by differentially changing preprocessed visual information to the amygdala. PMID:24298171

Pehrs, Corinna; Deserno, Lorenz; Bakels, Jan-Hendrik; Schlochtermeier, Lorna H; Kappelhoff, Hermann; Jacobs, Arthur M; Fritz, Thomas Hans; Koelsch, Stefan; Kuchinke, Lars

2014-11-01

52

Oscillatory Modulations in Human Fusiform Cortex during Motion-Induced Blindness: Intracranial Recording  

PubMed Central

Objective Motion-induced blindness (MIB) is an illusory phenomenon, in which a static target surrounded by moving distracters is perceived to disappear. We determined the electrocorticographic (ECoG) correlates of MIB. Methods While undergoing intracranial ECoG recording, a patient with focal epilepsy was instructed to report the transitions of a visual target, which was designed to illusorily or physically disappear and reappear. We then determined the neural modulations associated with illusory and physical transitions of the target. We also tested whether the phase of local delta activity could predict exclusively illusory transitions. Results High-gamma activity at 80–150 Hz was attenuated in the fusiform region prior to the reports of illusory and real visual target disappearance. Conversely, such high-gamma activity was augmented prior to the report of real target reappearance. Exclusively around illusory disappearance but not around real one, the delta phases in the fusiform region showed a highly skewed distribution with preference of the negative peak. Conclusions Neuronal modulations in the fusiform region may be involved in visual awareness, while spontaneous fluctuations of neural states entrained on delta rhythm may be involved in generation of MIB. Significance Our study increases our understanding of the mechanisms of visual awareness. PMID:22503904

Matsuzaki, Naoyuki; Juhász, Csaba; Asano, Eishi

2012-01-01

53

Incidence of fusiform rust infection on loblolly pine related to tip moth damage  

SciTech Connect

Nantucket pine tip moth (Rhyacionia frustrana) is a common pest over most of the natural range of loblolly pine, causing deformation and growth reduction of seedlings and saplings during the early life of the stand. Fusiform rust (caused by Cronartium quercuum f. sp. fusiforme) is a limiting factor in the production of southern pines throughout a broad area of the southeastern United States, extending from South Carolina to Texas. The target areas on the hosts for both pests are young, succulent shoot tissues. Carbofuran, a systematic insecticide, was used to determine the effect of controlling tip moth on seedlings infected by the fusiform rust organism. Beginning with the 2nd year carbofuran was applied over 4 successive years. The insecticide sharply reduced the incidence of tip moth and increased the height of 5-year-old saplings compared with untreated controls. Usually any treatment that stimulates the growth of pines also results in increased rust infection. However, this was not the case here because untreated saplings had significantly more infection. It is not known whether the increased disease incidence on untreated trees was due to the susceptibility and/or total number of secondary shoots initiated in response to tip dieback caused by the tip moth, or if carbofuran itself has some fungicidal effect resulting in lower infection on treated seedlings. 6 refs., 1 tab.

Powers, H.R. Jr.; Stone, D.M.

1985-09-01

54

Wingspan experience at Beijing Tiantan Hospital: new insights into the mechanisms of procedural complication from viewing intraoperative transient ischemic attacks during awake stenting for vertebrobasilar stenosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and aimIntracranial vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) stenosis portends a stroke and death rate of 8.5–22.8% annually despite medical therapy. Stenting has emerged as a treatment option but also carries substantial risk. Awake stenting under local anesthesia to minimize major procedural complication was investigated.MethodsBetween January 2007 and December 2008, 43 of 46 consecutive patients with severe symptomatic intracranial VBA stenosis underwent

W. J. Jiang; W. Yu; B. Du; E. H. C. Wong; F. Gao

2010-01-01

55

Achilles Tendon Rupture  

PubMed Central

Context: Achilles tendon (AT) rupture in athletes is increasing in incidence and accounts for one of the most devastating sports injuries because of the threat to alter or end a career. Despite the magnitude of this injury, reliable risk assessment has not been clearly defined, and prevention strategies have been limited. The purpose of this review is to identify potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes stated in the current literature. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search was conducted on AT rupture, or “injury” and “risk factors” and “athletes” from 1980 to 2011. Emphasis was placed on epidemiology, etiology, and review articles focusing on the risk for lower extremity injury in runners and gymnasts. Thirty articles were reviewed, and 22 were included in this assessment. Results: Aerial and ground athletes share many intrinsic risk factors for AT rupture, including overuse and degeneration of the tendon as well as anatomical variations that mechanically put an athlete at risk. Older athletes, athletes atypical in size for their sport, high tensile loads, leg dominance, and fatigue also may increase risk. Aerial athletes tend to have more extrinsic factors that play a role in this injury due to the varying landing surfaces from heights and technical maneuvers performed at various skill levels. Conclusion: Risk assessment for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes is multivariable and difficult in terms of developing prevention strategies. Quantitative measures of individual risk factors may help identify major contributors to injury. PMID:24427410

Wertz, Jess; Galli, Melissa; Borchers, James R.

2013-01-01

56

Ruptured aneurysm of the PICA communicating artery: a case report.  

PubMed

A 47-year-old man presented with a rare aneurysm arising from the posterior inferior cerebellar artery communicating artery (PICA com A), manifesting as subarachnoid with intraventricular hemorrhage. Cerebral angiography showed a defect of the left PICA, and the left PICA region was supplied by a communicating artery formed by the fusion of branches from the right PICA and right vertebral artery. Aneurysms arose in the communicating artery, and a small, unruptured fusiform aneurysm was observed adjacent to a ruptured aneurysm. Trapping was performed for the 2 aneurysms with occipital artery (OA)-PICA bypass. Six cases of aneurysms occurring in this vessel including ours have been reported, and hemodynamic factors and congenital fragility of the arterial wall have been suggested as causative factors. Ours is the first case in which a ruptured aneurysm of this vessel was treated surgically with concurrent vascular reconstruction. If the aneurysm has a shape that is difficult to clip, the affected vessel is difficult to preserve, and collateral blood flow to the affected PICA region is considered insufficient, trapping with OA-PICA bypass is recommended. PMID:24119627

Haga, Daisuke; Kuroki, Takao; Andoh, Shunpei; Nemoto, Masaaki; Sugo, Nobuo; Nagao, Takeki

2014-01-01

57

Solvothermal synthesis of fusiform hexagonal prism SrCO{sub 3} microrods via ethylene glycol solution  

SciTech Connect

Fusiform hexagonal prism SrCO{sub 3} microrods were prepared by a simple solvothermal route at 120 deg. C, and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. By controlling the content of ethylene glycol (EG), it was found that ethylene glycol (EG) played an important role in the formation of such SrCO{sub 3} microrods. Finally, effects of other solvents on the products, including 1,2-propanediol and glycerin, were also investigated.

Shi Liange [Key Laboratory for Nanostructured Materials, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Du Fanglin [Key Laboratory for Nanostructured Materials, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China)]. E-mail: dufanglin@qust.edu.cn

2007-08-07

58

Multifocal Cerebral Fusiform Aneurysms in Children with Immune Deficiencies Report of Four Cases  

PubMed Central

Summary We describe three children infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV 1), and one child suffering from familial mucocutaneous candidiasis; who all had multiple, fusiform subarachnoid intracranial aneurysms. Because infectious causative agents were never detected at the level of the lesions, a classical “mycotic” origin of these aneurysms seemed unlikely. Despite the fact that these aneurysms have the same angiographic appearance, they have different etiologies (immune and infectious). These data open the discussion on the reciprocal role of an infectious or immune initial trigger acting on a vascular (endothelial) target. The specificities of the target in terms of location and response enhance specific topographic characteristics (phenotypes) of the cerebral vasculature. PMID:20670504

Sedat, J.; Alvarez, H.; Rodesch, G.; Lasjaunias, P.

1999-01-01

59

Application of dual Willis covered stents in the management of large fusiform carotid aneurysms in a canine model.  

PubMed

This study evaluates the efficacy of dual Willis covered stents for the treatment of large fusiform carotid aneurysms in a canine model. Carotid fusiform aneurysms >10 mm long were surgically created in 10 dogs and were then repaired using either single or dual covered stents. Clinical results were assessed by scheduled angiography and histological features by light and electron microscopy. Angiography immediately post-op and 6 months after surgery revealed aneurysm isolation rates of 60 and 20% for the single stent technique and 60 and 100% for the dual stent technique, respectively. The rate of complete obliteration of the aneurysm sac differed significantly between treatments (P = 0.048). The dual stent technique also resulted in greater endothelialization. For large carotid fusiform aneurysms in a canine model, endovascular repair using dual Willis covered stents is technically feasible and more effectively obliterates the aneurysm sac than the use of a single stent. PMID:24459129

Wan-Yin, Shi; Ming-Hua, Li; Lei, Yan; Yue-Qi, Zhu; Jian-Ping, Gu

2014-12-01

60

Factors Predicting the Oculomotor Nerve Palsy following Surgical Clipping of Distal Vertebrobasilar Aneurysms: A Single-Institution Experience.  

PubMed

Background?The aim of our study was to identify various clinical and radiologic factors that correlate with the oculomotor nerve palsy following clipping of distal vertebrobasilar aneurysms. Methods?A total of 48 patients with 51 aneurysms were included in this retrospective study . Patient's age, gender, size, location, and projection of the aneurysm, preoperative Hunt and Hess (H&H) grade, presence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), temporary clipping, preoperative third nerve palsy, and Glasgow Outcome Scale were included in the model for analysis. Results?A total of 15 patients (31.25%) developed oculomotor nerve palsy following clipping of basilar apex aneurysms. 38 patients (79.2%) presented with SAH and 35 patients (72.9%) had poor H&H grades at presentation. The size of the aneurysm (p?=?0.03), preoperative H&H grade (p?=?0.04), preoperative oculomotor nerve dysfunction (p?=?0.007), and projection of an aneurysm (p?=?0.004) had shown a significant correlation with the oculomotor nerve palsy. The size of the aneurysm (p?=?0.030, odds ratio: 0.381; 95% confidence interval, 0.175-0.827] was an independent predictor of postoperative nerve dysfunction. Conclusion?The size of the aneurysm, clinical grade at presentation, and projection of the aneurysm correlated with the oculomotor nerve dysfunction following clipping. These clinical and radiologic parameters can be used to predict the oculomotor nerve outcome. PMID:25093149

Sharma, Mayur; Ahmed, Osama; Ambekar, Sudheer; Sonig, Ashish; Nanda, Anil

2014-08-01

61

The role of the fusiform face area in social cognition: implications for the pathobiology of autism.  

PubMed Central

A region in the lateral aspect of the fusiform gyrus (FG) is more engaged by human faces than any other category of image. It has come to be known as the 'fusiform face area' (FFA). The origin and extent of this specialization is currently a topic of great interest and debate. This is of special relevance to autism, because recent studies have shown that the FFA is hypoactive to faces in this disorder. In two linked functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of healthy young adults, we show here that the FFA is engaged by a social attribution task (SAT) involving perception of human-like interactions among three simple geometric shapes. The amygdala, temporal pole, medial prefrontal cortex, inferolateral frontal cortex and superior temporal sulci were also significantly engaged. Activation of the FFA to a task without faces challenges the received view that the FFA is restricted in its activities to the perception of faces. We speculate that abstract semantic information associated with faces is encoded in the FG region and retrieved for social computations. From this perspective, the literature on hypoactivation of the FFA in autism may be interpreted as a reflection of a core social cognitive mechanism underlying the disorder. PMID:12639338

Schultz, Robert T; Grelotti, David J; Klin, Ami; Kleinman, Jamie; Van der Gaag, Christiaan; Marois, René; Skudlarski, Pawel

2003-01-01

62

Emotional Face Processing in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Evidence for Functional Impairments in the Fusiform Gyrus  

PubMed Central

Objective Pediatric bipolar disorder involves poor social functioning, but the neural mechanisms underlying these deficits are not well understood. Previous neuroimaging studies have found deficits in emotional face processing localized to emotional brain regions. However, few studies have examined dysfunction in other regions of the face processing circuit. This study assessed hypoactivation in key face processing regions of the brain in pediatric bipolar disorder. Method Youth with a bipolar spectrum diagnosis (n=20) were matched to a nonbipolar clinical group (n=20), with similar demographics and comorbid diagnoses, and a healthy control group (n=20). Youth participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning which employed a task-irrelevant emotion processing design in which processing of facial emotions was not germane to task performance. Results Hypoactivation, isolated to the fusiform gyrus, was found when viewing animated, emerging facial expressions of happiness, sadness, fearfulness, and especially anger in pediatric bipolar participants relative to matched clinical and healthy control groups. Conclusions The results of the study imply that differences exist in visual regions of the brain’s face processing system and are not solely isolated to emotional brain regions, such as the amygdala. Findings are discussed in relation to facial emotion recognition and fusiform gyrus deficits previously reported in the autism literature. Behavioral interventions targeting attention to facial stimuli might be explored as possible treatments for bipolar disorder in youth. PMID:24290464

Perlman, Susan B.; Fournier, Jay C.; Bebko, Genna; Bertocci, Michele A.; Hinze, Amanda K.; Bonar, Lisa; Almeida, Jorge R. C.; Versace, Amelia; Schirda, Claudiu; Travis, Michael; Gill, Mary Kay; Demeter, Christine; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A.; Sunshine, Jeffrey L.; Holland, Scott K.; Kowatch, Robert. A.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Horwitz, Sarah M.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Fristad, Mary. A; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Findling, Robert L.; Phillips, Mary L.

2013-01-01

63

Blunt traumatic pericardial rupture.  

PubMed Central

A 28-year-old man presented with left chest, head and limb injuries following a road traffic accident (RTA). Increasing haemodynamic instability necessitated an emergency left thoracotomy at which a complete rupture of the pericardium and herniation of the heart was found. After repair, the patient made an uneventful post-operative recovery. The aetiology, investigation and management of this rare injury is discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7640832

Levine, A J; Collins, F J

1995-01-01

64

Rupture of Renal Transplant  

PubMed Central

Background. Rupture of renal allograft is a rare and serious complication of transplantation that is usually attributed to acute rejection, acute tubular necrosis, or renal vein thrombosis. Case Presentation. LD, a 26-year-old male with established renal failure, underwent deceased donor transplantation using kidney from a 50-year-old donor with acute kidney injury (Cr 430?mmol/L). LD had a stormy posttransplant recovery and required exploration immediately for significant bleeding. On day three after transplant, he developed pain/graft swelling and another significant haemorrhage with cardiovascular compromise which did not respond to aggressive resuscitation. At reexploration, the renal allograft was found to have a longitudinal rupture and was removed. Histology showed features of type IIa Banff 97 acute vascular rejection, moderate arteriosclerosis, and acute tubular necrosis. Conclusion. Possible ways of avoiding allograft rupture include use of well-matched, good quality kidneys; reducing or managing risk factors that would predispose to delayed graft function; ensuring a technically satisfactory transplant procedure with short cold and warm ischemia times; and avoiding large donor-recipient age gradients.

Baker, Shona; Popescu, Maria; Akoh, Jacob A.

2015-01-01

65

Microfilament bundles associated with tubular endoplasmic Reticulum in fusiform cells in the active cambial zone of Fraxinus excelsior L  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary In the active cambium ofFraxinus excelsior L. microfilament bundles and tubular endoplasmic reticulum appear always associated with each other in the parietal cytoplasm of fusiform cells. The two associated organelles are parallel to the longitudinal cell axis. The association is absent in small, isodiametric ray cells.

Leentje Goosen-de Roo; P. D. Burggraaf; K. R. Libbenga

1983-01-01

66

Activation of the middle fusiform 'face area' increases with expertise in recognizing novel objects.  

PubMed

Part of the ventral temporal lobe is thought to be critical for face perception, but what determines this specialization remains unknown. We present evidence that expertise recruits the fusiform gyrus 'face area'. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure changes associated with increasing expertise in brain areas selected for their face preference. Acquisition of expertise with novel objects (greebles) led to increased activation in the right hemisphere face areas for matching of upright greebles as compared to matching inverted greebles. The same areas were also more activated in experts than in novices during passive viewing of greebles. Expertise seems to be one factor that leads to specialization in the face area. PMID:10448223

Gauthier, I; Tarr, M J; Anderson, A W; Skudlarski, P; Gore, J C

1999-06-01

67

5HTTLPR predicts left fusiform gyrus activation to positive emotional stimuli?  

PubMed Central

This study was designed to replicate and extend past research examining the impact of the serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) on neural activation during emotional processing. Six women with at least one short allele were compared to six age-matched women with long/long alleles of the 5HTTLPR. Participants were shown 36 positive and 36 negative slides from the International Affective Picture Set, while functional images were acquired using a 4-T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Although we were unable to replicate past research demonstrating relatively increased amygdala activation among individuals with an “s” allele to negative stimuli, women with an s allele evidenced decreased left fusiform gyrus activation to positive emotional stimuli (as expected). We suggest that women with a short allele may be either less attentive or less “expert” with regard to positive emotional stimuli, and ideas for future research are presented. PMID:18849132

Demaree, Heath A.; Pu, Jie; Jesberger, Jack; Feeny, Norah; Jeng, Linda; Everhart, D. Erik; Duerk, Jeff; Tkach, Jean

2011-01-01

68

Influence of stent-assisted angioplasty on cognitive function and affective disorder in elderly patients with symptomatic vertebrobasilar artery stenosis  

PubMed Central

Background We aimed to investigate cognitive function and affective disorder in elderly patients with symptomatic vertebrobasilar artery stenosis (SVAS) after stent-assisted angioplasty (SAA) and to explore the potential mechanism. Material/Methods The study subjects were 26 elderly SVAS patients who were non-responsive to pharmacotherapy and received SAA (study group) and 30 patients receiving intracoronary stent implantation (control group). Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA), Hamilton depression rating scale (HAMD), and Hamilton anxiety rating scale (HAMA) were used. Results The total MoCA score, scores of line connection, copying cube, drawing clock, and delayed recall increased significantly in the study group after surgery (P<0.05, P<0.01). In addition, the MoCA score increased over time and the total MoCA score at 12 months was markedly higher than that at 1 month (P<0.05). The scores of HAMD and HAMA decreased dramatically after surgery compared with before surgery in these patients (P<0.01). A comparison at the corresponding period was performed between study group and control group, and it was found that the differences in total MoCA scores and scores of line connection, copying cube, drawing clock, and delayed recall before surgery and at 1 month after surgery were significant (P<0.05, P<0.01). Conclusions SAA may improve the visuospatial/executive abilities and delayed recall, as well as the depression and anxiety in patients with SVAS. Larger and controlled trails are needed to investigate the effect of SAA on cognition and affection in these patients. PMID:24990175

Yan, Yongxing; Liang, Lizhen; Yuan, Yanrong; Chen, Tao; Shen, Yonghui; Zhong, Changyang

2014-01-01

69

Ruptured Spleen as a Differential Diagnosis in Ruptured Tubal Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Two cases of traumatic biphasic or secondary splenic rupture are presented to demonstrate the clinical picture of an entity the obstetrician-gynecologist will be encountering more commonly in the future. The signs and symptoms of this condition figured prominently in the differential diagnosis of ruptured tubal pregnancy. PMID:6737489

Weekes, Leroy R.

1984-01-01

70

RBMK pressure tube rupture assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Russian RBMK reactor core design consists of multiple parallel pressure tube channels that contain Zr clad, UO{sub 2} fuel pin bundles. These parallel channels are contained within graphite moderator blocks which are, in turn, contained within a sealed core cavity. Current safety evaluation efforts of the RBMK reactors have been concentrating in the area of tube ruptures within the core cavity and, in particular, multiple tube ruptures that could threaten the reactor core integrity. Tube rupture events result in a pressurization of the reactor core cavity. The original design overpressure for the cavity region was based on a single tube rupture, resulting in considerable margin to the top plate lift pressure. The top plate lift pressure is 3.1 bar, and a single tube rupture would result in approximately 1.4 bar. RBMK plant specific cavity pressure relief designs provide for between three and in simultaneous tube ruptures before exceeding the top plate lift pressure. Thus, current safety evaluations have begun to examine the potential for multiple tube ruptures that could exceed the current cavity pressure relief designs. One such scenario being examined is a partial rupture in a group distribution header that results in stagnated (low) flow to up to 40 pressure tubes. The subsequent fuel heatup in these reduced flow tubes could result in multiple tube ruptures beyond the design relief capacity of the core cavity. This paper examines several key issues in evaluating this transient, including: (1) the effects of low flow, (2) the effects of axial peaking, and (3) the effects of radial peaking, all relative to the time to tube rupture. These issues each play a significant role in attempting to evaluate the likelihood and severity of multiple tube ruptures for a partial group distribution header break.

Schmitt, B.E.; Tsiklauri, G.V.

1994-08-01

71

Modeling rupture of growing aneurysms.  

PubMed

Growth and rupture of aneurysms are driven by micro-structural alterations of the arterial wall yet precise mechanisms underlying the process remain to be uncovered. In the present work we examine a scenario when the aneurysm evolution is dominated by turnover of collagen fibers. In the latter case it is natural to hypothesize that rupture of individual fibers (or their bonds) causes the overall aneurysm rupture. We examine this hypothesis in computer simulations of growing aneurysms in which constitutive equations describe both collagen evolution and failure. Failure is enforced in constitutive equations by limiting strain energy that can be accumulated in a fiber. Within the proposed theoretical framework we find a range of parameters that lead to the aneurysm rupture. We conclude in a qualitative agreement with clinical observations that some aneurysms will rupture while others will not. PMID:24359675

Balakhovsky, K; Jabareen, M; Volokh, K Y

2014-02-01

72

Ruptured thought: rupture as a critical attitude to nursing research.  

PubMed

In this paper, we introduce the notion of ‘rupture’ from the French philosopher Michel Foucault, whose studies of discourse and governmentality have become prominent within nursing research during the last 25 years. We argue that a rupture perspective can be helpful for identifying and maintaining a critical potential within nursing research. The paper begins by introducing rupture as an inheritance from the French epistemological tradition. It then describes how rupture appears in Foucault's works, as both an overall philosophical approach and as an analytic tool in his historical studies. Two examples of analytical applications of rupture are elaborated. In the first example, rupture has inspired us to make an effort to seek alternatives to mainstream conceptions of the phenomenon under study. In the second example, inspired by Foucault's work on discontinuity, we construct a framework for historical epochs in nursing history. The paper concludes by discussing the potential of the notion of rupture as a response to the methodological concerns regarding the use of Foucault-inspired discourse analysis within nursing research. We agree with the critique of Cheek that the critical potential of discourse analysis is at risk of being undermined by research that tends to convert the approach into a fixed method. PMID:24741691

Beedholm, Kirsten; Lomborg, Kirsten; Frederiksen, Kirsten

2014-04-01

73

Differential effects of androgenic and anti-androgenic progestins on fusiform and frontal gray matter volume and face recognition performance.  

PubMed

Effects of oral hormonal contraceptives (OC) on human brain structure and behavior have only recently become a focus of research. Two explorative reports observed larger regional gray matter (GM) volumes in OC users within the prefrontal cortex, ACC and fusiform gyri, as well as parahippocampal gyri, hippocampus and cerebellum. These studies did however not control for the androgenicity of the progestin compound of OC, did not take into consideration how long OC users had been on their OC, and did not control for age differences between the OC group and the naturally cycling group. We compared 20 naturally cycling women during their early follicular cycle phase to 18 users of OC containing androgenic progestins and 22 users of OC containing anti-androgenic progestins. When controlling for age, we found that in users of anti-androgenic progestins relative GM volumes within the bilateral fusiform gyri, fusiform face area (FFA), parahippocampal place area (PPA) and cerebellum, were significantly larger than in naturally cycling women, while in users of androgenic progestins, relative as well as absolute volumes within the bilateral middle and superior frontal gyri were significantly smaller compared to naturally cycling women. These morphological changes were related to performance in a face recognition task. Face recognition performance was significantly better in users of anti-androgenic progestins compared to the other groups and significantly related to absolute as well as relative GM volumes in the FFA and PPA. Total GM volume, as well as absolute GM volumes within the bilateral fusiform gyri, FFA, hippocampus, parahippocampus, PPA, middle frontal gyri and ACC were significantly larger, the longer the duration of OC use, particularly in users of androgenic progestins. Morphological differences between active and inactive pill phase were observed in users of androgenic progestins. These findings suggest differential effects of androgenic and anti-androgenic progestins on human brain structure. PMID:25446458

Pletzer, Belinda; Kronbichler, Martin; Kerschbaum, Hubert

2015-01-30

74

The Role of Controlled Anticoagulation in Balloon Occluding Vertebral Arteries to Treat Giant Fusiform Aneurysms of the Basilar Artery  

PubMed Central

Summary We suggest and discuss the role of controlled anticoagulation therapy after the balloon occlusion of vertebral arteries to treat giant fusiform aneurysms in the basilar trunk. Two cases of giant fusiform aneurysms were treated with balloon occlusion of vertebral arteries. Both of these patients suffered severe brain stem ischaemia. Anticoagulants were used to adjust the PTT to 1.5-2.5 times the normal level to control the formation speed of thrombosis inside the aneurysms. Case 1 was obliged to suspend the anticoagulation therapy one week after occlusion because of digestive tract haemorrhage, and died of severe brain stem ischaemia. On autopsy, the sac of the aneurysm was totally occupied by the thrombus. Two perforating arteries feeding the brain stem arising from the wall of the aneurysm and infarction in the brain stem were found. Case 2 was anticoagulated strictly and progressively improved after three weeks. Anticoagulation was terminated after one month. Follow-up MRI showed the aneurysm had disappeared six months later. Giant fusiform aneurysms in the basilar artery trunk can be treated with the balloon occlusion of vertebral arteries which induces thrombosis in the sac of aneurysm. Controlled anticoagulation should be given to slow down the thrombotic obliteration in the perforators arising from the aneurysm wall to the brain stem and give the brain stem have enough time to establish the sufficient collateral circulation. PMID:20670503

Ling, F.; Zhang, H.; Wang, D.; Li, M.; Miao, Z.; Song, Q.; Hao, M.; Li, X.

1999-01-01

75

Is the whole the sum of its parts? Configural processing of headless bodies in the right fusiform gyrus.  

PubMed

The current study aimed to explore the functional magnetic resonance (fMR)-adaption effect by presenting intact and scrambled headless bodies and faces. This fMR-adaption paradigm allows investigating processing specificity in distinct brain areas by comparing the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal related to the presentation of same or different pairs of bodies. There is clear evidence that we prefer whole bodies compared to the sum of their parts. This effect refers to a subtype of configural processing termed first-order relational information. The preference for whole bodies seems to be associated with activation pattern in body-sensitive brain regions. However, it remains unclear until now, which cortical area exactly mediates this preference. In the present study, we investigated whether there are neuronal populations that show a selective adaption to whole bodies compared to the sum of their parts. The right fusiform body area (FBA) showed a preference for whole bodies compared to the sum of their parts as the right and left fusiform face area showed a preference for whole faces compared to the sum of their parts. Thus, the present data support the idea that configural body and face processing is mediated by the fusiform gyrus. The current data further support the view that bodies are a special stimulus class with specific characteristics which are processed in body-sensitive brain areas. PMID:25510195

Soria Bauser, Denise; Suchan, Boris

2015-03-15

76

Creep Ruptures in Heterogeneous Materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present creep experiments on fiber composite materials with different controlled heterogeneity. All samples exhibit a power-law relaxation of the strain rate in the primary creep regime (Andrade's law) followed by a power-law acceleration up to rupture. We discover that the rupture time is proportional to the duration of the primary creep regime, showing the interplay between the two regimes and offering a method of rupture prediction. These experimental results are rationalized by a mean-field model of representative elements with nonlinear viscoelastic rheology and with a large heterogeneity of strengths.

Nechad, H.; Helmstetter, A.; El Guerjouma, R.; Sornette, D.

2005-01-01

77

Increased BOLD signal in the fusiform gyrus during implicit emotion processing in anorexia nervosa?  

PubMed Central

Background The behavioural literature in anorexia nervosa (AN) has suggested impairments in psychosocial functioning and studies using facial expression processing tasks (FEPT) have reported poorer recognition and slower identification of emotions. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used alongside a FEPT, depicting neutral, mildly happy and happy faces, to examine the neural correlates of implicit emotion processing in AN. Participants were instructed to specify the gender of the faces. Levels of depression, anxiety, obsessive–compulsive symptoms and eating disorder behaviour were obtained and principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to acquire uncorrelated variables. Results fMRI analysis revealed a greater blood-oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response in AN in the right fusiform gyrus to all facial expressions. This response showed a linear increase with the happiness of the facial expression and was found to be stronger in those not taking medication. PCA analysis revealed a single component indicating a greater level of general clinical symptoms. Conclusion Neuroimaging findings would suggest that alterations in implicit emotion processing in AN occur during early perceptual processing of social signals and illustrate greater engagement on the FEPT. The lack of separate components using PCA suggests that the questionnaires used might not be suited as predictive measures. PMID:24501698

Fonville, Leon; Giampietro, Vincent; Surguladze, Simon; Williams, Steven; Tchanturia, Kate

2013-01-01

78

The Fusiform Face Area Is Engaged in Holistic, Not Parts-Based, Representation of Faces  

PubMed Central

Numerous studies with functional magnetic resonance imaging have shown that the fusiform face area (FFA) in the human brain plays a key role in face perception. Recent studies have found that both the featural information of faces (e.g., eyes, nose, and mouth) and the configural information of faces (i.e., spatial relation among features) are encoded in the FFA. However, little is known about whether the featural information is encoded independent of or combined with the configural information in the FFA. Here we used multi-voxel pattern analysis to examine holistic representation of faces in the FFA by correlating spatial patterns of activation with behavioral performance in discriminating face parts with face configurations either present or absent. Behaviorally, the absence of face configurations (versus presence) impaired discrimination of face parts, suggesting a holistic representation in the brain. Neurally, spatial patterns of activation in the FFA were more similar among correct than incorrect trials only when face parts were presented in a veridical face configuration. In contrast, spatial patterns of activation in the occipital face area, as well as the object-selective lateral occipital complex, were more similar among correct than incorrect trials regardless of the presence of veridical face configurations. This finding suggests that in the FFA faces are represented not on the basis of individual parts but in terms of the whole that emerges from the parts. PMID:22792301

Zhang, Jiedong; Li, Xiaobai; Song, Yiying; Liu, Jia

2012-01-01

79

The Faces in Radiological Images: Fusiform Face Area Supports Radiological Expertise.  

PubMed

The fusiform face area (FFA) has often been used as an example of a brain module that was developed through evolution to serve a specific purpose-face processing. Many believe, however, that FFA is responsible for holistic processing associated with any kind of expertise. The expertise view has been tested with various stimuli, with mixed results. One of the main stumbling blocks in the FFA controversy has been the fact that the stimuli used have been similar to faces. Here, we circumvent the problem by using radiological images, X-rays, which bear no resemblance to faces. We demonstrate that FFA can distinguish between X-rays and other stimuli by employing multivariate pattern analysis. The sensitivity to X-rays was significantly better in experienced radiologists than that in medical students with limited radiological experience. For the radiologists, it was also possible to use the patterns of FFA activations obtained on faces to differentiate X-ray stimuli from other stimuli. The overlap in the FFA activation is not based on visual similarity of faces and X-rays but rather on the processes necessary for expertise with both kinds of stimulus. Our results support the expertise view that FFA's main function is related to holistic processing. PMID:25452573

Bilali?, Merim; Grottenthaler, Thomas; Nägele, Thomas; Lindig, Tobias

2014-12-01

80

Why is the Fusiform Face Area recruited for novel categories of expertise?: A neurocomputational investigation  

PubMed Central

What is the role of the Fusiform Face Area (FFA)? Is it specific to face processing, or is it a visual expertise area? The expertise hypothesis is appealing due to a number of studies showing that the FFA is activated by pictures of objects within the subject’s domain of expertise (e.g., cars for car experts, birds for birders, etc.), and that activation of the FFA increases as new expertise is acquired in the lab. However, it is incumbent upon the proponents of the expertise hypothesis to explain how it is that an area that is initially specialized for faces becomes recruited for new classes of stimuli. We dub this the “visual expertise mystery.” One suggested answer to this mystery is that the FFA is used simply because it is a fine discrimination area, but this account has historically lacked a mechanism describing exactly how the FFA would be recruited for novel domains of expertise. In this study, we show that a neurocomputational model trained to perform subordinate-level discrimination within a visually homogeneous class develops transformations that magnify differences between similar objects, in marked contrast to networks trained to simply categorize the objects. This magnification generalizes to novel classes, leading to faster learning of new discriminations. We suggest this is why the FFA is recruited for new expertise. The model predicts that individual FFA neurons will have highly variable responses to stimuli within expertise domains. PMID:17959155

Joyce, Carrie A.; Tong, Matthew H.; Cottrell, Garrison W.

2008-01-01

81

Activation of fusiform face area by Greebles is related to face similarity but not expertise.  

PubMed

Some of the brain areas in the ventral temporal lobe, such as the fusiform face area (FFA), are critical for face perception in humans, but what determines this specialization is a matter of debate. The face specificity hypothesis claims that faces are processed in a domain-specific way. Alternatively, the expertise hypothesis states that the FFA is specialized in processing objects of expertise. To disentangle these views, some previous experiments used an artificial class of novel objects called Greebles. These experiments combined a learning and fMRI paradigm. Given the high impact of the results in the literature, we replicated and further investigated this paradigm. In our experiment, eight participants were trained for ten 1-hr sessions at identifying Greebles. We scanned participants before and after training and examined responses in FFA and lateral occipital complex. Most importantly and in contrast to previous reports, we found a neural inversion effect for Greebles before training. This result suggests that people process the "novel" Greebles as faces, even before training. This prediction was confirmed in a postexperimental debriefing. In addition, we did not find an increase of the inversion effect for Greebles in the FFA after training. This indicates that the activity in the FFA for Greebles does not depend on the degree of expertise acquired with the objects but on the interpretation of the stimuli as face-related. PMID:21671738

Brants, Marijke; Wagemans, Johan; Op de Beeck, Hans P

2011-12-01

82

Emotional expressions evoke a differential response in the fusiform face area  

PubMed Central

It is widely assumed that the fusiform face area (FFA), a brain region specialized for face perception, is not involved in processing emotional expressions. This assumption is based on the proposition that the FFA is involved in face identification and only processes features that are invariant across changes due to head movements, speaking and expressing emotions. The present study tested this proposition by examining whether the response in the human FFA varies across emotional expressions with functional magnetic resonance imaging and brain decoding analysis techniques (n = 11). A one vs. all classification analysis showed that most emotional expressions that participants perceived could be reliably predicted from the neural pattern of activity in left and the right FFA, suggesting that the perception of different emotional expressions recruit partially non-overlapping neural mechanisms. In addition, emotional expressions could also be decoded from the pattern of activity in the early visual cortex (EVC), indicating that retinotopic cortex also shows a differential response to emotional expressions. These results cast doubt on the idea that the FFA is involved in expression invariant face processing, and instead indicate that emotional expressions evoke partially de-correlated signals throughout occipital and posterior temporal cortex. PMID:24194707

Harry, Bronson; Williams, Mark A.; Davis, Chris; Kim, Jeesun

2013-01-01

83

Is This Car Looking at You? How Anthropomorphism Predicts Fusiform Face Area Activation when Seeing Cars  

PubMed Central

Anthropomorphism encompasses the attribution of human characteristics to non-living objects. In particular the human tendency to see faces in cars has long been noticed, yet its neural correlates are unknown. We set out to investigate whether the fusiform face area (FFA) is associated with seeing human features in car fronts, or whether, the higher-level theory of mind network (ToM), namely temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) show a link to anthropomorphism. Twenty participants underwent fMRI scanning during a passive car-front viewing task. We extracted brain activity from FFA, TPJ and MPFC. After the fMRI session participants were asked to spontaneously list adjectives that characterize each car front. Five raters judged the degree to which each adjective can be applied as a characteristic of human beings. By means of linear mixed models we found that the implicit tendency to anthropomorphize individual car fronts predicts FFA, but not TPJ or MPFC activity. The results point to an important role of FFA in the phenomenon of ascribing human attributes to non-living objects. Interestingly, brain regions that have been associated with thinking about beliefs and mental states of others (TPJ, MPFC) do not seem to be related to anthropomorphism of car fronts. PMID:25517511

Kühn, Simone; Brick, Timothy R.; Müller, Barbara C. N.; Gallinat, Jürgen

2014-01-01

84

Face, eye, and body selective responses in fusiform gyrus and adjacent cortex: an intracranial EEG study  

PubMed Central

Functional MRI (fMRI) studies have investigated the degree to which processing of whole faces, face-parts, and bodies are differentially localized within the fusiform gyrus and adjacent ventral occipitotemporal cortex. While some studies have emphasized the spatial differentiation of processing into discrete areas, others have emphasized the overlap of processing and the importance of distributed patterns of activity. Intracranial EEG (iEEG) recorded from subdural electrodes provides excellent temporal and spatial resolution of local neural activity, and thus provides an alternative method to fMRI for studying differences and commonalities in face and body processing. In this study we recorded iEEG from 12 patients while they viewed images of novel faces, isolated eyes, headless bodies, and flowers. Event-related potential analysis identified 69 occipitotemporal sites at which there was a face-, eye-, or body-selective response when contrasted to flowers. However, when comparing faces, eyes, and bodies to each other at these sites, we identified only 3 face-specific, 13 eye-specific, and 1 body-specific electrodes. Thus, at the majority of sites, faces, eyes, and bodies evoked similar responses. However, we identified ten locations at which the amplitude of the responses spatially varied across adjacent electrodes, indicating that the configuration of current sources and sinks were different for faces, eyes, and bodies. Our results also demonstrate that eye-sensitive regions are more abundant and more purely selective than face- or body-sensitive regions, particularly in lateral occipitotemporal cortex. PMID:25191255

Engell, Andrew D.; McCarthy, Gregory

2014-01-01

85

Emotional expressions evoke a differential response in the fusiform face area.  

PubMed

It is widely assumed that the fusiform face area (FFA), a brain region specialized for face perception, is not involved in processing emotional expressions. This assumption is based on the proposition that the FFA is involved in face identification and only processes features that are invariant across changes due to head movements, speaking and expressing emotions. The present study tested this proposition by examining whether the response in the human FFA varies across emotional expressions with functional magnetic resonance imaging and brain decoding analysis techniques (n = 11). A one vs. all classification analysis showed that most emotional expressions that participants perceived could be reliably predicted from the neural pattern of activity in left and the right FFA, suggesting that the perception of different emotional expressions recruit partially non-overlapping neural mechanisms. In addition, emotional expressions could also be decoded from the pattern of activity in the early visual cortex (EVC), indicating that retinotopic cortex also shows a differential response to emotional expressions. These results cast doubt on the idea that the FFA is involved in expression invariant face processing, and instead indicate that emotional expressions evoke partially de-correlated signals throughout occipital and posterior temporal cortex. PMID:24194707

Harry, Bronson; Williams, Mark A; Davis, Chris; Kim, Jeesun

2013-01-01

86

Partial ACL rupture: an MR diagnosis?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose. We sought to clarify the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MR) to show partial ante- rior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures and to allow dis- tinction of partial from complete ACL ruptures. Materials and methods. Eighty-eight patients were stud- ied by arthroscopy and MR (36 with normal ACLs, 21 with partial ACL ruptures, and 31 with complete ACL ruptures). MR

Lawrence Yao; Amilcare Gentili; Leonard Petrus; Joong K. Lee

1995-01-01

87

EARTHQUAKE RUPTURES ON ROUGH FAULTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Natural fault surfaces exhibit roughness at all scales, with root-mean-square height fluctuations of order 10??3 to 10??2 times the profile length. We study earthquake rupture propagation on such faults, using strongly rate-weakening fault friction\\u000a and off-fault plasticity. Inelastic deformation bounds stresses to reasonable values and prevents fault opening. Stress perturbations\\u000a induced by slip on rough faults cause irregular rupture propagation

Eric M. Dunham; Jeremy E. Kozdon; David Belanger; Lin Cong

88

Vertebrobasilar circulatory disorders  

MedlinePLUS

... prevention of stroke in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack: a guideline for healthcare professionals from ... prevention of stroke in patients with stroke and transient ischemic attack. Stroke . 2008 May;39(5):1647- ...

89

Non-popliteal synovial rupture.  

PubMed

The ruptured popliteal synovial cyst is a common complication of chronic knee arthritis. In contrast, non-popliteal synovial rupture is less well recognized and may present a diagnostic dilemma. We report an 81-year-old woman who presented with chest wall pain and ecchymosis. Ultrasonography of the shoulder region readily diagnosed a dissecting parasynovial cyst. She developed the unusual complication of contralateral recurrence. Literature review revealed a small but important set of non-popliteal synovial ruptures in the regions of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, spine, hip, knee, and ankle. Local swelling, inflammation, ecchymosis, and nerve impingement may mimic other conditions. Awareness of the clinical presentations and a high index of suspicion are required to avoid diagnostic confusion. Management data are limited to case reports of arthrocentesis, injection, and very rarely, surgery. PMID:19390451

Sit, Michelle; Higgs, Jay B

2009-06-01

90

Self-Rupturing Hermetic Valve  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For commercial, military, and aerospace applications, low-cost, small, reliable, and lightweight gas and liquid hermetically sealed valves with post initiation on/off capability are highly desirable for pressurized systems. Applications include remote fire suppression, single-use system-pressurization systems, spacecraft propellant systems, and in situ instruments. Current pyrotechnic- activated rupture disk hermetic valves were designed for physically larger systems and are heavy and integrate poorly with portable equipment, aircraft, and small spacecraft and instrument systems. Additionally, current pyrotechnically activated systems impart high g-force shock loads to surrounding components and structures, which increase the risk of damage and can require additional mitigation. The disclosed mechanism addresses the need for producing a hermetically sealed micro-isolation valve for low and high pressure for commercial, aerospace, and spacecraft applications. High-precision electrical discharge machining (EDM) parts allow for the machining of mated parts with gaps less than a thousandth of an inch. These high-precision parts are used to support against pressure and extrusion, a thin hermetically welded diaphragm. This diaphragm ruptures from a pressure differential when the support is removed and/or when the plunger is forced against the diaphragm. With the addition of conventional seals to the plunger and a two-way actuator, a derivative of this design would allow nonhermetic use as an on/off or metering valve after the initial rupturing of the hermetic sealing disk. In addition, in a single-use hermetically sealed isolation valve, the valve can be activated without the use of potential leak-inducing valve body penetrations. One implementation of this technology is a high-pressure, high-flow-rate rupture valve that is self-rupturing, which is advantageous for high-pressure applications such as gas isolation valves. Once initiated, this technology is self-energizing and requires low force compared to current pyrotechnic-based burst disk hermetic valves. This is a novel design for producing a single-use, self-rupturing, hermetically sealed valve for isolation of pressurized gas and/or liquids. This design can also be applied for single-use disposable valves for chemical instruments. A welded foil diaphragm is fully supported by two mated surfaces that are machined to micron accuracies using EDM. To open the valve, one of the surfaces is moved relative to the other to (a) remove the support creating an unsupported diaphragm that ruptures due to over pressure, and/or (b) produce tension in the diaphragm and rupture it.

Tucker, Curtis E., Jr.; Sherrit, Stewart

2011-01-01

91

Ruptures of the rotator cuff.  

PubMed Central

Through the use of improved diagnostic techniques, including arthrography and arthroscopy, ruptures of the rotator cuff that previously might not have been recognized are now being identified more frequently. In most cases the symptoms are relatively mild and respond satisfactorily to rest and therapy. Occasionally, however, there is severe, persistent disability despite treatment. These ruptures require surgical repair. In such cases the data obtained from special investigations help the surgeon select the appropriate surgical approach and repair technique. An imaginative program of physiotherapy before and after the operation contributes greatly to a satisfactory result. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 PMID:7437980

Ha'eri, G B

1980-01-01

92

Spontaneous Forniceal Rupture in Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Forniceal rupture is a rare event in pregnancy. We report a case of a 26-year-old primigravid woman who experienced a forniceal rupture at 23 weeks of gestation with no inciting cause except for pregnancy. Pregnancy is associated with ureteral compression due to increase in pelvic vasculature with the right ureter more dilated due to anatomic reasons. Hormones such as prostaglandins and progesterone render the ureter more distensible to allow for pressure build-up and an obstructive picture at the collecting system. We will discuss physiologic changes in pregnancies that predispose to this uncommon phenomenon and the most up-to-date management strategies. PMID:25648411

Upputalla, Roshni; Moore, Robert M.; Jim, Belinda

2015-01-01

93

Quadriceps Tendon Rupture due to Postepileptic Convulsion  

PubMed Central

We present a case of quadriceps tendon (QT) rupture. QT ruptures can occur in all ages. The cause is mostly traumatic in origin. Spontaneous ruptures that are thought to result from predisposing conditions are rare. Post-convulsion QT ruptures lacking traumas in their history can be overlooked in clinical examinations. This should be born in mind by the attending physician, as early diagnosis and treatment of the condition can lead to satisfactory outcomes. PMID:24944977

Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yilmaz; Sahin, Rifat; Keskin, Davut

2014-01-01

94

Heterogeneous rupture on homogenous faults: Three-dimensional spontaneous rupture simulations with thermal pressurization  

Microsoft Academic Search

To understand role of fluid on earthquake rupture processes, we investigated effects of thermal pressurization on spatial variation of dynamic rupture by computing spontaneous rupture propagation on a rectangular fault. We found thermal pressurization can cause heterogeneity of rupture even on a fault of uniform properties. On drained faults, tractions drop linearly with increasing slip in the same way everywhere.

Yumi Urata; Keiko Kuge; Yuko Kase

2008-01-01

95

Distal biceps and triceps ruptures.  

PubMed

Biceps and triceps tendon ruptures are rather uncommon injuries and are most commonly diagnosed clinically. Magnetic resonance imaging can help the clinician to differentiate an incomplete tear and define any degeneration of the tendon. Surgical anatomical repair is typically performed in acute complete ruptures whereas nonoperative treatment can be used for partial ruptures, as well as for patients unfit for surgery. Single incision techniques are associated with a higher rate of nerve injuries, while double incision repairs have a higher prevalence of heterotopic ossification. Although various fixation methods have been applied including bone tunnels, interference screws, suture anchors, cortical button fixation, the current evidence does not support the superiority of one method over the other. A well-planned postoperative rehabilitation programme is essential for a good final outcome. As better fixation devices are being used, more aggressive rehabilitation programmes have been applied. Epidemiology, clinical evaluation, diagnosis, surgical and conservative management of these injuries are presented in this review along with the authors' preferred technique for the anatomical repair of acute complete ruptures. PMID:23352149

Kokkalis, Zinon T; Ballas, Efstathios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Soucacos, Panayotis N

2013-03-01

96

Behavior of the Edible Seaweed Sargassum fusiforme to Copper Pollution: Short-Term Acclimation and Long-Term Adaptation  

PubMed Central

Aquatic agriculture in heavy-metal-polluted coastal areas faces major problems due to heavy metal transfer into aquatic organisms, leading to various unexpected changes in nutrition and primary and/or secondary metabolism. In the present study, the dual role of heavy metal copper (Cu) played in the metabolism of photosynthetic organism, the edible seaweed Sargassum fusiforme, was evaluated by characterization of biochemical and metabolic responses using both 1H NMR and GC-MS techniques under acute (47 µM, 1 day) and chronic stress (8 µM, 7 days). Consequently, photosynthesis may be seriously inhibited by acute Cu exposure, resulting in decreasing levels of carbohydrates, e.g., mannitol, the main products of photosynthesis. Ascorbate may play important roles in the antioxidant system, whose content was much more seriously decreased under acute than that under chronic Cu stress. Overall, these results showed differential toxicological responses on metabolite profiles of S. fusiforme subjected to acute and chronic Cu exposures that allowed assessment of impact of Cu on marine organisms. PMID:25025229

Lin, Li-Dong; Zhang, Ai-Qin; Li, Nan; Lin, Yan-Qing; Li, Lu-Min; Wu, Qin-Qin; Yan, Xiu-Feng

2014-01-01

97

The mid-fusiform sulcus: A landmark identifying both cytoarchitectonic and functional divisions of human ventral temporal cortex  

PubMed Central

Human ventral temporal cortex (VTC) plays a pivotal role in high-level vision. An under-studied macroanatomical feature of VTC is the mid-fusiform sulcus (MFS), a shallow longitudinal sulcus separating the lateral and medial fusiform gyrus (FG). Here, we quantified the morphological features of the MFS in 69 subjects (ages 7–40), and investigated its relationship to both cytoarchitectonic and functional divisions of VTC with four main findings. First, despite being a minor sulcus, we found that the MFS is a stable macroanatomical structure present in all 138 hemispheres with morphological characteristics developed by age 7. Second, the MFS is the locus of a lateral-medial cytoarchitechtonic transition within the posterior FG serving as the boundary between cytoarchitectonic regions FG1 and FG2. Third, the MFS predicts a lateral-medial functional transition in eccentricity bias representations in children, adolescents, and adults. Fourth, the anterior tip of the MFS predicts the location of a face-selective region, mFus-faces/FFA-2. These findings are the first to illustrate that a macroanatomical landmark identifies both cytoarchitectonic and functional divisions of high-level sensory cortex in humans and have important implications for understanding functional and structural organization in the human brain. PMID:24021838

Weiner, Kevin S.; Golarai, Golijeh; Caspers, Julian; Chuapoco, Miguel R.; Mohlberg, Hartmut; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

2014-01-01

98

A Retrospective Analysis of Ruptured Breast Implants  

PubMed Central

Background Rupture is an important complication of breast implants. Before cohesive gel silicone implants, rupture rates of both saline and silicone breast implants were over 10%. Through an analysis of ruptured implants, we can determine the various factors related to ruptured implants. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 72 implants that were removed for implant rupture between 2005 and 2014 at a single institution. The following data were collected: type of implants (saline or silicone), duration of implantation, type of implant shell, degree of capsular contracture, associated symptoms, cause of rupture, diagnostic tools, and management. Results Forty-five Saline implants and 27 silicone implants were used. Rupture was diagnosed at a mean of 5.6 and 12 years after insertion of saline and silicone implants, respectively. There was no association between shell type and risk of rupture. Spontaneous was the most common reason for the rupture. Rupture management was implant change (39 case), microfat graft (2 case), removal only (14 case), and follow-up loss (17 case). Conclusions Saline implants have a shorter average duration of rupture, but diagnosis is easier and safer, leading to fewer complications. Previous-generation silicone implants required frequent follow-up observation, and it is recommended that they be changed to a cohesive gel implant before hidden rupture occurs. PMID:25396188

Baek, Woo Yeol; Lew, Dae Hyun

2014-01-01

99

Centrally-Rupturing Squib-Closure Disks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rupture-disk design makes squib action more predictable. In new design, center of rupture disk contains cruciform indentation in which thickness reduced to about 0.5 mil (0.013 mm). Reduces strength of center of rupture disk in same manner as that of pull tabs on beverage cans; therefore, disk will fail predictably in center.

Richter, R.

1986-01-01

100

The fusiform face area: a cortical region specialized for the perception of faces  

PubMed Central

Faces are among the most important visual stimuli we perceive, informing us not only about a person's identity, but also about their mood, sex, age and direction of gaze. The ability to extract this information within a fraction of a second of viewing a face is important for normal social interactions and has probably played a critical role in the survival of our primate ancestors. Considerable evidence from behavioural, neuropsychological and neurophysiological investigations supports the hypothesis that humans have specialized cognitive and neural mechanisms dedicated to the perception of faces (the face-specificity hypothesis). Here, we review the literature on a region of the human brain that appears to play a key role in face perception, known as the fusiform face area (FFA). Section 1 outlines the theoretical background for much of this work. The face-specificity hypothesis falls squarely on one side of a longstanding debate in the fields of cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience concerning the extent to which the mind/brain is composed of: (i) special-purpose (‘domain-specific’) mechanisms, each dedicated to processing a specific kind of information (e.g. faces, according to the face-specificity hypothesis), versus (ii) general-purpose (‘domain-general’) mechanisms, each capable of operating on any kind of information. Face perception has long served both as one of the prime candidates of a domain-specific process and as a key target for attack by proponents of domain-general theories of brain and mind. Section 2 briefly reviews the prior literature on face perception from behaviour and neurophysiology. This work supports the face-specificity hypothesis and argues against its domain-general alternatives (the individuation hypothesis, the expertise hypothesis and others). Section 3 outlines the more recent evidence on this debate from brain imaging, focusing particularly on the FFA. We review the evidence that the FFA is selectively engaged in face perception, by addressing (and rebutting) five of the most widely discussed alternatives to this hypothesis. In §4, we consider recent findings that are beginning to provide clues into the computations conducted in the FFA and the nature of the representations the FFA extracts from faces. We argue that the FFA is engaged both in detecting faces and in extracting the necessary perceptual information to recognize them, and that the properties of the FFA mirror previously identified behavioural signatures of face-specific processing (e.g. the face-inversion effect). Section 5 asks how the computations and representations in the FFA differ from those occurring in other nearby regions of cortex that respond strongly to faces and objects. The evidence indicates clear functional dissociations between these regions, demonstrating that the FFA shows not only functional specificity but also area specificity. We end by speculating in §6 on some of the broader questions raised by current research on the FFA, including the developmental origins of this region and the question of whether faces are unique versus whether similarly specialized mechanisms also exist for other domains of high-level perception and cognition. PMID:17118927

Kanwisher, Nancy; Yovel, Galit

2006-01-01

101

Predicting the endpoints of earthquake ruptures.  

PubMed

The active fault traces on which earthquakes occur are generally not continuous, and are commonly composed of segments that are separated by discontinuities that appear as steps in map-view. Stress concentrations resulting from slip at such discontinuities may slow or stop rupture propagation and hence play a controlling role in limiting the length of earthquake rupture. Here I examine the mapped surface rupture traces of 22 historical strike-slip earthquakes with rupture lengths ranging between 10 and 420 km. I show that about two-thirds of the endpoints of strike-slip earthquake ruptures are associated with fault steps or the termini of active fault traces, and that there exists a limiting dimension of fault step (3-4 km) above which earthquake ruptures do not propagate and below which rupture propagation ceases only about 40 per cent of the time. The results are of practical importance to seismic hazard analysis where effort is spent attempting to place limits on the probable length of future earthquakes on mapped active faults. Physical insight to the dynamics of the earthquake rupture process is further gained with the observation that the limiting dimension appears to be largely independent of the earthquake rupture length. It follows that the magnitude of stress changes and the volume affected by those stress changes at the driving edge of laterally propagating ruptures are largely similar and invariable during the rupture process regardless of the distance an event has propagated or will propagate. PMID:17108963

Wesnousky, Steven G

2006-11-16

102

Rupture directivity of small earthquakes at Parkfield  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AbstractTheoretical modeling of strike-slip <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> along a bimaterial interface suggests that earthquakes initiating on the interface will have a preferred <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction. We test this model with 450 small earthquakes (2 < M < 5) from Parkfield, California, to look for evidence of consistent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity along the San Andreas Fault. We analyze azimuthal variations in earthquake source spectra after applying an iterative correction for wave propagation effects. Our approach avoids directly modeling source spectra because these models generally assume symmetric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>; instead, we look for azimuthal variations in the amplitudes of the source spectra over specified frequency bands. Our overall results show similar proportions of events exhibiting characteristics of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity toward either the southeast or northwest. However, the proportion of events with southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity increases as we limit the data set to larger magnitudes, with 70% of the 46 events M > 3 exhibiting southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> characteristics. Some spatial and temporal variability in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity is also apparent. We observe a higher proportion of northwest directivity <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> following the 2004 M 6 Parkfield earthquake, which <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> toward the northwest. Our results are generally consistent with the preferred southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity model but suggest that directivity is likely due to several contributing factors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kane, Deborah L.; Shearer, Peter M.; Goertz-Allmann, Bettina P.; Vernon, Frank L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">103</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.S31A0181T"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Velocities of Small Earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Whether the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of small earthquakes differs from those of large earthquakes has been a long- standing question in seismology. Recent proposals as to whether and how the physics of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may change with earthquake size have sparked interest in the energy budget, which depends strongly on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity (Vr). Small earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities have proved difficult to determine due to the strong attenuation of high-frequency waves. We analyze P and S waves of small earthquakes to detect <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity and constrain Vr. We apply the projected Landweber deconvolution (PLD) method to a data set of 30 earthquakes 3.6<M<4.5 recorded by the HiNet seismic array. We use small aftershocks as empirical Green's functions (EGF) to deconvolve from the main shocks and obtain the relative source time functions (RSTF). The EGF approach removes the effects of complex structure between the earthquakes and the stations. Variation in RSTFs with azimuth yields estimates of Vr for 6 earthquakes from 0.4 to 0.9?. Our results are broadly consistent with those of Yamada and Mori (JGR, 2005) and McGuire (BSSA, 2004). We now explore the implications of the range in Vr for static stress drop (??), and the ratio of radiated energy to seismic moment, which are interrelated. Kanamori and Rivera (BSSA, 2004) discuss how Vr and ?? must change with earthquake moment, if the ratio of energy to moment ? increases with moment, as has been suggested by various studies. There is currently no consensus that such a change in this ratio truly occurs. The increase in the energy-to- moment ratio is controlled by the relation between moment and corner frequency, which has moment inversely proportional to corner frequency raised to the power (3 + ?). Data compiled in Kanamori and Rivera suggests ? of 0.5. Then Vr of 0.4 to 0.9? for M3 events require that ?? of M3 events range from 1 to 0.1 respectively, of that of M7 events. More constraints on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities of small earthquakes will help to resolve possible changes in the energy budget, and thus earthquake physics, with earthquake size.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tomic, J.; Houston, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">104</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4093169"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Dietary Fermented Seaweed and Seaweed <span class="hlt">Fusiforme</span> on Growth Performance, Carcass Parameters and Immunoglobulin Concentration in Broiler Chicks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study was conducted to investigate the effects of brown seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida) by-product and seaweed <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> (Hizikia fusiformis) by-product supplementation on growth performance and blood profiles including serum immunoglobulin (Ig) in broilers. Fermentation of seaweeds was conducted by Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus oryzae. In a 5-wk feeding trial, 750 one-d-old broiler chicks were divided into 5 groups, and were assigned to the control diet or experimental diets including control+0.5% brown seaweed (BS) by-product, control+0.5% seaweed <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> (SF) by-product, control+0.5% fermented brown seaweed (FBS) by-product, and control+0.5% fermented seaweed <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> (FSF) by-product. As a consequence, body weight gain (BWG) and gain:feed of seaweed by-product groups were clearly higher, when compared to those of control diet group from d 18 to 35 and the entire experimental period (p<0.05). In mortality rate, seaweed by-product groups were significantly lower when compared to control diet group during entire experimental period (p<0.05). However, Feed Intake of experimental diets group was not different from that of the control group during the entire experimental period. Whereas, Feed Intake of fermented seaweed by-product groups was lower than that of non-fermented seaweed groups (p<0.05). Total organ weights, lipids, and glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) of all treatment groups were not different from those of control group. However, glutamic pyruvate transaminase (GPT) of all treatment groups was higher than that of control group at d 17 (p<0.05). In case of serum Igs concentration, the concentration of IgA antibody in BS, SF, FSF treatment groups was significantly higher than in control group at d 35 (p<0.01). IgA concentration in FBS supplementation groups was negligibly decreased when compared to the control group. IgM concentration in the serums of all treatment groups was significantly higher than in control group (p<0.05) and in fermented seaweed by-product groups were much higher than in non-fermented seaweed groups (p<0.05). On the other hand, IgG concentrations in all treatment groups were lower than in control group (p<0.05). Taken together, our results suggest that by-product dietary supplementation of BS, SF, FBS, and FSF in poultry may provide positive effects of growth performance and immune response. PMID:25050025</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Choi, Y. J.; Lee, S. R.; Oh, J-W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">105</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25050025"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of dietary fermented seaweed and seaweed <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> on growth performance, carcass parameters and immunoglobulin concentration in broiler chicks.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study was conducted to investigate the effects of brown seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida) by-product and seaweed <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> (Hizikia fusiformis) by-product supplementation on growth performance and blood profiles including serum immunoglobulin (Ig) in broilers. Fermentation of seaweeds was conducted by Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus oryzae. In a 5-wk feeding trial, 750 one-d-old broiler chicks were divided into 5 groups, and were assigned to the control diet or experimental diets including control+0.5% brown seaweed (BS) by-product, control+0.5% seaweed <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> (SF) by-product, control+0.5% fermented brown seaweed (FBS) by-product, and control+0.5% fermented seaweed <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> (FSF) by-product. As a consequence, body weight gain (BWG) and gain:feed of seaweed by-product groups were clearly higher, when compared to those of control diet group from d 18 to 35 and the entire experimental period (p<0.05). In mortality rate, seaweed by-product groups were significantly lower when compared to control diet group during entire experimental period (p<0.05). However, Feed Intake of experimental diets group was not different from that of the control group during the entire experimental period. Whereas, Feed Intake of fermented seaweed by-product groups was lower than that of non-fermented seaweed groups (p<0.05). Total organ weights, lipids, and glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) of all treatment groups were not different from those of control group. However, glutamic pyruvate transaminase (GPT) of all treatment groups was higher than that of control group at d 17 (p<0.05). In case of serum Igs concentration, the concentration of IgA antibody in BS, SF, FSF treatment groups was significantly higher than in control group at d 35 (p<0.01). IgA concentration in FBS supplementation groups was negligibly decreased when compared to the control group. IgM concentration in the serums of all treatment groups was significantly higher than in control group (p<0.05) and in fermented seaweed by-product groups were much higher than in non-fermented seaweed groups (p<0.05). On the other hand, IgG concentrations in all treatment groups were lower than in control group (p<0.05). Taken together, our results suggest that by-product dietary supplementation of BS, SF, FBS, and FSF in poultry may provide positive effects of growth performance and immune response. PMID:25050025</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Choi, Y J; Lee, S R; Oh, J-W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">106</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20352593"> <span id="translatedtitle">Splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following endoscopic polypectomy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 70-year-old man presented with two medium-sized colon polyps at the office of a gastroenterologist. After endoscopic polypectomy in a hospital, the patient was admitted to another hospital because of collapse and increasing abdominal pain. CT scan revealed hematoperitoneum and splenic subcapsular hematoma. Laparotomy with splenectomy was performed because of extended splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The postoperative course was unremarkable except late wound dehiscence. PMID:20352593</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wiedmann, M W; Kater, F; Böhm, B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">107</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3015800"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Spleen Following Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is generally a safe and well-accepted procedure. However, in a small percentage of patients, it is associated with complications, such as bleeding and injury to the bile duct and other viscera. Splenic injury as a result of laparoscopic surgery has been reported only in the context of direct trauma, for example due to retraction in hand-assisted urologic surgery. To date, there have been no reported cases of patients requiring splenectomy following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We report an unusual case of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen presenting less than 28 days following “uncomplicated” laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Results: A 52-year-old female presented to our Accident and Emergency department 3 weeks following “uncomplicated” laparoscopic cholecystectomy, complaining of severe left upper quadrant pain radiating to the left shoulder tip. Clinical examination revealed a patient in hypovolemic shock, with localized left upper quadrant peritonism. Abdominal computed tomography supported a diagnosis of splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, and the patient required an emergency splenectomy. Discussion: Splenic injury rarely complicates laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We postulate that either congenital or posttraumatic adhesions of the parietal peritoneum to the spleen may have caused the capsule to tear away from the spleen when the pneumoperitoneum was established, resulting in subcapsular hematoma and subsequent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in this patient. Videoscopic assessment of the spleen at the end of laparoscopic cholecystectomy might be a worthwhile exercise to aid early recognition and management in such cases. PMID:17651581</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leff, Daniel; Nortley, Mei; Melly, Lucy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">108</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70036276"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ground motion hazard from supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An idealized <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, propagating smoothly near a terminal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity, radiates energy that is focused into a beam. For <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity less than the S-wave speed, radiated energy is concentrated in a beam of intense fault-normal velocity near the projection of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> trace. Although confined to a narrow range of azimuths, this beam diverges and attenuates. For <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity greater than the S-wave speed, radiated energy is concentrated in Mach waves forming a pair of beams propagating obliquely away from the fault. These beams do not attenuate until diffraction becomes effective at large distance. Events with supershear and sub-Rayleigh <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity are compared in 2D plane-strain calculations with equal stress drop, fracture energy, and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length; only static friction is changed to determine the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity. Peak velocity in the sub-Rayleigh case near the termination of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is larger than peak velocity in the Mach wave in the supershear case. The occurrence of supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation reduces the most intense peak ground velocity near the fault, but it increases peak velocity within a beam at greater distances. ?? 2010.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andrews, D.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">109</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24126835"> <span id="translatedtitle">Receptor architecture of visual areas in the face and word-form recognition region of the posterior <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recently, two extrastriate visual areas on the posterior <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus, areas FG1 and FG2, were identified based on cytoarchitectonical criteria (Caspers et al. in Brain Struct Funct 218:511-526, 2013a). They are located within the object-related ventral visual stream at the transition between early and higher-order (category-specific) visual areas. FG2 has a topographical position which is best comparable to the face or visual word-form recognition area. However, the precise function of FG2 is presently unknown. Since transmitter receptors are key molecules of neurotransmission, we analysed the regional and laminar distribution of 15 different receptor binding sites by means of quantitative in vitro receptor autoradiography. Significant differences between receptor densities of both areas were found for NMDA, GABAB, M3, nicotinic ?4/?2 and 5-HT1A receptors as well as for GABAA associated benzodiazepine binding sites. These results support the cytoarchitectonic segregation of FG1 and FG2 into two distinct cortical areas. In addition, principal component and hierarchical cluster analyses of the multireceptor data of both <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> areas and 24 visual, auditory, somatosensory and multimodal association areas not only revealed the typical receptor architectonic characteristics of visual areas for FG1 and FG2, but also suggest their putative function as object recognition regions due to the similarity of their receptor fingerprints with those of areas of the ventral visual stream. Furthermore, FG1 and FG2 build a cluster with the multimodal association areas of the inferior parietal lobule. This underlines their hierarchically high position in the visual system of the human cerebral cortex. PMID:24126835</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Caspers, Julian; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Caspers, Svenja; Schleicher, Axel; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">110</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24326433"> <span id="translatedtitle">Early second trimester uterine scar <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous uterine scar <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can be lethal in pregnant women. A spontaneous uterine scar <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the early mid-trimester is rare and difficult to diagnose. This is a case of a 30-year-old woman (G2P1L1) at 19 weeks of gestation and having undergone a previous caesarean section presented with acute abdomen in shock. Laparotomy revealed a uterine scar <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, which was resutured after evacuation of products of conception. This case merits that the uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> should be considered as a differential diagnosis in pregnant women presenting with acute abdomen. In this case, although there was uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the second trimester and a complete placental separation, fetus was alive which is quite unusual in patients presenting with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> uterus. PMID:24326433</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bharatnur, Sunanda; Hebbar, Shripad; Shyamala, G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">111</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23157060"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of splenic hemangioma in puerperium.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atraumatic splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare clinical entity and in the absence of trauma, the diagnosis and treatment are often delayed. In this article the authors discuss a case of a 45-year-old woman, gravida 5, para 4, with spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on her second postpartum day. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was related to a splenic hemangioma that is a vascular malformation and the most common neoplasm of the spleen. Despite the fact that hemangiomas are the most common primary neoplasms of the spleen, only few cases of splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> have been described in pregnancy or puerperium. However, spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare event and the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> should be suspected in woman with unexplained abdominal pain or with clear signs of haemorrhage. PMID:23157060</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carta, G; D'Alfonso, A; Nallbani, A; Palermo, P; Franchi, V; Patacchiola, F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">112</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4205863"> <span id="translatedtitle">Delayed aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following perforating trauma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The immediate death rate for aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> caused by pointed and sharp-edged instruments is very high; however, delayed aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following the trauma is rarely reported. A patient who had an upper abdominal stab wound was sent to our hospital, and an emergency exploratory laparotomy was performed. No traumatic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was found at that time. However, on the fifth day after surgery, aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred, and a large retroperitoneal hematoma was formed. The patient eventually died. Aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was confirmed by a second emergency exploratory laparotomy and the autopsy. The information from exploratory laparotomies, post-operative observations and treatments, medical imaging reports, and reasons for delayed aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as well as the underlying pathophysiological processes, are discussed in this case report. PMID:25405156</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, Xuefei; Xia, Ligang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">113</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730014827&hterms=sigma+nickel&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3D%257Bsigma%257D5%2Bnickel"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of cryogenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> disc design</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> disc designs of both the active (command actuated) and passive (pressure <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>) types were evaluated for performance characteristics at cryogenic temperatures and for capability to operate in a variety of cryogens, including gaseous and liquid fluorine. The test results, coupled with information from literature and industry searches, were used to establish a statement of design criteria and recommended practices for application of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> discs to cryogenic rocket propellant feed and vent systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Keough, J. B.; Oldland, A. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">114</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55514236"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantifying uncertainty in earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using dynamic and kinematic models, we analyze the ability of GPS and strong-motion data to recover the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> history of earthquakes. By analyzing the near-source ground-motion generated by earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> through barriers and asperities, we determine that both the prestress and yield stress of a frictional inhomogeneity can be recovered. In addition, we find that models with constraints on <span class="hlt">rupture</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morgan T. Page</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">115</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22004171"> <span id="translatedtitle">Neck curve polynomials in neck <span class="hlt">rupture</span> model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Neck <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Model is a model that explains the scission process which has smallest radius in liquid drop at certain position. Old fashion of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> position is determined randomly so that has been called as Random Neck <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Model (RNRM). The neck curve polynomials have been employed in the Neck <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Model for calculation the fission yield of neutron induced fission reaction of {sup 280}X{sub 90} with changing of order of polynomials as well as temperature. The neck curve polynomials approximation shows the important effects in shaping of fission yield curve.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kurniadi, Rizal; Perkasa, Yudha S.; Waris, Abdul [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">116</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25199188"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of uterine leiomyoma during labour.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in labour requires an emergency caesarean section. In women with a uterine scar, either from gynaecological surgery or from a previous caesarean section, it is well documented that the risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is higher than in those without. Spontaneous uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a uterus with fibroids during pregnancy or labour is extremely rare. We present a case of a 33-year-old, unbooked pregnant woman from Nigeria who had a uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> secondary to fibroids. She required an emergency caesarean section in labour. The fibroids were not removed. Her baby was born alive and in good condition and she made an uneventful recovery. PMID:25199188</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ramskill, Nikki; Hameed, Aisha; Beebeejaun, Yusuf</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">117</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23707180"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in athletes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The incidence of AT <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has increased in recent decades. AT <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> frequently occur in the third or fourth decade of life in sedentary individuals who play sport occasionally. <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> also occur in elite athletes. Clinical examination must be followed by imaging. Conservative management and early mobilization can achieve excellent results, but the rerupture rate is not acceptable for the management of young, active, or athletic individuals. Open surgery is the most common option for AT <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, but there are risks of superficial skin breakdown and wound problems. These problems can be prevented with percutaneous repair. PMID:23707180</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">118</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28948520"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical repair of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We evaluated the surgical results of 42 consecutive patients with spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the Achilles ten don treated from 1973 to 1984 to determine the causes of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and to evaluate our treatment methods. Patients were divided into early and late repair groups and their charts reviewed to determine common clinical features. A new method of repair with early functional</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">James L. Beskin; Richard A. Sanders; Stephen C. Hunter; Jack C. Hughston</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">119</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54098453"> <span id="translatedtitle">Predicting the endpoints of earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The active fault traces on which earthquakes occur are generally not continuous, and are commonly composed of segments that are separated by discontinuities that appear as steps in map-view. Stress concentrations resulting from slip at such discontinuities may slow or stop <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation and hence play a controlling role in limiting the length of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Here I examine the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Steven G. Wesnousky</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">120</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Geomo.216...53X"> <span id="translatedtitle">Do buried-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> earthquakes trigger less landslides than surface-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> earthquakes for reverse faults?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gorum et al. (2013, Geomorphology 184, 127-138) carried out a study on inventory compilation and statistical analyses of landslides triggered by the 2010 Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake. They revealed that spatial distribution patterns of these landslides were mainly controlled by complex <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mechanism and topography. They also suggested that blind-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> earthquakes trigger fewer landslides than surface-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> earthquakes on thrust reverse faults. Although a few lines of evidence indicate that buried-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> earthquakes might trigger fewer landslides than surface-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> earthquakes on reverse faults, more careful comparisons and analyses indicate that it is not always true. Instead, some cases show that a buried-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> earthquake can trigger a larger quantity of landslides that are distributed in a larger area, whereas surface-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> earthquakes can trigger larger but a fewer landslides distributed in a smaller area.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xu, Chong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">121</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19843435"> <span id="translatedtitle">Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in athletes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> commonly affect middle-aged athletes and can result in considerable functional impairment. While the cause is multifactorial, the greatest risk is present for athletes involved in sports that involve sudden acceleration and deceleration. A thorough history and physical examination can accurately yield a diagnosis, but when question remains, magnetic resonance imaging is superior to ultrasound-guided evaluation. The best evidence available suggests that operative treatment has a lower rate of rerupture, a higher rate of return to the same level of sport participation, and a higher complication rate, if an open technique is used. Percutaneous methods of fixation have lower complication rates without an increase in the rate of rerupture when compared with open methods. Augmentation of an Achilles tendon repair has demonstrated no clinical benefit. Rehabilitation with early mobilization leads to improved patient-reported outcomes. PMID:19843435</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deangelis, Joseph P; Wilson, Kristina M; Cox, Charles L; Diamond, Alex B; Thomson, A Brian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">122</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2777620"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Surgery of traumatic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report describes the clinical presentation, diagnosis, surgery and results of patients with acute traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the aorta in a series of 21 consecutive patients. Direct cross-clamping without additional methods of spinal cord protection was used in 18/21 patients (86%). Direct suture was possible in 12/21 patients (60%). In the remaining patients, the repair was carried out by interposition of a Dacron graft. Overall mortality was 7/21 patients (33%). However, in 3 patients with severe polytrauma irreversible brain damage was the cause of death whereas 2 patients died from septicemia and myocardial infarction, respectively. No paraplegia nor paraparesis occurred in the surviving patients which were operated by direct cross-clamping of the aorta and rapid reanastomosis without additional methods of spinal cord protection. PMID:2777620</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">von Segesser, L; Schneider, K; Siebenmann, R; Glinz, W; Turina, M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">123</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4134934"> <span id="translatedtitle">Learning to Read an Alphabet of Human Faces Produces Left-lateralized Training Effects in the <span class="hlt">Fusiform</span> Gyrus</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerous functional neuroimaging studies have shown that most orthographic stimuli, such as printed English words, produce a left-lateralized response within the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus (FG) at a characteristic location termed the visual word form area (VWFA). We developed an experimental alphabet (FaceFont) comprising 35 face–phoneme pairs to disentangle phonological and perceptual influences on the lateralization of orthographic processing within the FG. Using functional imaging, we found that a region in the vicinity of the VWFA responded to FaceFont words more strongly in trained versus untrained participants, whereas no differences were observed in the right FG. The trained response magnitudes in the left FG region correlated with behavioral reading performance, providing strong evidence that the neural tissue recruited by training supported the newly acquired reading skill. These results indicate that the left lateralization of the orthographic processing is not restricted to stimuli with particular visual-perceptual features. Instead, lateralization may occur because the anatomical projections in the vicinity of the VWFA provide a unique interconnection between the visual system and left-lateralized language areas involved in the representation of speech. PMID:24168219</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moore, Michelle W.; Durisko, Corrine; Perfetti, Charles A.; Fiez, Julie A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">124</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23410717"> <span id="translatedtitle">Successful endovascular treatment of three <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> cerebral aneurysms with the Pipeline Embolization Device in a patient with dilating HIV vasculopathy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dilating HIV vasculopathy can be a cause of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in patients with HIV. Although first identified in children, this condition is increasingly being recognized in adults and has a dismal natural history under medical or expectant management. Vessel wall invasion by varicella zoster virus, HIV or Mycobacterium avium intracellulare complex (MAI) has been postulated as a possible etiology. We present a case of an adult patient with HIV and chronic disseminated MAI infection who presented with ischemic stroke and three <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> cerebral aneurysms that were successfully treated with the pipeline embolization device (PED). Flow diversion may be a viable treatment option for patients presenting with this serious neurovascular condition when aneurysm location precludes parent vessel sacrifice or surgical bypass. In addition, platelet function testing with VerifyNow may be valuable in selecting the appropriate P2Y12 receptor antagonist to be used in order to prevent PED thrombosis, since some of the antiretroviral drugs may inhibit clopidogrel or prasugrel metabolism. PMID:23410717</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Delgado Almandoz, Josser E; Crandall, Benjamin M; Fease, Jennifer L; Scholz, Jill M; Anderson, Ruth E; Kadkhodayan, Yasha; Tubman, David E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">125</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3603934"> <span id="translatedtitle">Successful endovascular treatment of three <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> cerebral aneurysms with the Pipeline Embolization Device in a patient with dilating HIV vasculopathy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dilating HIV vasculopathy can be a cause of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in patients with HIV. Although first identified in children, this condition is increasingly being recognized in adults and has a dismal natural history under medical or expectant management. Vessel wall invasion by varicella zoster virus, HIV or Mycobacterium avium intracellulare complex (MAI) has been postulated as a possible etiology. We present a case of an adult patient with HIV and chronic disseminated MAI infection who presented with ischemic stroke and three <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> cerebral aneurysms that were successfully treated with the pipeline embolization device (PED). Flow diversion may be a viable treatment option for patients presenting with this serious neurovascular condition when aneurysm location precludes parent vessel sacrifice or surgical bypass. In addition, platelet function testing with VerifyNow may be valuable in selecting the appropriate P2Y12 receptor antagonist to be used in order to prevent PED thrombosis, since some of the antiretroviral drugs may inhibit clopidogrel or prasugrel metabolism. PMID:23400801</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Delgado Almandoz, Josser E; Crandall, Benjamin M; Fease, Jennifer L; Scholz, Jill M; Anderson, Ruth E; Kadkhodayan, Yasha; Tubman, David E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">126</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24168219"> <span id="translatedtitle">Learning to read an alphabet of human faces produces left-lateralized training effects in the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerous functional neuroimaging studies have shown that most orthographic stimuli, such as printed English words, produce a left-lateralized response within the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus (FG) at a characteristic location termed the visual word form area (VWFA). We developed an experimental alphabet (FaceFont) comprising 35 face-phoneme pairs to disentangle phonological and perceptual influences on the lateralization of orthographic processing within the FG. Using functional imaging, we found that a region in the vicinity of the VWFA responded to FaceFont words more strongly in trained versus untrained participants, whereas no differences were observed in the right FG. The trained response magnitudes in the left FG region correlated with behavioral reading performance, providing strong evidence that the neural tissue recruited by training supported the newly acquired reading skill. These results indicate that the left lateralization of the orthographic processing is not restricted to stimuli with particular visual-perceptual features. Instead, lateralization may occur because the anatomical projections in the vicinity of the VWFA provide a unique interconnection between the visual system and left-lateralized language areas involved in the representation of speech. PMID:24168219</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moore, Michelle W; Durisko, Corrine; Perfetti, Charles A; Fiez, Julie A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">127</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFM.S43A1056H"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Dynamics: Effect of Small Size Strength Heterogeneity on Earthquake Size, Slip Distribution and <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Velocity.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Geological data and kinematic inversions of seismological data show that the overall shapes of slip profile along strike present long linear slopes (Manighetti et al., J. Geophys. R, 2005). <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> dynamics of a homogeneous friction properties fault do not lead to such slip distribution. We tried to retrieve this feature using a direct modelling of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, performing 3D simulations with spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiation, dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation, and finally, self <span class="hlt">rupture</span> arrest (without a priori knowledge of the final size of the event). This last characteristic was obtained by imposing fault resistance to be infinite on some randomly sized and localized small patches. We found that small size heterogeneities, which cannot be identified by kinematic inversions using low frequency signal and hence only describing large-scale properties of earthquakes, might have a great influence on the characteristics of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: -For statistically identical random realizations of barrier distribution, we obtain a great variability of event size, with a majority of small events and a few realizations leading to the entire fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. -The arrest of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> by the distributed barrier leads, in general, final slip distribution to decay almost linearly from the zone of maximum slip. -Whereas, on an homogeneous model, one could observe a jump from subshear to supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation velocity, with small barriers but the same slip-weakening law parameters (stress drop, strength excess & Dc), the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can keep propagating at subshear velocities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hok, S.; Campillo, M.; Cotton, F.; Manighetti, I.; Favreau, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">128</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70137547"> <span id="translatedtitle">Metrics for comparing dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Earthquakes are complex events that involve a myriad of interactions among multiple geologic features and processes. One of the tools that is available to assist with their study is computer simulation, particularly dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulation. A dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulation is a numerical model of the physical processes that occur during an earthquake. Starting with the fault geometry, friction constitutive law, initial stress conditions, and assumptions about the condition and response of the near?fault rocks, a dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulation calculates the evolution of fault slip and stress over time as part of the elastodynamic numerical solution (? see the simulation description in the electronic supplement to this article). The complexity of the computations in a dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulation make it challenging to verify that the computer code is operating as intended, because there are no exact analytic solutions against which these codes’ results can be directly compared. One approach for checking if dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> computer codes are working satisfactorily is to compare each code’s results with the results of other dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> codes running the same earthquake simulation benchmark. To perform such a comparison consistently, it is necessary to have quantitative metrics. In this paper, we present a new method for quantitatively comparing the results of dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> computer simulation codes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barall, Michael; Harris, Ruth A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">129</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24730200"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Treatment of anterior cruciate ligament <span class="hlt">rupture</span>].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anterior cruciate ligament <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the knee is a common knee injury associated with sports and exercise. The injury typically arises when the foot is tightly locked against the floor or ground, whereby a sudden change of direction combined with the slowed motion causes a rotary motion of the upper part of the tibia and a force <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> the cruciate ligament. Approximately 30% of the injuries take place during a situation of direct contact. The instability of the knee due to the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may be strongly invalidizing. In such case surgical therapy is required, if appropriate conservative treatment does not lead to a good result. PMID:24730200</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Suomalainen, Piia; Sillanpää, Petri; Järvelä, Timo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">130</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=stress+AND+resistance+AND+resource&id=EJ826517"> <span id="translatedtitle">Describing Soils: Calibration Tool for Teaching Soil <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Resistance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> resistance is a measure of the strength of a soil to withstand an applied stress or resist deformation. In soil survey, during routine soil descriptions, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> resistance is described for each horizon or layer in the soil profile. The lower portion of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> resistance classes are assigned based on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> between thumb and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Seybold, C. A.; Harms, D. S.; Grossman, R. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">131</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3604295"> <span id="translatedtitle">Plantaris <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: why is it important?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Plantaris muscle is accessory plantar flexor of calf, a vestigial muscle of triceps surae complex. Its importance lies in the fact that its <span class="hlt">rupture</span> cans mimic deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Sometimes when there is <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of Achilles tendon, intact plantaris can still cause plantar flexion at ankle presenting a confusing picture. We present one such case of plantaris <span class="hlt">rupture</span> confused by radiology resident with DVT. A 51-year-old man had a feeling as if kicked in back of calf along with a snapping sound and severe pain while playing tennis. On seeing fluid between muscle plane and a hypoechoic structure radiology resident labelled it DVT. MRI suggested <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> plantaris as fluid and muscle stump were seen between gastronemius and soleus. Patient was treated conservatively with rest, ice compression and elevated leg and showed significant reduction in pain and swelling. PMID:23345486</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rohilla, Seema; Jain, Nitin; Yadav, Rohtas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">132</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/343749"> <span id="translatedtitle">Renal allograft <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with iliofemoral thrombophlebitis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a renal allograft in the early posttransplant period is associated with tachycardia, hypotension, oliguria, swelling, pain, a falling hematocrit level, and tenderness at the transplant site. Occasionally, the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> allograft can be saved by control of the hemorrhage. Deep vein thrombophlebitis, a common occurrence after prolonged surgery and cortocosteroid therapy, is less common in renal allograft transplantation, but may be associated with renal vein thrombosis. The simultaneous occurrence of deep vein thrombophlebitis, renal vein thrombosis, and allograft <span class="hlt">rupture</span> contraindicates anticoagulent therapy. We present a patient in whom ipsilateral deep vein thrombophlebitis developed eight days after a cadaveric renal allograft, followed in two days by hypotension, a falling hematocrit level, oliguria, and a painfall mass at the allograft site. Surgical exploration revealed a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> allograft with iliofemoral and renal vein thrombosis and profuse hemorrhage. A transplant nephrectomy was performed. PMID:343749</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Goldman, M H; Leapman, S B; Handy, R D; Best, D W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">133</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21091032"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute Iliac Artery <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: Endovascular Treatment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The authors present 7 patients who suffered iliac artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span> over a 2 year period. In 5 patients, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was iatrogenic: 4 cases were secondary to balloon angioplasty for iliac artery stenosis and 1 occurred during coronary angioplasty. In the last 2 patients, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was secondary to iliac artery mycotic aneurysm. Direct placement of a stent-graft was performed in all cases, which was dilated until extravasation was controlled. Placement of the stent-graft was successful in all the cases, without any complications. The techniques used, results, and mid-term follow-up are presented. In conclusion, endovascular placement of a stent-graft is a quick, minimally invasive, efficient, and safe method for emergency treatment of acute iliac artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, with satisfactory short- and mid-term results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chatziioannou, A.; Mourikis, D.; Katsimilis, J.; Skiadas, V., E-mail: bill_skiadas@yahoo.gr; Koutoulidis, V.; Katsenis, K.; Vlahos, L. [University of Athens, Radiology Department, Areteion Hospital (Greece)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-04-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">134</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.1177P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Finite <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Process of Izmit (turkey) Earthquake</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of the Izmit (Turkey) earthquake of 17 August 1999 (Mw=7.6), have been analysed using the wave form of P and S waves and the directivity function of Rayleigh waves recorded at teleseismic distances. The source model is a unilateral rectangular fault of finite dimensions (Haskell model). Initial values of orientation and sense <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, fault length and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity have been obtained from first motion of P wave and directivity function of Rayleigh waves. Depth and focal mechanism have been obtained from wave form of P and SH waves using a finite dimension source. The obtained solution is a strike slip mechanism with fault orientation : strike 270z, dip 80z and rake -180z, focal depth 10 km, fault length 120 km, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity 3 km/s and seismic moment 1.66 x 10^20 Nm. This solution agrees with the North Anatolia Fault tectonics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pro, C.; Buforn, E.; Udias, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">135</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/34631161"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cognitive Frames in Psychology: Demarcations and <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">As there seems to be a recurrent feeling of crisis in psychology, its present state is analyzed in this article. The author\\u000a believes that in addition to the traditional manifestations that have dogged psychology since it emerged as an independent\\u000a science some new features of the crisis have emerged. Three fundamental “<span class="hlt">ruptures</span>” are identified: the “horizontal” <span class="hlt">rupture</span>\\u000a between various schools</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andrey V. Yurevich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">136</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25207903"> <span id="translatedtitle">Using the Snare System to Cross the Acute-Angled <span class="hlt">Vertebrobasilar</span> Junction in Treating Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Aneurysm with the Stent-Assisted Method via a Retrograde Approach. A Technical Note.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Retrograde stenting via the contralateral vertebral artery (VA) is a safe and effective treatment for posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysm. Many methods, including tip shaping and the looping technique, have been attempted as ways to cross the <span class="hlt">vertebrobasilar</span> (VB) junction. Here, we introduce an alternative method using a Snare system to overcome the acute-angled VB junction after repeated failures using other techniques. The Snare system was navigated to the proximal basilar artery via the ipsilateral VA. A guidewire was introduced in the contralateral VA and gently advanced to the basilar artery in order to pass through the loop of the Snare system. Following this, the Snare system caught the guidewire and it was very carefully pulled down to the ipsilateral VA crossing the VB junction. We suggest this technique as a method to cross the acute-angled VB junction after failure of all other attempts to overcome this challenge. PMID:25207903</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shin, Hee Sup; Ryu, Chang-Woo; Koh, Jun Seok; Lee, Seung Hwan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">137</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54034681"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Paths in Kappa-Maps: Quantitative Insights on Heterogeneous Earthquake <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> From Energy Arguments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a notoriously complex process, at all observable scales. Although heterogeneities of strength and initial stress contribute to this <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complexity, a systematic approach to quantify their effect has not yet been attempted. For instance, little is known about the relation between the final size of an earthquake and the statistical properties of initial strength excess fields. Canonical</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Ampuero; J. Ripperger; M. Mai</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">138</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24128572"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of the monosaccharide composition of water-soluble polysaccharides from Sargassum <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> by high performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sargassum <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> (hijiki) is the well-known edible algae, whose polysaccharides have been proved to possess interesting bioactivities like antitumor, antioxidant, antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. A facile and sensitive method based on high-performance liquid chromatography method of pre-column derivatization with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) coupled with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS) has been established for the analysis of the monosaccharide composition of polysaccharides in S. <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span>. Monosaccharides have been converted into PMP-labelled derivatives with aqueous ammonia as a catalyst at 70 °C for 30 min. The optimisation of the pre-column derivatization process was studied. The LODs of the monosaccharides were in the range from 0.01 to 0.02 nmol. PMP-labelled mixture of monosaccharides has been well separated by a reverse-phase HPLC and detected by on-line ESI-MS method under optimised conditions. The mobile phase of elution system was chosen as acetonitrile (solvent A) and 20mM aqueous ammonium acetate (solvent B) (pH 3.0) with Zorbax XDB-C18 column at 30 °C for the separation of the monosaccharide derivatives. Identification of the monosaccharides composition was carried out by analysis with mass spectral behaviour and chromatography characteristics of 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) labelled monosaccharides. All PMP-labelled derivatives display high chemical stabilities, whose regular MS fragmentation is specific for reducing labelled sugars. The result showed that the S. <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> polysaccharide consisted of mannose, glucose, galactose, xylose, fucose and glucuronic acid or galacturonic acid, or both uronic acids. PMID:24128572</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wu, Xiaodan; Jiang, Wei; Lu, Jiajia; Yu, Ying; Wu, Bin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">139</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3510519"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of echinococcal cysts: diagnosis, classification, and clinical implications.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The authors classify <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of echinococcal cysts into three types: contained, communicating, and direct. Contained <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs when only the parasitic endocyst <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> and the cyst contents are confined within the host-derived pericyst. When cyst contents escape via biliary or bronchial radicles that are incorporated in the pericyst, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is communicating. Direct <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs when both the endocyst and the pericyst tear, spilling cyst contents directly into the peritoneal or pleural cavities or occasionally into other structures. Communicating and direct forms have more serious clinical implications than contained <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, but even contained <span class="hlt">rupture</span> should have prompt surgical attention to prevent it from developing into one of the other forms. Untreated communicating <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a liver cyst can lead to obstruction of the biliary system with a 50% mortality rate. Direct <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may cause anaphylaxis, and it should be managed surgically, possibly with adjunctive treatment with antihelminthic drugs to decrease the possibility of metastatic hydatosis. PMID:3510519</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lewall, D B; McCorkell, S J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">140</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10818980"> <span id="translatedtitle">Partial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the distal biceps tendon.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Partial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the distal biceps tendon is a relatively rare event, and various degrees of partial tendon tears have been reported. In the current study four patients with partial atraumatic distal biceps tendon tears (mean age, 59 years; range, 40-82 years) are reported. In all four patients, a common clinical pattern emerged. Pain at the insertion of the distal biceps tendon in the radius unrelated to any traumatic event was the main symptom. In all patients the diagnosis was based on magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography imaging. In three of four patients the partial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the tendon caused a significant bursalike lesion. The typical appearance was a partially <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> biceps tendon, with contrast enhancement signaling the degree of degeneration, tenosynovitis, and soft tissue swelling extending along the tendon semicircular to the proximal radius. In three patients, conservative treatment was successful. Only one patient needed surgery, with reinsertion of the tendon resulting in total functional recovery. PMID:10818980</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dürr, H R; Stäbler, A; Pfahler, M; Matzko, M; Refior, H J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">141</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18090814"> <span id="translatedtitle">The diagnosis of silicone breast implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magnetic resonance imaging of the breast in the diagnosis of silicone breast implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is widely accepted to be the imaging study of choice for most women. Magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of silicone implant failure has been shown to have the highest sensitivity and specificity and has the ability to image the entire implant without the use of ionizing radiation. Unfortunately, some women are unable to have a magnetic resonance imaging examination of the breast because of contraindications such as cardiac pacemakers, aneurysm clips, and claustrophobia. Therefore, mammography, ultrasonography, and computed tomography will have roles in the diagnosis of silicone breast implant <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. This article illustrates the spectrum of imaging appearances of normal silicone gel implants and the appearances of silicone breast implant <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. PMID:18090814</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gorczyca, David P; Gorczyca, Stephanie M; Gorczyca, Kathryn L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">142</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23622472"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acoustic levels of heavy truck tire <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Transportation vehicles, whether they are passenger vehicles or heavy trucks and transport vehicles, rely upon rubber tires to negotiate the roadways and surfaces on which they are driven. These tires have the potential of sudden <span class="hlt">rupture</span> resulting from various causes including but not limited to over-pressurization, sidewall failures, or punctures from roadway debris. These <span class="hlt">rupture</span> events can and do occur while the vehicles are stationary (e.g., during servicing) or are being driven, and often occur without notice. While the phenomenon of sudden tire failure has been documented for several decades, the potential bodily injury which can occur when an individual is in close proximity to such a sudden <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has only more recently been documented. Aside from anecdotal mention in case studies, there has been little quantitative information available on the acoustic levels during these failures. Our study provides measured acoustic levels as a function of distance for such catastrophic tire failures. PMID:23622472</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wood, Matthew; Woodruff, William</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5461408"> <span id="translatedtitle">Component external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequency estimates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to perform detailed internal flooding risk analyses of nuclear power plants, external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies are needed for various types of components - piping, valves, pumps, flanges, and others. However, there appears to be no up-to-date, comprehensive source for such frequency estimates. This report attempts to fill that void. Based on a comprehensive search of Licensee Event Reports (LERs) contained in Nuclear Power Experience (NPE), and estimates of component populations and exposure times, component external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies were generated. The remainder of this report covers the specifies of the NPE search for external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> events, analysis of the data, a comparison with frequency estimates from other sources, and a discussion of the results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eide, S.A.; Khericha, S.T.; Calley, M.B.; Johnson, D.A.; Marteeny, M.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6862348"> <span id="translatedtitle">Consequences of expansion joint bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Expansion joints are used in piping systems to accommodate pipe deflections during service and to facilitate fitup. Typically, the expansion joint bellows is the thinnest part of the pressure boundary, bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies are typically several orders of magnitude higher than pipe <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies. This paper reviews an effort to estimate the flow rates associated with bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The Level I PRA (probabilistic risk assessment) for the Savannah River Site production reactors made the bounding assumption that bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span> would produce the maximum possible leakage - that of a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB). This assumption resulted in predictions of flooding of the reactor building with a high conditional probability that a Loss of Pumping Accident and core melting would follow. This paper describes analyses that were performed to develop a realistic break area and leak rate resulting from bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and therefore reduce the impact that bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can have on the estimated total core melt frequency. In the event of a 360 degree circumferential break of the bellows the resulting two sections will separate to the point where the force from the internal pressure acting to push the bellows open is just balanced by the spring force of the bellows itself. For the bellows addressed in this analysis, the equilibrium separation distance is 0.7 inches with normal pump lineup. The opening area is influenced by any initial compression or extension due to installation alignment, and by any operational displacements such as thermal expansion of the adjoining pipe. The influence of such factors is considered and the impact on the flooding rate and, hence, core melt frequency is reviewed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daugherty, W.L.; Miller, R.F.; Cramer, D.S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10191106"> <span id="translatedtitle">Consequences of expansion joint bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Expansion joints are used in piping systems to accommodate pipe deflections during service and to facilitate fitup. Typically, the expansion joint bellows is the thinnest part of the pressure boundary, bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies are typically several orders of magnitude higher than pipe <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies. This paper reviews an effort to estimate the flow rates associated with bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The Level I PRA (probabilistic risk assessment) for the Savannah River Site production reactors made the bounding assumption that bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span> would produce the maximum possible leakage - that of a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB). This assumption resulted in predictions of flooding of the reactor building with a high conditional probability that a Loss of Pumping Accident and core melting would follow. This paper describes analyses that were performed to develop a realistic break area and leak rate resulting from bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and therefore reduce the impact that bellows <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can have on the estimated total core melt frequency. In the event of a 360 degree circumferential break of the bellows the resulting two sections will separate to the point where the force from the internal pressure acting to push the bellows open is just balanced by the spring force of the bellows itself. For the bellows addressed in this analysis, the equilibrium separation distance is 0.7 inches with normal pump lineup. The opening area is influenced by any initial compression or extension due to installation alignment, and by any operational displacements such as thermal expansion of the adjoining pipe. The influence of such factors is considered and the impact on the flooding rate and, hence, core melt frequency is reviewed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daugherty, W.L.; Miller, R.F.; Cramer, D.S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12038119"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Intrabiliary <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of hepatic hydatid cyst].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous hepatic hydatid cyst <span class="hlt">rupture</span> into the biliary tract is unusual. The authors describe a case of a 62-year-old man with a hepatic hydatid cyst, showing that it is possible to confirm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> into the biliary system with cholangiography-MRI. Surgical treatment remains the best form of management. Endoscopic management is a therapeutic possibility in all cases in which surgery is contraindicated. In the case observed endoscopic sphinctererotomy resolved the biliary obstruction, while the hydatid cyst was treated by transbiliary irrigation with scolicidal solutions and pharmacological therapy. The treatment permitted complete clinical resolution of the hepatic hydatosis. PMID:12038119</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cucinotta, Eugenio; Palmeri, Renato; Lazzara, Salvatore; Melita, Giuseppinella; Melita, Paolo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1797221"> <span id="translatedtitle">Delayed gallbladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following percutaneous cholecystostomy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Percutaneous cholecystostomy has become an accepted therapeutic alternative for high-risk patients with acute cholecystitis. However, some authors have cautioned that patients with gallbladder wall necrosis and gangrene may not be effectively treated by means of percutaneous drainage alone. A case is reported in which gallbladder wall necrosis progressed following technically successful percutaneous drainage. Spontaneous gallbladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> ensued, necessitating emergent cholecystectomy. Cholecystography 2 weeks following tube placement and 1 week prior to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> showed a markedly abnormal, irregular gallbladder lumen. The authors suggest that follow-up cholecystography may be a useful tool for evaluating patient response to percutaneous cholecystostomy and for determining subsequent patient management. PMID:1797221</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">LaBerge, J M; Gordon, R L; Kerlan, R K; Ring, E J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3531040"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> rudimentary horn at 22 weeks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rudimentary horn is a developmental anomaly of the uterus. Pregnancy in a non-communicating rudimentary horn is very difficult to diagnose before it <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. A case of undiagnosed rudimentary horn pregnancy at 22 weeks presented to Nizwa regional referral hospital in shock with features of acute abdomen. Chances of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in first or second trimester are increased with catastrophic haemorrhage leading to increased maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Management of such cases is a challenge till today due to diagnostic dilemma. Expertise in ultrasonography and early resort to surgical management is life saving in such cases. PMID:23293421</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dhar, Hansa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25110594"> <span id="translatedtitle">Myocardial <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> following Carbon Monoxide Poisoning.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the first case of severe cardiotoxicity of carbon monoxide leading to myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and fatal outcome. 83-year-old woman was hospitalized 4 hours after the fire in her house with no respiratory or cardiac symptoms. After two days, she has suffered sudden collapse leading to cardiac arrest. Postmortem examination revealed intramural haemorrhage with myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the apex of the left ventricle. Minimal stenosis was noted in the proximal coronary arteries with no evidence of distal occlusion or any other long-standing heart disease. This case supports recommendations for targeted cardiovascular investigations in cases of CO poisoning. PMID:25110594</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dragelyt?, Gabija; Plenta, J?ris; Chmieliauskas, Sigitas; Jasulaitis, Algimantas; Raudys, Romas; Jovaiša, Tomas; Badaras, Robertas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4119647"> <span id="translatedtitle">Myocardial <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> following Carbon Monoxide Poisoning</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the first case of severe cardiotoxicity of carbon monoxide leading to myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and fatal outcome. 83-year-old woman was hospitalized 4 hours after the fire in her house with no respiratory or cardiac symptoms. After two days, she has suffered sudden collapse leading to cardiac arrest. Postmortem examination revealed intramural haemorrhage with myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the apex of the left ventricle. Minimal stenosis was noted in the proximal coronary arteries with no evidence of distal occlusion or any other long-standing heart disease. This case supports recommendations for targeted cardiovascular investigations in cases of CO poisoning. PMID:25110594</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dragelyt?, Gabija; Plenta, J?ris; Chmieliauskas, Sigitas; Jasulaitis, Algimantas; Raudys, Romas; Jovaiša, Tomas; Badaras, Robertas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..1110153B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> tracking with different seismological methods</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spatial length, time duration, and direction of an earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are important parameters for an early warning of a potential tsunami. With different seismological methods namely polarization analysis of incoming compressional waves (P-waves), directivity effect, and wavelet transform these parameters are tried to estimate from recordings of broadband three-component-seismometers. One important requirement for a successful tsunami warning is a very fast (real time) investigation of seismograms. For some of the methods a dense station network and especially a wide backazimuthal distribution is necessary. The latter is a premise for the investigation of the directivity effect of an earthquake (in the literature this effect is often compared with a kind of doppler-effect). We show for some earthquakes e.g. Sichuan of May 2008, great Andaman of December 2004, and Pakistan of October 2005, that with a simple integration of regional and teleseismic recordings and subsequently plotting them sorted by the azimuth, stations can easily splitted into stations, from which the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> went away and stations, which lie in the direction of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. With this investigation, the question of the direction of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can quickly be answered.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bayer, B.; Yuan, X.; Saul, J.; Kind, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JChPh.141p4907G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Star polymers <span class="hlt">rupture</span> induced by constant forces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this work, we study the breakage process of an unknotted three-arm star-shaped polymer when it is pulled from its free ends by a constant force. The star polymer configuration is described through an array of monomers coupled by anharmonic bonds, while the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process is tracked in three-dimensional space by means of Langevin Molecular Dynamics simulations. The interaction between monomers is described by a Morse potential, while a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson energetic contribution accounts for the excluded volume interaction. We explore the effect of the molecular architecture on the distributions of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> times over a broad interval of pulling forces and star configurations. It was found that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time distribution of the individual star arms is strongly affected by the star configuration imposed by the pulling forces and the length of the arms. We also observed that for large pulling forces the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time distributions resemble the dominant features observed for linear polymer chains. The model introduced here provides the basic ingredients to describe the effects of tensile forces on stress-induced degradation of branched macromolecules and polymer networks.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">García, N. A.; Febbo, M.; Vega, D. A.; Milchev, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1030718"> <span id="translatedtitle">D-Zero Cryostat Supplemental <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Disc</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The common relief and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> disc vent line requires a double disc assembly with vented interspace for accurate disc burst pressures. The first disc must take pump and purge vacuum loading, but be set to operate at 110% of the MAWP, 18.3 psig (ASME code). The available solution is 18.3 psig with a burst tolerance of +/- psig. The interspace should be locally vented by a flow limiting vent valve to decouple the vent line backpressure from the vessel <span class="hlt">rupture</span> disc. The second disc must take the worst case vent line backpressure, the steady state value found in D-Zero engineering note 3740.000-EN-63 with all three cryostats simultaneously venting at the fire condition into the 4-inch x 6-inch and 6-inch x 8-inch sections. This value is less than 2 psid. The maximum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> value for the second disc must be less than the minimum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> value for the first disc less 2 psid i.e. < 16.3.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mulholland, G.T.; /Fermilab</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-08-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26599285"> <span id="translatedtitle">Steam generator tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (SGTR) scenarios</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The steam generator tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (SGTR) scenarios project was carried out in the EU 5th framework programme in the field of nuclear safety during years 2000–2002. The first objective of the project was to generate a comprehensive database on fission product retention in a steam generator. The second objective was to verify and develop predictive models to support accident management</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Auvinen; J. K. Jokiniemi; A. Lähde; T. Routamo; P. Lundström; H. Tuomisto; J. Dienstbier; S. Güntay; D. Suckow; A. Dehbi; M. Slootman; L. Herranz; V. Peyres; J. Polo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2568237"> <span id="translatedtitle">Occult uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: role of ultrasonography.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article presents a case of occult spontaneous uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complicated by pelvic infection and peritonitis in the postpartum period. Ultrasonography played a primary role in the diagnosis of this complication and clearly demonstrated the uterine wall defect. This finding was confirmed later by computed tomography and by surgery. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9640909</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cadet, J. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.data.scec.org/Module/s1act03.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">What Is an Earthquake?: <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this activity, the learner will watch three animations based on actual data from fault <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> from the two largest Southern California earthquakes in the 1990s: Landers (1992) and Northridge (1994). In Section 3, the learner will discover more about how such data is collected and analyzed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/09_28_2010_otk7Nay4LH_09_28_2010_1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surface <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in Northwest Saudi Arabia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wendy McCausland of the USGS Volcano Disaster Assistance Program and Hani Zahran of the Saudi Geological Survey view the southern end of the surface fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> caused by a M5.4 earthquake in the Saudi Arabian desert on May 19, 2009. The ground displacements in the soft sediments of the foreground...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29864197"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the membranes and postpartum infection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The greatest risk of preterm prelabour <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes (PPROM) is preterm delivery. According to the Perinatal Information System of Slovenia there were 5.92% preterm deliveries in 1994. We studied 809 deliveries of less than 34 weeks of gestation in the Ljubljana Maternity, from 1992 to 1994; 33.7% of these started with PPROM. Risk factors for PPROM were conization, cerclage</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marjan Pajntar; Ivan Verdenik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23889586"> <span id="translatedtitle">Endovascular repair of iatrogenic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has been used for traumatic and acute spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the descending thoracic aorta with good results. We present the case of a 40-year-old male whose thoracic spinal prosthesis eroded through the descending thoracic aorta; the aortic disruption was successfully managed with emergent deployment of an endovascular stent. PMID:23889586</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lo, Casey; Galvin, Sean D; Barnett, Stephen; Seevanayagam, Siven</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2728191"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical Management of Spontaneous <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Hepatocellular Adenoma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">AIMS Spontaneous <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> hepatocellular adenoma (SRHA) is a rare life-threatening condition that may require surgical treatment to control hemorrhaging and also stabilize the patient. We report a series of emergency surgeries performed at our institution for this condition. METHODS We reviewed medical records and radiology files of 28 patients (from 1989 to 2006) with a proven diagnosis of hepatocellular adenoma (HA). Three (10.7%) of 28 patients had spontaneous <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> hepatocellular adenoma, two of which were associated with intrahepatic hemorrhage while one had intraperitoneal bleeding. Two patients were female and one was male. Both female patients had a background history of oral contraceptive use. Sudden abdominal pain associated with hemodynamic instability occurred in all patients who suffered from spontaneous <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> hepatocellular adenoma. The mean age was 41.6 years old. The preoperative assessment included liver function tests, ultrasonography and computed tomography. RESULTS The surgical approaches were as follows: right hemihepatectomy for controlling intraperitoneal bleeding, and right extended hepatectomy and non-anatomic resection of the liver for intrahepatic hemorrhage. There were no deaths, and the postoperative complications were bile leakage and wound infection (re-operation), as well as intraperitoneal abscess (re-operation) and pleural effusion. CONCLUSION Spontaneous <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> hepatocellular adenoma may be treated by surgery for controlling hemorrhages and stabilizing the patient, and the decision to operate depends upon both the patient’s condition and the expertise of the surgical team. PMID:19690662</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ribeiro Junior, Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle; Chaib, Eleazar; Saad, William Abrão; D’Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; Cecconello, Ivan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51328197"> <span id="translatedtitle">Supershear <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Transition on Fault Stepovers using Different Friction Parameterizations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is well known that fault stepovers can under some circumstances allow through-going <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, and under other circumstances cause <span class="hlt">rupture</span> termination (e.g., Harris and Day 1993; Kase and Kuge, 1998; Duan and Oglesby, 2006). However, the effect of the stepover on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity has not been investigated, and there has also not been an investigation of how different frictional parameterizations</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. J. Ryan; D. D. Oglesby</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4268758"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> rectal duplication with urogenital abnormality: Unusual presentation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rectal duplication (RD) accounts for 5% of alimentary tract duplication. A varied presentation and associated anomalies have been described in the literature. Antenatal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the RD is very rare. We present an unusual case of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> RD associated with urogenital abnormalities in newborn male. We are discussing diagnosis, embryology, management and literature review of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> RD. PMID:25552833</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M Narendra; Jadhav, Vinay; Shankar, Gowri; Santhanakrishnan, Ramesh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24014791"> <span id="translatedtitle">Review article: Treatment for Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in athletes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Treatment for Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in athletes is controversial. Surgical fixation has lower rates of re-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> and confers increased strength and function, whereas conservative treatment has lower risks of wound complications. We review the literature on the optimal treatment for Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in athletes. PMID:24014791</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stavrou, Maria; Seraphim, Andreas; Al-Hadithy, Nawfal; Mordecai, Simon C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v077/i011/JB077i011p02087/JB077i011p02087.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Zones of Large South American Earthquakes and Some Predictions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study attempts to forecast likely locations for large shallow South American earthquakes in the near future by examining the past space-time pattern of occurrence of large (M _ 7.7) earthquakes, the lateral extent of their <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zones, and, where possible, the direction of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> zones of large shallow earthquakes generally abut and do not overlap. Patterns of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John A. Kelleher</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.seismo.ethz.ch/staff/martin/papers/AGUMonograph_Ampueroetal.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Properties of Dynamic Earthquake <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> With Heterogeneous Stress Drop</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a notoriously complex process, at all observable scales. We introduce a simplified semi-dynamic crack model to investigate the connec - tion between the statistical properties of stress and those of macroscopic source parameters such as <span class="hlt">rupture</span> size, seismic moment, apparent stress drop and radiated energy. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> initiation is treated consistently with nucleation on a linear slip- weakening</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J.-P. Ampuero; J. Ripperger</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54619313"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> process of the great 1963 Kurile Islands earthquake sequence: Asperity interaction and multiple event <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The great Kurile Islands underthrusting earthquake (Mw=8.5) of October 13, 1963, was accompanied by a large foreshock and an aftershock. This sequence allows us to investigate the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process and faul heterogeneities along a subduction zone. We have characterized the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of the main shock event by deconvolving long-period P wave seismograms from azimuthally well-distributed stations to obtain source</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Susan L. Beck; Larry J. Ruff</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40448597"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> terminations and size of segment boundaries from historical earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in the Basin and Range Province</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The fault-segmentation method is commonly used to estimate the potential earthquake size. Segment boundaries play an important role in arresting earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> from event to event. In the Basin and Range Province, earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> terminations are commonly associated with structural discontinuities, but not all-structural discontinuities have the capability to terminate an earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The size of structural discontinuities with respect</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peizhen Zhang; Fengying Mao; D. B. Slemmons</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.princeton.edu/~napl/pdf/Kaiser_etal2014.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Whole person-evoked fMRI activity patterns in human <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus are accurately modeled by a linear combination of face-and body-evoked activity patterns</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">investigate a special case of the grouping of components into a whole: the composition of the human bodyWhole person-evoked fMRI activity patterns in human <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus are accurately modeled by a linear combination of face- and body-evoked activity patterns Daniel Kaiser,1 * Lukas Strnad,1</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kastner, Sabine</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRB..119.3133H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> modulated by waves in damaged fault zones</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">are usually surrounded by damaged zones of lower elastic moduli and seismic wave velocities than their host rocks. If the interface between the damaged rocks and host rocks is sharp enough, earthquakes happening inside the fault zone generate reflected waves and head waves, which can interact with earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> and modulate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties such as <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed, slip rate, and rise time. We find through 2-D dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations the following: (1) Reflected waves can induce multiple slip pulses. The rise time of the primary pulse is controlled by fault zone properties, rather than by frictional properties. (2) Head waves can cause oscillations of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed and, in a certain range of fault zone widths, a permanent transition to supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with speeds that would be unstable in homogeneous media. (3) Large attenuation smears the slip rate function and delays the initial acceleration of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed but does not affect significantly the rise time or the period of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed oscillations. (4) Fault zones cause a rotation of the background stress field and can induce plastic deformations on both extensional and compressional sides of the fault. The plastic deformations are accumulated both inside and outside the fault zone, which indicates a correlation between fault zone development and repeating <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Spatially periodic patterns of plastic deformations are formed due to oscillating <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed, which may leave a permanent signature in the geological record. Our results indicate that damaged fault zones with sharp boundaries promote multiple slip pulses and supershear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Yihe; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Helmberger, Don V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25547556"> <span id="translatedtitle">Early diagnosis and management of myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Left ventricular free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a catastrophic mechanical complication of myocardial infarction. We present an 82-year-old woman with an anterolateral ST segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with thrombolysis. Because of unexplained hypotension, echocardiography was performed and contrast (Definity; Lantheus Medical Imaging) was used to improve visualization. Findings included a small- to moderate-sized circumferential pericardial effusion without frank tamponade, however, there was significant intramyocardial tracking of the contrast into the epicardial space, localized to the mid to apical portion of the anterior septum, consistent with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> or disruption of the wall segment. The patient was promptly taken to the operating room where fresh blood and clots were evacuated from the pericardial space with immediate hemodynamic improvement. The patient underwent successful surgical repair. PMID:25547556</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Shuangbo; Glavinovic, Tamara; Tam, James W</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23109311"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical treatment of gastrocnemius muscle <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the medial head of the gastrocnemius, known as "tennis leg", typically occurs when the muscle has been overstretched by dorsiflexion of the ankle with full knee extension. The classic clinical presentation is a middle-aged person who complains of sports-related acute pain in the mid portion of the calf, associated with a snapping sensation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound is often required to evaluate patients with this condition. This injury is usually managed non-operatively, surgical treatment rarely being indicated according to published reports. One case of longstanding and one of recent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the musculotendinous junction of the medial head of the gastrocnemius that were successfully treated by surgical repair are presented here and the MRI characteristics and indications for surgery are discussed. PMID:23109311</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cheng, Yu; Yang, Hui-lin; Sun, Zhi-yong; Ni, Li; Zhang, Hong-tao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4091436"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in Plasmodium vivax malaria</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Malaria can present with various clinical symptoms and complications. While a tertian malaria form that is especially prevalent in Korea is characterized by mild clinical progression, occasional splenic complications are known to occur. A 26-year-old Korean male soldier without prior medical history visited The Armed Forces Capital Hospital with left upper quadrant abdominal pain one day ago. Hemostasis under laparoscopic approach was attempted. The operation was converted into laparotomy due to friable splenic tissue and consequently poor hemostasis. Splenectomy was performed. The patient was discharged at postoperative day 17 without complication. While numerous diseases can result in splenic complications, such as splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, malarial infection is known as the most common cause. The incidence of malarial infection in Korea is increasing annually, and there are occasional reports of splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> due to the infection, which requires attention. PMID:25025027</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Kwang Min; Bae, Byung Koo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860005910&hterms=Internal+Combustion+Engine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3D%2528%2528Internal%2BCombustion%2529%2BEngine%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of Stirling engine materials</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The automotive Stirling engine, being investigated jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternate to the internal combustion engine, uses high-pressure hydrogen as the working fluid. The long-term effects of hydrogen on the high temperature strength properties of materials is relatively unknown. This is especially true for the newly developed low-cost iron base alloy NASAUT 4G-A1. This iron-base alloy when tested in air has creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> strengths in the directionally solidified condition comparable to the cobalt base alloy HS-31. The equiaxed (investment cast) NASAUT 4G-A1 has superior creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> to the equiaxed iron-base alloy XF-818 both in air and 15 MPa hydrogen.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Titran, R. H.; Scheuerman, C. M.; Stephens, J. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25507721"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Simultaneous determination of ten phytohormones in five parts of Sargasum <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> (Hary.) Seichell by high performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A method for the simultaneous determination of indole-3-acetic acid, N6-(2-isopentenyl) adenosine, N6-(2-isopentenyl) adenine, trans-zeatin riboside, zeatin, strigolactone, abscisic acid, salicylic acid, gibberellin A3 and jasmonic acid in five different parts of main branch, lateral branch, primary leaf, secondary leaf and stem of Sargasum <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> (Hary.) Seichell was established by high performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (HPLC-TQMS). The samples were extracted with methanol/water/formic acid (15 : 4 :1, v/v/v) (containing 0.5% 2, 6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol, BHT) after vacuum freeze-drying. The separation was performed on a Hypersil Gold C18 column by using methanol and water as mobile phases with gradient elution. The analytes were detected by tandem mass spectrometry in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The electrospray ionization (ESI) source was used for the quantitative analysis in the positive mode or negative mode. Under the optimized conditions, the correlation coefficients (r) of the ten phytohormones were from 0. 9989 to 1. 0000 in the linear ranges. The detection limits of the ten phytohormones were 0. 001 2-4. 651 2 ?/L. The average recoveries were 72. 24% -91. 31% with the relative standard deviations not more than 6. 59%. In the five parts of fresh Sargasum <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> (Hary.) Seichell samples, the contents of the ten phytohormones were from not detected to 4 041. 431 ng/g. This method has good sensitivity, precision, recovery, and can be used to simultaneously determine the phytohormones. PMID:25507721</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Yan; Xu, Jilin; Zheng, Liyang; Li, Min; Yan, Xiaojun; Luo, Qijun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25434123"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Simultaneous determination of ten phytohormones in five parts of Sargasum <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> (Hary.) Seichell by high performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A method for the simultaneous determination of indole-3-acetic acid, N6-(2-isopentenyl) adenosine, N6-(2-isopentenyl) adenine, trans-zeatin riboside, zeatin, strigolactone, abscisic acid, salicylic acid, gibberellin A3 and jasmonic acid in five different parts of main branch, lateral branch, primary leaf, secondary leaf and stem of Sargasum <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> (Hary.) Seichell was established by high performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (HPLC-TQMS). The samples were extracted with methanol/water/formic acid (15 : 4 :1, v/v/v) (containing 0.5% 2, 6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol, BHT) after vacuum freeze-drying. The separation was performed on a Hypersil Gold C18 column by using methanol and water as mobile phases with gradient elution. The analytes were detected by tandem mass spectrometry in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The electrospray ionization (ESI) source was used for the quantitative analysis in the positive mode or negative mode. Under the optimized conditions, the correlation coefficients (r) of the ten phytohormones were from 0. 9989 to 1. 0000 in the linear ranges. The detection limits of the ten phytohormones were 0. 001 2-4. 651 2 ?/L. The average recoveries were 72. 24% -91. 31% with the relative standard deviations not more than 6. 59%. In the five parts of fresh Sargasum <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> (Hary.) Seichell samples, the contents of the ten phytohormones were from not detected to 4 041. 431 ng/g. This method has good sensitivity, precision, recovery, and can be used to simultaneously determine the phytohormones. PMID:25434123</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Yan; Xu, Jilin; Zheng, Liyang; Li, Min; Yan, Xiaojun; Luo, Qijun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28941058"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical treatment of partial Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fifty-four patients with a total of 58 partial <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the Achilles tendon were treated surgically. The postoperative observation time ranged from 8 months to 7 years. Forty-six patients indicated that they were pleased with the results, 8 were satisfied, and 3 were unsatisfied (one died during the interim). Thirty-seven of the 44 patients who had been engaged in competitive</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tor Finn Denstad; Asbjørn Roaas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900000179&hterms=burnout&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dburnout"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wrapped Wire Detects <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Of Pressure Vessel</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Simple, inexpensive technique helps protect against damage caused by continuing operation of equipment after <span class="hlt">rupture</span> or burnout of pressure vessel. Wire wrapped over area on outside of vessel where breakthrough most likely. If wall breaks or burns, so does wire. Current passing through wire ceases, triggering cutoff mechanism stopping flow in vessel to prevent further damage. Applied in other situations in which pipes or vessels fail due to overpressure, overheating, or corrosion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hunt, James B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3951965"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Repetition of Large-Earthquake <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This survey of well-documented repeated fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> confirms that some faults have exhibited a ``characteristic'' behavior during repeated large earthquakes--that is, the magnitude, distribution, and style of slip on the fault has repeated during two or more consecutive events. In two cases faults exhibit slip functions that vary little from earthquake to earthquake. In one other well-documented case, however, fault</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kerry Sieh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70026606"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> models with dynamically determined breakdown displacement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The critical breakdown displacement, Dc, in which friction drops to its sliding value, can be made dependent on event size by specifying friction to be a function of variables other than slip. Two such friction laws are examined here. The first is designed to achieve accuracy and smoothness in discrete numerical calculations. Consistent resolution throughout an evolving <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is achieved by specifying friction as a function of elapsed time after peak stress is reached. Such a time-weakening model produces Dc and fracture energy proportional to the square root of distance <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has propagated in the case of uniform stress drop. The second friction law is more physically motivated. Energy loss in a damage zone outside the slip zone has the effect of increasing Dc and limiting peak slip velocity (Andrews, 1976). This article demonstrates a converse effect, that artificially limiting slip velocity on a fault in an elastic medium has a toughening effect, increasing fracture energy and Dc proportionally to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation distance in the case of uniform stress drop. Both the time-weakening and the velocity-toughening models can be used in calculations with heterogeneous stress drop.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andrews, D.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JBO....14c4007S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamics of retinal photocoagulation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In laser retinal photocoagulation, short (<20 ms) pulses have been found to reduce thermal damage to the inner retina, decrease treatment time, and minimize pain. However, the safe therapeutic window (defined as the ratio of power for producing a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to that of mild coagulation) decreases with shorter exposures. To quantify the extent of retinal heating and maximize the therapeutic window, a computational model of millisecond retinal photocoagulation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was developed. Optical attenuation of 532-nm laser light in ocular tissues was measured, including retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) pigmentation and cell-size variability. Threshold powers for vaporization and RPE damage were measured with pulse durations ranging from 1 to 200 ms. A finite element model of retinal heating inferred that vaporization (<span class="hlt">rupture</span>) takes place at 180-190°C. RPE damage was accurately described by the Arrhenius model with activation energy of 340 kJ/mol. Computed photocoagulation lesion width increased logarithmically with pulse duration, in agreement with histological findings. The model will allow for the optimization of beam parameters to increase the width of the therapeutic window for short exposures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Huie, Phil; Brown, Jefferson; Palanker, Daniel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JInst...7C2002E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Single Event Gate <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in EMCCD technology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The high electric fields (typically 3 MV/cm2 interpoly field) utilised in Electron Multiplying Charged Coupled Devices (EMCCDs) reveal a potential vulnerability from Single Event Phenomena (SEP), in particular Single Event Gate <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> (SEGR). SEGR is where a conduction path between two conductive areas of the CCD is produced, causing device failure. If EMCCDs are to be used for space applications the susceptibility to these events needs to be explored. A positive result from such an investigation can increase the technology readiness level of the device moving it another step closer to being used in space. Testing undertaken at the CYClotron of LOuvain la NEuve (CYCLONE), using the Heavy Ion Facility (HIF), conclusively showed EMCCD technology to have resilience to heavy ions that surpassed initial expectations. The simulations undertaken prior to experiment suggested gate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> would occur at 20-40 MeV cm2/mg, however Linear Energy Transfers (LETs) greater than 100 MeV cm2/mg proved to not cause a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> event. Within the radiation belts heavy ions with an LET greater than 60 MeV cm2/mg are not very common when compared to the fluxes used at the HIF. Possible reasons for this result are discussed in this work, leading to a conclusion that EMCCD technology is a secure choice for space flight.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evagora, A. M.; Murray, N. J.; Holland, A. D.; Burt, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20506939"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous reconstruction of quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after TKA and neglected Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report a case of simultaneous reconstruction of a quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and neglected Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, which occurred before TKA with an ipsilateral hamstring autograft. A 64-year-old woman presented with persistent right knee pain. She also had right heel pain and had received multiple steroid injections at the knee joint and heel. On examination, she showed osteoarthritis in the medial and lateral compartments of the knee joint and an Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the ipsilateral limb. There was skin dimpling and the proximal portion of tendon was migrated. We performed TKA, and the postoperative course was satisfactory. She returned 3 months postoperatively, however, with skin dimpling around the suprapatellar area and weakness of knee extension. Her ankle symptoms were also aggravated because she could not use the knee joint freely. We performed simultaneous reconstruction of the quadriceps tendon and the Achilles tendon using an ipsilateral hamstring autograft.Hamstring autograft offers a good alternative treatment option for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> repair, particularly with concommitant <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of multiple sites when primary repair is not possible or the viability of repaired tissue is poor. PMID:20506939</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, Yong Seuk; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Han, Kyeong-Jin; Cho, Jae Ho; Han, Seung Hwan; Lee, Doo-Hyung; Oh, Kyung Soo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21608792"> <span id="translatedtitle">Liver Hydatid Cyst with Transdiaphragmatic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> and Lung Hydatid Cyst <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> into Bronchi and Pleural Space</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of this case study is to present effectiveness of percutaneous drainage as a treatment option of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> lung and liver hydatid cysts. A 65-year-old male patient was admitted with complicated liver and lung hydatid cysts. A liver hydatid cyst had <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> transdiaphragmatically, and a lung hydatid cyst had <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> both into bronchi and pleural space. The patient could not undergo surgery because of decreased respiratory function. Both cysts were drained percutaneously using oral albendazole. Povidone-iodine was used to treat the liver cyst after closure of the diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The drainage was considered successful, and the patient had no recurrence of signs and symptoms. Clinical, laboratory, and radiologic recovery was observed during 2.5 months of catheterization. The patient was asymptomatic after catheter drainage. No recurrence was detected during 86 months of follow-up. For inoperable patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> liver and lung hydatid cysts, percutaneous drainage with oral albendazole is an alternative treatment option to surgery. The percutaneous approach can be life-saving in such cases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ar Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I bas, Bilgin Kadri, E-mail: bilginaribas@hotmail.com; Dingil, Guerbuez [A.Y. Ankara Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Koeroglu, Mert [Sueleyman Demirel University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Uenguel, Uemit; Zaral Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , Aliye Ceylan [A.Y. Ankara Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28964611"> <span id="translatedtitle">End-to-End Operative Repair of Achilles Tendon <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the long-term results of operative repair in 23 consecutive patients with Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, treated between 1984 and 1991, to evaluate our treat ment method and determine the clinical causes of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Fifty-four percent of <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occurred in peo ple in their 30s; 90% occurred during participation in acceleration-deceleration sports. All but three patients were treated within 1</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jeffery J. Soldatis; Donald B. Goodfellow; John H. Wilber</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23464778"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: case report and literature review.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous diaphragm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is extremely rare. Usually a diaphragm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is trauma induced. We describe a case of an 18-year old patient admitted 2 hours after onset, presenting severe epigastric and left sided chest pain without any trauma history. Upright chest x-ray revealed displaced stomach and colon into the left pleural cavity with a collapsed left lung. Surgery for a left-sided diaphragm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with stomach, spleen and colon splenic flexure herniation was undertaken. We present a brief review regarding the aetiology, diagnostic and treatment policy of spontaneous diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:23464778</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ghidirim, Gh; Mishin, I; Condratsky, E; Zastavnitsky, Gh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21276522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute and chronic Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in athletes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Achilles tendon is the most injured tendon of athletes in the lower extremities and is the most common tendon to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> spontaneously. Operative repair provides earlier return to sporting activities and lesser rate of rerupture. The general goal is to attempt anastomosis of the acute <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> ends; however, delayed <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> may require more extensive procedures. New surgical approaches, including percutaneous and mini-open techniques, are being introduced to potentially diminish perioperative complications. Advent of early protective range of motion and rehabilitation has shown a potential for earlier return to sporting activities for Achilles <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. PMID:21276522</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thompson, Jonathan; Baravarian, Bob</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.data.scec.org/Module/s1act02.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">What Is an Earthquake?: Fault-<span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Analogies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This activity has two parts: the first part will demonstrate the weaknesses of simple fault models (like block diagrams) in depicting the process of fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> accurately; and the second part is centered around a fairly simple animation of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation, seen by an oblique map view, that attempts to show more accurately what we should envision when we think about fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. This activity provides different analogies for describing the process of fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, with attention paid to the strengths and weaknesses of each.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54001169"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ground Motion Simulations of Scenario Earthquake <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> of the Hayward Fault</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We compute ground motions in the San Francisco Bay area for a suite of 35 magnitude 6.7--7.2 scenario earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> involving the Hayward fault. The suite of scenarios encompasses variability in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length, hypocenter, distribution of slip, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed, and rise time. The five <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lengths include the Hayward fault and portions thereof, as well as combined <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. Aagaard; R. Graves; S. Larsen; S. Ma; A. Rodgers; T. Brocher; R. Graymer; R. Harris; J. Lienkaemper; D. Ponce; D. Schwartz; R. Simpson; P. Spudich; D. Dreger; A. Petersson; J. Boatwright</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52626305"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fault length, multi-fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, and relations to earthquakes in California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fault length is used to estimate the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length of future earthquakes. However, fault length is often poorly defined, and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> often breaks beyond the mapped faults. Furthermore, multiple faults often <span class="hlt">rupture</span> together in a single earthquake. In this work I quantify how to use fault length to infer future <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length. I used observations of previous <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> breaking multiple</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Natanya Maureen Black</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3182099"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kinetics of Hole Nucleation in Biomembrane <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The core component of a biological membrane is a fluid-lipid bilayer held together by interfacial-hydrophobic and van der Waals interactions, which are balanced for the most part by acyl chain entropy confinement. If biomembranes are subjected to persistent tensions, an unstable (nanoscale) hole will emerge at some time to cause <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Because of the large energy required to create a hole, thermal activation appears to be requisite for initiating a hole and the activation energy is expected to depend significantly on mechanical tension. Although models exist for the kinetic process of hole nucleation in tense membranes, studies of membrane survival have failed to cover the ranges of tension and lifetime needed to critically examine nucleation theory. Hence, <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> giant (~20 ?m) membrane vesicles ultra-slowly to ultra-quickly with slow to fast ramps of tension, we demonstrate a method to directly quantify kinetic rates at which unstable holes form in fluid membranes, at the same time providing a range of kinetic rates from < 0.01 s?1 to > 100 s?1. Measuring lifetimes of many hundreds of vesicles, each tensed by precision control of micropipet suction, we have determined the rates of failure for vesicles made from several synthetic phospholipids plus 1:1 mixtures of phospho- and sphingo-lipids with cholesterol, all of which represent prominent constituents of eukaryotic cell membranes. Plotted on a logarithmic scale, the failure rates for vesicles are found to rise dramatically with increase of tension. Converting the experimental profiles of kinetic rates into changes of activation energy versus tension, we show that the results closely match expressions for thermal activation derived from a combination of meso-scale theory and molecular-scale simulations of hole formation. Moreover, we demonstrate a generic approach to transform analytical fits of activation energies obtained from <span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiments into energy landscapes characterizing the process hole nucleation along the reaction coordinate defined by hole size. PMID:21966242</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evans, Evan; Smith, Benjamin A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24902970"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mechanisms of plaque formation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atherosclerosis causes clinical disease through luminal narrowing or by precipitating thrombi that obstruct blood flow to the heart (coronary heart disease), brain (ischemic stroke), or lower extremities (peripheral vascular disease). The most common of these manifestations is coronary heart disease, including stable angina pectoris and the acute coronary syndromes. Atherosclerosis is a lipoprotein-driven disease that leads to plaque formation at specific sites of the arterial tree through intimal inflammation, necrosis, fibrosis, and calcification. After decades of indolent progression, such plaques may suddenly cause life-threatening coronary thrombosis presenting as an acute coronary syndrome. Most often, the culprit morphology is plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with exposure of highly thrombogenic, red cell-rich necrotic core material. The permissive structural requirement for this to occur is an extremely thin fibrous cap, and thus, <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occur mainly among lesions defined as thin-cap fibroatheromas. Also common are thrombi forming on lesions without <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (plaque erosion), most often on pathological intimal thickening or fibroatheromas. However, the mechanisms involved in plaque erosion remain largely unknown, although coronary spasm is suspected. The calcified nodule has been suggested as a rare cause of coronary thrombosis in highly calcified and tortious arteries in older individuals. To characterize the severity and prognosis of plaques, several terms are used. Plaque burden denotes the extent of disease, whereas plaque activity is an ambiguous term, which may refer to one of several processes that characterize progression. Plaque vulnerability describes the short-term risk of precipitating symptomatic thrombosis. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of atherosclerotic plaque initiation and progression; how plaques suddenly precipitate life-threatening thrombi; and the concepts of plaque burden, activity, and vulnerability. PMID:24902970</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bentzon, Jacob Fog; Otsuka, Fumiyuki; Virmani, Renu; Falk, Erling</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1615127E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Capturing Continental <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Processes in Afar</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Both continental and oceanic rifting processes are highly 3D, but the stability of the along-axis segmentation from rifting to breakup, and its relationship to seafloor spreading remains debated. Three-dimensional models of the interactions of faults and magmatism in time and space are in development, but modelling and observations suggest that magmatic segments may propagate and/or migrate during periods of magmatism. Our ability to discriminate between the various models in large part depends on the quality of data in the ocean-transition zone, or, observations from zones of incipient plate <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Largely 2D crustal-scale seismic data from magmatic passive margins reveal large magmatic additions to the crust, but the timing of this heat and mass transfer is weakly constrained. Thus, the lack of information on the across rift breadth of the deforming zone at <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, and the relationship between the early rift segmentation and the seafloor spreading segmentation represent fundamental gaps in knowledge. Our study of Earth's youngest magmatic margin, the superbly exposed, tectonically active southern Red Sea, aims to answer the following questions: What are the geometry and kinematics of active fault systems across the 'passive margin' to zone of incipient plate <span class="hlt">rupture</span>? What is the relationship between the initial border fault segmentation, and the breakup zone segmentation? What is the distribution of active deformation and magmatism, and how does it compare to time-averaged strain patterns? We integrate results of recent experiments that suggest widespread replacement of crust and mantle lithosphere beneath the 'passive' margin, and explain the ongoing seismic deformation as a consequence of bending stresses across the ocean-continent transition, with or without a dynamic component.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ebinger, Cynthia; Belachew, Manahloh; Tepp, Gabrielle; Keir, Derek; Ayele, Atalay</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24679079"> <span id="translatedtitle">Isolated unilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the alar ligament.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Only 6 cases of isolated unilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the alar ligament have been previously reported. The authors report a new case and review the literature, morbid anatomy, and pathogenesis of this rare injury. The patient in their case, a 9-year-old girl, fell head first from a height of 5 feet off the ground. She presented with neck pain, a leftward head tilt, and severe limitation of right rotation, extension, and right lateral flexion of the neck. Plain radiographs and CT revealed no fracture but a shift of the dens toward the right lateral mass of C-1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed signal hyperintensity within the left dens-atlas space on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences and interruption of the expected dark signal representing the left alar ligament, suggestive of its <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. After 12 weeks of immobilization in a Guilford brace, MRI showed lessened dens deviation, and the patient attained full and painless neck motion. Including the patient in this case, the 7 patients with this injury were between 5 and 21 years old, sustained the injury in traffic accidents or falls, presented with marked neck pain, and were treated with external immobilization. All patients had good clinical outcome. The mechanism of injury is hyperflexion with rotation. Isolated unilateral alar ligament <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a diagnosis made by excluding associated fracture, dislocation, or disruption of other major ligamentous structures in the craniovertebral junction. CT and MRI are essential in establishing the diagnosis. External immobilization is adequate treatment. PMID:24679079</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wong, Sui-To; Ernest, Kimberly; Fan, Grace; Zovickian, John; Pang, Dachling</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22048747"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anterior cruciate ligament <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in gouty arthritis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 34-year-old male presented with right knee instability without any trauma. He had been diagnosed with right knee gouty arthritis 2 years prior. An arthroscopic examination revealed abundant calcific material deposited around the knee joint, including in the ACL tissue, and that the ACL was torn at the femoral attachment site. Treatment involved a synovectomy to remove calcific material, followed by an ACL reconstruction. Histology evaluation revealed gouty arthritis with the presence of tophi in the synovium, soft tissue, and ACL tissue. The case presented here indicates the possibility of pathologic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the ACL associated with gouty tophus infiltration of that ligament. Level of evidence IV. PMID:22048747</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hwang, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Soon-Hyuck; Han, Seung-Beom; Park, Si-Young; Jeong, Woong-Kyo; Kim, Chul-Hwan; Lee, Dae-Hee</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvE..90e2710T"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of lipid vesicles near solid surfaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The behavior of lipid vesicles near solid surfaces, despite its scientific and technological significance, is poorly understood. By simultaneously taking into account (i) the dynamics of spontaneous pore opening and closing in surface bound vesicles; (ii) their volume loss via leakage through the pores; (iii) and the propagation of their contact line, we have developed a simple model that can fully describe the detailed mechanism of and provide the necessary conditions for the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of vesicles and the subsequent formation of supported lipid bilayers. The predictions of the model are in qualitative agreement with many of the experimental observations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takáts-Nyeste, Annamária; Derényi, Imre</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70024680"> <span id="translatedtitle">Complex earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and local tsunamis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In contrast to far-field tsunami amplitudes that are fairly well predicted by the seismic moment of subduction zone earthquakes, there exists significant variation in the scaling of local tsunami amplitude with respect to seismic moment. From a global catalog of tsunami runup observations this variability is greatest for the most frequently occuring tsunamigenic subduction zone earthquakes in the magnitude range of 7 < Mw < 8.5. Variability in local tsunami runup scaling can be ascribed to tsunami source parameters that are independent of seismic moment: variations in the water depth in the source region, the combination of higher slip and lower shear modulus at shallow depth, and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complexity in the form of heterogeneous slip distribution patterns. The focus of this study is on the effect that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complexity has on the local tsunami wave field. A wide range of slip distribution patterns are generated using a stochastic, self-affine source model that is consistent with the falloff of far-field seismic displacement spectra at high frequencies. The synthetic slip distributions generated by the stochastic source model are discretized and the vertical displacement fields from point source elastic dislocation expressions are superimposed to compute the coseismic vertical displacement field. For shallow subduction zone earthquakes it is demonstrated that self-affine irregularities of the slip distribution result in significant variations in local tsunami amplitude. The effects of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complexity are less pronounced for earthquakes at greater depth or along faults with steep dip angles. For a test region along the Pacific coast of central Mexico, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude is calculated for a large number (N = 100) of synthetic slip distribution patterns, all with identical seismic moment (Mw = 8.1). Analysis of the results indicates that for earthquakes of a fixed location, geometry, and seismic moment, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude can vary by a factor of 3 or more. These results indicate that there is substantially more variation in the local tsunami wave field derived from the inherent complexity subduction zone earthquakes than predicted by a simple elastic dislocation model. Probabilistic methods that take into account variability in earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes are likely to yield more accurate assessments of tsunami hazards.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Geist, E.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/831681"> <span id="translatedtitle">Idiopathic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the iliac vein.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Idiopathic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of large veins is very rare. There has been one report in the Portugese literature of such an instance involving the iliac vein. Our patient was an elderly woman in whom evidence of intra-abdominal hemorrhage developed. There was no clinical evidence of trauma. At laparotomy a large retroperitoneal hematoma secondary to an 8-mm tear in the left common iliac vein was found. The tear occurred adjacent to where the right common iliac artery passes over the vein. Repair was followed by uneventful recovery. Results of the pathological examination showed nonspecific information. PMID:831681</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brown, L; Sanchez, F; Mannix, H</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.6684C"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> velocity inferred from near-field differential ground motion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The velocity of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation is a fundamental source parameter that strongly affects ground motion. It is commonly assessed from kinematic inversion of strong-motion or teleseismic data, sometimes combined with InSar and/or GPS data. The obtained <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity remains inevitably affected by uncertainties, mainly due to imperfect knowledge of the earth structure and tradeoffs between different source parameters. In this study we show how the analysis of differential ground-motion may help constraining the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity, without a priori information about the earth velocity structure. Our analysis is based on synthetic ground-motion simulations (0-2 Hz) for vertical strike-slip earthquakes propagating unilaterally at a fixed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity in a homogeneous elastic medium covered with a 1 km-thick low velocity layer (shear wave velocity equal to 1 km/s). We show that when the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> reaches the bottom of the shallow layer, the phase velocity of transverse waves measured in the forward <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction up to a few <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lengths is equal to the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity, for a large range of frequencies. The comparison with the phase velocity obtained for a point source then enables to retrieve the value of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity. The phase velocity is simply computed from the ratio between the ground velocity and the shear strain or the rotation about a vertical axis. This study points out the utility of setting up dense arrays at the vicinity of major faults to retrieve <span class="hlt">rupture</span> features such as the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Causse, Mathieu; Cornou, Cécile; Bécasse, Julie; Bouchon, Michel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006JGRB..111.3307S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonlinear thermoporoelastic effects on dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study we theoretically examine thermohydraulic effects on dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We first derive the system of governing equations assuming a thermoporoelastic medium and then conduct numerical calculations based on these equations. Nonlinear feedback between changes in temperature, fluid pressure, and fault slip are shown to play an important role in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics. For example, these feedbacks produce a longer duration of fault slip than that predicted by the classical Griffith crack model assumed in an elastic medium; deviation of our results from those of the Griffith crack model increases with increased thickness of the heated fault zone. The feedback effects also produce slip-weakening behavior and gradual slip onset. The slip-weakening distance increases with increased rate of fluid outflow from the heated fault zone. Our simulations demonstrate that smaller events record smaller static stress drops, consistent with seismological observations. This relationship occurs because ongoing fault slip tends to result in increased fluid pressure. Our simulations also indicate that scaling relationships between small and large earthquakes are complicated by thermohydraulic effects.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Suzuki, Takehito; Yamashita, Teruo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24637031"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complicating aortitis: a case report].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tropical aortitis is a rare and poorly described aortic disease, sometimes confounded with Takayasu's disease, mainly in people from Africa. In this case report, the panaortic aneurysmal disease in a young woman from Haiti, first diagnosed after a work-up on renovascular hypertension, would appear to approach this particular arterial disease with no clinical, radiological or biological argument for an infectious etiology. The initially suspected diagnosis of Takayasu's disease had to be rethought because of the presence of several saccular aneurysms extending from the aortic arch to the infrarenal aorta, rarely described in Takayasu's aortitis. Expert opinions from vascular surgeons and clinicians tagged this aortic disease as similar to tropical aortitis which remained asymptomatic for more than a decade. Hypertension was managed with successful balloon angioplasty of the left renal artery stenosis and anti-hypertensive combination therapy. Surgical management of the extended aortic aneurysms was not proposed because of the stability and asymptomatic nature of the aneurysmal disease and the high risk of surgical morbidity and mortality. More than ten years after diagnosis, the course was marked with inaugural and sudden-onset chest pain concomitant with contained <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. This case report underlines the persistent risk of aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and the importance of an anatomopathological study for the diagnosis of complex aortic disease. PMID:24637031</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yannoutsos, A; Mercier, O; Messas, E; Safar, M E; Blacher, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25279443"> <span id="translatedtitle">False vs True <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">New medical nomenclature: False <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes or False ROM and Double <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes or Double ROM are being introduced into the English language. A single caregiver found about 1% of term births and 10% of term PROM involved False ROM, in which the chorion breaks while the amnion remains intact. Diagnostically, if meconium or vernix is observed, then both the chorionic and amniotic sacs have broken. In the absence of detection of vernix or meconium, an immediate accurate diagnostic test for False ROM is lacking and differentiating between True ROM from False ROM is possible only after leaking stops, which takes hours to days. The obvious benefit of differentiating between 'True' and 'False' ROM, is that in the case of False ROM, the amnion is intact and ascending infections are likely not at increased risk, although research is lacking as to whether False ROM is associated with an increased rate of ascending infection. Three cases of False ROM are presented and avenues for future research are enumerated. PMID:25279443</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cohain, J S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T33C2644F"> <span id="translatedtitle">How is a stick slip <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiated?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated the initiation process of stick slip events that occurred during large scale rock friction experiments conducted on the large scale shaking table at NIED (Fukuyama et al., 2012, AGU Fall meeting). We used a pair of Indian gabbro rock samples stacked vertically and applied normal and shear forces. The sliding area between the samples is 1.5m in length and 0.1m in width. We conducted a sequence of experiments using the same rock sample, and before each experiment we removed gouge particles created during the previous experiment by a brush and a cleaner. Here, we show the experiments under constant slip velocity of 0.1mm/s with constant normal stress of 2.7MPa (LB04-003) or 6.7MPa (LB04-005); the final displacement reached 0.04m. We used 44 acoustic sensors (PZT, vertical mode, 0.5MHz resonance frequency), 32 2-comp strain gouges (SGs) for shear strain and 16 1-comp SGs for normal strain measurements, with 48 0.5MHz dynamic SG amplifiers. We also used a 2MN load cell for shear force measurement and three 0.4MN load cells for vertical forces. Data are recorded continuously at an interval of 10MHz for PZT and 1MHz for other sensors. Just after the shear force applied, many stick slip events (SEs) occurred at an interval of a few seconds. By looking carefully at the PZT and SG array data during an SE, we found that one SE consists of many micro stick slip events (MSEs), which can be grouped into two (the former and the latter). These two groups correspond to the acceleration and deceleration stage of the SE. In LB04-005 (6.7MPa normal stress), a clear nucleation phase can be detected that initiated at a narrow area, propagate slowly (~20m/s) and accelerated. Then, a seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> started to propagate at a velocity of ~3km/s (subshear) or ~6.5km/s (supershear). Detailed features are shown in Mizoguchi et al. (this meeting). It should be noted that this seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiated at a narrow area inside the nucleation zone and sometimes after a certain amount of time; it does not seem a smooth transition process from the acceleration to the seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as proposed in Ohnaka and Shen (1999, JGR). In contrast, under low normal stress case (LB04-003, 2.7MPa), there were no visible nucleation phases but a sequence of foreshocks was observed, which was not dominant in LB04-005. The foreshock slip area was typically around 10cm long. Again, we could not see any visible correlation between the location and preceding time of foreshocks and that of seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiation. By looking at the fault surface topography that was recorded as photograph images before and after the experiment, in the nucleation zone, grooves are not developed, while outside the nucleation area, grooves are well developed. Grooves are caused by the creation of gouge particles during the sliding. It could be interesting to note that outside the groove, the sliding surface looks very smooth and shiny, indicating that this area was polished but did not create gouge particles. Therefore, we might speculate that this shiny fault area is responsible for the initiation phase and when the stress state becomes critical, seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> starts around one of the grooves. And in LB04-003, the shiny area might not support the shear stress so that the foreshock releases the strain around the grooves.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fukuyama, E.; Mizoguchi, K.; Yamashita, F.; Kawakata, H.; Takizawa, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31797659"> <span id="translatedtitle">Posttraumatic free intraperitoneal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of liver cystic echinococcosis: a case series and review of literature</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">BackgroundA serious complication of cystic echinococcus (CE) is the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the cysts. Free intra-abdominal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs in approximately 3.2% of all cases. Posttraumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of liver CE is very rare.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gurkan Ozturk; Bulent Aydinli; M. Ilhan Yildirgan; Mahmut Basoglu; S. Selcuk Atamanalp; K. Yalcin Polat; Fatih Alper; Bulent Guvendi; M. Nuran Akcay; Durkaya Oren</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26173142"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biomechanics of Plaque <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: Progress, Problems, and New Frontiers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has become identified as a critical step in the evolution of arterial plaques, especially as clinically significant events occur in critical arteries. It has become common in the past dozen years or so to consider which plaques are vulnerable, even though not yet <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>. Thrombotic events have remained significant, but in a context where they are seen as</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peter D. Richardson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19642345"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Late diagnosed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the diaphragm --a case review].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The authors describe a case of the patient with late diagnosis of the diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. There was a bowel obstruction found in X-ray scan. After endotracheal intubation was complicated of tension pneumotorax. Laparotomy was found <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the diaphragm. PMID:19642345</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Simánek, V; Treska, V; Klecka, J; Spidlen, V; Vodicka, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2604640"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intracranial aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and ventricular opacification during carotid angiography.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A case of intra-angiography <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an aneurysm, a rarity, is reported. It was confirmed by CT Scan and autopsy. The aneurysm <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> despite taking all precautions recommended in the literature. This complication may be reduced by the use of non-ionic contrast media and slow flow rate injections. PMID:2604640</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jayakumar, P N; Jain, V K; Rao, T V; Arya, B Y</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6577844"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tracheobronchial and oesophageal <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> caused by blunt injury.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the period 1968-1982, six patients with tracheobronchial <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> following chest injury were treated in the Royal Newcastle Hospital Intensive Care Unit. In one there was associated oesophageal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The management of these patients is described and recommendations regarding management are made. PMID:6577844</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">James, O F; Moore, P G; Gillies, J R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53072436"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characteristic scales of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from numerical models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerical models of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are used to investigate characteristic length scales and size distributions of repeated earthquakes on vertical, planar fault segments. The models are based on exact solutions of static three-dimensional (3-D) elasticity. Dynamical <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is approximated by allowing the static stress field to expand from slip motions at a single velocity. To show how the vertical fault</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. H. Heimpel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.5421G"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> process of the 2000 and 2008 Ölfus (Iceland) earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have studied the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of three earthquakes occurred in 2000 (17-06, Mw=6.5 and 21-06, Mw=6.4) and 2008 (29-05, Mw=6.2) in Iceland, with epicentres very close. We have estimated focal mechanism from inversion of body waves at teleseismic distances (30°-90°) using the algorithm developed by Kikuchi and Kanamori for a kinematic source. In a second step, the slip distribution over the fault-plane has been estimated. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity and direction of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> have been estimated from Rayleigh waves using the directivity function. The obtained results show similar focal mechanism for the three earthquakes corresponding to strike-slip motion. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> plane is oriented in all cases in NS direction, which agrees with tectonics of the area. The slip distribution obtained for the three shocks, shows a single process that starts at shallow depth (5 to 7 km), with the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagating to the south and parallel to the surface. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity estimated from body waves and Rayleigh waves is very low: 1.5 km/s. In order to confirm these low values, we have estimated the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process using strong motion data recorded by Icelandic Strong-Motion Network. Accelerograms were converted to displacement by double integration and filtered. We have carried out a kinematic inversion of these data in order to constraint the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Girona, Társilo; Pro, Carmen; Buforn, Elisa; Peyrat, Sophie; Sigbjörnsson, Ragnar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47267936"> <span id="translatedtitle">Survivors of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysm: the iceberg's tip</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In four and a half years 25 patients in one community suffered a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysm. Eleven died at home, nine died without operation in hospital, and only five had the aneurysm removed. There were four survivors. A further seven patients might have lived had they had a prompt operation. The average operative mortality for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms among series</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R H Armour</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4010050"> <span id="translatedtitle">Contained Left Ventricular Free Wall <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> following Myocardial Infarction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the free wall of the left ventricle occurs in approximately 4% of patients with infarcts and accounts for approximately 20% of the total mortality of patients with myocardial infractions. Relatively few cases are diagnosed before death. Several distinct clinical forms of ventricular free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> have been identified. Sudden <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with massive hemorrhage into the pericardium is the most common form; in a third of the cases, the course is subacute with slow and sometimes repetitive hemorrhage into the pericardial cavity. Left ventricular pseudoaneurysms generally occur as a consequence of left ventricular free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> covered by a portion of pericardium, in contrast to a true aneurysm, which is formed of myocardial tissue. Here, we report a case of contained left ventricular free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following myocardial infarction. PMID:24804119</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shiyovich, Arthur; Nesher, Lior</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5528696"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of high-energy pipe <span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiments: Final report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fracture mechanics and thermal hydraulic evaluations of the EPRI high energy pipe <span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiments have been carried out. The purpose of these evaluations was to benchmark analytical methods with prototypical pipe leak and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior. Fracture mechanics predictions were made using methods and materials property data available in the literature. Conditions which were predicted to produce a pipe leak did result in a leak while conditions expected to result in pipe <span class="hlt">rupture</span> did <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Further, system blowdown following breaching of the pipe wall does not appear to influence the pipe leak or <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior except for long axial defects. The thermal hydraulic behavior of the EPRI high energy pipe tests was typical of system blowdowns from an initial subcooled condition. Predictions of vessel depressurization, discharge flow rate from the final crack opening area, and blowdown thrust forces are consistent with observations. 22 refs., 18 figs., 12 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gerber, T.L.; Kuo, A.Y.; Copeland, J.F.; Abdollahian, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22007028"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clinical features of early myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of acute myocardial infarction.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We assessed the clinical features of patients with myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> within 48 to 72 hours, defined as early myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI). Six patients (4 men, 66 ± 13 years) with early myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> were identified from 1252 consecutive patients undergoing PCI for STEMI. We evaluated the degree of microvascular reperfusion using thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) myocardial perfusion (TMP) grade and a resolution of sum of ST-segment elevation in a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG). Time from PCI to myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was 11 ± 7 hours. All patients showed TMP grade 0 or 1 and an increase in sum of ST-segment elevation after PCI (1.9 ± 0.5 vs 2.5 ± 0.7 mV; P = .032), suggesting severely failed reperfusion at the level of microcirculation as the common feature to develop early myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after PCI for STEMI. PMID:22007028</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Suzuki, Makoto; Enomoto, Daijiro; Seike, Fumiyasu; Fujita, Shimpei; Honda, Kazuo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4116424"> <span id="translatedtitle">Whole person-evoked fMRI activity patterns in human <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus are accurately modeled by a linear combination of face- and body-evoked activity patterns</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Visual cues from the face and the body provide information about another's identity, emotional state, and intentions. Previous neuroimaging studies that investigated neural responses to (bodiless) faces and (headless) bodies have reported overlapping face- and body-selective brain regions in right <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus (FG). In daily life, however, faces and bodies are typically perceived together and are effortlessly integrated into the percept of a whole person, raising the possibility that neural responses to whole persons are qualitatively different than responses to isolated faces and bodies. The present study used fMRI to examine how FG activity in response to a whole person relates to activity in response to the same face and body but presented in isolation. Using multivoxel pattern analysis, we modeled person-evoked response patterns in right FG through a linear combination of face- and body-evoked response patterns. We found that these synthetic patterns were able to accurately approximate the response patterns to whole persons, with face and body patterns each adding unique information to the response patterns evoked by whole person stimuli. These results suggest that whole person responses in FG primarily arise from the coactivation of independent face- and body-selective neural populations. PMID:24108794</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kaiser, Daniel; Strnad, Lukas; Seidl, Katharina N.; Kastner, Sabine</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23678116"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stimulus value signals in ventromedial PFC reflect the integration of attribute value signals computed in <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus and posterior superior temporal gyrus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We often have to make choices among multiattribute stimuli (e.g., a food that differs on its taste and health). Behavioral data suggest that choices are made by computing the value of the different attributes and then integrating them into an overall stimulus value signal. However, it is not known whether this theory describes the way the brain computes the stimulus value signals, or how the underlying computations might be implemented. We investigated these questions using a human fMRI task in which individuals had to evaluate T-shirts that varied in their visual esthetic (e.g., color) and semantic (e.g., meaning of logo printed in T-shirt) components. We found that activity in the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus, an area associated with the processing of visual features, correlated with the value of the visual esthetic attributes, but not with the value of the semantic attributes. In contrast, activity in posterior superior temporal gyrus, an area associated with the processing of semantic meaning, exhibited the opposite pattern. Furthermore, both areas exhibited functional connectivity with an area of ventromedial prefrontal cortex that reflects the computation of overall stimulus values at the time of decision. The results provide supporting evidence for the hypothesis that some attribute values are computed in cortical areas specialized in the processing of such features, and that those attribute-specific values are then passed to the vmPFC to be integrated into an overall stimulus value signal to guide the decision. PMID:23678116</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lim, Seung-Lark; O'Doherty, John P; Rangel, Antonio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21768227"> <span id="translatedtitle">Goal-directed actions activate the face-sensitive posterior superior temporal sulcus and <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus in the absence of human-like perceptual cues.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The conditions under which we identify entities as animate agents and the neural mechanisms supporting this ability are central questions in social neuroscience. Prior studies have focused upon 2 perceptual cues for signaling animacy: 1) surface features representing body forms such as faces, torsos, and limbs and 2) motion cues associated with biological forms. Here, we consider a third cue--the goal-directedness of an action. Regions in the social brain network, such as the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) and <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> face area (FFA), are activated by human-like motion and body form perceptual cues signaling animacy. Here, we investigate whether these same brain regions are activated by goal-directed motion even when performed by entities that lack human-like perceptual cues. We observed an interaction effect whereby the presence of either human-like perceptual cues or goal-directed actions was sufficient to activate the right pSTS and FFA. Only stimuli that lacked human-like perceptual cues and goal-directed actions failed to activate the pSTS and FFA at the same level. PMID:21768227</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shultz, Sarah; McCarthy, Gregory</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S53D..05G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Macroscopic Source Properties from Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Styles in Plastic Media</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High stress concentrations at earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts may generate an inelastic off-fault response at the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tip, leading to increased energy absorption in the damage zone. Furthermore, the induced asymmetric plastic strain field in in-plane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes may produce bimaterial interfaces that can increase radiation efficiency and reduce frictional dissipation. Off-fault inelasticity thus plays an important role for realistic predictions of near-fault ground motion. Guided by our previous studies in the 2D elastic case, we perform <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics simulations including rate-and-state friction and off-fault plasticity to investigate the effects on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties. We quantitatively analyze macroscopic source properties for different <span class="hlt">rupture</span> styles, ranging from cracks to pulses and subshear to supershear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, and their transitional mechanisms. The energy dissipation due to off-fault inelasticity modifies the conditions to obtain each <span class="hlt">rupture</span> style and alters macroscopic source properties. We examine apparent fracture energy, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and healing front speed, peak slip and peak slip velocity, dynamic stress drop and size of the process and plastic zones, slip and plastic seismic moment, and their connection to ground motion. This presentation focuses on the effects of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> style and off-fault plasticity on the resulting ground motion patterns, especially on characteristic slip velocity function signatures and resulting seismic moments. We aim at developing scaling rules for equivalent elastic models, as function of background stress and frictional parameters, that may lead to improved "pseudo-dynamic" source parameterizations for ground-motion calculation. Moreover, our simulations provide quantitative relations between off-fault energy dissipation and macroscopic source properties. These relations might provide a self-consistent theoretical framework for the study of the earthquake energy balance based on observable earthquake source parameters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gabriel, A.; Ampuero, J. P.; Dalguer, L. A.; Mai, P. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3836932"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of De Novo Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm 8 Days after the Clipping of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysm</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rapidly developed de novo aneurysm is very rare. We present a rapidly developed and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> de novo anterior communicating aneurysm 8 days after the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of another aneurysm. This de novo aneurysm was not apparent in the initial 3-dimensional computed tomography and digital subtraction angiography. We reviewed the literature and discussed possible mechanisms for the development of this de novo aneurysm. PMID:24278654</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ha, Sung-Kon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Kim, Se-Hoon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1646059"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expansion and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of charged microcapsules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the deformations of pH-responsive spherical microcapsules -- micrometer-scale liquid drops surrounded by thin, solid shells -- under the influence of electrostatic forces. When exposed to a large concentration of NaOH, the microcapsules become highly charged, and expand isotropically. We find that the extent of this expansion can be understood by coupling electrostatics with shell theory; moreover, the expansion dynamics is well described by Darcy's law for fluid flow through the microcapsule shell. Unexpectedly, however, below a threshold NaOH concentration, the microcapsules begin to disintegrate, and eventually <span class="hlt">rupture</span>; they then expand non-uniformly, ultimately forming large, jellyfish-like structures. Our results highlight the fascinating range of behaviors exhibited by pH-responsive microcapsules, driven by the interplay between electrostatic and mechanical forces.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Datta, Sujit S; Weitz, David A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1401.8270v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expansion and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of charged microcapsules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the deformations of pH-responsive spherical microcapsules -- micrometer-scale liquid drops surrounded by thin, solid shells -- under the influence of electrostatic forces. When exposed to a large concentration of NaOH, the microcapsules become highly charged, and expand isotropically. We find that the extent of this expansion can be understood by coupling electrostatics with shell theory; moreover, the expansion dynamics is well described by Darcy's law for fluid flow through the microcapsule shell. Unexpectedly, however, below a threshold NaOH concentration, the microcapsules begin to disintegrate, and eventually <span class="hlt">rupture</span>; they then expand non-uniformly, ultimately forming large, jellyfish-like structures. Our results highlight the fascinating range of behaviors exhibited by pH-responsive microcapsules, driven by the interplay between electrostatic and mechanical forces.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sujit S. Datta; Alireza Abbaspourrad; David A. Weitz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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style="font-weight: bold;">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25036206"> <span id="translatedtitle">Perianeurysmal edema as a predictive sign of aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Subarachnoid hemorrhage following intracranial aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Several factors may affect the probability of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, such as tobacco and alcohol use; size, shape, and location of the aneurysm; presence of intraluminal thrombus; and even the sex of the patient. However, few data correlate such findings with the timing of aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The authors report 2 cases of middle-age women with headache and MRI findings of incidental aneurysms. Magnetic resonance imaging showed evidence of surrounding parenchymal edema, and in one case there was a clear increase in edema during follow-up, suggesting a progressive inflammatory process that culminated with <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These findings raise the possibility that bleb formation and an enlargement of a cerebral aneurysm might be associated with an inflammatory reaction of the aneurysm wall resulting in perianeurysmal edema and subsequent aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. There may be a temporal link between higher degree of edema and higher risk for <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, including risk for immediate <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:25036206</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pahl, Felix Hendrik; de Oliveira, Matheus Fernandes; Ferreira, Nelson Paes Fortes Diniz; de Macedo, Leonardo Lopes; Brock, Roger Schmidt; de Souza, Valéria Cardoso</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMOS11D1674A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Time-dependent <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> on Tsunami Generation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Differential GPS data from the recent Chile 2009 and Japan 2011 seismic events have unveiled complex time-dependent ground motion dynamics during seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Current tsunami modeling techniques usually ignore this time-dependent behavior in tsunami sources by assuming an instantaneous initial deformation field. Initial attempts to include time-dependent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior have motivated scientists to simulate this phenomenon as a series of instantaneous changes in the sea-floor. The present study investigates the effect of dynamic ground motion <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on tsunami generation by including the time-dependent initial conditions in the derivation of the linear shallow-water wave equations. We then study the sensitivity of initial water surface deformation to time-dependent seafloor <span class="hlt">rupture</span> by performing a parametric study of varying speed and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction, while assuming a monotonic deformation from an initial pre-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> state to a post-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> final state. Numerical results for some selected scenarios are validated by comparing with analytical solutions of the non-homogeneous linear shallow-water equations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arcas, D.; Kanoglu, U.; Moore, C. W.; Aydin, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFM.S12B1207G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ground Motion Levels From Deeper Versus Shallower Fault <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Somerville (2000) found a systematic difference in the level of earthquake ground motions for three M 7.2-7.6 earthquakes with large surface <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, and three M 6.7-7.0 earthquakes on buried faults. He found that the acceleration spectra of the smaller events are much larger than the 1994 UCB code spectrum for soil site conditions in the intermediate period range of 0.5-2.5 seconds, but similar to the UCB code spectrum at longer periods. He pointed out that this is contrary to all current earthquake source models and ground motion spectral scaling with magnitude. We have tested the results by Somerville using dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modeling. We compare a 45o-dipping, 5 km buried thrust fault to a 30o-dipping thrust fault that breaks the surface in a halfspace model with uniform dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> parameters on the faults. The seismic moments of the two dynamic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> amount to 3.4 ? 1019 Nm (M 7.0) in the first, and 5.3 ? 1019 Nm (M 7.1) in the latter case. The increased seismic moment for the surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is due to the time-dependent normal-stress interaction of the wavefield with the free surface. We find that, compared to those for the buried <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, the surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> shows larger spectral accelerations for periods between 0.33 and 5 seconds. Thus, our dynamic simulations can not confirm the observations from Somerville (2000), and we conclude that his results are not a first-order dynamic effect related to the depth of burial of the fault. Finally, we test whether dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modeling can explain the differences by in ground motion levels from a combination of smaller fault areas and larger slip velocities for buried faults relative to those for scenarios with surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (Somerville et al., 2002).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gottschaemmer, E.; Olsen, K. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.6261G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interaction of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with small-scale heterogeneities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Broadband ground motion simulations, with frequencies up to 10Hz, are important for engineering purposes, in particular for seismic hazard assessment for critical facilities. One problem in such simulations is the generation of high frequency radiation emitted during the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process. Ad-hoc kinematic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> characterizations can be tweaked through empirical models to radiate over the desired frequency range, but their physical consistency remains questionable. In contrast, for physically self-consistent dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modeling, controlled by friction, material parameters and the adopted physical laws, the mechanism that may lead to appropriate high-frequency radiation require heterogeneity in friction, stress, or fault geometry (or even all three quantities) at unknown but small length scales. Dunham at al. (2011) studied dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation on rough faults in 2D, and described how fault roughness excites high-frequency radiation. In our study, we focus on the interaction of the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with small-scale heterogeneities on planar faults in 3D. We study effects of the interaction of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with 1) small-scale heterogeneities in the medium (that is, randomized 3D wave speed and density variations), and 2) small-scale heterogeneities in the frictional parameters. Our numerical results show significant variations in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity or peak slip velocity if small-scale heterogeneities are present. This indicates that the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is sensitive to both types of spatial inhomogeneity. At the same time we observe that the resulting near-source seismic wave fields are not very sensitive to these <span class="hlt">rupture</span> variations, indicating that wavefront healing effects may "simplify" the complex seismic radiation once the waves propagated several wave-lengths away from the fault.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Galis, Martin; Mai, P. Martin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21599415"> <span id="translatedtitle">Minimum energy path to membrane pore formation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We combine dynamic self-consistent field theory with the string method to calculate the minimum energy path to membrane pore formation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. In the regime where nucleation can occur on experimentally relevant time scales, the structure of the critical nucleus is between a solvophilic stalk and a locally thinned membrane. Classical nucleation theory fails to capture these molecular details and significantly overestimates the free energy barrier. Our results suggest that thermally nucleated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may be an important factor for the low <span class="hlt">rupture</span> strains observed in lipid membranes. PMID:21599415</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ting, Christina L; Appelö, Daniel; Wang, Zhen-Gang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3241991"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gastric <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> and Necrosis in Prader-Willi Syndrome</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hyperphagia and obesity are common features in individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Demographic and cause of death data from individuals with PWS were obtained through a national support organization. Four reports of unexpected mortality due to gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and necrosis were found in 152 reported deaths, accounting for 3% of the causes of mortality. Four additional individuals were suspected to have gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Vomiting and abdominal pain, although rare in PWS, were frequent findings in this cohort. The physician should consider an emergent evaluation for gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and necrosis in individuals with PWS who present with vomiting and abdominal pain. PMID:17667731</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stevenson, David A.; Heinemann, Janalee; Angulo, Moris; Butler, Merlin G.; Loker, Jim; Rupe, Norma; Kendell, Patrick; Cassidy, Suzanne B.; Scheimann, Ann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984PhDT.........3Q"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Effects of Friction on the <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Earthquake Faults</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The role of friction in the earthquake fault process is studied in this thesis. The frictional breakage criterion on the fault surface is simple. Portions of the fault at rest are held at rest by a static frictional stress. If the local stress at a point on the fault exceeds a static frictional limit, that portion of the fault yields, and subsequent motion is retarded by a dynamic frictional stress. The local, finite, and non-linear character of the boundary conditions on the fault require a model based on finite differences. The model is two-dimensional and scalar, so that calculations may be minimized and the model retain physical meaning. The processes and effects of the genesis and cessation of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are not considered. A "standard" model with given grid spacing and fixed initial conditions is used for the bulk of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations. The parameter space of two dimensionless ratios R and S is investigated. R is the ratio of the static frictional limit to the elasticity of the medium and S is the ratio of the difference in the static frictional limit and the applied tectonic stress to the stress drop. It is found that the particle velocities scale with R, and that there are two distinct modes of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> depending on the value of S. For S > S(,c) (where 2.0 < S(,c) < 2.25), the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is stick-slip, and for S < S(,c) the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is smooth. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed is found to be a monotonically decreasing function of S, and has a subsonic/supersonic transition around S(,c). The energy flow in the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> region is illustrated for both modes of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and found to be fundamentally different for the two <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes. Solitary waves pinned to the fault surface are observed in the stick-slip case. The grid spacing and initial conditions are altered to test the model-dependence of the results. It is found that while the details of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are model-dependent, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity and S(,c) are model-independent, suggesting these results reflect real physical phenomena. These results may help explain variable <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity and multiple events in large earthquakes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Quist, Gregory Matthew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17143686"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous "spaghetti" flexor tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in the rheumatoid wrist.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 54-year-old woman who had been treated for rheumatoid arthritis for 12 years developed spontaneous multiple flexor tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> during a 5-month period. Radiography revealed volar subluxation of the lunate bone. Surgery was performed 5 months after the first onset of tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. All eight flexors, except the flexor pollicis longus tendons, had <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, and the damage resembled spaghetti. Four flexor digitorum profundus tendons were reconstructed by bridge graft using their respective sublimis tendons. Wrist joint fusion and tenolysis were performed 3 months after the first operation. Each finger achieved a good range of motion 2 years and 6 months after the second operation. PMID:17143686</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hashizume, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Keiichiro; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Inoue, Hajime</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24854899"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a single liquid aluminium alloy film.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present study is based on the idea of understanding the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of films in metal foams by studying free standing metallic films as a model system. Liquid dynamics, the velocity of the <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> material as well as the behaviour of ceramic particles inside the melt were analysed optically ex situ and by synchrotron X-ray radiography in situ. It was found that the resistance of films to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is mainly based on the interaction between solid particles and an immobile oxide skin, the formation of which depends on the oxygen content of the surrounding atmosphere and the presence of magnesium. PMID:24854899</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heim, K; García-Moreno, F; Vinod Kumar, G S; Rack, A; Banhart, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.S51B2375M"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Synchronicity in Complex Fault Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">While most investigators would agree that the timing of large earthquakes within a fault system depends on stress-mediated interactions among its elements, much of the debate relevant to time-dependent forecasting has been centered on single-fault concepts, such as characteristic earthquake behavior. We propose to broaden this discussion by quantifying the multi-fault concept of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> synchronicity. We consider a finite set of small, fault-spanning volumes {Vk} within a fault system of arbitrary (fractal) complexity. We let Ck be the catalog of length tmax comprising Nk discrete times {ti(k)} that mark when the kth volume participates in a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of magnitude > M. The main object of our analysis is the complete set of event time differences {?ij(kk') = ti(k) - tj(k')}, which we take to be a random process with an expected density function ?kk'(t). When k = k', we call this function the auto-catalog density function (ACDF); when k ? k', we call it the cross-catalog density function (CCDF). The roles of the ACDF and CCDF in synchronicity theory are similar to those of autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions in time-series analysis. For a renewal process, the ACDF can be written in terms of convolutions of the interevent-time distribution, and many of its properties (e.g., large-t asymptote) can be derived analytically. The interesting information in the CCDF, like that in the ACDF, is concentrated near t = 0. If two catalogs are completely asynchronous, the CCDF collapses to an asymptote given by the harmonic mean of the ACDF asymptotes. Synchronicity can therefore be characterized by the variability of the CCDF about this asymptote. The brevity of instrumental catalogs makes the identification of synchronicity at large M difficult, but we will illustrate potentially interesting behaviors through the analysis of a million-year California catalog generated by the earthquake simulator, RSQSim (Deiterich & Richards-Dinger, 2010), which we sampled at a dozen fault-spanning volumes. At the magnitude threshold M = 7, the ACDF can be well fit by renewal models with fairly small aperiodicity parameters (? < 0.2) for all fault volumes but one (on the San Jacinto fault). At interseismic (Reid) time scales, we observe pairs of fault segments that are tightly locked, such as the Cholame and Carrizo sections of the San Andreas Fault (SAF), where the CCDF and two ACDFs are nearly equal; segments out of phase (Carrizo-SAF/Coachella-SAF and Coachella-SAF/San Jacinto), where the CCDF variation is an odd function of time; and segments where events are in phase with integer ratios of recurrence times (2:1 synchronicity of Coachella-SAF/Mojave-SAF and Carrizo-SAF/Mojave-SAF). At near-seismic (Omori) time scales, we observe various modes of clustering, triggering, and shadowing in RSQSim catalogs; e.g., events on Mojave-SAF trigger Garlock events, and events on Coachella-SAF shut down events on San Jacinto. Therefore, despite its geometrical complexity and multiplicity of time scales, the RSQSim model of the San Andreas fault system exhibits a variety of synchronous behaviors that increase the predictability of large <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> within the system. A key question for earthquake forecasting is whether the real San Andreas system is equally, or much less, synchronous.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Milner, K. R.; Jordan, T. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56014119"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geomorphic Signals for Preferred Propagation Direction of Earthquake <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> on North Anatolian Fault System, TURKEY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The North Anatolian Fault <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> in a sequence of large earthquakes between 1939 and 1999, generally progressing from east to west. The 1943 and 1944 <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> propagated unilateraly in opposite directions. Preliminary analysis of the geomorphology along these <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> shows distinct differences that may reflect repeated <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> with similar propagation directions. A persistent preferred propagation direction should produce asymmetric damage</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Yildirim; O. Dor; T. Rockwell; O. Emre; Y. Ben-Zion; M. Sisk; T. Duman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.U21B..02B"> <span id="translatedtitle">The 2010 Chile Earthquake - Variations in the <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Mode</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The magnitude 8.8, February 27, 2010 Chile, that occurred along the south central Nazca/South American plate boundary was an underthrusting event with an aftershock length of ~600 km along strike, with a bi-lateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that started near Cobquecura and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> north to Valparaiso and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> 100 km south of Concepcion. This segment of the south central coast of Chile has a long record of damaging underthrusting earthquakes dating back to 1570 that based on intensity and tsunami reports show variations in the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mode between earthquake cycles. In light of the recent 2010 Chile earthquake we review the historic earthquake record along this segment of the subduction zone and compare it to the slip distribution determined during the 2010 mainshock. The 2010 earthquake appears to have failed at least 2 segments of the plate boundary that failed previously in multiple earthquakes with different <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lengths. The southern region of the 2010 <span class="hlt">rupture</span> last failed in 1835, 1751, 1657 and 1570. The northern segment of the 2010 <span class="hlt">rupture</span> last failed in 1928 (Ms=8.0), 1751, and in 1730. The 1751 earthquake probably <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> both the 1928 and 1835 earthquake zones based on intensities and tsunami reports. The 1751 earthquake had intensity 9 in Concepcion, Talcahuano, Chillan, and Talca, and intensity 6 at Valparaiso (Askew and Algermissen, 1985). The northern termination of the 2010 <span class="hlt">rupture</span> appears to end near 33.5°S to ~34°S which coincides with the southern portion of the 1985 (Mw=8.0) zone that previously <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> in 1906 (Ms=8.4). Modeling of teleseismic P, SH and R1 waveforms show a bilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with the largest patch of slip ~ 100 km north and updip of the epicenter with smaller patches of slip to the south and down dip of the epicenter (Lay et al., 2010). As expected the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity is difficult to constrain with teleseismic data. Recent results from back projecting the P-waves recorded using Transportable Array data in the U.S. also show a bilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with the location of the highest slip region north of the epicenter. All of these methods show significant mainshock slip in the 1928 <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone and lesser amounts of slip in the part of the 1835 <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone that did not fail in 1928, despite the longer time since 1835. The aftershocks of the 2010 and 1985 earthquakes overlap but the high slip region of the 2010 earthquakes does not appear to overlap significantly with the high slip region of the 1985 earthquake and the latter may have contributed to the termination of the 2010 earthquake. The 2010 Chile earthquake segment along the south central Chile subduction shows large variations in the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mode in previous earthquakes. What controls the size of the earthquake (i.e. how many segments fail in a given event) is still uncertain but important in understanding the potential hazard of the Chile subduction zone.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Beck, S. L.; Comte, D.; Lay, T.; Kiser, E.; Ishii, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9211611"> <span id="translatedtitle">Etiology and pathophysiology of tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in sports.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Of all spontaneous tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, complete Achilles tendon tears are most closely associated with sports activities (1-3). Schönbauer (3) reported that 75% of all <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the Achilles tendon are related to sports. In Plecko & Passl (2) the number was 60%. In our material of 430 cases, the number of sports-related Achilles <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> was very similar (62%), while only 2% of <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of other tendons were sports-related (P < 0.001) (1). Also, the majority of Achilles reruptures occurred in sports. The <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occurred most often in soccer (34%), track and field (16%) and basketball (14%). The distribution of Achilles <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> according to different sports varies considerably from country to country, according to the national sport traditions. For example, in northern and middle Europe, soccer, tennis, track and field, indoor ball games, downhill skiing, and gymnastics are the most common; and in North America, football, basketball, baseball, tennis and downhill skiing dominate the statistics (1, 2, 4). In sports, some Achilles <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are not spontaneous or degeneration-induced but may occur as a consequence of the remarkably high forces that are involved in the performance (2). <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> in the high jump or triple jump are good examples. In such cases, failure in the neuromuscular protective mechanisms due to fatigue or disturbed co-ordination can frequently be found. The spontaneous complete <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the supraspinatus tendon of the rotator cuff does not occur very frequently in sports. Those sports that include high-energy throwing movements, such as American and Finnish baseball, American football, rugby and discuss and javelin throwing, may, however, produce this injury. Partial tears and inflammations of the rotator cuff complex are much more frequent in throwing sports. The complete <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the proximal long head of the biceps brachii tendon is rare among competitive and recreational athletes. In our material, under 2% of these <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> were associated with sports activities (5). The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (avulsion) of the distal tendon of the biceps muscle is rare. In sports, gymnastics, body building and weight lifting have been said to be able to produce this injury (6). In general, complete <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the quadriceps tendon and the patellar tendon occur most often in older individuals. In our study, the mean age of these patients was 65 years (5). However, these injuries do also occur in younger age groups, especially in athletes. In athletes, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> most frequently occurs in high-power sports events, such as high jump, basketball and weight lifting, at the age of 15-30 years. A chronic-patellar apicitis (jumper's knee) may predispose <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the tendon (7). As is the case with the rotator cuff complex, overuse inflammation and partial tears of the quadriceps and patellar tendons are one of the most characteristic athletic injuries. Complete spontaneous <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of other tendons in sports are rare, although the literature does provide case studies from almost every tendon the human body possesses (8-18). PMID:9211611</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kannus, P; Natri, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20538732"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stent grafting a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> para-anastomotic iliac aneurysm.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this case report, we present an 83-year-old man with a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> para-anastomotic aneurysm who underwent a stent graft in spite of his condition of acute shock. Our patient presented at the emergency room (ER) with acute abdominal pain. Shortly after arrival, he collapsed because of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> para-anastomotic aneurysm after the previous aorto-bi-iliac aneurysm repair in 1984. He was charged with a cardiac history that made him unsuitable for surgery. We chose for resuscitation followed by inflation of an aortic balloon that made the patient hemodynamically stable. He then underwent iliac stent grafting and was discharged from the hospital at 22 days after the procedure. The mortality rate of patients with a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> para-anastomotic aortic aneurysm arriving at hospital ranges from 32% to 70%. Endovascular stent placement for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> iliac aneurysmal arteries can be a safe treatment in selected patients. PMID:20538732</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Menke, Vivianda; Castenmiller, Peter H; Versteijlen, Rob J; Van der Laan, Lijckle</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4320801"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aneurysmal <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a Mesodiverticular Band to a Meckel's Diverticulum</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a mesodiverticular band has not previously been reported in the clinical literature. We are reporting a case of hemoperitoneum in a 51-year-old male after an aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a mesodiverticular band. This case demonstrates that in rare instances, a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the mesodiverticular band leading to Meckel's diverticulum can lead to significant hemoperitoneum. This is usually caused by a traumatic injury but in our case was apparently caused by an aneurysm of the mesodiverticular artery. Patients with known Meckel's diverticula should be aware of the possibility of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as should clinicians treating those with a history of this usually benign congenital abnormality. Rapid surgical intervention is necessary to repair the source of bleeding, as massive blood loss was encountered in this case.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sommerhalder, Christian; Fretwell, Kenneth R.; Salzler, Gregory G.; Creasy, John M.; Robitsek, R. Jonathan; Schubl, Sebastian D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16119282"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical treatment options for patella tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, Part I: Acute.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Patella tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a debilitating injury. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential to prevent retraction of the patella with subsequent adhesions and quadriceps contractures. In a young patient with an acute <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, primary repair usually is possible with various methods described to protect the repair. In acute injuries with inadequate tissue, augmentation with hamstring tendons or allograft generally is necessary. Because of the different types of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and the possibility for poor quality tissue, the surgeon should always be prepared to combine different techniques to obtain tthe best repair. Continuous passive motion generally can be initiated early with a secure repair. In patients with a patella tendon <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> that is promptly diagnosed, securely repaired, and followed closely through their rehabilitation, good results can be expected. PMID:16119282</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Greis, Patrick E; Holmstrom, Michael C; Lahav, Amit</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011TRACE..10..383O"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Cylindrical Ice Model and Tuna Fish during Freezing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The gape and heave produced on the surface of tuna fish during freezing were confirmed by <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of cylindrical type ice model. The results of experiment were shown as summarized below; 1) in case of restraining the progress of ice formation of model during freezing,any <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was produced at not only slow freezing but also quick freezing. It was the same as tuna fish; 2) in case of closing surface of ice model covered perfectly by outside shell ice during slow freezing,it was not <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> at not only ice model but also tuna fish. On the contrary it was cracked at quick freezing not only ice model but also tuna fish; 3) therefore it was confirmed that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of tuna fish during freezing had been easy to produce at quick freezing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ogawa, Yutaka; Uno, Mitsuyo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6709557"> <span id="translatedtitle">Occult <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen--two unusual clinical presentations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Case reports of two patients with occult <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the spleen are presented. In one, blunt trauma appeared to involve only the neck and upper chest, resulting in two distinct tracheal injuries and no clinical indication of abdominal injury. On the 5th day after injury this patient strangulated an indirect inguinal hernia. At subsequent surgery, a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen was also found. The second patient gave no history of trauma and presented in cardiac and respiratory failure after a 2-month illness characterized by abdominal pain. On clinical and biochemical assessments, he was considered to have pancreatitis complicated by pseudocyst formation. Laparotomy revealed intra-abdominal haemorrhage and a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen. The diagnosis and complications of occult <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen are discussed. PMID:6709557</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moore, P G; Gillies, J G; James, O F; Saltos, N</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/59743"> <span id="translatedtitle">Controls on earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and triggering mechanisms in subduction zones</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Large earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and triggering mechanisms that drive seismicity in subduction zones are investigated in this thesis using a combination of earthquake observations, statistical and physical modeling. A comparison ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Llenos, Andrea Lesley</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.S21B0576B"> <span id="translatedtitle">3D Dynamic Crack <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> by a Finite Volume Method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a 3D spontaneous crack of arbitrary shape has been investigated using a Finite Volume (FV) approach. The full domain is decomposed in tetrahedra while the surface on which the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is supposed to take place is discretized with triangles which are faces of tetrahedra. Because of this meshing strategy, any shape of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> surface could be designed and is performed once before simulations start. First of all, the elastodynamic equations are described into a pseudo-conservative form for easy application of the FV discretisation. Explicit boundary conditions are given using criteria based on the conservation of discrete energy through the crack surface. Using a stress-threshold criterion, these conditions specify fluxes through those triangles which have suffered <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. On these broken surfaces, stress follows A linear slip-weakening law although other friction laws can be implemented as well. Numerical solutions on a planar fault are achieved for the problem version 3 of the SCEC community dynamic-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> benchmark exercise (Harris and Archuleta, 2004) and compared with those provided by a Finite Difference (FD) technique (Day et al, 2005). Another benchmark problem is also tackled involving a nonplanar curved fault (Cruz-Atienza et al, 2007). Solutions for this difficult exercise are compared with those computed with a Boundary Integral (BI) method (Aochi et al, 2000). In both benchmarck problems, comparisons show that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts are well modelled with a slight delay in time especially along the antiplane direction related to the low-order interpolation of the FV approach which requires further mesh refinement or/and an higher-order interpolation strategy as for Galerkin Discontinuous approach. Slip-rate and shear stress amplitudes are well modelled as well as stopping phases and stress overshoots. We expect this method, which is well adapted to multi-preocessor parallel computing to be competitive with others for solving large scale dynamic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> scenario of seismic sources in the near future. References : Aochi, H., E. Fukuyama and M. Matsuura, 2000. Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation of a non-planar fault in 3D elastic medium, PAGEOPH, 157, 2003-2027. Cruz-Atienza, V.M., J. Virieux, J. and H. Aochi, 3D finite-difference dynamic-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> modeling along nonplanar faults, Geophysics, 72, SM123-SM137. Day, S. M., L.A. Dalguer, N. Lapusta and Y. Liu, 2005, Comparison of finite difference and boundary integral solutions to three-dimensional spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: Journal of Geophysical Research, 110, B12307, http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2005JB003813. Harris, R. A. and R. J. Archuleta, 2004, Earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics: Comparing the numerical simulation methods: EOS, 85, 321.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ben Jemaa, M.; Glinsky-Olivier, N.; Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Virieux, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return 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href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4255892"> <span id="translatedtitle">Soft, Brown <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: Clinical Signs and Symptoms Associated with <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> PIP Breast Implants</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Preoperative signs and symptoms of patients with Poly Implant Prothese (PIP) implants could be predictive of device failure. Based on clinical observation and intraoperative findings 4 hypotheses were raised: (1) Preoperative clinical signs including acquired asymmetry, breast enlargement, fullness of the lower pole, decreased mound projection, and change in breast consistency could be indicative of implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. (2) Device failure correlates with a low preoperative Baker grade of capsule. (3) Brown-stained implants are more prone to implant failure. (4) The brown gel could be indicative of iodine ingression through a substandard elastomer shell. Methods: Preoperative clinical signs were compared with intraoperative findings for 27 patients undergoing PIP implant explantation. Results: Acquired asymmetry (P = 0.0003), breast enlargement (P = 0.0002), fuller lower pole (P < 0.0001), and loss of lateral projection (P < 0.0001) were all significantly predictive of device failure. Capsule Baker grade was lower preoperatively for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> implants. The lack of palpable and visible preoperative capsular contracture could be secondary to the elastic nature of the capsular tissue found. Brown implants failed significantly more often than white implants. Analysis of brown gel revealed the presence of iodine, suggesting povidone iodine ingression at implantation. Conclusions: Preoperative signs can be predictive of PIP implant failure. Brown-stained implants are more prone to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The presence of iodine in the gel suggests unacceptable permeability of the shell early in the implant’s life span. A noninvasive screening test to detect brown implants in situ could help identify implants at risk of failure in those who elect to keep their implants. PMID:25506532</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Duncan, Robert T.; Feig, Christine; Reintals, Michelle; Hill, Sarah</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3826277"> <span id="translatedtitle">Extracellular Matrix Dynamics and Fetal Membrane <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in determining cell and organ function: (1) it is an organizing substrate that provides tissue tensile strength; (2) it anchors cells and influences cell morphology and function via interaction with cell surface receptors; and (3) it is a reservoir for growth factors. Alterations in the content and the composition of the ECM determine its physical and biological properties, including strength and susceptibility to degradation. The ECM components themselves also harbor cryptic matrikines, which when exposed by conformational change or proteolysis have potent effects on cell function, including stimulating the production of cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Collectively, these properties of the ECM reflect a dynamic tissue component that influences both tissue form and function. This review illustrates how defects in ECM synthesis and metabolism and the physiological process of ECM turnover contribute to changes in the fetal membranes that precede normal parturition and contribute to the pathological events leading to preterm premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes (PPROM). PMID:22267536</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Strauss,, Jerome F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3884862"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous Ureteral <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Diagnosis and Treatment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the urinary collecting system associated with perinephric or retroperitoneal extravasation of the urine is an unusual condition and it is commonly associated with renal obstructing disease. Perforation could occur at any level from the calix to the bladder but it is usually seen at the fornices and upper ureter. It may lead to several serious consequences including urinoma, abscess formation, urosepsis, infection, and subsequent irreversible renal impairment. We report a case of a 69-year-old woman who presented at the emergency department of our institution with severe abdominal pain. Due to symptomatology worsening, complete laboratory evaluation was performed and the patient underwent abdominal contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) evaluation which showed contrast agent extravasation outside the excretory system without any evidence of renal calculi at basal acquisition. It was decided to perform a double-J stent placement which was followed by complete healing of the ureter and its removal was performed 8 weeks later. Diagnosis and therapeutic approaches are discussed. PMID:24455381</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pampana, E.; Altobelli, S.; Morini, M.; Ricci, A.; D'Onofrio, S.; Simonetti, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/230715"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> strength of alloy 718</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Alloy 718 is the most widely used of the nickel-base superalloys in aerospace applications such as compressor and turbine disks, cases, compressor blades and fasteners in aircraft gas-turbine engines. Since the development of the superalloy by Inco Alloys International over 30 years ago, researchers have made many slight modifications in chemical composition, and have refined process techniques to achieve further improvements in performance. Relatively little information on the effects of phosphorus has been published, and the available information is contradictory. However, phosphorus in superalloys is generally considered detrimental, and by specification is controlled to a low maximum value (0.015% max, for example, in AMS5662 E). This lack of data is the basis of a study by Teledyne Allvac to determine the effects of the interaction of phosphorus, boron, and carbon on the mechanical properties, processing characteristics, and microstructure of Allvac 718. Results show that a significant improvement in stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties over those of a commercial Alloy 718 material is possible by optimizing phosphorus, boron, and carbon additions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kennedy, R.L.; Cao, W.D.; Thomas, W.M. [Teledyne Allvac, Monroe, NC (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3388513"> <span id="translatedtitle">Size-Dependent <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Strain of Elastically Stretchable Metal Conductors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Experiments show that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> strain of gold conductors on elastomers decreases as the conductors are made long and narrow. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> is caused by the irreversible coalescence of microcracks into one long crack. A mechanics model identifies a critical crack length ?cr, above which the long crack propagates across the entire conductor width. ?cr depends on the fracture toughness of the gold film and the width of the conductor. The model provides guidance for the design of highly stretchable conductors. PMID:22773917</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Graudejus, O.; Jia, Z.; Li, T.; Wagner, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3418044"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intraperitoneal <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Hepatic Hydatid Cyst Following Blunt Abdominal Trauma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Peritonitis due to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of liver hydatid cyst secondary to blunt abdominal trauma can present with fatal consequences. Timely diagnosis and appropriate surgical management can be life saving. We report a case of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> liver hydatid cyst in the peritoneal cavity following trauma and its successful operative management in a preadolescent previously asymptomatic boy. Importance of detailed physical examination and early diagnosis by using appropriate radiological investigations is highlighted. PMID:22953304</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dhua, Anjan Kumar; Sharma, Akshay</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4080494"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysm diagnosed through non-contrast MRI</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of an aneurysm is a rare complication although it is considered a common cause of death. Some of these patients present with the classic triad of symptoms such as abdominal pain, pulsatile abdominal mass and shock. Most symptoms are misleading and will only present as vague abdominal pain. Here we describe one such patient with an unusual presentation of a misleading abdominal mass which was eventually diagnosed as a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysm after an emergency MRI. PMID:25003065</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chatra, Priyank S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24882658"> <span id="translatedtitle">Atraumatic splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after coagulopathy owing to a snakebite.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Among the many complications that may follow envenomation by some species of venomous snakes, coagulopathy is common and well known. However, hemoperitoneum induced by coagulopathy after a snakebite is rare. Atraumatic spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is also an uncommon and life-threatening condition. Here, we report a case of presumptive envenomation by Gloydius spp. that resulted in atraumatic splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as a probable manifestation of coagulopathy, which has not been previously reported. PMID:24882658</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kang, Changwoo; Kim, Dong Hoon; Kim, Seong Chun; Kim, Dong Seob; Jeong, Chi-Young</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9595238"> <span id="translatedtitle">Delayed traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the thoracic aorta into the esophagus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A case of delayed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the thoracic aorta into the esophagus after blunt thoracic injury is reported. It involved a hemodynamically stable 18-year-old male patient without any clinical or radiological signs to indicate aortic injury. Aortoesophageal fistula presented in the fifth post traumatic day, with a sudden dyspnea episode, intraperitoneal hemorrhage and lower gastrointestinal bleeding, due to intraperitoneal and intragastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of intramural esophageal hematoma. PMID:9595238</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Komborozos, V A; Belenis, I; Malagari, C; Yannopoulos, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24347218"> <span id="translatedtitle">Iliopsoas hematoma due to muscular <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following defibrillation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We describe a 62 year old patient who presented with acute anterior ischemia and subsequently developed an iliopsoas hematoma. The patient was treated surgically due to rapid progression and femoral neuropathy, and the iliopsoas muscle <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was diagnosed intraoperatively. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was related to the external electrical defibrillation the patient had on admission. This was a rare case, and we hope the report would help to raise physicians' awareness regarding this complication and treatment. PMID:24347218</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jahollari, Artan; Cavolli, Raif; Tavlasoglu, Murat; Sallahu, Ferat; Muriqi, Shkelzen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23161834"> <span id="translatedtitle">Continuous microwire patterns dominated by controllable <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of liquid films.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Controllable microwire patterns are prepared by dominating the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of liquid films. Regular rhombic-shaped micropillar arrays serve as wetting defects to pin or depin liquids, yielding continuous, herringbone, bead-shaped polystyrene microwire patterns or bead arrays. The results provide a deeper understanding of the controllable <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of liquid films and offer a general strategy for the organization of polymers into structures needed for wiring, interconnects, and functional devices for future microfabrication. PMID:23161834</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xin, Zhiqing; Su, Bin; Wang, Jianjun; Zhang, Xingye; Zhang, Zhiliang; Deng, Mengmeng; Song, Yanlin; Jiang, Lei</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55187036"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Modeling With Stochastic Fault Stress</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate how the evolution of dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is controlled by heterogeneous stress distributions on the fault plane. A 3D finite difference code is used to model <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on a single vertical fault plane obeying a slip-weakening friction law. The friction parameters (critical slip-weakening distance, coefficients of friction) are kept homogeneous over the fault plane, whereas the distributions of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. M. Mai; J. Ripperger</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/gl/gl0421/2004GL021030/2004GL021030.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Slip tapers at the tips of faults and earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Slip gradients near the tips of earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> and faults are typically linear. For non-interacting faults or earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, tip tapers are scale invariant, and about 1–2 orders of magnitude larger for faults than for earthquakes. For fault tips interacting with other faults, the taper can be as much as a factor of 10 greater than for non-interacting faults. For</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Christopher H. Scholz; Theresa M. Lawler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40031702"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aqueous solvents for extracting glanded cottonseed protein without gland <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The presence of pigment glands has thwarted attempts to extract edible cottonseed protein aqueously from glanded seeds or\\u000a gland-rich meals, probably because of the widely held belief that glands <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on contact with aqueous media. We found several\\u000a aqueous salt solutions in which glands did not <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Glands remained intact in saturated (2m) sodium sulfate, but not in saturated 2m</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. L. Muller; T. J. Jacks; T. P. Hensarling</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70017559"> <span id="translatedtitle">The temporal distribution of seismic radiation during deep earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The time history of energy release during earthquakes illuminates the process of failure, which remains enigmatic for events deeper than about 100 kilometers. Stacks of teleseismic records from regional arrays for 122 intermediate (depths of 100 to 350 kilometers) and deep (depths of 350 to 700 kilometers) earthquakes show that the temporal pattern of short-period seismic radiation has a systematic variation with depth. On average, for intermediate depth events more radiation is released toward the beginning of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> than near the end, whereas for deep events radiation is released symmetrically over the duration of the event, with an abrupt beginning and end of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These findings suggest a variation in the style of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> related to decreasing fault heterogeneity with depth.The time history of energy release during earthquakes illuminates the process of failure, which remains enigmatic for events deeper than about 100 kilometers. Stacks of teleseismic records from regional arrays for 122 intermediate (depths of 100 to 350 kilometers) and deep (depths of 350 to 700 kilometers) earthquakes show that the temporal pattern of short-period seismic radiation has a systematic variation with depth. On average, for intermediate depth events more radiation is released toward the beginning of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> than near the end, whereas for deep events radiation is released symmetrically over the duration of the event, with an abrupt beginning and end of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These findings suggest a variation in the style of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> related to decreasing fault heterogeneity with depth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Houston, H.; Vidale, J.E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991AIPC..217..165S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> predictions for tantalum alloy T-111</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A knowledge of the short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of Tantalum alloy T-111 is necessary to predict device integrity in the heat source section of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) at the end of service life, in the event of a fuel fire. High pressures exist in RTGs near the end of service life, these are caused by gas generation resulting from radioactive decay of the nuclear fuel. The internal pressure exerts a significant hoop stress on the T-111 alloy structural containment member. This paper analyses the short term creep behavior (<span class="hlt">rupture</span> times up to ˜2×103 hrs.) of cold worked (CW) T-111 alloy, using the existing data of Stephenson (1967). Corellations for the time to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, time to 1% strain and minimum creep rate have been obtained from this data using multivariable linear regression analysis. These results are compared to other short term <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data for T-111 alloy. Finally, at the stress/temperature levels relevant to the RTG fuel fire scenario near the end of service life, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time correlation for T-111 alloy predicts a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time of approximately 100 hrs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stephens, John J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvE..85c1905B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a biomembrane under dynamic surface tension</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">How long will a fluid membrane vesicle stressed with a steady ramp of micropipette last before <span class="hlt">rupture</span>? Or conversely, how high should the surface tension be to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> such a membrane? To answer these challenging questions we developed a theoretical framework that allows for the description and reproduction of dynamic tension spectroscopy (DTS) observations. The kinetics of the membrane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> under ramps of surface tension is described as a succession of an initial pore formation followed by the Brownian process of the pore radius crossing the time-dependent energy barrier. We present the formalism and a derive (formal) analytical expression of the survival probability describing the fate of the membrane under DTS conditions. Using numerical simulations for the membrane prepared in an initial state with a given distribution of times for pore nucleation, we study the membrane lifetime (or inverse of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> rate) and distribution of membrane surface tension at <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as a function of membrane characteristics like pore nucleation rate, the energy barrier to failure, and tension loading rate. It is found that simulations reproduce the main features of DTS experiments, particularly the pore nucleation and pore-size diffusion-controlled limits of membrane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics. This approach can be adapted and applied to processes of permeation and pore opening in membranes (electroporation, membrane disruption by antimicrobial peptides, vesicle fusion).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bicout, D. J.; Kats, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2900591"> <span id="translatedtitle">Carotid Atheroma <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Observed In Vivo and FSI-Predicted Stress Distribution Based on Pre-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> Imaging</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atherosclerosis at the carotid bifurcation is a major risk factor for stroke. As mechanical forces may impact lesion stability, finite element studies have been conducted on models of diseased vessels to elucidate the effects of lesion characteristics on the stresses within plaque materials. It is hoped that patient-specific biomechanical analyses may serve clinically to assess the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> potential for any particular lesion, allowing better stratification of patients into the most appropriate treatments. Due to a sparsity of in vivo plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data, the relationship between various mechanical descriptors such as stresses or strains and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> vulnerability is incompletely known, and the patient-specific utility of biomechanical analyses is unclear. In this article, we present a comparison between carotid atheroma <span class="hlt">rupture</span> observed in vivo and the plaque stress distribution from fluid–structure interaction analysis based on pre-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> medical imaging. The effects of image resolution are explored and the calculated stress fields are shown to vary by as much as 50% with sub-pixel geometric uncertainty. Within these bounds, we find a region of pronounced elevation in stress within the fibrous plaque layer of the lesion with a location and extent corresponding to that of the observed site of plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:20232151</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rayz, Vitaliy L.; Soares, Bruno; Wintermark, Max; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Saloner, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840020892&hterms=800H&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3D800H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of candidate Stirling engine iron supperalloys in high-pressure hydrogen. Volume 2: Hydrogen creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of nine iron base and one cobalt base candidate Stirling engine alloys is evaluated. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> life, minimum creep rate, and time to 1% strain data are analyzed. The 3500 h <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life stress and stress to obtain 1% strain in 3500 h are also estimated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhattacharyya, S.; Peterman, W.; Hales, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhDT.........3T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vortex dynamics in <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> and unruptured intracranial aneurysms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are a potentially devastating pathological dilation of brain arteries that affect 1.5-5 % of the population. Causing around 500 000 deaths per year worldwide, their detection and treatment to prevent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is critical. Multiple recent studies have tried to find a hemodynamics predictor of aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, but concluded with distinct opposite trends using Wall Shear Stress (WSS) based parameters in different clinical datasets. Nevertheless, several research groups tend to converge for now on the fact that the flow patterns and flow dynamics of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms are complex and unstable. Following this idea, we investigated the vortex properties of both unruptured and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cerebral aneurysms. A brief comparison of two Eulerian vortex visualization methods (Q-criterion and lambda 2 method) showed that these approaches gave similar results in our complex aneurysm geometries. We were then able to apply either one of them to a large dataset of 74 patient specific cases of intracranial aneurysms. Those real cases were obtained by 3D angiography, numerical reconstruction of the geometry, and then pulsatile CFD simulation before post-processing with the mentioned vortex visualization tools. First we tested the two Eulerian methods on a few cases to verify their implementation we made as well as compare them with each other. After that, the Q-criterion was selected as method of choice for its more obvious physical meaning (it shows the balance between two characteristics of the flow, its swirling and deformation). Using iso-surfaces of Q, we started by categorizing the patient-specific aneurysms based on the gross topology of the aneurysmal vortices. This approach being unfruitful, we found a new vortex-based characteristic property of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms to stratify the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> risk of IAs that we called the Wall-Kissing Vortices, or WKV. We observed that most <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms had a large amount of WKV, which appears to agree with the current hypothesized biological triggers of pathological remodeling of the artery walls. Having a good natural ratio of statuses in our IA cohort (55 unruptured vs. 19 <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>), we were able to test the statistical significance of our predictor to fortify our findings. We also performed a distribution analysis of our cohort with respect to the number of WKV to strengthen the encouraging statistical analysis result; both analyses provided a clear good separation of the status of the aneurysms based on our predictor. Lastly, we constructed a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to analyze the power different thresholds of WKV had in splitting the data in a binary way (unruptured/<span class="hlt">ruptured</span>). The number of WKV was efficaciously able to stratify the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status, identifying 84.21 % of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms (with 25.45 % of false positives, i.e. unruptured IAs tagged as <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>) when using a threshold value of 2. Our novel work undertaken to study the vortex structures in IAs brought to light interesting characteristics of the flow in the aneurysmal sac. We found that there are several distinct categories in which the aneurysm vortex topologies can be put in without relationship to the aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status. This first finding was in contradiction with available already-published results. Nonetheless, <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> IAs had a statistically significant larger amount of WKV as opposed to unruptured aneurysms. This new predictor we propose to the community could very well clear a new path among the currently controversial WSS-based parameters. Although it needs to be improved to be more resilient, the first results obtained by the WKV-based parameter are promising when applied to a large dataset of 74 IAs patient-specific transient CFD simulations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trylesinski, Gabriel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.T13E2436H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Properties of <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Pulses Induced by Damaged Fault Zones</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Low-velocity fault zones (LVFZ) are found in most mature faults. They are usually 100-400 m wide and have ~20%-60% wave velocity reductions relative to the country rock. To study the effect of LVFZs on earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and the radiated wavefield, we conduct 2D spectral element simulations of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on faults that bisect a LVFZ, considering a range of velocity reductions and widths. Most earthquakes apparently have slip rise times much shorter than their overall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration. A number of dynamic mechanisms for such pulse-like <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> have been proposed, including frictional self-healing, fault strength heterogeneities and bimaterial effects. We find that <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in LVFZs with strong enough wave velocity contrast behave as pulses. These pulses are generated by fault locking induced by waves reflected from the boundaries of the LVFZ. Their rise time is proportional to the wave travel time across the LVFZ. Pure pulse-like <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is favored by high velocity reduction and narrow width of the LVFZ. This mechanism of pulse generation is robust to variations of initial stress, smoothness of the LVFZ structure, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mode and exclusion of frictional healing. Moreover, we find that LVFZs can generate complex <span class="hlt">rupture</span> patterns. LVFZs with low velocity reduction induce multiple <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts involving co-existing pulses and cracks. LVFZs with certain widths can accelerate the transition to supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed. The LVFZ can also induce repeated nucleation of pulses in front of a crack. These additional effects of LVFZs on dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can have characteristic signatures on the radiated wavefield and contribute especially to high frequency ground motions. Given the natural existence of LVFZ and the generality of the pulse generation mechanism presented, it seems unlikely for earthquakes to propagate as pure cracks. However, a mixed crack-pulse <span class="hlt">rupture</span> might not be distinguishable from a pure crack <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the low resolution of current seismological source observations. To further analyze the relation between wavefield and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> healing fronts, we are analyzing the dynamic fault stresses generated by elementary kinematic sources inside a LVFZ. Our goal is to identify which wave phase (such as S or SS) plays the dominant role in the process of pulse generation and. By studying the amplitude and timing of this phase as a function of velocity reduction and width of the LVFZ we can rationalize the effect of fault zone properties on the induced pulses, including their conditions of existence, their rise time and their supershear transition. We will also report on numerical simulations including rate-and-state dependent friction with severe velocity-weakening. Our aims are to assess how frictional self-healing and the LVFZ effect compete to control the properties of pulses, and to identify possible observables that can discriminate between these two mechanisms of pulse generation. We will also investigate if the LVFZ mechanism persists across multiple earthquake cycles, using a recent extension of the spectral element method to longer time scale processes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Y.; Ampuero, J. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRB..118.5530H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Downdip landward limit of Cascadia great earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">paper examines the constraints to the downdip landward limit of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> for the Cascadia great earthquakes off western North America. This limit is a primary control for ground motion hazard at near-coastal cities. The studies also provide information on the physical controls of subduction thrust <span class="hlt">rupture</span> globally. The constraints are (1) "locked/transition" zones from geodetic deformation (GPS, repeated leveling, tide gauges); (2) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone from paleoseismic coastal marsh subsidence, "paleogeodesy"; (3) temperature on the thrust for the seismic-aseismic transition; (4) change in thrust seismic reflection character downdip from thin seismic to thick ductile; (5) fore-arc mantle corner aseismic serpentinite and talc overlying the thrust; (6) updip limit of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) slow slip; (7) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> area associations with shelf-slope basins; (8) depth limit for small events on the thrust; and (9) landward limit of earthquakes on the Nootka transform fault zone. The most reliable constraints for the limit of large <span class="hlt">rupture</span> displacement, >10 m, are generally just offshore in agreement with thermal control for this hot subduction zone, but well-offshore central Oregon and near the coast of northern Washington. The limit for 1-2 m <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that can still provide strong shaking is less well estimated 25-50 km farther landward. The fore-arc mantle corner and the updip extent of ETS slow slip are significantly landward from the other constraints. Surprisingly, there is a downdip gap between the best other estimates for the great earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone and the ETS slow slip. In this gap, plate convergence may occur as continuous slow creep.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hyndman, R. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3872822"> <span id="translatedtitle">Predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> potential</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aortic aneurysm is a leading cause of death in adults, often taking lives without any premonitory signs or symptoms. Adverse clinical outcomes of aortic aneurysm are preventable by elective surgical repair; however, identifying at-risk individuals is difficult. The objective of this study was to perform a predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm (AsAA) tissue to assess <span class="hlt">rupture</span> risk on a patient-specific level. AsAA tissues, obtained intra-operatively from 50 patients, were subjected to biaxial mechanical and uniaxial failure tests to obtain their passive elastic mechanical properties. A novel analytical method was developed to predict the AsAA pressure-diameter response as well as the aortic wall yield and failure responses. Our results indicated that the mean predicted AsAA diameter at <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was 5.6 ± 0.7 cm, and the associated blood pressure to induce <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was 579.4 ± 214.8 mmHg. Statistical analysis showed significant positive correlation between aneurysm tissue compliance and predicted risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, where patients with a pressure-strain modulus ?100 kPa may be nearly twice as likely to experience <span class="hlt">rupture</span> than patients with more compliant aortic tissue. The mechanical analysis of pre-dissection patient tissue properties established in this study could predict the “future” onset of yielding and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in AsAA patients. The analysis results implicate decreased tissue compliance as a risk factor for AsAA <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The presented methods may serve as a basis for the development of a pre-operative planning tool for AsAA evaluation, a tool currently unavailable. PMID:23948500</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Martin, Caitlin; Sun, Wei; Pham, Thuy; Elefteriades, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3021316"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hemodynamic-Morphologic Discriminants for Intracranial Aneurysm <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background and Purpose To identify significant morphologic and hemodynamic parameters that discriminate intracranial aneurysm (IA) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status using 3D angiography and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Methods 119 IAs (38 <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, 81 unruptured) were analyzed from 3D angiographic images and CFD. Six morphologic and seven hemodynamic parameters were evaluated for significance with respect to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis identified area under the curve (AUC) and optimal thresholds separating <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> from unruptured aneurysms for each parameter. Significant parameters were examined by multivariate logistic regression analysis in 3 predictive models—morphology only, hemodynamics only, and combined—to identify independent discriminants, and the AUC-ROC of the predicted probability of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status was compared among these models. Results Morphologic parameters (Size Ratio [SR], Undulation Index, Ellipticity Index, and Nonsphericity Index) and hemodynamic parameters (Average Wall Shear Stress [WSS], Maximum intra-aneurysmal WSS, Low WSS Area, Average Oscillatory Shear Index [OSI], Number of Vortices, and Relative Resident Time) achieved statistical significance (p<0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated SR to be the only independently significant factor in the morphology model (AUC=0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75–0.91), whereas WSS and OSI were the only independently significant variables in the hemodynamics model (AUC=0.85, 95% CI 0.78–0.93). The combined model retained all three variables, SR, WSS, and OSI (AUC=0.89, 95% CI 0.82–0.96). Conclusion All three models—morphological (based on SR), hemodynamic (based on WSS and OSI), and combined—discriminate IA <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status with high AUC values. Hemodynamics is as important as morphology in discriminating aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status. PMID:21106956</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xiang, Jianping; Natarajan, Sabareesh K.; Tremmel, Markus; Ma, Ding; Mocco, J; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Levy, Elad I.; Meng, Hui</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.S32B..08V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral Element simulation of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics on curvilinear faults</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerical simulation of fault <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> process requires today the resolution of several time and space scales, to capture the nucleation, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front propagation, and the short wave radiation associated with heterogeneous fault systems of complexgeometries. Two classes of methods are usually used in seismology: finite differences and boundary integral equations. Classical mixed formulation of finite differences suffers from smoothing and smearing of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front due to the inherent interpolation of staggered schemes. Although if extensions to curved faults have recently been proposed (Cruz-Atienza and Virieux, 2004), using Saenger's stencils, up to now applications of FD methods have been mostly restricted to planar faults. On the other hand, boundary integral equations (Andrews, 1976; Fukuyama and Madariaga, 2000) have been shown to accurately model 3D curvilinear fault segments but are is restricted to homogeneous or layered elastic media. A important issue, still be correctly resolved is the physics of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation when reaching the surface. In this framework, Spectral Element method, combining both the geometrical flexibility of finite elements and convergence rate of high-order spectral methods is an attractive tool for numerical simulation of earthquake dynamic <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> on realistic fault segments in complex geological media. We present numerical simulations of 2D inplane dynamic faulting using the SE method. The results are discussed paying a special attention to the sub- to super-shear transition for both planar and non planar faults, to the influence of different frictional laws on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation and to the influence of layered geolgical media both on the dynamics of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process and the short wave radiation. On going work on two main extensions will be discussed : interactions as the faulting process reach the surface and 3D geometries of faults.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vilotte, J.; Festa, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24531049"> <span id="translatedtitle">Resting-state fMRI reveals functional connectivity between face-selective perirhinal cortex and the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> face area related to face inversion.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Studies examining the neural correlates of face perception and recognition in humans have revealed multiple brain regions that appear to play a specialized role in face processing. These include an anterior portion of perirhinal cortex (PrC) that appears to be homologous to the face-selective 'anterior face patch' recently reported in non-human primates. Electrical stimulation studies in the macaque indicate that the anterior face patch is strongly connected with other face-selective patches of cortex, even in the absence of face stimuli. The intrinsic functional connectivity of face-selective PrC and other regions of the face-processing network in humans are currently less well understood. Here, we examined resting-state fMRI connectivity across five face-selective regions in the right hemisphere that were identified with separate functional localizer scans: the PrC, amygdala (Amg), superior temporal sulcus, <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> face area (FFA), and occipital face area. A partial correlation technique, controlling for fluctuations in occipitotemporal cortex that were not face specific, revealed connectivity between the PrC and the FFA, as well as the Amg. When examining the 'unique' connectivity of PrC within this face processing network, we found that the connectivity between the PrC and the FFA as well as that between the PrC and the Amg persisted even after controlling for potential mediating effects of other face-selective regions. Lastly, we examined the behavioral relevance of PrC connectivity by examining inter-individual differences in resting-state fluctuations in relation to differences in behavioral performance for a forced-choice recognition memory task that involved judgments on upright and inverted faces. This analysis revealed a significant correlation between the increased accuracy for upright faces (i.e., the face inversion effect) and the strength of connectivity between the PrC and the FFA. Together, these findings point to a high degree of functional integration of face-selective aspects of PrC in the face processing network with notable behavioral relevance. PMID:24531049</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">O'Neil, Edward B; Hutchison, R Matthew; McLean, D Adam; Köhler, Stefan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S53D..08D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Using Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Models to Explore Physical Controls on the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seismic and geodetic recordings are routinely used to invert for kinematic source models of large earthquakes, which provide us with detailed images of slip distribution and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> evolution on causative faults. To gain insight into physical conditions that allow a fault to slip and a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to propagate in the way they did, we can resort to dynamic source models that obey physical laws in continuum mechanics and rock friction. Published kinematic models of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake reveal several features of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These features include 1) high static stress drop with large amounts of slip in a small area, 2) a weak initial phase, down-dip <span class="hlt">rupture</span> for the first 40 seconds, extensive shallow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during 60 to 70 seconds, and continuing deeper <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lasting more than 100 seconds, and 3) systematically down-dip high-frequency radiation with respect to the hypocenter. In this study, we use spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models to explore what physical conditions, including the initial stress state and friction properties on the subducting fault, can reproduce these features, so that we can gain some physical insights into controls on this megathrust earthquake. Dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations of this shallow dipping megathrust faulting at reasonable spatial and temporal resolutions require parallel computing on supercomputers. Our newly parallelized finite element method algorithm EQdyna allows us to simulate a large suite of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models to examine the questions. In model setup, we use depth-dependence principal stresses and take into account variations in pore fluid pressure and frictional properties associated with subducted seafloor features such as seamounts. Our preliminary results suggest followings. First, a high strength and high stress drop patch (probably a subducted seamount or seamout chain) just above the hypocenter on the fault plane can delay up-dip <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and result in a concentrated large slip area. Second, significantly negative stress drop on the shallow portion of the subducting fault associated with the active accretionary prism is needed to reduce the amplitude of shallow slip and to confine shallow slip in a small area near the trench just up-dip of the region of maximum fault slip. Third, heterogeneities in the seismic strength parameter S down-dip of the hypocenter, probably due to both heterogeneous stresses from previous earthquakes and heterogeneous friction properties at the brittle and ductile transition zone, can produce large amounts of high-frequency radiations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Duan, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AGUFM.S52A0116Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Process of the 1999 Chi-Chi Earthquake</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Earthquake source dynamics provides key elements for the prediction of strong ground motion and for understanding the physics of earthquake processes. This research investigates the characteristics of dynamic source <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake by using a 3D finite difference method with variable grid spacing. A new algorithm is proposed to deal with a non-planar fault model. This approach does not require aligning the fault plane to the finite-difference grid for implementation of FDM and provide a method to deal with a more realistically irregular geometry fault model. We apply this approach to the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake with a curved fault surface and rebuild the dynamic source <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process for this larger earthquake. Our results show that for the Chi-Chi earthquake, the behaviors of the most of the subfaults followed a slip-weakening friction law during <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. And the distributions of the dynamic source parameters estimated from the kinematic results are quite heterogeneous. For the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process, this study reveals the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation jumping phenomenon which is difficult to be simulated in kinematic modeling. That is when the propagation front encountered a zone with a high strength excess, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> would pause to accumulate more energy to break it. Meanwhile, if there are low strength excess zones around the barrier, the propagation front would jump over the barrier to break the low strength excess zones and leave the high strength barrier unbroken. Such phenomenon of the high strength excess barriers intend to delay the propagation front can be seen clearly in the dynamic model. Using a thick fault zone model, the dynamic model discovers that the slip on the hanging-wall side is larger than that on the food-wall side and the northern parts have the longer source duration that the southern parts and these northern parts have an extreme large slip. Based on the dynamic source <span class="hlt">rupture</span> model, the strong ground motions near the fault surface breaks are simulated in frequency range of 0.05 to 0.5 Hz. In general, the synthetic velocity waveforms agree well with the observed records for most stations. The dynamic source model successfully simulates the distinctive velocity pulse for the stations in the forward <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction. Also our dynamic source model successfully reproduced the waveforms as well as the distinctive velocity pulses for the station nearby or on the fault surface breaks. These results demonstrate that our dynamic source model can reproduce the main features of long period ground motions; hence, lead us to a better understanding on the source <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of the Chi-Chi earthquake.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, W.; Iwata, T.; Irikura, K.; Pitarka, A.; Sekiguchi, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S43C2259K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> scenarios for strong ground motion prediction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models provide physically reasonable <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes under presumed fault geometry and stress field. We propose that dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models based on geological or geomorphological data are used as earthquake scenarios for strong ground motion prediction. We apply our method to possible sources of earthquake occurring on the Uemachi fault systems. The Uemachi fault system runs just underneath the western part of Osaka plain, extends about 45 km, and dips 60 degrees to the east. We model the fault geometry from the surface traces and the shape of the Osaka basin-floor. The stress condition is presumed based on slip distributions on the fault. Spatially varied cumulative slip distribution along the strike of the Uemachi fault system was obtained by reflection surveys, borehole data, etc. The borehole data at a site along the fault showed that the vertical slip on the earth's surface due to the last event was between 1.6 to 2.4 m (Sugiyama et al., 2003). Combining these data, we presume an prototype of the slip distribution along strike. The slip distribution along dip is modeled through simulations of spontaneous <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> under vertically depth-dependent stress conditions to realize spontaneously stopping <span class="hlt">rupture</span> near the bottom of the seismogeneic zone. Onto this large-scale heterogeneous slip distribution model, we add fractal heterogeneities in small-scale created from different random numbers. These slip distributions are converted to the distributions of static stress drop. For each stress drop model, some hypocenter locations are assumed. We calculate dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes by the finite-difference method (Kase, 2010), assuming the slip-weakening friction law. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> area and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time on each point depend on stress model and hypocenter location. Based on these <span class="hlt">rupture</span> scenarios, we simulate lower frequency components of ground motion by the finite-difference method (Pitarka, 1999) excluding the shallow sediment above the engineering basement. Higher frequency components are computed by the stochastic Green's function method (Onishi and Horike, 2000). Effects of the shallow alluvium layers are calculated by 1D multi-reflection theory considering nonlinear effect by equivalent linear technique using a computer code DYNEQ (Yoshida and Suetomi, 1996).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kase, Y.; Sekiguchi, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S14A..07G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Near-Source Shaking and Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in Plastic Media</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent well recorded earthquakes show a high degree of complexity at the source level that severely affects the resulting ground motion in near and far-field seismic data. In our study, we focus on investigating source-dominated near-field ground motion features from numerical dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations in an elasto-visco-plastic bulk. Our aim is to contribute to a more direct connection from theoretical and computational results to field and seismological observations. Previous work showed that a diversity of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> styles emerges from simulations on faults governed by velocity-and-state-dependent friction with rapid velocity-weakening at high slip rate. For instance, growing pulses lead to re-activation of slip due to gradual stress build-up near the hypocenter, as inferred in some source studies of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. Moreover, off-fault energy dissipation implied physical limits on extreme ground motion by limiting peak slip rate and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity. We investigate characteristic features in near-field strong ground motion generated by dynamic in-plane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations. We present effects of plasticity on source process signatures, off-fault damage patterns and ground shaking. Independent of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> style, asymmetric damage patterns across the fault are produced that contribute to the total seismic moment, and even dominantly at high angles between the fault and the maximum principal background stress. The off-fault plastic strain fields induced by transitions between <span class="hlt">rupture</span> styles reveal characteristic signatures of the mechanical source processes during the transition. Comparing different <span class="hlt">rupture</span> styles in elastic and elasto-visco-plastic media to identify signatures of off-fault plasticity, we find varying degrees of alteration of near-field radiation due to plastic energy dissipation. Subshear pulses suffer more peak particle velocity reduction due to plasticity than cracks. Supershear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are affected even more. The occurrence of multiple <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts affect seismic potency release rate, amplitude spectra, peak particle velocity distributions and near-field seismograms. Our simulations enable us to trace features of source processes in synthetic seismograms, for example exhibiting a re-activation of slip. Such physical models may provide starting points for future investigations of field properties of earthquake source mechanisms and natural fault conditions. In the long-term, our findings may be helpful for seismic hazard analysis and the improvement of seismic source models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gabriel, A.; Mai, P. M.; Dalguer, L. A.; Ampuero, J. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24650079"> <span id="translatedtitle">Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> - treatment and complications: A systematic review.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a frequent injury with an increasing incidence. Until now, there is no consensus regarding optimal treatment. The aim of this review was to illuminate and summarize randomized controlled trials comparing surgical and non-surgical treatment of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> during the last 10 years. Seven articles were found and they were all acceptable according to international quality assessment guidelines. Primary outcomes were re-<span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, other complications, and functional outcomes. There was no significant difference in re-<span class="hlt">ruptures</span> between the two treatments, but a tendency to favoring surgical treatment. Further, one study found an increased risk of soft-tissue-related complications after surgery. Patient satisfaction and time to return to work were significantly different in favor of surgery in one study, and there was also better functional outcome after surgery in some studies. These seven studies indicate that surgical patients have a faster rehabilitation. However, the differences between surgical and non-surgical treatment appear to be subtle and it could mean that rehabilitation is more important, rather than the actual initial treatment. Therefore, further studies will be needed in regard to understanding the interplay between acute surgical or non-surgical treatment, and the rehabilitation regimen for the overall outcome after Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. PMID:24650079</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Holm, C; Kjaer, M; Eliasson, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AcGeo..62.1087M"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of an evaporating liquid bridge between two grains</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The study examines <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of evaporating liquid bridges between two glass spheres. Evolution of the bridge profile has been recorded with the use of high-speed camera. Geometrical characteristics of the bridge were then used to calculate evolution of the variables during the process: Laplace pressure, capillary force, and surface tension force. For the purpose of reference, the bridge evolution is followed also during kinematic extension. During both processes the diameter of the neck decreases, with an acceleration of about 1-2 ms before the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Two distinct <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes are observed, depending on the bridge aspect ratio. After the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, the mass of liquid splits, forming two separate oscillating drops attached to the spheres, and a suspended satellite droplet. Just before the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, an increasing repulsive Laplace pressure, and decreasing negative surface tension force develop. Capillary force follows the trend of the surface tension force, with an accelerating decline. Duration of the whole process and liquid mass stabilization is from 10 to 60 ms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mielniczuk, Boleslaw; El Youssoufi, Moulay Said; Sabatier, Laurent; Hueckel, Tomasz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JPES....2.1140Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Properties of Welded Joints of Heat Resistant Steels</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study, the high-temperature mechanical and creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of Grade 91/Grade 91 (Mod. 9Cr-Mo) similar welded joints and Grade 91/Inconel 82/SUS304 dissimilar welded joints were examined. The effects of temperature and stress on the failure location in the joints were also investigated. Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests were conducted at 823, 873, and 923 K; the applied stress ranges were 160-240, 80-160, and 40-80 MPa, respectively. The creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> strengths of the specimens with welded joints were lower than those of the specimens of the base metal at all temperature levels; in addition, these differences in creep strength increased with temperature. After being subjected to long-term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests, the fracture type exhibited by the dissimilar welded joints was transformed from Types V and VII to Type IV. It was estimated that the fracture type exhibited by the dissimilar welded joints after 100,000-h <span class="hlt">rupture</span> strength tests at 823 K and 873 K was Type IV fracture.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yamazaki, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Takashi; Hongo, Hiromichi; Tabuchi, Masaaki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4275862"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous ureteric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> secondary to an invasive desmoid tumour</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">INTRODUCTION Spontaneous ureteric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare entity that presents as an extravasation of urine from the ureter without previous surgery, ureteric manipulation and external trauma of the ureter. We report the case of a desmoid tumour presenting as spontaneous ureteric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> which was managed in our institution. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 28 years old healthy male presented with a four day history of generalised abdominal pain secondary to spontaneous right ureteric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Patient was initially managed via insertion of nephrostomy tube and antibiotics. After unsuccessful attempts of retrograde and antegrade ureteric stent insertion, patient was subsequently managed via elective surgical intervention. The excised specimen revealed desmoid tumour as cause of the ureteric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. DISCUSSION Desmoid tumours are rare benign tumours arising from fascial or musculoaponeurotic structures that do not metastasise, but tend to invade locally. It is often initially managed medically prior to undertaking a definitive surgical intervention. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of ureteric perforation secondary to a desmoid tumour of the mesentery. CONCLUSION Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the ureter is often misdiagnosed as other conditions. History taking and examination can be unreliable, hence a high level of suspicion and further investigations should be utilised. Once the diagnosis is made, treatment can be individualised based on aetiology. PMID:25460442</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yoon, Peter Daechul; Ahmadi, Nariman; Strahan, Stephen; Wang, Audrey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3352434"> <span id="translatedtitle">The prevention of carotid artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Carotid artery exposure and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is one of the most feared complications of head and neck surgery. The ideal method for preventing <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an exposed artery should be easy to perform, safe, effective and should spare local and regional flaps for later use in reconstruction. Isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate (Bucrylate) is a commercially available compound that appears to meet these criteria. Test animals were divided into two groups. The carotid arteries of 12 dogs (group A) were exteriorized bilaterally and coated with Bucrylate unilaterally. Group B (four dogs) underwent the same procedure except that the vessels were bilaterally coated. Wounds were dressed twice daily with moist-to-dry gauze. No antibiotics were given. Nine of the 12 unprotected arteries in group A <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> within 2 weeks, and one unprotected artery <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> on postoperative day (POD) 29. Two dogs healed over both vessels. In group B, three dogs <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> their arteries within 2 weeks. One dog healed over both vessels. Gross and histologic examination of the arteries showed a striking difference between coated and uncoated vessels. We believe that Bucrylate and cyanoacrylate adhesives hold promise in the clinical protection of exposed carotid arteries. PMID:3352434</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Costantino, P D; Atiyah, R A; Mico, A S; Sisson, G A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20110011347&hterms=aggressive&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Daggressive"> <span id="translatedtitle">Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Stress <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Test</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">One of the major concerns for the aging Space Shuttle fleet is the stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). Stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life of a COPV has been defined as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress levels and time. To assist in the evaluation of the aging COPVs in the Orbiter fleet an analytical reliability model was developed. The actual data used to construct this model was from testing of COPVs constructed of similar, but not exactly same materials and pressure cycles as used on Orbiter vessels. Since no actual Orbiter COPV stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data exists the Space Shuttle Program decided to run a stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> test to compare to model predictions. Due to availability of spares, the testing was unfortunately limited to one 40" vessel. The stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> test was performed at maximum operating pressure at an elevated temperature to accelerate aging. The test was performed in two phases. The first phase, 130 F, a moderately accelerated test designed to achieve the midpoint of the model predicted point reliability. The more aggressive second phase, performed at 160 F was designed to determine if the test article will exceed the 95% confidence interval of the model. This paper will discuss the results of this test, it's implications and possible follow-on testing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Russell, Richard; Flynn, Howard; Forth, Scott; Greene, Nathanael; Kezian, Michael; Varanauski, Don; Yoder, Tommy; Woodworth, Warren</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21191518"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of hepatic hemangiomas: A review of the literature.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hepatic hemangiomas are congenital vascular malformations, considered the most common benign mesenchymal hepatic tumors, composed of masses of blood vessels that are atypical or irregular in arrangement and size. Hepatic hemangiomas can be divided into two major groups: capillary hemangiomas and cavernous hemangiomas These tumors most frequently affect females (80%) and adults in their fourth and fifth decades of life. Most cases are asymptomatic although a few patients may present with a wide variety of clinical symptoms, with spontaneous or traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> being the most severe complication. In cases of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, clinical manifestations consist of sudden abdominal pain, and anemia secondary to a haemoperitoneum. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy can also occur. Haemodynamic instability and signs of hypovolemic shock appear in about one third of cases. As the size of the hemangioma increases, so does the chance of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Imaging studies used in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas include ultrasonography, dynamic contrast-enchanced computed tomography scanning, magnetic resonance imaging, hepatic arteriography, digital subtraction angiography, and nuclear medicine studies. In most cases hepatic hemangiomas are asymptomatic and should be followed up by means of periodic radiological examination. Surgery should be restricted to specific situations. Absolute indications for surgery are spontaneous or traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with hemoperitoneum, intratumoral bleeding and consumptive coagulopathy (Kassabach-Merrit syndrome). In a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain due to unknown abdominal disease, spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a hepatic tumor such as a hemangioma should be considered as a rare differential diagnosis. PMID:21191518</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jr, Marcelo Af Ribeiro; Papaiordanou, Francine; Gonçalves, Juliana M; Chaib, Eleazar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3010512"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of hepatic hemangiomas: A review of the literature</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hepatic hemangiomas are congenital vascular malformations, considered the most common benign mesenchymal hepatic tumors, composed of masses of blood vessels that are atypical or irregular in arrangement and size. Hepatic hemangiomas can be divided into two major groups: capillary hemangiomas and cavernous hemangiomas These tumors most frequently affect females (80%) and adults in their fourth and fifth decades of life. Most cases are asymptomatic although a few patients may present with a wide variety of clinical symptoms, with spontaneous or traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> being the most severe complication. In cases of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, clinical manifestations consist of sudden abdominal pain, and anemia secondary to a haemoperitoneum. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy can also occur. Haemodynamic instability and signs of hypovolemic shock appear in about one third of cases. As the size of the hemangioma increases, so does the chance of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Imaging studies used in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas include ultrasonography, dynamic contrast-enchanced computed tomography scanning, magnetic resonance imaging, hepatic arteriography, digital subtraction angiography, and nuclear medicine studies. In most cases hepatic hemangiomas are asymptomatic and should be followed up by means of periodic radiological examination. Surgery should be restricted to specific situations. Absolute indications for surgery are spontaneous or traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with hemoperitoneum, intratumoral bleeding and consumptive coagulopathy (Kassabach-Merrit syndrome). In a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain due to unknown abdominal disease, spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a hepatic tumor such as a hemangioma should be considered as a rare differential diagnosis. PMID:21191518</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jr, Marcelo AF Ribeiro; Papaiordanou, Francine; Gonçalves, Juliana M; Chaib, Eleazar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4177807"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radiographic Risk Factors for Contralateral <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in Dogs with Unilateral Cranial Cruciate Ligament <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Complete cranial cruciate ligament <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (CR) is a common cause of pelvic limb lameness in dogs. Dogs with unilateral CR often develop contralateral CR over time. Although radiographic signs of contralateral stifle joint osteoarthritis (OA) influence risk of subsequent contralateral CR, this risk has not been studied in detail. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a retrospective longitudinal cohort study of client-owned dogs with unilateral CR to determine how severity of radiographic stifle synovial effusion and osteophytosis influence risk of contralateral CR over time. Detailed survival analysis was performed for a cohort of 85 dogs after case filtering of an initial sample population of 513 dogs. This population was stratified based on radiographic severity of synovial effusion (graded on a scale of 0, 1, and 2) and severity of osteophytosis (graded on a scale of 0, 1, 2, and 3) of both index and contralateral stifle joints using a reproducible scoring method. Severity of osteophytosis in the index and contralateral stifles was significantly correlated. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the contralateral cranial cruciate ligament was significantly influenced by radiographic OA in both the index and contralateral stifles at diagnosis. Odds ratio for development of contralateral CR in dogs with severe contralateral radiographic stifle effusion was 13.4 at one year after diagnosis and 11.4 at two years. Odds ratio for development of contralateral CR in dogs with severe contralateral osteophytosis was 9.9 at one year after diagnosis. These odds ratios were associated with decreased time to contralateral CR. Breed, age, body weight, gender, and tibial plateau angle did not significantly influence time to contralateral CR. Conclusion Subsequent contralateral CR is significantly influenced by severity of radiographic stifle effusion and osteophytosis in the contralateral stifle, suggesting that synovitis and arthritic joint degeneration are significant factors in the disease mechanism underlying the arthropathy. PMID:25254499</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chuang, Connie; Ramaker, Megan A.; Kaur, Sirjaut; Csomos, Rebecca A.; Kroner, Kevin T.; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Schaefer, Susan L.; Muir, Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25130942"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tracheal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in complicated delivery: a case report and review of the literature.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A case of distal tracheal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is described, literature review reveals two previously reported cases of neonatal distal tracheal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as well as 14 cases of anterior subglottic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. All patients had shoulder dystocia, and 59% had associated brachial plexus injury. Delayed diagnosis (>3 days) was common in the distal tracheal group (66%), compared to 0% in the anterior subglottic group. The 2 distal tracheal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> patients were initially managed conservatively, but ultimately required open repair. Distal tracheal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is exceedingly rare and more difficult to diagnose and manage than the more common anterior subglottic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:25130942</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Siegel, Bianca; Bent, John P; Weinstein, Samuel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19225999"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of latissimus dorsi muscle in a tennis player.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the latissimus dorsi muscle is a rare injury, and few reported cases were avulsion injuries at their humeral insertion. Seven cases of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the latissimus dorsi muscle have been reported, but only 1 occurred at the myotendinous junction. The mechanism of this injury is reported to be forceful resisted arm adduction or extension, and reported injuries were rock climbing and attempting to pull up on an overhead handhold, waterskiing injury during pull-up with ski rope, overuse in golf in the leading arm, and abduction-external rotation with horizontally extended arm during a professional steer wrestling performance. The latissimus dorsi muscle is not a critical muscle for activities of daily living; however, the significance of the muscle is increased in professional or elite athletes. This article presents a case of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the latissimus dorsi muscle at the myotendinous junction that occurred during a sports activity. PMID:19225999</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, Jin-Young; Lhee, Sang-Hoon; Keum, Jeong-Sup</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8775340"> <span id="translatedtitle">Repair of ventricular septal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> through the right atrium.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The right atrial approach for repair of ventricular septal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> associated with myocardial infarction is an alternative technique to the conventional approach of exposing the septum through the left ventricle. This technique may be combined with mitral valve replacement, infarct excision, or aneurysm resection, by avoiding a direct incision in the ventricle reduce postrepair bleeding and impairment of ventricular contractile function. We present a case of ventricular septal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> repaired through the right atrium and review our surgical technique. This technique may be applied to most cases of ventricular septal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, and is particularly useful when the ventricular wall is not infarcted or aneurysmal, and the defect involves the central portion of the muscular septum, the inlet septum, and the subaortic and membranous area. PMID:8775340</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Berrizbeitia, L D; McGrath, L B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10181223"> <span id="translatedtitle">Engineering evaluation of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> strainer in Building 309</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report deals with the consequences of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> steam strainer and is divided into two sections. Section 1 evaluates the engineering aspects of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> steam strainer, investigates the events that culminated in the damage and considers factors that may have contributed to the incident. Recommendations are presented to upgrade the system in Building 309 by incorporating hardware changes and proposes a change in operating procedures. Section 2 utilizes the findings presented in Section 1 as a basis for conducting a review on the remainder of the 300 Area steam system, in order to identify similar problem areas. Corrective action recommendations to reduce the risk of repeating component <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> from water hammer conditions were developed out of the survey and the associated review.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Papenfuss, J.N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25516684"> <span id="translatedtitle">Emergency laparoscopic partial splenectomy for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen: a case report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a common consequence of blunt abdominal trauma. Emergency splenectomy is indicated when conservative management is not effective. With better understanding of the immunologic function of the spleen, surgeons have begun to perform the splenic-preserving surgery. However, it is technical challenge to perform emergency laparoscopic partial splenectomy for patient with spleen <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. A 15-year-old male patient suffered from grade III spleen injury basing on the American association for the surgery of trauma splenic injury scale. Conservative treatment failed to success basing on the dramatically decreased hemoglobin level. During the laparoscopic exploration, we found that two individual <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> were associated with the upper pole of spleen. An emergency laparoscopic partial splenectomy was successfully carried out. The operative time was approximate 150 min and the estimated blood loss was 200 mL. The post-operative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on the 7(th) post-operative day. PMID:25516684</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cai, Yun-Qiang; Li, Chun-Lin; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xin; Peng, Bing</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70026333"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> hazard for strike-slip earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present fault displacement data, regressions, and a methodology to calculate in both a probabilistic and deterministic framework the fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> hazard for strike-slip faults. To assess this hazard we consider: (1) the size of the earthquake and probability that it will <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to the surface, (2) the rate of all potential earthquakes on the fault (3) the distance of the site along and from the mapped fault, (4) the complexity of the fault and quality of the fault mapping, (5) the size of the structure that will be placed at the site, and (6) the potential and size of displacements along or near the fault. Probabilistic fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> hazard analysis should be an important consideration in design of structures or lifelines that are located within about 50m of well-mapped active faults.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Petersen, M.; Cao, T.; Dawson, T.; Frankel, A.; Wills, C.; Schwartz, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2589064"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in infectious mononucleosis: a review.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the spleen is a rare complication of infectious mononucleosis (IM) occurring in 0.1-0.5 percent of patients with proven IM [1]. Although splenectomy has been advocated as the definitive therapy in the past, numerous recent reports have documented favorable outcomes with non-operative management. A review of the literature suggests that non-operative management can be successful if appropriate criteria, such as hemodynamic stability and transfusion requirements are applied in patient selection. We report the case of a 36 year old man with infectious mononucleosis who had a spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and who was successfully managed by splenectomy. Based on review of the literature, an approach to management of a spontaneously <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> spleen secondary to IM is suggested. PMID:9493849</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Asgari, M. M.; Begos, D. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4276298"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Case of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Splenic Artery Aneurysm in Pregnancy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a splenic artery aneurysm is rare complication of pregnancy that is associated with a significant maternal and fetal mortality. Case. A multiparous female presented in the third trimester with hypotension, tachycardia, and altered mental status. A <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> splenic artery aneurysm was discovered at the time of laparotomy and cesarean delivery. The patient made a full recovery following resection of the aneurysm. The neonate survived but suffered severe neurologic impairment. Conclusion. The diagnosis of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> splenic artery aneurysm should be considered in a pregnant woman presenting with signs of intra-abdominal hemorrhage. Early intervention by a multidisciplinary surgical team is key to preserving the life of the mother and fetus. PMID:25574408</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Corey, Elizabeth K.; Harvey, Scott A.; Sauvage, Lynnae M.; Bohrer, Justin C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4321505"> <span id="translatedtitle">PIP breast implants: <span class="hlt">rupture</span> rate and correlation with breast cancer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aim To evaluate the incidence of Poly Implant Prosthése (PIP) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the prevalence of the detected signs and the potential correlation with breast carcinoma. Patients and methods 67 patients with silicone breast implants and clinical indications for breast MRI were evaluated for a total of 125 implants: 40 (32%) PIP in 21 patients and 85 non-PIP in 46 patients (68%), the latest considered as control group. A 1.5-T MR imaging device was used in order to assess implant integrity with dedicated sequences and in 6 cases a dynamic study was performed for characterizing breast lesions. Two radiologists with more than 5 years’ experience in the field of MRI evaluated in consensus all MR images searching for the presence of clear signs of intra or extra-capsular implant <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Results 20/40 (50%) PIP implants presented signs of intra-capsular <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: linguine sign in 20 cases (100%), tear-drop sign in 6 (30%). In 12/20 cases (60%), MRI signs of extra-capsular <span class="hlt">rupture</span> were detected. In the control group, an intra-capsular <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was diagnosed in 12/85 cases (14%) associated with extra-capsular one in 5/12 cases (42%). Among the six cases with suspected breast lesions, in 2/21 patients with PIP implants (10%) a breast carcinoma was diagnosed (mucinous carcinoma, n=1; invasive ductal carcinoma, n=1). In 4/46 patients (9%) with non-PIP implants, an invasive ductal carcinoma was diagnosed. Conclusion The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> rate of PIP breast implants is significantly higher than non-PIP (50% vs 14%). MRI represents the most accurate imaging tool for evaluating breast prostheses and the linguine sign is the most common MRI sign to be searched. The incidence of breast carcinoma does not significantly differ between the PIP and non-PIP implants and a direct correlation with breast cancer can not been demonstrated. PMID:25644728</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">MOSCHETTA, M.; TELEGRAFO, M.; CORNACCHIA, I.; VINCENTI, L.; RANIERI, V.; CIRILLI, A.; RELLA, L.; IANORA, A.A. STABILE; ANGELELLI, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4310132"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rapid aneurysm growth and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in systemic lupus erythematosus</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to intracranial aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a major neurosurgical emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Rapid aneurysm growth is associated with <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-system autoimmune disorder whose complications can include cerebral vasculitis and vasculopathy. Intracranial aneurysms are not known to occur more frequently in SLE patients than the general population; however, aneurysm growth rates have not been studied in SLE. Case Description: We present a 43-year-old female with SLE on prednisone, hydroxychloroquine, and azathioprine with moderate disease activity who presented with severe, acute-onset headache and was found to have Hunt and Hess grade II SAH due to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an 8 mm saccular anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm. The patient developed severe vasospasm, re-<span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, and was taken for angiography and embolization, which was challenging due to a high degree of vasospasm and arterial stenosis. Review of imaging from less than 2 years prior demonstrated a normal ACoA complex without evidence of an aneurysm. Conclusion: We review the literature and discuss the risk factors and pathophysiology of rapid aneurysm growth and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as well as the pathologic vascular changes associated with SLE. Although SLE patients do not develop intracranial aneurysm at an increased rate, these changes may predispose them to higher incidence of growth and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. This possibility-coupled with increased morbidity and mortality of SAH in SLE-suggests that SAH should be considered in SLE patients presenting with headache, and advocates for more aggressive treatment of SLE patients with unruptured aneurysms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Graffeo, Christopher S.; Tanweer, Omar; Nieves, Cesar Fors; Belmont, H. Michael; Izmirly, Peter M.; Becske, Tibor; Huang, Paul P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3862203"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clinical Characteristics and Surgical Problems of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Globe Injury?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Ocular trauma is a major cause of vision loss, especially in the young patients, and is the leading cause of unilateral blind in China. Objective The aims of this report are to analyze ciliary and choroidal lesion characteristics and outcomes of a group of patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> globe injuries and discuss finding a more effective treatment protocol. Here we report our experience treating <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> globe injuries. Methods Seventy-five patients (75 eyes) with a diagnosis of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> globe injuries were selected from 264 patients with open globe injuries at the Shierming Eye Hospital of Shandong Province between January 2009 and December 2011. General information and clinical characteristics such as ciliary and choroidal lesion features were reviewed. Results Of the 75 patients, 85.3% were men, and the average age of the patients was 37.2 years (range, 6–63 years). The right eye was injured in 52.0%; enucleation was performed in 9 patients. There was no light perception, in the final corrected visual acuity in another 3 patients. The ratio of better visual acuity (better than 0.1) increased from 0 preoperatively to 16.0% postoperatively. Among the 75 patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> globe injuries, 13 had ciliary injury and 47 (62.7%) had choroidal injuries. Both ciliary and choroidal injuries were detected in 15 patients. Retinal tissue incarceration during sclera suturing was usually the vital point leading to unfavorable results. Conclusions <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> globe injury usually results in severe visual acuity damage. Active treatment could help to restore visual acuity in patients to some degree. Some effective treatment protocols for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> globe injuries could be followed. Some unsuitable procedures in primary treatment should be avoided to achieve a better prognosis. PMID:24385006</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bi, Hongsheng; Cui, Yan; Li, Yang; Wang, Xingrong; Zhang, Jianhua</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23622508"> <span id="translatedtitle">A broken heart: right ventricular <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after blunt cardiac injury.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 68 year old woman who was a restrained driver was brought to the hospital after sustaining severe motor vehicle accident. She underwent CT of the chest demonstrating pulmonary infiltrates, multiple rib fractures, bilateral hemo- and pneumothoraces. Subsequent review of the images noted contrast extravasating from the apical portion of the right ventricle into the pericardial space, demonstrating a confined <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of right ventricle. Cardiac <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a common complication of a rare event and there are few examples in the imaging literature capturing such event. PMID:23622508</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nabeel, Muhammad; Williams, Kim Allan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24292386"> <span id="translatedtitle">Supraspinatus <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the musculotendinous junction in a young woman.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The vast majority of rotator cuff tears occur within the tendon or as an avulsion from the greater tuberosity. Supraspinatus injury at the musculotendinous junction is a very uncommon event. We describe a case of supraspinatus <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the musculotendinous junction, with successful conservative treatment. It occurred in a 23-year-old woman, the youngest patient with this uncommon type of injury. To our knowledge, this is the first case of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the supraspinatus muscle at the musculotendinous junction in a young woman and the second in a woman. PMID:24292386</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benazzo, Francesco; Marullo, Matteo; Pietrobono, Luigi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4216311"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seminoma presented as testicular <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: Case report and literature review</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the testis as a result of blunt trauma is rarely seen in daily urological practice. We report an unusual case of incidental seminoma diagnosed after surgical exploration and subsequent orchidectomy of a severed testis following testicular injury as a result of trivial blunt trauma. This case highlights the inability of investigative tools, such as a scrotal ultrasound, in distinguishing an underlying tumour in the presence of testicular parenchymal damage. We therefore advocate a high index of clinical suspicion for co-existing pathology in cases of testicular <span class="hlt">rupture</span> secondary to an insignificant blunt trauma to the scrotum. PMID:25408819</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lunawat, Rahul; Craciun, Marius; Omorphos, Savvas; Weston, Philip M.T.; Biyani, Shekhar C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25410030"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of sternocleidomastoid muscle following an epileptic seizure.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 29-year-old man, a known epileptic, presented to an accident and emergency department following a tonic-clonic seizure, suffering a second seizure in the department. Subsequently, he reported neck pain, swelling and stiffness. An otorhinolaryngology neck examination revealed a tender left side with two palpable masses and a reduced range of movement. Ultrasound confirmed a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> middle third of the left sternocleidomastoid muscle, which was successfully treated non-surgically with analgaesia and intensive physiotherapy. Uncommonly, sternocleidomastoid muscle <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has been reported following high-velocity trauma, but to the best of our knowledge this is the first case described in the literature following an epileptic seizure. PMID:25410030</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wooles, Nicola Rachel; Bell, Philip Robert; Korda, Marian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16119741"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical treatment options for patella tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, part II: chronic.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Patella tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a debilitating injury that often occurs in the setting of preexisting tendon degeneration. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential to prevent retraction of the patella with subsequent adhesions and quadriceps contractures. In the setting of a chronic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, augmentation with hamstring tendons or allograft reconstruction generally is necessary. Patients who undergo delayed repair are at risk for a compromised result secondary to loss of full knee flexion and decreased quadriceps strength, although a functional extensor mechanism is likely to be reestablished. Overall the results of chronic repair are less satisfactory than the acute repair, but still provide an extensor mechanism for the patient and thus provide function. PMID:16119741</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Greis, Patrick E; Lahav, Amit; Holmstrom, Michael C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3680613"> <span id="translatedtitle">Massive Spontaneous Diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Induced by a Squatting Position</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">While a diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> commonly results from trauma to the abdomen and chest, a spontaneous diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is very rare. A 68-year-old male presented with chest pain that had originated while doing farm work in a squatting position. Images revealed a 5 cm defect of the left diaphragmatic dome, and the entire stomach was displaced into the thorax. The diaphragmatic defect was round and half had a well-demarcated margin. The remaining fragile tissue was completely excised and was closed primarily. The patient was uneventfully discharged and resumed with a normal diet 10 days after the operation. PMID:23772415</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Su Wan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4293197"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous Intercostal Arterial <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Restrained by Conservative Management</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A spontaneous intercostal arterial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in patients without associated illness or trauma is extremely rare. We present a 58-year-old man with an idiopathic and spontaneous arterial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> restrained by conservative management. He was admitted to our institute with an intermittent back pain lasting for 3 days. His past history included no notable diseases and chest trauma. An enhanced computed tomography revealed an effusion of blood around the descending aorta and hematoma from right 10th intercostal artery. Management of blood pressure and administration of tranexamic acid were performed and he was uneventfully discharged at 11 days after onset.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ishida, Atsuhisa; Chikazawa, Genta; Maeda, Kazuki; Yoshitaka, Hidenori</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24386587"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> common femoral artery aneurysm or abdominal aortic aneurysm?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We encountered a patient with a large retroperitoneal hematoma due to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a common femoral artery aneurysm. A 77-year-old man was transferred to our hospital with left groin pain and shock. Computed tomography demonstrated a large retroperitoneal hematoma involving the left iliofemoral segment with extravasation of contrast into the left groin from a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> left common femoral artery aneurysm. The patient also had an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Reconstruction of the common femoral artery with a graft was performed successfully. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and subsequently underwent Y-graft replacement of the abdominal aortic aneurysm. PMID:24386587</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Niino, Tetsuya; Unosawa, Satoshi; Kimura, Haruka</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21608624"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous Liver <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> After Treatment With Drug-Eluting Beads</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is a rare and life-threatening complication. Pathophysiologic mechanisms are not yet fully known; it is suggested that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is preceded by reactive tissue edema and intratumerous bleeding, leading to a rapid expansion of tumour mass with risk of extrahepatic bleeding in the case of subcapsular localisation. This case report discusses a sudden, unexpected lethal complication in a 74 year-old male patient treated with TACE using DC Bead loaded with doxorubicin (DEBDOX) in a progressive multifocal HCC.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ritter, C. O., E-mail: ritter@roentgen.uni-wuerzburg.de [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Radiology (Germany); Wartenberg, M.; Mottok, A. [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Pathology (Germany); Steger, U. [University of Wuerzburg, Department of General, Visceral, Vascular, and Pediatric Surgery (Germany); Goltz, J. P.; Hahn, D.; Kickuth, R. [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Radiology (Germany)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1611224G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coupling a geodynamic seismic cycling model to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamic simulations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The relevance and results of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> scenarios are implicitly linked to the geometry and pre-existing stress and strength state on a fault. The absolute stresses stored along faults during interseismic periods, are largely unquantifiable. They are, however, pivotal in defining coseismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> styles, near-field ground motion, and macroscopic source properties (Gabriel et al., 2012). Obtaining these in a physically consistent manner requires seismic cycling models, which directly couple long-term deformation processes (over 1000 year periods), the self-consistent development of faults, and the resulting dynamic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. One promising approach to study seismic cycling enables both the generation of spontaneous fault geometries and the development of thermo-mechanically consistent fault stresses. This seismo-thermo-mechanical model has been developed using a methodology similar to that employed to study long-term lithospheric deformation (van Dinther et al., 2013a,b, using I2ELVIS of Gerya and Yuen, 2007). We will innovatively include the absolute stress and strength values along physically consistent evolving non-finite fault zones (regions of strain accumulation) from the geodynamic model into dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations as an initial condition. The dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations will be performed using SeisSol, an arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) scheme (Pelties et al., 2012). The dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models are able to incorporate the large degree of fault geometry complexity arising in naturally evolving geodynamic models. We focus on subduction zone settings with and without a splay fault. Due to the novelty of the coupling, we first focus on methodological challenges, e.g. the synchronization of both methods regarding the nucleation of events, the localization of fault planes, and the incorporation of similar frictional constitutive relations. We then study the importance of physically consistent fault stress, strength, and geometry input for dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation in terms of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> path and dynamics. On the other hand, it will provide the opportunity to compare slow earthquake akin events developing in quasi-static geodynamic model to fully dynamic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in terms of coseismic displacements and stress changes. Gabriel, A.-A. (2012), J.-P. Ampuero, L. A. Dalguer, and P. M. Mai, The transition of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes in elastic media, J. Geophys. Res., 117(B9), 01480227. Gerya, T., and D. Yuen (2007), Robust characteristics method for modelling multiphase visco-elasto-plastic thermo-mechanical problems, Phys. Earth Planet In., 163(1-4), 83-105. Pelties, C. (2012), J. De la Puente, J.-P. Ampuero, G. B. Brietzke, and M. Käser Three-Dimensional Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>, Simulation with a High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Method on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes, J. Geophys. Res., 117(B2), B02309. van Dinther, Y. (2013a), T.V. Gerya, L.A. Dalguer, F. Corbi, F. Funiciello, and P.M. Mai, The seismic cycle at subduction thrusts: 2. Dynamic implications of geodynamic simulations validated with laboratory models, J. Geophys. Res., 118(4), 1502-1525. van Dinther, Y. (2013b), T.V. Gerya, L.A. Dalguer, P.M. Mai, G. Morra, and D. Giardini, The seismic cycle at subduction thrusts: insights from seismo-thermo-mechanical models, J. Geophys. Res., 118, 6183-6202.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gabriel, Alice; van Dinther, Ylona</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3927114"> <span id="translatedtitle">Transcatheter closure of sinus of Valsalva aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a young patient</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare cardiac anomaly and demands prompt treatment. We present a case of a young patient who underwent transcatheter closure due to a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> sinus of Valsalva aneurysm. PMID:24570758</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sat?lm??, Seçkin; Bozbeyo?lu, Emrah; Y?ld?r?mtürk, Özlem; Y?ld?r?m, Ayd?n</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24950170"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous flexor tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in systemic lupus erythematosus: A case report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous flexor tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is an unusual complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and has not previously been reported. While tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in association with SLE have been focused on the previous studies, upper extremity tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are infrequently reported in the literature. Here, we present an uncommon case of spontaneous flexor tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the ring and little fingers in a patient with SLE and discuss the mechanism of injury and its surgical treatment. PMID:24950170</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Tokunaga, Daisaku; Kishida, Aiko; Taniguchi, Daigo; Seno, Takahiro; Kawahito, Yutaka; Kubo, Toshikazu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23493342"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computational fluid dynamics simulation of an anterior communicating artery <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> during angiography.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of the hemodynamic environment of an anterior communicating artery that spontaneously <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> immediately following three-dimensional rotational angiography. Subsequent digital subtraction angiography allowed for the localization of the point of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> within the aneurysm dome. CFD analysis demonstrated a concentrated jet that impinged directly at the site of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Peak systolic pressure and wall shear stress were both maximal near the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> location. PMID:23493342</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hodis, Simona; Uthamaraj, Susheil; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Kallmes, David F; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.9139G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantitative relations between earthquake source properties from dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations incorporating off-fault plasticity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High stress concentrations at earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts may generate inelastic off-fault response around the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tip, leading to increased energy absorption in the damage zone. Accounting for off-fault plasticity in earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations imposes physical limits on extreme ground motion as plastic dissipation limits the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed and peak slip rate of pulses. We present physics-based relations between earthquake source parameters derived from analytic considerations and from a consistent set of 2D dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models that incorporate severe velocity-weakening friction and off-fault plasticity assuming homogeneous initial conditions. Specifically, we deduce a non-linear relation between the peak slip velocity and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed, which holds for sub- and super-shear, crack- and pulse-like <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. We find that these relations are statistically consistent with the correlation of peak slip rate and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed in 3D dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models under linear slip weakening friction and highly heterogeneous initial stress. Furthermore the closeness to failure (CF) parameter introduced by Templeton and Rice (2008) is an adequate predictor of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed for slow <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, whereas <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds larger than ~80% S-wave speed have a more complicated dependence on stress orientation and the relative strength of the fault. These relations, combined with the limits on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed imposed by off-fault plasticity, may encapsulate a major influence of plastic deformation on near-field ground motions. Our study captures fundamental processes governing dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation coupled to self-similar off-fault energy dissipation. Thus, our results may be a suitable starting point to develop new pseudo-dynamic source parametrizations for source inversion and ground motion prediction that account for off-fault plasticity. We will report on the suitability of these relations in the presence of other sources of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> complexity, e.g. coalescing <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gabriel, Alice; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Dalguer, Luis A.; Mai, P. Martin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3387331"> <span id="translatedtitle">Isolated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the subscapularis tendon in an arm wrestler.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rotator cuff injuries, especially in athletes, can be very disabling. A case of an isolated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the subscapularis tendon in an arm wrestler is reported. Preoperative arthrogram and CT scan with intraoperative pictures are used to illustrate the pathology. Recommendation for treatment is surgical repair. PMID:3387331</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Biondi, J; Bear, T F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930000755&hterms=metal-oxide-semiconductor+transistors&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dmetal-oxide-semiconductor%2Btransistors"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analyzing Single-Event Gate <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> In Power MOSFET's</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Susceptibilities of power metal-oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's) to single-event gate <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> analyzed by exposing devices to beams of energetic bromine ions while applying appropriate bias voltages to source, gate, and drain terminals and measuring current flowing into or out of each terminal.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zoutendyk, John A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/464297"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Loop Annex (RLA) ion exchange vault entry and characterization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This engineering report documents the entry and characterization of the <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located near the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns were found in the vault. Some of which contained transuranics, Cs 137, and Co 60. The characterization information is necessary for future vault cleanout and column disposal.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ham, J.E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6644869"> <span id="translatedtitle">New finding in the radiographic diagnosis of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The authors describe a new radiographic sign of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the Achilles tendon system. It is a fracture, with separation through an osteophyte at the insertion of this tendon. Previously reported signs are also discussed as well as the present case report.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Newmark, H.; Mellon, W.S. Jr.; Malhotra, A.K.; Olken, S.M.; Halls, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JChPh.139f5101N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anthrax toxin-induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of artificial lipid bilayer membranes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes <span class="hlt">rupture</span> artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nablo, Brian J.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L.; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M.; Kasianowicz, John J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=35622"> <span id="translatedtitle">PROTOTYPE SYSTEM FOR PLUGGING LEAKS IN <span class="hlt">RUPTURED</span> CONTAINERS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A development program was performed successfully to develop and test a prototype system for temporarily stopping the flow of hazardous materials spilling on land or underwater from <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> or damaged containers. The prototype system is portable, integrated, and field-operable by...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24286667"> <span id="translatedtitle">Isolated splenic peliosis with spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after a viperine bite.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Isolated splenic peliosis is an extremely uncommon condition that can present with atraumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and potential fatal outcome. We here report 1 such case that developed after a viperine bite in a 21-year-old woman. The case highlights the diagnostic findings on computed tomographic (CT) scan and its potential complications. PMID:24286667</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lal, Anupam; Singhal, Manphool; Sharma, Navneet; Bhalla, Ashish; Khandelwal, Niranjan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800024516&hterms=Griffith+Observatory&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DGriffith%2BObservatory"> <span id="translatedtitle">Theory of time-dependent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the Earth</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fracture mechanics is used to develop a theory of earthquake mechanism which includes the phenomenon of subcritical crack growth. The following phenomena are predicted: slow earthquakes, multiple events, delayed multiple events (doublets), postseismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> growth and afterslip, foreshocks, and aftershocks. The theory predicts a nucleation stage prior to an earthquake, and suggests a physical mechanism by which one earthquake may 'trigger' another.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Das, S.; Scholz, C. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25368704"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous postpartum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an intact uterus: a case report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of uterus is an obstetrical complication characterized by a breach in the uterine wall and the overlying serosa. We report an unusual case of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an unscarred uterus in a 33-year-old woman, a day after her third successful vaginal delivery. A 33-year-old pregnant woman, gravid 3, para 3, was referred to our department at 39 gestational week because of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes. Despite tocolysis administration, her pregnancy was delivered vaginally after 2 days, giving birth to a male neonate of 3,020 g with normal Apgar scores at first and fifth minute. Her uterus was intact and gynecological examination after delivery was normal without any potential signs or symptoms of pathology. However, the day following her labor, patient complained of left iliac fossa pain. Her blood tests revealed a CRP value at 27.6 mg/L, whereas the X-rays revealed an extensive impacted fecal mass in the colon. MRI revealed that the left lower myometrial part of the uterus was depicted abrupt, with simultaneous presence of hemorrhagic stuff. The decision of laparotomy was therefore made in order to further evaluate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of uterus and properly treat patient. And subtotal hysterectomy was performed. Postoperative follow-up period was not characterized by any complications and patient was finally discharged 4 days after hysterectomy. PMID:25368704</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mavromatidis, George; Karavas, George; Margioula-Siarkou, Chrysoula; Petousis, Stamatios; Kalogiannidis, Ioannis; Mamopoulos, Apostolos; Rousso, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/jb0711/2007JB005027/2007JB005027.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Role of fault branches in earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> propagating along a straight “main” fault and encountering a finite-length branch fault. Such intersections are often observed in natural fault systems. The predicted effects of the interaction with the branch that we report can be remarkable; they can strongly perturb the propagation velocity on the main fault and, in some cases, even arrest that propagation. Earlier</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harsha S. Bhat; Marion Olives; Renata Dmowska; James R. Rice</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40385788"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnitude scaling of the near fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity pulse</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Current ground motion models all assume monotonically increasing spectral amplitude at all periods with increasing magnitude. However, near fault recordings from recent earthquakes confirm that the near fault fault-normal forward <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity velocity pulse is a narrow band pulse whose period increases with magnitude. This magnitude dependence of the period of the near fault pulse is expected from theory, because</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paul G. Somerville</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870006230&hterms=Victor+Bautista&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DVictor%2BBautista"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mechanics of shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> applied to earthquake zones</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The mechanics of shear slippage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in rock masses are reviewed. The essential ideas in fracture mechanics are summarized emphasizing the interpretation and relation among the fracture parameters in shear cracks. The slip-weakening model is described. The general formulation of the problem of nonuniform slip distribution in a continuum is covered.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Victor C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31740748"> <span id="translatedtitle">Delayed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of aortic aneurysms following endovascular stent grafting</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Deployment of transfemoral, endovascular stent grafts for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms is appealing for several reasons: avoidance of abdominal incision, lack of aortic cross-clamping, potential for regional anesthesia, and shortened hospital stay. Concerns remain, however, regarding the ability of these devices to completely exclude the aneurysm and prevent aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and the long-term integrity of the device. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alan B. Lumsden; Robert C. Allen; Elliot L. Chaikof; Michael Resnikoff; Mark W. Moritz; Harvey Gerhard; John J. Castronuovo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.tecn.upf.es/~jbisbal/publications/DEXA2011.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prediction of Cerebral Aneurysm <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> using Hemodynamic, Morphologic and Clinical</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Prediction of Cerebral Aneurysm <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> using Hemodynamic, Morphologic and Clinical Features¸cats (ICREA), Barcelona, Spain jesus.bisbal@upf.edu Abstract. Cerebral aneurysms pose a major clinical threat of the patient and characteristics of the aneurysm. The dataset used included 157 cases, with 294 features each</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Riera, Jesús Bisbal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1502.03623.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Force-induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a DNA duplex</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of double-stranded DNA under stress is a key process in biophysics and nanotechnology. In this article we consider the shear-induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of short DNA duplexes, a system that has been given new importance by recently designed force sensors and nanotechnological devices. We argue that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> must be understood as an activated process, where the duplex state is metastable and the strands will separate in a finite time that depends on the duplex length and the force applied. Thus, the critical shearing force required to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> a duplex within a given experiment depends strongly on the time scale of observation. We use simple models of DNA to demonstrate that this approach naturally captures the experimentally observed dependence of the critical force on duplex length for a given observation time. In particular, the critical force is zero for the shortest duplexes, before rising sharply and then plateauing in the long length limit. The prevailing approach, based on identifying when the presence o...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mosayebi, Majid; Doye, Jonathan P K; Ouldridge, Thomas E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mutation&pg=7&id=EJ780661"> <span id="translatedtitle">"The Little Gray Book": Pedagogy, Discourse and <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in 1937</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1937, the Ministry of Education in Ontario published a document entitled "Programme of Studies for Grades 1 to VI of Public and Separate Schools" that became known amongst teachers as the "little gray book". The curriculum and pedagogy in the document enunciated a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> or mutation in pedagogical discourse that broke with previously existing…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Milewski, Patrice</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25544065"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assessing the potential risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of abdominal aortic aneurysms.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) involve complex interplays between inflammatory and biomechanical factors that can be elucidated with anatomical and functional imaging. Although AAA size has been well-established in the literature to correlate with risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (and subsequent need for vascular intervention), there are other less-well-known characteristics about AAAs that also contribute to higher risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. This review focuses on biomechanical, radiological, and epidemiological characteristics of AAAs that are associated with higher <span class="hlt">rupture</span> risk. For clinicians, knowing and considering a wide variety of risk factors in addition to AAA size is important to initiate early and proper intervention for AAA repair. Although there is no official quantitative risk score of AAA <span class="hlt">rupture</span> risk that takes other non-size-related variables into account, if clinicians are aware of these other parameters, it is hoped that intervention can be appropriately performed for higher-risk AAAs that have not met the size-threshold for elective repair. PMID:25544065</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Khan, S; Verma, V; Verma, S; Polzer, S; Jha, S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900018794&hterms=efp&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Defp"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep and creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of strongly reinforced metallic composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A creep and creep damage theory is presented for metallic composites with strong fibers. Application is to reinforced structures in which the fiber orientation may vary throughout but a distinct fiber direction can be identified locally (local transverse isotropy). The creep deformation model follows earlier work and is based on a flow potential function that depends on invariants reflecting stress and the material symmetry. As the focus is on the interaction of creep and damage, primary creep is ignored. The creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> model is an extension of continuum damage mechanics and includes an isochronous damage function that depends on invariants specifying the local maximum transverse tension and the maximum longitudinal shear stress. It is posited that at high temperature and low stress, appropriate to engineering practice, these stress components damage the fiber/matrix interface through diffusion controlled void growth, eventually causing creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Experiments are outlined for characterizing a composite through creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests under transverse tension and longitudinal shear. Application is made to a thin-walled pressure vessel with reinforcing fibers at an arbitrary helical angle. The results illustrate the usefulness of the model as a means of achieving optimal designs of composite structures where creep and creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are life limiting.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robinson, D. N.; Binienda, W. K.; Miti-Kavuma, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://esag.harvard.edu/dmowska/DeDontneyTeRiDm_BimatDirectiv_JGR11.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of plastic deformation on bimaterial fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">accumulate in either the stiffer or the more compliant material. For high angles of most compressive stress predominately accumulates. The orientation of the most compressive principal stress is the controlling factor reverse that direction for low angles of most compressive stress so that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> will preferentially</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dmowska, Renata</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70022078"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mapping the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of moderate earthquakes by inverting accelerograms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a waveform inversion method that uses recordings of small events as Green's functions to map the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> growth of moderate earthquakes. The method fits P and S waveforms from many stations simultaneously in an iterative procedure to estimate the subevent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time and amplitude relative to the Green's function event. We invert the accelerograms written by two moderate Parkfield earthquakes using smaller events as Green's functions. The first earthquake (M = 4.6) occurred on November 14, 1993, at a depth of 11 km under Middle Mountain, in the assumed preparation zone for the next Parkfield main shock. The second earthquake (M = 4.7) occurred on December 20, 1994, some 6 km to the southeast, at a depth of 9 km on a section of the San Andreas fault with no previous microseismicity and little inferred coseismic slip in the 1966 Parkfield earthquake. The inversion results are strikingly different for the two events. The average stress release in the 1993 event was 50 bars, distributed over a geometrically complex area of 0.9 km2. The average stress release in the 1994 event was only 6 bars, distributed over a roughly elliptical area of 20 km2. The <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of both events appear to grow spasmodically into relatively complex shapes: the inversion only constrains the <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> to grow more slowly than the S wave velocity but does not use smoothness constraints. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hellweg, M.; Boatwright, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29798953"> <span id="translatedtitle">Endovascular Repair of Nontraumatic <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Thoracic Aortic Pathologies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Endovascular repair of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is receiving increased attention as the number of experienced users increases. Development of thoracic aortic stent grafts has lagged behind infrarenal advancements because of the reported prevalence of disease. In a few centers, however, the experience in performing thoracic stent graft procedures is quite substantial, such that endovascular therapy has been</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mark A. Farber; Frank J. Criado</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30772933"> <span id="translatedtitle">Advances in the surgical repair of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Over the past two decades, the mortality rate for elective repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms has improved to an acceptable level (<5%). However, surgical results of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysms have remained fairly constant with about 50% in hospital mortality rates. Growing experience with the use of the left retroperitoneal exposure for elective aortic surgery allowed the authors to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. C Darling; J. A Cordero; B. B Chang; D. M Shah; P. S. K Paty; W. E Lloyd; R. P Leather</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61350953"> <span id="translatedtitle">Semiscale steam-generator tube-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> test results. [PWR</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Semiscale Program and Test facility are located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and operated by EG and G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy. The system is a small-scale model of the primary coolant system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear generating plant. An experimental program designed to provide data from steam generator tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dimenna</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70037689"> <span id="translatedtitle">Complex <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during the 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Initially, the devastating Mw 7.0, 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake seemed to involve straightforward accommodation of oblique relative motion between the Caribbean and North American plates along the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone. Here, we combine seismological observations, geologic field data and space geodetic measurements to show that, instead, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process may have involved slip on multiple faults. Primary surface deformation was driven by <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on blind thrust faults with only minor, deep, lateral slip along or near the main Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone; thus the event only partially relieved centuries of accumulated left-lateral strain on a small part of the plate-boundary system. Together with the predominance of shallow off-fault thrusting, the lack of surface deformation implies that remaining shallow shear strain will be released in future surface-<span class="hlt">rupturing</span> earthquakes on the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault zone, as occurred in inferred Holocene and probable historic events. We suggest that the geological signature of this earthquakeg-broad warping and coastal deformation rather than surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> along the main fault zoneg-will not be easily recognized by standard palaeoseismic studies. We conclude that similarly complex earthquakes in tectonic environments that accommodate both translation and convergenceg-such as the San Andreas fault through the Transverse Ranges of Californiag-may be missing from the prehistoric earthquake record. ?? 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hayes, G.P.; Briggs, R.W.; Sladen, A.; Fielding, E.J.; Prentice, C.; Hudnut, K.; Mann, P.; Taylor, F.W.; Crone, A.J.; Gold, R.; Ito, T.; Simons, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4217756"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous Postpartum <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of an Intact Uterus: A Case Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of uterus is an obstetrical complication characterized by a breach in the uterine wall and the overlying serosa. We report an unusual case of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an unscarred uterus in a 33-year-old woman, a day after her third successful vaginal delivery. A 33-year-old pregnant woman, gravid 3, para 3, was referred to our department at 39 gestational week because of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes. Despite tocolysis administration, her pregnancy was delivered vaginally after 2 days, giving birth to a male neonate of 3,020 g with normal Apgar scores at first and fifth minute. Her uterus was intact and gynecological examination after delivery was normal without any potential signs or symptoms of pathology. However, the day following her labor, patient complained of left iliac fossa pain. Her blood tests revealed a CRP value at 27.6 mg/L, whereas the X-rays revealed an extensive impacted fecal mass in the colon. MRI revealed that the left lower myometrial part of the uterus was depicted abrupt, with simultaneous presence of hemorrhagic stuff. The decision of laparotomy was therefore made in order to further evaluate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of uterus and properly treat patient. And subtotal hysterectomy was performed. Postoperative follow-up period was not characterized by any complications and patient was finally discharged 4 days after hysterectomy. PMID:25368704</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mavromatidis, George; Karavas, George; Margioula-Siarkou, Chrysoula; Petousis, Stamatios; Kalogiannidis, Ioannis; Mamopoulos, Apostolos; Rousso, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29553805"> <span id="translatedtitle">Early aortic valve cusp <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in relapsing polychondritis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aortic regurgitation associated with relapsing polychondritis usually occurs late in the disease as a result of aortic root dilatation. A case where aortic regurgitation occurred early and was due to cusp <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with a normal aortic root is reported. The patient required urgent aortic valve replacement within six weeks of developing a murmur despite apparent control of inflammation with immunosuppressive</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D A Marshall; R Jackson; A P Rae; H A Capell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/33839836"> <span id="translatedtitle">Synchronous moyamoya syndrome and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cerebral aneurysm in Alagille syndrome</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Moyamoya syndrome and cerebral aneurysm formation are rare cerebrovascular manifestations of Alagille syndrome. Although previously reported in isolation, occurrence of these complications in a single patient has not been described. We report clinical and imaging features of synchronous moyamoya syndrome and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cerebral aneurysm in a patient with Alagille syndrome.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ron C. Gaba; Rajesh P. Shah; Andrew A. Muskovitz; Grace Guzman; Edward A. Michals</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53248494"> <span id="translatedtitle">Short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> predictions for tantalum alloy T-111</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A knowledge of the short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of Tantalum alloy T-111 is necessary to predict device integrity in the heat source section of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) at the end of service life, in the event of a fuel fire. High pressures exist in RTGs near the end of service life, these are caused by gas generation resulting</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John J. Stephens</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1523371"> <span id="translatedtitle">Splenic peliosis with spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: report of two cases</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Peliosis is a rare condition characterised by multiple cyst-like, blood-filled cavities within the parenchyma of solid organs. Most commonly affecting the liver, isolated splenic peliosis is an even more unique phenomenon. Patients with the condition are often asymptomatic. However, this potentially lethal condition can present with spontaneous organ <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We present two such cases, discuss their management and review what is currently known in the existing literature. Case presentation A previously well twenty-six year old woman presented with abdominal pain following a trivial episode of coughing. A diagnosis of spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was made following clinical and radiological examination. She underwent emergency splenectomy and made a full, uneventful recovery. Histopathological examination confirmed splenic peliosis. The second case describes an eighty six year old lady who sustained a trivial fall and developed pain in her left side. A CT confirmed splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. She became haemodynamically unstable during her admission and underwent emergency splenectomy. Histopathological examination revealed splenic peliosis. She went on to make an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Splenic peliosis is very rare. It has a number of associations including immunosuppression, drug therapy and infection. Although patients are often asymptomatic, life-threatening spontaneous organ <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may occur. If the diagnosis of peliosis is confirmed, additional investigations should be considered to detect its presence in other organs. Furthermore, the presence of the condition may be relevant if further medical or surgical intervention is planned. PMID:16800889</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lashbrook, Daniel J; James, Roger W; Phillips, Andrea J; Holbrook, Anthony G; Agombar, Andrew C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52929383"> <span id="translatedtitle">Role of fault branches in earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> propagating along a straight ``main'' fault and encountering a finite-length branch fault. Such intersections are often observed in natural fault systems. The predicted effects of the interaction with the branch that we report can be remarkable; they can strongly perturb the propagation velocity on the main fault and, in some cases, even arrest that propagation. Earlier</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harsha S. Bhat; Marion Olives; Renata Dmowska; James R. Rice</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29145937"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fungal bezoar and bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> secondary to Candida tropicalis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Candidal urinary tract infections typically occur in a host with compromised immune function. Although usually associated with aerobic bacterial infections, emphysematous cystitis occasionally complicates fungal infections of the lower urinary tract, especially in diabetics. Another uncommon occurrence is formation of a “fungus ball” leading to obstructive uropathy. We present a case of bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a patient with emphysematous cystitis</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Craig V Comiter; Michael McDonald; Jane Minton; Subbarao V Yalla</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www5.pbrc.hawaii.edu/faculty/former/gbg/me/pdf/09.Human%20Fetal%20Membranes.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Human Fetal Membranes: Their Preterm Premature <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>1 [Create Reference</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">difficulties for the family unit. Preterm birth can occur secondary to preterm labor, preterm premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> labor, defined as regular uterine contractions with progressive cervical dilatation [1] . Preterm birth Reference] TABLE OF CONTENTS [INTRODUCTION] [PRETERM LABOR...] [DECIDUAL/PLACENTAL RELAXINS, A FOCUSED STUDY</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bryant-Greenwood, Gillian D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://rses.anu.edu.au/~nick/teachdoc/papers/Lomax_Michelini_2009.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tsunami early warning using earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration Anthony Lomax1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tsunami early warning using earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration Anthony Lomax1 and Alberto Michelini2] Effective tsunami early warning for coastlines near a tsunamigenic earthquake requires notification within 5, greater than about 50 s. Here we show that T0 gives more information on tsunami importance than moment</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rawlinson, Nick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4296268"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous Endovascular Treatment of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Cerebral Aneurysms and Vasospasm</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective The management of patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cerebral aneurysms and severe vasospasm is subject to considerable controversy. We intended to describe herein an endovascular technique for the simultaneous treatment of aneurysms and vasospasm. Materials and Methods A series of 11 patients undergoing simultaneous endovascular treatment of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms and vasospasm were reviewed. After placement of a guiding catheter within the proximal internal carotid artery for coil embolization, an infusion line of nimodipine was wired to one hub, and of a microcatheter was advanced through another hub (to select and deliver detachable coils). Nimodipine was then infused continuously during the coil embolization. Results This technique was applied to 11 <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms accompanied by vasospasm (anterior communicating artery, 6 patients; internal carotid artery, 2 patients; posterior communicating and middle cerebral arteries, 1 patient each). Aneurysmal occlusion by coils and nimodipine-induced angioplasty were simultaneously achieved, resulting in excellent outcomes for all patients, and there were no procedure-related complications. Eight patients required repeated nimodipine infusions. Conclusion Our small series of patients suggests that the simultaneous endovascular management of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cerebral aneurysms and vasospasm is a viable approach in patients presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage and severe vasospasm.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cho, Young Dae; Ahn, Jun Hyong; Jung, Seung Chai; Kim, Chang Hun; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Lim, Jeong Wook</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/122535"> <span id="translatedtitle">Axial creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> time of boron-aluminum composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Axial creep tests of a 10vol% boron-aluminum hotpressed monolayer composite were carried out under several constant loads at 300 C in air. The composite behaved with slight primary creep, but did not show appreciable secondary creep. Several specimens encountered a momentary increase of strain during the creep test which separated the creep curve into two regions, because of the individual fiber breaks in the composite. And then, almost all the specimens suddenly fractured without tertiary creep. From the viewpoint of reliability engineering the statistical properties of the creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> time were investigated. The average creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> time decreased with an increase in the applied stress, and the relatively large coefficient of variation was estimated in every case, being around 1,000%. However, these scatters were estimated to be smaller than the scatter of creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> time in the boron fiber itself. That means, the reliability of the fiber`s creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> time is improved by compositing with matrix material.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Goda, Koichi [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Hamada, Jun`ichi [Nippon Steel Co., Hikari, Yamaguchi (Japan). Hikari R and D Lab.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21090810"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the Superficial Femoral Artery Treated with Endovascular Stent-Grafting</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) is rare. It may occur in the presence of an SFA aneurysm or in a nonaneurysmal, but usually atherosclerotic, artery. Previously these <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> have been treated by surgical exclusion, often with bypass grafting. We report a case of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a nonaneurysmal SFA treated successfully with endovascular stent-grafting.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ramus, James R. [Royal Berkshire Hospital, Department of General Surgery (United Kingdom)], E-mail: jimramusuk@yahoo.co.uk; Gibson, Matthew [Royal Berkshire Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Magee, Timothy [oyal Berkshire Hospital, Department of General Surgery (United Kingdom); Torrie, Peter [The Royal Berkshire Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-09-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" 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Lee and Ender A. Finol</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Assessment of Aortic Aneurysm <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Risk Rafael Izbicki, Ann B. Lee and Ender A. Finol Carnegie Mellon University May 2011 Abstract The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is associated, it is important to find good predictors for immediate risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Clinically, the size of the aneurysm</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810002601&hterms=Environmental+rupture&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DEnvironmental%2Brupture"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> of polymer-matrix composites. [graphite-epoxy laminates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An accelerated characterization method for resin matrix composites is reviewed. Methods for determining modulus and strength master curves are given. Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> analytical models are discussed as applied to polymers and polymer matrix composites. Comparisons between creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiments and analytical models are presented. The time dependent creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process in graphite epoxy laminates is examined as a function of temperature and stress level.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brinson, H. F.; Griffith, W. I.; Morris, D. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://seismo.berkeley.edu/~rallen/pub/2010wurman/WurmanPhDThesis2010.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Earthquake Early Warning and the Physics of Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Gilead Wurman</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Earthquake Early Warning and the Physics of Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> By Gilead Wurman 2010 #12; #12; 1 Abstract Earthquake Early Warning and the Physics of Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of whether earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are self-similar, cascading failures, or whether their size is somehow</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Allen, Richard M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.alcf.anl.gov/files/groundmotionesptechreportwrapped_0.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">ANL/ALCF/ESP-13/8 Using Multi-scale Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Models to</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">ANL/ALCF/ESP-13/8 Using Multi-scale Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Models to Improve Ground Motion Estimates ALCF Laboratory, or UChicago Argonne, LLC. #12;ANL/ALCF/ESP-13/8 Using Multi-scale Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Models-scale Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Models to Improve Ground Motion Estimates PI: Thomas Jordan ESP Postdoc: Geoffrey Ely</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kemner, Ken</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54787970"> <span id="translatedtitle">Using Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Variations along the Sumatra-Andaman Subduction System to Examine Fault Zone Variations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The 26 December great Sumatran-Andaman earthquake in the Indian Ocean caused extensive damage and loss of life from intense shaking and the resulting tsunami. Recent studies of this earthquake have suggested portions of the fault <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> at variable speeds, with both fast and slow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities observed along the 1200 km long <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length [e.g. Ammon et al., 2005]. Variations</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. L. Bilek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T51C2486M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seismic waves radiated during dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of granite laboratory samples</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using arrays of piezoelectric sensors, we analyze the way that seismic waves are radiated during dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of saw-cut faults in granite laboratory samples. We compare stick-slip events generated on a on a 0.15 m-long fault in a triaxial apparatus at 70 to 200 MPa normal stress with those on a 2 m-long fault in a large-scale biaxial apparatus at 1 to 7 MPa normal stress. The two machines have different values of unloading stiffness and produce stick-slip events with significantly different properties. Events on the triaxial apparatus have greater overall slip (400 to 1600 ?m) and larger sample-average shear stress changes (25 to 110 MPa) but shorter overall slip duration (200 to 400 ?s) compared to those on the large biaxial apparatus (50 to 150 ?m slip, 0.1 to 0.4 MPa stress changes, and 2 to 4 ms overall slip duration). As a result, the average slip speeds are much larger for events on the triaxial apparatus (2 to 4 m/s) compared to those on the large biaxial apparatus (15 to 75 mm/s). To explore the consequences of these differences, and how they relate to differences in dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes and seismic radiation, each sample is instrumented with at least 15 piezoelectric sensors which are used to study the timing, location, amplitude, and frequency content of radiated seismic waves. In addition, an array of strain gages on the 2 m samples allows us to explore how the local distribution of shear stress along the fault affects the way that fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs. We find that at low stress levels fault slip along the 2 m fault occurs as brief bursts of rapid, seismic slip followed by slowly expanding (5 to 200 m/s) fronts of largely aseismic afterslip (80 to 500 ?m/s slip rates). Higher stress levels on the same fault produce <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> that propagate close to the shear wave speed and continuously radiate seismic waves near the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front. In some cases we observe the rapid termination of seismic radiation on the 2 m fault when a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front propagates into a low stress region. Finally, we evaluate which of our observations are controlled by the boundary conditions and elastic properties of the apparatus and which are controlled by the elastic and frictional properties of the rocks and are most relevant to dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes that generate natural earthquakes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mclaskey, G.; Kilgore, B. D.; Lockner, D. A.; Beeler, N. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.T23F..04U"> <span id="translatedtitle">Why did the Southern Gulf of California <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> So Rapidly?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many rifts at the margins of oceans developed over a few, to many, tens of million years before sea-floor spreading. In contrast, the southern Gulf of California developed unusually rapidly from a new oblique-divergent plate boundary to sea-floor spreading in 6 to 10 million years, from 12.5 to 6 - 2 Ma. <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> continental (rift to passive) margins can be categorized as those that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> continent interiors to form smaller continents versus those that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tectonically active continental margins to form terranes. The southern Gulf includes 6 spreading centers: northern East Pacific rise and Guaymas that started spreading at ~6 Ma, Alarcon that fully initiated at 2.4 Ma, and 3 others that started spreading about 2 Ma. The northern third of the Gulf has not evolved to the sea-floor spreading stage. There are six key observations in pre-rift and syn-rift geology that were likely factors in the rapid <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, most of which are unique to tectonically active continental margins. (1) The rift margin is along the interior side of an older (Cretaceous) magmatic arc that formed a narrow belt of contrasting rheology along which the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred. (2) A long-lived Tertiary volcanic arc was the precursor to the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, and occurred immediately before the rifting stage. (3) The arc included a huge caldera belt active from 34 - 19 Ma, only a few million years before onset of rifting, and lies immediately under much of the southern Gulf. A previous study suggests this event caused mantle depletion and led to the wide, magma-poor rift domain. (4) Relative plate motion was rapid (~50 km/my) during the last 12.5 m.y. of oblique divergence. (5) The oblique component of plate motion resulted in linked strike-slip and normal faults and pull-apart basins; these basins are known to produce rapid localized subsidence and thin crust promoting localization. (6) In Guaymas basin, moderately high sedimentation promoted a narrow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone but did not overwhelm the system to prevent final localization as may have occurred in northern Gulf and Salton trough.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Umhoefer, P. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.2567C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kinematic Seismic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Parameters from a Doppler Analysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The radiation emitted from extended seismic sources, mainly when the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> spreads in preferred directions, presents spectral deviations as a function of the observation location. This aspect, unobserved to point sources, and named as directivity, are manifested by an increase in the frequency and amplitude of seismic waves when the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs in the direction of the seismic station and a decrease in the frequency and amplitude if it occurs in the opposite direction. The model of directivity that supports the method is a Doppler analysis based on a kinematic source model of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and wave propagation through a structural medium with spherical symmetry [1]. A unilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can be viewed as a sequence of shocks produced along certain paths on the fault. According this model, the seismic record at any point on the Earth's surface contains a signature of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process that originated the recorded waveform. Calculating the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction and velocity by a general Doppler equation, - the goal of this work - using a dataset of common time-delays read from waveforms recorded at different distances around the epicenter, requires the normalization of measures to a standard value of slowness. This normalization involves a non-linear inversion that we solve numerically using an iterative least-squares approach. The evaluation of the performance of this technique was done through a set of synthetic and real applications. We present the application of the method at four real case studies, the following earthquakes: Arequipa, Peru (Mw = 8.4, June 23, 2001); Denali, AK, USA (Mw = 7.8; November 3, 2002); Zemmouri-Boumerdes, Algeria (Mw = 6.8, May 21, 2003); and Sumatra, Indonesia (Mw = 9.3, December 26, 2004). The results obtained from the dataset of the four earthquakes agreed, in general, with the values presented by other authors using different methods and data. [1] Caldeira B., Bezzeghoud M, Borges JF, 2009; DIRDOP: a directivity approach to determining the seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity vector. J Seismology, DOI 10.1007/s10950-009-9183-x</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Caldeira, Bento; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Borges, José F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24834440"> <span id="translatedtitle">Graphene mechanics: II. Atomic stress distribution during indentation until <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Previous Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments found single layers of defect-free graphene to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at unexpectedly high loads in the micronewton range. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we modeled an AFM spherical tip pressing on a circular graphene sheet and studied the stress distribution during the indentation process until <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We found the graphene <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force to have no dependency on the sheet size and a very weak dependency on the indenter velocity, allowing a direct comparison to experiment. The deformation showed a non-linear elastic behavior, with a two-dimensional elastic modulus in good agreement with previous experimental and computational studies. In line with theoretical predictions for linearly elastic sheets, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forces of non-linearly elastic graphene are proportional to the tip radius. However, as a deviation from the theory, the atomic stress concentrates under the indenter tip more strongly than predicted and causes a high probability of bond breaking only in this area. In turn, stress levels decrease rapidly towards the edge of the sheet, most of which thus only serves the role of mechanical support for the region under the indenter. As a consequence, the high ratio between graphene sheets and sphere radii, hitherto supposed to be necessary for reliable deformation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> studies, could be reduced to a factor of only 5-10 without affecting the outcome. Our study suggests time-resolved analysis of forces at the atomic level as a valuable tool to predict and interpret the nano-scale response of stressed materials beyond graphene. PMID:24834440</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Costescu, Bogdan I; Gräter, Frauke</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.S21C2070X"> <span id="translatedtitle">Off-fault Yielding During Dynamic <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span>: Distribution and Orientations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We use 2D spectral element code to simulate dynamic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> on a fault governed by slip- and velocity-weakening friction with off-fault yielding and possible elastic contrast across the fault. The off-fault yielding is implemented with Mohr-Coulomb plasticity, and a continuum brittle damage that accounts for dynamic changes of elastic properties in the yielding zones (Lyakhovsky et al., 1997). The studies attempt to clarify properties of dynamic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> and generated yielding zones for different off-fault rheologies, frictional laws, orientations of the maximum regional compressive stress relative to fault ?, values of the seismic S ratio and conditions representing different depth sections. In the current simulations, the damage rheology is used with parameters that prevent off-fault instabilities, leading to results that are generally similar to those obtained with plasticity. The location and extent of the yielding zone are found to depend on ?, seismic S ratio and the crack vs. pulse mode of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, in agreement with previous theoretical and numerical studies. The off-fault yielding zone is wide for conditions representing shallow depth and becomes progressively localized for conditions representing deeper sections. The intensity of plasticity/damage for both <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes is enhanced for larger regional stress, but the width can be suppressed due to higher confining pressure and larger rock cohesion. The angle ? representing expected microcrack orientations is generally shallow (less than 45 degrees) on the compressional side and steep (greater than 45 degrees) on the extensional side. The ? values depend also on the S ratio, conditions representing different depth sections, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed, and existence of velocity contrast across the fault. The latter produces steeper angles of ? on the compliant side compared to the stiffer side for situations representing the same type (extension or compression) of quadrant.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xu, S.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Ampuero, J. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JGRB..11011303I"> <span id="translatedtitle">Earthquakes as multiscale dynamic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> with heterogeneous fracture surface energy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We propose a model of the wide-scale growth of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during an earthquake, based on our multiscale simulation of a planar crack in a three-dimensional homogeneous elastic space. A simple slip-weakening law governs the fracture/friction processes, and its characteristic parameters, slip-weakening distance and fracture surface energy, have multiscale heterogeneous distributions. We consider a set of randomly distributed circular patches, whose diameter is proportional to the fracture surface energy. Each patch represents an asperity between irregular fault surfaces, and the size-number relation of the patches obeys power law statistics. We assess <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation from a small instability using a boundary integral equation method with a renormalization technique. Although most events stop shortly after their initiation, some grow, triggering neighboring patches of similar size. Small and large events show statistically self-similar properties of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> growth and stop spontaneously without requiring a special stopping mechanism. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity locally exceeds the shear wave speed but globally remains subshear speed due to the increase of the average fracture energy as the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> grows. The relation between size and frequency of events is a power law, which is explained by the triggering probability between patches. As a consequence of statistically self-similar random triggering growth, we observe a distinct "main phase" in seismic waves similar to those of natural earthquakes, but we cannot estimate the final size of the event from the initial part of the seismic waves. If this is true for the real earthquakes, predicting the size of a future earthquake would be quite difficult.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ide, Satoshi; Aochi, Hideo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9012998"> <span id="translatedtitle">Advances in the surgical repair of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysms.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Over the past two decades, the mortality rate for elective repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms has improved to an acceptable level (< 5%). However, surgical results of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysms have remained fairly constant with about 50% in hospital mortality rates. Growing experience with the use of the left retroperitoneal exposure for elective aortic surgery allowed the authors to extend the use of this technique to the repair of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysm. The extended left retroperitoneal approach using a posterolateral exposure through the 10th intercostal space allowed the surgeon expeditiously and reliably to obtain supraceliac aortic control by dividing the left crus of the diaphragm in all patients. In total, 104 aortic replacements were performed for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysm during the past 7 years. Of these patients, 87 were men and 17 women; mean(range) age was 72(52-95) years. Hemodynamic instability (as defined by a systolic blood pressure of < 90 mmHg) was present before surgery in 41% (43/104) of patients. The operative mortality rate was 27.9% (29/104). Preoperative hemodynamic instability, time of operative delay and aortic cross-clamp time did not correlate with operative mortality. The median duration of intensive care unit stay was 4 (range 1-60) days and hospital stay 11 (range 6-175) days. The results of this series identified that a change in the operative technique for the repair of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysm beneficially affected patient survival. The authors suggest that expeditious supraceliac control without thoracotomy is an excellent alternative and offers an advantage in the surgical management of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysm. PMID:9012998</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Darling, R C; Cordero, J A; Chang, B B; Shah, D M; Paty, P S; Lloyd, W E; Leather, R P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15..439G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Benchmarking of the ADER-DG Method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We will verify the arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) method in various test cases of the 'SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Code Verification Exercise' benchmark suite (Harris et al. 2009). The ADER-DG scheme is able to solve the spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> problem with high-order accuracy in space and time on three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Strong mesh coarsening or refinement at areas of interest can be applied to keep the computational costs feasible. Moreover, the method does not generate spurious high-frequency contributions in the slip rate spectra and therefore does not require any artificial damping as demonstrated in previous presentations and publications (Pelties et al. 2010 and 2012). We will show that the mentioned features hold also for more advanced setups as e.g. a branching fault system, heterogeneous background stresses and bimaterial faults. The advanced geometrical flexibility combined with an enhanced accuracy will make the ADER-DG method a useful tool to study earthquake dynamics on complex fault systems in realistic rheologies. References: Harris, R.A., M. Barall, R. Archuleta, B. Aagaard, J.-P. Ampuero, H. Bhat, V. Cruz-Atienza, L. Dalguer, P. Dawson, S. Day, B. Duan, E. Dunham, G. Ely, Y. Kaneko, Y. Kase, N. Lapusta, Y. Liu, S. Ma, D. Oglesby, K. Olsen, A. Pitarka, S. Song, and E. Templeton, The SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Code Verification Exercise, Seismological Research Letters, vol. 80, no. 1, pages 119-126, 2009 Pelties, C., J. de la Puente, and M. Kaeser, Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Modeling in Three Dimensions on Unstructured Meshes Using a Discontinuous Galerkin Method, AGU 2010 Fall Meeting, abstract #S21C-2068 Pelties, C., J. de la Puente, J.-P. Ampuero, G. Brietzke, and M. Kaeser, Three-Dimensional Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Simulation with a High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Method on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes, JGR. - Solid Earth, VOL. 117, B02309, 2012</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gabriel, Alice; Pelties, Christian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S21B2452P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Benchmarking of the ADER-DG Method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We will verify the arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) method in various test cases of the 'SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Code Verification Exercise' benchmark suite (Harris et al. 2009). The ADER-DG scheme is able to solve the spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> problem with high-order accuracy in space and time on three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Strong mesh coarsening or refinement at areas of interest can be applied to keep the computational costs feasible. Moreover, the method does not generate spurious high-frequency contributions in the slip rate spectra and therefore does not require any artificial damping as demonstrated in previous presentations and publications (Pelties et al. 2010 and 2012). We will show that the mentioned features hold also for more advanced setups as e.g. a branching fault system, heterogeneous background stresses and bimaterial faults. The advanced geometrical flexibility combined with an enhanced accuracy will make the ADER-DG method a useful tool to study earthquake dynamics on complex fault systems in realistic rheologies. References: Harris, R.A., M. Barall, R. Archuleta, B. Aagaard, J.-P. Ampuero, H. Bhat, V. Cruz-Atienza, L. Dalguer, P. Dawson, S. Day, B. Duan, E. Dunham, G. Ely, Y. Kaneko, Y. Kase, N. Lapusta, Y. Liu, S. Ma, D. Oglesby, K. Olsen, A. Pitarka, S. Song, and E. Templeton, The SCEC/USGS Dynamic Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Code Verification Exercise, Seismological Research Letters, vol. 80, no. 1, pages 119-126, 2009 Pelties, C., J. de la Puente, and M. Kaeser, Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Modeling in Three Dimensions on Unstructured Meshes Using a Discontinuous Galerkin Method, AGU 2010 Fall Meeting, abstract #S21C-2068 Pelties, C., J. de la Puente, J.-P. Ampuero, G. Brietzke, and M. Kaeser, Three-Dimensional Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Simulation with a High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Method on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes, JGR. - Solid Earth, VOL. 117, B02309, 2012</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pelties, C.; Gabriel, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4035708"> <span id="translatedtitle">Risk of cerebral arteriovenous malformation <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during pregnancy and puerperium</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective: To determine whether the risk of arteriovenous malformation (AVM) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is increased during pregnancy and puerperium. Methods: Participants included 979 female patients with intracranial AVM admitted to Beijing Tiantan Hospital between 1960 and 2010. Two neurosurgery residents reviewed medical records for each case. Of them, 393 patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> AVM between 18 and 40 years of age were used for case-crossover analysis. Number of children born and clinical information during pregnancy and puerperium were retrieved to identify whether AVM <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred during this period. Results: Of the 979 women, 797 hemorrhages occurred during 25,578 patient-years of follow-up, yielding an annual hemorrhage rate of 3.11%. The annual AVM hemorrhage rate in patients aged 18 to 40 years (n = 579) was 2.78%, lower than the rate in other age groups (odds ratio = 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.65–0.86, p < 0.05). Of the 393 patients with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of AVM aged 18 to 40 years, 12 hemorrhages occurred in 12 patients over 452 pregnancies, yielding a hemorrhage rate of 2.65% per pregnancy or 3.32% per year. Among the remaining 381 patients, 441 hemorrhages occurred during 10,627 patient-years of follow-up, yielding an annual hemorrhage rate of 4.14%. The odds ratio for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of AVM during pregnancy and puerperium, compared with the control period, was 0.71 (95% confidence interval 0.61–0.82). Conclusions: No increased risk of hemorrhage was found in patients with cerebral AVM during pregnancy and the puerperium. We therefore would not advise against pregnancy in women with intracranial AVM. PMID:24759847</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, Shuo; Zhao, Yuan-li; Teo, Mario; Guo, Peng; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Rong; Cao, Yong; Ye, Xun; Kang, Shuai</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://earthquakes.ou.edu/reches/Publications/Heesakkers_I.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> at Focal Depth, Part I: Structure and <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the Pretorius Fault, TauTona Mine, South Africa</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tona Mine, South Africa V. HEESAKKERS,1,2 S. MURPHY,1,3 and Z. RECHES 1 Abstract--We analyze the structure of the Archaean Pretorius fault in TauTona mine, South Africa, as well as the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>-zone that recently reactivated it. The analysis is part of the Natural Earthquake Laboratory in South African Mines (NELSAM</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ze'ev, Reches</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25566485"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> popliteal cyst diagnosed by ultrasound before evaluation for deep vein thrombosis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most popliteal cysts are asymptomatic. However, cysts may <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, resulting in pain and swelling of the leg that could also arise from other diseases, including deep vein thrombosis, lymphedema, cellulitis, and tear of a muscle or tendon. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> popliteal cyst based on only a patient's history and physical examination. Musculoskeletal ultrasound has been regarded as a diagnostic tool for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> popliteal cyst. Here, we describe a patient who was rapidly diagnosed as <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> popliteal cyst by ultrasonography. Therefore, ultrasound could be used to distinguish a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> popliteal cyst from other diseases in patients with painful swollen legs before evaluation for deep vein thrombosis. PMID:25566485</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Joon Sung; Lim, Seong Hoon; Hong, Bo Young; Park, So Young</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4280382"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Popliteal Cyst Diagnosed by Ultrasound Before Evaluation for Deep Vein Thrombosis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most popliteal cysts are asymptomatic. However, cysts may <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, resulting in pain and swelling of the leg that could also arise from other diseases, including deep vein thrombosis, lymphedema, cellulitis, and tear of a muscle or tendon. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> popliteal cyst based on only a patient's history and physical examination. Musculoskeletal ultrasound has been regarded as a diagnostic tool for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> popliteal cyst. Here, we describe a patient who was rapidly diagnosed as <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> popliteal cyst by ultrasonography. Therefore, ultrasound could be used to distinguish a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> popliteal cyst from other diseases in patients with painful swollen legs before evaluation for deep vein thrombosis. PMID:25566485</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Joon Sung; Lim, Seong Hoon; Hong, Bo Young</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24118583"> <span id="translatedtitle">Balloon cinch deformity during angioplasty procedures: an indication for impending <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty (PTA) is a commonly performed procedure for hemodialysis vascular access dysfunction including thrombosis. While PTA is generally safe, balloon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during the procedure is a potential complication. Because such a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can cause damage to the blood vessel, indication of an imminent balloon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> might help avoid such a complication. This analysis reports on six PTA procedures that were complicated by balloon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. All cases demonstrated terminal (caudal/cranial) cinch deformation. There was a loss of sharp terminal tapering and its replacement with banana silhouette before the balloon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Importantly, the contour deformation and balloon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred at a pressure that was lower than the rated burst pressure. The cinch deformity can be used as an indication for impending balloon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We suggest deflation of balloons that demonstrate shape deformations to avoid vascular injury. PMID:24118583</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Salman, Loay; Castro, Hector; Vazquez-Padron, Roberto I; Monrroy, Mauricio; Abdelwahed, Yehia; Rizvi, Abid; Duque, Juan; Akmal, Muhammad Usman Talha; Merrill, Donna; Nayer, Ali; Asif, Arif</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12006391"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characteristics of intact and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> atherosclerotic plaques in brachiocephalic arteries of apolipoprotein E knockout mice.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The brachiocephalic arteries of fat-fed apolipoprotein E knockout mice develop plaques that frequently <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and form luminal thromboses. The morphological characteristics of plaques without evidence of instability or with healed previous <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> (intact) and vessels with acutely <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> plaques (<span class="hlt">ruptured</span>) have now been defined, to understand the process of plaque destabilization in more detail. Ninety-eight apolipoprotein E knockout mice were fed a diet supplemented with 21% lard and 0.15% cholesterol, for 5 to 59 weeks. Of these 98 mice, 51 had an acutely <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> plaque in the brachiocephalic artery. <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> and intact plaques differed in terms of plaque cross-sectional area (intact, 0.109+/-0.016 mm2; <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, 0.192+/-0.009 mm2; P=0.0005), luminal occlusion (intact, 35.3+/-3.3%; <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, 57.7+/-1.9%; P<0.0001), the number of buried caps within the lesion (intact, 1.06+/-0.12; <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, 2.66+/-0.16; P<0.0001), fibrous cap thickness (intact, 4.7+/-0.6 microm; <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, 2.0+/-0.3 microm; P=0.0004), and lipid fractional volume (intact, 35.9+/-3.0%; <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, 50.7+/-2.2%; P=0.0019). This study confirms that plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a frequent occurrence in the brachiocephalic arteries of apolipoprotein E knockout mice on a high-fat diet. The data also show that <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> plaques in these mice show many of the characteristics of vulnerable plaques in humans. This supports the use of this model in studies of the mechanisms and therapy of plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:12006391</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Williams, Helen; Johnson, Jason Lee; Carson, Kevin George Stephen; Jackson, Christopher Langdale</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a 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class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.S43A2473Q"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> process of the 2013 Okhotsk deep mega earthquake from iterative backprojection and compress sensing methods</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On May 24th 2013 a Mw 8.3 normal faulting earthquake occurred at a depth of approximately 600 km beneath the sea of Okhotsk, Russia. It is a rare mega earthquake that ever occurred at such a great depth. We use the time-domain iterative backprojection (IBP) method [1] and also the frequency-domain compressive sensing (CS) technique[2] to investigate the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process and energy radiation of this mega earthquake. We currently use the teleseismic P-wave data from about 350 stations of USArray. IBP is an improved method of the traditional backprojection method, which more accurately locates subevents (energy burst) during earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and determines the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds. The total <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration of this earthquake is about 35 s with a nearly N-S <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction. We find that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is bilateral in the beginning 15 seconds with slow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds: about 2.5km/s for the northward <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and about 2 km/s for the southward <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. After that, the northward <span class="hlt">rupture</span> stopped while the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> towards south continued. The average southward <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed between 20-35 s is approximately 5 km/s, lower than the shear wave speed (about 5.5 km/s) at the hypocenter depth. The total <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length is about 140km, in a nearly N-S direction, with a southward <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length about 100 km and a northward <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length about 40 km. We also use the CS method, a sparse source inversion technique, to study the frequency-dependent seismic radiation of this mega earthquake. We observe clear along-strike frequency dependence of the spatial and temporal distribution of seismic radiation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process. The results from both methods are generally similar. In the next step, we'll use data from dense arrays in southwest China and also global stations for further analysis in order to more comprehensively study the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of this deep mega earthquake. Reference [1] Yao H, Shearer P M, Gerstoft P. Subevent location and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> imaging using iterative backprojection for the 2011 Tohoku Mw 9.0 earthquake. Geophysical Journal International, 2012, 190(2): 1152-1168. [2]Yao H, Gerstoft P, Shearer P M, et al. Compressive sensing of the Tohoku-Oki Mw 9.0 earthquake: Frequency-dependent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes. Geophysical Research Letters, 2011, 38(20).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Qin, W.; Yin, J.; Yao, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16159053"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> intracranial aneurysms in the elderly: epidemiology, diagnosis, and management.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often a devastating condition and a significant cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. Because the percentage of senior citizens is increasing in many countries and because of the increased incidence of SAH in elderly patients, <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> intracranial aneurysm is an increasingly frequent pathology in western countries. Twenty years ago, older people were considered to have such a poor prognosis that they were frequently excluded from active treatment on the unique basis of their advanced age. Improving results published in recent studies showed that the classic fatalistic attitude associated with age and intracranial aneurysm (IA) should be reconsidered. Therefore, because of improvements in surgical results and neuro-intensive care, the appearance of interventional neuroradiology, and more aggressive rehabilitation programs, the management of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> IA in the elderly is changing. This article aims to review epidemiology, emphasize the specific aspects of the disease in the elderly, and present the current management of SAH in an elderly population. PMID:16159053</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sedat, Jacques; Dib, Mustapha; Rasendrarijao, David; Fontaine, Denys; Lonjon, Michel; Paquis, Philippe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4164137"> <span id="translatedtitle">Management of Hepatic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Diagnosed after an Emergency Cesarean Section</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A careful management of hepatic capsular <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, with massive hemoperitoneum which occurred 14 hours after an emergency cesarean section at 36 weeks of gestation, is meticulously reported. The grade of hepatic involvement varies from minor capsular laceration to extensive parenchymal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Our management involved a combination of surgical interventions and aggressive supportive care. The patient was discharged after 53 days and 4 laparotomies and an unsuccessful attempt of superselective artery embolization. Ultrasound after 40 days from the last surgery showed uniform hepatic parenchyma free of focal lesions. Due to the rarity and the unpredictability nature of this devastating event we believe necessary to report our experience, reinforcing the importance of the postsurgery management. PMID:25254049</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Damiani, Gianluca Raffaello; Merola, Viviana; Barnaba, Mario; Landi, Stefano; Cormio, Gennaro; Pellegrino, Antonio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/491556"> <span id="translatedtitle">Single event gate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in thin gate oxides</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As integrated circuit densities increase with each new technology generation, both the lateral and vertical dimensions shrink. Operating voltages, however, have not scaled as aggressively as feature size, with a resultant increase in the electric fields within advanced geometry devices. Oxide electric fields are in fact increasing to greater than 5 MV/cm as feature size approaches 0.1 {micro}m. This trend raises the concern that single event gate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (SEGR) may limit the scaling of advanced integrated circuits (ICs) for space applications. The dependence of single event gate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (SEGR) critical field on oxide thickness is examined for thin gate oxides. Critical field for SEGR increases with decreasing oxide thickness, consistent with an increasing intrinsic breakdown field.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sexton, F.W.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Dodd, P.E.; Hash, G.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3880742"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Uterine Vein in Twin Pregnancy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective. Aim of our study is to present a case of a twin pregnancy following invitro fertilization cycle complicated with hemoperitoneum at third trimester. Case. A 26-year-old nulliparous pregnant woman at 32 weeks of gestation with twin pregnancy following invitro fertilization cycle complained of abdominal pain. After 48 hours of admission, laparotomy was performed with indications of aggravated abdominal pain and decreased hemoglobin levels. Utero-ovarian vein branch <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was detected on the right posterior side of uterus and bleeding was stopped by suturing the vein. Etiopathogenesis of the present case still remains unclear. Conclusion. Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the uterine vessels during pregnancy is a rare complication and may lead to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis and treatment are based on the clinical symptoms of acute abdominal pain and laboratory tests of hypovolemic shock signs. PMID:24455353</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Doger, Emek; Cakiroglu, Yigit; Yildirim Kopuk, Sule; Akar, Bertan; Caliskan, Eray; Yucesoy, Gulseren</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24455353"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of uterine vein in twin pregnancy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective. Aim of our study is to present a case of a twin pregnancy following invitro fertilization cycle complicated with hemoperitoneum at third trimester. Case. A 26-year-old nulliparous pregnant woman at 32 weeks of gestation with twin pregnancy following invitro fertilization cycle complained of abdominal pain. After 48 hours of admission, laparotomy was performed with indications of aggravated abdominal pain and decreased hemoglobin levels. Utero-ovarian vein branch <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was detected on the right posterior side of uterus and bleeding was stopped by suturing the vein. Etiopathogenesis of the present case still remains unclear. Conclusion. Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the uterine vessels during pregnancy is a rare complication and may lead to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis and treatment are based on the clinical symptoms of acute abdominal pain and laboratory tests of hypovolemic shock signs. PMID:24455353</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Doger, Emek; Cakiroglu, Yigit; Yildirim Kopuk, Sule; Akar, Bertan; Caliskan, Eray; Yucesoy, Gulseren</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19688217"> <span id="translatedtitle">Two patients with a complete proximal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the hamstring.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two men visited our Emergency Room because of a water-ski-accident. At physical examination, there was hematoma at the upper leg with loss of strength at extension of the hip and flexion of the knee. Both patients had a palpable gap just distal of the ischial tuberosity. Further imaging by sonography and MR-scan showed a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the proximal hamstring tendon. Treatment was operative refixation of the hamstring tendons at the ischial tuberosity. After treatment consisted of brace for 4 weeks after operation. Both patients returned to their pre-operatively sports, though at a lower level. Surgical treatment of a complete proximal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the hamstrings is recommended in case of sportive patients. PMID:19688217</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Floor, Sebastiaan; van der Veen, Alex H; Devilee, Roger J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4039606"> <span id="translatedtitle">Isolated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the superficial vein of the penis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Penile emergencies are rare but when they do occur, prompt diagnosis and treatment are warranted. Emergent conditions of the male genitalia are mainly traumatic, vascular or infectious. Penile emergencies are usually caused by trauma to the penis, during sexual intercourse or manipulation of an erect penis during masturbation. One of the traumatic vascular penile emergencies is superficial penile dorsal vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. This is a rare condition, with just a few reported cases. It is usually taken into differential diagnosis with the other acute penile injuries that present, such as acute penile edema or ecchymosis. We report a case of 59-year-old male with a superficial penile dorsal vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span> which occurred during manipulation of the erect penis. PMID:24940469</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eken, Alper; Acil, Meltem; Arpaci, Taner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25389983"> <span id="translatedtitle">Uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after the uterine fundal pressure maneuver.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abstract Objective: To clarify the incidence of uterine fundal pressure at delivery and its effect on uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Study design: A questionnaire was sent to 2518 institutions in Japan. We received a response from 1430. Results: Of reporting institutions, 89.4% used fundal pressure in at least some of their deliveries. Among the 347,771 women who delivered vaginally in this study, 38,973 (11.2%) were delivered with the assistance of fundal pressure. There were six cases of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> associated with uterine fundal pressure, with one case resulting in maternal death secondary to amniotic fluid embolism. Conclusion: Since uterine fundal pressure may potentially cause serious injury to either the mother and/or neonates, the indications for application need to be clearly elucidated, and obstetric care providers also need comprehensive education and training. PMID:25389983</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hasegawa, Junichi; Sekizawa, Akihiko; Ishiwata, Isamu; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Kinoshita, Katsuyuki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3191721"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Umbilical Hernia in Pregnancy: A Case Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 28 year old woman presented with a spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an umbilical hernia in her seventh month of pregnancy. She had four previous unsupervised normal deliveries. There was no history of trauma or application of herbal medicine on the hernia. The hernia sac <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> at the inferior surface where it was attached to the ulcerated and damaged overlying skin. There was a gangrenous eviscerated small bowel. The patient was resuscitated and the gangrenous small bowel was resected and end to end anastomosis done. The hernia sac was excised and the 12 cm defect repaired. Six weeks later, she had spontaneous vaginal delivery of a live baby. We advocate that large umbilical hernias should be routinely repaired when seen in women of child bearing age. PMID:22043438</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ahmed, Adamu; Stephen, Garba; Ukwenya, Yahaya</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5901443"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep and creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of Alloy 718</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Data obtained from creep and creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests conducted on 18 heats of Alloy 718 were used to formulate models for predicting high temperature time dependent behavior of this alloy. Creep tests were conducted on specimens taken from a number of commercial product forms including plate, bar, and forgoing material that had been procured and heat treated in accordance with ASTM specifications B-670 or B-637. Data were obtained over the temperature range of 427 to 760{degree}C ad at test times to about 87,000 h. Comparisons are given between experimental data and the analytical models. The analytical models for creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> included one based on lot-centering regression analysis and two based on the Minimum Commitment Method. A master'' curve approach was used to develop and equation for estimating creep deformation up to the onset of tertiary creep. 11 refs., 13 figs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brinkman, C.R.; Booker, M.K.; Ding, J.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JChPh.139p5101N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Statistical mechanics of DNA <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: Theory and simulations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the effects of the shear force on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mechanism on a double stranded DNA. Motivated by recent experiments, we perform the atomistic simulations with explicit solvent to obtain the distributions of extension in hydrogen and covalent bonds below the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force. We obtain a significant difference between the atomistic simulations and the existing results in the literature based on the coarse-grained models (theory and simulations). We discuss the possible reasons and improve the coarse-grained model by incorporating the consequences of semi-microscopic details of the nucleotides in its description. The distributions obtained by the modified model (simulations and theoretical) are qualitatively similar to the one obtained using atomistic simulations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nath, S.; Modi, T.; Mishra, R. K.; Giri, D.; Mandal, B. P.; Kumar, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3522472"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous renal allograft <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Clinical and pathological patterns.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of an allografted kidney occurred in five patients 5-17 days after transplantation. In one patient the microscopic pathological changes corresponded with the nodose polyarteritis pattern. In four patients interstitial rejection nephritis with severe haemorrhage and haematoma was found. It is suggested that the bleeding is due to peristatic hyperaemia and defects in the inner elastic membranes. In one case multifocal necrotizing arteriopathy was the main pathogenetic factor. PMID:3522472</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schwartz, A; Podzimek, A; Valenta, J; Klecka, J; Opatrný, K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5024132"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the right hemidiaphragm due to blunt trauma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Five cases of right-sided <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the diaphragm are reviewed. Orthopedic injury, head injury, and shock were the most common associated findings. Apparent elevation of the right hemidiaphragm was seen initially in all cases, but two were misdiagnosed. An algorithm that includes modified peritoneal lavage, CT scan with contrast, and intraperitoneal Tc sulfur colloid is suggested for patients with suspected right diaphragmatic trauma.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leaman, P.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3482074"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bladder <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> following Conversion to Enteric Drainage after Pancreatic Transplantation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Complications associated with bladder-drained pancreatic transplant are not uncommon and include urinary tract infections and reflux pancreatitis. Bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with peritoneal leak is a rare complication after pancreatic transplantation and can present as an acute abdomen with rapidly deteriorating renal function. We describe the first case of a urine leak into the peritoneal cavity occurring after conversion from bladder to enteric drainage. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose such a complication. PMID:23197947</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Srivastava, Vikas; Passaris, George; Juneja, Rajiv; Siddins, Mark; Barbara, Jeffrey A.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730008901&hterms=seamless+pipe&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dseamless%2Bpipe"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests of internally pressurized Inconel 702 tubes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seamless Inconel 702 tubes with 0.375-in. outside diameter and 0.025-in. wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1390 to 1575 F and internal helium pressures from 700 to 1800 psi. Lifetimes ranged from 29 to 1561 hr. The creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> strength of the tubes was about 70 percent lower than that of sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gumto, K. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48404450"> <span id="translatedtitle">Factors influencing the notch <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life of superalloy 718</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The superalloy grade 718 is used extensively for aeroengine applications. Since the fabricated structures operate at high\\u000a temperatures and engine-designer has also to reckon with stress concentrations, notched stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> testing is an important\\u000a acceptance criterion. The specification stipulates a minimum life of 23 hours and minimum elongation of 4%, when testing is\\u000a done on specimens with a combined notched</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Nageswara Rao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28037201"> <span id="translatedtitle">Predictors of death in nonruptured and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose: This study evaluated perioperative variables to predict death in nonruptured and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery.Methods: A consecutive review of all patients who underwent AAA surgery from January 1984 to December 1993 was carried out. Perioperative variables were analyzed with univariate and multivariate statistical models to predict mortality rates.Results: Four hundred seventy-eight patients with nonruptured AAAs and 157</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jerry C. Chen; Henry D. Hildebrand; Anthony J. Salvian; David C. Taylor; Sandy Strandberg; Terence M. Myckatyn; York N. Hsiang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56685228"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of Stress <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Tested Neutron Irradiated Tantalum Alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Irradiation of metals with high-energy particles produces nano-scale defects that act as obstacles to dislocation glide. This paper presents the effects of low-level neutron radiation on the stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and microstructural properties of two tantalum alloys, Ta-10%W and Ta-8%W-2%Hf (T-111), which have been used to encapsulate radioactive fuel for space Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS). Ta-10%W and T-111 test specimens were</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chadwick D. Barklay; Jane Y. Howe; Daniel P. Kramer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1502.03623v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Force-induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a DNA duplex</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of double-stranded DNA under stress is a key process in biophysics and nanotechnology. In this article we consider the shear-induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of short DNA duplexes, a system that has been given new importance by recently designed force sensors and nanotechnological devices. We argue that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> must be understood as an activated process, where the duplex state is metastable and the strands will separate in a finite time that depends on the duplex length and the force applied. Thus, the critical shearing force required to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> a duplex within a given experiment depends strongly on the time scale of observation. We use simple models of DNA to demonstrate that this approach naturally captures the experimentally observed dependence of the critical force on duplex length for a given observation time. In particular, the critical force is zero for the shortest duplexes, before rising sharply and then plateauing in the long length limit. The prevailing approach, based on identifying when the presence of each additional base pair within the duplex is thermodynamically unfavorable rather than allowing for metastability, does not predict a time-scale-dependent critical force and does not naturally incorporate a critical force of zero for the shortest duplexes. Additionally, motivated by a recently proposed force sensor, we investigate application of stress to a duplex in a mixed mode that interpolates between shearing and unzipping. As with pure shearing, the critical force depends on the time scale of observation; at a fixed time scale and duplex length, the critical force exhibits a sigmoidal dependence on the fraction of the duplex that is subject to shearing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Majid Mosayebi; Ard A. Louis; Jonathan P. K. Doye; Thomas E. Ouldridge</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.dspace.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/237580"> <span id="translatedtitle">Emergency endovascular repair of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> visceral artery aneurysms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">ral World Journal of Emergency ssBioMed CentSurgery Open AcceCase report Emergency endovascular repair of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> visceral artery aneurysms Umar Sadat*, Nadim Noor, Tjun Tang and Kevin Varty Address: Cambridge Vascular Unit, Addenbrooke... 's Hospital, Cambridge, UK Email: Umar Sadat* - sadat.umar@gmail.com; Nadim Noor - nadimnoor@doctors.org.uk; Tjun Tang - tt279@cam.ac.uk; Kevin Varty - kevin.varty@addenbrookes.nhs.uk * Corresponding author Abstract Background: Visceral artery aneurysms...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sadat, Umar; Noor, Nadim; Tang, Tjun Y; Varty, Kevin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-07-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JMEP...23.2858O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Material Parameters for Creep <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Austenitic Stainless Steel Foils</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of austenitic stainless steel foil, 347SS, used in compact recuperators have been evaluated at 700 °C in the stress range of 54-221 MPa to establish the baseline behavior for its extended use. Creep curves of the foil show that the primary creep stage is brief and creep life is dominated by tertiary creep deformation with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lives in the range of 10-2000 h. Results are compared with properties of bulk specimens tested at 98 and 162 MPa. Thin foil 347SS specimens were found to have higher creep rates and higher <span class="hlt">rupture</span> ductility than their bulk specimen counterparts. Power law relationship was obtained between the minimum creep rate and the applied stress with stress exponent value, n = 5.7. The value of the stress exponent is indicative of the rate-controlling deformation mechanism associated with dislocation creep. Nucleation of voids mainly occurred at second-phase particles (chromium-rich M23C6 carbides) that are present in the metal matrix by decohesion of the particle-matrix interface. The improvement in strength is attributed to the precipitation of fine niobium carbides in the matrix that act as obstacles to the movement of dislocations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Osman, H.; Borhana, A.; Tamin, M. N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3342953"> <span id="translatedtitle">Transient nuclear envelope <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> during interphase in human cancer cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Neoplastic cells are often characterized by specific morphological abnormalities of the nuclear envelope (NE), which have been used for cancer diagnosis for more than a century. The NE is a double phospholipid bilayer that encapsulates the nuclear genome, regulates all nuclear trafficking of RNAs and proteins and prevents the passive diffusion of macromolecules between the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm. Whether there is a consequence to the proper functioning of the cell and loss of structural integrity of the nucleus remains unclear. Using live cell imaging, we characterize a phenomenon wherein nuclei of several proliferating human cancer cell lines become temporarily <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> during interphase. Strikingly, NE <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> was associated with the mislocalization of nucleoplasmic and cytoplasmic proteins and, in the most extreme cases, the entrapment of cytoplasmic organelles in the nuclear interior. In addition, we observed the formation of micronuclei-like structures during interphase and the movement of chromatin out of the nuclear space. The frequency of these NE <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> events was higher in cells in which the nuclear lamina, a network of intermediate filaments providing mechanical support to the NE, was not properly formed. Our data uncover the existence of a NE instability that has the potential to change the genomic landscape of cancer cells. PMID:22567193</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vargas, Jesse D.; Hatch, Emily M.; Anderson, Daniel J.; Hetzer, Martin W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeoJI.199.1138F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kinematic earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> inversion in the frequency domain</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We develop a frequency-based approach to earthquake slip inversion that requires no prior information on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity or slip-rate functions. Because the inversion is linear and is performed separately at each frequency, it is computationally efficient and suited to imaging the finest resolvable spatial details of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We demonstrate the approach on synthetic seismograms based on the Source Inversion Validation Exercise 1 (SIV1) of a crustal Mw 6.6 strike-slip earthquake recorded locally. A robust inversion approach is obtained by applying a combination of damping, smoothing and forcing zero slip at the edge of the fault model. This approach achieves reasonable data fits, overall agreement to the SIV1 model, including slip-rate functions of each subfault, from which its total slip, slip time history and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity can be extracted. We demonstrate the method's robustness by exploring the effects of noise, random timing errors, and fault geometry errors. The worst effects on the inversion are seen from errors in the assumed fault geometry.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fan, Wenyuan; Shearer, Peter M.; Gerstoft, Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24161439"> <span id="translatedtitle">Delayed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the iliac artery after percutaneous angioplasty.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the iliac artery during percutaneous angioplasty is a life-threatening condition that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment to rescue the patient. Recently, percutaneous angioplasty has become an outpatient procedure, but there is no reliable guideline for observation time in the hospital after percutaneous angioplasty. We describe a 67-year-old man with bilateral lesions in the iliac artery who experienced a delayed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the iliac artery 2 days after percutaneous balloon angioplasty and placement of a self-expandable stent. The patient was successfully treated by endovascular intervention with a stent graft. In our department, percutaneous angioplasty is not performed in an outpatient clinic, and all patients are admitted to the hospital and observed for at least 3 days after percutaneous angioplasty. Because our patient was in the hospital when the iliac artery <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, prompt diagnosis and treatment were possible. Moreover, because appropriately sized stent grafts were prepared in the hospital, timely endovascular treatment could be performed, and the patient recovered successfully. From this case, we conclude that observing patients for a sufficient time in the hospital and preparing appropriately sized stent grafts are 2 important factors for the safety of patients who undergo percutaneous angioplasty. PMID:24161439</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, Jong Kwon; Oh, Sung Jin; Shin, Jin Yong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ExFl...54.1465K"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of thin liquid films sprayed on solid surfaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An experimental study was done to observe the formation of thin films by spraying liquid onto a solid surface and to determine the conditions under which the films would <span class="hlt">rupture</span> or remain stable. Water, or water mixed with 20-70 % by weight of glycerin, was sprayed for varying lengths of time onto a circular, 165-mm-diameter plate made of either Plexiglas, steel, or Parafilm-M and the motion of the liquid recorded using a high-speed camera. Water films <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> immediately after the impact near the center of the surface. Then, if the film thickness was greater than a critical value, the water flooded back and the hole closed; otherwise, the hole remained in the water layer. The critical film thickness increases linearly with advancing liquid-solid contact angle. Increasing liquid viscosity by adding glycerin had little effect on critical film thickness, but inhibited spreading of the liquid and suppressed initial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the liquid layer. A surface energy model was used to predict the variation of critical film thickness with surface wettability.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kadoura, M.; Chandra, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003JPhy4.106..141B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mécanismes de <span class="hlt">rupture</span> d'interfaces sous sollicitation dynamique rapide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Le test d'adhérence par choc laser (LASer Adhesion Test : LASAT) est développé afin de devenir une mesure non destructrice de l'adhérence à l'interface entre deux matériaux. Cette technique utilise un laser impulsionnel de forte puissance pour générer une onde de choc se propageant dans le substrat puis dans la couche. Des contraintes de traction peuvent ainsi être induites entre la couche et le substrat par le jeu des réflexions sur les différentes interfaces du système. La <span class="hlt">rupture</span> peut être détectée sur l'historique de la vitesse de la face opposée au laser. Celle ci est mesurée par vélocimétrie Doppler de type VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector). Les résultats expérimentaux obtenus sur un système (substrat : aluminium, couche : cuivre) déposé par projection plasma permettent de valider cette nouvelle technique. En particulier, le test permet d'étudier l'influence des paramètres de projection sur l'adhérence entre le cuivre et l'aluminium. Par ailleurs, une première interprétation numérique des mécanismes de <span class="hlt">rupture</span> sous sollicitation dynamique est donnée grâce à l'utilisation de différents critères de <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dans un code de propagation des chocs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bolis, C.; Berthe, L.; Boustie, M.; Arrigoni, M.; Jeandin, M.; Barradas, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21083431"> <span id="translatedtitle">Endovascular Repair of Contained <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the Thoracic Aorta</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose: To assess the efficacy of stent-grafts for the treatment of acute <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the thoracic aorta. Methods: Four patients with acute contained <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the thoracic aorta were treated by insertion of stent-grafts. The underlying aortic lesions were aneurysm, acute aortic ulcer, acute type B dissection and giant cell aortitis. The procedures were performed under general anesthesia in three patients and local anesthesia in one patient. Results: All stent-grafts were successfully deployed. All patients survived the procedure and are now alive and well at follow-up (mean 6.3 months, range 44 days-16 months). One patient underwent a second stent procedure 10 days after the first procedure because of a proximal endoleak. All hemothoraces have resolved. There were no complications. Conclusion:Treatment of acute contained <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of the thoracic aorta by the insertion of stent-grafts is feasible. The technical success rates,complication rates and patient survival compare favorably with emergency surgery.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morgan, Robert [Department of Radiology, St. George's Hospital, Blackshaw Road, London SW17 0QT (United Kingdom); Loosemore, Tom [Department of Vascular Surgery, St. George's Hospital, Blackshaw Road, London SW17 0QT (United Kingdom); Belli, Anna-Maria [Department of Radiology, St. George's Hospital, Blackshaw Road, London SW17 0QT (United Kingdom)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-08-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://w3.lmt.ens-cachan.fr/PDFs/DOUDARD.2004.5.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, t. 332, Serie II b, p. 1??, 2001 -PXPPxxxxx.TEX -Endommagement, fatigue, <span class="hlt">rupture</span>/Damage, fatigue, <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, t. 332, S´erie II b, p. 1­??, 2001 - PXPPxxxxx.TEX - Endommagement, fatigue, <span class="hlt">rupture</span>/Damage, fatigue, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> Identification of the scatter in high cycle fatigue from temperature´emie des sciences/´Editions scientifiques et m´edicales Elsevier SAS Fatigue/ Microplasticity/ Poisson</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4331642"> <span id="translatedtitle">Early and delayed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in a 10-year multicenter registry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> after abdominal endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a function of graft maintenance of the seal and fixation. We describe our 10-year experience with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after EVAR. Methods From 2000 to 2010, 1736 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) from 17 medical centers underwent EVAR in a large, regional integrated health care system. Preoperative demographic and clinical data of interest were collected and stored in our registry. We retrospectively identified patients with postoperative <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, characterized as “early” and “delayed” <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (?30 days and >30 days after the initial EVAR, respectively), and identified predictors associated with delayed <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Results The overall follow-up rate was 92%, and the median follow-up was 2.7 years (interquartile range, 1.2–4.4 years) in these 1736 EVAR patients. We identified 20 patients with <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>; 70% were male, the mean age was 79 years, and mean AAA size at the initial EVAR was 6.3 cm. Six patients underwent initial EVAR for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (n = 2) or symptomatic presentation (n = 4). Of the 20 post-EVAR <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, 25% (five of 20) were early, all occurring within 2 days after the initial EVAR. Of these five patients, four had intraoperative adverse events leading directly to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, with one type I and one type III endoleak. Of the five early <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, four patients underwent endovascular repair and one received repair with open surgery, resulting in two perioperative deaths. Among the remaining 15 patients, the median time from initial EVAR to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was 31.1 months (interquartile range, 13.8–57.3 months). Most of these delayed <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> (10 of 15) were preceded by AAA sac increases, including three patients with known endoleaks who underwent reintervention. At the time of delayed <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, nine of 15 patients had new endoleaks. Among all 20 patients, six patients did not undergo repair (all delayed patients) and died, nine underwent repeated EVAR, and five had open repair. For patients who underwent repair for delayed <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, mortality at 30 days and 1 year were 44.4% and 66.7%, respectively. Multivariable Cox regression analysis identified age 80 to 89 (hazard ratio, 3.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1–9.4; P =.03), and symptomatic or <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> initial indication for EVAR (hazard ratio, 7.4; 95% confidence interval, 2.2–24.8; P < .01) as significant predictors of delayed <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Conclusions <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> after EVAR is a rare but devastating event, and mortality after repair exceeds 60% at 1 year. Most delayed cases showed late AAA expansion, thereby implicating late loss of seal and increased endoleaks as the cause of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in these patients and mandating vigilant surveillance. PMID:24957409</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Candell, Leah; Tucker, Lue-Yen; Goodney, Philip; Walker, Joy; Okuhn, Steven; Hill, Bradley; Chang, Robert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JGRB..11612307H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pulse-like <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> induced by low-velocity fault zones</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Low-velocity fault zones (LVFZs) are found in most mature faults. They are usually 100-400 m wide and have ˜20%-60% wave velocity reductions relative to the country rock. To study the effect of LVFZs on earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and the radiated wavefield, we conducted two-dimensional (2-D) simulations of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on faults that bisect a LVFZ, considering a range of velocity reductions and widths. Most earthquakes apparently have slip rise times much shorter than their overall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration. A number of dynamic mechanisms for such pulse-like <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> have been proposed, including frictional self-healing, fault strength heterogeneities, and bimaterial effects. We find that <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in LVFZs with strong enough wave velocity contrast behave as pulses. These pulses are generated by fault locking induced by waves reflected from the boundaries of the LVFZ. This mechanism of pulse generation is robust to variations of initial stress, smoothness of the LVFZ structure, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mode, and exclusion of frictional healing. Moreover, we find that LVFZs can generate complex <span class="hlt">rupture</span> patterns. LVFZs with low-velocity reduction induce multiple <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts involving coexisting pulses and cracks. LVFZs with certain widths can accelerate the transition to supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed. These additional effects of LVFZs on dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can contribute to the complexity of high-frequency ground motions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Yihe; Ampuero, Jean-Paul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRB..117.9311G"> <span id="translatedtitle">The transition of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> styles in elastic media under velocity-weakening friction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although kinematic earthquake source inversions show dominantly pulse-like subshear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior, seismological observations, laboratory experiments and theoretical models indicate that earthquakes can operate with different <span class="hlt">rupture</span> styles: either as pulses or cracks, that propagate at subshear or supershear speeds. The determination of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> style and speed has important implications for ground motions and may inform about the state of stress and strength of active fault zones. We conduct 2D in-plane dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations with a spectral element method to investigate the diversity of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> styles on faults governed by velocity-and-state-dependent friction with dramatic velocity-weakening at high slip rate. Our <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models are governed by uniform initial stresses, and are artificially initiated. We identify the conditions that lead to different <span class="hlt">rupture</span> styles by investigating the transitions between decaying, steady state and growing pulses, cracks, sub-shear and super-shear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> as a function of background stress, nucleation size and characteristic velocity at the onset of severe weakening. Our models show that small changes of background stress or nucleation size may lead to dramatic changes of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> style. We characterize the asymptotic properties of steady state and self-similar pulses as a function of background stress. We show that an earthquake may not be restricted to a single <span class="hlt">rupture</span> style, but that complex <span class="hlt">rupture</span> patterns may emerge that consist of multiple <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts, possibly involving different styles and back-propagating fronts. We also demonstrate the possibility of a super-shear transition for pulse-like <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Finally, we draw connections between our findings and recent seismological observations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gabriel, A.-A.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Dalguer, L. A.; Mai, P. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PApGe.164.1881B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interaction of a Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> on a Fault Plane with Short Frictionless Fault Branches</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous bilateral mode II shear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> were nucleated on faults in photoelastic Homalite plates loaded in uniaxial compression. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> velocities were measured and the interaction between the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front and short fault branches was observed using high-speed digital photography. Fault branches were formed by machining slits of varying lengths that intersected the fault plane over a range of angles. These branches were frictionless because they did not close under static loading prior to shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> nucleation. Three types of behavior were observed. First, the velocity of both <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts was unaffected when the fault branches were oriented 45° to the main slip surface and the length of the branches were less than or equal to ~0.75 R 0* (where R 0* is the slip-weakening distance in the limit of low <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed and an infinitely long slip-pulse). Second, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation stopped at the branch on the compressive side of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tip but was unaffected by the branch on the tensile side when the branches were ~1.5 R 0* in length and remained oriented 45° to the principle slip surface. Third, branches on the tensile side of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tip nucleated tensile ``wing tip'' extensions when the branches were oriented at 70° to the interface. Third, when the branches were oriented at 70° to the interface, branches on the tensile side of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tip nucleated tensile ``wing-crack'' extensions. We explain these observations using a model in which the initial uniaxial load produces stress concentrations at the tips of the branches, which perturb the initial stress field on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> plane. These stress perturbations affect both the resolved shear stress driving the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and the fault-normal stress that controls the fault strength, and together they explain the observed changes in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Biegel, Ronald L.; Sammis, Charles G.; Rosakis, Ares J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFMNG21B0936K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Pre-Stress State and <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Velocity on Dynamic Fault Branching</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We consider a mode II <span class="hlt">rupture</span> which propagates along a planar main fault and encounters an intersection with a branching fault that makes an angle with the main fault. Within a formulation that allows the failure path to be dynamically self-chosen, we study the following questions: Does the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> start along the branch? Does it continue? Which side is most favored for branching, the extensional or compressional? Does <span class="hlt">rupture</span> continue on the main fault too? What path is finally self-chosen? Failure in the modeling is described by a slip-weakening law for which the peak and residual strength, and strength at any particular amount of slip, is proportional to normal stress. We use the elastodynamic boundary integral equation method to allow simulations of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> along the branched fault system. Our results show that dynamic stresses around the <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> fault tip, which increase with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity at locations off the main fault plane, relative to those on it, could initiate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on a branching fault. As suggested by prior work [Poliakov, Dmowska and Rice, 2002, http://esag.harvard.edu/dmowska/PDR.pdf], whether a branching <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, once begun, can be continued to a larger scale depends on principal stress directions in the pre-stress state and on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity. The most favored side for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> transferring on a branching fault switches from the extensional side to the compressive side as we consider progressively shallower angles of the direction of maximum pre-compression with the main fault. Simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> on both faults is usually difficult for a narrow branching angle due to strong stress interaction between faults, which discourages <span class="hlt">rupture</span> continuation on the other side. However, it can be activated by enhanced dynamic stressing when the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity is very near the limiting velocity (Rayleigh wave velocity for mode II). It can also be activated when the branching angle is wide because of decreasing stress interaction between faults. Natural examples seem consistent with the simulations we present.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kame, N.; Rice, J. R.; Dmowska, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/68/76/78/PDF/06_fonrouge_-_petzold_1_2012_III.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">De la technologie de <span class="hlt">rupture</span> à la stratégie de <span class="hlt">rupture</span> : Europlasma, un cas d'entrepreneuriat durable</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sur un marché traditionnel, une entreprise nouvellement créée tente de faire sa place grâce à une technologie de <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Peut elle être qualifiée d'agent perturbateur ? Telle est la question qui se pose à l'examen du cas Europlasma qui, dans un premier temps, essayer d'imposer son standard technologique avant d'aborder une stratégie de valorisation qui peut être qualifiée de stratégie</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cecile Fonrouge</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70021511"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidence for surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in 1868 on the Hayward fault in north Oakland and major <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> in prehistoric earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">WGCEP90 estimated the Hayward fault to have a high probability (0.45 in 30 yr) of producing a future M7 Bay Area earthquake. This was based on a generic recurrence time and an unverified segmentation model, because there were few direct observations for the southern fault and none for the northern Hayward fault. To better constrain recurrence and segmentation of the northern Hayward fault, we trenched in north Oakland. Unexpectedly, we observed evidence of surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> probably from the M7 1868 earthquake. This extends the limit of that surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> 13 km north of the segmentation boundary used in the WGCEP90 model and forces serious re-evaluation of the current two-segment paradigm. Although we found that major prehistoric <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> have occurred here, we could not radiocarbon date them. However, the last major prehistoric event appears correlative with a recently recognized event 13 km to the north dated AD 1640-1776. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lienkaemper, J.J.; Williams, P.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRB..119.8331L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Progression of spontaneous in-plane shear faults from sub-Rayleigh to compressional wave <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">investigate numerically the passage of spontaneous, dynamic in-plane shear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> from initiation to their final <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed, using very fine grids. By carrying out more than 120 simulations, we identify two different mechanisms controlling supershear transition. For relatively weaker faults, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed always passes smoothly and continuously through the range of speeds between the Rayleigh and shear wave speeds (the formerly considered forbidden zone of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds). This, however, occurs in a very short time, before the <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> reach the compressional wave speed. The very short time spent in this range of speeds may explain why a jump over these speeds was seen in some earlier numerical and experimental studies and confirms that this speed range is an unstable range, as predicted analytically for steady state, singular cracks. On the other hand, for relatively stronger faults, we find that a daughter <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is initiated by the main (mother) <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, ahead of it. The mother <span class="hlt">rupture</span> continues to propagate at sub-Rayleigh speed and eventually merges with the daughter <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, whose speed jumps over the Rayleigh to shear wave speed range. We find that this daughter <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is essentially a "pseudorupture," in that the two sides of the fault are already separated, but the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has negligible slip and slip velocity. After the mother <span class="hlt">rupture</span> merges with it, the slip, the slip velocity, and the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed become dominated by those of the mother <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The results are independent of grid sizes and of methods used to nucleate the initial <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Chao; Bizzarri, Andrea; Das, Shamita</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015E%26PSL.411..112W"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> speed dependence on initial stress profiles: Insights from glacier and laboratory stick-slip</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Slow slip events are now well-established in fault and glacier systems, though the processes controlling slow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> remain poorly understood. The Whillans Ice Plain provides a window into these processes through bi-daily stick-slip seismic events that displace an ice mass over 100 km long with a variety of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds observed at a single location. We compare the glacier events with laboratory experiments that have analogous loading conditions. Both systems exhibit average <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities that increase systematically with the pre-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> stresses, with local <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities exhibiting large variability that correlates well with local interfacial stresses. The slip events in both cases are not time-predictable, but clearly slip-predictable. Local pre-stress may control <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior in a range of frictional failure events, including earthquakes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Walter, Jacob I.; Svetlizky, Ilya; Fineberg, Jay; Brodsky, Emily E.; Tulaczyk, Slawek; Grace Barcheck, C.; Carter, Sasha P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApPhL.106a3102B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Time-resolved observation of thermally activated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a capillary-condensed water nanobridge</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The capillary-condensed liquid bridge is one of the most ubiquitous forms of liquid in nature and contributes significantly to adhesion and friction of biological molecules as well as microscopic objects. Despite its important role in nanoscience and technology, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of the bridge is not well understood and needs more experimental works. Here, we report real-time observation of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a capillary-condensed water nanobridge in ambient condition. During slow and stepwise stretch of the nanobridge, we measured the activation time for <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, or the latency time required for the bridge breakup. By statistical analysis of the time-resolved distribution of activation time, we show that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a thermally activated stochastic process and follows the Poisson statistics. In particular, from the Arrhenius law that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> rate satisfies, we estimate the position-dependent activation energies for the capillary-bridge <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bak, Wan; Sung, Baekman; Kim, Jongwoo; Kwon, Soyoung; Kim, Bongsu; Jhe, Wonho</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19980029715&hterms=earthquake&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dearthquake"> <span id="translatedtitle">Systematic Underestimation of Earthquake Magnitudes from Large Intracontinental Reverse Faults: Historical <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> Break Across Segment Boundaries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Because most large-magnitude earthquakes along reverse faults have such irregular and complicated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> patterns, reverse-fault segments defined on the basis of geometry alone may not be very useful for estimating sizes of future seismic sources. Most modern large <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of historical earthquakes generated by intracontinental reverse faults have involved geometrically complex <span class="hlt">rupture</span> patterns. <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> across surficial discontinuities and complexities such as stepovers and cross-faults are common. Specifically, segment boundaries defined on the basis of discontinuities in surficial fault traces, pronounced changes in the geomorphology along strike, or the intersection of active faults commonly have not proven to be major impediments to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Assuming that the seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> will initiate and terminate at adjacent major geometric irregularities will commonly lead to underestimation of magnitudes of future large earthquakes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rubin, C. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3679219"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Role of Geometric and Biomechanical Factors in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Risk Assessment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The current clinical management of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease is based to a great extent on measuring the aneurysm maximum diameter to decide when timely intervention is required. Decades of clinical evidence show that aneurysm diameter is positively associated with the risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, but other parameters may also play a role in causing or predisposing the AAA to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Geometric factors such as vessel tortuosity, intraluminal thrombus volume, and wall surface area are implicated in the differentiation of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> and unruptured AAAs. Biomechanical factors identified by means of computational modeling techniques, such as peak wall stress, have been positively correlated with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> risk with a higher accuracy and sensitivity than maximum diameter alone. The objective of this review is to examine these factors, which are found to influence AAA disease progression, clinical management and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> potential, as well as to highlight on-going research by our group in aneurysm modeling and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> risk assessment. PMID:23508633</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Raut, Samarth S.; Chandra, Santanu; Shum, Judy; Finol, Ender A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/at2wkyldm9624nfx.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the pectoralis major: a meta-analysis of 112 cases</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Of about 150 cases reported in the literature on pectoralis major <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, 108 were selected as presenting enough data to\\u000a be analyzed for cause, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> site, injury mechanism, and treatment outcome. We added data on four of our own cases reported\\u000a here. All patients yet reported have been men. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the PM occurs most commonly in sports during weight</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Klaus Bak; Ewen A. Cameron; Ian J. P. Henderson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/x2m453725104w261.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The influence of sulfur on stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> fracture in inconel 718 superalloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effects of sulfur, with content variations of 15 to 175 ppm, on the stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> and tensile properties in nickel-base\\u000a alloy 718 are reported. The stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> life dramatically decreased with increasing sulfur content. This was especially\\u000a noticeable in the ductility loss at 650 C. Auger electron spectroscopy of stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> tested specimens provided direct\\u000a evidence of sulfur and phosphorus segregation to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. X. Dong; X. S. Xie; R. G. Thompson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28979182"> <span id="translatedtitle">Incidence of Major Tendon <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears in US Army Soldiers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Although a rare event, the prevalence of major tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has increased in recent decades. Identification of risk factors is important for prevention purposes.Hypothesis: Race is a risk factor for major tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>.Study Design: Cohort study (prevalence); Level of evidence, 2.Methods: All patients admitted for surgical management of a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a major tendon at Womack Army Medical Center,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daniel W. White; Joseph C. Wenke; Dan S. Mosely; Sally B. Mountcastle; Carl J. Basamania</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3278032"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recanalization Rates after Endovascular Coil Embolization in a Cohort of Matched <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> and Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary The aim of this study was to retrospectively assess the recanalization rate, factors associated with and time taken for recanalization to occur in a matched <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> and unruptured aneurysm population that were treated with endovascular coiling. <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> and unruptured aneurysms treated between 2002 and 2007 were matched for aneurysm location, diameter and neck size. Recanalization rate, time to recanalize, re-treatment rate and clinical outcome were analysed. Ninety-eight matched <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> and unruptured aneurysms (49 aneurysms in each group) were studied. 46.8% of aneurysms in the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> group achieved complete obliteration on the initial post treatment angiogram versus 34.7% in the unruptured group. The <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> group had a higher rate of recanalization (40.4% versus 20.4%). 25.5% of aneurysms had significant recanalization in the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> group versus 6.1% in the unruptured group (p=0.009). The retreatment rate was higher in the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> group (21.3% versus 6%). <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> aneurysms took a shorter time to recanalize with a mean time of 5.3±3.8 months versus 12.4±7.7months (p=0.003). Multivariate logistic regression analysis found neck size (p=0.0098), wide neck morphology (p=0.0174), aneurysm diameter (p< 0.0001) and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms (p=0.0372) were significant predictors of recanalization. The majority of patients in both groups had a good outcome with GOS=5 (85.7% and 83.7%) but two deaths occurred in the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> group. <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> and unruptured aneurysms showed significant differences in rate, degree and timing of recanalization, thus requiring different protocols for imaging follow-up post endovascular treatment. Earlier and more frequent imaging follow-up is recommended for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms. PMID:21561556</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tan, I.Y.L.; Agid, R.F.; Willinsky, R.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3953527"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute Simultaneous <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Patellar Tendon</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Acute simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and patellar tendon is a rare injury. We present a case report of a 32-year-old male patient with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> ACL and ipsilateral patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> sustained while playing baseball. Surgery was performed on the patellar tendon and the ACL simultaneously. The clinical and radiological outcomes of the treatment were successful. We present this case with a review of the literatures. PMID:24639949</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, Gwang Chul; Park, Sung-Hae</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20152982"> <span id="translatedtitle">Identification of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> locations in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms using experimental and computational techniques.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the event of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, the outcome is often death. This paper aims to experimentally identify the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> locations of in vitro AAA models and validate these <span class="hlt">rupture</span> sites using finite element analysis (FEA). Silicone rubber AAA models were manufactured using two different materials (Sylgard 160 and Sylgard 170, Dow Corning) and imaged using computed tomography (CT). Experimental models were inflated until <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with high speed photography used to capture the site of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. 3D reconstructions from CT scans and subsequent FEA of these models enabled the wall stress and wall thickness to be determined for each of the geometries. Experimental models <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> at regions of inflection, not at regions of maximum diameter. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> pressures (mean+/-SD) for the Sylgard 160 and Sylgard 170 models were 650.6+/-195.1mmHg and 410.7+/-159.9mmHg, respectively. Computational models accurately predicted the locations of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Peak wall stress for the Sylgard 160 and Sylgard 170 models was 2.15+/-0.26MPa at an internal pressure of 650mmHg and 1.69+/-0.38MPa at an internal pressure of 410mmHg, respectively. Mean wall thickness of all models was 2.19+/-0.40mm, with a mean wall thickness at the location of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of 1.85+/-0.33 and 1.71+/-0.29mm for the Sylgard 160 and Sylgard 170 materials, respectively. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> occurred at the location of peak stress in 80% (16/20) of cases and at high stress regions but not peak stress in 10% (2/20) of cases. 10% (2/20) of models had defects in the AAA wall which moved the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> location away from regions of elevated stress. The results presented may further contribute to the understanding of AAA biomechanics and ultimately AAA <span class="hlt">rupture</span> prediction. PMID:20152982</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Doyle, Barry J; Cloonan, Aidan J; Walsh, Michael T; Vorp, David A; McGloughlin, Timothy M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://people.tamu.edu/~bduan/Duan_2008JB005847.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inelastic strain distribution and seismic radiation from <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a fault kink</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We extend an elastodynamic finite element method to incorporate off-fault plastic yielding into a dynamic earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> model. We simulate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> for models of faults with a kink (a sharp change in fault strike), examining how off-fault plastic yielding affects <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation, seismic radiation, and near-fault strain distribution. We find that high-frequency radiation from a kink can be reduced by</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benchun Duan; Steven M. Day</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28949058"> <span id="translatedtitle">Antimicrobial therapy in expectant management of preterm premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the membranes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">SummaryWe review the impact of antimicrobial treatment on maternal and fetal outcome during expectant management of preterm premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the membranes. Relevant studies were retrieved from Medline (1966 to August, 1994) with the search term fetal-membrane-premature-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> and antibiotics or antimicrobial, Excerpta Medica (1972 to August, 1994) with the search term premature fetus, membrane <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, and antibiotic or antimicrobial therapy,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. M Mercer; K. L Arheart</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40027746"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seismic intensity distribution of shallow earthquakes due to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities and faulting modes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Isoseismals of seismic intensity distributions are represented by earthquake source size, faulting mode, and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity\\u000a of fault propagation. Unilateral faulting forms egg—shaped isoseimals, while bilateral faulting forms elliptical ones. It\\u000a is found that the ratio of major to minor axes of isoseismals is sensitive to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> velocity, faulting\\u000a mode, and fault trend have been determined from the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Junji Koyama; Sihua Zheng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070019695&hterms=health+index+measurement&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dhealth%2Bindex%2Bmeasurement"> <span id="translatedtitle">Strain Measurement Using FBG on COPV in Stress <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Test</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested to perform ambient temperature hydrostatic pressurization testing of a Space Transportation System (STS) 40-in. Kevlar Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV). The 40-in. vessel was of the same design and approximate age as the STS Main Propulsion System (MPS) and Orbiter Maneuvering System (OMS) vessels. The NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) assembled a team of experts and conducted an assessment that involved a review of national Kevlar COPY data. During the review, the STS COPVs were found to be beyond their original certification of ten years. The team observed that the likelihood of STS COPV Stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, a catastrophic burst before leak failure mode, was greater than previously believed. Consequently, a detailed assessment of remaining stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life became necessary. Prior to STS-114, a certification deviation was written for two flights of OV-103 (Discovery) and OV-104 (Atlantis) per rationale that was based on an extensive review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, COPV data, and revisions to the STS COPV stress levels. In order to obtain flight rationale to extend the certification deviation through the end of the Program, the Orbiter Project Office has directed an interagency COPV team to conduct further testing and analysis to investigate conservatism in the stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> model and evaluate material age degradation. Additional analysis of stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life requires understanding the fiber stresses including stress that occurs due to thru-wall composite compression in COPV components. Data must be obtained at both zero gauge pressure (pre-stress) and at the component operating pressure so that this phenomenon can be properly evaluated. The zero gauge pressure stresses are predominantly a result of the autofrettage process used during vessel manufacture. Determining these pre-stresses and the constitutive behavior of the overwrap at pressure will provide necessary information to better predict the remaining life of the STS COPVs. The primary test objective is obtaining data to verify the hypothesis of a radially oriented thru-thickness stress-riser in the COPV composite whose magnitude is a function of the applied pressure and the load history. The anticipated load dependent response follows from the constitutive behavior of the composite overwrap so data to quantify its nonlinear and time dependent response will be sought. The objective of the Fiber Braggs Gratings (FBGs) were to advance the state-of-the-art by developing techniques using FBG sensors that are capable of assessing stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> degradation in Kevlar COPVs in a health monitoring mode (1). Moreover, they sought to answer questions of how embedded sensors affect overall integrity of the structure. And lastly, they sought to provide an important link in the overall stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> study that will help close the loop on the COPV fabrication process. NDE inspection methods will be used from start to finish and FBG will be an integral link within the overall chain.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Banks, Curtis; Grant, Joseph</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3347250"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pathologic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the Spleen in Mantle-Cell-Type Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) accounts for less than 10 percent of all non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Pathologic or spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the spleen has been reported in patients with lymphoma; however only 5 cases have been reported in patients with MCL. Although splenomegaly occurs frequently in patients with MCL, spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is rare. We present a case of a 51-year-old female with MCL, who presented to the medical emergency room with splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. This case illustrates that clinicians should be aware of the incidence and presentation of patients with MCL and spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as early detection and heightened suspicion may prevent potentially fatal outcomes. PMID:22577390</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tan, Christopher B.; Rajan, Dhyan; Majeed, Sumreen; Ahmed, Shadab; Freedman, Lester; Mustacchia, Paul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24418448"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous hepatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> caused by hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The causes of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome or hepatic hemorrhage as a serious complication of HELLP are not known. Although spontaneous hepatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> associated with HELLP syndrome is a rare complication of pregnancy, hepatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> results in life-threatening complications. The cornerstone of prognosis is early diagnosis. Hepatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in HELLP syndrome should be considered a differential diagnosis in pregnant patients with sudden onset of abdominal pain or hypotension. We report a case of 30-year-old primigravida female with spontaneous hepatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> caused by HELLP syndrome as a presenting symptom of right upper quadrant abdominal pain. PMID:24418448</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">You, Je Sung; Chung, Yong Eun; Chung, Hyun Soo; Joo, Youngseon; Chung, Sung Phil; Lee, Hahn Shick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T41D..02B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variable land-level changes at a non-persistent megathrust <span class="hlt">rupture</span> boundary, Sitkinak Island, Alaska</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fault-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> segmentation models require paleoseismic data to validate inferred <span class="hlt">rupture</span> boundaries. We examined the southwestern end of the 1964 Mw 9.2 <span class="hlt">rupture</span> along the Alaska-Aleutian megathrust to test the prehistoric persistence of this historical <span class="hlt">rupture</span> boundary. On Sitkinak Island in the Trinity Islands, 20 hand-collected cores and tidal outcrops beneath tidal and freshwater marshes reveal five abrupt lithologic contacts that record a mixed record of coseismic uplift (3 events) and subsidence (2 events) in the last ~1000 years. Diatom and foraminiferal assemblages in modern and core material obtained from the southwestern Sitkinak lagoon indicate rapid uplift ca. AD 1788 and just prior to 575 × 65 cal yr and 735 × 65 cal yr; and rapid subsidence in AD 1964 and soon after ~735 cal yr as constrained by 14C ages and tephra correlation. Because the northern coast of Sitkinak was reportedly uplifted in AD 1964 and the island is currently subsiding interseismically above a locked patch of the megathrust, we interpret coseismic subsidence as representing the along-strike transition from elastic uplift to subsidence at the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> boundary; this implies that the AD 1964 zero uplift isobase crosses the island. Similar behavior has been observed during large megathrust <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in Indonesia and the Solomon Islands and is predicted by elastic dislocation models. A sand bed traced inland 1.5 km and bracketed with 14C, 137Cs, and 210Pb ages was most likely deposited by a tsunami associated with megathrust <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in 1788. Historical records suggest that the AD 1788 <span class="hlt">rupture</span> extended from the southwest at least 100 km northeast to the Russian settlement at Three Saints Bay near Old Harbor, Kodiak Island. The complicated uplift and subsidence record we observe on Sitkinak Island, interpreted in the context of historical reports of the AD 1788 <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, is consistent with at least three <span class="hlt">rupture</span> segmentation models. In Model A, Sitkinak is located at a boundary for 1964- and 1788-type <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. A complication with Model A is that it requires 1788-type <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> to extend at least 100 km into the AD 1964 <span class="hlt">rupture</span> area. Model B assumes coseismic uplift for large megathrust events on Sitkinak, with subsidence accompanying only updip <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> or upper-plate deformation. Model B is inconsistent with the observation of coseismic subsidence of the southwestern lagoon in AD 1964. At present we prefer Model C, where megathrust <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> end or continue near Sitkinak in a complex, and as yet undetermined, pattern. An implication of our field evidence is that seismic hazard models should relax the assumption that the AD 1964 <span class="hlt">rupture</span> endpoint is persistent.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Briggs, R. W.; Engelhart, S. E.; Nelson, A. R.; Kemp, A.; Haeussler, P. J.; Dura, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JNuM..445...78Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reduction in the onset time of breakaway oxidation on Zircaloy cladding <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> under simulated LOCA conditions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Breakaway oxidation, which is characterized by sudden increases in oxidation rate and significant hydrogen absorption after longer exposure in high-temperature steam, was examined for the ballooned and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cladding. Short test rods with PWR-type Zircaloy-4 cladding were heated in steam and oxidized at 1273 K for periods from 1200 to 3600 s after ballooning and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The breakaway oxidation was observed after more than 1500 s in the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cladding whereas it was observed after more than 3600 s in the non-<span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cladding at this temperature.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yamato, Masaaki; Nagase, Fumihisa; Amaya, Masaki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRB..118.5888L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of fault heterogeneity on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics: An experimental approach using ultrafast ultrasonic imaging</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study is devoted to the experimental investigation of the interaction of a propagating <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with one or several mechanical heterogeneities. We developed a friction laboratory experiment where a soft elastic solid slides past a rigid flat plate. The system is coupled to an original medical imaging technique, ultrasound speckle interferometry, that allows observing the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics as well as the emitted elastic shear wavefield into the solid body. We compare the dynamics of propagating <span class="hlt">rupture</span> for a homogeneous flat interface and for three cases of heterogeneous sliding surfaces: (1) an interface with a single point-like barrier made of a small rock pebble, (2) an interface with a single linear barrier that joins the edges of the faults in a direction perpendicular to slip, and (3) an interface with multiple barriers disposed on half of its surface area, creating a heterogeneous zone. We obtain experimental observations of dynamic effects that have been predicted by numerical dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations and provide experimental observations of the following phenomena: a barrier can stop or delay the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation; a linear single barrier can change the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity, increasing or decreasing it; we observe transition from subshear to supershear propagation due to the linear barrier; a large heterogeneous area slows down the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. We observe a strong variability of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics occurring for identical frictional conditions, which we impute to heterogeneity of the stress field due to both the loading conditions and memory of the stress field due to previous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Latour, S.; Voisin, C.; Renard, F.; Larose, E.; Catheline, S.; Campillo, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20997047"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study on the Accidental <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Hot Leg or Surge Line in SBO Accident</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The postulated total station blackout accident (SBO) of PWR NPP with 600 MWe in China is analyzed as the base case using SCDAP/RELAP5 code. Then the hot leg or surge line are assumed to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> before the lower head of Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, and the progressions are analyzed in detail comparing with the base case. The results show that the accidental <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of hot leg or surge line will greatly influence the progression of accident. The probability of hot leg or surge line <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in intentional depressurization is also studied in this paper, which provides a suggestion to the development of Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMG). (authors)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kun Zhang; Xuewu Cao [Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.S51B2358P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of nucleation parameters and initial stress on forbidden zone <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Due to the inherent complexity in earthquake nucleation most numerical models of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulate nucleation by forcing <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to propagate at a fixed velocity within a certain region on the fault termed the nucleation zone. This work focuses on the influence this artificial nucleation procedure has on subsequent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on the fault. Using a finite element model for dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation, numerical experiments were performed for different size nucleation zones and for different <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities. It is shown that as the size of the nucleation zone increases, the gradient of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity within the forbidden zone also increases, that is, for larger forced nucleation zones the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity passes more rapidly through the region of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities between the Rayleigh wave speed and the shear wave speed that immediately precedes the supershear transition. Importantly, the position of the supershear transition does not shift appreciably for variations in nucleation zone radius, only the rate at which the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity increases towards the transition point. Additional experiments were also performed to ascertain the influence of different initial stress states on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Specifically, the shear stress on the fault was varied, while the normal stress and the yield stress remained the same, effectively moving the fault nearer to or farther from failure. These experiments demonstrate the strong influence the initial stress conditions have on the resulting <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, specifically with regards to the distance at which the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> transitions to supershear speeds and the maximum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity attained on the fault. As the initial stress increases towards the yield stress, we find the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> transitions to supershear speeds sooner, i.e. closer to the hypocenter, and the final <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity is higher. It is possible that all <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> approach the same final <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed at different rates, so that they appear to reach different final speeds for the same finite fault length, however any in-depth analysis of this phenomenon is beyond the scope of this work. A possible physical explanation for the observed behavior in which the output of the model is attempting to accurately reflect a unique <span class="hlt">rupture</span> predetermined by the stress state and material properties of the fault is explained and supported numerically. Furthermore, the influence of artificial nucleation parameters, e.g., the size of the nucleation zone, on the resultant <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has important implications for the common time-weakening nucleation procedure employed in dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modeling, as well as for understanding the evolution of <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> during a seismic event. Significantly, if the expected <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is entirely determined by the stress state and friction parameters on a fault, as opposed to the particular nucleation processes, it might be possible to predict where <span class="hlt">rupture</span> will occur and where it will extend to for certain known stress configurations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Payne, R. M.; Duan, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3698858"> <span id="translatedtitle">Patterns of placental pathology in preterm premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Inflammation is associated with preterm premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes (PPROM) and adverse neonatal outcomes. Subchorionic thrombi, with or without inflammation, may also be a significant pathological finding in PPROM. Patterns of inflammation and thrombosis may give insight into mechanisms of adverse neonatal outcomes associated with PPROM. To characterize histologic findings of placentas from pregnancies complicated by PPROM at altitude, 44 placentas were evaluated for gross and histological indicators of inflammation and thrombosis. Student’s t-test (or Mann–Whitney U-test), ?2 analysis (or Fisher’s exact test), mean square contingency and logistic regression were used when appropriate. The prevalence of histologic acute chorioamnionitis (HCA) was 59%. Fetal-derived inflammation (funisitis and chorionic plate vasculitis) was seen at lower frequency (30% and 45%, respectively) and not always in association with HCA. There was a trend for Hispanic women to have higher odds of funisitis (OR = 5.9; P = 0.05). Subchorionic thrombi were seen in 34% of all placentas. The odds of subchorionic thrombi without HCA was 6.3 times greater that the odds of subchorionic thrombi with HCA (P = 0.02). There was no difference in gestational age or <span class="hlt">rupture</span>-to-delivery interval, with the presence or absence of inflammatory or thrombotic lesions. These findings suggest that PPROM is caused by or can result in fetal inflammation, placental malperfusion, or both, independent of gestational age or <span class="hlt">rupture</span>-to-delivery interval; maternal ethnicity and altitude may contribute to these findings. Future studies focused on this constellation of PPROM placental findings, genetic polymorphisms and neonatal outcomes are needed. PMID:23828732</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Armstrong-Wells, J.; Post, M. D.; Donnelly, M.; Manco-Johnson, M. J.; Fisher, B. M.; Winn, V. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AIPC..969..439B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of Stress <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Tested Neutron Irradiated Tantalum Alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Irradiation of metals with high-energy particles produces nano-scale defects that act as obstacles to dislocation glide. This paper presents the effects of low-level neutron radiation on the stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and microstructural properties of two tantalum alloys, Ta-10%W and Ta-8%W-2%Hf (T-111), which have been used to encapsulate radioactive fuel for space Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS). Ta-10%W and T-111 test specimens were exposed to a neutron fluence level (1.2×1015nvt) at temperatures less than <0.2 Tm, which is equivalent to the cumulative fluence associated with the 30-year mission life of a RPS. This fluence level results in an atomic displacement damage of approximately 3.0×10-7 dpa in both alloys. The atomic displacement damage produces an approximate two-order of magnitude increase in the stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time, and a two-order of magnitude reduction in steady state creep rate. These observations are statistically significant at the 0.05 significance level. Transmission electron microscopy of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> specimens reveals that the interaction of the irradiation produced defects with ao/2<111> screw dislocations results in a five-fold increase in dislocation density and a pronouncement of the ordering of dislocations into mosaic patterns of cellular or subgranular arrangements. The results of this research are significant because they provide a basic understanding of the strength mechanisms in two tantalum alloys (Ta-10%W and T-111) resulting from neutron irradiation at temperatures <0.2 Tm.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barklay, Chadwick D.; Howe, Jane Y.; Kramer, Daniel P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013E%26PSL.381..147Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Large earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process variations on the Middle America megathrust</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The megathrust fault between the underthrusting Cocos plate and overriding Caribbean plate recently experienced three large <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>: the August 27, 2012 (Mw 7.3) El Salvador; September 5, 2012 (Mw 7.6) Costa Rica; and November 7, 2012 (Mw 7.4) Guatemala earthquakes. All three events involve shallow-dipping thrust faulting on the plate boundary, but they had variable <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes. The El Salvador earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> from about 4 to 20 km depth, with a relatively large centroid time of ˜19 s, low seismic moment-scaled energy release, and a depleted teleseismic short-period source spectrum similar to that of the September 2, 1992 (Mw 7.6) Nicaragua tsunami earthquake that <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> the adjacent shallow portion of the plate boundary. The Costa Rica and Guatemala earthquakes had large slip in the depth range 15 to 30 km, and more typical teleseismic source spectra. Regional seismic recordings have higher short-period energy levels for the Costa Rica event relative to the El Salvador event, consistent with the teleseismic observations. A broadband regional waveform template correlation analysis is applied to categorize the focal mechanisms for larger aftershocks of the three events. Modeling of regional wave spectral ratios for clustered events with similar mechanisms indicates that interplate thrust events have corner frequencies, normalized by a reference model, that increase down-dip from anomalously low values near the Middle America trench. Relatively high corner frequencies are found for thrust events near Costa Rica; thus, variations along strike of the trench may also be important. Geodetic observations indicate trench-parallel motion of a forearc sliver extending from Costa Rica to Guatemala, and low seismic coupling on the megathrust has been inferred from a lack of boundary-perpendicular strain accumulation. The slip distributions and seismic radiation from the large regional thrust events indicate relatively strong seismic coupling near Nicoya, Costa Rica, patchy zones of strong seismic coupling in the shallowest megathrust region along Nicaragua and El Salvador, and small deeper patchy zones of strong seismic coupling near Guatemala, which can be reconciled with the geodetic observations as long as the strong coupling is limited to a small fraction of the megathrust area.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ye, Lingling; Lay, Thorne; Kanamori, Hiroo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48440500"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> de remblais en site estuarien apport de la géochimie</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Résumé  La zone industrialo-portuaire de Montoir de Bretagne a été édifiée sur des espaces gagnés sur l'estuaire de la Loire au cours\\u000a des cinquante dernières années. Les terrains qui la constituent sont donc très jeunes et leur nature essentiellement vaseuse\\u000a fait qu'ils sont très sensibles à la <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.\\u000a \\u000a L'analyse chimique des eaux interstitielles permet de mettre en évidence les sols intéressés</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Dupain</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22113662"> <span id="translatedtitle">Infectious or Noninfectious? <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span>, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin, E-mail: telgalal@yahoo.co.uk [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Papiewski, Andrzej [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Poland); Szubert, Wojciech [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Szopinski, Piotr [Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Clinic of Vascular Surgery (Poland)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/659228"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> loop annex ion exchange RLAIX vault deactivation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This engineering report documents the deactivation, stabilization and final conditions of the <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located northwest of the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns, piping debris, and column liquid were removed from the vault, packaged and shipped for disposal. The vault walls and floor were decontaminated, and portions of the vault were painted to fix loose contamination. Process piping and drains were plugged, and the cover blocks and rain cover were installed. Upon closure,the vault was empty, stabilized, isolated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ham, J.E.; Harris, D.L., Westinghouse Hanford</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23731558"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coil embolization of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> frontopolar artery aneurysm: case report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Distal anterior cerebral artery aneurysms are infrequent. The most common location is at the bifurcation of the pericallosal and callosomarginal arteries. Cerebral artery anomalies can sometimes, at least partially, explain aneurysm formation in less common locations in relation to hemodynamic stress caused on the vascular wall. We report a very rare case of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> frontopolar artery aneurysm as a part of an anomalous anterior cerebral artery complex that was, for the first time, treated with endovascular coiling. PMID:23731558</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Castaño-Leon, Ana M; Cicuendez, Marta; Paredes, Igor; Alen, Jose F; Navia, Pedro; Lagares, Alfonso</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S33C..06K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stimulating <span class="hlt">rupture</span> surfaces in a finite rock volume</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pore fluids in rocks and pore pressure perturbations can trigger earthquakes. Sometimes fluid injections into boreholes are able to induce potentially damaging seismic events. For instance, this was the case by stimulations at such Enhanced Geothermal Systems like the ones at Basel, in Cooper Basin, at The Geysers field and at Soultz. Fluid-induced microearthquakes in hydrocarbon or geothermal reservoirs, aftershocks of tectonic earthquakes or seismic emission in rock samples are examples of seismicity resulting from a seismogenic activation of finite volumes of rocks. Such a finiteness can influence frequency-magnitude statistics of the seismicity. Previously we have observed that fluid-induced large-magnitude events at geothermal and hydrocarbon reservoirs are frequently underrepresented in comparison with the Gutenberg-Richter statistics. This is an indication that the events are much more probable on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> surfaces contained nearly completely within the stimulated volume. Here we theoretically analyse the influence of the finiteness of a perturbed volume on the frequency-magnitude statistics of induced events. Our analysis is a phenomenological one. It is possibly applicable to different types of the seismicity triggering like a triggering by pore-pressure perturbations or a triggering by rate-and-state processes. We approximate a stimulated volume by an ellipsoid or cuboid, and derive the magnitude statistics of induced events from the statistics of randomly orientated thin flat discs of different sizes, representing the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> surfaces. We consider different possible scenarios of event triggering: <span class="hlt">rupture</span> surfaces located completely within the stimulated volume and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> surfaces which are intersecting with the stimulated volume. We derive lower and upper bounds of the probability to induce a given-magnitude event. The bounds depend on the characteristic scales of the stimulated volume. The minimum principal axis is the most influential geometric parameter. We compare our analytical results with data on seismicity induced by fluid injections in boreholes. Fitting the bounds to the frequency-magnitude distribution can provide an estimate of a largest expected magnitude and a characteristic stress drop, in addition to improved estimates of the Gutenberg-Richter a- and b- parameters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Krüger, O. S.; Shapiro, S. A.; Dinske, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720008738&hterms=seamless+pipe&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dseamless%2Bpipe"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests of internally pressurized Rene 41 tubes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Weld-drawn tubes of Rene 41 with 0.935 centimeter outside diameter and 0.064 centimeter wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1117 to 1233 K and internal helium pressures from 5.5 to 12.4 meganewtons per square meter. Lifetimes ranged from 5 to 2065 hours. The creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> strength of the tubes was 50 percent lower than that of unwelded, thick sheet specimens, and 20 percent lower than that of unwelded, thin sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gumto, K. H.; Weiss, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">428</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25087829"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> thoracoabdominal aneurysm treatment with modified chimney stent graft.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 76-year-old woman presented with symptomatic contained-<span class="hlt">ruptured</span> thoracoabdominal aneurysm at the level of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and the hepatic artery origin from the SMA. The chimney technique for celiac trunk, SMA, and right renal artery (periscope configuration) was performed. An endovascular leak from the distal landing zone of the SMA stent graft was treated using a second modified stent graft with the SMA branches preservation. The 18-month follow-up computed tomography angiography demonstrated the aneurysm exclusion, no endovascular leak, and visceral and renal arteries patency. PMID:25087829</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marino, Mario; Kasemi, Holta; Di Angelo, Costantino Luca; Fadda, Gian Franco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">429</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21867660"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Recurring pneumothorax due to traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the diaphragm