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1

Treatment of a ruptured vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysm using pipeline embolization device.  

PubMed

Treatment options of ruptured vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysms (VFA) are limited and often carry significant mortality and morbidity. We report the use of Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) to successfully treat a patient with a ruptured vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysm (VFA) who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 73 year-old man with a history of cardiac stent placement seven days earlier presented with Hunt-Hess II SAH. He was taking aspirin and clopidogrel. Computed tomography angiogram revealed a large vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysm. Microsurgical treatment options are technically challenging and carry high risk. He underwent endovascular treatment of the ruptured VFA using overlapping PEDs. Five PEDs were placed in a telescoping fashion to reconstruct the affected portions of the left vertebral and basilar arteries. An additional 2-mm blister aneurysm in the right vertebral artery was also discovered during the conventional cerebral angiography and was treated with one additional PED. The patient remained neurologically intact after the procedure. He was continued on aspirin and clopidogrel. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging at three months demonstrated patency of the stents without any evidence of ischemic change. Follow-up conventional cerebral angiogram at six months demonstrated thrombosis of the VFA and reconstruction of the vertebrobasilar system. The patient remained clinically well. An endovascular approach using PEDs can be a safe and effective treatment option for ruptured VFA in selected cases. PMID:23593603

Tan, Lee A; Moftakhar, Roham; Lopes, Demetrius K

2013-03-31

2

Treatment of a Ruptured Vertebrobasilar Fusiform Aneurysm Using Pipeline Embolization Device  

PubMed Central

Treatment options of ruptured vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysms (VFA) are limited and often carry significant mortality and morbidity. We report the use of Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) to successfully treat a patient with a ruptured vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysm (VFA) who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 73 year-old man with a history of cardiac stent placement seven days earlier presented with Hunt-Hess II SAH. He was taking aspirin and clopidogrel. Computed tomography angiogram revealed a large vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysm. Microsurgical treatment options are technically challenging and carry high risk. He underwent endovascular treatment of the ruptured VFA using overlapping PEDs. Five PEDs were placed in a telescoping fashion to reconstruct the affected portions of the left vertebral and basilar arteries. An additional 2-mm blister aneurysm in the right vertebral artery was also discovered during the conventional cerebral angiography and was treated with one additional PED. The patient remained neurologically intact after the procedure. He was continued on aspirin and clopidogrel. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging at three months demonstrated patency of the stents without any evidence of ischemic change. Follow-up conventional cerebral angiogram at six months demonstrated thrombosis of the VFA and reconstruction of the vertebrobasilar system. The patient remained clinically well. An endovascular approach using PEDs can be a safe and effective treatment option for ruptured VFA in selected cases.

Tan, Lee A.; Lopes, Demetrius K.

2013-01-01

3

[Ruptured fusiform aneurysm of the supreme anterior communicating artery: a case report].  

PubMed

The supreme anterior communicating artery (SAcom) is a very rare anomaly that appears as a communicating artery between the anterior cerebral arteries (ACAs). This anomaly was first reported by Laitinen and Snellman in 1960. They described the SAcom as a connection between both pericallosal bifurcations. They also suggest that the SAcom may be an embryological remnant and a cause of aneurysm formation. A distal ACA aneurysm can be associated with the SAcom. In this case report, we describe a ruptured fusiform aneurysm originating from the SAcom. We treated the patient by trapping the SAcom along with the aneurysm. This is the first case report regarding a ruptured fusiform aneurysm originating from the SAcom itself. PMID:23180748

Saito, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Miyata, Hajime; Moroi, Junta; Mutoh, Tatsushi; Suzuki, Akifumi

2012-12-01

4

Dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar dissecting aneurysm originating from atherosclerosis: an autopsy case.  

PubMed

We herein report an unusual case of profound brain infarction of the posterior circulation due to a dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar dissecting aneurysm (DVDA) originating from atherosclerosis. On autopsy, diffuse atherosclerosis was observed with a multi-fusiform aneurysm measuring 1 to 2 cm in diameter ranging from the left vertebral artery to the basilar artery. The microscopic findings of the aneurysm revealed severe stenosis of the artery caused by intimal thickening, intimal flap formation and thrombosis, indicating the presence of a dissecting aneurysm originating from atherosclerosis. The DVDA observed in this case was considered to be slowly progressive and associated with the development of atherosclerosis. The etiology of structural destabilization in patients with DVDA involves rupture of the internal elastic lamina, which is dislodged by massive hematomas that form atheromatous lesions. PMID:23955618

Isa, Katsunori; Sakima, Hirokuni; Kosuge, Noritake; Kokuba, Kazuhito; Goya, Yoshino; Nakachi, Koh; Ishihara, Satoshi; Tokashiki, Takashi; Ohya, Yusuke; Saio, Masanao

2012-03-01

5

Intravascular stent and endovascular coil placement for a ruptured fusiform aneurysm of the basilar artery. Case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

The authors demonstrate the technical feasibility of using intravascular stents in conjunction with electrolytically detachable coils (Guglielmi detachable coils [GDCs]) for treatment of fusiform, broad-based, acutely ruptured intracranial aneurysms and review the literature on endovascular approaches to ruptured aneurysms and cerebral stent placement. A 77-year-old man presented with an acute subarachnoid hemorrhage of the posterior fossa. A fusiform aneurysm with a broad-based neck measuring 12 mm and involving the distal vertebral artery (VA) and proximal third of the basilar artery (BA) was demonstrated on cerebral angiography. The aneurysm was judged to be inoperable. Six days later a repeated hemorrhage occurred. A 15-mm-long intravascular stent was placed across the base of the aneurysm in the BA and expanded to 4 mm to act as a bridging scaffold to create a neck. A microcatheter was then guided through the interstices of the stent into the body and dome of the aneurysm, and GDCs were deposited for occlusion. The arteriogram obtained after stent placement demonstrated occlusion of the main dome and body of the aneurysm. The coils were stably positioned and held in place by the stent across the distal VA and BA fusiform aneurysm. Excellent blood flow to the distal BA and posterior cerebral artery was maintained through the stent. There were no new brainstem ischemic events attributable to the procedure. No rebleeding from the aneurysm had occurred by the 10.5-month follow-up evaluation, and the patient has experienced significant neurological improvement. Certain types of intracranial fusiform aneurysms may now be treated by combining intravascular stent and GDC placement for aneurysm occlusion via an endovascular approach. This is the first known clinical application of this novel approach in a ruptured cerebral aneurysm. PMID:9384409

Higashida, R T; Smith, W; Gress, D; Urwin, R; Dowd, C F; Balousek, P A; Halbach, V V

1997-12-01

6

Treatment of Acute Intracranial Vertebrobasilar Dissection with Angioplasty and Stent Placement: Report of Two Cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: Acute vertebrobasilar dissection may cause sub- arachnoid hemorrhage by rupturing through the adventia or cerebral infarct by progressive occlusion of the true lumen. Recent reports on the endovascular management of this condition have focused on treatment of pseudoaneu- rysms. We report two cases where angioplasty or stent placement was successfully used to improve compromised blood flow secondary to vertebrobasilar

Steven J. Willing; Frank Skidmore; Jill Donaldson; Ulises Lisandro Nobo; Konstantin Chernukha

7

Vertebrobasilar Artery Occlusion  

PubMed Central

The presentation of vertebrobasilar artery occlusion varies with the cause of occlusion and location of ischemia. This often results in delay in diagnosis. Areas of the brain supplied by the posterior circulation are difficult to visualize and usually require angiography or magnetic resonance imaging. Intravenous thrombolysis and local-intra arterial thrombolysis are the most common treatment approaches used. Recanalization of the occluded vessel significantly improves morbidity and mortality. Here we present a review of the literature and a case of a patient with altered mental status caused by vertebrobasilar artery occlusion.

Schoen, Jessica C.; Boysen, Megan M.; Warren, Chase R.; Chakravarthy, Bharath; Lotfipour, Shahram

2011-01-01

8

Angiographic follow-up of vertebrobasilar artery aneurysms treated with detachable coils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Endovascular treatment of ruptured vertebrobasilar artery aneurysms with Gugliemi detachable coils (GDC) has become an alternative to surgery. Mid-term angiographic follow-up can now be reported. Of 111 vertebrobasilar aneurysms in 110 patients we treated with GDC since 1992, 53 underwent angiography within 1 year and 59 after more than 18 months. We did not achieve complete occlusion on initial treatment of 23 aneurysms (21%).

C. Groden; B. Eckert; T. Ries; E. Neumaier Probst; T. Kucinski; H. Zeumer

2003-01-01

9

Workflow Optimization in Vertebrobasilar Occlusion  

SciTech Connect

Objective: In vertebrobasilar occlusion, rapid recanalization is the only substantial means to improve the prognosis. We introduced a standard operating procedure (SOP) for interventional therapy to analyze the effects on interdisciplinary time management. Methods: Intrahospital time periods between hospital admission and neuroradiological intervention were retrospectively analyzed, together with the patients' outcome, before (n = 18) and after (n = 20) implementation of the SOP. Results: After implementation of the SOP, we observed statistically significant improvement of postinterventional patient neurological status (p = 0.017). In addition, we found a decrease of 5:33 h for the mean time period from hospital admission until neuroradiological intervention. The recanalization rate increased from 72.2% to 80% after implementation of the SOP. Conclusion: Our results underscore the relevance of SOP implementation and analysis of time management for clinical workflow optimization. Both may trigger awareness for the need of efficient interdisciplinary time management. This could be an explanation for the decreased time periods and improved postinterventional patient status after SOP implementation.

Kamper, Lars, E-mail: lars.kamper@helios-kliniken.de; Meyn, Hannes [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal (Germany); Rybacki, Konrad [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany); Nordmeyer, Simone [St. Josef-Hospital Oberhausen, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy (Germany); Kempkes, Udo; Piroth, Werner [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal (Germany); Isenmann, Stefan [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Department of Neurology, HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal (Germany); Haage, Patrick [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal (Germany)

2012-06-15

10

Meningovascular syphilis with fatal vertebrobasilar occlusion.  

PubMed

We report the case of a young patient with meningovascular syphilis who suffered fatal vertebrobasilar occlusion despite thrombolytic treatment and endovascular interventions. A 35-year-old man without any known medical history presented with an acute ischemic stroke and was initially treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. He was then transferred to the stroke center, where he underwent endovascular recanalization of his occluded vertebrobasilar system. Despite initial successful recanalization, he suffered recurrent vertebrobasilar occlusion, and a second endovascular treatment attempt was unsuccessful. He subsequently developed a pontine hemorrhage and acute hydrocephalus and died secondary to transtentorial herniation. Laboratory findings were suggestive of prior spirochetal infection, and autopsy revealed necrotizing vasculitis and extensive adventitial inflammation involving the basilar and vertebral arteries, supporting the diagnosis of meningovascular syphilis. PMID:19680027

Feng, Wuwei; Caplan, Michael; Matheus, Maria G; Papamitsakis, Nikolaos I H

2009-08-01

11

Inner ear dysfunction due to vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke.  

PubMed

Because the blood supply to the inner ear originates from the vertebrobasilar system, vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke can present with vertigo and hearing loss due to infarction of the inner ear (i.e., labyrinthine infarction). Sometimes vertigo and hearing loss are warning symptoms of impending vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke (mainly in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery territory). In this case, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is normal and the clinician must rely on other clinical features to make the diagnosis. Here the authors review the keys to the diagnosis of vertigo and hearing loss associated with vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke. PMID:19834865

Kim, Ji Soo; Lee, Hyung

2009-10-15

12

Time Management in Acute Vertebrobasilar Occlusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute vertebrobasilar occlusion (VBO) is associated with a high risk of stroke and death. Although local thrombolysis may\\u000a achieve recanalization and improve outcome, mortality is still between 35% and 75%. However, without recanalization the chance\\u000a of a good outcome is extremely poor, with mortality rates of 80–90%. Early treatment is a fundamental factor, but detailed\\u000a studies of the exact time

Lars Kamper; Konrad Rybacki; Michael Mansour; Sven B. Winkler; Udo Kempkes; Patrick Haage

2009-01-01

13

Combined Stent Placement and Thrombolysis in Acute Vertebrobasilar Ischemic Stroke  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke is often associated with high morbidity and mortality with limited therapeutic options. Endovascular treatment with thrombolysis has offered some hope for affected patients; however, overall outcomes have been less than satisfactory. In this report, we present the results of our approach in six consecutive cases of acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke by combined proximal

Doris D. M. Lin; Philippe Gailloud; Norman J. Beauchamp; Eric M. Aldrich; Robert J. Wityk; Kieran J. Murphy

2003-01-01

14

Thrombus in Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectatic Artery Treated with Intravenous Urokinase  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia is often found in patients with posterior circulation ischemia. Brain ischemia is caused by abnormal flow in the dilated artery and obstruction of paramedian arteries or intraluminal thrombus with artery-to-artery embolism. We report a patient with vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia and luminal thrombus treated with intravenous urokinase who did well but died 2 months later of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Case

Michael De Georgia; John Belden; Linda Pao; Michael Pessin; Eddie Kwan; Louis Caplan

1999-01-01

15

Persistent external carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis via the hypoglossal canal  

Microsoft Academic Search

A persistent external carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis, associated with intracranial aneurysms, was identified. The anomalous\\u000a vessel passed through the hypoglossal canal, and was possibly a variant of the persistent primitive hypoglossal artery.

M. Nakamura; S. Kobayashi; T. Yoshida; M. Kamagata; T. Sasaki

2000-01-01

16

[Cervical discopathy, cervical migraine and vertebrobasilar arterial insufficiency: Clinical correlations].  

PubMed

The pathogenesis of cervical migraine may suggest that a connection exists between it and cervical discopathy and also vertebrobasilar arterial insufficiency. This correlation was studied in a group of 103 patients subjected to clinical observations. In 83 of them cervical discopathy was found, in 69 cervical migraine and in 40 vertebrobasilar insufficiency were present. Among those with discopathy migraine was present in 63.6% of cases, and vertebrobasilar insufficiency in 31%. In patients with cervical migraine degenerative changes of the type of cervical discopathy were present in 90% of cases, although in only 56.5% of cases clinical signs were present connected with these changes. Vertebrobasilar insufficiency was present in 45% of patients with cervical migraine, that is more frequently than in discopathy. In the group with vertebrobasilar insufficiency radiological changes in the cervical spine were present in 77.5% of cases and the same proportion of patients in this group had cervical migraine. These numbers confirm the connection between cervical migraine and radiological changes and clinical manifestations of discopathy, and they indicate also that cervical migraine may be a successive stage of vascular changes leading to circulatory failure in the area supplied by vertebral arteries. This failure may have a different course and pathological mechanism. In 12.5% of patients in this group no cervical migraine or radiological changes were demonstrated. The term "cervical migraine" seems inappropriate since this type of headache has another substrate and mechanism than true migraine. PMID:714220

Domza?, T; Zaleska, B; Kwasucki, J

17

Revascularization of vertebrobasilar artery occlusion at the chronic stage.  

PubMed

We describe a patient who underwent intracranial angioplasty and Solitaire stent placement for recanalization of a vertebrobasilar artery occlusion 2 months after symptom onset. Computed tomography angiography and digital subtraction angiography showed that both vertebral arteries and the proximal basilar artery were occluded. Balloon angioplasty was performed on a segment of the occluded left vertebral artery and basilar artery, followed by successful detachment of one Solitaire stent. Repeat angiography showed near normal patency of the left vertebrobasilar artery. The patient`s symptoms improved significantly, and postoperative transcranial Doppler sonography 3 months later showed no evidence of in-stent restenosis. PMID:23887219

Liu, Xun-Can; Chen, Chen; Shi, Ming-Chao; Wang, Shou-Chun

2013-07-01

18

Time Management in Acute Vertebrobasilar Occlusion  

SciTech Connect

Acute vertebrobasilar occlusion (VBO) is associated with a high risk of stroke and death. Although local thrombolysis may achieve recanalization and improve outcome, mortality is still between 35% and 75%. However, without recanalization the chance of a good outcome is extremely poor, with mortality rates of 80-90%. Early treatment is a fundamental factor, but detailed studies of the exact time management of the diagnostic and interventional workflow are still lacking. Data on 18 patients were retrospectively evaluated. Time periods between symptom onset, admission to hospital, time of diagnosis, and beginning of intervention were correlated with postinterventional neurological status. The Glasgow Coma Scale and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) were used to examine patients before and after local thrombolysis. Additionally, multivariate statistics were applied to reveal similarities between patients with neurological improvement. Primary recanalization was achieved in 77% of patients. The overall mortality was 55%. Major complications were intracranial hemorrhage and peripheral embolism. The time period from symptom onset to intervention showed a strong correlation with the postinterventional NIHSS as well as the patient's age, with the best results in a 4-h interval. Multivariate statistics revealed similarities among the patients. Evaluation of time management in acute VBO by multivariate statistics is a helpful tool for definition of similarities in this patient group. Similarly to the door-to-balloon time for acute coronary interventions, the chances for a good outcome depend on a short time interval between symptom onset and intervention. While the only manipulable time period starts with hospital admission, our results emphasize the necessity of efficient intrahospital workflow.

Kamper, Lars, E-mail: lars.kamper@helios-kliniken.d [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal (Germany); Rybacki, Konrad [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany); Mansour, Michael; Winkler, Sven B.; Kempkes, Udo; Haage, Patrick [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal (Germany)

2009-03-15

19

Fusiform Lenticulostriate Artery Aneurysm with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: The Role for Superselective Angiography in Treatment Planning  

PubMed Central

Summary Aneurysms of the lenticulostriatal perforating arteries are rare and either involve the middle cerebral artery-perforator junction or are located distally in basal ganglia. We describe a rare ruptured fusiform lenticulostriatal perforating artery aneurysm arising from a proximal M2 MCA branch, discerned on superselective microcatheter angiography, presenting solely with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 50-year-old previously healthy man presented with diffuse SAH and negative CT angiogram. Cerebral angiogram demonstrated a 2 mm fusiform aneurysm presumably arising from the right lateral lenticulostriate perforator but the exact origin of the perforator was unclear. Superselective angiography was required to precisely delineate the aneurysm and its vessel of origin and directly influenced treatment planning (surgical trapping). Superselective microcatheter angiography provides both an option for endovascular therapy as well as more accurate delineation for surgical planning for these rare aneurysms.

Kochar, P.S.; Morrish, W.F.; Hudon, M.E.; Wong, J.H.; Goyal, M.

2010-01-01

20

Bilateral vertebral artery balloon occlusion for giant vertebrobasilar aneurysms  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe the clinical presentation, radiological and clinical results in six consecutive patients with a giant vertebrobasilar\\u000a aneurysm treated by bilateral vertebral artery balloon occlusion. Five patients presented with headache and signs of brain-stem\\u000a compression and one with subarachnoid haemorrhage. In all patients vertebral artery balloon occlusion was performed. In four,\\u000a this followed successful test occlusion. In one patient, who

M. Sluzewski; E. H. Brilstra; W. J. van Rooij; D. Wijnalda; C. A. F. Tulleken; G. J. E. Rinkel

2001-01-01

21

Leo Stent for Endovascular Treatment of Broad-Necked and Fusiform Intracranial Aneurysms  

PubMed Central

Summary The advent of intracranial stents has widened the indications for endovascular treatment of broad-necked and fusiform aneurysms. Leo stent is a self-expandable, nitinol, braided stent dedicated to intracranial vessels. The aim of this study is to present our experience in endovascular treatment of broad-necked and fusiform intracranial aneurysms using self-expanding, nitinol Leo stents. Between February 2004 and November 2006, 25 broad-necked and three fusiform aneurysms in 28 patients were treated using Leo stents in our centre. There were 18 patients who experienced acute subarachnoid haemorrhage due to aneurysm rupture, two patients who experienced SAH at least 12 months ago and in eight patients aneurysms were found incidentally. Aneurysms were located as follows: internal carotid artery15, basilar artery5, basilar tip3, posterior inferior cerebral artery2, M1/M2 segment1, A2 segment1 and vertebral artery1. There were no difficulties with stent deployment and delivery. All patients after acute SAH (n=18) underwent stent implantation and coil embolization in one procedure. The remaining patients underwent coil embolization in a staged procedure. Immediate aneurysm occlusion of more than 95% was achieved in all patients who underwent stent placement and coil embolization in one procedure. There were three thromboembolic complications encountered in patients in an acute setting of SAH, preloaded only on acetylsalicylic acid. Use of abciximab led to patency within the stent and parent vessel. However, one of these patients presented rebleeding from the aneurysm during administration of abciximab and died. Application of Leo stents in cases of broadnecked and fusiform intracranial aneurysms is safe and effective with a low complication rate.

Juszkat, R.; Nowak, S.; Smol, S.; Kociemba, W.; Blok, T.; Zarzecka, A.

2007-01-01

22

Vertebrobasilar Occlusion Presenting as Sudden Isolated Bilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Case Report  

PubMed Central

Isolated bilateral deafness is a rare but possible symptom of vertebrobasilar ischemia, primarily due to occlusion of the anterior inferior cerebellar arteries or their branch, the internal auditory artery. We reported on uncommon case of sudden bilateral sensorineural hearing loss without typical neurological symptoms resulting from vertebrobasilar ischemia. We performed the available examinations, including otoscopy, laboratory tests, and pure tone audiogram, however we were not able to identify the cause of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Brain magnetic resonance image showed the cerebellar infarction of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory. Brain magnetic resonance angiography showed bilateral vertebral and basilar artery occlusion. We suggest vertebrobasilar ischemia as a cause of sudden isolated deafness.

Kim, Eunja; Son, Min-Ki; Kang, Chang-Ki

2013-01-01

23

Fusiform aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery: short review article  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Fusiform superior cerebellar artery (SCA) aneurysms are quite rare and only 9 cases have been reported in the literature.\\u000a Fusiform aneurysms are a small group of cerebral aneurysms among the most difficult to treat. The therapeutic approaches in\\u000a the limited number cited in the literature include surgery and endovascular occlusion. Surgical techniques which have been\\u000a used are parent artery occlusion,

B. Atalay; N. Altinors; C. Yilmaz; H. Caner; O. Ozger

2007-01-01

24

Skin Waste, Vertex Angle, and Scar Length in Excisional Biopsies: Comparing Five Excision Patterns???Fusiform Ellipse, Fusiform Circle, Rhomboid, Mosque, and S-Shaped  

Microsoft Academic Search

The common excision skin pattern is either a fusiform ellipse or another pattern with dissimilar length and width. The purpose of this study was to define the most advantageous skin pattern regarding skin waste, vertex angle, and scar length. Five skin excision patterns used traditionally for closure of round lesions were analyzed: fusiform ellipse, fusiform circle, rhomboid, mosque, and S-shaped.

Tamara Raveh Tilleman; Michael M. Tilleman; Gertruud A. M. Krekels; Martino H. A. Neumann

2004-01-01

25

Results of isolated carotid surgery in patients with vertebrobasilar insufficiency.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to establish whether carotid-revascularized patients who had preoperative vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) displayed distinctive characteristics and whether a particular prognosis would ensure. From January 1985 to December 1993, 1022 carotid revascularizations were performed, of which 114 (11%) were for high-grade stenosis associated with VBI. The group with VBI and the group without VBI were compared according to a set of 121 prospectively collected variables. Of all the demographic and risk-factor variables, only female prevalence (42% vs. 27%) and hypertension (77% vs. 27%) distinguished the group with VBI, who also exhibited a significantly higher proportion of significant contralateral carotid lesions (27.2% vs. 8.9%) and vertebrosubclavian lesions (38.6% vs. 24.8%). Following isolated carotid surgery, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups as to their cumulative rate of permanent neurological mortality and morbidity (2.6% in the group with VBI vs. 3.4% in the group without it). With an average follow-up of 60 months, VBI was cured in 82.4% and improved condition shown in 6.5% of patients. However, the proportion of good results fell to 65% in patients with a nonfunctional circle of Willis. Out of 13 cases of failure to control VBI, cure was finally effected by means of contralateral revascularization in 3 cases and by means of vertebrosubclavian revascularization in 5 cases out of 6. At 5 years, the actuarial rates of neurological event-free intervals and survival were not different from one group to another. In most cases, isolated carotid surgery is sufficient to bring vertebrobasilar insufficiency under control, except when significant vertebrosubclavian lesions and a nonpatent circle of Willis call for simultaneous carotid and vertebral artery surgery. PMID:9841689

Cardon, A; Kerdiles, Y; Lucas, A; Podeur, L; Ferte, L; Le Du, J; Desjardins, J F

1998-11-01

26

Elevated vertebrobasilar artery resistance in neonatal spontaneously hypertensive rats  

PubMed Central

There is a strong correlation between increased vertebral artery resistance and arterial blood pressure in humans. The reasons for this increased resistance at high systemic pressure remain unknown, but may include raised sympathetic activity. With the recent finding that prehypertensive spontaneously hypertensive (PHSH) rats, which have raised sympathetic nerve activity, but a blood pressure comparable to normotensive rat strains, we hypothesized that its vertebrobasilar vascular resistance would already be raised and, as a consequence, would exhibit a more responsive Cushing response (e.g., brain ischemia evoked sympathoexcitation and a pressor response). We report that PHSH rats exhibited a remodeling of the basilar artery (i.e., increased wall thickness and lower lumen-to-wall thickness ratio) that occurred before the onset of hypertension. In a novel in vitro vascularly isolated, arterially perfused brain stem preparation of PHSH rats of 4–5 wk of age, brain stem vascular resistance was raised by ?35% relative to age- and sex-matched normotensive rats (P < 0.05). In the in situ arterial perfused working heart-brain stem preparation, occlusion of both vertebral arteries in the PHSH rat resulted in a significantly greater increase in sympathetic activity (57 vs. 20%, PHSH vs. control; P < 0.01) that triggered a greater increase in arterial perfusion pressure (8 vs. 3 mmHg, PHSH vs. control; P < 0.01) compared with normotensive rats. These data indicate raised vertebrobasilar artery resistance before the onset of hypertension in the PHSH rat. With the raised responsiveness of the Cushing response in the PHSH rat, we discuss the possibility of brain stem perfusion as a central nervous system determinant of the set point of vasomotor sympathetic tone in the hypertensive condition.

Cates, Matthew J.; Steed, Peter W.; Abdala, Ana P. L.; Langton, Philip D.

2011-01-01

27

[Diffusion-weighted MRT in vertebrobasilar ischemia. Application, sensitivity, and prognostic value].  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability, sensitivity, and predictive power of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of vertebrobasilar infarction. From 1997 to 2002, we prospectively recruited 268 patients with acute signs and symptoms suspective of vertebrobasilar ischemia. The patients underwent biplanar EPI-T2 and EPI DWI within 24 h after onset of symptoms and high-resolution MRI as a control within 7 days. One hundred twenty-one patients had additional CT scanning. The DWI revealed acute vertebrobasilar infarction in 71.0%. The mean time exposure of DWI was 8 min and thus no more than that of CT imaging. It showed significantly more acute lesions than CT imaging (28.0%), but additional high-resolution MRI was not able to reveal more lesions than DWI alone. Even in 42 patients with reversible brainstem or cerebellar symptoms classified as TIA or PRIND, DWI demonstrated acute ischemia in 42.8%. Sixty-three patients with optimal final diagnosis of vertebrobasilar ischemia had normal DWI. One week after onset of symptoms, 88.9% of these patients had recovered completely or showed minimal symptoms. Therefore, DWI is a sensitive indicator of acute vertebrobasilar ischemia. It is no more time-consuming than CT imaging, and normal DWI is a predictor of good clinical outcome in patients with brainstem or cerebellar infarction. PMID:15088089

Marx, J J; Thoemke, F; Mika-Gruettner, A; Fitzek, S; Vucurevic, G; Urban, P P; Stoeter, P; Dieterich, M; Hopf, H C

2004-04-01

28

Face-Specific Processing in the Human Fusiform Gyrus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The perception of faces is sometimes regarded as a specialized task involving discrete brain regions. In an attempt to identi$ face-specific cortex, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure activation evoked by faces presented in a continuously changing montage of common objects or in a similar montage of nonobjects. Bilateral regions of the posterior fusiform gyrus were activated

Gregory McCarthy; Aina Puce; John C. Gore; Truett Allison

1997-01-01

29

Unique fusiform alumina nanotubes fabricated by combined anodization.  

PubMed

Alumina nanotubes (ANTs) with unique fusiform morphologies were synthesized via a simple electrochemical route; the fluctuation of the electronic current density during the anodization process is considered to be the main reason for the formation of such new alumina nanostructures. PMID:21218215

Yi, Li; Zhiyuan, Ling; Xing, Hu; Yisen, Liu; Yi, Chang

2011-01-07

30

Fusiform Gyrus Volume Reduction and Facial Recognition in Chronic Schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The fusiform gyrus (FG), or occipitotem- poral gyrus, is thought to subserve the processing and encoding of faces. Of note, several studies have re- ported that patients with schizophrenia show deficits in facial processing. It is thus hypothesized that the FG might be one brain region underlying abnormal facial recogni- tion in schizophrenia. The objectives of this study were

Toshiaki Onitsuka; Martha E. Shenton; Kiyoto Kasai; Paul G. Nestor; Sarah K. Toner; Ron Kikinis; Ferenc A. Jolesz; Robert W. McCarley

2003-01-01

31

An unhappy patient following successful sonothrombolysis in vertebrobasilar thrombosis: dilemma with final diagnosis.  

PubMed

Acute vertebrobasilar thrombosis is often associated with high mortality and prolonged disability. Therapeutic route and the time window for systemic thrombolysis in acute settings remain uncertain. We describe a case of severe acute ischemic stroke due to vertebrobasilar thrombosis who achieved rapid arterial recanalization and remarkable clinical recovery during ultrasound enhanced intravenous thrombolysis, initiated at 4.5 hours after the symptom-onset. We discuss some important issues, related to the final diagnosis, that arise due to the complete clinical recovery, rapid arterial recanalization and absence of any acute infarction on subsequent neuroimaging. PMID:20649852

Vijayan, Joy; Tai, Mei-Ling S; Ahmad, Aftab; Sharma, Vijay K

2011-04-01

32

Endovascular Treatment of Supra-Aortic Extracranial Stenoses in Patients with Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency Symptoms  

SciTech Connect

Purpose. Stenoses and thromboses of vessels feeding the vertebrobasilar territory can evoke serious disturbances including ischemic stroke. We present our experience of endovascular interventions for patients with signs of vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) resulted from subclavian, vertebral and brachiocephalic arterial stenoses. Methods. Twenty-one patients (10 men) aged from 35 to 84 years (mean 64.3 years) with symptoms compatible with VBI underwent balloon angioplasty and stenting of subclavian (SA), innominate (IA) and vertebral (VA) arteries. Procedures were done by radiologists experienced in systematic stenting of the lesions. VBI was manifested by persistent signs in 15 patients, and by transitory ischemic attacks in the posterior circulatory territory in 4 (19%). Two patients (10%) experienced ischemic strokes (in the vertebrobasilar circulation in both cases). In 3 patients (14%) VBI was accompanied by upper limb vascular insufficiency symptoms. All cases were resistant to medical treatment. A neurologist assessed complaints, initial VBI signs and their alteration after intervention in all patients. Outcomes were measured with the 5-point scale suggested by Malek et al.: (1) excellent result (asymptomatic, no neurologic deficits and no symptoms of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (2) good (no neurologic deficits, at most one transient episode of vertebrobasilar ischemia over a period of 3 months after treatment); (3) fair (minimal neurologic deficit and at most one transient episode per month of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (4) poor (no improvement compared with neurologic status before treatment and/or persistent symptoms of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (5) death (regardless of cause). Endovascular treatment was performed for SA stenosis in 15 patients, for SA occlusion in 2, for IA stenosis in 2, and for VA stenosis in 2. There were 15 cases of atherosclerosis, 2 of aortoarteritis, 4 of proximal SA kinking. SA and IA stenoses ranged from 60% to 100% (mean 74.5%), VA stenoses were 90% in both cases. Results. Initial technical success was achieved in 96% of cases. There were no postprocedural complications or deaths. During 6-36 months (mean 21.3 months) of follow-up all patients showed improvement in VBI symptoms or upper limb ischemia. Within 36 months after the procedure outcomes were estimated as excellent and good in 13 patients (76%) and poor in 2 (12%), the last being attributed to atherosclerosis progression in other vascular areas. Restenosis in the stented area has developed in 1 patient (6%). Conclusions. Balloon angioplasty and stenting of extracranial vertebrobasilar arterial stenoses appeared to be effective in endovascular treatment of medically resistant VBI. Further investigations are required to clarify the role of subclavian artery kinking in VBI development and indications for various methods of its correction.

Zaytsev, A.Y., E-mail: cir-auz@mail.ru; Stoyda, A.Y.; Smirnov, V.E. [I.M. Setchenov Moscow Medical Academy, Department of Angiography and Interventional Radiology (Russian Federation); Scherbyuk, A.N. [I.M. Setchenov Moscow Medical Academy, Department of Vascular Surgery (Russian Federation); Kondrashin, S.A [I.M. Setchenov Moscow Medical Academy, Department of Angiography and Interventional Radiology (Russian Federation); Artukchina, E.G. [I.M. Setchenov Moscow Medical Academy, Department of Vascular Surgery (Russian Federation); Kikevitch, V.A. [N.N. Burdenko Interventional Radiology Center, Department of Angiography and Interventional Radiology (Russian Federation)

2006-10-15

33

[Spontaneous dissection (intramural hematoma) in vertebrobasilar artery and ischemic stroke].  

PubMed

Twelve patients (mean age 36,0+/-10,4 years) with a vertebral artery dissection (VAD) were followed-up during 2,5 months - 5 years. All patients underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the head, MR-angiography (11 patients - repeated studies), 5 patients - conventional cerebral angiography. VAD was located on extracranial (7), intracranial (1), extra-intracranial levels (4), the extension of dissection to the basilar artery was found in 2 patients. Dissection involving both vertebral arteries was observed in 6 patients, recurrent VAD after 4-15 months - in 3 patients. A total number of VAD was 22, a total number of cerebrovascular events - 15. The latter included ischemic strokes (13), transient ischemic attacks (1) and isolated headache (1). Ischemic cerebrovascular events were characterized by the combination of cerebral ischemic symptoms with occipital headache and/or posterior neck pain (79%) which usually preceded ischemic cerebral symptoms by the interval of several hours - 3 weeks as well as a goof recovery of neurological deficit (92%). In a half of patients, cerebral ischemic symptoms developed after neck movements or manual therapy. Angiography revealed the stenosis of vertebral arteries, usually elongated, irregular or tapered (64%), more often located at the level of V3-V4 segments, vertebral artery occlusion (36%) and pseudoaneurisms (19%). The repeated angiography performed in 2-3 months or more showed positive changes in 82%, the complete (86%) or partial (14%) resolution of all stenoses and the complete or partial recanalization of the half of vertebral artery occlusions, the regress of all pseudoaneurisms. An intramural hematoma on MR imaging (the axial plane) was found in 85% dissections analyzed, the increased vertebral artery outer diameter - in 69%. Atherosclerotic plaques were absent in all cases. VAD is one of unknown causes of ischemic stroke in vertebrobasilar circulation. Diagnosis is based on characteristic clinical and angiography data. PMID:18379492

Kalashnikova, L A; Krotenkova, M V; Knovalov, R N; Protski?, S V; Kadykov, A S

2007-01-01

34

Vertebrobasilar Thrombosis in Children: Report of Two Cases and Recommendations for Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two consecutive cases of children with vertebrobasilar thrombosis (VBT) were treated with high-dose intra-arterial urokinase within 4 h of presenting to the emergency room, after full evaluation by CT scan, MRI and MR angiography. Complete resolution of neurologic symptoms was achieved in both cases. Based on our limited pediatric experience, previous treatment of VBT at our institution and a review

Arno Sungarian; John A. Duncan III

2003-01-01

35

Traumatic Vertebral Arterial Dissection and Vertebrobasilar Arterial Thrombosis Successfully Treated with Endovascular Thrombolysis and Stenting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: A case of traumatic extracranial vertebral arte- rial dissection leading to vertebrobasilar thrombosis and respiratory compromise requiring mechanical ventilation was managed with intraarterial thrombolysis and stenting of the vertebral intimal dissection. In contrast to similar, previously reported cases, this critically ill patient made a full recovery, returning to his job as a secondary school teacher.

Rupert F. Price; Robin Sellar; Clarence Leung; Michael J. O'Sullivan

1998-01-01

36

Brain stem compression by a giant vertebrobasilar aneurysm mimicking seronegative myasthenia.  

PubMed

A patient is described with a vertebrobasilar aneurysm who was erroneously thought to have myasthenia gravis on the basis of the clinical presentation and investigations, which were interpreted as supportive of a disorder of the neuromuscular junction. Despite the correct diagnosis being made at a late stage the patient made a full recovery after radiological intervention. PMID:11413279

Frisby, J; Wills, A; Jaspan, T

2001-07-01

37

Traumatic vertebral arterial dissection and vertebrobasilar arterial thrombosis successfully treated with endovascular thrombolysis and stenting.  

PubMed

A case of traumatic extracranial vertebral arterial dissection leading to vertebrobasilar thrombosis and respiratory compromise requiring mechanical ventilation was managed with intraarterial thrombolysis and stenting of the vertebral intimal dissection. In contrast to similar, previously reported cases, this critically ill patient made a full recovery, returning to his job as a secondary school teacher. PMID:9802490

Price, R F; Sellar, R; Leung, C; O'Sullivan, M J

1998-10-01

38

Percutaneous transluminal cerebral angioplasty and stenting in acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke. Report of two cases.  

PubMed

Summary: Reports of cerebral transluminal angioplasty and stenting in patients with vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke are scanty. Herein we report on the use of "monorail" coronary balloon angioplasty and stent balloon mounted catheters in two patients with acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke, focussing on the differences and possible advantages of the "monorail" technique in comparison with the "over-the-wire" technique. In both patients, the clinical picture was characterized by progressive brainstem symptoms followed by acute loss of consciousness related to an atherothrombotic occlusion and subocclusion of the dominant intracranial vertebral artery, respectively. In one patient, superselective thrombolytic therapy and balloon angioplasty resulted in a dissection flap at the vertebrobasilar junction. The latter was treated by successful deployment of a coronary stent. In the other patient, the subocclusive lesion was directly treated by angioplasty and stenting without thrombolytic therapy. The clinical outcome was poor for one patient ("locked in" syndrome) while the other had a complete clinical recovery. In acute atherothrombotic vertebrobasilar stroke transluminal cerebral angioplasty and stenting may be successfully performed allowing vessel recanalization. PMID:20594522

Nistri, M; Mangiafico, S; Cellerini, M; Villa, G; Mennonna, P; Ammannati, F; Giordano, G P

2004-10-20

39

Vertebrobasilar dissection with subarachnoid hemorrhage: a retrospective study of 29 patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have reviewed initial diagnostic features, treatment, and outcome in 29 patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage due to non-traumatic vertebrobasilar artery dissection diagnosed in our hospital between 1993 and 2003. The dissections occurred in the vertebral artery in 19 patients, the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) in two patients, the basilar artery in four patients, and in the vertebral artery

B Ramgren; M Cronqvist; B Romner; L Brandt; S Holtås; E-M Larsson

2005-01-01

40

Percutaneous Transluminal Cerebral Angioplasty and Stenting in Acute Vertebrobasilar Ischemic Stroke  

PubMed Central

Summary Reports of cerebral transluminal angioplasty and stenting in patients with vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke are scanty. Herein we report on the use of “monorail” coronary balloon angioplasty and stent balloon mounted catheters in two patients with acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke, focussing on the differences and possible advantages of the “monorail” technique in comparison with the “over-the-wire” technique. In both patients, the clinical picture was characterized by progressive brainstem symptoms followed by acute loss of consciousness related to an atherothrombotic occlusion and subocclusion of the dominant intracranial vertebral artery, respectively. In one patient, superselective thrombolytic therapy and balloon angioplasty resulted in a dissection flap at the vertebrobasilar junction. The latter was treated by successful deployment of a coronary stent. In the other patient, the subocclusive lesion was directly treated by angioplasty and stenting without thrombolytic therapy. The clinical outcome was poor for one patient (“locked in” syndrome) while the other had a complete clinical recovery. In acute atherothrombotic vertebrobasilar stroke transluminal cerebral angioplasty and stenting may be successfully performed allowing vessel recanalization.

Nistri, M.; Mangiafico, S.; Cellerini, M.; Villa, G.; Mennonna, P.; Ammannati, F.; Giordano, G. P.

2002-01-01

41

Visual Loss, Homonymous Hemianopia, and Unilateral Optic Neuropathy as the Presenting Symptoms of Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectasia  

PubMed Central

Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD) is a relatively rare disorder for which unfortunately there is no treatment. Here we describe a case of simultaneous pre- and postchiasmal visual pathway pathology secondary to a space occupying VBD. In addition our patient demonstrates one of the very few cases of VBD compression of the retrochiasmal pathway with no other cranial nerve involvement.

Mortzos, Panteleimon; S?rensen, Torben Lykke

2013-01-01

42

Intracranial Pseudoaneurysms, Fusiform Aneurysms and Carotid-Cavernous Fistulas  

PubMed Central

Summary The study assessed the effectiveness and safety of endovascular covered stents in the management of intracranial pseudoaneurysms, fusiform aneurysms and direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Fourteen endovascular covered stents were used to repair three pseudoaneurysms, six fu-siform aneurysms and six direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Aneurysms were in the carotid artery in seven cases, in the vertebral artery two cases. It was not possible to treat two additional cases transcutaneously for technical reasons?2/15. Percutaneous closure of the lesions with an endovascular covered stent was successful in 13 of 15 cases. Initial follow-up showed good stent patency. No complications were observed after stent implantation. During follow-up, stent thromboses were detected in two of nine patients with follow-up digital subtracted angiography. One carotid-cavernous fistula of Barrow Type A transformed into Barrow Type D at nine month follow-up study was cured with a procudure of Onyx-18 injection. Endovascular covered stents may be an option for percutaneous closure of intracranial pseudoaneurysms, fusiform aneurysms and direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Endoluminal vascular repair with covered stents offers an alternative therapeutic approach to conventional modalities.

Lv, Xianli; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang; Lv, Ming; Zhang, Jingbo; Wu, Zhongxue

2008-01-01

43

Covert face recognition without the fusiform-temporal pathways.  

PubMed

Patients with prosopagnosia are unable to recognize faces consciously, but when tested indirectly they can reveal residual identification abilities. The neural circuitry underlying this covert recognition is still unknown. One candidate for this function is the partial survival of a pathway linking the fusiform face area (FFA) and anterior-inferior temporal (AIT) cortex, which has been shown to be essential for conscious face identification. Here we performed functional magnetic, and diffusion tensor imaging in FE, a patient with severe prosopagnosia, with the goal of identifying the neural substrates of his robust covert face recognition. FE presented massive bilateral lesions in the fusiform gyri that eliminated both FFAs, and also disrupted the fibers within the inferior longitudinal fasciculi that link the visual areas with the AITs and medial temporal lobes. Therefore participation of the fusiform-temporal pathway in his covert recognition was precluded. However, face-selective activations were found bilaterally in his occipital gyri and in his extended face system (posterior cingulate and orbitofrontal areas), the latter with larger responses for previously-known faces than for faces of strangers. In the right hemisphere, these surviving face selective-areas were connected via a partially persevered inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. This suggests an alternative occipito-frontal pathway, absent from current models of face processing, that could explain the patient's covert recognition while also playing a role in unconscious processing during normal cognition. PMID:21570471

Valdés-Sosa, Mitchell; Bobes, Maria A; Quiñones, Ileana; Garcia, Lorna; Valdes-Hernandez, Pedro A; Iturria, Yasser; Melie-Garcia, Lester; Lopera, Francisco; Asencio, José

2011-05-04

44

Processing of Facial Emotion in the Human Fusiform Gyrus  

PubMed Central

Electrophysiological and fMRI-based investigations of the ventral temporal cortex of primates provide strong support for regional specialization for the processing of faces. These responses are most frequently found in or near the fusiform gyrus, but there is substantial variability in their anatomical location and response properties. An outstanding question is the extent to which ventral temporal cortex participates in processing dynamic, expressive aspects of faces, a function usually attributed to regions near the superior temporal cortex. Here, we investigated these issues through intracranial recordings from eight human surgical patients. We compared several different aspects of face processing (static and dynamic faces; happy, neutral, and fearful expressions) with power in the high-gamma band (70–150 Hz) from a spectral analysis. Detailed mapping of the response characteristics as a function of anatomical location was conducted in relation to the gyral and sulcal pattern on each patient’s brain. The results document responses with high responsiveness for static or dynamic faces, often showing abrupt changes in response properties between spatially close recording sites and idiosyncratic across different subjects. Notably, strong responses to dynamic facial expressions can be found in the fusiform gyrus, just as can responses to static faces. The findings suggest a more complex, fragmented architecture of ventral temporal cortex around the fusiform gyrus, one that includes focal regions of cortex that appear relatively specialized for either static or dynamic aspects of faces.

Kawasaki, Hiroto; Tsuchiya, Naotsugu; Kovach, Christopher K.; Nourski, Kirill V.; Oya, Hiroyuki; Howard, Matthew A.; Adolphs, Ralph

2012-01-01

45

Differential gene expression in loblolly pine ( Pinus taeda L.) challenged with the fusiform rust fungus, Cronartium quercuum f.sp. fusiforme  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cronartium quercuum f.sp. fusiforme is the pathogen that incites fusiform rust disease of southern pine species. To date, a number of host resistance genes have been mapped. Although genomic mapping studies have provided valuable information on the genetic basis of disease interactions in this pine-rust pathosystem, the interaction at the molecular level is poorly understood. To further our understanding of

Henrietta Myburg; Alison M. Morse; Henry V. Amerson; Thomas L. Kubisiak; Dudley Huber; Jason A. Osborne; Saul A. Garcia; C. Dana Nelson; John M. Davis; Sarah F. Coverte; Leonel M. van Zyl

2006-01-01

46

Uterine Rupture  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Uterine rupture may be defined as a disruption of the uterine muscle extending to and involving the uterine serosa or disruption\\u000a of the uterine muscle with extension to the bladder or broad ligament [1]. Uterine dehiscence is defined as disruption of\\u000a the uterine muscle with intact uterine serosa [1]. Uterine rupture is associated with severe maternal and perinatal morbidity\\u000a and

Sharon R. Sheehan; Deirdre J. Murphy

47

Usefulness of Grasping a Guiding Catheter with a Loop-Snare Wire for Stent Placement into the Vertebrobasilar Artery  

SciTech Connect

In cases in which the subclavian artery is severely tortuous or branches with an extremely angulated origin, stent placement in the vertebrobasilar artery on the approach from the femoral artery is often technically difficult. We report two cases in which a stent placement procedure for the vertebrobasilar artery was successfully performed by grasping a guiding catheter with a loop-snare wire. This technique is useful for tortuous arteries or arteries branching with an extremely angulated origin.

Yoneda, Kenji, E-mail: yoneda_ken@rad.m.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Matsui, Osamu; Sanada, Junichiro; Kusanagi, Miho [Kanazawa University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Okamoto, Yoshikazu; Kida, Shinya [Kanazawa University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery (Japan)

2006-08-15

48

Face Processing without Awareness in the Right Fusiform Gyrus  

PubMed Central

We investigated brain activity evoked by faces which were not consciously perceived by subjects. Subdural electrophysiological recordings and functional neuroimaging studies have each demonstrated face-specific processing in the fusiform gyrus (FFG) of humans. Using pattern masks, a stimulus can be presented but not consciously perceived, and thus can be used to assay obligatory or automatic processes. Here, using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and pattern masking, we observed that masked faces but not masked objects activated the right FFG. Other regions activated by consciously perceived unmasked faces were not activated when faces were masked. These data provide strong evidence for an automatic face processing region in the right FFG.

Morris, James P.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.; McCarthy, Gregory

2012-01-01

49

Adjuvant use of self-expanding stents in acute atherothrombotic vertebrobasilar occlusions.  

PubMed

Recanalization of acute atherothrombotic vertebrobasilar occlusions is a challenging neuroendovascular procedure. A long angiographic occlusion frequently overestimates the true extent of occlusive plaque. We propose the novel use of the Solitaire stent (ev3 Endovascular, Plymouth, MN, USA) as an adjuvant device in the endovascular management of acute atherothrombotic vertebrobasilar occlusions and present our experience. A self-expanding Solitaire stent is fully deployed, but not detached, along the entire occluded segment, from normal-to-normal arterial segment, to obtain a transient endovascular bypass effect and to obtain clear depiction of the true extent and characteristics of the complicated plaque. The Solitaire stent is then retrieved and a stent with greater radial force and lower porosity is deployed across the occlusion to achieve full revascularization of the vertebral and basilar arteries and branches. This technique allows early revascularization (transient endovascular bypass) and permits a clear definition of the underlying plaque, a crucial step for a safe angioplasty. PMID:23384507

Cohen, José E; Gomori, John M; Itshayek, Eyal; Leker, Ronen R

2013-02-04

50

Genetic dissection of fusiform rust and pitch canker disease traits in loblolly pine.  

PubMed

Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) exhibits genetic resistance to fusiform rust disease (incited by the biotrophic fungus, Cronartium quercuum f. sp. fusiforme) and pitch canker disease (incited by the necrotrophic fungus, Fusarium circinatum). In this study, a total of 14,015 loblolly pine cuttings from 1,065 clones were screened in controlled greenhouse conditions to identify phenotypes of clones, families, and parents that guide a genetic dissection of disease traits associated with pitch canker and fusiform rust. A total of 23,373 phenotypic data points were collected for lesion length (pitch canker) and gall score, gall length, and gall width (fusiform rust). We verified heritable fusiform rust and pitch canker traits and calculated parental, clonal, and full-sib family rankings for both diseases. Genetic correlations revealed that traits associated with fusiform rust are genetically distinct from one another, and that the genetic mechanisms underlying pitch canker and fusiform rust resistance are independent. The disease phenotyping described here is a critical step towards identifying specific loci and alleles associated with fusiform rust and pitch canker resistance. PMID:15700146

Kayihan, Gogce C; Huber, Dudley A; Morse, Alison M; White, Timothy L; Davis, John M

2005-02-08

51

Differential Development of Selectivity for Faces and Bodies in the Fusiform Gyrus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Viewing faces or bodies activates category-selective areas of visual cortex, including the fusiform face area (FFA), fusiform body area (FBA), and extrastriate body area (EBA). Here, using fMRI, we investigate the development of these areas, focusing on the right FFA and FBA. Despite the overlap of functionally defined FFA and FBA (54%-75%…

Peelen, Marius V.; Glaser, Bronwyn; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Eliez, Stephan

2009-01-01

52

Mid-fusiform Activation during Object Discrimination Reflects the Process of Differentiating Structural Descriptions  

PubMed Central

The present study explored constraints on mid-fusiform activation during object discrimination. In three experiments, participants performed a matching task on simple line configurations, nameable objects, three dimensional (3-D) shapes, and colors. Significant bilateral mid-fusiform activation emerged when participants matched objects and 3-D shapes, as compared to when they matched two-dimensional (2-D) line configurations and colors, indicating that the mid-fusiform is engaged more strongly for processing structural descriptions (e.g., comparing 3-D volumetric shape) than perceptual descriptions (e.g., comparing 2-D or color information). In two of the experiments, the same mid-fusiform regions were also modulated by the degree of structural similarity between stimuli, implicating a role for the mid-fusiform in fine differentiation of similar visual object representations. Importantly, however, this process of fine differentiation occurred at the level of structural, but not perceptual, descriptions. Moreover, mid-fusiform activity was more robust when participants matched shape compared to color information using the identical stimuli, indicating that activity in the mid-fusiform gyrus is not driven by specific stimulus properties, but rather by the process of distinguishing stimuli based on shape information. Taken together, these findings further clarify the nature of object processing in the mid-fusiform gyrus. This region is engaged specifically in structural differentiation, a critical component process of object recognition and categorization.

Liu, Xun; Steinmetz, Nicholas A.; Farley, Alison B.; Smith, Charles D.; Joseph, Jane E.

2009-01-01

53

Rupture disc  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intermediate heat transport system for a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor includes a device for rapidly draining the sodium therefrom should a sodium-water reaction occur within the system. This device includes a rupturable member in a drain line in the system and means for cutting a large opening therein and for positively removing the sheared-out portion from the opening cut

Robert G

1977-01-01

54

Comparison of open and controlled pollinated pine families for susceptibility to air pollution, acid rain, and fusiform rust. Progress report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Loblolly pine seedlings were fumigated with SOâ, ozone, and a combination of SOâ and ozone to determine the relative susceptibility of different strains to air pollution and to fusiform rust. There seems to be no relationship between susceptibility to air pollution and to fusiform rust, indicating it should be possible to select strains resistant to both fusiform rust and air

B. Chevone; H. R. Jr. Powers

1982-01-01

55

Giant Fusiform Basilar Artery Aneurysm Causing Obstructive Hydrocephalus  

PubMed Central

A 58-year-old man presented with a sudden onset gait disturbance and urinary incontinence. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR angiography showed a fusiform basilar artery aneurysm, 2 cm in diameter and 5 cm long. The aneurysm was thrombosed except the ectatic basilar artery flowing through it. Compression of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pathways caused obstructive hydrocephalus with resultant transependymal CSF leakage. Conventional angiography missed the aneurysm. A one-sided ventriculoperitoneal shunt was placed to treat the patient's hydrocephalus. The patient's symptoms improved after surgery. MR imaging and MR angiography were useful noninvasive methods of detecting the aneurysm, defining its relationship with surrounding structures, and determining the cause of the hydrocephalus. ImagesFigure 1

Gelal, Fazil; Vidinli, Berna Dirim; Yurt, Alaattin; Cakir, Yusuf; Uygur, Murat

2002-01-01

56

Ibudilast, a mixed PDE3\\/4 inhibitor, causes a selective and nitric oxide\\/cGMP-independent relaxation of the intracranial vertebrobasilar artery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ibudilast, a mixed phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3\\/4 inhibitor, is a cerebral vasodilator widely used in Japan for treating post-stroke dizziness. However, little studies have been conducted on the vasorelaxant effects of PDE inhibitors in the vertebrobasilar artery associated with dizziness onset. The in vitro vasorelaxant properties of ibudilast were, therefore, investigated by comparing with known selective PDE inhibitors, using vertebrobasilar arteries.

Takanobu Yamazaki; Tsuyoshi Anraku; Shigeki Matsuzawa

2011-01-01

57

Fusiform gyrus face-selectivity reflects facial recognition ability  

PubMed Central

Regions of the occipital and temporal lobes, including a region in the fusiform gyrus (FG), have been proposed to comprise a “core” visual representation system for faces, in part because they show face selectivity and face repetition suppression. But recent fMRI studies of developmental prosopagnosics (DPs) raise questions about whether these measures relate to face processing skills. Although DPs manifest deficient face processing, most studies to date have not shown unequivocal reductions of functional responses in the proposed core regions. We scanned 15 DPs and 15 non-DP control participants with fMRI while employing factor analysis to derive behavioral components related to face identification or other processes. Repetition suppression specific to facial identities in FG or to expression in FG and STS did not show compelling relationships with face identification ability. However, we identified robust relationships between face selectivity and face identification ability in FG across our sample for several convergent measures, including voxel-wise statistical parametric mapping, peak face selectivity in individually defined “fusiform face areas” (FFAs), and anatomical extents (cluster sizes) of those FFAs. None of these measures showed associations with behavioral expression or object recognition ability. As a group, DPs had reduced face-selective responses in bilateral FFA when compared with non-DPs. Individual DPs were also more likely than non-DPs to lack expected face-selective activity in core regions. These findings associate individual differences in face processing ability with selectivity in core face processing regions. This confirms that face selectivity can provide a valid marker for neural mechanisms that contribute to face identification ability.

Furl, N.; Garrido, L.; Dolan, R.; Driver, J.; Duchaine, B.

2012-01-01

58

Angiographic and clinical outcomes of stent-alone treatment for spontaneous vertebrobasilar dissecting aneurysm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Spontaneous vertebrobasilar dissecting aneurysm (VBD) is a very challenging disease with an unpredictable clinical course\\u000a and controversies on treatment strategy. The present study reports radiological and clinical outcomes of stent-alone treatment\\u000a (SAT) for VBD.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Twenty-four VBDs treated with SAT are included in the present study. Clinical and angiographic data were reviewed retrospectively.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  A total of 24 lesions in 22 patients

Won Ki Yoon; Young Woo Kim; Seong-Rim Kim; Ik Seong Park; Sang Don Kim; Kwang Wook Jo; Min Woo Baik

2010-01-01

59

Wingspan Stent for High-Grade Symptomatic Vertebrobasilar Artery Atherosclerotic Stenosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  This study was designed to present the treatment outcomes with Wingspan stent angioplasty of high-grade intracranial vertebrobasilar\\u000a artery (VBA) stenosis in symptomatic patients.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Between 2007 and 2010, the records of 30 patients with 31 intracranial high-grade VBA stenoses (all?70%) who underwent elective\\u000a stenting due to the failure of medical therapy were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical evaluation was performed based on the

Jian Li; Zhen-Wei Zhao; Guo-Dong Gao; Jian-Ping Deng; Jia Yu; Li Gao; Yang Yuan; You-Zhi Qv

60

Intermixed structure of voxels with different hemispheric characteristics in the fusiform face area.  

PubMed

The fusiform face area, a high-level visual area, is pivotal in processing facial information. This area receives inputs from the left and right visual fields unlike the primary visual area, which only receives inputs from its contralateral visual field. Response of the fusiform face area to ipsilateral stimulation depends on the signals crossing over at the corpus callosum. We investigated the distribution of voxel-wise activation to determine whether ipsilateral-dominant voxels exist in the fusiform face area using high spatial resolution functional MRI at 7 T. We further examined the possible functional differences between ipsilateral-dominant and contralateral-dominant voxels. By unilateral visual field stimulation, we detected ipsilateral-dominant voxels in the right fusiform face area. Their distribution was spatially heterogeneous. We tested upright and inverted facial stimulation confined to unilateral visual fields and found that these ipsilateral-dominant voxels had a different functional nature from contralateral-dominant voxels. PMID:23222657

Choi, Uk-Su; Sung, Yul-Wan; Choi, Sang-Han; Kim, Nambeom; Kim, Young-Bo; Cho, Zang-Hee; Ogawa, Seiji

2013-01-23

61

Stroke due to a fusiform aneurysm of the cervical vertebral artery: case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aneurysms of the cervical vertebral artery (VA) are uncommon; they are often caused by trauma or spontaneous dissection.\\u000a A fusiform aneurysm without evidence of atherosclerosis or dissection has not been reported previously. A 46-year-old man\\u000a presented with a pontine infarct. Imaging revealed a fusiform aneurysm of the left VA at the C5–6 level, with occlusion of\\u000a the basilar artery. Associated

S. Suzuki; T. Inoue; S. Haga; S. Nishio; S. Kono; A. Mizushima; M. Fukui

1998-01-01

62

Priming for letters and pseudoletters in mid-fusiform cortex: examining letter selectivity and case invariance  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large body of research indicates a critical role for the left mid-fusiform cortex in reading, however, the extent to which\\u000a this area is dedicated exclusively to the processing of words and letters has been debated. Two questions regarding left mid-fusiform\\u000a function are critical to this debate: (1) Are letters stored preferentially compared to visually equivalent non-letters (letter\\u000a selectivity)? (2)

E. Darcy Burgund; Yi Guo; Elyse L. Aurbach

2009-01-01

63

Altered fusiform connectivity during processing of fearful faces in social anxiety disorder.  

PubMed

Social anxiety disorder (SAD) has been associated with hyper-reactivity in limbic brain regions like the amygdala, both during symptom provocation and emotional face processing tasks. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study we sought to examine brain regions implicated in emotional face processing, and the connectivity between them, in patients with SAD (n=14) compared with healthy controls (n=12). We furthermore aimed to relate brain reactivity and connectivity to self-reported social anxiety symptom severity. SAD patients exhibited hyper-reactivity in the bilateral fusiform gyrus in response to fearful faces, as well as greater connectivity between the fusiform gyrus and amygdala, and decreased connectivity between the fusiform gyrus and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Within the SAD group, social anxiety severity correlated positively with amygdala reactivity to emotional faces, amygdala-fusiform connectivity and connectivity between the amygdala and superior temporal sulcus (STS). These findings point to a pivotal role for the fusiform gyrus in SAD neuropathology, and further suggest that altered amygdala-fusiform and amygdala-STS connectivity could underlie previous findings of aberrant socio-emotional information processing in this anxiety disorder. PMID:24105443

Frick, A; Howner, K; Fischer, H; Kristiansson, M; Furmark, T

2013-10-08

64

Complete Nonvisualization of Basilar Artery on MR Angiography in Patients with Vertebrobasilar Ischemic Stroke: Favorable Outcome Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: In vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) occasionally fails to visualize the basilar artery, but in these patients, little attention has been given to establishing correlations between the clinical and the radiological findings. Our aim was to identify clinical or radiological measures that could assist in predicting a favorable clinical outcome. Methods: Risk factors, clinicoradiological features, and functional

H. Y. Kim; C. S. Chung; S. Y. Moon; K. H. Lee; S. H. Han

2004-01-01

65

A Population-Based Case-Series of Ontario Patients Who Develop a Vertebrobasilar Artery Stroke After Seeing a Chiropractor  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeThe current evidence suggests that association between chiropractic care and vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) stroke is not causal. Rather, recent epidemiological studies suggest that it is coincidental and reflects the natural history of the disorder. Because neck pain and headaches are symptoms that commonly precede the onset of a VBA stroke, these patients might seek chiropractic care while their stroke is

Stephanie Choi; Eleanor Boyle; Pierre Côté; J. David Cassidy

2011-01-01

66

Skin waste, vertex angle, and scar length in excisional biopsies: comparing five excision patterns--fusiform ellipse, fusiform circle, rhomboid, mosque, and S-shaped.  

PubMed

The common excision skin pattern is either a fusiform ellipse or another pattern with dissimilar length and width. The purpose of this study was to define the most advantageous skin pattern regarding skin waste, vertex angle, and scar length. Five skin excision patterns used traditionally for closure of round lesions were analyzed: fusiform ellipse, fusiform circle, rhomboid, mosque, and S-shaped. In the analysis, the pattern characteristics were formulated by geometric principles, from which the results were compared. The smallest skin waste was found in rhomboid and mosque patterns, whereas the largest skin waste was found in the fusiform circle and ellipse. The vertex angle was found to decrease monotonously with the excision length-to-width ratio for all patterns except the mosque shape, which is zero per definition. The paradigm stating that a vertex angle of 30 degrees or less is maintained for length-to-width ratios below 4 in the surgical ellipse was found incorrect. It holds only for rhomboid and S-shaped excisions. The scar length was found almost independent of the pattern, with a variance of 3 percent. The authors conclude that the most advantageous surgical skin patterns are the rhomboid and mosque excisions. PMID:15108876

Raveh Tilleman, Tamara; Tilleman, Michael M; Krekels, Gertruud A M; Neumann, Martino H A

2004-03-01

67

[Changes in vertebral arteries in patients with ischemic stroke in the vertebro-basilar basin as a result of duplex scanning].  

PubMed

With duplex scanning of neck vessels in 120 patients with acute ischemic stroke in the vertebrobasilar basin revealed changes in the vertebral artery in (68.3%) of patients, which cause difficulty in blood flow in the vessels of vertebro-basilar basin. Among them were seen often atherosclerotic stenoses (53.3%), deformation (11.7%) and abnormal discharge of vertebral arteries (3.3%). PMID:23951915

68

Fusiform function in children with an ASD is a matter of "who"  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the importance of face processing for normal social development, no fMRI studies of face processing in autism have focused exclusively on the childhood years. In order to fill that gap, forty-five children between the ages of 6-12 participated in practice scans, and after exclusion due to motion, 11 children with an ASD and 11 age-matched normal controls were included in final analyses. Methods Stimuli consisted of pictures of a familiar adult, familiar child, stranger adult, stranger child, and objects. During the scan, children pressed a button in response to an identical face shown on two consecutive trials. Based on our prior research, masks of four anatomical ROIs including the fusiform gyrus, amygdala, anterior and posterior cingulate were created and manually edited for anatomical precision for each subject. Following deconvolution analyses, the number of voxels significantly active and % signal change values that fell within each ROI mask were calculated for each subject. Results Analyses revealed normal fusiform activity in children with autism when viewing a face of their mother or other children. In contrast, looking at stranger adult faces initiated profound deficits in that the mean number of significantly active voxels in the fusiform bilaterally was approximately 25% of that shown in typically developing children. Conclusions A selective fusiform deficit in response only to the faces of adult strangers may be the result of reduced attention and interest during those conditions. Face processing abnormalities found in autism likely exists beyond the fusiform.

Pierce, Karen; Redcay, Elizabeth

2008-01-01

69

[Cognitive functions and treatment of their impairment in elderly patients with the vertebrobasilar issufficiensy].  

PubMed

Authors studied impairment of cognitive functions in 180 patients, aged 56-74 years, with chronic blood flow deficiency in the vertebrobasilar territory. Along with neurological examination, we used MRI of the brain and the cervical spine, MRI-angiography, ultrasound Doppler method, EEG, ECG, clinical and biochemical blood testing. Cognitive functions were assessed using standard neuropsychological tests (a word retrieval test, the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Frontal Assessment battery, the Schulte test, the Landolt test, Wechsler tests, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and others). Neuropsychological performance was assessed before and after treatment with cavinton (25 mg intravenous during 10 days and then 10 mg 3 times daily during 3 months). The treatment improved cognitive function and the effect remained for more than 3 months. PMID:23739435

Skoromets, A A; Aliev, K T; Lalayan, T V; Pugachova, E L; Smolko, D G

2013-01-01

70

Anatomical connectivity patterns predict face-selectivity in the fusiform gyrus  

PubMed Central

A fundamental assumption in neuroscience is that brain structure determines function. Accordingly, functionally distinct regions of cortex should be structurally distinct in their connections to other areas. We tested this hypothesis in relation to face selectivity in the fusiform gyrus. By using only structural connectivity, as measured through diffusion weighted imaging, we are able to predict functional activation to faces in the fusiform gyrus. These predictions outperformed two control models and a standard group-average benchmark. The structure-function relationship discovered from these participants was highly robust in predicting activation in a second group of participants, despite differences in acquisition parameters and stimuli. This approach can thus reliably estimate activation in participants who cannot perform functional imaging tasks, and is an alternative to group-activation maps. Additionally, we identified cortical regions whose connectivity is highly influential in predicting face-selectivity within the fusiform, suggesting a possible mechanistic architecture underlying face processing in humans.

Saygin, Zeynep M.; Osher, David E.; Koldewyn, Kami; Reynolds, Gretchen; Gabrieli, John D.E.; Saxe, Rebecca R.

2011-01-01

71

The fusiform response to faces: explicit versus implicit processing of emotion.  

PubMed

Regions of the fusiform gyrus (FG) respond preferentially to faces over other classes of visual stimuli. It remains unclear whether emotional face information modulates FG activity. In the present study, whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) was obtained from fifteen healthy adults who viewed emotionally expressive faces and made button responses based upon emotion (explicit condition) or age (implicit condition). Dipole source modeling produced source waveforms for left and right primary visual and left and right fusiform areas. Stronger left FG activity (M170) to fearful than happy or neutral faces was observed only in the explicit task, suggesting that directed attention to the emotional content of faces facilitates observation of M170 valence modulation. A strong association between M170 FG activity and reaction times in the explicit task provided additional evidence for a role of the fusiform gyrus in processing emotional information. PMID:21932258

Monroe, Justin F; Griffin, Mark; Pinkham, Amy; Loughead, James; Gur, Ruben C; Roberts, Timothy P L; Christopher Edgar, J

2011-09-20

72

Recurrent spontaneous esophageal rupture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spontaneous esophageal rupture is an uncommon and poorly understood condition. Recurrent rupture is extremely rare, with only one previously reported case in the literature. Here, we present a case series of two patients who had recurrent ruptures, and discuss the principles underlying the management of such cases.

Omar A. Khan; Clifford W. Barlow; David F. Weeden; Khalid M. Amer

2005-01-01

73

Spontaneous Kidney Allograft Rupture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spontaneous renal allograft rupture is one of the most dangerous complications of kidney transplantation, which can result in graft loss.This condition needs immediate surgical intervention. Conservative management has dismal results. Its prevalence varies from 0.3% to 3%. Rupture occurs in first few weeks after transplantation. Predisposing factors for graft rupture are acute rejection, acute tubular necrosis, and renal vein thrombosis.

H. Shahrokh; H. Rasouli; M. A. Zargar; K. Karimi; K. Zargar

2005-01-01

74

Category-related activation for written words in the posterior fusiform is task specific  

PubMed Central

Category-related brain activations have been reported in the posterior fusiform gyri when people view pictures of tools and animals, but only a single study has observed this pattern when the stimuli were words, rather than pictures. Here we replicate these category effects with words and provide evidence that distinctive patterns of activation are task-specific. The results suggest that category-related activation in the posterior fusiform gyri can be driven either “bottom-up” by visual processing of images or “top-down” by word processing.

Devlin, Joseph T.; Rushworth, Matthew F. S.; Matthews, Paul M.

2009-01-01

75

Glass rupture disk  

DOEpatents

A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

Glass, S. Jill (Albuquerque, NM); Nicolaysen, Scott D. (Albuquerque, NM); Beauchamp, Edwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01

76

Neurons in the Fusiform Gyrus are Fewer and Smaller in Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Abnormalities in face perception are a core feature of social disabilities in autism. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies showed that patients with autism could perform face perception tasks. However, the fusiform gyrus (FG) and other cortical regions supporting face processing in controls are hypoactive in patients with autism.…

van Kooten, Imke A. J.; Palmen, Saskia J. M. C.; von Cappeln, Patricia; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.; Korr, Hubert; Heinsen, Helmut; Hof, Patrick R.; van Engeland, Herman; Schmitz, Christoph

2008-01-01

77

Endovascular parent artery occlusion in large-giant or fusiform distal posterior cerebral artery aneurysms  

Microsoft Academic Search

. Posterior cerebral artery aneurysms are amenable to deconstructive surgical treatment because of the rich collateral supply of the distal posterior cerebral artery. This report retrospectively analyses the outcome of endovascular parent artery occlusion for large or fusiform distal posterior cerebral artery aneurysms. Medical records and cerebral angiograms from two endovascular centres were analysed retrospectively. Eight patients with large or

Anil Arat; Civan Islak; Isil Saatci; Naci Kocer; Saruhan Cekirge

2002-01-01

78

Activation of the fusiform gyrus when individuals with autism spectrum disorder view faces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prior imaging studies have failed to show activation of the fusiform gyrus in response to emotionally neutral faces in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) [Critchley et al., Brain 124 (2001) 2059; Schultz et al., Arch. Gen. Psychiatry 57 (2000) 331]. However, individuals with ASD do not typically exhibit the striking behavioral deficits that might be expected to result from

Nouchine Hadjikhani; Robert M. Joseph; Josh Snyder; Christopher F. Chabris; Jill Clark; Shelly Steele; Lauren McGrath; Mark Vangel; Itzhak Aharon; Eric Feczko; Gordon J Harris; Helen Tager-Flusberg

2004-01-01

79

Neurons in the Fusiform Gyrus are Fewer and Smaller in Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Abnormalities in face perception are a core feature of social disabilities in autism. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies showed that patients with autism could perform face perception tasks. However, the fusiform gyrus (FG) and other cortical regions supporting face processing in controls are hypoactive in patients with autism.…

van Kooten, Imke A. J.; Palmen, Saskia J. M. C.; von Cappeln, Patricia; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.; Korr, Hubert; Heinsen, Helmut; Hof, Patrick R.; van Engeland, Herman; Schmitz, Christoph

2008-01-01

80

The Left Fusiform Area Is Affected by Written Frequency of Words  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The recent neuroimaging literature gives conflicting evidence about whether the left fusiform gyrus (FG) might recognize words as unitary visual objects. The sensitivity of the left FG to word frequency might provide a neural basis for the orthographic input lexicon theorized by reading models [Patterson, K., Marshall, J. C., & Coltheart, M.…

Proverbio, Alice M.; Zani, Alberto; Adorni, Roberta

2008-01-01

81

Two-Stage Selection in Slash Pine Produces Good Gains in Fusiform Rust Resistance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The best 6 of 21 progeny-tested first-generation slash pine selections were crossed in a half diallel to study inheritance patterns of their superior fusiform rust resistance (5 trees) and height (1 tree). Their six first-test progenies were duplicated an...

E. R. Sluder

1996-01-01

82

Affective Judgments of Faces Modulate Early Activity (?160 ms) within the Fusiform Gyri  

Microsoft Academic Search

Functional neuroimaging studies have implicated the fusiform gyri (FG) in structural encoding of faces, while event-related potential (ERP) and magnetoencephalography studies have shown that such encoding occurs approximately 170 ms poststimulus. Behavioral and functional neuroimaging studies suggest that processes involved in face recognition may be strongly modulated by socially relevant information conveyed by faces. To test the hypothesis that affective

Diego A. Pizzagalli; Dietrich Lehmann; Andrew M. Hendrick; Marianne Regard; Roberto D. Pascual-Marqui; Richard J. Davidson

2002-01-01

83

Activation of the middle fusiform 'face area' increases with expertise in recognizing novel objects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Part of the ventral temporal lobe is thought to be critical for face perception, but what determines this specialization remains unknown. We present evidence that expertise recruits the fusiform gyrus 'face area'. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure changes associated with increasing expertise in brain areas selected for their face preference. Acquisition of expertise with novel objects

Isabel Gauthier; Michael J. Tarr; Adam W. Anderson; Pawel Skudlarski; John C. Gore

1999-01-01

84

The common basis of wood grain figures is the systematically changing orientation of cambial fusiform cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various types of wavy grain, the striped figures on radial surfaces of wood with interlocked grain, and even moiré or checkered figures, are all interpreted as resulting from systematically changing orientation of cambial cells. Such changing orientations are manifestations of morphogenic wave phenomena that affect the orientation (rightward or leftward) of anticlinal and pseudotransverse divisions of fusiform initial cells and

Z. Hejnowicz; J. A. Romberger

1979-01-01

85

Activation of the fusiform gyrus when individuals with autism spectrum disorder view faces.  

PubMed

Prior imaging studies have failed to show activation of the fusiform gyrus in response to emotionally neutral faces in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) [Critchley et al., Brain 124 (2001) 2059; Schultz et al., Arch. Gen. Psychiatry 57 (2000) 331]. However, individuals with ASD do not typically exhibit the striking behavioral deficits that might be expected to result from fusiform gyrus damage, such as those seen in prosopagnosia, and their deficits appear to extend well beyond face identification to include a wide range of impairments in social perceptual processing. In this study, our goal was to further assess the question of whether individuals with ASD have abnormal fusiform gyrus activation to faces. We used high-field (3 T) functional magnetic resonance imaging to study face perception in 11 adult individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 10 normal controls. We used face stimuli, object stimuli, and sensory control stimuli (Fourier scrambled versions of the face and object stimuli) containing a fixation point in the center to ensure that participants were looking at and attending to the images as they were presented. We found that individuals with ASD activated the fusiform face area and other brain areas normally involved in face processing when they viewed faces as compared to non-face stimuli. These data indicate that the face-processing deficits encountered in ASD are not due to a simple dysfunction of the fusiform area, but to more complex anomalies in the distributed network of brain areas involved in social perception and cognition. PMID:15219586

Hadjikhani, Nouchine; Joseph, Robert M; Snyder, Josh; Chabris, Christopher F; Clark, Jill; Steele, Shelly; McGrath, Lauren; Vangel, Mark; Aharon, Itzhak; Feczko, Eric; Harris, Gordon J; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

2004-07-01

86

Vertebrobasilar dissection with subarachnoid hemorrhage: a retrospective study of 29 patients.  

PubMed

We have reviewed initial diagnostic features, treatment, and outcome in 29 patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage due to non-traumatic vertebrobasilar artery dissection diagnosed in our hospital between 1993 and 2003. The dissections occurred in the vertebral artery in 19 patients, the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) in two patients, the basilar artery in four patients, and in the vertebral artery extending into the PICA in four patients. A pseudoaneurysm was found in 20 patients. Clinical manifestations typically included sudden onset of moderate to severe headache, nuchal rigidity, and drowsiness. Fourteen patients were treated conservatively. Fifteen patients underwent endovascular treatment with either parent artery occlusion (13 patients) or aneurysmal coil occlusion with preservation of the parent artery (2 patients). Re-bleeding occurred within 12 days and before treatment in nine patients. Eight of these had a pseudoaneurysm. No patient bled after endovascular treatment. Poor grade and early re-bleeding were associated with less favorable outcome. Outcome at 6 months did not differ significantly between endovascular and conservative treatment. Altogether, good recovery was achieved for 16 patients, moderate disability was seen in one, severe disability in four, and eight patients (27%) died. The absence of bleeding subsequent to endovascular treatment in this study suggests that endovascular treatment may be a rational approach in these patients at high risk of re-bleeding, especially those with a pseudoaneurysm. PMID:15711986

Ramgren, B; Cronqvist, M; Romner, B; Brandt, L; Holtås, S; Larsson, E-M

2005-02-16

87

Neuronal fiber pathway abnormalities in autism: An initial MRI diffusion tensor tracking study of hippocampo-fusiform and amygdalo-fusiform pathways  

PubMed Central

MRI diffusion-tensor tracking (DTT) was performed in 17 high-functioning adolescents/adults with autism and 17 pairwise-matched controls. White matter pathways involved in face processing were examined due to the relevance of face perception to the social symptoms of autism, and due to known behavioral and functional imaging findings in autism. The hippocampo-fusiform (HF) and amygdalo-fusiform (AF) pathways had normal size and shape but abnormal microstructure in the autism group. The right HF had reduced across-fiber diffusivity (D-min) compared with controls, opposite to the whole-brain effect of increased D-min. In contrast, left HF, right AF, and left AF had increased D-min and increased along-fiber diffusivity (D-max), more consistent with the whole-brain effect. There was a general loss of lateralization compared with controls. The right HF D-min was markedly low in the autism subgroup with lower Benton face recognition scores, compared with the lower-Benton control subgroup, and compared with the higher-Benton autism subgroup. Similar behavioral relationships were found for performance IQ. Such results suggest an early functionally-significant pathological process in right HF consistent with small-diameter axons (with correspondingly slower neural transmission) and/or higher packing density. In left AF and HF, changes were interpreted as secondary, possibly reflecting axonal loss and/or decreased myelination.

CONTURO, THOMAS E.; WILLIAMS, DIANE L.; SMITH, CHARLES D.; GULTEPE, EREN; AKBUDAK, ERBIL; MINSHEW, NANCY J.

2012-01-01

88

Preliminary studies on the chemical characterization and antioxidant properties of acidic polysaccharides from Sargassum fusiforme *  

PubMed Central

In order to investigate the antioxidant properties of the polysaccharides from the brown alga Sargassum fusiforme, the crude polysaccharides from S. fusiforme (SFPS) were extracted in hot water, and the lipid peroxidation inhibition assay exhibited that SFPS possessed a potential antioxidant activity. Hence, two purely polymeric fractions, SFPS-1 and SFPS-2 were isolated by the column of DEAE (2-diethylaminoethanol)-Sepharose Fast Flow, with their molecular weights of 51.4 and 30.3 kDa determined by high performance gel permeation chromatography (HPGPC). They were preliminarily characterized using chemical analysis in combination of infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies and found to contain large amounts of uronic acids and ?-glycosidical linkages. The antioxidant activities of these two SFPS fractions were evaluated using superoxide and hydroxyl radical-scavenging assays. The results show that the antioxidant ability of SFPS-2 was higher than that of SFPS-1, probably correlating with the molecular weight and uronic acid content.

Zhou, Jing; Hu, Nan; Wu, Ya-lin; Pan, Yuan-jiang; Sun, Cui-rong

2008-01-01

89

Treatment of a pediatric recurrent fusiform middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm with a flow diverter.  

PubMed

Pediatric patients with aneurysm often have different localizations and morphologies from adults and recurrences are not uncommon after successful clip reconstruction/obliteration. Treatment of a recurrent pediatric aneurysm after clip ligation is a technical challenge. We present the case of an adolescent with a middle cerebral artery (MCA) fusiform aneurysm which recurred following clip reconstruction and bypass. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular flow diversion. PMID:23188788

Burrows, Anthony M; Zipfel, Gregory; Lanzino, Giuseppe

2012-11-27

90

Dissecting Contributions of Prefrontal Cortex and Fusiform Face Area to Face Working Memory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interactions between prefrontal cortex (PFC) and stimulusspecific visual cortical association areas are hypothesized to mediate visual working memory in behaving monkeys. To clarify the roles for homologous regions in humans, event-related fMRI was used to assess neural activity in PFC and fusiform face area (FFA) of subjects performing a delay-recognition task for faces. In both PFC and FFA, activity increased

T. Jason Druzgal; Mark D'Esposito

2003-01-01

91

Traumatic dissecting aneurysm at the vertebrobasilar junction in a 3-month-old infant: evaluation and treatment strategies. Case report.  

PubMed

Intracranial aneurysms in young infants are extremely rare, with few published reports on the etiology, evaluation, treatment strategies, and follow-up of this condition in this population. The authors report the case of a traumatic dissecting aneurysm at the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) in a 3-month-old infant caused by nonaccidental trauma. Therapeutic occlusion of the VBJ was contemplated, but coil embolization of the main aneurysm sac proved feasible, and anticoagulation and antiplatelet agents were initiated. The patient made a full neurological recovery, and follow-up studies demonstrated stable aneurysm occlusion. Management and follow-up strategies for this challenging condition are discussed. PMID:18447682

Wang, Huan; Orbach, Darren B

2008-05-01

92

Incidence of fusiform rust infection on loblolly pine related to tip moth damage  

SciTech Connect

Nantucket pine tip moth (Rhyacionia frustrana) is a common pest over most of the natural range of loblolly pine, causing deformation and growth reduction of seedlings and saplings during the early life of the stand. Fusiform rust (caused by Cronartium quercuum f. sp. fusiforme) is a limiting factor in the production of southern pines throughout a broad area of the southeastern United States, extending from South Carolina to Texas. The target areas on the hosts for both pests are young, succulent shoot tissues. Carbofuran, a systematic insecticide, was used to determine the effect of controlling tip moth on seedlings infected by the fusiform rust organism. Beginning with the 2nd year carbofuran was applied over 4 successive years. The insecticide sharply reduced the incidence of tip moth and increased the height of 5-year-old saplings compared with untreated controls. Usually any treatment that stimulates the growth of pines also results in increased rust infection. However, this was not the case here because untreated saplings had significantly more infection. It is not known whether the increased disease incidence on untreated trees was due to the susceptibility and/or total number of secondary shoots initiated in response to tip dieback caused by the tip moth, or if carbofuran itself has some fungicidal effect resulting in lower infection on treated seedlings. 6 refs., 1 tab.

Powers, H.R. Jr.; Stone, D.M.

1985-09-01

93

Fusiform activation to animals is driven by the process, not the stimulus.  

PubMed

Previous studies have found that the lateral posterior fusiform gyri respond more robustly to pictures of animals than pictures of manmade objects and suggested that these regions encode the visual properties characteristic of animals. We suggest that such effects actually reflect processing demands arising when items with similar representations must be finely discriminated. In a positron emission tomography (PET) study of category verification with colored photographs of animals and vehicles, there was robust animal-specific activation in the lateral posterior fusiform gyri when stimuli were categorized at an intermediate level of specificity (e.g., dog or car). However, when the same photographs were categorized at a more specific level (e.g., Labrador or BMW), these regions responded equally strongly to animals and vehicles. We conclude that the lateral posterior fusiform does not encode domain-specific representations of animals or visual properties characteristic of animals. Instead, these regions are strongly activated whenever an item must be discriminated from many close visual or semantic competitors. Apparent category effects arise because, at an intermediate level of specificity, animals have more visual and semantic competitors than do artifacts. PMID:15814003

Rogers, Timothy T; Hocking, Julia; Mechelli, Andrea; Patterson, Karalyn; Price, Cathy

2005-03-01

94

Robust and Task-Independent Spatial Profile of the Visual Word Form Activation in Fusiform Cortex  

PubMed Central

Written language represents a special category of visual information. There is strong evidence for the existence of a cortical region in ventral occipitotemporal cortex for processing the visual form of written words. However, due to inconsistent findings obtained with different tasks, the level of specialization and selectivity of this so called visual word form area (VWFA) remains debated. In this study, we examined category selectivity for Chinese characters, a non-alphabetic script, in native Chinese readers. In contrast to traditional approaches of examining response levels in a restricted predefined region of interest (ROI), a detailed distribution of the BOLD signal across the mid-fusiform cortical surface and the spatial patterns of responses to Chinese characters were obtained. Results show that a region tuned for Chinese characters could be consistently found in the lateral part of the left fusiform gyrus in Chinese readers, and this spatial pattern of selectivity for written words was not influenced by top-down tasks such as phonological or semantic modulations. These results provide strong support for the robust spatial coding of category selective response in the mid-fusiform cortex, and demonstrate the utility of the spatial distribution analysis as a more meaningful approach to examine functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data.

Bai, Jian'e; Gong, Qiyong; Liu, Haicheng; Chen, Hsuan-Chih; He, Sheng; Weng, Xuchu

2011-01-01

95

Multivoxel Patterns in Fusiform Face Area Differentiate Faces by Sex and Race  

PubMed Central

Although prior research suggests that fusiform gyrus represents the sex and race of faces, it remains unclear whether fusiform face area (FFA)–the portion of fusiform gyrus that is functionally-defined by its preferential response to faces–contains such representations. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate whether FFA represents faces by sex and race. Participants were scanned while they categorized the sex and race of unfamiliar Black men, Black women, White men, and White women. Multivariate pattern analysis revealed that multivoxel patterns in FFA–but not other face-selective brain regions, other category-selective brain regions, or early visual cortex–differentiated faces by sex and race. Specifically, patterns of voxel-based responses were more similar between individuals of the same sex than between men and women, and between individuals of the same race than between Black and White individuals. By showing that FFA represents the sex and race of faces, this research contributes to our emerging understanding of how the human brain perceives individuals from two fundamental social categories.

Contreras, Juan Manuel; Banaji, Mahzarin R.; Mitchell, Jason P.

2013-01-01

96

Oscillatory Modulations in Human Fusiform Cortex during Motion-Induced Blindness: Intracranial Recording  

PubMed Central

Objective Motion-induced blindness (MIB) is an illusory phenomenon, in which a static target surrounded by moving distracters is perceived to disappear. We determined the electrocorticographic (ECoG) correlates of MIB. Methods While undergoing intracranial ECoG recording, a patient with focal epilepsy was instructed to report the transitions of a visual target, which was designed to illusorily or physically disappear and reappear. We then determined the neural modulations associated with illusory and physical transitions of the target. We also tested whether the phase of local delta activity could predict exclusively illusory transitions. Results High-gamma activity at 80–150 Hz was attenuated in the fusiform region prior to the reports of illusory and real visual target disappearance. Conversely, such high-gamma activity was augmented prior to the report of real target reappearance. Exclusively around illusory disappearance but not around real one, the delta phases in the fusiform region showed a highly skewed distribution with preference of the negative peak. Conclusions Neuronal modulations in the fusiform region may be involved in visual awareness, while spontaneous fluctuations of neural states entrained on delta rhythm may be involved in generation of MIB. Significance Our study increases our understanding of the mechanisms of visual awareness.

Matsuzaki, Naoyuki; Juhasz, Csaba; Asano, Eishi

2012-01-01

97

Wingspan Stent for High-Grade Symptomatic Vertebrobasilar Artery Atherosclerotic Stenosis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study was designed to present the treatment outcomes with Wingspan stent angioplasty of high-grade intracranial vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) stenosis in symptomatic patients. Methods: Between 2007 and 2010, the records of 30 patients with 31 intracranial high-grade VBA stenoses (all{>=}70%) who underwent elective stenting due to the failure of medical therapy were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical evaluation was performed based on the modified Rankin scale and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Results: In all cases, the stent deployment was technically successful. The mean stenosis decreased significantly from 82.28 {+-} 8.02% (range, 72-99%) to 11.18 {+-} 7.28% (range, 0-25%) after stent-assisted angioplasty (P < 0.05). Periprocedure complications occurred in 3 (10%) of 30 patients; there were 2 cases of perforator strokes and 1 case of transient flow insufficiency with stent overlap. Clinical follow-up (mean, 17.81 {+-} 11.49 months; range, 5-40 months) was available for 27 patients, and angiographic follow-up (mean, 9.95 {+-} 5.74 months, range, 5-20 months) was available for 19 patients. Only one case demonstrated recurrent symptoms with restenosis ({>=}50%). There were no recurrent ischemic events and no cases of restenosis in the other patients. Conclusions: According to our data, the Wingspan stent for symptomatic intracranial VBA stenoses is a safe and efficacious treatment alternative in cases with recurrent symptoms despite medical therapy. However, the improvement of outcome requires the reduction in the rate of procedure-related complications and long-term outcomes still have to be demonstrated.

Li Jian, E-mail: ns981212@yahoo.com.cn; Zhao Zhenwei, E-mail: zzwzc@sina.com; Gao Guodong, E-mail: gaoguo_dong@163.com; Deng Jianping [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Team of Neurovascular Angioplasty, Department of Interventional Neuroradiology and Neurosurgery (China); Yu Jia [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Neurology (China); Gao Li; Yuan Yang; Qv Youzhi [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Neuroradiology (China)

2012-04-15

98

[Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm].  

PubMed

Rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysm is a high lethal risk pathology, which requires precise diagnosis and urgent and efficient surgical treatment. Despite improved diagnostic capabilities (echoscopy, in specialized departments--angiography, computed tomography, magnetic nucleus resonance), mortality related to this pathology remains high in intensive care units. In the present article data concerning prevalence and clinical outcomes of the rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysm for 1999-2001 is presented in detail. During this period 22 patients have undergone surgery due to abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. Described are most prevalent complications, mortality rates and causes, analyzed are treatment strategy and tactics. PMID:12474751

Urbonavicius, Sigitas; Antusevas, Aleksandras

2002-01-01

99

[Knee extensor mechanism ruptures].  

PubMed

Knee extensor mechanism is composed of the quadriceps and its tendon, patella and patellar tendon. Rupture of either the quadriceps or patellar tendon, or of the patella itself, lead to a disruption of the knee extensor mechanism. Clinical examination reveals an inability to actively extend the knee. Standard radiographs of the knee show a suprapatellar swelling of the soft tissues in case of quadriceps tendon rupture, or a displaced patellar fracture, or a patella alta in case of patellar tendon rupture. Echography and MRI confirm the diagnosis and may reveal associated injuries. In case of knee extensor mechanism rupture, early surgical reconstruction of quadriceps or patellar tendon, or patella osteosynthesis, are mandatory to achieve early functional recovery. PMID:21919393

Duthon, V B; Fritschy, D

2011-08-10

100

Partial Rotator Cuff Ruptures  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Partial rotator cuff ruptures are not rare and occur mainly in the supraspinatus tendon and may extend to that of infraspinatus,\\u000a but rarely to the tendon of subscapularis. Isolated lesions in the tendons of infraspinatus, teres minor or subscapularis\\u000a are rare. Partial ruptures usually occur before the sixth decade of life and can be a cause of unexplained pain in

Antonio Cartucho

101

Normal Anatomical Features and Variations of the Vertebrobasilar Circulation and Its Branches: An Analysis with 64-Detector Row CT and 3T MR Angiographies  

PubMed Central

Purpose. To determine the normal anatomical features and variations of the vertebrobasilar circulation and its branches in patients who underwent multidetector computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiographies of the brain. Methods. 135 patients (male, 83 and female, 52; mean age, 50.1 years) who underwent CT (n = 71) or MR (n = 64) angiographies of the vertebrobasilar vasculature for various reasons were analyzed retrospectively. The right and left distal vertebral arteries (VAs), posterior inferior cerebellar arteries (PICAs), anterior inferior cerebellar arteries (AICAs), superior cerebellar arteries (SCAs), posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs), and posterior communicating arteries (PCoAs) were analyzed individually. Results. In 24.4% of the cases (33/135) right PICA, in 19.3% of the cases (26/135) left PICA, in 17.8% of the cases (24/135) right AICA, and in 18.5% of the cases (25/135) left AICA were absent. In cases without PICA or AICA, there was a statistically significant, moderately or well-developed AICA or PICA on the same side, respectively (P < 0.001). The most common variation was isolated absence of right PICA and was seen in 17.8% of the cases. Conclusions. The anatomic features of the branches of the vertebrobasilar circulation may be different from well-known normal anatomy. CT and MR angiographies allow a precise and detailed evaluation of vertebrobasilar circulation.

Akgun, Veysel; Bozkurt, Yalcin; Hamcan, Salih; Sari, Sebahattin; Akgun, Hakan

2013-01-01

102

Traumatic rupture of the intracranial vertebral artery due to rotational acceleration.  

PubMed

The reason for blunt forces against the head to rupture the basal brain arteries has been discussed in forensic and trauma research. However, well-documented case reports demonstrating the mechanism of injury, the clinical course and the forensic work up are rare. We present the case of a 40-year-old man, who was assaulted with blunt force to the head resulting in death 34 h later from a longitudinal rupture of the distal left vertebral artery. Computer tomography of the brain and the face demonstrated a basal subarachnoidal haemorrhage, signs of increased intracranial pressure and a fracture of the right orbital bone. Angiography showed a long fusiform dilatation of both intracranial vertebral arteries with an active pseudoaneurysm on the left side. At autopsy signs of a blunt trauma to the head, extensive basal subarachnoidal haemorrhage and a minor subdural haemorrhage were found. Histological examination revealed a transmural longitudinal rupture of the left vertebral artery with vital reaction and no signs of preexisting vascular disease. We discuss the current literature regarding traumatic basal brain artery rupture, important clinical decision making processes as well as pitfalls in the forensic work up. In addition, this singular well-documented case gives new insights in the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of traumatic basal artery rupture. PMID:19008059

Kaiser, Ch; Schnabel, A; Berkefeld, J; Bratzke, H

2008-11-13

103

Electrical stimulation of human fusiform face-selective regions distorts face perception.  

PubMed

Face-selective neural responses in the human fusiform gyrus have been widely examined. However, their causal role in human face perception is largely unknown. Here, we used a multimodal approach of electrocorticography (ECoG), high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and electrical brain stimulation (EBS) to directly investigate the causal role of face-selective neural responses of the fusiform gyrus (FG) in face perception in a patient implanted with subdural electrodes in the right inferior temporal lobe. High-resolution fMRI identified two distinct FG face-selective regions [mFus-faces and pFus-faces (mid and posterior fusiform, respectively)]. ECoG revealed a striking anatomical and functional correspondence with fMRI data where a pair of face-selective electrodes, positioned 1 cm apart, overlapped mFus-faces and pFus-faces, respectively. Moreover, electrical charge delivered to this pair of electrodes induced a profound face-specific perceptual distortion during viewing of real faces. Specifically, the subject reported a "metamorphosed" appearance of faces of people in the room. Several controls illustrate the specificity of the effect to the perception of faces. EBS of mFus-faces and pFus-faces neither produced a significant deficit in naming pictures of famous faces on the computer, nor did it affect the appearance of nonface objects. Further, the appearance of faces remained unaffected during both sham stimulation and stimulation of a pair of nearby electrodes that were not face-selective. Overall, our findings reveal a striking convergence of fMRI, ECoG, and EBS, which together offer a rare causal link between functional subsets of the human FG network and face perception. PMID:23100414

Parvizi, Josef; Jacques, Corentin; Foster, Brett L; Witthoft, Nathan; Withoft, Nathan; Rangarajan, Vinitha; Weiner, Kevin S; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

2012-10-24

104

Ruptured jejunal artery aneurysm.  

PubMed

Visceral artery aneurysms (VAAs), unlike aortic aneurysms, are very rare, but are also a potentially lethal vascular disease. Jejunal artery aneurysms only account for less than 3% of VAAs, but have a 30% risk of rupture, with 20% death rate, presenting with only few and vague symptoms. We report the case of a 76-year-old man presenting at the emergency department (ED) with a crampy epigastric pain and vomiting. An ultrasound performed diagnosed free abdominal fluid and immediate CT scan diagnosed jejunal artery aneurysm spontaneously rupturing, followed by hypovolaemic shock. Emergent surgery was undertaken, and aneurysmectomy, followed by partial enterectomy with primary anastomosis were performed, because of segmentary jejunal ischaemia. The patient's recovery was unremarkable. High level of suspicion, rapid diagnosis capability and prompt surgical or endovascular intervention, as well as an effective teamwork in the ED are critical to avoid the devastating consequences of ruptured VAAs. PMID:23771962

Costa, Sílvia; Costa, Alexandre; Pereira, Tiago; Maciel, Jorge

2013-06-13

105

Incomplete Cesarean Scar Rupture  

PubMed Central

Background Uterine rupture at the site of a previous cesarean scar is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of pregnancy, which is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Case Presentation A 30-year old woman at 24th week of gestation and complaint of pain, contractions and spotting was admitted in Royan Institute in Tehran, Iran. She had a past medical history of an EP and a cesarean section delivery, respectively 4 and 2 years before hospitalization. Herniation of an amniotic membrane into the maternal bladder was found on ultrasound examination. Conclusion Risk factors of cesarean scar rupture should be considered in women undergoing subsequent pregnancies as they need extra care. Ultrasonography can be used to evaluate women with previous cesarean section to assess the risks of scar rupture during subsequent pregnancies.

Ahmadi, Firoozeh; Siahbazi, Shiva; Akhbari, Farnaz

2013-01-01

106

Endovascular Stenting for Restenosis of the Intracranial Vertebrobasilar Artery After Balloon Angioplasty: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature  

SciTech Connect

Percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty (PTA) has been used in the treatment of critical stenosis of the intracranial vertebrobasilar artery (VBA). PTA of the intracranial VBA carries the risk of fatal complications such as arterial dissection or acute occlusion as well as postoperative restenosis. The estimated risk of periprocedural complications and restenosis were approximately 20% and 27%. The use of recently developed stents could prevent these problems of PTA. We present two cases of restenosis of the intracranial VBA after PTA which stenoses were successfully retreated with endovascular stenting using flexible coronary stents without any complications. Neither restenosis nor other recurrent symptoms were observed during the 4- and 6-month follow-up period. Reviewing the literature of 33 cases and our 2 cases, the overall complication rates related to stenting and restenosis were 5.6% and 7.8%. Endovascular stenting for the treatment of intracranial VBA can reduce the risk of arterial dissection and restenosis.

Kiyosue, Hiro, E-mail: hkiyosue@oita-med.ac.jp; Okahara, Mika [Department of Radiology, Nagatomi Neurosurgical Hospital, Oita Medical University, 3-2, Omichi-machi (Japan); Yamashita, Masanori; Nagatomi, Hirofumi [Neurosurgery, Nagatomi Neurosurgical Hospital (Japan); Nakamura, Natsuki [Shinbeppu Hospital, Department of Cardiology (Japan); Mori, Hiromu [Oita Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan)

2004-09-15

107

Hemispheric asymmetry in the fusiform gyrus distinguishes Homo sapiens from chimpanzees.  

PubMed

While the neural basis for linguistic communication has been linked to brain structural asymmetries found only in humans (wider connective spacing is found between the minicolumns of neurons in the left hemisphere language areas), it is unknown if the opposite microanatomical asymmetry exists in the fusiform gyrus which typically supports a right hemisphere bias for face processing. Unlike language, face processing is an ability shared with chimpanzees and, as Darwin observed, the widespread use of facial expressions in animal communication suggests a biological basis. We tested the principle that minicolumn asymmetry follows typical functional dominance in humans, and tested its evolutionary continuity, by measuring minicolumn width, neuronal size and density in the mid-fusiform cortex in 14 humans and 14 chimpanzees. We found that microanatomical asymmetry distinguishes humans from chimpanzees although the direction of asymmetry is the same as in language areas-the right hemisphere contained narrower minicolumns and smaller pyramidal neurons, as in auditory language areas. Uniformly narrow minicolumns in chimpanzees and in the human right hemisphere are consistent with mechanistic predictions supporting the apparent bias towards holistic face processing. Wider minicolumns and larger neurons in the human left hemisphere may be consistent with a language function such as word-form processing. Microanatomical asymmetry in the neocortex therefore provides a correlate of hemispheric specialisation. PMID:23108793

Chance, Steven A; Sawyer, Eva K; Clover, Linda M; Wicinski, Bridget; Hof, Patrick R; Crow, Timothy J

2012-10-30

108

Cytoarchitectonical analysis and probabilistic mapping of two extrastriate areas of the human posterior fusiform gyrus.  

PubMed

The human extrastriate visual cortex comprises numerous functionally defined areas, which are not identified in the widely used cytoarchitectonical map of Brodmann. The ventral part of the extrastriate cortex is particularly devoted to the identification of visual objects, faces and word forms. We analyzed the region immediately antero-lateral to hOc4v in serially sectioned (20 ?m) and cell body-stained human brains using a quantitative observer-independent cytoarchitectonical approach to further identify the anatomical organization of the extrastriate cortex. Two novel cytoarchitectonical areas, FG1 and FG2, were identified on the posterior fusiform gyrus. The results of ten postmortem brains were then registered to their MRI volumes (acquired before histological processing), 3D reconstructed, and spatially normalized to the Montreal Neurological Institute reference brain. Finally, probabilistic maps were generated for each cytoarchitectonical area by superimposing the areas of the individual brains in the reference space. Comparison with recent functional imaging studies yielded that both areas are located within the object-related visual cortex. FG1 fills the gap between the retinotopically mapped area VO-1 and a posterior fusiform face patch. FG2 is probably the correlate of this face patch. PMID:22488096

Caspers, Julian; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B; Schleicher, Axel; Mohlberg, Hartmut; Amunts, Katrin

2012-04-10

109

Absence of normal activation of the left anterior fusiform gyrus during naming in left temporal lobe epilepsy.  

PubMed

Patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) often have impaired naming. We studied 13 patients with left TLE and 10 healthy control subjects with [(15)O]H2O PET during visual confrontation naming. Statistical mapping detected multiple regions of significant cerebral blood flow increases within individuals. The left fusiform gyrus was activated in nine healthy subjects, but only in two patients with TLE (a significant difference, p < 0.001). Other activation sites were more variable in healthy subjects and those with TLE. Impaired naming ability may be associated with a lack of increased cerebral blood flow in the left fusiform gyrus in TLE. PMID:9521277

Henry, T R; Buchtel, H A; Koeppe, R A; Pennell, P B; Kluin, K J; Minoshima, S

1998-03-01

110

Ruptured extrauterine pregnancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extrauterine pregnancies contribute substantially to maternal mortality in all parts of the world. The most common cause of these deaths is massive bleeding after rupture of the ectopic pregnancy. The advent of transvaginal ultrasonography in early pregnancy and the use of quantitative measurement of the ?-unit of human chorionic gonadotropin have revolutionized the management of this condition. These diagnostic modalities

D. R. Slabbert; T. F. Kruger

2006-01-01

111

Rupture of a Large Vertebral Artery Aneurysm Following Proximal Occlusion  

PubMed Central

Summary Proximal occlusion of the vertebral artery is regarded as a safe and effective method of treating aneurysms of the vertebral artery or the vertebrobasilar junction unsuitable for treatment by neck clipping. Complications known to develop after this procedure include ischemic lesions of the perforators and other areas. There are only a limited number of reports on early rupture of aneurysm following proximal occlusion of the vertebral artery for the treatment of unruptured aneurysm. We recently encountered a case of large aneurysm of the vertebral artery identified after detection of brainstem compression. This patient underwent proximal occlusion of the vertebral artery with a coil and developed a fatal rupture of the aneurysm ten days after proximal occlusion. The patient was a 72-year-old woman who had complained of dysphagia and unsteadiness for several years. An approximately 20 mm diameter aneurysm was detected in her left vertebral artery. She underwent endovascular treatment, that is, her left vertebral artery was occluded with coils at a point proximal to the aneurysm. Her initial post-procedure course was uneventful. However, she suddenly developed right-side hemiparesis nine days after procedure. At that time, CT scan suggested sudden thrombosis of the aneurysm. Right vertebral angiography revealed a small part of the aneurysm. She was treated conservatively. Ten days after the procedure, she suffered massive subarachnoid haemorrhage. Both the present case and past reports suggest that proximal occlusion of the vertebral artery is effective in treating relatively large aneurysms unsuitable for treatment by neck clipping or trapping. However, when the bifurcation of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) is distal to the occluded point in cases where the PICA bifurcates from the aneurysm or the neck region, blood supply to the aneurysm may persist because anterograde blood flow to the PICA may be preserved. Therefore, clinicians must consider the possibility of aneurysm rupture after proximal occlusion in the following cases: 1) when the aneurysm is large or giant, but non-thrombosed; 2) when thrombosis occurs soon after the procedure; 3) when postoperative angiography shows partial filling of the aneurysm with contrast agent through the contralateral vertebral artery of basilar artery or the cervical muscle branches.

Iwabuchi, S.; Yokouchi, T.; Kimura, H.; Ueda, M.; Samejima, H.

2005-01-01

112

Task Effects in the Mid-Fusiform Gyrus: A Comparison of Orthographic, Phonological, and Semantic Processing of Chinese Characters  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The left mid-fusiform gyrus is repeatedly reported to be involved in visual word processing. Nevertheless, it is controversial whether this area responds to orthographic processing of reading. To examine this idea, neural activity was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging in the present study while subjects performed phonological,…

Guo, Yi; Burgund, E. Darcy

2010-01-01

113

Comparison of Open and Controlled Pollinated Pine Families for Susceptibility to Air Pollution, Acid Rain, and Fusiform Rust. Progress Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Loblolly pine seedlings were fumigated with SO sub 2 , ozone, and a combination of SO sub 2 and ozone to determine the relative susceptibility of different strains to air pollution and to fusiform rust. There seems to be no relationship between susceptibi...

B. Chevone H. R. Powers

1982-01-01

114

Further Comparisons between Infection of Loblolly and Slash Pines by Fusiform Rust After Artificial Inoculation or Planting.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Seedlings from half-diallel crosses, one each of loblolly and slash pines, were used to test the effectiveness of artificial inoculation for predicting field infection by fusiform rust. Each half-diallel cross was among six parents, three of which were ra...

E. R. Sluder H. R. Powers

1986-01-01

115

Fingerspelling, signed language, text and picture processing in deaf native signers: The role of the mid-fusiform gyrus  

PubMed Central

In fingerspelling, different hand configurations are used to represent the different letters of the alphabet. Signers use this method of representing written language to fill lexical gaps in a signed language. Using fMRI, we compared cortical networks supporting the perception of fingerspelled, signed, written, and pictorial stimuli in deaf native signers of British Sign Language (BSL). In order to examine the effects of linguistic knowledge, hearing participants who knew neither fingerspelling nor a signed language were also tested. All input forms activated a left fronto-temporal network, including portions of left inferior temporal and mid-fusiform gyri, in both groups. To examine the extent to which activation in this region was influenced by orthographic structure, two contrasts of orthographic and non-orthographic stimuli were made: one using static stimuli (text vs. pictures), the other using dynamic stimuli (fingerspelling vs. signed language). Greater activation in left and right inferior temporal and mid-fusiform gyri was found for pictures than text in both deaf and hearing groups. In the fingerspelling vs. signed language contrast, a significant interaction indicated locations within the left and right mid-fusiform gyri. This showed greater activation for fingerspelling than signed language in deaf but not hearing participants. These results are discussed in light of recent proposals that the mid-fusiform gyrus may act as an integration region, mediating between visual input and higher-order stimulus properties.

Waters, Dafydd; Campbell, Ruth; Capek, Cheryl M.; Woll, Bencie; David, Anthony S.; McGuire, Philip K.; Brammer, Michael J.; MacSweeney, Mairead

2007-01-01

116

Impaired Face Discrimination in Acquired Prosopagnosia Is Associated with Abnormal Response to Individual Faces in the Right Middle Fusiform Gyrus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The middle fusiform gyrus (MFG) and the inferior occipital gyrus (IOG) are activated by both detection and identification of faces. Paradoxically, patients with acquired prosopagnosia following lesions to either of these regions in the right hemisphere cannot identify faces, but can still detect faces. Here we acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data during face processing in a patient presenting

Christine Schiltz; Bettina Sorger; Roberto Caldara; Fatima Ahmed; Eugene Mayer; Rainer Goebel; Bruno Rossion

2005-01-01

117

Task Effects in the Mid-Fusiform Gyrus: A Comparison of Orthographic, Phonological, and Semantic Processing of Chinese Characters  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The left mid-fusiform gyrus is repeatedly reported to be involved in visual word processing. Nevertheless, it is controversial whether this area responds to orthographic processing of reading. To examine this idea, neural activity was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging in the present study while subjects performed phonological,…

Guo, Yi; Burgund, E. Darcy

2010-01-01

118

Facial affect recognition training in autism: can we animate the fusiform gyrus?  

PubMed

One of the most consistent findings in the neuroscience of autism is hypoactivation of the fusiform gyrus (FG) during face processing. In this study the authors examined whether successful facial affect recognition training is associated with an increased activation of the FG in autism. The effect of a computer-based program to teach facial affect identification was examined in 10 individuals with high-functioning autism. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) changes in the FG and other regions of interest, as well as behavioral facial affect recognition measures, were assessed pre- and posttraining. No significant activation changes in the FG were observed. Trained participants showed behavioral improvements, which were accompanied by higher BOLD fMRI signals in the superior parietal lobule and maintained activation in the right medial occipital gyrus. PMID:16492133

Bölte, Sven; Hubl, Daniela; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Prvulovic, David; Dierks, Thomas; Poustka, Fritz

2006-02-01

119

Dissociation between overt and unconscious face processing in fusiform face area.  

PubMed

The precise role of the fusiform face area (FFA) in face processing remains controversial. In this study, we investigated to what degree FFA activation reflects additional functions beyond face perception. Seven volunteers underwent rapid event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging while they performed a face-encoding and a face-recognition task. During face encoding, activity in the FFA for individual faces predicted whether the individual face was subsequently remembered or forgotten. However, during face recognition, no difference in FFA activity between consciously remembered and forgotten faces was observed, but the activity of FFA differentiated if a face had been seen previously or not. This demonstrated a dissociation between overt recognition and unconscious discrimination of stimuli, suggesting that physiological processes of face recognition can take place, even if not all of its operations are made available to consciousness. PMID:14741644

Lehmann, Christoph; Mueller, Thomas; Federspiel, Andrea; Hubl, Daniela; Schroth, Gerhard; Huber, Oswald; Strik, Werner; Dierks, Thomas

2004-01-01

120

Decreased GABAB Receptors in the Cingulate Cortex and Fusiform Gyrus in Autism  

PubMed Central

Autism is a behaviorally defined neurodevelopmental disorder and among its symptoms are disturbances in face and emotional processing. Emerging evidence demonstrates abnormalities in the GABAergic (gamma-aminobutyric acid) system in autism, which likely contributes to these deficits. GABAB receptors play an important role in modulating synapses and maintaining the balance of excitation-inhibition in the brain. The density of GABAB receptors in subjects with autism and matched controls was quantified in the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, important for socio-emotional and cognitive processing, and the fusiform gyrus, important for identification of faces and facial expressions. Significant reductions in GABAB receptor density were demonstrated in all three regions examined suggesting that alterations in this key inhibitory receptor subtype may contribute to the functional deficits in individuals with autism. Interestingly, the presence of seizure in a subset of autism cases did not have a significant effect on the density of GABAB receptors in any of the three regions.

Gibbs, Terrell T.; Blatt, Gene J.

2010-01-01

121

Fusiform gyrus face selectivity relates to individual differences in facial recognition ability.  

PubMed

Regions of the occipital and temporal lobes, including a region in the fusiform gyrus (FG), have been proposed to constitute a "core" visual representation system for faces, in part because they show face selectivity and face repetition suppression. But recent fMRI studies of developmental prosopagnosics (DPs) raise questions about whether these measures relate to face processing skills. Although DPs manifest deficient face processing, most studies to date have not shown unequivocal reductions of functional responses in the proposed core regions. We scanned 15 DPs and 15 non-DP control participants with fMRI while employing factor analysis to derive behavioral components related to face identification or other processes. Repetition suppression specific to facial identities in FG or to expression in FG and STS did not show compelling relationships with face identification ability. However, we identified robust relationships between face selectivity and face identification ability in FG across our sample for several convergent measures, including voxel-wise statistical parametric mapping, peak face selectivity in individually defined "fusiform face areas" (FFAs), and anatomical extents (cluster sizes) of those FFAs. None of these measures showed associations with behavioral expression or object recognition ability. As a group, DPs had reduced face-selective responses in bilateral FFA when compared with non-DPs. Individual DPs were also more likely than non-DPs to lack expected face-selective activity in core regions. These findings associate individual differences in face processing ability with selectivity in core face processing regions. This confirms that face selectivity can provide a valid marker for neural mechanisms that contribute to face identification ability. PMID:20617881

Furl, Nicholas; Garrido, Lúcia; Dolan, Raymond J; Driver, Jon; Duchaine, Bradley

2010-07-09

122

Rust and Rupture: Atherosclerosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter provides an overview of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and integrates the latest clinical guidelines and\\u000a trials into a concise and practical guide to cardiovascular risk reduction and the management of dyslipidemia. These measures\\u000a form the basis for a management strategy aimed at halting the progression of atherosclerosis, stabilizing rupture-prone plaques,\\u000a preventing arterial thrombosis, and improving cardiovascular prognosis.

Justin T. Saunders; Christie M. Ballantyne

123

Premature rupture of membranes.  

PubMed Central

The management of patients with premature rupture of membranes has changed markedly in the past several years. The basis for this is a combination of a better understanding of newborn physiology, improved neonatal care, refinements in antibiotic therapy, and the widespread use of maternal and fetal monitoring. The best outcome for both mother and infant undoubtedly reflects data based on a combination of factors, among which are gestational age survival, evidence of fetal distress, presence or absence of labor and sepsis, and of course, the cervical condition as it is related to labor-readiness. An important recent advance is the recognition that an active observation management program is associated with less morbidity and mortality than the classic management course of delivery within 12 hours of membrane rupture. The fact that preterm premature rupture of membranes tends to recur in subsequent pregnancies offers an opportunity for prevention. Moreover, advances in perinatal and neonatal care will continue to improve the outcomes of these women and their children.

Poma, P. A.

1996-01-01

124

Blood vessel rupture by cavitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cavitation is thought to be one mechanism for vessel rupture during shock wave lithotripsy treatment. However, just how cavitation\\u000a induces vessel rupture remains unknown. In this work, a high-speed photomicrography system was set up to directly observe\\u000a the dynamics of bubbles inside blood vessels in ex vivo rat mesenteries. Vascular rupture correlating to observed bubble dynamics\\u000a were examined by imaging

Hong Chen; Andrew A. Brayman; Michael R. Bailey; Thomas J. Matula

2010-01-01

125

Rupture of an oxide blister  

SciTech Connect

Expressions have been derived which describe the critical stress and pressure necessary to rupture oxide blisters which form on aluminum during the growth of corrosion pits. These expressions have been derived and evaluated for radial cracks in the oxide blister. The critical stress and corresponding pressure for rupture decrease with increasing blister radius and decrease with increasing crack length. The critical stress is independent of the ratio of oxide film thickness to blister radius, whereas the rupture pressure increases with this ratio. The critical stress is independent of Poisson`s ratio for the oxide film whereas the rupture pressure is weakly dependent on Poisson`s ratio for the oxide film.

Ryan, R.L.; McCafferty, E. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-08-01

126

[Achilles tendon rupture].  

PubMed

The treatment of acute of Achilles tendon rupture experienced a dynamic development in the last ten years. Decisive for this development was the application of MRI and above all the ultrasonography in the diagnostics of the pathological changes and injuries of tendons. The question of rupture morphology as well as different courses of healing could be now evaluated objectively. These advances led consequently to new modalities in treatment concepts and rehabilitation protocols. The decisive input for improvements of the outcome results and particularly the shortening of the rehabilitation period came with introduction of the early functional treatment in contrast to immobilizing plaster treatment. In a prospective randomized study (1987-1989) at the Trauma Dept. of the Hannover Medical School could show no statistical differences comparing functional non-operative with functional operative therapy with a special therapy boot (Variostabil/Adidas). The crucial criteria for therapy selection results from the sonographically measured position of the tendon stumps in plantar flexion (20 degrees). With complete adaptation of the tendons' ends surgical treatment does not achieve better results than non-operative functional treatment in term of tendon healing and functional outcome. Regarding the current therapeutic standards each method has is advantages and disadvantages. Both, the operative and non-operative functional treatment enable a stable tendon healing with a low risk of re-rupture (1-2%). Meanwhile there is consensus for early functional after-treatment of the operated Achilles' tendons. There seems to be a trend towards non-operative functional treatment in cases of adequate sonographical findings, or to minimal invasive surgical techniques. PMID:10798233

Thermann, H; Hüfner, T; Tscherne, H

2000-03-01

127

Vertebrobasilar recanalization techniques before the placement of stent-retrievers: reopening is not synonymous with good outcome.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the recanalization rate and clinical outcome three months after endovascular treatment for vertebrobasilar occlusion before the placement of stentrievers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We reviewed all cases of basilar thrombosis treated with endovascular techniques at our center. We reviewed the clinical outcomes with the main objective of determining the recanalization rate and the secondary objective of evaluating the outcome using the modified Rankin scale (mRS) three months after treatment. We assessed clinical and angiographic variables and correlated them with outcome and complications. RESULTS: We reviewed a total of 27 consecutive patients (mean age, 58.1±15.5 y; median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), 21, interquartile range, 18-29; median Glasgow coma score (GCS) 7, interquartile range, 4-9.5). The mean time between the onset of symptoms and endovascular treatment was 26.3±41.7hours. Complete or partial recanalization was achieved in 23 (85.1%) patients. Three months after treatment, 16 (59.2%) had died and 6 (22.2%) had good outcome (mRS ? 2). CONCLUSION: Endovascular treatment achieved a high rate of recanalization of occlusions of the basilar artery. Nevertheless, a high percentage of the patients did not have a good outcome. New materials might improve the prognosis in these patients. PMID:22770874

Delgado Acosta, F; Jiménez Gómez, E; de Asís Bravo Rodríguez, F; Oteros Fernández, R; Ochoa Sepúlveda, J J

2012-07-01

128

Creep Rupture Modelling of Polymers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Damage by creep related fracture process is of primary importance in en gineering polymers and their composites. Modelling of creep rupture is useful for engi neering design especially in obtaining design stresses. Previously, the creep rupture times of polyethylene and polypropylene have been described successfully using a three element model with a critical elastic stored energy criterion. The modelling is

S. H. Teoh; B. W. Cherry; H. H. Kausch

1992-01-01

129

Creep Ruptures in Heterogeneous Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present creep experiments on fiber composite materials with different controlled heterogeneity. All samples exhibit a power-law relaxation of the strain rate in the primary creep regime (Andrade's law) followed by a power-law acceleration up to rupture. We discover that the rupture time is proportional to the duration of the primary creep regime, showing the interplay between the two regimes

H. Nechad; A. Helmstetter; R. El Guerjouma; D. Sornette

2005-01-01

130

Dolichoectasia of the circle of Willis arteries and fusiform aneurysm of basilar artery - case report and review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Summary Background: Dolichoectasia of intracranial arteries is a rare arteriopathy characterized by elongation and widening of the arteries and disturbance of the laminar blood flow. It involves mostly vertebral and basilar arteries. In advanced cases, formation of a fusiform aneurysm is possible. Case Report: A sixty-four-year-old female with hypertension was admitted to the hospital with severe non-systemic vertigo and dysarthria, which had lasted for a couple of weeks. Imaging of the brain revealed dolichoectasia of arteries of the circle of Willis coexisting with a fusiform aneurysm of the basilar artery. Conclusions: Intracranial arterial dolichoectasia may be asymptomatic for a long time. However, in many cases it leads to neurological symptoms associated with haemodynamic disturbance (due to unstable wall clots) and mass effect caused by the widened vessel.

Baran, Boguslawa; Kornafel, Olga; Guzinski, Maciej; Sasiadek, Marek

2012-01-01

131

Differential neuronal responses to the self and others in the extrastriate body area and the fusiform body area  

Microsoft Academic Search

The extrastriate body area (EBA) and the fusiform body area (FBA) are selectively activated by viewing human bodies. However,\\u000a the role of these functionally defined brain areas in self-other discrimination is still unresolved. Thirty-one females were\\u000a presented with 16 pictures of their own body and another body in a bikini and with scrambled images while fMRI was performed.\\u000a Moreover, standardized

Silja Vocks; Martin Busch; Dietrich Grönemeyer; Dietmar Schulte; Stephan Herpertz; Boris Suchan

2010-01-01

132

Brain activity for peripheral biological motion in the posterior superior temporal gyrus and the fusiform gyrus: Dependence on visual hemifield and view orientation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biological motion, the movement of the human body presented by a small number of point lights, activates among other regions lining the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) and gyrus (pSTG) and of the fusiform gyrus. In previous studies with foveal stimuli the activity in the pSTS\\/pSTG was often confined to the right hemisphere and bilateral in fusiform gyrus. We presented

Lars Michels; Raimund Kleiser; Marc H. E. de Lussanet; Rüdiger J. Seitz; Markus Lappe

2009-01-01

133

Effect of head orientation on gaze processing in fusiform gyrus and superior temporal sulcus.  

PubMed

We used functional MRI with an event-related design to dissociate the brain activation in the fusiform gyrus (FG) and posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS) for multiple face and gaze orientations. The event-related design allowed for concurrent behavioral analysis, which revealed a significant effect of both head and gaze orientation on the speed of gaze processing, with the face and gaze forward condition showing the fastest reaction times. In conjunction with this behavioral finding, the FG responded with the greatest activation to face and gaze forward, perhaps reflecting the unambiguous social salience of congruent face and gaze directed toward the viewer. Random effects analysis showed greater activation in both the FG and posterior STS when the subjects viewed a direct face compared to an angled face, regardless of gaze direction. Additionally, the FG showed greater activation for forward gaze compared to angled gaze, but only when the face was forward. Together, these findings suggest that head orientation has a significant effect on gaze processing and these effects are manifest not only in the STS, but also the FG. PMID:14527592

Pageler, Natalie M; Menon, Vinod; Merin, Noah M; Eliez, Stephan; Brown, Wendy E; Reiss, Allan L

2003-09-01

134

Lower-Level Stimulus Features Strongly Influence Responses in the Fusiform Face Area  

PubMed Central

An intriguing region of human visual cortex (the fusiform face area; FFA) responds selectively to faces as a general higher-order stimulus category. However, the potential role of lower-order stimulus properties in FFA remains incompletely understood. To clarify those lower-level influences, we measured FFA responses to independent variation in 4 lower-level stimulus dimensions using standardized face stimuli and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). These dimensions were size, position, contrast, and rotation in depth (viewpoint). We found that FFA responses were strongly influenced by variations in each of these image dimensions; that is, FFA responses were not “invariant” to any of them. Moreover, all FFA response functions were highly correlated with V1 responses (r = 0.95–0.99). As in V1, FFA responses could be accurately modeled as a combination of responses to 1) local contrast plus 2) the cortical magnification factor. In some measurements (e.g., face size or a combinations of multiple cues), the lower-level variations dominated the range of FFA responses. Manipulation of lower-level stimulus parameters could even change the category preference of FFA from “face selective” to “object selective.” Altogether, these results emphasize that a significant portion of the FFA response reflects lower-level visual responses.

Cassidy, Brittany S.; Devaney, Kathryn J.; Holt, Daphne J.; Tootell, Roger B. H.

2011-01-01

135

Rab11a-dependent exocytosis of discoidal/fusiform vesicles in bladder umbrella cells  

PubMed Central

The discoidal/fusiform vesicles (DFV) of bladder umbrella cells undergo regulated exocytosis in response to stretch, but little is known about their biogenesis or the molecular machinery that modulates this process. We observed that Rab11a was expressed in umbrella cells (but not Rab11b or Rab25) and was associated with DFV. Using adenovirus-mediated delivery we transduced umbrella cells in situ with either dominant active (DA) or dominant negative (DN) mutants of Rab11a. DA-Rab11a stimulated an increase in apical surface area in the absence of stretch, whereas DN-Rab11a inhibited stretch-induced changes. Endocytosed fluid and membrane markers had little access to Rab11a-positive DFV, but virally expressed human growth hormone (hGH), a secretory protein, was packaged into DFV. Whereas expression of DA-Rab11a stimulated release of hGH into the bladder lumen, expression of DN-Rab11a had the opposite effect. Our results indicate that DFV may be biosynthetic in nature and that their exocytosis depends on the activity of the Rab11a GTPase.

Khandelwal, Puneet; Ruiz, Wily G.; Balestreire-Hawryluk, Elena; Weisz, Ora A.; Goldenring, James R.; Apodaca, Gerard

2008-01-01

136

The Fusiform Face Area Is Engaged in Holistic, Not Parts-Based, Representation of Faces  

PubMed Central

Numerous studies with functional magnetic resonance imaging have shown that the fusiform face area (FFA) in the human brain plays a key role in face perception. Recent studies have found that both the featural information of faces (e.g., eyes, nose, and mouth) and the configural information of faces (i.e., spatial relation among features) are encoded in the FFA. However, little is known about whether the featural information is encoded independent of or combined with the configural information in the FFA. Here we used multi-voxel pattern analysis to examine holistic representation of faces in the FFA by correlating spatial patterns of activation with behavioral performance in discriminating face parts with face configurations either present or absent. Behaviorally, the absence of face configurations (versus presence) impaired discrimination of face parts, suggesting a holistic representation in the brain. Neurally, spatial patterns of activation in the FFA were more similar among correct than incorrect trials only when face parts were presented in a veridical face configuration. In contrast, spatial patterns of activation in the occipital face area, as well as the object-selective lateral occipital complex, were more similar among correct than incorrect trials regardless of the presence of veridical face configurations. This finding suggests that in the FFA faces are represented not on the basis of individual parts but in terms of the whole that emerges from the parts.

Zhang, Jiedong; Li, Xiaobai; Song, Yiying; Liu, Jia

2012-01-01

137

Left fusiform BOLD responses are inversely related to word-likeness in a one-back task  

PubMed Central

Although its precise functional contribution to reading remains unclear, there is broad consensus that activity in the left mid-fusiform gyrus is highly sensitive to written words and word-like stimuli. In the current study, we take advantage of a particularity of the Chinese writing system in order to manipulate word-likeness parametrically, from real characters, to pseudo-characters that vary in whether they contain phonological and semantic cues, to artificial stimuli with varying surface similarity to real characters. In a one-back task, BOLD activity in the left mid-fusiform was inversely related to word-likeness, such that the least activity was observed in response to real characters, and the greatest to artificial stimuli that violate the orthotactic constraints of the writing system. One possible explanation for this surprising result is that the short-term memory demands of the one-back task put more pressure on the visual system when other sources of information cannot be used to aid in detecting repeated stimuli. For real characters and, to a lesser extent for pseudo-characters, information about meaning and pronunciation can contribute to performance, whereas artificial stimuli are entirely dependent on visual information. Consistent with this view, functional connectivity analyses revealed a strong positive relationship between left mid-fusiform and other visual areas, whereas areas typically involved in phonological and semantic processing for text were negatively correlated with this region.

Wang, Xiaojuan; Yang, Jianfeng; Shu, Hua; Zevin, Jason D.

2011-01-01

138

Spontaneous Rupture of Pyometra  

PubMed Central

Spontaneous perforation is a very rare complication of pyometra. The clinical findings of perforated pyometra are similar to perforation of the gastrointestinal tract and other causes of acute abdomen. In most cases, a correct and definite diagnosis can be made only by laparotomy. We report two cases of diffuse peritonitis caused by spontaneous perforated pyometra. The first case is a 78-year-old woman with abdominal pain for which laparotomy was performed because of suspected incarcerated hernia. The second case is a 61-year-old woman with abdominal pain for which laparotomy was performed because of symptoms of peritonitis. At laparotomy of both cases, 1 liter of pus with the source of uterine was found in the abdominal cavity. The ruptured uterine is also detected. More investigations revealed no malignancy as the reason of the pyometra.

Mallah, Fatemeh; Eftekhar, Tahere; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad

2013-01-01

139

Ibudilast, a mixed PDE3/4 inhibitor, causes a selective and nitric oxide/cGMP-independent relaxation of the intracranial vertebrobasilar artery.  

PubMed

Ibudilast, a mixed phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3/4 inhibitor, is a cerebral vasodilator widely used in Japan for treating post-stroke dizziness. However, little studies have been conducted on the vasorelaxant effects of PDE inhibitors in the vertebrobasilar artery associated with dizziness onset. The in vitro vasorelaxant properties of ibudilast were, therefore, investigated by comparing with known selective PDE inhibitors, using vertebrobasilar arteries. Vasorelaxant activities of PDE3, PDE4, PDE5 inhibitors, and ibudilast were assessed in 5-hydroxytryptamine precontracted ring preparations from rabbit intracranial and extracranial vertebrobasilar arteries. Ibudilast more selectively relaxed the intracranial than extracranial artery. Similarly, selective PDE3 and PDE4 inhibitors showed higher selectivity for intracranial arteries. Furthermore, like selective PDE4 inhibitor, the vasorelaxation by ibudilast accompanied by increase in cAMP levels was inhibited by the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 in intracranial arteries. Next, it was examined whether nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP signaling is involved in this vasorelaxation in intracranial arteries. The suppression of NO/cGMP signaling by an NO synthase inhibitor or a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor potentiated the vasorelaxion by a PDE3 inhibitor and reduced that by a PDE4 inhibitor, while either suppression of the signaling had little influence on that by ibudilast. These results suggest that ibudilast has the high vasoselectivity for intracranial artery based on a mixed PDE3 and PDE4-inhibition, and effectively relaxes intracranial arteries independently of NO/cGMP signaling because of its vasorelaxation compensated by either PDE3- or PDE4-inhibition depending on the state of NO/cGMP signaling change. PMID:21036126

Yamazaki, Takanobu; Anraku, Tsuyoshi; Matsuzawa, Shigeki

2010-10-29

140

Creep Ruptures in Heterogeneous Materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present creep experiments on fiber composite materials with different controlled heterogeneity. All samples exhibit a power-law relaxation of the strain rate in the primary creep regime (Andrade's law) followed by a power-law acceleration up to rupture. We discover that the rupture time is proportional to the duration of the primary creep regime, showing the interplay between the two regimes and offering a method of rupture prediction. These experimental results are rationalized by a mean-field model of representative elements with nonlinear viscoelastic rheology and with a large heterogeneity of strengths.

Nechad, H.; Helmstetter, A.; El Guerjouma, R.; Sornette, D.

2005-01-01

141

Creep ruptures in heterogeneous materials.  

PubMed

We present creep experiments on fiber composite materials with different controlled heterogeneity. All samples exhibit a power-law relaxation of the strain rate in the primary creep regime (Andrade's law) followed by a power-law acceleration up to rupture. We discover that the rupture time is proportional to the duration of the primary creep regime, showing the interplay between the two regimes and offering a method of rupture prediction. These experimental results are rationalized by a mean-field model of representative elements with nonlinear viscoelastic rheology and with a large heterogeneity of strengths. PMID:15783567

Nechad, H; Helmstetter, A; El Guerjouma, R; Sornette, D

2005-01-31

142

Partial ACL rupture: an MR diagnosis?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose. We sought to clarify the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MR) to show partial ante- rior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures and to allow dis- tinction of partial from complete ACL ruptures. Materials and methods. Eighty-eight patients were stud- ied by arthroscopy and MR (36 with normal ACLs, 21 with partial ACL ruptures, and 31 with complete ACL ruptures). MR

Lawrence Yao; Amilcare Gentili; Leonard Petrus; Joong K. Lee

1995-01-01

143

The Fusiform Face Area responds automatically to statistical regularities optimal for face categorization.  

PubMed

Statistical regularities pervade our perceptual world. Assuming that the human brain is tuned for satisfying the constraints of the visual environment, visual system computations should be optimized for processing such regularities. A socially relevant and highly recurrent homogenous pattern for which the brain has developed sensitivity is certainly the human face. Yet, for which statistical regularities the face sensitive regions are tuned for, and to what extent their detection occurs automatically is largely unexplored. Using fMRI we measured activations within the face sensitive areas for nonface symmetrical and asymmetrical curvilinear patterns with either more high-contrast elements in the upper or in the lower part. Faceness evaluation performed outside of the scanner showed that these patterns were not perceived as schematic faces. Noticeably, symmetry violations disrupted perception of faceness, despite objective image similarity measures showing high faceness values for those patterns. Among the faces sensitive regions, only the right Fusiform Face Area (FFA) showed sensitivity to symmetry. This region showed also greater responses to patterns with more elements in the upper part. Critically, the FFA's responses were more strongly correlated with the physical objective faceness properties of the stimuli than the perceived subjective faceness ratings of the observers. These findings provide direct evidence that the neural computations of the right FFA are tuned to curvilinear symmetrical patterns with high-contrasted elements in the upper part, which fit best with the physical structure of human faces. Such low-level geometrical regularities might be used by the FFA to automatically categorize visual shapes as faces. PMID:18671278

Caldara, Roberto; Seghier, Mohamed L

2009-05-01

144

[Splenic rupture and anticoagulant therapy].  

PubMed

Splenic rupture associated with anticoagulant therapy is a rare entity. We report a case of spontaneous splenic rupture in a 62-year-old man who was treated by acenocoumarol orally after an aortic-valve replacement. Unrecognised, minor trauma may lead to splenic haemorrhage in patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. The symptoms and signs may mimic those of acute myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock. Early diagnosis is essential. Reversal of the anticoagulant and emergent splenectomy are the treatments of choice. PMID:15324967

Badaoui, R; Chebboubi, K; Delmas, J; Jakobina, S; Mahjoub, Y; Riboulot, M

2004-07-01

145

Creep rupture of polymer composites  

Microsoft Academic Search

A creep-rupture model, based on a creep model which was successfully applied in a previous paper to model and predict the creep of a unidirectional carbon-fiber-reinforced epoxy composite and that of the epoxy matrix, and a critical energy fracture criterion, are presented. The results of the successful application of this model to predict the creep rupture of AS4\\/3501-6 composite specimens

J. Raghavan; M. Meshii

1997-01-01

146

Fault Branching and Rupture Directivity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Can the rupture directivity of past earthquakes be inferred from fault geometry? Nakata et al. [J. Geogr., 1998] propose to relate the observed surface branching of fault systems with directivity. Their work assumes that all branches are through acute angles in the direction of rupture propagation. However, in some observed cases rupture paths seem to branch through highly obtuse angles, as if to propagate ``backwards". Field examples of that are as follows: (1) Landers 1992. When crossing from the Johnson Valley to the Homestead Valley (HV) fault via the Kickapoo (Kp) fault, the rupture from Kp progressed not just forward onto the northern stretch of the HV fault, but also backwards, i.e., SSE along the HV [Sowers et al., 1994, Spotila and Sieh, 1995, Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995, Rockwell et al., 2000]. Measurements of surface slip along that backward branch, a prominent feature of 4 km length, show right-lateral slip, decreasing towards the SSE. (2) At a similar crossing from the HV to the Emerson (Em) fault, the rupture progressed backwards along different SSE splays of the Em fault [Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995]. (3). In crossing from the Em to Camp Rock (CR) fault, again, rupture went SSE on the CR fault. (4). Hector Mine 1999. The rupture originated on a buried fault without surface trace [Li et al., 2002; Hauksson et al., 2002] and progressed bilaterally south and north. In the south it met the Lavic Lake (LL) fault and progressed south on it, but also progressed backward, i.e. NNW, along the northern stretch of the LL fault. The angle between the buried fault and the northern LL fault is around -160o, and that NNW stretch extends around 15 km. The field examples with highly obtuse branch angles suggest that there may be no simple correlation between fault geometry and rupture directivity. We propose that an important distinction is whether those obtuse branches actually involved a rupture path which directly turned through the obtuse angle (while continuing also on the main fault), or rather involved arrest by a barrier on the original fault and jumping [Harris and Day, JGR, 1993] to a neighboring fault on which rupture propagated bilaterally to form what appears as a backward-branched structure. Our studies [Poliakov et al., JGR in press, 2002; Kame et al, EOS, 2002] of stress fields around a dynamically moving mode II crack tip show a clear tendency to branch from the straight path at high rupture speeds, but the stress fields never allow the rupture path to directly turn through highly obtuse angles, and hence that mechanism is unlikely. In contrast, study of fault maps in the vicinity of the Kp to HV fault transition [Sowers et al., 1994], discussed as case (1) above, strongly suggest that the large-angle branching occurred as a jump, which we propose as the likely general mechanism. Implications for the Nakata et al. [1998] aim of inferring rupture directivity from branch geometry is that this will be possible only when rather detailed characterization (by surface geology, seismic relocation, trapped waves) of fault connectivity can be carried out in the vicinity of the branching junction, to ascertain whether direct turning of the rupture path through an angle, or jumping and then propagating bilaterally, were involved in prior events. They have opposite implications for how we would associate past directivity with a (nominally) branched fault geometry.

Dmowska, R.; Rice, J. R.; Kame, N.

2002-12-01

147

Traumatic Rupture of the Aorta  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether delay of the repair of the ruptured thoracic aorta in patients with other major injuries is safe and has a potential positive impact on survival. Summary Background Data The accepted treatment for acute traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta has been repair of the injury as soon as possible. This form of management, however, has been accompanied by a death rate of 0% to 54% mortality, often related to the presence of other injuries. Methods The records of 30 consecutive patients with rupture of the thoracic aorta from blunt trauma treated from 1995 to 2001 were retrospectively reviewed. Two of them died shortly after admission and were excluded from further consideration. The remaining 28 patients were divided according to the time of the repair of the rupture into two groups. Group 1 patients underwent repair of the rupture immediately after the diagnosis was made. Group 2 patients, who had associated injuries that were likely to increase the risk of surgical death, had either repair more than 48 hours after injury (subgroup 2A) or had no repair (subgroup 2B). The patients in group 2 had their mean arterial pressure maintained at less than 70 mm Hg with medication to eliminate shear stress on the aortic tear while being observed. Results Twenty-eight patients (22 men, 6 women) with an average age of 36 years (range 19–76) were treated. Twenty-five had rupture of the descending thoracic aorta and three had rupture in the ascending thoracic aorta. Group 1 comprised 14 patients, 5 of whom died during surgery or in the early postoperative period. Group 2 comprised 14 patients, 9 in subgroup 2A and 5 in subgroup 2B. Two patients in subgroup 2A and three patients in subgroup 2B died of associated injuries or illnesses. Rupture of the traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta did not occur in any of the patients in group 2. Conclusions Delayed repair of acute traumatic aortic rupture is safe under appropriate treatment and should be considered in selected patients.

Symbas, Panagiotis N.; Sherman, Andrew J.; Silver, Jeffery M.; Symbas, John D.; Lackey, Jodi J.

2002-01-01

148

Rupture of the tracheobronchial tree.  

PubMed Central

Eleven cases of tracheobronchial rupture are described. Nine were the result of external non-penetrating trauma and all but three had other serious injuries. The remaining two were caused by endobronchial intubation. Of the cases caused by external injury, respiratory tract injury was confined to the cervical trachea in three. Two required tracheostomy and repair and the third was managed conservatively; all made satisfactory recoveries. Intrathoracic rupture was recognised on or soon after admission in three cases. One patient died of uncontrollable pulmonary haemorrhage before he could be operated on; immediate repair gave good long term results in the other two. In three cases rupture of the main bronchus was not recognised until complete obstruction developed three, five, and 12 weeks after the accidents. The strictures were resected and the lung re-expanded. Robertshaw endobronchial tubes ruptured the left main bronchus in two patients undergoing oesophageal surgery. Uneventful recovery followed immediate repair. The difficulty of confirming rupture of a major airway is discussed and the importance of conserving the lung when the diagnosis has been missed is emphasised. Images

Roxburgh, J C

1987-01-01

149

A Case of Prosopometamorphopsia Restricted to the Nose and Mouth with Right Medial Temporooccipital Lobe Infarction that Included the Fusiform Face Area  

PubMed Central

Background Metamorphopsia includes a broad spectrum of visual perceptual distortions, such as alteration of perceived object size or, rarely, altered perception of faces, termed prosopometamorphopsia. Case Report This report describes a patient who complained of metamorphopsia restricted to the center of the face, particularly the lower part of the face (nose and mouth), following infarction of the right medial temporooccipital lobe that included the fusiform face area. Conclusions The fusiform face area is commonly believed to be a face-selective cortical region dedicated to the visual analysis of face stimuli. We speculate that any injury to this brain area could bring about prosopometamorphopsia involving whole or unilateral face perception, or very rarely, as in our case, distortion restricted to the central area of the face. Furthermore, there could be topographical correspondences between facial structures and the fusiform face area.

Hwang, Jung Yun; Cho, Eun Kyoung; Han, Jeong Ho; Lee, Seon Hwa; Lee, Seung Yeon; Kim, Doo Eung

2012-01-01

150

The fusiform face area is tuned for curvilinear patterns with more high-contrasted elements in the upper part.  

PubMed

The ability to identify conspecifics from the face is of primary interest for human social behavior. Newborns' visual preference for schematic face-like stimuli has been recently related to a sensitivity for visual patterns with a greater number of elements in the upper compared to the lower part. At the adult level, neuroimaging studies have identified a network of cortical areas devoted to the detection and identification of faces. However, whether and how low-level structural properties of face stimuli contribute to the preferential response to faces in these areas remain to be clarified. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), here we investigated whether the adults' face-sensitive cortical areas show a preference for top-heavy patterns, similarly to newborns' preference. Twelve participants were presented with head-shaped and square patterns with either more elements in the upper or the lower vertical part. In the right fusiform gyrus ('fusiform face area', FFA), an area showing a preference for faces over other visual object categories, there was a larger activation for curvilinear patterns with more high-contrast elements in the upper part, even though these patterns were not perceived as face stimuli. These findings provide direct evidence that the FFA is tuned for geometrical properties fitting best with the structure of faces, a computational mechanism that might drive the automatic detection of faces in the visual world. PMID:16460963

Caldara, Roberto; Seghier, Mohamed L; Rossion, Bruno; Lazeyras, Francois; Michel, Christoph; Hauert, Claude-Alain

2006-02-07

151

46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture disc is the only pressure relief device on the tank,...

2011-10-01

152

Traumatic duodenal rupture in a soccer player  

PubMed Central

Traumatic duodenal rupture resulting from blunt trauma during soccer is an extremely rare occurrence. A case report of this unusual condition is presented together with a review of the literature. Key Words: soccer; football; duodenal rupture; trauma

Houshian, S.

2000-01-01

153

Chordal rupture. I: aetiology and natural history.  

PubMed Central

Between 1970 and 1981, 12% of patients undergoing mitral valve surgery were found to have chordal rupture. Spontaneous or primary rupture accounted for 74.6% of patients (primary group); in the remainder (secondary group) chordal rupture complicated chronic rheumatic valvular disease (8.9%), bacterial endocarditis on both normal (8.5%) and rheumatic valves (4.7%), ischaemic heart disease (2.3%), acute rheumatic fever (0.5%), and osteogenesis imperfecta (0.5%). Isolated posterior rupture was seen most frequently (54%), with anterior rupture in 36% and rupture of both mitral cusps in 10% of patients. A short symptomatic history of acute mitral regurgitation was rare, occurring in only 4% of patients in either the primary or secondary groups, suggesting that mitral regurgitation due to ruptured chordae is a progressive disease. In contrast to previous reports the clinical presentation did not help to differentiate the aetiology of the chordal rupture.

Oliveira, D B; Dawkins, K D; Kay, P H; Paneth, M

1983-01-01

154

Open repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures.  

PubMed

Although the Achilles tendon is the strongest in the body, it also is the most often ruptured. Achilles tendon rupture most often occurs during sports activities in middle-aged men. Operative repair of a ruptured Achilles tendon can be accomplished with a variety of techniques, ranging from open repair, to minimally invasive technique, to endoscopic-assisted repair. This article focuses on open repair of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Surgical techniques, rehabilitation protocol, and the authors' preferred method are described. PMID:19857843

Rosenzweig, Seth; Azar, Frederick M

2009-12-01

155

Rupture dimensions and rupture processes of fluid-induced microcracks in salt rock  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed and applied a simple empirical Green function method to study induced microcracks observed during hydraulic fracturing experiments in salt rock. Either unidirectional ruptures on rectangular faults or allround ruptures on elliptical faults are tested to explain the observed directivity effects in body-wave amplitude spectra. Mostly, the rectangular rupture model and horizontal fault planes are favored. The average rupture

T. Dahm

2001-01-01

156

Histopathological findings in spontaneous tendon ruptures.  

PubMed

A spontaneous rupture of a tendon may be defined as a rupture that occurs during movement and activity, that should not and usually does not damage the involved musculotendinous units (1). Spontaneous tendon ruptures were uncommon before the 1950s. Böhler found only 25 Achilles tendon ruptures in Wien between 1925 and 1948 (2). Mösender & Klatnek treated 20 Achilles tendon ruptures between 1953 and 1956, but 105 ruptures between 1964 and 1967 (3). Lawrence et al. found only 31 Achilles tendon ruptures in Boston during a period of 55 years (1900-1954) (4). During the recent decades tendon ruptures have, however, become relatively common in developed countries, especially in Europe and North America. A high incidence of tendon ruptures has been reported in Austria, Denmark, Finland, Germany. Hungary, Sweden, Switzerland and the USA; somewhat lower incidences have been reported in Canada, France, Great Britain and Spain. On the other hand, Greece, Japan, the Netherlands and Portugal have reported a clearly lower incidence. Interestingly, Achilles tendon ruptures are a rarity in developing countries, especially in Africa and East-Asia (5). In many developed countries, the increases in the rupture incidence have been dramatic. In the National Institute of Traumatology in Budapest, Hungary, the number of patients with an Achilles tendon rupture increased 285% in men and 500% in women between two successive 7-year periods, 1972-1978 and 1979-1985 (5). PMID:9211612

Józsa, L; Kannus, P

1997-04-01

157

Case report Recurrent spontaneous esophageal rupture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spontaneous esophageal rupture is an uncommon and poorly understood condition. Recurrent rupture is extremely rare, with only one previously reported case in the literature. Here, we present a case series of two patients who had recurrent ruptures, and discuss the principles underlying the management of such cases. Q 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Omar A. Khan; Clifford W. Barlow; David F. Weeden; Khalid M. Amer

158

Blunt Traumatic Rupture of the Aorta  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Aortic rupture is a potentially fatal complication in trauma. We report our surgical result in the treatment of traumatic aortic rupture in eastern Taiwan. Patients and Methods: From August 1996 to October 2000, six patients with traumatic aortic rupture had surgery at Tzu Chi General Hospital. Five had a widened mediastinum on chest X-ray examination. They were diag- nosed

Shen-Feng Chao; Bee-Song Chang

159

Fractal avalanche ruptures in biological membranes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bilayer membranes envelope cells as well as organelles, and constitute the most ubiquitous biological material found in all branches of the phylogenetic tree. Cell membrane rupture is an important biological process, and substantial rupture rates are found in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells under a mechanical load. Rupture can also be induced by processes such as cell death, and active

Irep Gözen; Paul Dommersnes; Ilja Czolkos; Aldo Jesorka; Tatsiana Lobovkina; Owe Orwar

2010-01-01

160

Traumatic pericardial rupture with skeletonized phrenic nerve  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Traumatic pericardial rupture is a rare presentation. Pericardial rupture itself is asymptomatic unless complicated by either hemorrhage or herniation of the heart through the defect. Following diagnosis surgical repair of the pericardium is indicated because cardiac herniation may result in vascular collapse and sudden death. OBJECTIVES: Here we present a case of traumatic, non-herniated pericardial rupture with complete skeletonization

Zain Khalpey; Taufiek K Rajab; Jan D Schmitto; Philipp C Camp

2011-01-01

161

Helical CT of Blunt Diaphragmatic Rupture  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE. This study evaluated CT findings for signs of blunt diaphragmatic rupture. MATERIALS AND METHODS. CT examinations of 179 blunt trauma patients, includ- ing 11 with left-sided and five with right-sided blunt diaphragmatic rupture, were reviewed by two staff radiologists who first decided by consensus on the presence or absence of 11 pub- lished signs of blunt diaphragmatic rupture and

Alain Nchimi; David Szapiro; Benoît Ghaye; Valérie Willems; Jamil Khamis; Luc Haquet; Charlemagne Noukoua; Robert F. Dondelinger

162

Spontaneous rupture of a splenotic nodule.  

PubMed Central

A case is presented of spontaneous rupture of splenic tissue occurring 14 years after a splenectomy was carried out for trauma. Spontaneous rupture of a splenotic nodule has not previously been described and it may be added to the list of causes of spontaneous haemoperitoneum. The incidence and function of residual splenic tissue are briefly discussed and other causes of splenic rupture are outlined.

Lanigan, D. J.

1990-01-01

163

MRI of tibialis anterior tendon rupture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ruptures of the tibialis anterior tendon are rare. We present the clinical histories and MRI findings of three recent male patients with tibialis anterior tendon rupture aged 58–67 years, all of whom presented with pain over the dorsum of the ankle. Two of the three patients presented with complete rupture showing discontinuity of the tendon, thickening of the retracted portion of

Robert A. Gallo; Brett H. Kolman; Richard H. Daffner; Robert L. Sciulli; Catherine C. Roberts; Patrick J. DeMeo

2004-01-01

164

Rupture of spleen post colonoscopy.  

PubMed

We review an interesting case of elective colonoscopy for rectal bleeding in a 68-year-old woman complicated by splenic rupture. She was managed by aggressive fluid and blood resuscitation followed by splenectomy. She had a smooth recovery and was discharged home 4 days after admission. The extreme rarity and interesting clinical course of the patient are discussed. PMID:19668895

Younes, Nidal A; Al-Ardah, Mahmoud I; Daradkeh, Salam S

2009-08-01

165

Multiple tendon ruptures of unknown etiology.  

PubMed

Tendon ruptures are common findings in foot and ankle practice. The etiology of tendon ruptures tends to be multifactorial-usually due to a combination of trauma, effects of systemic diseases, adverse effects of medications, and obesity. We present an unusual case of right Achilles tendinitis, left Achilles tendon rupture, bilateral peroneus longus tendon rupture, and left peroneus brevis tendon rupture of unknown etiology. This case report highlights the need for research for other possible, lesser known etiologies of tendon pathology. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic, Level IV, Case Study. PMID:23966259

Axibal, Derek P; Anderson, John G

2013-08-21

166

Prefrontal-Hippocampal-Fusiform Activity During Encoding Predicts Intraindividual Differences in Free Recall Ability: An Event-Related Functional-Anatomic MRI Study  

PubMed Central

The ability to spontaneously recall recently learned information is a fundamental mnemonic activity of daily life, but has received little study using functional neuroimaging. We developed a functional MRI (fMRI) paradigm to study regional brain activity during encoding that predicts free recall. In this event-related fMRI study, ten lists of fourteen pictures of common objects were shown to healthy young individuals and regional brain activity during encoding was analyzed based on subsequent free recall performance. Free recall of items was predicted by activity during encoding in hippocampal, fusiform, and inferior prefrontal cortical regions. Within-subject variance in free recall performance for the ten lists was predicted by a linear combination of condition-specific inferior prefrontal, hippocampal, and fusiform activity. Recall performance was better for lists in which pre-frontal activity was greater for all items of the list and hippocampal and fusi-form activity were greater specifically for items that were recalled from the list. Thus, the activity of medial temporal, fusiform, and prefrontal brain regions during the learning of new information is important for the subsequent free recall of this information. These fronto-temporal brain regions act together as a large-scale memory-related network, the components of which make distinct yet interacting contributions during encoding that predict subsequent successful free recall performance.

Dickerson, B.C.; Miller, S.L.; Greve, D.N.; Dale, A.M.; Albert, M.S.; Schacter, D.L.; Sperling, R.A.

2009-01-01

167

Rupture directivity of small earthquakes at Parkfield  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AbstractTheoretical modeling of strike-slip <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> along a bimaterial interface suggests that earthquakes initiating on the interface will have a preferred <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction. We test this model with 450 small earthquakes (2 < M < 5) from Parkfield, California, to look for evidence of consistent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity along the San Andreas Fault. We analyze azimuthal variations in earthquake source spectra after applying an iterative correction for wave propagation effects. Our approach avoids directly modeling source spectra because these models generally assume symmetric <span class="hlt">rupture</span>; instead, we look for azimuthal variations in the amplitudes of the source spectra over specified frequency bands. Our overall results show similar proportions of events exhibiting characteristics of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity toward either the southeast or northwest. However, the proportion of events with southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity increases as we limit the data set to larger magnitudes, with 70% of the 46 events M > 3 exhibiting southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> characteristics. Some spatial and temporal variability in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity is also apparent. We observe a higher proportion of northwest directivity <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> following the 2004 M 6 Parkfield earthquake, which <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> toward the northwest. Our results are generally consistent with the preferred southeast <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity model but suggest that directivity is likely due to several contributing factors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kane, Deborah L.; Shearer, Peter M.; Goertz-Allmann, Bettina P.; Vernon, Frank L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23027970"> <span id="translatedtitle">High-resolution imaging of expertise reveals reliable object selectivity in the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> face area related to perceptual performance.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> face area (FFA) is a region of human cortex that responds selectively to faces, but whether it supports a more general function relevant for perceptual expertise is debated. Although both faces and objects of expertise engage many brain areas, the FFA remains the focus of the strongest modular claims and the clearest predictions about expertise. Functional MRI studies at standard-resolution (SR-fMRI) have found responses in the FFA for nonface objects of expertise, but high-resolution fMRI (HR-fMRI) in the FFA [Grill-Spector K, et al. (2006) Nat Neurosci 9:1177-1185] and neurophysiology in face patches in the monkey brain [Tsao DY, et al. (2006) Science 311:670-674] reveal no reliable selectivity for objects. It is thus possible that FFA responses to objects with SR-fMRI are a result of spatial blurring of responses from nonface-selective areas, potentially driven by attention to objects of expertise. Using HR-fMRI in two experiments, we provide evidence of reliable responses to cars in the FFA that correlate with behavioral car expertise. Effects of expertise in the FFA for nonface objects cannot be attributed to spatial blurring beyond the scale at which modular claims have been made, and within the lateral <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus, they are restricted to a small area (200 mm(2) on the right and 50 mm(2) on the left) centered on the peak of face selectivity. Experience with a category may be sufficient to explain the spatially clustered face selectivity observed in this region. PMID:23027970</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McGugin, Rankin Williams; Gatenby, J Christopher; Gore, John C; Gauthier, Isabel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3479484"> <span id="translatedtitle">High-resolution imaging of expertise reveals reliable object selectivity in the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> face area related to perceptual performance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> face area (FFA) is a region of human cortex that responds selectively to faces, but whether it supports a more general function relevant for perceptual expertise is debated. Although both faces and objects of expertise engage many brain areas, the FFA remains the focus of the strongest modular claims and the clearest predictions about expertise. Functional MRI studies at standard-resolution (SR-fMRI) have found responses in the FFA for nonface objects of expertise, but high-resolution fMRI (HR-fMRI) in the FFA [Grill-Spector K, et al. (2006) Nat Neurosci 9:1177–1185] and neurophysiology in face patches in the monkey brain [Tsao DY, et al. (2006) Science 311:670–674] reveal no reliable selectivity for objects. It is thus possible that FFA responses to objects with SR-fMRI are a result of spatial blurring of responses from nonface-selective areas, potentially driven by attention to objects of expertise. Using HR-fMRI in two experiments, we provide evidence of reliable responses to cars in the FFA that correlate with behavioral car expertise. Effects of expertise in the FFA for nonface objects cannot be attributed to spatial blurring beyond the scale at which modular claims have been made, and within the lateral <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus, they are restricted to a small area (200 mm2 on the right and 50 mm2 on the left) centered on the peak of face selectivity. Experience with a category may be sufficient to explain the spatially clustered face selectivity observed in this region.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McGugin, Rankin Williams; Gatenby, J. Christopher; Gore, John C.; Gauthier, Isabel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23517694"> <span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> cerebral artery blister aneurysm].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the case of a young patient with subarachnoid haemorrhage secondary to a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> blister-like aneurysm. Since this kind of aneurysms have fragile walls without a well-defined neck, their treatment is difficult. We initially planned the deployment of a flow-diverter stent, but an angiogram obtained after 10 days revealed a morphological change of the aneurysm. Therefore, we finally deployed a conventional stent and introduced 2 micro coils into the point of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, obtaining a good morphological result without rebleeding. Follow-up at 1 and 6 months did not observe regrowth of the aneurysm. We offer a brief introduction and discussion of this pathology and its treatment. PMID:23517694</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vega Valdés, Pedro; Murias Quintana, Eduardo; Meilán Martínez, Angela; Gutiérrez Morales, Julio; Lopez Garcia, Antonio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21934278"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of horseshoe kidney.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the case of a 25-year-old male who came to the emergency room for pain and abdominal distension following trauma to the mesogastrium. A CT scan was performed, revealing a voluminous retroperitoneal hematoma with laceration of both inferior renal poles with regard to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the isthmus of a horseshoe kidney. The patient presented anemization and increased pain, requiring selective embolization by means of arteriography of a branch of the right renal artery and placement of a double J stent due to urinary extravasation in the lower left kidney pole. Following 1 year of monitoring, the patient has maintained normal renal function. Renal affection in blunt abdominal trauma is frequent, occurring in 7% of previously pathological kidneys. The traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of horseshoe kidney is facilitated by its particular anatomical characteristics, constituting an infrequent entity, knowledge of which is necessary to achieve conservative management that renders it possible to preserve renal function. PMID:21934278</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Molina Escudero, R; Cancho Gil, M J; Husillos Alonso, A; Lledó García, E; Herranz Amo, F; Ogaya Piniés, G; Ramón Botella, E; Simó, G; Navas Martínez, M C; Hernández Fernández, C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7837018"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatically <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> globes in children.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This retrospective study was designed to document the etiology of traumatically <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> globes in children and to determine the prognostic value of several clinical parameters with respect to visual outcome. Forty-six children 16 years of age and under seen in the emergency room over a 2-year period were found to have full thickness penetration of the globe. Fifty-nine percent of injuries occurred during recreational activities, and 59% occurred outside of the home. Boys outnumbered girls by a 6:1 ratio. For children, initial visual acuity proved to be less valuable as a prognostic indicator with regard to final vision than has been reported in adults. Smaller corneal wounds offered better visual outcomes. Four eyes were enucleated. Ten <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> (22%) were related to activity involving guns. Four of six BB gun injuries were the result of a ricocheted BB. Visual outcomes in gun-related injuries were particularly poor. PMID:7837018</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rudd, J C; Jaeger, E A; Freitag, S K; Jeffers, J B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7116984"> <span id="translatedtitle">Earthquake fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation through soil</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The phenomenon of earthquake fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation through soil is quite complex and is not well understood at this time. This paper presents the results of an integrated investigation of this problem. Insights are developed from the examination of surface fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> field case histories, laboratory physical model tests, and physical analogies to the earthquake fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process. Field observations and experimental results illustrate the typical patterns of behavior developed in the soil overlying a base rock fault displacement. Evidence suggests that differential movement across the distinct fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dissipates as the fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagates toward the ground surface through unconsolidated earth materials, and that the characteristics of the soil overlying the bedrock fault strongly influence the observed earthquake fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation behavior.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bray, J.D.; Seed, R.B.; Seed, H.B. (Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)); Cluff, L.S. (Pacific Gas Electric, San Francisco, CA (United States))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21549964"> <span id="translatedtitle">A case of 'second <span class="hlt">rupture</span>' following open repair of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> Achilles tendon.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a case of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a 54-year-old man whilst rehabilitating following end-to-end open repair of an acute Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Re-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> following surgical repair of Achilles tendon is well known. This case however, is atypical as the second <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred significantly proximal to the first <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. To our knowledge this is the first time this has been described in the English literature. We have termed this incident a 'second <span class="hlt">rupture</span>'. We describe the surgical technique used by the operating surgeon during open repair of this 'second <span class="hlt">rupture</span>', involving a gastrocnemius flap turndown. This has lead to the patient making a good recovery, despite complications. This case report serves to inform surgeons of the existence of this type of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, whilst considering possible aetiologies and suggesting a technique for repair of the injury. PMID:21549964</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rushton, P R P; Singh, A K; Deshmukh, R G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22055493"> <span id="translatedtitle">A case of "fresh <span class="hlt">rupture</span>" after open repair of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> Achilles tendon.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the case of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a 54-year-old man while rehabilitating after end-to-end open repair of an acute Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Re-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> after surgical repair of Achilles tendon is well known. The present case, however, is atypical, because the second <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred significantly proximal to the first <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. To our knowledge, this is the first time this has been described in English language studies. We have termed this incident a fresh <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. A gastrocnemius turndown flap was used to repair the fresh <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, which led to a satisfactory recovery. This case report serves to inform surgeons of the existence of this type of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, while considering the possible etiologies and suggesting a technique that has been shown to be successful in the present case. PMID:22055493</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rushton, Paul R P; Singh, Alok K; Deshmukh, Rajiv G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/k9wj3p82pt46w82r.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Delayed presentation of traumatic intraperitoneal bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A child with urine ascites as a delayed manifestation of post-traumatic intraperitoneal bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is presented. The\\u000a diagnosis was suggested by abdominal CT scan and confirmed with a cystogram. While uncommon, late presentation of intraperitoneal\\u000a bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following trauma may occur from masking of a primary laceration or development of secondary <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at the\\u000a site of a hematoma in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Brown; H. L. Magill; T. L. Black</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29298585"> <span id="translatedtitle">Extracellular matrix content of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> anterior cruciate ligament tissue</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs) can <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with simple movements, suggesting that structural changes in the ligament may reduce the loading capacity of the ligament. We aimed to investigate if proteoglycan and collagen levels were different between <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> and non-<span class="hlt">ruptured</span> ACLs. We also compared changes in <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tissue over time.During arthroscopic knee reconstruction surgery 24 <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> ACLs were collected from participants</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kate Young; Tom Samiric; Julian Feller; Jill Cook</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23707180"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in athletes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The incidence of AT <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has increased in recent decades. AT <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> frequently occur in the third or fourth decade of life in sedentary individuals who play sport occasionally. <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> also occur in elite athletes. Clinical examination must be followed by imaging. Conservative management and early mobilization can achieve excellent results, but the rerupture rate is not acceptable for the management of young, active, or athletic individuals. Open surgery is the most common option for AT <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, but there are risks of superficial skin breakdown and wound problems. These problems can be prevented with percutaneous repair. PMID:23707180</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23262175"> <span id="translatedtitle">Regulation of brain activity in the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> face and parahippocampal place areas in 7-11-year-old children.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Developmental studies have demonstrated that cognitive processes such as attention, suppression of interference and memory develop throughout childhood and adolescence. However, little is currently known about the development of top-down control mechanisms and their influence on cognitive performance. In the present study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate modulation of activity in the ventral visual cortex in healthy 7-11-year-old children and young adults. The participants performed tasks that required attention to either face (Fs task) or scene (Sf task) images while trying to ignore distracting scene or face images, respectively. A face-selective area in the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus (<span class="hlt">fusiform</span> face area, FFA) and an area responding preferentially to scene images in the parahippocampal gyrus (parahippocampal place area, PPA) were defined using functional localizers. Children responded slower and less accurately in the tasks than adults. In children, the right FFA was less selective to face images and regulation of activity between the Fs and Sf tasks was weaker compared to adults. In the PPA, selectivity to scenes and regulation of activity, there according to the task demands were comparable between children and adults. During the tasks, children activated prefrontal cortical areas including the middle (MFG) and superior (SFG) frontal gyrus more than adults. Functional connectivity between the right FFA and left MFG was stronger in adults than children in the Fs task. Children, on the other hand, had stronger functional connectivity than adults in the Sf task between the right FFA and right PPA and between right MFG and medial SFG. There were no group differences in the functional connectivity between the PPA and the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Together the results suggest that, in 7-11-year-old children, the FFA is still immature, whereas the selectivity to scenes and regulation of activity in the PPA is comparable to adults. The results also indicated functional immaturity of the PFC in children compared to adults and weaker connectivity between the PFC and the rFFA, explaining the weaker regulation of activity in the rFFA between the Fs and Sf tasks. PMID:23262175</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vuontela, Virve; Jiang, Ping; Tokariev, Maksym; Savolainen, Petri; Ma, Yuanye; Aronen, Eeva T; Fontell, Tuija; Liiri, Tiina; Ahlström, Matti; Salonen, Oili; Carlson, Synnöve</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23317371"> <span id="translatedtitle">Endovascular Embolization by Parent Artery Reconstruction of a Symptomatic <span class="hlt">Fusiform</span> Posterior Cerebral Artery Aneurysm Using Onyx HD-500: A Neurointerventional Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Posterior cerebral artery aneurysms are treatment challenge for the neurosurgeon. Parent artery occlusion, trapping and bypass have been the classic treatment options for aneurysms in this location. With the introduction of newer embolic agents such as Onyx®, endovascular intervention is now a viable therapy for these aneurysms. CASE SUMMARY: We report the case of a 60-year-old man who presented with a symptomatic, though unruptured, <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> left posterior cerebral artery aneurysm. Given the distal location of this dominant sided aneurysm, post-operative visual deficits and aphasia were a concern if parent vessel occlusion were to be performed. Therefore, an endovascular reconstruction using Onyx HD-500 and two closed-cell stents was performed. CONCLUSIONS: This report illustrates the ability of a high-density liquid embolic agent to provide immediate reconstruction of a <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> aneurysm in a distal location. PMID:23317371</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bogason, Einar T; Patel, Akshal S; Cockroft, Kevin M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12876150"> <span id="translatedtitle">A network of occipito-temporal face-sensitive areas besides the right middle <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus is necessary for normal face processing.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Neuroimaging studies have identified at least two bilateral areas of the visual extrastriate cortex that respond more to pictures of faces than objects in normal human subjects in the middle <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus [the '<span class="hlt">fusiform</span> face area' (FFA)] and, more posteriorly, in the inferior occipital cortex ['occipital face area' (OFA)], with a right hemisphere dominance. However, it is not yet clear how these regions interact which each other and whether they are all necessary for normal face perception. It has been proposed that the right hemisphere FFA acts as an isolated ('modular') processing system for faces or that this region receives its face-sensitive inputs from the OFA in a feedforward hierarchical model of face processing. To test these proposals, we report a detailed neuropsychological investigation combined with a neuroimaging study of a patient presenting a deficit restricted to face perception, consecutive to bilateral occipito-temporal lesions. Due to the asymmetry of the lesions, the left middle <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus and the right inferior occipital cortex were damaged but the right middle <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus was structurally intact. Using functional MRI, we disclosed a normal activation of the right FFA in response to faces in the patient despite the absence of any feedforward inputs from the right OFA, located in a damaged area of cortex. Together, these findings show that the integrity of the right OFA is necessary for normal face perception and suggest that the face-sensitive responses observed at this level in normal subjects may arise from feedback connections from the right FFA. In agreement with the current literature on the anatomical basis of prosopagnosia, it is suggested that the FFA and OFA in the right hemisphere and their re-entrant integration are necessary for normal face processing. PMID:12876150</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rossion, Bruno; Caldara, Roberto; Seghier, Mohamed; Schuller, Anne-Marie; Lazeyras, Francois; Mayer, Eugene</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-07-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22159512"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preparation and certification of hijiki reference material, NMIJ CRM 7405-a, from the edible marine algae hijiki (Hizikia <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span>).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A certified reference material, NMIJ CRM 7405-a, for the determination of trace elements and As(V) in algae was developed from the edible marine hijiki (Hizikia <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span>) and certified by the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). Hijiki was collected from the Pacific coast in the Kanto area of Japan, and was washed, dried, powdered, and homogenized. The hijiki powder was placed in 400 bottles (ca. 20 g each). The concentrations of 18 trace elements and As(V) were determined by two to four independent analytical techniques, including (ID)ICP-(HR)MS, ICP-OES, GFAAS, and HPLC-ICP-MS using calibration solutions prepared from the elemental standard solution of Japan calibration service system (JCSS) and the NMIJ CRM As(V) solution, and whose concentrations are certified and SI traceable. The uncertainties of all the measurements and preparation procedures were evaluated. The values of 18 trace elements and As(V) in the CRM were certified with uncertainty (k = 2). PMID:22159512</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Narukawa, Tomohiro; Inagaki, Kazumi; Zhu, Yanbei; Kuroiwa, Takayoshi; Narushima, Izumi; Chiba, Koichi; Hioki, Akiharu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17052016"> <span id="translatedtitle">[A case of a vertebral artery <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> aneurysm treated with stent assisted coil embolization: technique to prevent coil migration].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Placement of a stent over the aneurysm neck and secondary coil embolization prevents coil migration and allows attenuated packing of the coils. However, during the course of the embolization, coils project over and obscure the parent vessel. Here we report a novel technique for endovascular parent vessel reconstruction with aneurysm embolization. A 73-year-old male had an incidental <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> aneurysm at the V4 segment of the left vertebral artery. The size of the aneurysm increased from 7 mm to 8 mm in diameter. Since the right vertebral artery was hypoplastic, endovascular parent vessel reconstruction with coil embolization was performed. A flexible balloon-expandable coronary stent was navigated to the lesion and deployed successfully followed by coil embolization using a microcatheter through the stent. The balloon was inflated intermittently during coil insertion avoiding coil migration to inside the stent. Furthermore, the angle of the image intensifier was manipulated to visualize the inside of the stent. Postoperative course was uneventful and follow-up MRI three moths later demonstrated obliteration of the aneurysm and patency of the parent artery. This technique provides a practical treatment strategy for the management of a circumferential aneurysm. PMID:17052016</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hayashi, Kentaro; Kitagawa, Naoki; Morikawa, Minoru; Kawakubo, Jun-ichi; Hiu, Takeshi; Horie, Nobutaka; Tsutsumi, Keisuke; Nagata, Izumi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23400801"> <span id="translatedtitle">Successful endovascular treatment of three <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> cerebral aneurysms with the Pipeline Embolization Device in a patient with dilating HIV vasculopathy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dilating HIV vasculopathy can be a cause of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in patients with HIV. Although first identified in children, this condition is increasingly being recognized in adults and has a dismal natural history under medical or expectant management. Vessel wall invasion by varicella zoster virus, HIV or Mycobacterium avium intracellulare complex (MAI) has been postulated as a possible etiology. We present a case of an adult patient with HIV and chronic disseminated MAI infection who presented with ischemic stroke and three <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> cerebral aneurysms that were successfully treated with the pipeline embolization device (PED). Flow diversion may be a viable treatment option for patients presenting with this serious neurovascular condition when aneurysm location precludes parent vessel sacrifice or surgical bypass. In addition, platelet function testing with VerifyNow may be valuable in selecting the appropriate P2Y12 receptor antagonist to be used in order to prevent PED thrombosis, since some of the antiretroviral drugs may inhibit clopidogrel or prasugrel metabolism. PMID:23400801</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Delgado Almandoz, Josser E; Crandall, Benjamin M; Fease, Jennifer L; Scholz, Jill M; Anderson, Ruth E; Kadkhodayan, Yasha; Tubman, David E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29201007"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the uterus: A changing picture</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Eighty nine cases of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the gravid uterus occurring over a period of 15 years with 77,133 deliveries, were analysed. The overall incidence of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> uteri was 1 per 866 deliveries. The patients were devided into two groups, those with a scarred uterus (47) and those with an unscarred uterus (42). Distinct differences in terms of parity, age, aetiology</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. V. Van der Merwe; W. U. A. M. Ombelet</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v081/i032/JB081i032p05679/JB081i032p05679.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Velocity of Plane Strain Shear Cracks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Propagation of plane strain shear cracks is calculated numerically by using finite difference equations with second-order accuracy. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> model, in which stress drops gradually as slip increases, combines two different <span class="hlt">rupture</span> criteria: (1) slip begins at a finite stress level; (2) finite energy is absorbed per unit area as the crack advances. Solutions for this model are nonsingular. In</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. J. Andrews</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/10680095"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the innominate artery</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective: Blunt traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the innominate artery is uncommon. We reviewed our experience to correlate the impact of patient stability, presence of associated injuries and location of the injury within the artery with outcome. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of patients admitted between January 1, 1998 and December 17, 2002 with traumatic innominate artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Injuries were defined</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Riyad Karmy-Jones; Robert DuBose; Stephen King</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60403918"> <span id="translatedtitle">Capacity credit calculation for exchanger tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper reports that overpressure relieving in heat exchanger tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span> case is quite different from other cases, such as fire, utility failure, inadvertent valve opening\\/closure, etc., when designing a pressure relief valve (PRV). In most cases, it is quite straightforward. The calculated relief load is the capacity that needs to be relieved. But, in heat exchanger tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span> cases,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55725946"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic Interface <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in Extremely Heterogeneous Media</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fracture experiments of monolithic brittle materials usually show the maximum speed of smooth <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at some 30 % of the relevant shear wave speed. This experimental maximum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed is by far lower than those predicted by theories and inferred from inversions of seismograms, and some seismic inversions (e.g., the 1979 Imperial Valley, 1992 Landers, 1999 Izmit, 2001 the central</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. Uenishi; K. Tsuji</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3085625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Superficial Dorsal Vein <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Imitating Penile Fracture</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dorsal vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the penis is a rare condition, and few cases have been reported in the literature. Herein we report a 41-year-old man who presented with mildly painful and acute swollen penis, which initially imitated a penile fracture but was surgically explored and shown to be a superficial dorsal vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Topsakal, Medih; Kavukcu, Ender; Karadeniz, Tahir</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28955380"> <span id="translatedtitle">Posterior tibial tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in athletic people</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present our findings in six athletic patients with a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> or partially <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> posterior tibial tendon. Pain in the midarch region, difficulty pushing off while running, and a pronated flattened longitudinal arch are the usual symptoms and physical findings of this injury. Surgical treatment, including reattachment of the rup tured posterior tibial tendon, is effective in restoring some but</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee Woods; Robert E. Leach</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/32203434"> <span id="translatedtitle">Arachnoid Cyst <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> with Concurrent Subdural Hygroma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Arachnoid cysts (ACs) are relatively common intracranial mass lesions, which occur most often in the middle cranial fossa. While these lesions can present as a mass lesion, many are asymptomatic. Rarely, posttraumatic or spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of ACs can result in intracystic hemorrhage, subdural hematoma or subdural hygroma. We have encountered two cases of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> arachnoid cysts that resulted in subdural</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jill W. Donaldson; Mary Edwards-Brown; Thomas G. Luerssen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20537884"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute closed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of EHL revisited.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Isolated closed injuries to the EHL are rare. Traumatic closed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of EHL in the absence of diabetes mellitus, arthritis or local steroid injections is hitherto unreported. We present a case of closed EHL <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after a hyperflexion injury to the interphalangeal joint of the big toe, successfully managed with surgery, along with review of existing literature. PMID:20537884</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shah, K; Carter, Bob</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28064956"> <span id="translatedtitle">Longitudinal <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of polyester knitted vascular prostheses</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aim: The purpose of the study was the characterization of a type of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurring on warp-knitted polyester vascular prostheses. Materials and Methods: We studied 20 cases of warp-knitted polyester vascular prostheses that were explanted from humans that showed a longitudinal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as a part of a collaborative retrieval program. All the prostheses were immediately fixed in a 10% formaldehyde</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nabil Chakfe; Gunnar Riepe; Florence Dieval; Jean-Francois Le Magnen; Lu Wang; Elisabeth Urban; Marc Beaufigeau; Bernard Durand; Herbert Imig; Jean-Georges Kretz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://jeb.biologists.org/cgi/reprint/198/3/831.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">CREEP <span class="hlt">RUPTURE</span> OF WALLABY TAIL TENDONS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The tail tendons from wallabies ( Macropus rufogriseus) suffer creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at stresses of 10 MPa or above, whereas their yield stress in a dynamic test is about 144 MPa. At stresses between 20 and 80 MPa, the time-to- <span class="hlt">rupture</span> decreases exponentially with stress, but at 10 MPa, the lifetime is well above this exponential. For comparison, the stress on</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">XIAO TONG WANG; ROBERT F. KER</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26099653"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of polymer-matrix composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An accelerated characterization method for resin-matrix composites is reviewed. Methods for determining modulus and strength master curves are given. Creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> analytical models are discussed as applied to polymers and polymer-matrix composites. Comparisons between creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiments and analytical models are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. F. Brinson; W. I. Griffith; D. H. Morris</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19901876"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the Andrade Shear Disk</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The use of the Andrade shear disk as a means of determining the multiaxial stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> criteria for metals is discussed. Test results are reported for disks machined from materials which undergo both small and large strains to failure. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behaviour of the disks which undergo large deformations is analysed. Statements are made concerning the use of conventional constitutive</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. R. Hayhurst; B. Storakers</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3033242"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with skeletonized phrenic nerve</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Traumatic pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare presentation. Pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> itself is asymptomatic unless complicated by either hemorrhage or herniation of the heart through the defect. Following diagnosis surgical repair of the pericardium is indicated because cardiac herniation may result in vascular collapse and sudden death. Objectives Here we present a case of traumatic, non-herniated pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with complete skeletonization of the phrenic nerve. Case report An 18-year-old healthy male suffered multi-trauma after falling 50 feet onto concrete. The patient could not be stabilized despite exploratory laparotomy with splenectomy, IR embolization and packing for a liver laceration. Right posterolateral thoracotomy revealed a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> pericardium with a completely skeletonized phrenic nerve. The pericardium was repaired with a Goretex(R) patch. Conclusion A high level of suspicion for pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is necessary in all patients with high-velocity thoracic injuries.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AGUFM.S42I..02N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mapping Great Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Area</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">At the northern Cascadia margin, the Juan de Fuca plate is underthrusting North America at about 45 mm/yr. Thermal and deformation studies indicate that, off southern Vancouver Island, the interplate interface is presently fully locked for a distance of some 60 km downdip from the deformation front. Great thrust earthquakes on this section of the interface, with magnitudes of up to 9, have been estimated to occur at an average interval of about 590 yr. Further downdip there is a transition zone from fully locked behavior to aseismic sliding, with the deep aseismic zone exhibiting slow slip thrust events. We show that at the northern Cascadia margin there is a change in the reflection character on seismic images from a thin reflection package (< 2 km thick) where the subduction thrust is inferred to be seismogenic, to a broad reflection band (> 4 km thick) at greater depth where there is aseismic slip. This change in reflection character provides us with a new technique for detailed mapping of the maximum landward extent of great earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The landward edge of the locked zone on the northern Cascadia subduction thrust inferred by reflection imaging appears to lie some 25-30 km closer to the land than estimated from thermal and dislocation modeling, possibly suggesting a somewhat greater megathrust seismic hazard at inland cities. Deep seismic reflection images from Alaska, Chile and SW Japan show a similar broad reflection band above the subduction thrust in the region of stable sliding and thin thrust reflections further seaward, perhaps suggesting that reflection imaging may be a globally important predictive tool for determining the maximum expected <span class="hlt">rupture</span> area in megathrust earthquakes. The eastern Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone is an ideal setting for testing this hypothesis. In this region, recent megathrust earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> areas are defined by aftershocks, inversion of geodetic data points to strong lateral variations in coupling, and wide shelf area allows for a relatively inexpensive and full marine mapping of the locked and transition zones, and partial mapping of the slow slip zone.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nedimovi?, M. R.; Hyndman, R. D.; Ramachandran, K.; Spence, G. D.; Brocher, T. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3020259"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reduced GABAA receptors and benzodiazepine binding sites in the posterior cingulate cortex and <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus in autism</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Individuals with autism display deficits in the social domain including the proper recognition of faces and interpretations of facial expressions. There is an extensive network of brain regions involved in face processing including the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus (FFG) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Functional imaging studies have found that controls have increased activity in the PCC and FFG during face recognition tasks, and the FFG has differential responsiveness in autism when viewing faces. Multiple lines of evidence have suggested that the GABAergic system is disrupted in the brains of individuals with autism and it is likely that altered inhibition within the network influences the ability to perceive emotional expressions. On-the-slide ligand binding autoradiography was used to determine if there were alterations in GABAA and/or benzodiazepine binding sites in the brain in autism. Using 3H-muscimol and 3H-flunitrazepam we could determine whether the number (Bmax), binding affinity (Kd), and/or distribution of GABAA receptors and its benzodiazepine binding sites (BZD) differed from controls in the FFG and PCC. Significant reductions in the number of GABAA receptors and BZD binding sites in the superficial layers of the PCC and FFG, and in the number of BZD binding sites were found in the deep layers of the FFG. In addition, the autism group had a higher binding affinity in the superficial layers of the GABAA study. Taken together, these findings suggest that the disruption in inhibitory control in the cortex may contribute to the core disturbances of socio-emotional behaviors in autism.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oblak, Adrian L.; Gibbs, Terrell T.; Blatt, Gene J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3701285"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structural changes in left <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> areas and associated fiber connections in children with abacus training: evidence from morphometry and tractography</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Evidence supports the notion that the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus (FG), as an integral part of the ventral occipitotemporal junction, is involved widely in cognitive processes as perceiving faces, objects, places or words, and this region also might represent the visual form of an abacus in the abacus-based mental calculation process. The current study uses a combined voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis to test whether long-term abacus training could induce structural changes in the left FG and in the white matter (WM) tracts distribution connecting with this region in school children. We found that, abacus-trained children exhibited significant smaller gray matter (GM) volume than controls in the left FG. And the connectivity mapping identified left forceps major as a key pathway connecting left FG with other brain areas in the trained group, but not in the controls. Furthermore, mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values within left forceps major were significantly increased in the trained group. Interestingly, a significant negative correlation was found in the trained group between the GM volume in left FG and the mean FA value in left forceps major, suggesting an inverse effect of the reported GM and WM structural changes. In the control group, a positive correlation between left FG GM volume and tract FA was found as well. This analysis visualized the group level differences in GM volume, FA and fiber tract between the abacus-trained children and the controls, and provided the first evidence that GM volume change in the left FG is intimately linked with the micro-structural properties of the left forceps major tracts. The present results demonstrate the structural changes in the left FG from the intracortical GM to the subcortical WM regions and provide insights into the neural mechanism of structural plasticity induced by abacus training.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Yongxin; Wang, Yunqi; Hu, Yuzheng; Liang, Yurong; Chen, Feiyan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21144790"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fatal lower extremity varicose vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Varicose vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare cause of death, although varicosities are a common pathology. We present three cases of sudden death due to varicose vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. After a review of the literature, the case circumstances and the findings of imaging examination, performed in two cases, are presented. One of them had undergone a post-mortem computed tomography angiography (PMCTA), and one a PMCTA as well as a post-mortem magnetic resonance (PMMR) imaging prior to conventional autopsy. One of the cases presented herein is, to our knowledge, the youngest known fatality due to varicose vein <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:21144790</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Preiss, Ulrich; Hatch, Gary M; Zech, Wolf Dieter; Ketterer, Thomas; Bolliger, Stephan; Thali, Michael J; Ruder, Thomas D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-08</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3407438"> <span id="translatedtitle">Laparoscopic Repair of a Traumatic Bladder <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Laparoscopic repair of the traumatic intraperitoneal bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a proven, safe, and effective technique in the appropriate setting. A 23-year-old male with traumatic intraperitoneal bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> proven by cystogram after a motor vehicle collision was successfully repaired via a laparoscopic approach. We describe the technique in detail including 2-layer closure and follow-up care. A review of the literature using PubMed with the key words [laparoscopic repair bladder injury] AND [bladder trauma] was performed. We recommend the consideration of laparoscopic repair of the intraperitoneal bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in more trauma patients who meet criteria.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hugo Cuadra, Rene; Ricchiuti, Daniel J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=soil&pg=2&id=EJ826517"> <span id="translatedtitle">Describing Soils: Calibration Tool for Teaching Soil <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Resistance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|<span class="hlt">Rupture</span> resistance is a measure of the strength of a soil to withstand an applied stress or resist deformation. In soil survey, during routine soil descriptions, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> resistance is described for each horizon or layer in the soil profile. The lower portion of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> resistance classes are assigned based on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> between thumb and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Seybold, C. A.; Harms, D. S.; Grossman, R. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21091032"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute Iliac Artery <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: Endovascular Treatment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The authors present 7 patients who suffered iliac artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span> over a 2 year period. In 5 patients, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was iatrogenic: 4 cases were secondary to balloon angioplasty for iliac artery stenosis and 1 occurred during coronary angioplasty. In the last 2 patients, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was secondary to iliac artery mycotic aneurysm. Direct placement of a stent-graft was performed in all cases, which was dilated until extravasation was controlled. Placement of the stent-graft was successful in all the cases, without any complications. The techniques used, results, and mid-term follow-up are presented. In conclusion, endovascular placement of a stent-graft is a quick, minimally invasive, efficient, and safe method for emergency treatment of acute iliac artery <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, with satisfactory short- and mid-term results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chatziioannou, A.; Mourikis, D.; Katsimilis, J.; Skiadas, V., E-mail: bill_skiadas@yahoo.gr; Koutoulidis, V.; Katsenis, K.; Vlahos, L. [University of Athens, Radiology Department, Areteion Hospital (Greece)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-04-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19085055"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> without cardiac injury.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare injury following blunt chest trauma. It is frequently fatal because of serious complications such as cardiac herniation and/or contusion. We report a case of traumatic pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> without cardiac injury, which was incidentally identified intraoperatively. A 63-year-old woman was transported to the hospital after sustaining blunt chest trauma from a motor vehicle accident. Radiographic workup demonstrated multiple fractures, pulmonary contusion, and hemopneumothorax. A chest tube was inserted, and persistent bleeding was observed. An exploratory thoracotomy was performed, and active pulmonary bleeding was controlled. Further exploration revealed major pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> without cardiac herniation or intrapericardial injury, which was repaired by a bovine pericardial patch. Her postoperative course was uneventful. It is usually difficult to make a diagnosis of pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, and a misdiagnosis often leads to a fatal consequence. Therefore, an immediate surgical exploration is warranted if clinical and radiographic findings suggest the condition. PMID:19085055</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nakamura, Teruya; Maloney, James D; Osaki, Satoru</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10854026"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic duodenal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a soccer player.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Traumatic duodenal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> resulting from blunt trauma during soccer is an extremely rare occurrence. A case report of this unusual condition is presented together with a review of the literature. PMID:10854026</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Houshian, S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=NUREG0651"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of Steam Generator Tube <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Events.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The NRC Staff's review of three domestic pressurized water reactor steam generator tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span> events has shown that no significant offsite doses or systems performance inadequacies have occurred. The plant operators and systems successfully avoided dire...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. B. Marsh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17374865"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectrum of CT findings in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and impending <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of abdominal aortic aneurysms.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Prompt diagnosis of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and impending <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of abdominal aortic aneurysms is imperative. The computed tomographic (CT) findings of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysms are often straightforward. Most <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are manifested as a retroperitoneal hematoma accompanied by an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Periaortic blood may extend into the perirenal space, the pararenal space, or both. Intraperitoneal extravasation may be an immediate or a delayed finding. Discontinuity of the aortic wall or a focal gap in otherwise continuous circumferential wall calcifications may point to the location of a <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. There usually is a delay of several hours between the initial intramural hemorrhage and frank extravasation into the periaortic soft tissues. Contained or impending <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are more difficult to identify. A small amount of periaortic blood may be confused with the duodenum, perianeurysmal fibrosis, or adenopathy. Imaging features suggestive of instability or impending <span class="hlt">rupture</span> include increased aneurysm size, a low thrombus-to-lumen ratio, and hemorrhage into a mural thrombus. A peripheral crescent-shaped area of hyperattenuation within an abdominal aortic aneurysm represents an acute intramural hemorrhage and is another CT sign of impending <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Draping of the posterior aspect of an aneurysmal aorta over the vertebrae is associated with a contained <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:17374865</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rakita, Dmitry; Newatia, Amit; Hines, John J; Siegel, David N; Friedman, Barak</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2770317"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aortic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in seat belt wearers.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several investigations have indicated that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the thoracic aorta is one of the leading causes of immediate death in victims of road traffic accidents. In Finland in 1983, 92% of front-seat passengers were seat belt wearers on highways and 82% in build-up areas. The mechanisms of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the aorta have been intensively investigated, but the relationship between seat belt wearing and injury mechanisms leading to aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is still largely unknown. This study comprises 4169 fatally injured victims investigated by the Boards of Traffic Accident Investigation of Insurance Companies during the period 1972 to 1985. Chest injuries were recorded as the main cause of death in 1121 (26.9%) victims, 207 (5.0%) of those victims having worn a seat belt. Aortic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> were found at autopsy in 98 victims and the exact information of the location of the aortic tears was available in 68. For a control group, we analyzed 72 randomly chosen unbelted victims who had a fatal aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in similar accidents. The location of the aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in unbelted victims was more often in the ascending aorta, especially in drivers, whereas in seat belt wearers the distal descending aorta was statistically more often <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, especially in right-front passengers (p less than 0.05). The steering wheel predominated statistically as the part of the car estimated to have caused the injury in unbelted victims (37/72), and some interior part of the car was the most common cause of fatal thoracic impacts in seat belt wearers (48/68) (p less than 0.001). The mechanism of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the aorta in the classic site just distal to the subclavian artery seems to be rapid deceleration, although complex body movements are also responsible in side impact collisions. The main mechanism leading to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the ascending aorta seems to be severe blow to the bony thorax. This also often causes associated thoracic injuries, such as heart <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and sternal fracture. Injuries in the ascending aorta were mostly found in unbelted victims and were sustained in frontal impact collisions, the injury-causing part of the car being the steering wheel. <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> of the distal descending part of the aorta were frequently associated with fractures of the thoracic vertebra. PMID:2770317</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arajärvi, E; Santavirta, S; Tolonen, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/24732112"> <span id="translatedtitle">Imaging of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal and pelvic tumors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of tumors is usually a critical and life-threatening condition. We demonstrate a wide variety of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tumors\\u000a with their imaging characteristics including gastric lymphoma, gastric leiomyosarcoma, leiomyosarcoma of the ileum, hepatocellular\\u000a carcinoma, pancreatic pseudocyst, renal angiomyolipoma, renal cell carcinoma, ovarian endometrial cyst, ovarian corpus luteum\\u000a cyst, and ovarian teratoma. Their imaging features are illustrated with an emphasis on clues</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yoshie Iwasaki; Junichi Matsumoto; Eimei Okamoto; Hiroshi Niimi; Yasuo Nakajima; Tohru Ishikawa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2584656"> <span id="translatedtitle">Three rare causes of extensor tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Three unusual cases of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of finger extensor tendons by attrition are reported. In one instance it was associated with long-standing nonunion of a scaphoid fracture, with a posttraumatic dorsal subluxation of the lower end of the ulna in another, and with a Madelung's deformity in the third. Extensor tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has not been previously recorded in the English-language literature after the first two conditions. PMID:2584656</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harvey, F J; Harvey, P M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/7q57323t7175088j.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cognitive Frames in Psychology: Demarcations and <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">As there seems to be a recurrent feeling of crisis in psychology, its present state is analyzed in this article. The author\\u000a believes that in addition to the traditional manifestations that have dogged psychology since it emerged as an independent\\u000a science some new features of the crisis have emerged. Three fundamental “<span class="hlt">ruptures</span>” are identified: the “horizontal” <span class="hlt">rupture</span>\\u000a between various schools</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andrey V. Yurevich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14529221"> <span id="translatedtitle">Delayed primary realignment of posterior urethral <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The treatment of acute posterior urethral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is controversial. Twelve patients who presented with acute posterior urethral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> over a five-year period were treated by delayed primary realignment of the injury. The technique of this procedure and the outcome are the subject of this presentation. Eight patients had successful realignment without strictures. Two patients with strictures responded to simple dilatations with bougies and the other two had formal urethroplasty. PMID:14529221</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shittu, O B; Okeke, L I; Kamara, T B; Adebayo, S A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2879216"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Profunda Femoris Aneurysm Secondary to Neurofibromatosis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Neurofibromatosis is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by abnormal growth that involves tissues of mesodermal and neuroectodermal origin. Aneurysms are rarely seen in peripheral arteries. This report presents a case of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> arterial aneurysm secondary to neurofibromatosis; the lesion occurred in the profunda femoris artery, a highly unusual location. Treatment of patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> arterial aneurysm secondary to neurofibromatosis may be interventional or surgical. In this case, a surgical approach was successful.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Emrecan, Bilgin; Onem, Gokhan; Susam, Ibrahim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15132929"> <span id="translatedtitle">Percutaneous repair of acute Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Various studies have shown that the operative treatment of a freshly <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> Achilles tendon is generally considered to be more appropriate than a nonoperative regimen. However, complications in open reconstructions are reported to occur in 11-29%. The method used in this study reduced the risk of complications arising from operation, but simultaneously allowed early postoperative mobilization and functional treatment. It was a percutaneous repair of the Achilles tendon, using two Lengemann extension wires for coadaptation of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tendon. To fix the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> site, the authors used a fibrin sealant. The spikes of the wire were hooked in at the fascia of the soleus muscle. Via a big, curved needle, the wire was placed in the distal stumps of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tendon and guided out laterally and medially above the calcaneus. After blocking the wires distally, the fibrin sealant was applied at the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> site. The current report describes this method of treatment in 66 patients. The postoperative observation period was 1 year. Sixty-four patients were male and two were female. Their average age was 42 years. The Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occurred during sporting activities and were treated by operation within 22 hours on average. The outcome was very good in 98%. One patient (2%) suffered a rerupture due to trauma. There were no other complications. PMID:15132929</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gorschewsky, Ottmar; Pitzl, Martin; Pütz, Andrej; Klakow, Andreas; Neumann, Wolfram</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24128572"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of the monosaccharide composition of water-soluble polysaccharides from Sargassum <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> by high performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sargassum <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> (hijiki) is the well-known edible algae, whose polysaccharides have been proved to possess interesting bioactivities like antitumor, antioxidant, antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. A facile and sensitive method based on high-performance liquid chromatography method of pre-column derivatization with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) coupled with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS) has been established for the analysis of the monosaccharide composition of polysaccharides in S. <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span>. Monosaccharides have been converted into PMP-labelled derivatives with aqueous ammonia as a catalyst at 70°C for 30min. The optimisation of the pre-column derivatization process was studied. The LODs of the monosaccharides were in the range from 0.01 to 0.02nmol. PMP-labelled mixture of monosaccharides has been well separated by a reverse-phase HPLC and detected by on-line ESI-MS method under optimised conditions. The mobile phase of elution system was chosen as acetonitrile (solvent A) and 20mM aqueous ammonium acetate (solvent B) (pH 3.0) with Zorbax XDB-C18 column at 30°C for the separation of the monosaccharide derivatives. Identification of the monosaccharides composition was carried out by analysis with mass spectral behaviour and chromatography characteristics of 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) labelled monosaccharides. All PMP-labelled derivatives display high chemical stabilities, whose regular MS fragmentation is specific for reducing labelled sugars. The result showed that the S. <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> polysaccharide consisted of mannose, glucose, galactose, xylose, fucose and glucuronic acid or galacturonic acid, or both uronic acids. PMID:24128572</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wu, Xiaodan; Jiang, Wei; Lu, Jiajia; Yu, Ying; Wu, Bin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15543861"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pulsatile flow in <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> models of abdoiminal aortic aneurysms: flow fields, velocity patterns and flow-induced wall stresses.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As one important step in the investigation of the mechanical factors that lead to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of abdominal aortic aneurysms, flow fields and flow-induced wall stress distributions have been investigated in model aneurysms under pulsatile flow conditions simulating the in vivo aorta at rest. Vortex pattern emergence and evolution were evaluated, and conditions for flow stability were delineated. Systolic flow was found to be forward-directed throughout the bulge in all the models, regardless of size. Vortices appeared in the bulge initially during deceleration from systole, then expanded during the retrograde flow phase. The complexity of the vortex field depended strongly on bulge diameter In every model, the maximum shear stress occurred at peak systole at the distal bulge end, with the greatest shear stress developing in a model corresponding to a 4.3 cm AAA in vivo. Although the smallest models exhibited stable flow throughout the cycle, flow in the larger models became increasingly unstable as bulge size increased, with strong amplification of instability in the distal half of the bulge. These data suggest that larger aneurysms in vivo may be subject to more frequent and intense turbulence than smaller aneurysms. Concomitantly, increased turbulence may contribute significantly to wall stress magnitude and thereby to risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:15543861</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peattie, Robert A; Riehle, Tiffany J; Bluth, Edward I</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6856091"> <span id="translatedtitle">Capacity credit calculation for exchanger tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper reports that overpressure relieving in heat exchanger tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span> case is quite different from other cases, such as fire, utility failure, inadvertent valve opening/closure, etc., when designing a pressure relief valve (PRV). In most cases, it is quite straightforward. The calculated relief load is the capacity that needs to be relieved. But, in heat exchanger tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span> cases, the actual amount of relieving capacity from the relieving device is not necessarily equal to the one from the high-pressure side through a tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Very often, the actual amount of relieving capacity from the relieving device is less than the flow from the higher-pressure side through a tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. At the time of a tube <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, the process fluid flows through the breakage of a heat exchanger tube wall from its high-pressure side to its low-pressure side. The process fluid will then flow through the orifice of a PRV from the low-pressure side of the heat exchanger to the back-pressure side, which could be a flare, a K.O. drum or even atmosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wong, W.Y. (Stothert-Christenson Engineering Ltd., Burnaby, B.C. (Canada))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=470154"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from blunt chest trauma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Borrie, J. and Lichter, I. (1974).Thorax, 29, 329-337. Pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from blunt chest trauma. Pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may occur in two distinct anatomical sites, namely the diaphragmatic pericardium and the pleuropericardium. They may be combined. The problems in each type are different. In <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> diaphragmatic pericardium the rent may involve the pericardial cavity alone, or may extend into one or both adjoining pleural cavities. Upward herniation of abdominal viscera can occur, with or without strangulation. The presence of a pericardial rent may be suggested by diagnostic pneumoperitoneum, and chest films showing displaced abdominal viscera; its extent may be fully revealed only by thoracotomy. If the rent involves only the diaphragmatic pericardium without lateral spread into a pleural cavity, the presence of a rent may be revealed only by exploratory thoracotomy with pericardiotomy. In <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> pleuropericardium the rent is usually vertical and may occur on either side, more usually on the left. It may be recognized on chest films in its early stages by the presence of intrapericardial air arising from associated lung trauma. There is serious risk of heart dislocation with or without strangulation. The defect must be surgically repaired and, because of pericardial retraction, it may require a fabric patch. Teflon fabric has proved to be a long-term satisfactory pericardial substitute. Two cases of each type of pericardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are described and illustrate these points. Images</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Borrie, J.; Lichter, I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10140552"> <span id="translatedtitle">Component external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequency estimates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to perform detailed internal flooding risk analyses of nuclear power plants, external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies are needed for various types of components - piping, valves, pumps, flanges, and others. However, there appears to be no up-to-date, comprehensive source for such frequency estimates. This report attempts to fill that void. Based on a comprehensive search of Licensee Event Reports (LERs) contained in Nuclear Power Experience (NPE), and estimates of component populations and exposure times, component external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> frequencies were generated. The remainder of this report covers the specifies of the NPE search for external leakage and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> events, analysis of the data, a comparison with frequency estimates from other sources, and a discussion of the results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eide, S.A.; Khericha, S.T.; Calley, M.B.; Johnson, D.A.; Marteeny, M.L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8948254"> <span id="translatedtitle">Increasing incidence of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the period 1987-91, 153 cases of total Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> were diagnosed in the city of Malmo (population 230,000). Almost two thirds were caused by sporting activities, notably badminton. <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> caused by nonsports injuries were found in older subjects. Compared to the age-specific incidence in 1950-73, a marked increase in both sports and nonsports injuries was found and patients in the latter group were older than in the former period. Patients with Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> can be classified into two subgroups with partly different etiologies: young or middle-aged athletes and older non-athletic persons. The increase in the former group is mostly explained by increased participation in recreational sports; the cause of increase in the latter group is unknown. PMID:8948254</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Möller, A; Astron, M; Westlin, N</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16146098"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysm in computed tomography.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of the study is presentation the usefulness of CT examination in evaluation of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysms. Material comprises a group of six patients (two women and four men) aged 52-79 years, examined in the 2nd Department of Radiology, Medical University of Lublin between the year 1997 and 2002. In all patients US examination and CT was performed. USG was performed with a Hitachi EUB 410 apparatus. CT was performed with Somatom AR. T scanner by Siemens, with two matrixes, 512 x 512 and 320 x 320 pixels. High resolution reconstruction algorithm was used with the possibility of performing spatial reformations. Five- and 10 mm-axial sections were performed before and after administering of contrast agents. Delayed scans were performed to reveal extravasations of the contrast agent. In three cases axial sections and MPR reconstructions revealed the presence of the periaortic haematoma with active extravasation of the contrasted blood. The <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysm in two cases was associated with extensive retroperitoneal haematoma. The periaortic haematoma extended along the wall of the aneurysm. In one case the haematoma was localized mainly in front of aorta. In one case of aneurysm of abdominal aorta and iliac arteries, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> or left iliac artery with large retroperitoneal haematoma in the pelvis and intensive extravasation of contrasted blood was seen. The US examination with Power Doppler and Duplex facilitate in three cases evaluation of aneurysm localization. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of abdominal aortic aneurysm is life-threatening condition, in vast majority of cases resulting in patient's death. In cases of acute <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the clinical symptoms and CT examination of stable patients are essential. In chronic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the early diagnosis is very important. The main role plays CT examination, which enables revealing of the aneurysm, precise evaluation of the leakage, retroperitoneal haematoma, vertebral destruction and dislocation of aorta and kidneys. PMID:16146098</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pas?awski, Marek; Z?omaniec, Janusz; Gwizdak, Jacek; Szafranek, Joanna</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22883898"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>: mallet, flexor digitorum profundus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mallet injuries are the most common closed tendon injury in the athlete. Flexor digitorum profundus <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are rare in baseball, but are common injuries in contact sports. The diagnosis for each condition is based on clinical examination, although radiographs should be evaluated for a possible bony component. Treatment for mallet injury depends on the athlete's goals of competition and understanding of the consequences of any treatment chosen. Gripping, throwing, and catching would be restricted or impossible with the injured finger immobilized. Treatment of FDP <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> is almost always surgical and requires reattachment of the torn tendon to the distal phalanx. PMID:22883898</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yeh, Peter C; Shin, Steven S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/657630"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bilateral simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendons.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bilateral simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendons is very rare and occurred in an 82-year-old man. This may be the fifth case to have been reported in the English literature. Only minor stress on extensor mechanisms preceded the <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Interrupted mattress sutures restored muscle continuity and function. A "pull-out" wire system was not used for protection of healing muscles because adequate amount of tissue mass was available for approximation. Excellent results require intensive postoperative physical therapy. Old age of the patient should not be a deterrent to surgical treatment in carefully selected individuals. PMID:657630</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Siwek, K W; Rao, J P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23293421"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> rudimentary horn at 22 weeks.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rudimentary horn is a developmental anomaly of the uterus. Pregnancy in a non-communicating rudimentary horn is very difficult to diagnose before it <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. A case of undiagnosed rudimentary horn pregnancy at 22 weeks presented to Nizwa regional referral hospital in shock with features of acute abdomen. Chances of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in first or second trimester are increased with catastrophic haemorrhage leading to increased maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Management of such cases is a challenge till today due to diagnostic dilemma. Expertise in ultrasonography and early resort to surgical management is life saving in such cases. PMID:23293421</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dhar, Hansa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3277969"> <span id="translatedtitle">Treatment of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> ICA during Transsphenoidal Surgery</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the internal carotid artery (ICA) during transsphenoidal surgery is a rare but potentially lethal complication. Direct surgical repair of the ICA may be difficult and time-consuming in an acute setting. Urgent endovascular treatments with vascular plug or stent-graft have been the feasible options to date. We desrcibe two cases of iatrogenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of ICA during transsphenoidal surgery. In the first case we occluded the ICA with a vascular plug at the site of tear where cross circulation was adequate. In the second case we had to preserve the ICA with stent-graft since there was no adequate cross circulation. These two strategies are discussed below.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ghatge, S.B.; Modi, D.B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/886036"> <span id="translatedtitle">COMPARISON OF CLADDING CREEP <span class="hlt">RUPTURE</span> MODELS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The objective of this calculation is to compare several creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> correlations for use in calculating creep strain accrued by the Zircaloy cladding of spent nuclear fuel when it has been emplaced in the repository. These correlations are used to calculate creep strain values that are then compared to a large set of experimentally measured creep strain data, taken from four different research articles, making it possible to determine the best fitting correlation. The scope of the calculation extends to six different creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> correlations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. Macheret</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-06-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3666500"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pectoralis major tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Surgical procedures review.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary Pectoralis major (PM) muscle is the powerful dynamic stabiliser of the shoulder that acts as a flexor, adductor and internal rotator. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the PM tendon is a relatively rare injury that was firstly described in a French boy by Patissier in 1822 and later, in 1861, by Letenneur who reported another similiar case. To date, over 200 cases have been published. In this article we describe the clinical anatomy and the mechanism of injuries of PM and we review the surgical procedures for acute and chronic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Merolla, Giovanni; Paladini, Paolo; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996Sci...271..482B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energy Dissipation during <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Adhesive Bonds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study energy-dissipation mechanisms during the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a thin adhesive bond formed by short chain molecules. The degree of dissipation and its velocity dependence varied with the state of the film. When the adhesive was in a liquid phase, dissipation was caused by viscous loss. In glassy films, dissipation occurred during a sequence of rapid structural rearrangements. Roughly equal amounts of energy were dissipated in each of three types of rapid motion: cavitation, plastic yield, and bridge <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These mechanisms have similarities to nucleation, plastic flow, and crazing in commercial polymeric adhesives.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baljon, Arlette R. C.; Robbins, Mark O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/33841172"> <span id="translatedtitle">Uncommon course for a vertebral artery dissection: <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>, occlusion and recanalization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Intracranial arterial dissections of the <span class="hlt">vertebrobasilar</span> system are recognized as a cause of stroke. Although the pathogenic mechanism underlying this phenomenon is unknown, in some cases the stroke originates from subarachnoid hemorrhage, while in others ischemia is the cause. In cases where hemorrhage occurs, occlusion of the lesion is effective in reducing the risk of re-bleeding. However, deciding on treatment</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yasushi Matsumoto; Hisashi Nagashima; Toshihide Toriyama; Shigeaki Kobayashi; Kazuhiro Hongo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48904992"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of plastic deformation on bimaterial fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Elastic mismatch across a fault is not sufficient to predict <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directionThe orientation of the stress state controls the location of plastic deformationStress orientation and elastic mismatch control <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nora DeDontney; Elizabeth L. Templeton-Barrett; James R. Rice; Renata Dmowska</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1875905"> <span id="translatedtitle">Asymptomatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the uterus: a case report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the gravid uterus is a serious obstetric emergency that threatens maternal and fetal life. In certain cases the classic clinical picture may be absent. Most asymptomatic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are in the lower segment and of minor extent or are really dehiscences of scars. This paper presents a case of massive spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> involving the entire corpus diagnosed at elective postpartum sterilization. This unusual event stimulated a review of the causes and clinical presentations of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alper, M. M.; Dudley, D. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v077/i011/JB077i011p02087/JB077i011p02087.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Zones of Large South American Earthquakes and Some Predictions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study attempts to forecast likely locations for large shallow South American earthquakes in the near future by examining the past space-time pattern of occurrence of large (M _ 7.7) earthquakes, the lateral extent of their <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zones, and, where possible, the direction of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> zones of large shallow earthquakes generally abut and do not overlap. Patterns of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John A. Kelleher</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48926202"> <span id="translatedtitle">Material contrast does not predict earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation direction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Earthquakes often occur on faults that juxtapose different rocks. The result is <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior that differs from that of an earthquake occurring on a fault in a homogeneous material. Previous 2D numerical simulations have studied simple cases of earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation where there is a material contrast across a fault and have come to two different conclusions: 1) earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruth A. Harris; Steven M. Day</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/p5jgh1b0vgnvnq9a.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cell membrane destabilizes progressively during repetitive mechanical <span class="hlt">rupture</span> events</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The postfusion oscillation cycle method of electrofused cells was applied to red blood cell membranes to induce repetitive membrane <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> and test the mechanical membrane resistance against sequential events of membrane strain and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. After producing doublets from pairs of electrofused cells, they entered the oscillation cycle, providing a sequence of at least four consecutive colloidosmotic-driven <span class="hlt">rupture</span> events. Different gradations</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Martin Baumann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27099758"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quartz Crystal Microbalance Induced Bond <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Sensing for Medical Diagnostics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Disease detection at the point of care could be performed using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of antibody-antigen bonds. An integrated digital solution for smart sensing is proposed where the QCM is driven and its resonant frequency change is captured as an indication of bond <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. After reviewing the principle of QCM induced bond <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, a digital transceiver system</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. J. van der Werff; Y. J. Yuan; E. R. Hirst; W. L. Xu; H. Chen; J. E. Bronlund</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55435941"> <span id="translatedtitle">Split Nodes and Fault Zone Models for Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Simulation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The accuracy of numerical calculation of the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of earthquakes mainly depends on the fault boundary condition on the fault where friction is taking place. During <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the slip is calculated via the equation of motion while the shear stress is controlled by frictional sliding. Such <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models generally lead to nonlinear, mixed-boundary value problems. The boundary treatment</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. A. Dalguer; S. M. Day</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28656194"> <span id="translatedtitle">Partial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the distal biceps tendon</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on 7 cases of partial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the distal biceps tendon. The mean patient age was 52 years (range, 38-58 years). There were 5 men and 2 women. The dominant arm was affected in all 7 patients. Pain was the chief complaint in all patients. Immobilization and physiotherapy were attempted in all patients, and 4 had at least</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dimitris G. Vardakas; Douglas S. Musgrave; Sokratis E. Varitimidis; Felix Goebel; Dean G. Sotereanos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19585785"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a paratrooper.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A paratrooper presents after a parachuting accident with the inability to urinate. Initial emergency bedside ultrasound, followed by confirmatory abdominal CT, is carried out and demonstrates an intraperitoneal bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The patient is taken to the operating room and a 3-layer closure with omental buttressing is carried out. PMID:19585785</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ford, David; Palma, James; Robinson, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a 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href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pectear.com/faq/when%20to%20operate.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pectoralis major tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>: when to operate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The treatment of pectoralis major tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> has been the subject of much debate. The classical history of the injury is forced abduction and external rotation. The cases of two patients (an amateur rugby union player and a recreational snowboarder) are reported. The diagnosis was made by clinical examination in both patients, and both were operated on more than two</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J F Quinlan; M Molloy; B J Hurson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29928049"> <span id="translatedtitle">Splenic artery aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in pregnancy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Splenic artery aneurysm (SAA) is the commonest visceral artery aneurysm. It is diagnosed more frequently in younger women, with up to 95% presenting during pregnancy. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> is associated with a disproportionately high maternal and fetal mortality.We performed a literature search on the patient and SAA characteristics, clinical presentations, management and outcome of this serious complication.There were 32 patients in total</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jennifer Fong Ha; Michael Phillips; Kingsley Faulkner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3727204"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical Resection of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FLH) is a rare primary tumor of the liver, which typically arises from noncirrhotic livers and affects patients below the age of 35. We report on a 29-year-old male patient who presented with a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> FLH and was treated with surgical resection. Options for treatment and review of the management are described.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Minutolo, Vincenzo; Licciardello, Alessio; Arena, Manuel; Minutolo, Orazio; Lanteri, Raffaele; Arena, Goffredo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21959707"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of fetal hydronephrosis: case report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hydronephrosis is the most common congenital anomaly observed with prenatal ultrasonography. Ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) is the most common cause of prenatal hydronephrosis. Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has been reported in adults with severe hydronephrosis. There is no reported spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> case in the fetus in the literature. A spontaneous ureteral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> due to severe UPJO was reported in this case report. Prenatal ultrasound at 33 week gestation in a 21-year-old pregnant woman, revealed a female fetus with grade IV hydronephrosis of the right kidney, suggestive of a UPJO. During the follow-up at XXXVIII week, 5 cm cystic structure was not observed in right kidney. Mild ectasia was present in pelvicalyciel part which make us think about spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Ultrasonographic examination after a week post-delivery revealed 15 mm pelvicalyciel ectasia on right side which persisted during the second control after 1 month. Vesicoureteral reflux was not detected during voiding cystourethrogram. Diuretic renography revealed loss of right renal function completely. Because there was not any complain or any clinical sign, surgery was not thought. Spontaneous follow-up was recommended. PMID:21959707</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kosus, A; Kosus, N; Duran, M; Turhan, N</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005shwa.book..295T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Active diaphragm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with laser beam irradiation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We performed shock tube operations with a layer of diaphragm being <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> by laser beam irradiation. Mylar or Cellophane was examined as the diaphragm material. It has been demonstrated that shock tube can be operated with this new technique. The absorbed energy depends on the material and thickness of the diaphragm and is an important control parameter.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takahashi, T.; Torikai, H.; Yang, Q. S.; Watanabe, K.; Sasoh, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.data.scec.org/Module/s1act03.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">What Is an Earthquake?: <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this activity, the learner will watch three animations based on actual data from fault <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> from the two largest Southern California earthquakes in the 1990s: Landers (1992) and Northridge (1994). In Section 3, the learner will discover more about how such data is collected and analyzed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3278820"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prediction of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in acute myocardial infarction.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In two patient series including 809 and 327 patients, respectively, with acute myocardial infarction we have compared those who died in myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (verified at autopsy, Group A) with those who died without <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (autopsied, Group B), and those who survived hospitalization (Group C) with regard to previous history and clinical course in hospital. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> among autopsied patients was observed in 45% and 40% of the cases in the respective studies. Previous infarction was observed in each study as 0% and 0% in Group A compared with 25% and 31% in Group B, and 20% and 34% in Group C. Previous angina pectoris was observed in 26% and 22% in Group A compared with 50% and 54% in Group B and 52% and 54% in Group C. Maximum serum enzyme activity in Group A did not differ from Group B, but was higher than in Group C (p less than 0.001). Group A patients tended to have a higher initial pain score and a higher requirement of analgesics compared with other groups, whereas initial heart rate or systolic blood pressure did not differ in these patients compared to others. We thus conclude that patients with myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> have a very low occurrence of previous myocardial infarction and angina pectoris, and that their pain course appears to be particularly severe in the acute phase. PMID:3278820</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Herlitz, J; Samuelsson, S O; Richter, A; Hjalmarson, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/65f652s5.pdf;origin=repeccitec"> <span id="translatedtitle">US Foreign Policy: Continuity or <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">James Mann refutes the idea that George W. Bush’s foreign policy was a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from previous administrations. He does find that it took previous policies much further but these trends had already been in place. He points to a number of military interventions to bolster his case including Haiti, Somalia, Panama, Iraq and Yugoslavia. He notes that previous administrations in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">James Mann; John Mueller; Ronald Steel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1030718"> <span id="translatedtitle">D-Zero Cryostat Supplemental <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Disc</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The common relief and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> disc vent line requires a double disc assembly with vented interspace for accurate disc burst pressures. The first disc must take pump and purge vacuum loading, but be set to operate at 110% of the MAWP, 18.3 psig (ASME code). The available solution is 18.3 psig with a burst tolerance of +/- psig. The interspace should be locally vented by a flow limiting vent valve to decouple the vent line backpressure from the vessel <span class="hlt">rupture</span> disc. The second disc must take the worst case vent line backpressure, the steady state value found in D-Zero engineering note 3740.000-EN-63 with all three cryostats simultaneously venting at the fire condition into the 4-inch x 6-inch and 6-inch x 8-inch sections. This value is less than 2 psid. The maximum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> value for the second disc must be less than the minimum <span class="hlt">rupture</span> value for the first disc less 2 psid i.e. < 16.3.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mulholland, G.T.; /Fermilab</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-08-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2425781"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a renal angiomyolipoma (hamartoma)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 54-year-old woman with spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of angiomyolipoma is presented. The literature on the 2 types of angiomyolipoma, without and with association of tuberose sclerosis, their rarity and the difficulties in their diagnoses, is reviewed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stavorovsky, M.; Irge, D.; Morag, B.; Schujman, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cardio.bjmu.edu.cn/reference/186.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">New insights into atherosclerotic plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coronary artery atherosclerosis is the major cause of mortality and morbidity in the indus- trialised world. Progressive narrowing of cor- onary arteries causes angina. However, it is <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the plaque that causes the cata- strophic consequences of atherosclerosis, such as myocardial infarction. Recent work has identified that the stability of the plaque rather than its absolute size determines the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D M Braganza; M R Bennett</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/32592804"> <span id="translatedtitle">Primary obstructive megaureter with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> kidney</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 17-year-old boy presented to the emergency department for severe left flank pain and gross hematuria 1 hour after playing basketball without significant collision. Laboratory tests showed normal renal function and massive hematuria. Abdominal computed tomography scan disclosed a primary megaureter with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> kidney. We successfully treated him with ureteral stenting followed by endoscopic ureterotomy and ureteroneocystostomy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chun-Hou Liao; H SUN; D YANG</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19041564"> <span id="translatedtitle">Primary obstructive megaureter with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> kidney.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 17-year-old boy presented to the emergency department for severe left flank pain and gross hematuria 1 hour after playing basketball without significant collision. Laboratory tests showed normal renal function and massive hematuria. Abdominal computed tomography scan disclosed a primary megaureter with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> kidney. We successfully treated him with ureteral stenting followed by endoscopic ureterotomy and ureteroneocystostomy. PMID:19041564</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chung, Shiu-Dong; Sun, Hsu-Dong; Yang, Den-Kai; Liao, Chun-Hou</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26465607"> <span id="translatedtitle">Linear matching method for creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> assessment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The recently developed linear matching method (LMM), which is easily implemented within commercial FE codes, has been successfully used to evaluate elastic and plastic shakedown loads. In this paper, the method is extended to the prediction of the creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life of a structure, based upon a bounding method currently used in the life assessment method R5. The method corresponds</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. F. Chen; M. J. Engelhardt; A. R. S. Ponter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23956918"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical resection of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FLH) is a rare primary tumor of the liver, which typically arises from noncirrhotic livers and affects patients below the age of 35. We report on a 29-year-old male patient who presented with a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> FLH and was treated with surgical resection. Options for treatment and review of the management are described. PMID:23956918</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Minutolo, Vincenzo; Licciardello, Alessio; Arena, Manuel; Minutolo, Orazio; Lanteri, Raffaele; Arena, Goffredo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60170726"> <span id="translatedtitle">Design procedure prevents PE pipe <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">rupture</span> prevention design procedure for plastic gas distribution pipe is nearing completion at Southwest Research Institute (SWRI). Given the pipe size, polyethylene (PE) resin, and minimum operating temperature, the maximum safe operating pressure can be determined for which rapid crack propagation (RCP) cannot occur. A computer program, called PFRAC, has been developed for this purpose and uses Charpy energy</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grigory</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3649179"> <span id="translatedtitle">A case of splenic torsion and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> presenting as <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> ectopic pregnancy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Splenic torsion with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of spleen is an extremely rare phenomenon. The clinical picture mimics several common conditions which are causes of acute abdomen and so it is seldom detected pre-operatively. An 18 year old female patient was admitted with an acute abdomen and shock. The provisional diagnosis was of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> ectopic pregnancy. Peri-operatively we found a spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the spleen following torsion along with early intrauterine pregnancy. Splenectomy was carried out and patient recovered well. Our report confirms that this rare entity can present as an acute abdomen which is very difficult to diagnose preoperatively and can masquerade as <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> ectopic pregnancy in women of childbearing age group.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lahiri, Somdatta; Dasgupta, Nabanita; Mondal, Aftab-ud-din</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23198424"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Numerical simulation of fluid-structure interaction in <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> aneurysm treated with stent with triangular wire cross-section].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new stent with triangular wire cross-section was proposed. The new stents were compared with traditional circular wire cross-section stent in the same porosity in order to investigate its effectiveness in treating intracranial aneurysms. Three models were established separately, including the aneurysm model with circle cross section stent, the aneurysm model with triangular cross section stent and the aneurysm model with non-stent. Then the same boundary conditions were set to contrast the resistance to flow, velocity, pressure, wall shear stress and total mesh displacement. The resistance to flow of triangular cross section stent was lower than circle cross section stent and the velocity, pressure, total mesh displacement of aneurysm model with triangular cross section stent were all higher than those of the model with circle cross section stent. Moreover, the peak value and valley value of wall shear stress in aneurysm model with triangular cross section stent were higher than those of the other. Triangular cross section stent might play a negative role to aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupturing</span>. Thus, the therapeutic effect of stent with triangle cross section was not better than the stent with circle cross section. In the clinical application, doctors should consider the various factors, and choose the most suitable one. PMID:23198424</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yan, Tingting; Lin, Fangfang; Chen, Xue; Qiao, Aike</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/33214401"> <span id="translatedtitle">The ELANA technique: Constructing a high flow bypass using a non-occlusive anastomosis on the ICA and a conventional anastomosis on the SCA in the treatment of a <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> giant basilar trunk aneurysm</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary A patient with a partially thrombosed <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> giant basilar trunk aneurysm presented with devastating headache and symptoms of progressive brain stem compression. Having an aneurysm inaccessible for endovascular treatment, and after failing a vertebral artery balloon occlusion test, he was offered bypass surgery in order to exclude the aneurysm from the cerebral circulation and relieve his symptoms. A connection</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. J. N. Streefkerk; J. F. C. Wolfs; W. Sorteberg; A. G. Sorteberg; C. A. F. Tulleken</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1751-0759-1-23.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Specific components of face perception in the human <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus studied by tomographic estimates of magnetoencephalographic signals: a tool for the evaluation of non-verbal communication in psychosomatic paradigms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">AIMS: The aim of this study was to determine the specific spatiotemporal activation patterns of face perception in the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus (FG). The FG is a key area in the specialized brain system that makes possible the recognition of face with ease and speed in our daily life. Characterization of FG response provides a quantitative method for evaluating the fundamental</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yuka Okazaki; Andreas A Ioannides</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' 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showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70042554"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> directivity of moderate earthquakes in northern California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We invert peak ground velocity and acceleration (PGV and PGA) to estimate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity for 47 moderate earthquakes (3.5?M?5.4) in northern California. We correct sets of PGAs and PGVs recorded at stations less than 55–125 km, depending on source depth, for site amplification and source–receiver distance, then fit the residual peak motions to the unilateral directivity function of Ben-Menahem (1961). We independently invert PGA and PGV. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction can be determined using as few as seven peak motions if the station distribution is sufficient. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity is unstable, however, if there are no takeoff angles within 30° of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> velocities are generally subsonic (0.5?–0.9?); for stability, we limit the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity at v=0.92?, the Rayleigh wave speed. For 73 of 94 inversions, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction clearly identifies one of the nodal planes as the fault plane. The 35 strike-slip earthquakes have <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directions that range from nearly horizontal (6 events) to directly updip (5 events); the other 24 <span class="hlt">rupture</span> partly along strike and partly updip. Two strike-slip earthquakes <span class="hlt">rupture</span> updip in one inversion and downdip in the other. All but 1 of the 11 thrust earthquakes <span class="hlt">rupture</span> predominantly updip. We compare the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directions for 10 M?4.0 earthquakes to the relative location of the mainshock and the first two weeks of aftershocks. Spatial distributions of 8 of 10 aftershock sequences agree well with the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity calculated for the mainshock.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Seekins, Linda C.; Boatwright, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.S31A1700B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Apparent Supersonic <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> for Strike-slip <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: Should We Consider it in the Seismic Hazard Analysis?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent numerical studies indicated that the supersonic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> could produce larger off-fault damage at distant sites than the sub-shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, due to the famous "mach cone" effect (Dunham and Archuleta, 2005; Bhat et al, 2007). These results were obtained using the steady-state <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations in a half-space earth. For more realistic layered or 3D earth models, we should also consider the effects of apparent supersonic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, i.e., the deep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is still in a speed slower than the local shear velocity, but faster than the near surface S or even the P wave velocity. The apparent super-shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> could excite the mach effect, but how large it is has not yet been quantitatively addressed. In this study, we explore this possibility by performing numerical simulations for pure strike-slip <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> on a vertical fault inside various layered earth models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barrows, M. B.; Shao, G.; Ji, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7163E..19S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computational model of retinal photocoagulation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In patterned scanning laser photocoagulation, shorter duration (< 20 ms) pulses help reduce thermal damage beyond the photoreceptor layer, decrease treatment time and minimize pain. However, safe therapeutic window (defined as the ratio of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> threshold power to that of light coagulation) decreases for shorter exposures. To quantify the extent of thermal damage in the retina, and maximize the therapeutic window, we developed a computational model of retinal photocoagulation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Model parameters were adjusted to match measured thresholds of vaporization, coagulation, and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) damage. Computed lesion width agreed with histological measurements in a wide range of pulse durations and power. Application of ring-shaped beam profile was predicted to double the therapeutic window width for exposures in the range of 1 - 10 ms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Huie, Phil; Palanker, Daniel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60433983"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> disc. [LMFBR intermediate heat transport system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The intermediate heat transport system for a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor includes a device for rapidly draining the sodium therefrom should a sodium-water reaction occur within the system. This device includes a <span class="hlt">rupturable</span> member in a drain line in the system and means for cutting a large opening therein and for positively removing the sheared-out portion from the opening cut</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/46502154"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the short time creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Short time tensile creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests were made on 7 mil lamp filament wire and on 7 mil undoped tungsten wire in the temperature\\u000a range 2500 to 3100 K. Steady-state creep rate was described by an expression having the form: ? =AD?\\/E)m whereA is a constant,D is the self-diffusion coefficient, ? is the creep stress,E is the elastic modulus, andm</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. W. Pugh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9244805"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fatigue <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of wallaby tail tendons.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wallaby tail tendons fail after repeated application of stresses much lower than would be needed to break them in a single pull. We show that this a fatigue phenomenon, distinct from the creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that occurs after prolonged application of a constant stress. The two phenomena are disctinguished by experiments in which tensile stress is cycled at different frequencies, ranging from 1 to 50 Hz. PMID:9244805</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, X T; Ker, R F; Alexander, R M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/86168152phh41134.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Blunt traumatic abdominal aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: CT imaging</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Blunt abdominal aortic trauma is a rare but potentially lethal event. It is commonly associated with high-speed motor vehicle\\u000a accidents. Intimal flap, thrombosis, and pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta are the more common findings. We present a\\u000a case of blunt abdominal aortic trauma in which CT disclosed free aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with intraabdominal bleeding and a huge retroperitoneal\\u000a hematoma, an extremely</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gaetano Nucifora; Fjoralba Hysko; Annarosa Vasciaveo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47936851"> <span id="translatedtitle">Treatment of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Intracranial Aneurysm: Our Approach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">There have been revolutionary developments in surgical clipping and endovascular coiling for the treatment of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> aneurysms.\\u000a Surgical clipping as a treatment modality has been developed since the past 100 years. Endovascular coiling of intracranial\\u000a aneurysms is a technique that has been available for the past 10 years and widely accepted throughout the world. Guglielmi\\u000a detachable coil treatment is becoming</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yoko Kato; Hirotoshi Sano; Minoru Yoneda; Sadayoshi Watanabe; Shamsul Alam; Khandelwal Prashant; Shamson Sharad Rajamani; Tetsuo Kanno</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21608792"> <span id="translatedtitle">Liver Hydatid Cyst with Transdiaphragmatic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> and Lung Hydatid Cyst <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> into Bronchi and Pleural Space</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of this case study is to present effectiveness of percutaneous drainage as a treatment option of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> lung and liver hydatid cysts. A 65-year-old male patient was admitted with complicated liver and lung hydatid cysts. A liver hydatid cyst had <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> transdiaphragmatically, and a lung hydatid cyst had <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> both into bronchi and pleural space. The patient could not undergo surgery because of decreased respiratory function. Both cysts were drained percutaneously using oral albendazole. Povidone-iodine was used to treat the liver cyst after closure of the diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The drainage was considered successful, and the patient had no recurrence of signs and symptoms. Clinical, laboratory, and radiologic recovery was observed during 2.5 months of catheterization. The patient was asymptomatic after catheter drainage. No recurrence was detected during 86 months of follow-up. For inoperable patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> liver and lung hydatid cysts, percutaneous drainage with oral albendazole is an alternative treatment option to surgery. The percutaneous approach can be life-saving in such cases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ar Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I bas, Bilgin Kadri, E-mail: bilginaribas@hotmail.com; Dingil, Guerbuez [A.Y. Ankara Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Koeroglu, Mert [Sueleyman Demirel University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Uenguel, Uemit; Zaral Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , Aliye Ceylan [A.Y. Ankara Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21897194"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after intentional medication overdose.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the case of a 51-year-old woman who had a medical history of diabetes, depression with past suicide attempts, and suicidal ideation. She was found unresponsive in a motel with multiple bottles of medicines (melatonin, carisoprodol, ativan, and clonazepam) and an unopened bottle of wine. She was transported to the local hospital and treated for benzodiazepine toxicity and aspiration pneumonitis.The decedent gradually became more alert and was extubated 3 days after hospital admission. The decedent was reportedly getting up to use the restroom when she became tachypneic and diaphoretic and complained of generalized body pain. Her condition quickly declined, and she was pronounced deceased. A postmortem examination revealed an acute bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and soft tissue hemorrhage.A review of the literature reveals that isolated bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after minimal or no trauma in association with alcohol or drug ingestion is an infrequently reported, but recognized, injury. The diagnosis of bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> should be considered in a patient with lower abdominal pain, even without a history of trauma. A history of voiding or bladder dysfunction should increase the suspicion for this injury. If suspected, a retrograde cystogram should be obtained promptly. Failure to consider and recognize this injury may lead to significant morbidity. PMID:21897194</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huston, Butch; Mills, Kelly; Froloff, Victor; McGee, Michael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JBO....14c4007S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamics of retinal photocoagulation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In laser retinal photocoagulation, short (<20 ms) pulses have been found to reduce thermal damage to the inner retina, decrease treatment time, and minimize pain. However, the safe therapeutic window (defined as the ratio of power for producing a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to that of mild coagulation) decreases with shorter exposures. To quantify the extent of retinal heating and maximize the therapeutic window, a computational model of millisecond retinal photocoagulation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was developed. Optical attenuation of 532-nm laser light in ocular tissues was measured, including retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) pigmentation and cell-size variability. Threshold powers for vaporization and RPE damage were measured with pulse durations ranging from 1 to 200 ms. A finite element model of retinal heating inferred that vaporization (<span class="hlt">rupture</span>) takes place at 180-190°C. RPE damage was accurately described by the Arrhenius model with activation energy of 340 kJ/mol. Computed photocoagulation lesion width increased logarithmically with pulse duration, in agreement with histological findings. The model will allow for the optimization of beam parameters to increase the width of the therapeutic window for short exposures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Huie, Phil; Brown, Jefferson; Palanker, Daniel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21288526"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of plasma membrane under tension.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a study on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of single NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts under tension using micropipette aspiration. Membrane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was characterized by breaking and formation of an enclosed membrane linked to a tether at the cell apex. Three different <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes, namely: single break, initial multiple breaks, and continuous multiple breaks, were observed under similar loading condition. The measured mean tensile strengths of plasma membrane were 3.83 ± 1.94 and 3.98 ± 1.54mN/m for control cells and cells labeled with TubulinTracker, respectively. The tensile strength data was described by Weibull distribution. For the control cells, the Weibull modulus and characteristic strength were 1.86 and 4.40 mN/m, respectively; for cells labeled with TubulinTracker, the Weibull modulus and characteristic strength were 2.68 and 4.48 mN/m, respectively. Based on the experimental data, the estimated average transmembrane proteins-lipid cleavage strength was 2.64 ± 0.64 mN/m. From the random sampling of volume ratio of transmembrane proteins in cell membrane, we concluded that the Weibull characteristic of plasma membrane strength was likely to be originated from the variation in transmembrane proteins-lipid interactions. PMID:21288526</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tan, Samuel Chun Wei; Yang, Tianyi; Gong, Yingxue; Liao, Kin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JInst...7C2002E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Single Event Gate <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in EMCCD technology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The high electric fields (typically 3 MV/cm2 interpoly field) utilised in Electron Multiplying Charged Coupled Devices (EMCCDs) reveal a potential vulnerability from Single Event Phenomena (SEP), in particular Single Event Gate <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> (SEGR). SEGR is where a conduction path between two conductive areas of the CCD is produced, causing device failure. If EMCCDs are to be used for space applications the susceptibility to these events needs to be explored. A positive result from such an investigation can increase the technology readiness level of the device moving it another step closer to being used in space. Testing undertaken at the CYClotron of LOuvain la NEuve (CYCLONE), using the Heavy Ion Facility (HIF), conclusively showed EMCCD technology to have resilience to heavy ions that surpassed initial expectations. The simulations undertaken prior to experiment suggested gate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> would occur at 20-40 MeV cm2/mg, however Linear Energy Transfers (LETs) greater than 100 MeV cm2/mg proved to not cause a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> event. Within the radiation belts heavy ions with an LET greater than 60 MeV cm2/mg are not very common when compared to the fluxes used at the HIF. Possible reasons for this result are discussed in this work, leading to a conclusion that EMCCD technology is a secure choice for space flight.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evagora, A. M.; Murray, N. J.; Holland, A. D.; Burt, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8079227"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of fetal membranes and chorioamnionitis].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The article presents a survey of preterm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the amniotic membranes at term (more than 1 hour prior to uterine contractions) and preterm (< 37 weeks). The diagnosis of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can be suspected from the history alone in 90% of the cases, and confirmed by inspection. In doubtful cases the pH in fluid from the posterior fornix of the vagina is determined and microscopy is performed. Amniotic fluid is alkaline. Microscopy of a dried specimen shows "ferning" when amniotic fluid is present (crystallization test). Staining with Nil blue will reveal orange foetal cells in fresh specimens, usually only late in pregnancy (after the 38 week). The crystallization test is useful, however, in all three trimesters. The cause of membrane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and of chorioamnionitis may be infection. Chorioamnionitis is a serious clinical condition, but can be subclinical and may occur with intact membranes. It can lead to preterm delivery. It is important that chorioamnionitis be diagnosed (maternal fever, tachycardia, uterine contractions, abdominal pain, foul smelling vaginal discharge and elevated C-reactive protein). The condition is treated with antibiotics and labour must be induced. PMID:8079227</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haram, K; Daugaard, H O</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-05-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23015276"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of multiple receptor-ligand bonds: bimodal distribution of bond <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Monte Carlo simulation of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of multiple receptor-ligand bonds between two PMN cells suspended in a Newtonian fluid is performed. In the presence of a hydrodynamic drag force acting on two PMN cells the interplay of multiple receptor-ligand bonds between these cells leads to a bimodal distribution of the bond <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force at certain loading rates. Specifically, it is found that the interplay of multiple bonds between two PMN cells in the presence of hydrodynamic drag force acting on these cells modifies the bond energy landscape in such a way as to lead to a bimodal distribution of the bond <span class="hlt">rupture</span> force where a low force peak switches to a high force peak as the loading rate is increased progressively, characteristics of two-state systems. PMID:23015276</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gupta, V K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10211195"> <span id="translatedtitle">The epidemiology of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a Danish county.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The epidemiology of Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> was examined during the 13-year period 1984-1996 in a Danish county. Five hospitals, serving a population of 220,000 cooperated. There were 718 <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, 544 men (75.8%) and 174 women (24.2%). The male to female ratio was 3:1. The average age was 42.1 years (3-82) and 62% were between 30-49 years. 74.2% of the <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> were sport-related and 89% of these occurred in ball and racket games. The annual incidence of achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> increased from 18.2/10(5) inhabitants in 1984 to 37.3/10(5) in 1996. The peak incidence in sport-related <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occurred in the age group 30-49 years, but <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> not related to sport occurred in older patients with a peak incidence in those 50-59 years. PMID:10211195</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Houshian, S; Tscherning, T; Riegels-Nielsen, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvL.109s8302S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measuring Thermal <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Force Distributions from an Ensemble of Trajectories</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span>, bond breaking, or extraction from a deep and narrow potential well requires considerable force while producing minimal displacement. In thermally fluctuating systems, there is not a single force required to achieve <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, but a spectrum, as thermal forces can both augment and inhibit the bond breaking. We demonstrate measurement and interpretation of the distribution of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forces between pairs of colloidal particles bonded via the van der Waals attraction. The otherwise irreversible bond is broken by pulling the particles apart with optical tweezers. We show that an ensemble of the particle trajectories before, during and after the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> event may be used to produce a high fidelity description of the distribution of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forces. This analysis is equally suitable for describing <span class="hlt">rupture</span> forces in molecular and biomolecular contexts with a number of measurement techniques.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Swan, J. W.; Shindel, M. M.; Furst, E. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3350117"> <span id="translatedtitle">Misdiagnosed Uterine <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of an Advanced Cornual Pregnancy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cornual pregnancy is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge with potential severe consequences if uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurs with following massive intraabdominal bleeding. We report a case of a misdiagnosed <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cornual pregnancy occurring at 21 weeks of gestation. Ultrasound examination and computer tomography revealed no sign of abnormal pregnancy. The correct diagnosis was first made at emergency laparotomy. Uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> should be considered in pregnant women presenting with abdominal pain and haemodynamic instability.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sant, Christian Linus Hastrup; Andersen, Poul Erik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/ug8agrq49rqh0a5c.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">MRI of complete <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the pectoralis major muscle</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the pectoralis major muscle is a rare clinical entity. Only few reports have discussed its MRI or CT features.\\u000a We have reviewed the imaging features of four cases of complete <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the pectoralis major muscle. One case of acute\\u000a injury underwent surgical repair. MRI is useful in delineating the site and extent of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in relation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. Ohashi; G. Y. El-Khoury; John P. Albright; David S. Tearse</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19318288"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the unscarred uterus during labor. Case report].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report a case of spontaneous uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a 19 year-old patient Gravida 1 para 2 with no past history of uterine surgery. The diagnosis of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, evoked in the early post-partum in the presence of acute abdominal pain, collapsus and haemoperitoneum on ultrasonography, was confirmed by laparotomy. Treatment consisted in hysterorrhaphy. The etiopathogenesis, clinical and therapeutical aspects of spontaneous unscarred uterine <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are discussed throughout a literature review. PMID:19318288</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leung, F; Courtois, L; Aouar, Z; Bourtembourg, A; Eckman, A; Terzibachian, J J; Maillet, R; Riethmuller, D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' 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showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16131683"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bilateral spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of Achilles tendons: a case report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous bilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of Achilles tendon is rare. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the Achilles tendon has been described in patients on oral corticosteroid therapy. The sudden dorsiflexion of the plantar-flexed foot is the usual mechanism of injury. Spontaneous bilateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is common in the degenerated tendon, which is often seen in patients with long-term corticosteroid therapy. This case is unusual because the patient has never taken steroids. We discuss the mechanism of injury and other probable causes. PMID:16131683</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rao, S K; Navadgi, B C; Vasdev, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51927880"> <span id="translatedtitle">The 2010 Chile Earthquake - Variations in the <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Mode</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The magnitude 8.8, February 27, 2010 Chile, that occurred along the south central Nazca\\/South American plate boundary was an underthrusting event with an aftershock length of ~600 km along strike, with a bi-lateral <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that started near Cobquecura and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> north to Valparaiso and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> 100 km south of Concepcion. This segment of the south central coast of Chile has</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. L. Beck; D. Comte; T. Lay; E. Kiser; M. Ishii</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011GeoRL..38.8310L"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> directivity of microearthquake sequences near Parkfield, California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The direction of propagation is an important factor that affects the pattern of ground motion generated by an earthquake. Characterizing factors favoring a potential <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation direction is thus an important task. Here we analyze the earthquake directivity of repeating earthquake sequences located on the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California. All earthquakes of a sequence have very similar waveforms and have overlapping surface <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. We show that subtle variations of the transfer function between earthquakes of a common sequence can be interpreted as a change of apparent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration. Relative apparent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> durations are computed for all pairs of events at all available stations and for each sequence. We invert these measurements to obtain an estimation of the apparent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration for each individual event of the sequence relative to a reference event. Variation of apparent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> duration with azimuth attests for the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity. We show that the majority of analyzed microearthquakes presents a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the south-east direction. We also show that, on a given repeating sequence, most earthquakes tend to show the same <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lengliné, O.; Got, J.-L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AIPC..907.1466Q"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Modulus of <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> from a Mathematical Point of View</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this work is to present a complete mathematical study about the three-point bending experiments and the modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of brittle materials. We will present the mathematical model associated to three-point bending experiments and we will use the asymptotic expansion method to obtain a new formula to calculate the modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We will compare the modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of porcelain obtained with the previous formula with that obtained by using the classic theoretical formula. Finally, we will also present one and three-dimensional numerical simulations to compute the modulus of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Quintela, P.; Sánchez, M. T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23464778"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: case report and literature review.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous diaphragm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is extremely rare. Usually a diaphragm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is trauma induced. We describe a case of an 18-year old patient admitted 2 hours after onset, presenting severe epigastric and left sided chest pain without any trauma history. Upright chest x-ray revealed displaced stomach and colon into the left pleural cavity with a collapsed left lung. Surgery for a left-sided diaphragm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with stomach, spleen and colon splenic flexure herniation was undertaken. We present a brief review regarding the aetiology, diagnostic and treatment policy of spontaneous diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:23464778</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ghidirim, Gh; Mishin, I; Condratsky, E; Zastavnitsky, Gh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.data.scec.org/Module/s1act02.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">What Is an Earthquake?: Fault-<span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Analogies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This activity has two parts: the first part will demonstrate the weaknesses of simple fault models (like block diagrams) in depicting the process of fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> accurately; and the second part is centered around a fairly simple animation of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation, seen by an oblique map view, that attempts to show more accurately what we should envision when we think about fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. This activity provides different analogies for describing the process of fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, with attention paid to the strengths and weaknesses of each.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011NJPh...13i5010E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kinetics of hole nucleation in biomembrane <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The core component of a biological membrane is a fluid-lipid bilayer held together by interfacial-hydrophobic and van der Waals interactions, which are balanced for the most part by acyl chain entropy confinement. If biomembranes are subjected to persistent tensions, an unstable (nanoscale) hole will emerge at some time to cause <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Because of the large energy required to create a hole, thermal activation appears to be requisite for initiating a hole and the activation energy is expected to depend significantly on mechanical tension. Although models exist for the kinetic process of hole nucleation in tense membranes, studies of membrane survival have failed to cover the ranges of tension and lifetime needed to critically examine nucleation theory. Hence, <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> giant (~20 ?m) membrane vesicles ultra-slowly to ultra-quickly with slow to fast ramps of tension, we demonstrate a method to directly quantify kinetic rates at which unstable holes form in fluid membranes, at the same time providing a range of kinetic rates from <0.01 to >100 s-1. Measuring lifetimes of many hundreds of vesicles, each tensed by precision control of micropipette suction, we have determined the rates of failure for vesicles made from several synthetic phospholipids plus 1:1 mixtures of phospho- and sphingo-lipids with cholesterol, all of which represent prominent constituents of eukaryotic cell membranes. Plotted on a logarithmic scale, the failure rates for vesicles are found to rise dramatically with an increase in tension. Converting the experimental profiles of kinetic rates into changes of activation energy versus tension, we show that the results closely match expressions for thermal activation derived from a combination of meso-scale theory and molecular-scale simulations of hole formation. Moreover, we demonstrate a generic approach to transform analytical fits of activation energies obtained from <span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiments into energy landscapes characterizing the process of hole nucleation along the reaction coordinate defined by hole size.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evans, Evan; Smith, Benjamin A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3620434"> <span id="translatedtitle">Migraine before <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of intracranial aneurysms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) causes thunderclap headache but it remains unclear whether headache in general and migraine in particular are more prevalent in patients with unruptured SIA. Methods In a prospective case–control study 199 consecutive patients with SIA (103 females and 96 males, mean age: 43.2 years) received a semistructured face to face interview focusing on past headaches. All were admitted to hospital mostly because of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (177) or for unruptured aneurysm (22). In parallel we interviewed 194 blood donors (86 females, 108 males, mean age: 38.4 years). Diagnoses were made according to the International Headache Society criteria. Aneurysms were diagnosed by conventional cerebral angiography. Results During the year before <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, 124 (62.3%) had one or more types of headache. These headaches included: migraine without aura (MO): 78 (39.2%), migraine with aura (MA): 2 (1%), probable migraine (PM): 4 (2%), tension-type headache (TTH): 39 (19.6%), cluster headache (CH): 2 (1%), posttraumatic headaches (PH): 2 (1%). 1-year prevalence of headaches in controls was 32.5% (63 patients out of 194), they included: TTH: 45 (23.1%), MO: 17(8.8%), PH: 1(0.5%). Only the prevalence of MO was significantly higher in patients with SIA (OR 6.7, 95% CI 3.8-11.9, p?<?0.0001). Conclusions Unruptured SIA cause a marked increase in the prevalence of migraine without aura but not in the prevalence of other types of headache.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.T54B..08P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surface <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Characteristics and <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Mechanics of the Yushu Earthquake (Ms7.1), 14/04/2010</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On April 14th 2010, a disastrous earthquake (Ms 7.1) struck Yushu County, Qinghai Province, China, killing thousands of people. This earthquake occurred as a result of sinistral strike-slip faulting on the western segment of the Xianshuihe Fault zone in eastern Tibetan Plateau. Our group conducted scientific investigation in the field on co-seismic surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and active tectonics in the epicenter area immediately after the earthquake. Here, we introduce our preliminary results on the surface <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mechanics of the Yushu Earthquake. The surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone of Yushu earthquake, which is about 49 km-long, consists of 3 discontinuous left stepping <span class="hlt">rupture</span> segments, which are 19 km, 22 km, and about 8 km, respectively, from west to east. Each segment consists of a series of right stepping en-echelon branch <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. The branch <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> consist of interphase push-up and tension fissures or simply en-echelon tension fissures. The co-seismic displacements had been surveyed with a total station in detail on landmarks such as rivers, gullies, roads, farmlands, wire poles, and fences. The maximum offset measured is 2.3m, located near the Guoyangyansongduo Village. There are 3 offset peaks along the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone corresponding to the 3 segments of the surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone. The maximum offsets in the west, central, and east segment <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zones are 1.4m, 2.3m, and 1.6m respectively. The surface <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone of Yushu earthquake strikes in a 310°NW direction. The fault plane dips to the northeast and the dip angle is about 81°. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zone is developed in transtension setting. Tension normal fault developed during the sinistral strike-slip process of the fault. The valley west of Yushu City and the Longbao Lake are both pull-apart basins formed during the transtension activity of the fault.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pan, J.; Li, H.; Xu, Z.; Li, N.; Wu, F.; Guo, R.; Zhang, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.T21E..03S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation beneath potential landslide wedge</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0), much larger slip and tsunami occurred than expectation at outer-wedge (toe of the trench landward slope) of Japan trench (eg. Ide et al., 2011). Similarly, outer-wedge deformation was pointed out in northern segment of 1986 Meiji-Sanriku earthquake (Ms 7.2), and it was discussed that earthquake-related landslide induced large tsunami (eg. Kanamori, 1972; Tanioka and Satake, 1996). Many landslides and normal faults, potential tsunami genesis, are developed at outer-wedge of Japan trench (Henry et al., 1989). Some steep normal-faults turn to horizon at deep portion, and land sliding may be prevented by basal friction. If seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagates to basal fault of the outer-wedge, triggered gravity collapse will enlarge deformation of the outer-wedge to cause large tsunamis. It was considered that seismogenic fault locks at deep portion under inner-wedge of the plate subduction zone, and outer-wedge was classified into aseismic zone classically. Seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation to outer-wedge is still uncertain. Seismic slip at the outer-wedge was found from the drilled core during IODP Nankai trough seismogenic zone drilling project (NanTroSEIZE) in Nankai trough, southwest Japan. Samples were obtained from the frontal thrust (438 mbsf), which connects the deep plate boundary to the seafloor at the toe of the accretionary wedge, and from a megasplay fault (271 mbsf) that branches from the plate boundary décollement. Higher vitrinite reflectance of 0.57 % and 0.37 % than the host rock of 0.24 % were found at splay and plate boundary faults zones respectively. These correspond with 300-400 °C and > 20°C of host rock. Local high temperature zone less than several cm thick may be caused by frictional shear heat at fault zone (Sakaguchi, et al., 2011). Shear velocity and durations can be estimated from thermal property of the sediment and distribution of the vitrinite anomaly (Hamada et al., 2011). This result shows that seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has been propagated to outer-wedge of the plate subduction zone. Such a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation probably trigger gravity collapse of the outer-wedge.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sakaguchi, A.; Kawamura, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1073757"> <span id="translatedtitle">Embolisation of recently <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> intracranial aneurysms.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage due to the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of aneurysms unsuitable for craniotomy and clipping have been treated by coil embolisation within three weeks. Sixty nine of 75 consecutive patients were successfully treated. Procedure related complications occurred in 10 patients, resulting in permanent neurological deficits in three and one death (4.8%). The Glasgow outcome scores at six weeks were 53 grade 1, seven grade 2, four grade 3, and five grade 5. These results are comparable with surgical series despite a high proportion of aneurysms in the posterior cerebral circulation. Images</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Byrne, J V; Molyneux, A J; Brennan, R P; Renowden, S A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16089834"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anisotropy in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lines of paper sheets.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have experimentally investigated the fracture process in paper samples submitted to a uniaxial force. Five types of paper sheets (newsprint, towel, sulfite, silk, and couche papers) were fractured along two orthogonal orientations. In order to characterize the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lines of the paper sheets we utilized the Hurst exponent. Our results indicate a dependence of the Hurst exponent on the orientation of the paper sheets for samples of newsprint and, probably, towel and silk papers. For the other types of paper the Hurst exponent does not depend on the direction of crack propagation. PMID:16089834</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Menezes-Sobrinho, I L; Couto, M S; Ribeiro, I R B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-06-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PhRvE..71f6121M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anisotropy in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lines of paper sheets</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have experimentally investigated the fracture process in paper samples submitted to a uniaxial force. Five types of paper sheets (newsprint, towel, sulfite, silk, and couche papers) were fractured along two orthogonal orientations. In order to characterize the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lines of the paper sheets we utilized the Hurst exponent. Our results indicate a dependence of the Hurst exponent on the orientation of the paper sheets for samples of newsprint and, probably, towel and silk papers. For the other types of paper the Hurst exponent does not depend on the direction of crack propagation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Menezes-Sobrinho, I. L.; Couto, M. S.; Ribeiro, I. R. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23678116"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stimulus value signals in ventromedial PFC reflect the integration of attribute value signals computed in <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus and posterior superior temporal gyrus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We often have to make choices among multiattribute stimuli (e.g., a food that differs on its taste and health). Behavioral data suggest that choices are made by computing the value of the different attributes and then integrating them into an overall stimulus value signal. However, it is not known whether this theory describes the way the brain computes the stimulus value signals, or how the underlying computations might be implemented. We investigated these questions using a human fMRI task in which individuals had to evaluate T-shirts that varied in their visual esthetic (e.g., color) and semantic (e.g., meaning of logo printed in T-shirt) components. We found that activity in the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus, an area associated with the processing of visual features, correlated with the value of the visual esthetic attributes, but not with the value of the semantic attributes. In contrast, activity in posterior superior temporal gyrus, an area associated with the processing of semantic meaning, exhibited the opposite pattern. Furthermore, both areas exhibited functional connectivity with an area of ventromedial prefrontal cortex that reflects the computation of overall stimulus values at the time of decision. The results provide supporting evidence for the hypothesis that some attribute values are computed in cortical areas specialized in the processing of such features, and that those attribute-specific values are then passed to the vmPFC to be integrated into an overall stimulus value signal to guide the decision. PMID:23678116</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lim, Seung-Lark; O'Doherty, John P; Rangel, Antonio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20136433"> <span id="translatedtitle">The ethyl alcohol extract of Hizikia <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> inhibits matrix metalloproteinase activity and regulates tight junction related protein expression in Hep3B human hepatocarcinoma cells.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We tested the correlation between the tightness of tight junctions (TJs) and the anti-invasive activity of the ethyl alcohol extract of Hizikia <span class="hlt">fusiforme</span> (EHF) in Hep3B human hepatocarcinoma cells. EHF inhibited cell proliferation, motility, and invasiveness, which were associated with increased TJ tightness, as demonstrated by an increase in transepithelial electrical resistance. EHF dose-dependently decreased the secretion of matrix metalloprotease-2 and -9, which correlated with a decrease in mRNA and protein expression, but increased tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and -2 mRNA levels. Additionally, immunoblotting results indicated that EHF suppressed the major components of TJ, claudins (-1, -3, and -4), which play a key role in the control and selectivity of paracellular transport. These data indicate that EHF may inhibit cancer cell invasion through the tightening of TJs, which may counteract the up-regulation of claudins. Furthermore, EHF treatment decreased the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor proteins, while concurrently increasing that of thrombospondin-1 and E-cadherin. In conclusion, these results suggest that EHF treatment may inhibit tumor metastasis and invasion and therefore act as a dietary resource for decreasing the risk of developing cancer. PMID:20136433</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Sung Ok; Choi, Yung Hyun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21360830"> <span id="translatedtitle">Altered posterior cingulate cortical cyctoarchitecture, but normal density of neurons and interneurons in the posterior cingulate cortex and <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus in autism.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Autism is a developmental disorder with prenatal origins, currently estimated to affect 1 in 91 children in the United States. Social-emotional deficits are a hallmark of autism and early neuropathology studies have indicated involvement of the limbic system. Imaging studies demonstrate abnormal activation of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), a component of the limbic system. Abnormal activation has also been noted in the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus (FFG), a region important for facial recognition and a key element in social interaction. A potential imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory interneurons in the cortex may contribute to altered information processing in autism. Furthermore, reduced numbers of GABA receptors have previously been reported in the autistic brain. Thionin-stained sections were used to qualitatively assess cytoarchitectonic patterning and quantitatively determine the density of neurons and immunohistochemistry was used to determine the densities of a subset of GABAergic interneurons utilizing parvalbumin-and calbindin-immunoreactivity. In autism, the PCC displayed altered cytoarchitecture with irregularly distributed neurons, poorly demarcated layers IV and V, and increased presence of white matter neurons. In contrast, no neuropathology was observed in the FFG. There was no significant difference in the density of thionin, parvalbumin, or calbindin interneurons in either region and there was a trend towards a reduced density of calbindin neurons in the PCC. This study highlights the presence of abnormal findings in the PCC, which appear to be developmental in nature and could affect the local processing of social-emotional behaviors as well as functioning of interrelated areas. PMID:21360830</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oblak, Adrian L; Rosene, Douglas L; Kemper, Thomas L; Bauman, Margaret L; Blatt, Gene J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3450923"> <span id="translatedtitle">Goal-Directed Actions Activate the Face-Sensitive Posterior Superior Temporal Sulcus and <span class="hlt">Fusiform</span> Gyrus in the Absence of Human-Like Perceptual Cues</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The conditions under which we identify entities as animate agents and the neural mechanisms supporting this ability are central questions in social neuroscience. Prior studies have focused upon 2 perceptual cues for signaling animacy: 1) surface features representing body forms such as faces, torsos, and limbs and 2) motion cues associated with biological forms. Here, we consider a third cue—the goal-directedness of an action. Regions in the social brain network, such as the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) and <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> face area (FFA), are activated by human-like motion and body form perceptual cues signaling animacy. Here, we investigate whether these same brain regions are activated by goal-directed motion even when performed by entities that lack human-like perceptual cues. We observed an interaction effect whereby the presence of either human-like perceptual cues or goal-directed actions was sufficient to activate the right pSTS and FFA. Only stimuli that lacked human-like perceptual cues and goal-directed actions failed to activate the pSTS and FFA at the same level.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shultz, Sarah</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=481840"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the myocardium. Occurrence and risk factors.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The occurrence of myocardial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> was studied in a well defined unselected population of patients with acute myocardial infarction, and the group of patients who died of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the heart were compared with two control groups. Of a total of 3960 patients, 1746 (44%) fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for acute myocardial infarction. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> was defined solely on the basis of the presence of a pathological passage through part of the myocardium, either the free wall of the left ventricle or the septum, found at necropsy or during operation. Two controls were selected for each patient and matched for age and sex, one (control group A) with acute myocardial infarction having died in hospital but not of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (non-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> cardiac death) and one (control group B) with acute myocardial infarction having survived the hospital stay. Necropsy was performed in 75% of all fatal cases with acute myocardial infarction. The total hospital mortality was 19%, the highest mortality being among women over 70 years (29%). <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> (n = 56) were found in 17% of the hospital deaths, or 3.2% of all cases of acute myocardial infarction. Women aged less than 70 had the highest incidence of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, 42% of deaths being due to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The mean age for patients with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and controls was 70.5 years. The median time after admission to death was approximately 50 hours for patients and control group A. Thirty per cent of the patients with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred within 24 hours of the initial symptoms occurring. Angina and previous acute myocardial infarction were more common among control group A. Patients with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and control group B were mostly relatively free of previous cardiovascular or other diseases (chronic angina pectoris ( > 2 months) and previous myocardial infarction). Sustained hypertension during admission to the coronary care unit was more common in patients than in control group A. Hypotension and shock were more common among control group A. Most (79%) of the patients who subsequently <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> did not receive any corticosteroids at all during the hospital stay. Severe heart failure and antiarrhythmic treatment were more uncommon among patients than among control group A. Patients with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> received analgesics approximately three times a day throughout their stay. Control group B received analgesics mostly during the first 24 hours. Thus female patients, patients with first infarcts, and patients with sustained chest pain should be investigated for the possibility of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. As many as one third (32%) of <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> may be subacute, and therefore time is available for diagnosis and surgery.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dellborg, M; Held, P; Swedberg, K; Vedin, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9617415"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in badminton players.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">All patients with badminton-related acute Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> registered during 1990 to 1994 at the University Hospital of Umeå were retrospectively followed up using a questionnaire. Thirty-one patients (mean age, 36.0 years), 27 men and 4 women, were included. Thirty patients (97%) described themselves as recreational players or beginners. The majority of the injuries (29 of 31, 94%) happened at the middle or end of the planned game. Previous local symptoms had been noticed by five patients (16%). Long-term results showed that patients treated with surgery had a significantly shorter sick leave absence than patients treated without surgery (50 versus 75 days). There was no obvious selection favoring any treatment modality. None of the surgically treated patients had reruptures, but two reruptures occurred in the nonsurgically treated group. There seemed to be fewer remaining symptoms and a higher sports activity level after the injury in the surgically treated group. Our results indicate that local muscle fatigue may interfere with strength and coordination. Preventive measures such as specific treatment of minor injuries and adequate training of strength, endurance, and coordination are important. Our findings also indicate that surgical treatment and careful postoperative rehabilitation is of great importance among badminton players of any age or sports level with Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:9617415</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fahlström, M; Björnstig, U; Lorentzon, R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9244804"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of wallaby tail tendons.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The tail tendons from wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus) suffer creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at stresses of 10 MPa or above, whereas their yield stress in a dynamic test is about 144 MPa. At stresses between 20 and 80 MPa, the time-to-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> decreases exponentially with stress, but at 10 MPa, the lifetime is well above this exponential. For comparison, the stress on a wallaby tail tendon, when its muscle contracts isometrically, is about 13.5 MPa. Creep lifetime depends sharply on temperature and on specimen length, in contrast to strength and stiffness as observed in dynamic tests. The creep curve (strain versus time) can be considered as a combination of primary creep (decelerating strain) and tertiary creep (accelerating strain). Primary creep is non-damaging, but tertiary creep is accompanied by accumulating damage, with loss of stiffness and strength. 'Damage' is quantitatively defined as the fractional loss of stiffness. A creep theory is developed in which the whole of tertiary creep and, in particular, the creep lifetime are predicted from measurements made at the onset of creep, when the tendon is undamaged. This theory is based on a 'damage hypothesis', which can be stated as: damaged material no longer contributes to stiffness and strength, whereas intact material makes its full contribution to both. PMID:9244804</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, X T; Ker, R F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JGRB..116.2310B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic seismic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> on melting fault zones</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a physical model that describes the behavior of spontaneous earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> dynamically propagating on a fault zone and that accounts for the presence of frictional melt produced by the sliding surfaces. First, we analytically derive the solution for the temperature evolution inside the melt layer, which generalizes previous approximations. Then we incorporate such a solution into a numerical code for the solution of the elastodynamic problem. When a melt layer is formed, the linear slip-weakening law (initially governing the fault and relying on the Coulomb friction) is no longer valid. Therefore we introduce on the fault a linearly viscous rheology, with a temperature-dependent dynamic viscosity. We explore through numerical simulations the resulting behavior of the traction evolution in the cohesive zone before and after the transition from Coulomb friction and viscous rheology. The predictions of our model are in general agreement with the data from exhumed faults. We also find that the fault, after undergoing the breakdown stress drop controlled by the slip-weakening constitutive equation, experiences a second traction drop controlled by the exponential weakening of fault resistance due to the viscous rheology. This further drop enhances the instability of the fault, increasing the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds, the peaks in fault slip velocity, and the fracture energy density.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bizzarri, Andrea</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20569577"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Giant Basilar Artery Aneurysm in a Comatose Adolescent: Successful Obliteration Using Intraoperative SSEP, BAER, and MEP Monitoring. A Case Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary: Giant basilar aneurysms are infrequently seen in children. We present the endovascular management of an adolescent who presented comatose with pinpoint pupils due to a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> giant basilar trunk aneurysm. A noncontrast head CT disclosed a large prepontine lesion with brainstem hemorrhage. Catheter angiography showed a 4.5 cm irregular, <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> basilar trunk aneurysm. With SSEP, BAER, and MEP monitoring, the patient underwent bilateral temporary vertebral artery occlusion, followed by GDC embolization of the aneurysm. Postprocedure internal carotid angiograms showed adequate blood supply to the basilar apex via patent posterior communicating arteries. On postprocedure day two, the patient was following commands. The remainder of his hospital course was uneventful. Postoperative angiograms showed no residual filling of the aneurysm. At 12 months the patient was neurologically intact and at baseline function as an honor student and follow-up angiogram showed persistent occlusion of the aneurysm from the circulation. Successful endovascular treatment has been considered a less invasive and safer alternative to surgical management of some complex vascular lesions. While most reports on reversing basilar artery flow have been carried out in awake patients with neurological examinations, this is not possible in a patient presenting in a comatose state. This report suggests that SSEPs, BAERs and MEP may be of use in such patients in safely carrying out basilar artery occlusion. PMID:20569577</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nwagwu, C I; Mathews, M S; Scott, J A; Denardo, A J; Horner, T G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/t3u346n3u43qtm4k.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the aortic isthmus: An emergency?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The objectives of this study were to explore the hypotheses that: (1) patients with traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the aortic isthmus (TRA) who have not exsanguinated into the pleural cavity upon hospital presentation are unilikely to develop <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the hematoma during the time necessary to investigate all injuries and attend to those of more immediate danger; and (2) appropriate medical</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">James W. Pate; Timothy C. Fabian; William Walker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/32875810"> <span id="translatedtitle">Monochorionic Twins with <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Vasa Previa: Double Trouble!</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Velamentous cord insertion and vasa previa occur more frequently in monochorionic twin pregnancies than in singleton pregnancies. Both have been linked with poor perinatal outcome due to the increased risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the velamentous vessels. We present a case of acute fetal distress in 2 fetuses in a monochorionic twin pregnancy caused by <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> vasa previa that was not</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Papathanasiou; R. Witlox; D. Oepkes; F. J. Walther; K. W. M. Bloemenkamp; E. Lopriore</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/34938741"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonoxidative modification of low density lipoprotein by <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> myocytes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study, the interaction of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> cardiac myocytes with low density lipoprotein (LDL) has been investigated and the consequent extent of uptake by macrophages. The results show that lysate released from <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> myocytes is capable of inducing LDL oxidation and that the resulting modified form is recognised and degraded by macrophages. Peroxyl radical scavengers inhibit the LDL oxidation but</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Louise C Bourne; David J Lamb; Cliff S Collis; Michael O'Brien; David S Leake; Catherine Rice-Evans</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23008157"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aortocoronary saphenous vein graft <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during diagnostic angiography.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coronary saphenous vein graft (SVG) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during diagnostic angiography is a very rare but known complication of the procedure. It has typically been reported to occur at the site of pseudoaneurysms or secondary to an interventional procedure involving the graft. We present a case of SVG mid-body <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during diagnostic angiography that occurred without evidence of pseudoaneurysmal changes. PMID:23008157</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Salcedo, Jonathan D; Bhakta, Mayurkumar D; Kern, Morton J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31498569"> <span id="translatedtitle">Splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as a presenting feature of endocarditis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We describe the first case of infective endocarditis presenting with spontaneous splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Our patient, a known intravenous drug user presented with hypovolaemic shock secondary to splenic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The patient was resuscitated and underwent an emergency splenectomy. Subsequent clinical examination revealed a systolic murmur and a diagnosis of mitral valve infective endocarditis was made after echocardiography. Splenic tissue, blood cultures</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">James Roger Winearls; Steven McGloughlin; John F Fraser</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v104/iB04/98JB02412/98JB02412.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mapping the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of moderate earthquakes by inverting accelerograms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a waveform inversion method that uses recordings of small events as Green's functions to map the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> growth of moderate earthquakes. The method fits P and S waveforms from many stations simultaneously in an iterative procedure to estimate the subevent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time and amplitude relative to the Green's function event. We invert the accelerograms written by two moderate</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Margaret Hellweg; John Boatwright</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1550485"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cardiac <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from blunt trauma with atrial septal defect.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A review of the literature disclosed 63 survivors of cardiac chamber <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from blunt trauma, with no mention of associated atrial septal defect. I treated a 17-year-old girl and a 33-year-old man who survived cardiac <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from motor vehicle accidents, both of whom were discovered postoperatively on echocardiography to have atrial septal defects. PMID:1550485</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baumgartel, E D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/10678647"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: recent outcome with regard to neurologic deficit</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background. Traumatic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is highly lethal, and its surgical treatment is complicated by a high rate of paraplegia.Methods. The charts of 263 patients with traumatic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from vehicular accidents treated between 1971 and 1998 were reviewed. Patients were grouped according to four periods: group 1, 1971 to 1975, (n = 31); group 2, 1976 to 1985, (n =</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Safuh Attar; Marcelo G. Cardarelli; Stephen W. Downing; Aurelio Rodriguez; Douglas C. Wallace; Robert S. West; Joseph S. McLaughlin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48955098"> <span id="translatedtitle">Depth dependence of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity in deep earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Explaining deep seismicity is a long-standing challenge in earth science. Between 300 and 700 km depth, earthquakes are scarce except between ?530 and ?600 km, where the majority of events occur. By imaging the seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process for a set of recent deep earthquakes using the back projection of teleseismic P-waves, we found that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocities are less than</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mitsuru Suzuki; Yuji Yagi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41269107"> <span id="translatedtitle">The effect of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on fetal heart rate patterns</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The high success rate of vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) and its low association with complications has led to VBACs being attempted at all types of facilities, including birth centers. It must be kept in mind that unpredictable uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can occur and that uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> necessitates emergency intervention. The only reported predictable feature of fetal heart rate patterns</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cydney Afriat Menihan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/32419400"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tracheobronchial <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: a considerable risk for young teenagers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tracheobronchial (TB) <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> are ten times lower in children than in adults. Despite its rarity in the literature, we found that it is as common as in adults in our series. We investigated TB <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in childhood regarding age, trauma presentation, injury localization and treatment options. From 1994 through 2001, eight children (six male, two female) were admitted to our</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Melih Kaptanoglu; Kasim Dogan; Aydin Nadir; Ugur Gonlugur; Ibrahim Akkurt; Zehra Seyfikli; Ilhan Gunay</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/5859631"> <span id="translatedtitle">Predicting the <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Probabilities of Molecular Bonds in Series</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An assembly of two receptor ligand bonds in series will typically break at the weaker complex upon application of an external force. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> site depends highly on the binding potentials of both bonds and on the loading rate of the applied force. A model is presented that allows simulations of force-induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of bonds in series at a given</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gregor Neuert; Christian H. Albrecht; Hermann E. Gaub</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.5421G"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> process of the 2000 and 2008 Ölfus (Iceland) earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have studied the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of three earthquakes occurred in 2000 (17-06, Mw=6.5 and 21-06, Mw=6.4) and 2008 (29-05, Mw=6.2) in Iceland, with epicentres very close. We have estimated focal mechanism from inversion of body waves at teleseismic distances (30°-90°) using the algorithm developed by Kikuchi and Kanamori for a kinematic source. In a second step, the slip distribution over the fault-plane has been estimated. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity and direction of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> have been estimated from Rayleigh waves using the directivity function. The obtained results show similar focal mechanism for the three earthquakes corresponding to strike-slip motion. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> plane is oriented in all cases in NS direction, which agrees with tectonics of the area. The slip distribution obtained for the three shocks, shows a single process that starts at shallow depth (5 to 7 km), with the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagating to the south and parallel to the surface. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity estimated from body waves and Rayleigh waves is very low: 1.5 km/s. In order to confirm these low values, we have estimated the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process using strong motion data recorded by Icelandic Strong-Motion Network. Accelerograms were converted to displacement by double integration and filtered. We have carried out a kinematic inversion of these data in order to constraint the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Girona, Társilo; Pro, Carmen; Buforn, Elisa; Peyrat, Sophie; Sigbjörnsson, Ragnar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/e376641g7828m7t6.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> renal artery aneurysm during pregnancy, a clinical dilemma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">BACKGROUND: <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a renal artery aneurysm (RAA) during pregnancy is a rare event, with a high mortality rate for both mother and fetus. Increased blood flow and intra-abdominal pressure, and vascular changes secondary to increased steroid production are postulated as contributory to the increased risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during pregnancy. CASE PRESENTATION: We present here a case report of total</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Khaled B Soliman; Yaser Shawky; Mohamed M Abbas; Mohamed Ammary; Allaa Shaaban</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9447366"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the uterine artery in pregnancy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A case of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the uterine artery in the third trimester of pregnancy is described. Review of the literature reveals only three similar cases. Clinical signs are sudden abdominal pain with hemodynamic collapse and a decrease in the level of hemoglobin. Treatment consists in performing a laparotomy with suturing of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> artery. PMID:9447366</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Swaegers, M C; Hauspy, J J; Buytaert, P M; De Maeseneer, M G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30740210"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the anterior cruciate ligament after anabolic steroids</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anabolic steroids remain popular among body builders and power athletes despite numerous warning about their side effects. A case of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the anterior cruciate ligament is reported in a bodybuilder taking steroids. While there are many published reports of tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> associated with steroid intake, the authors could find no report relating to ligament disruption.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B J Freeman; G D Rooker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8808545"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the anterior cruciate ligament after anabolic steroids.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anabolic steroids remain popular among body builders and power athletes despite numerous warning about their side effects. A case of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the anterior cruciate ligament is reported in a bodybuilder taking steroids. While there are many published reports of tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> associated with steroid intake, the authors could find no report relating to ligament disruption. PMID:8808545</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Freeman, B J; Rooker, G D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60682516"> <span id="translatedtitle">Endovascular Treatment of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Aortocaval Fistula</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aortocaval fistula (ACF) is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We report the endovascular repair of an AAA <span class="hlt">rupture</span> into the inferior vena cava. A 78-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for acute hypotension. She presented with a pulsatile abdominal mass and became rapidly anuric. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed an AAA <span class="hlt">rupture</span> into the inferior vena</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Giuseppe Guzzardi; Rita Fossaceca; Ignazio Divenuto; Antonello Musiani; Piero Brustia; Alessandro Carriero</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2496021"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the stomach following mouth-to-mouth respiration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Successful repair and survival after <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the stomach in a patient who received mouth-to-mouth respiration is presented. We were able to find only one report in the literature where <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the stomach occurred following this manoeuvre—the patient did not survive. The possible aetiological factors and measures designed to avoid this complication are discussed. ImagesFig. 1</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Solowiejczyk, M.; Wapnick, S.; Koren, E.; Mandelbaum, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=EGGLTR1127"> <span id="translatedtitle">Offsite Exposure from <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Waste Gas Decay Tank.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The offsite exposure resulting in the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the waste gas decay (storage) tank has been calculated. The tank <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is assumed to occur following a 20% fuel pin perforation blowdown experiment from which the gaseous fission products have been transf...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. A. Dinneen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59275619"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> while playing basketball</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is an uncommon injury in healthy people and only a few cases have been reported in athletes. This is the first report of a patient with simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> incurred while playing basketball. The injury was surgically repaired and the patient had a good functional outcome.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M Shah; N Jooma</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40786419"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in materials containing an amorphous phase</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Experimental observations of creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in materials containing an amorphous second phase are presented. Based on these and other observations, a theoretical model is developed for a dominant aspect of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: creep crack growth. According to the model the crack extends into a damage zone consisting of cavities in the second phase. Two limiting solutions are presented. One occurs when</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. D. Thouless; A. G. Evans</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26173142"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biomechanics of Plaque <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: Progress, Problems, and New Frontiers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Plaque <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has become identified as a critical step in the evolution of arterial plaques, especially as clinically significant events occur in critical arteries. It has become common in the past dozen years or so to consider which plaques are vulnerable, even though not yet <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>. Thrombotic events have remained significant, but in a context where they are seen as</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peter D. Richardson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/ag8p5j9ajdgwc0xj.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Emergent endovascular treatment of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this study was to evaluate the results of endovascular and surgical treatments for <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms (VADAs) to determine which treatment is preferable. We evaluated the cases of 25 consecutive patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> VADAs treated in our institution. From 1992 to 1997, five patients were treated surgically. Since 1998, 20 patients with VADAs have been</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. Sugiu; K. Tokunaga; K. Watanabe; W. Sasahara; S. Ono; T. Tamiya; I. Date</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dredizaltinli.com/isolated_duodenal_rupture.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Isolated duodenal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> due to blunt abdominal trauma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Duodenal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following blunt abdominal trauma is rare and it usually seen with other abdominal organ injuries. It represents approximately 2% to 20% of patients with blunt abdominal injury and often occurs after blows to the upper abdomen, or abdominal compression from high-riding seat belts. Two cases of blunt duodenal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> successfully treated surgically, are presented with their preoperative diagnosis</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Atilla Celik; Ediz Altinli; Ender Onur; Aziz Sumer; Neset Koksal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S14A..07L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Depth-varying <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Properties of Subduction Zone Megathrust Faults</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Earth's largest earthquakes <span class="hlt">rupture</span> megathrust faults at subduction zone plate boundaries. The 2004 Sumatra (Mw 9.2), 2010 Chile (Mw 8.8) and 2011 Tohoku (Mw 9.0) great earthquakes exhibit similarities in spatial variations of seismic wave radiation from their <span class="hlt">rupture</span> zones, with coherent short-period radiation preferentially emanating from the deeper portion of the megathrust while the largest fault displacements occur at shallower megathrust depths with relatively less short-period radiation. In numerous regions, large tsunami earthquakes <span class="hlt">rupture</span> the shallowest region of the plate boundary with large displacements and very low short-period radiation, while low-frequency earthquakes, seismic tremor and slow slip events occur down-dip of the primary seismogenic portion of some megathrusts. These observations indicate that interplate thrust faults <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with systematic depth-variations characterized by four distinct domains from the trench to the down-dip edge of the seismogenic zone. Attributes of large <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> such as seismic moment scaled radiated energy vary with the domain or domains <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>. Fundamental differences in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior exist between these domains, with variations in frictional properties, pore fluids, sediments, mineral phase, rock-type contrast, and temperature likely contributing to depth-dependent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lay, T.; Kanamori, H.; Ammon, C. J.; Yue, H.; Koper, K. D.; Hutko, A. R.; Brodsky, E. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010APS..DFD.GY006B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of thin liquid films with Plateau borders</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In metal foams there is fluid flow from a lamella into the Plateau borders resulting in lamellar thinning. Since surfactants are not used to slow the flow, instability of a lamella quickly leads to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, bubble coalescence and overall coarsening of the foam. This talk presents the results of numerical calculations of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of a lamellar film with Plateau borders in a gas-liquid metallic foam. The numerical calculations show the evolution of a lamella from the initiation of an instability up to the time just prior to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> times and locations are monitored as a function of the Plateau border radius of curvature. The effect of symmetry-breaking configurations in which a lamella spans two Plateau borders having different radii of curvature shows that the location of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can be near the thin film - Plateau border junction. Solutions at late times are compared to the similarity solutions for the case of free films without Plateau borders.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brush, Lucien; McIntyre, Alan; Roper, Steven</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3151209"> <span id="translatedtitle">A brachialis muscle <span class="hlt">rupture</span> diagnosed by ultrasound; case report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Trauma to the elbow caused by lifting heavy objects frequently involves <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the tendon of the biceps brachii muscle. Less frequently a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the brachialis muscle occurs. To our knowledge, only five cases involving traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the brachialis muscle were described in the past 20 years. We will briefly report these cases. To demonstrate and evaluate muscle injuries, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the most sensitive and specific method of choice. We report an isolated brachialis muscle <span class="hlt">rupture</span> caused by resisted flexion and pronation of the lower arm. Physical examination combined with ultrasound evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> brachialis muscle. Treatment was non-operative with full restoration of function.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1250391"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mechanisms for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of pancreatic pseudocysts. A biomechanical evaluation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Considerable morbidity and mortality continue to attend the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of pancreatic pseudocysts. If the mechanism responsible for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> were known, it is conceivable that patients with impending <span class="hlt">rupture</span> could be identified and appropriate measures taken. In an effort to determine whether pseudocysts <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from increased internal pressure, in vivo pressure measurements and stress calculations were performed in 10 intact pseudocysts. Next, fresh strips of pseudocyst wall tissue from seven patients were placed in a tensile testing machine, and ultimate strength (peak stress capacity) was determined. The average in vitro peak stress prior to yield and separation was 12.30 +/- 2.75 Kg-F/cm2. Both this value, and calculated internal pressures required to achieve this level of wall stress, are more than 100 times greater than the corresponding values ever measured in humans. In all likelihood, pseudocysts <span class="hlt">rupture</span> from diminished wall thickness resulting from immaturity and/or enzymatic debridement.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bradley, E L; Vito, R P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.S13A1059Y"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Process of the 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake Inferred From Local P-wave Records: Second hypocenter, Initial <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>, Main <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>, Asperity and Killer Pulse</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The 2007 Noto Hanto earthquake (Mjma6.9; Mw6.7) occurred on 25 March 2007 (JST) in the Noto Peninsula area of central Japan, which shook strongly the near-source region. Many strong-motion stations recorded the seismic motion near the source region. In this study we analyzed the P-wave part of such records. In the waveform a typical characteristic can be seen. That is an emergent onset. The strong-motion records at local stations except the three nearest stations show nearly two seconds of small but increasing amplitude arrival (hereafter, called "initial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> phase") followed by the onset of the main energy release (hereafter, called "main <span class="hlt">rupture</span> phase"). Such an emergent onset is seen on strong-motion records of other earthquakes (e.g., the 2000 Western Tottori earthquake; the 2005 West Off Fukuoka Prefecture earthquake; the 2007 Niigataken Chuetsu-oki earthquake). For the three nearest stations, S wave may have masked the main <span class="hlt">rupture</span> phase with the lager amplitudes. The P- wave part of the records has another remarkable feature. In the first P onset part of the initial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> phase two events can be seen. The difference between the two arrivals is about 0.5 s. Using a master-event technique (Takenaka et al., 2006, EPS) we determined the location of the second event (hereafter called "the second hypocenter") relative to the location of the first event (i.e. hypocenter), and then estimated the relative location and time of the onset of the main <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with respect to the second hypocenter. We furthermore mapped the asperity area on the main fault plane using a source imaging technique based on the back-projection (Yamamoto and Takenaka, 2006, AGU Fall Meeting). From these analyses, we derived the following <span class="hlt">rupture</span> history of this earthquake: The initial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> plane and the main <span class="hlt">rupture</span> plane are different as suggested by the focal mechanism solutions of the P-wave polarities (JMA, 2007) and the CMT (F-net, NIED, 2007). The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> first propagated toward the direction of strike of the initial <span class="hlt">rupture</span> plane for 0.5 seconds and changed to the main <span class="hlt">rupture</span> plane, where this changing point is the second hypocenter. It located at about 1 km apart from the hypocenter. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> then restarted toward the direction of Wajima City along the main <span class="hlt">rupture</span> plane. The main <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (breaking of the asperity) began at a time of 2.4 s after the second hypocenter onset at a position of 1.0 km and 1.4 km in the strike and updip directions, respectively, from the second hypocenter. The asperity distributes along an updip and strike direction from the second hypocenter and the imaging peak locates around the coast near Monzen-cho, Wajima city in the Noto Peninsula. This estimated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> history is consistent with damage distribution and spatial pattern of the observed killer pulse (forward <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity pulse) in S-wave portion of the strong-motion records. (Acknowledgements) We used the strong-motion records supplied by the National Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED; K-NET, KiK-net, F-net), and the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yamamoto, Y.; Takenaka, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/33929858"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous bilateral Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> associated with statin medication despite regular rock climbing exercise</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Introduction<span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> of the Achilles tendon are common however simultaneous <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> occur less frequently. Eccentric loading exercise programmes have been used to successfully treat Achilles tendinopathy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michael R. Carmont; Adrian M. Highland; Christopher M. Blundell; Mark B. Davies</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S53D..05G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Macroscopic Source Properties from Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Styles in Plastic Media</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High stress concentrations at earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> fronts may generate an inelastic off-fault response at the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tip, leading to increased energy absorption in the damage zone. Furthermore, the induced asymmetric plastic strain field in in-plane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes may produce bimaterial interfaces that can increase radiation efficiency and reduce frictional dissipation. Off-fault inelasticity thus plays an important role for realistic predictions of near-fault ground motion. Guided by our previous studies in the 2D elastic case, we perform <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics simulations including rate-and-state friction and off-fault plasticity to investigate the effects on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties. We quantitatively analyze macroscopic source properties for different <span class="hlt">rupture</span> styles, ranging from cracks to pulses and subshear to supershear <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>, and their transitional mechanisms. The energy dissipation due to off-fault inelasticity modifies the conditions to obtain each <span class="hlt">rupture</span> style and alters macroscopic source properties. We examine apparent fracture energy, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and healing front speed, peak slip and peak slip velocity, dynamic stress drop and size of the process and plastic zones, slip and plastic seismic moment, and their connection to ground motion. This presentation focuses on the effects of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> style and off-fault plasticity on the resulting ground motion patterns, especially on characteristic slip velocity function signatures and resulting seismic moments. We aim at developing scaling rules for equivalent elastic models, as function of background stress and frictional parameters, that may lead to improved "pseudo-dynamic" source parameterizations for ground-motion calculation. Moreover, our simulations provide quantitative relations between off-fault energy dissipation and macroscopic source properties. These relations might provide a self-consistent theoretical framework for the study of the earthquake energy balance based on observable earthquake source parameters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gabriel, A.; Ampuero, J. P.; Dalguer, L. A.; Mai, P. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhDT.......127P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantifying uncertainty in earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using dynamic and kinematic models, we analyze the ability of GPS and strong-motion data to recover the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> history of earthquakes. By analyzing the near-source ground-motion generated by earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> through barriers and asperities, we determine that both the prestress and yield stress of a frictional inhomogeneity can be recovered. In addition, we find that models with constraints on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity have less ground motion than constraint-free, spontaneous dynamic models with equivalent stress drops. This suggests that kinematic models with such constraints overestimate the actual stress heterogeneity of earthquakes. We use GPS data from the well-recorded 2004 Mw6.0 Parkfield Earthquake to further probe uncertainties in kinematic models. We find that the inversion for this data set is poorly resolved at depth and near the edges of the fault. In such an underdetermined inversion, it is possible to obtain spurious structure in poorly resolved areas. We demonstrate that a nonuniform grid with grid spacing matching the local resolution length on the fault outperforms small uniform grids, which generate spurious structure in poorly resolved regions, and large uniform grids, which lose recoverable information in well-resolved areas of the fault. The nonuniform grid correctly averages out large-scale structure in poorly resolved areas while recovering small-scale structure near the surface. In addition to probing model uncertainties in earthquake source models, we also examine the effect of model uncertainty in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA). While methods for incorporating parameter uncertainty of a particular model in PSHA are well-understood, methods for incorporating model uncertainty are more difficult to implement due to the high degree of dependence between different earthquake-recurrence models. We show that the method used by the 2002 Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities (WGCEP-2002) to combine the probability distributions given by multiple earthquake recurrence models has several adverse effects on their result. In particular, WGCEP-2002 uses a linear combination of the models which ignores model dependence and leads to large uncertainty in the final hazard estimate. In addition to analyzing current statistical problems, we present alternative methods for rigorously incorporating model uncertainty into PSHA.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Page, Morgan T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007GeoRL..3419307S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fluid-induced <span class="hlt">rupture</span> experiment on Fontainebleau sandstone: Premonitory activity, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation, and aftershocks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 14% porosity Fontainebleau sandstone sample (diameter = 40 mm, length = 88 mm) was loaded tri-axially, under 100 MPa confining pressure and 240 MPa differential stress. In drained conditions and under constant load, pore pressure (water) was raised until failure was triggered. During the experiment, elastic wave velocities and permeability were monitored while more than 3000 Acoustic Emissions (AE) were located prior and after failure. AE locations show that macroscopic fracture propagated from a large nucleation patch at speeds comprised between 0.1 and 4 m/s. Number of AE hits per second followed Omori's law, with exponents of 0.92 and 1.18 pre- and post-failure respectively. No quiescence was observed post failure, except where <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initially nucleated from. Fast depressurization of the pore space induced secondary aftershocks located within the fracture plane, possibly indicating a heterogeneous fault geometry after <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, of lower permeability, that compacted during the release of pore pressure.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schubnel, A.; Thompson, B. D.; Fortin, J.; Guéguen, Y.; Young, R. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14560546"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the Achilles and patellar tendons.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Certain similarities can clearly be appreciated between Achilles and patellar tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>. Both are strong tendons that transmit force bridging at least one joint of the lower limb. When healthy, both require massive forces to be disrupted, and both can be weakened through certain systemic disease processes, steroids, and fluoroquinones. Both allow for a variety of innovative management possibilities that ultimately lend themselves to individual surgical preference. We feel that, although surgical management plays an important role in restoring continuity in knee extension and in plantar flexion, functional outcome inevitably relies on patient motivation and a well-established physiotherapy regime. Sports physicians should be able to identify both conditions early in their presentation, but still hold a high index of suspicion for these problems in athletes who have an acute exacerbation of ongoing tendinopathy. PMID:14560546</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maffulli, Nicola; Wong, Jason</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.S42A..03D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Poroelastic Bimaterial Effects in <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A mismatch of elastic properties across a fault induces normal stress changes during spatially nonuniform slip. Recently, Rudnicki and Rice (2006) showed that similar effects follow from a mismatch of poroelastic properties (e.g., permeability) within fluid-saturated damage fringes along the fault walls; those induce changes in pore pressure on the slip plane and hence changes in effective normal stress during slip. The sign of both changes can be either positive or negative, and they need not agree. Both signs reverse when the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagates in the opposite direction, introducing asymmetry into the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process. We model a poroelastic fault zone cut by a planar fault separating regions of potentially different poroelastic properties. Slip compresses one side of the fault while dilating the opposite side. The resulting undrained pore pressure change is of opposite sign across the fault, and pore fluid diffuses to ensure continuity of pore pressure and fluid flux across the fault. Pore pressure on the fault decreases if the compressive side is less permeable (all other quantities being equal) and vice-versa. The poroelastic properties are measured over the hydraulic diffusion length, generally of order a few millimeters in well-sheared fault core cataclasite for a slip duration of a few seconds. (Poroelastic effects are essentially negligible on that time scale at greater distances from the fault because of vastly smaller pore pressure gradients; the material responds there like a classical elastic solid with moduli based on undrained poroelastic response.) Steady sliding of two half-spaces (neglecting shear heating) with identical elastic properties but a mismatch in poroelastic properties is unstable to perturbations for all non-zero values of the friction coefficient and Skempton's coefficient. The growth rate is proportional to the wavenumber of the perturbation, rendering this problem ill-posed in a manner similar to that for elastic mismatch. When both elastic and poroelastic properties are discontinuous across the fault, sliding is unstable for arbitrarily small friction coefficients if the elastic mismatch permits the existence of a generalized Rayleigh wave. When the poroelastic effect opposes the elastic bimaterial effect, there exists a critical parameter set at which the effects precisely balance and sliding is neutrally stable. The propagation direction of the unstable mode reverses across this critical state. For a large elastic mismatch, the generalized Rayleigh wave goes out of existence and sliding is stabilized for friction coefficients less than some critical value; this value is altered by the poroelastic response. This stability analysis is augmented by calculations of spontaneous <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> on slip-weakening faults across which elastic and poroelastic properties may be discontinuous. Prakash-Clifton regularization permits convergent solutions in the otherwise ill-posed regime. The numerical method is validated by comparison to analytical solutions for the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a line asperity between dissimilar elastic solids in frictionless contact (Harris and Day, 1997) and for a self-similar crack between identical elastic solids but with a mismatch in poroelastic properties.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dunham, E. M.; Rice, J. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15777313"> <span id="translatedtitle">Methemoglobinemia misdiagnosed as <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> ectopic pregnancy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 22-year-old woman with an initial diagnosis of '<span class="hlt">ruptured</span> ectopic pregnancy' and 'hemorrhagic shock' was sent to the operation room for surgical treatment. The mucocutaneous color was deeply cyanosed and the pulse oximeter oxygen saturation (SpO2) was only 86% after tracheal intubation (100% O2). 'Chocolate-brown' blood was observed and methemoglobinemia was considered. Then the arterial blood gas (ABG) sample was obtained, an intravenous infusion of methylene blue and vitamin C followed. The patient recovered quickly, and later two other patients with similar symptoms were treated in the same way. The success was due to a correct diagnosis accompanied with prompt treatment and quick recognition of the etiology. PMID:15777313</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, J J; Lin, N; Lv, R; Sun, J; Zhao, F; Zhang, J; Xu, J G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16912491"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of fetal sacrococcygeal teratoma.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">With recent advances in technology, fetal sacrococcygeal teratoma is being diagnosed increasingly during the early prenatal period by ultrasound examination. In addition, early detection of tumor related complications such as polyhydramnios, congestive heart failure, hydrops, hemorrhage, urinary tract or bowel obstruction can be followed closely in utero. Active prenatal management can improve fetal perinatal outcome by allowing planned delivery for neonatal surgery [Chisholm, C.A. et al.: Am J Perinatol 1999;16:47-50] or in some cases, fetal intervention. Additionally, families can be counseled appropriately regarding the range of outcomes. We report a case of fetal sacrococcygeal teratoma Type I diagnosed at 20 weeks with a prominent vessel supplying the tumor mass. At 23 weeks, there was a sudden appearance of an additional lobular mass, consistent with intrauterine spontaneous <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> of a sacrococcygeal teratoma mass. PMID:16912491</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sy, Edgar D; Lee, Hanmin; Ball, Robert; Farrell, Jody; Poder, Liina; Nobuhara, Kerilyn K; Farmer, Diana L; Harrison, Michael R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10530854"> <span id="translatedtitle">Percutaneous repair of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tendo Achillis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Percutaneous repair of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> tendo Achillis has a low rate of failure and negligible complications with the wound, but the sural nerve may be damaged. We describe a new technique which minimises the risk of injury to this nerve. The repair is carried out using three midline stab incisions over the posterior aspect of the tendon. A No. 1 nylon suture on a 90 mm cutting needle approximates the tendon with two box stitches. The procedure can be carried out under local anaesthesia. We reviewed 27 patients who had a percutaneous repair at a median interval of 35 months after the injury. They returned to work at four weeks and to sport at 16. One developed a minor wound infection and another complex regional pain syndrome type II. There were no injuries to the sural nerve or late reruptures. This technique is simple to undertake and has a low rate of complications. PMID:10530854</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Webb, J M; Bannister, G C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1015643"> <span id="translatedtitle">Disorganisation: a model for 'early amnion <span class="hlt">rupture</span>'?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The hypothesis of an intrinsic defect of germ plasma put forward by Streeter to explain the abnormalities observed in 'amniotic bands sequence' (ABS) was not supported by Torpin, who suggested that the bands derived from early amnion <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, with formation of mesodermal strings and naked chorion, which then constricted or adhered to fetal parts. Recently, several authors have recorded and discussed possible mechanisms for 'non-band related' malformations in patients with otherwise typical limb constrictions and amputations. The mouse mutant disorganisation (Ds) is a semidominant with 72% of heterozygotes manifesting abnormalities, which include cranioschisis, limb duplications and deficiencies, gastro/thoracoschisis, and papillae protruding from other parts of the body. We report similar abnormalities including papillae in five fetuses and one newborn with ABS and, based on these observations and published reports, we suggest that a human homologue for Ds may be the cause of at least some examples of ABS. Images</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Donnai, D; Winter, R M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1070293"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic retroperitoneal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the duodenum.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A report of six cases of retroperitoneal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the duodenum is presented. A high index of suspicion is necessary to enable early diagnosis to be made and appropriate treatment carried out. Early treatment will prevent the extremely rare, but at present uniformly fatal complication of gas gangrene. Plain X-ray and Gastrografin studies may help to elucidate the situation in particular cases, but are no substitute for repeated careful abdominal examination. It is suggested that large doses of penicillin be employed where possible in the management of these cases, in addition to such antibiotic therapy as may be expected to be effective against the usual Gram-negative bowel flora. PMID:1070293</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vellar, D J; Vellar, I D; Pianta, R M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23524505"> <span id="translatedtitle">Behçet's disease with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> anterior communicating artery aneurysm following <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> thoracic aortic aneurysm.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 48-year-old Japanese woman with Behçet's disease suffered successive <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of thoracic aortic and cerebral aneurysms within one year. The patient underwent successful surgical treatment for both aneurysms. Histological examination of the aneurysm walls revealed lymphocyte infiltration into the adventitia with smooth muscle cell hyperplasia in the thickened intima. This is an extremely unusual presentation of Behçet's disease associated with both cerebral and aortic aneurysms. PMID:23524505</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ogata, Atsushi; Kawashima, Masatou; Matsushima, Toshio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.S31A0186B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Role of Fault Branches in Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> propagating along a straight "main" fault and encountering a finite-length branch fault. Such intersections are often observed in natural fault systems. The predicted effects of the interaction with the branch that we report can be remarkable; they can strongly perturb the propagation velocity on the main fault and, in some cases, even arrest that propagation. Earlier work [Poliakov et al., 2002, Kame et al., 2003; Bhat et al., 2004] emphasized the role of the fault pre-stress state, branch geometry (i.e., branching angle), and the incoming <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity at the branching junction in determining whether the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> would follow the branch or continue on the main fault or both, through simulations which did not let a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on the branch encounter a barrier or a fault end (called "infinite" branch cases henceforth). In this study we look at "finite" branch cases, and study the effect also of branch length, with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> being blocked from propagation beyond the branch end. It is known that sudden stoppage of a dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front leads to the propagation of large dynamic stress perturbations in the medium. These have been known to nucleate <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> on adjacent fault segments [Harris and Day, 1983, Harris et al., 2001,Fliss et al., 2004, among others]. We thus anticipate interaction between the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on the main fault and the branched one at two stages, namely, when the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is propagating on the branch and when it is suddenly blocked at the branch end. We show that in general <span class="hlt">rupture</span> termination on a compressional branch little affects propagation on the main fault compared to the infinite branch cases. For branches on the extensional side, we show in some cases that whereas an infinite branch would have allowed (or stopped) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation on the main fault, a finite branch stops (or allows) propagation on the main fault. Such results have a dependence on branch length that we document. We also illustrate branch-related complexities in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity evolution which could be one of the sources of the high-frequency content of strong ground motion records. Complexities in the slip distribution, often associated with a presumed heterogeneous strength distribution along the fault, can also be observed when <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is terminated on a branch.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhat, H. S.; Dmowska, R.; Olives, M.; Rice, J. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JGRB..11211309B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Role of fault branches in earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> propagating along a straight "main" fault and encountering a finite-length branch fault. Such intersections are often observed in natural fault systems. The predicted effects of the interaction with the branch that we report can be remarkable; they can strongly perturb the propagation velocity on the main fault and, in some cases, even arrest that propagation. Earlier work (Kame et al., 2003; Bhat et al., 2004) emphasized the role of the fault pre-stress state, branch geometry (i.e., branching angle), and the incoming <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity at the branching junction in determining whether the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> would follow the branch or continue on the main fault or both, through simulations which did not let a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on the branch encounter a barrier or a fault end (called `infinite' branch cases henceforth). In this study we look at "finite" branch cases, and study the effect also of branch length, with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> being blocked from propagation beyond the branch end. It is known that sudden stoppage of a dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front leads to the propagation of large dynamic stress perturbations in the medium. These have been known to nucleate or terminate <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> on adjacent fault segments (Harris et al., 1991; Harris and Day, 1993, 1999; Harris et al., 2002; Fliss et al., 2005, among others). We thus anticipate interaction between the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on the main fault and the branched one at two stages, when the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is propagating on the branch and when it is suddenly blocked at the branch end. We show that in general <span class="hlt">rupture</span> termination on a compressional branch little affects propagation on the main fault compared to the infinite branch cases. For branches on the extensional side, we show in some cases, that whereas an infinite' branch would have allowed (or stopped) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation on the main fault, a finite branch stops (or allows) propagation on the main fault. Such results have a dependence on branch length that we document. We also illustrate branch-related complexities in <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity evolution which could be one of the sources of the high-frequency content of strong ground motion record. Complexities in the slip distribution, often associated with a presumed heterogeneous strength distribution along the fault, can also be observed when <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is terminated on a branch.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhat, Harsha S.; Olives, Marion; Dmowska, Renata; Rice, James R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23637269"> <span id="translatedtitle">Does microcalcification increase the risk of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of atherosclerotic plaque, which is related to maximal stress conditions in the plaque among others, is a major cause of mortality. More careful examination of stress distributions in atherosclerotic plaques reports that it could be due to local stress behaviors at critical sites caused by cap thinning, inflammation, macroscopic heterogeneity, and recently, the presence of microcalcifications. However, the role of microcalcifications is not yet fully understood, and most finite element models of blood vessels with atheroma plaque ignore the heterogeneity of the plaque constituents at the microscale. The goal of this work is to investigate the effect of microcalcifications on the stress field of an atheroma plaque vessel section. This is achieved by performing a parametric finite element study, assuming a plane strain hypothesis, of a coronary artery section with eccentric atheroma plaque and one microcalcification incorporated. The geometrical parameters used to define and design the idealized coronary plaque anatomy and the microcalcification were the fibrous cap thickness and the microcalcification ratio, angle and eccentricity. We could conclude that microcalcifications should be considered in the modeling of this kind of problems since they cause a significant alteration of the vulnerable risk by increasing the maximum maximal principal stress up to 32%, although this increase of stress is not uniform (12% on average). The obtained results show that the fibrous cap thickness, the microcalcification ratio and the microcalcification eccentricity, in combination with the microcalcification angle, appear to be the key morphological parameters that play a determinant role in the maximal principal stress and accordingly in the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> risk of the plaque. PMID:23637269</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cilla, Myriam; Monterde, David; Peña, Estefanía; Martínez, Miguel Á</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2503527"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: associated injuries and outcome.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A retrospective case note analysis was performed on all patients treated for traumatic diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (TDR) at a major teaching hospital between January 1990 and August 1998. Patients were identified from the prospectively maintained UK Trauma and Research Network Database. Of the 480 cases of torso trauma admitted during the study period, 16 (3.3%) had TDR. Blunt trauma accounted for 13 (81%) of the injuries. A radiological pre-operative diagnosis was made in 10 (62.5%) patients. Seven of these were made on initial chest radiography, two on ultrasound scan and one on computed tomography. All patients underwent a midline laparotomy and TDR was subsequently diagnosed at operation in 6 patients. The left hemidiaphragm was <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> in 14 (87.5%) patients and there was visceral herniation in 8 (50%). Twelve patients with blunt trauma had associated abdominal and extra-abdominal injuries, but only one of the three patients with penetrating trauma had other injuries. The median Injury Severity Score (range) was 21 (9-50). The median time (range) spent on the intensive care unit was 2 days (0-35 days). Pulmonary complications occurred in 7 (44%) patients. Two (12.5%) patients died from associated head injuries. TDR results from blunt and penetrating torso trauma, is uncommon, rarely occurs in isolation and is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. A high index of suspicion makes early diagnosis more likely as initial physical and radiological signs may be lacking. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 (A) Figure 3 (B)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Simpson, J.; Lobo, D. N.; Shah, A. B.; Rowlands, B. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23974299"> <span id="translatedtitle">Arterial distensibility in patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> and unruptured intracranial aneurysms: Is it a predisposing factor for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> risk?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background A risk factor assessment that reliably predicts whether patients are predisposed to intracranial aneurysm (IA) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has yet to be formulated. As such, the clinical management of unruptured IA remains unclear. Our aim was to determine whether impaired arterial distensibility and hypertrophic remodeling might be indicators of risk for IA <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Material and Methods The study population (n=49) was selected from consecutive admissions for either unruptured IA (n=23) or <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> IA (n=26) from January to December 2010. Hemodynamic measures were taken from every patient, including systolic and diastolic blood pressure using a sphygmomanometer. Unruptured IA and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> IA characteristics, including aneurysmal shape, size, angle, aspect ratio, and bottleneck factor, were measured and calculated from transverse brain CT angiography images. With ultrasound, the right common carotid artery intima-media thickness was measured, as well as the lumen diameter during systole and diastole. Arterial wall strain, distensibility, stiffness index, and elastic modulus were calculated and compared between patients with unruptured IAs and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> IAs. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results General demographic data did not differ between patients with unruptured IAs and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> IAs. Greater mean intima-media thickness (p=0.013), mean stiffness index (p=0.044), and mean elastic modulus (p=0.026) were observed for patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> IAs. Moreover, mean strain (p=0.013) and mean distensibility (p=0.024) were decreased in patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> IAs. Conclusions Patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> IAs demonstrated decreased arterial distensibility and increased intima-media thickness at the level of the carotid arteries. By measuring these parameters via ultrasound, it may be possible to predict whether patients with existing IAs might <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and hemorrhage into the subarachnoid space. PMID:23974299</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dusak, Abdurrahim; Kamasak, Kaan; Goya, Cemil; Adin, Mehmet E; Elbey, Mehmet A; Bilici, Aslan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3762537"> <span id="translatedtitle">Arterial distensibility in patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> and unruptured intracranial aneurysms: Is it a predisposing factor for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> risk?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background A risk factor assessment that reliably predicts whether patients are predisposed to intracranial aneurysm (IA) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has yet to be formulated. As such, the clinical management of unruptured IA remains unclear. Our aim was to determine whether impaired arterial distensibility and hypertrophic remodeling might be indicators of risk for IA <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Material/Methods The study population (n=49) was selected from consecutive admissions for either unruptured IA (n=23) or <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> IA (n=26) from January to December 2010. Hemodynamic measures were taken from every patient, including systolic and diastolic blood pressure using a sphygmomanometer. Unruptured IA and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> IA characteristics, including aneurysmal shape, size, angle, aspect ratio, and bottleneck factor, were measured and calculated from transverse brain CT angiography images. With ultrasound, the right common carotid artery intima-media thickness was measured, as well as the lumen diameter during systole and diastole. Arterial wall strain, distensibility, stiffness index, and elastic modulus were calculated and compared between patients with unruptured IAs and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> IAs. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results General demographic data did not differ between patients with unruptured IAs and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> IAs. Greater mean intima-media thickness (p=0.013), mean stiffness index (p=0.044), and mean elastic modulus (p=0.026) were observed for patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> IAs. Moreover, mean strain (p=0.013) and mean distensibility (p=0.024) were decreased in patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> IAs. Conclusions Patients with <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> IAs demonstrated decreased arterial distensibility and increased intima-media thickness at the level of the carotid arteries. By measuring these parameters via ultrasound, it may be possible to predict whether patients with existing IAs might <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and hemorrhage into the subarachnoid space.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dusak, Abdurrahim; Kamasak, Kaan; Goya, Cemil; Adin, Mehmet E.; Elbey, Mehmet A.; Bilici, Aslan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3110607"> <span id="translatedtitle">Altered posterior cingulate cortical cyctoarchitecture, but normal density of neurons and interneurons in the posterior cingulate cortex and <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus in autism</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lay Abstract Autism is a behaviorally defined disorder with increasing prevalence rates globally. The disorder is characterized by deficits in several domains including social behaviors, restricted and repetitive behaviors, and deficits in communication. Two regions thought to contribute to deficits in social behavior are the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus (FFG). The PCC is involved in processing emotionally salient stimuli, and also has a role in processing faces. The FFG is the area responsible for object and face recognition. A potential imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory processing in the brain may contribute to some of the abnormal social behaviors observed in autism. This is supported by previous work suggesting reduced GABA receptors in the autistic brain. The present study used thionin stained section to qualitatively assess cortical patterning and quantitatively assess the density of neurons. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry was used to determine the density of a subset of GABAergic interneurons. In the autistic brain, the PCC displayed several abnormal cortical patterns including irregularly distributed neurons in specific cortical layers, and the presence of increased white matter neurons. In marked contrast, the FFG appeared normal and there were no significant differences in the density of neurons or interneurons in either region. The present study highlights the presence of abnormal findings in the PCC, which appear to have developmental origins and could affect local processing of social-emotional behaviors as well as the function of interrelated cortical areas. Scientific Abstract Autism is a developmental disorder with prenatal origins, currently estimated to affect 1 in 91 children in the United States. Social-emotional deficits are a hallmark of autism and early neuropathology studies have indicated involvement of the limbic system. Imaging studies demonstrate abnormal activation of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), a component of the limbic system. Abnormal activation has also been noted in the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus (FFG), a region important for facial recognition and a key element in social interaction. A potential imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory interneurons in the cortex may contribute to altered information processing in autism. Furthermore, reduced numbers of GABA receptors have previously been reported in the autistic brain. Thionin stained sections were used to qualitatively assess cytoarchitectonic patterning and quantitatively determine the density of neurons and immunohistochemistry was used to determine the densities of a subset of GABAergic interneurons utilizing parvalbumin- and calbindin- immunoreactivity. In autism, the PCC displayed altered cytoarchitecture with irregularly distributed neurons, poorly demarcated layers IV and V, and increased presence of white matter neurons. In contrast, no neuropathology was observed in the FFG. There was no significant difference in the density of thionin, parvalbumin, or calbindin interneurons in either region and there was a trend towards a reduced density of calbindin neurons in the PCC. This study highlights the presence of abnormal findings in the PCC, which appear to be developmental in nature and could affect the local processing of social-emotional behaviors as well as functioning of interrelated areas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rosene, Douglas L.; Kemper, Thomas L.; Bauman, Margaret L.; Blatt, Gene J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22807338"> <span id="translatedtitle">Neural adaptation to thin and fat bodies in the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> body area and middle occipital gyrus: An fMRI adaptation study.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Visual perception can be strongly biased due to exposure to specific stimuli in the environment, often causing neural adaptation and visual aftereffects. In this study, we investigated whether adaptation to certain body shapes biases the perception of the own body shape. Furthermore, we aimed to evoke neural adaptation to certain body shapes. Participants completed a behavioral experiment (n = 14) to rate manipulated pictures of their own bodies after adaptation to demonstratively thin or fat pictures of their own bodies. The same stimuli were used in a second experiment (n = 16) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) adaptation. In the behavioral experiment, after adapting to a thin picture of the own body participants also judged a thinner than actual body picture to be the most realistic and vice versa, resembling a typical aftereffect. The <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> body area (FBA) and the right middle occipital gyrus (rMOG) show neural adaptation to specific body shapes while the extrastriate body area (EBA) bilaterally does not. The rMOG cluster is highly selective for bodies and perhaps body parts. The findings of the behavioral experiment support the existence of a perceptual body shape aftereffect, resulting from a specific adaptation to thin and fat pictures of one's own body. The fMRI results imply that body shape adaptation occurs in the FBA and the rMOG. The role of the EBA in body shape processing remains unclear. The results are also discussed in the light of clinical body image disturbances. Hum Brain Mapp 34:3233-3246, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22807338</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hummel, Dennis; Rudolf, Anne K; Brandi, Marie-Luise; Untch, Karl-Heinz; Grabhorn, Ralph; Hampel, Harald; Mohr, Harald M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23628159"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cortical mapping by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitative cytological analysis in the human brain: a feasibility study in the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The cerebral cortex is a layered cellular structure that is tangentially organized into a mosaic of anatomically and functionally distinct fields. In spite of centuries of investigation, the precise localization and classification of many areas in the cerebral cortex remain problematic because the relationship between functional specificity and intra-cortical structure has not been firmly established. Furthermore, it is not yet clear how surface landmarks, visible through gross examination and, more recently, using non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), relate to underlying microstructural borders and to the topography of functional activation. We have designed a multi-modal neuroimaging protocol that combines MRI and quantitative microscopic analysis in the same individual to clarify the topography of cytoarchitecture underlying gross anatomical landmarks in the cerebral cortex. We tested our approach in the region of the <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> gyrus (FG) because, in spite of its seemingly smooth appearance on the ventral aspect of both hemispheres, this structure houses many functionally defined areas whose histological borders remain unclear. In practice, we used MRI-based automated segmentation to define the region of interest from which we could then collect quantitative histological data (specifically, neuronal size and density). A modified stereological approach was used to sample the cortex within the FG without a priori assumptions on the location of architectonic boundaries. The results of these analyses illustrate architectonic variations along the FG and demonstrate that it is possible to correlate quantitative histological data to measures that are obtained in the context of large-scale, non-invasive MRI-based population studies. PMID:23628159</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schenker-Ahmed, Natalie M; Annese, Jacopo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFM.S41B0991F"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> geometry of microearthquakes inferred from analysis of multiple events</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Complicated waveforms of some swarm earthquakes in West Bohemia, Central Europe indicate complicated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> history and possible space separation of several subruptures. I obtained the position and timing of the subevents building up the multiple event by waveform modeling with the use of empirical Green's functions. In total 18 multiple events were successfully modeled as double or triple events with separate <span class="hlt">rupture</span> positions. The separation of subsources reached 100 ms in time and 320 m in space. The relative positions of the subevents with respect to the geometry of the fault indicate that most of them occurred very close to the common fault plane that was activated during the swarm. The space-time separation of the subevents corresponds to a speed of 3.0 km/s, a value typical for <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation of large earthquakes. The later subevents occur farther than the nominal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> radius of the first subevent, and their mutual distance scales with magnitude. These observations suggest that the analyzed multiple-events share a common fault surface and that their subevents represent individual <span class="hlt">rupture</span> episodes. The angular distribution of the position vectors of later subevents indicates that many of them result from a slip-parallel <span class="hlt">rupture</span> growth, while some of the <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> propagate upwards. The hypocenters of the multiple events are not distributed uniformly on the fault plane; their clustering indicates that some patches of the fault are more likely to generate a stick-slip failure than the others.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fischer, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S43C2271X"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mode controlled by pre-stress and Dc</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerical simulations of seismic source dynamics have great significance in understanding both the physical mechanisms and the radiation characteristics of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes. We study the dynamic <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> of a planar fault embedded in 3D isotropic and homogeneous full space by using boundary integral equation method with simple discretization scheme and slip-weakening friction law. Benefit from the efficiency of the method, we could simulate effect of the values of the parameter spaces which are the characteristic slip distance (Dc) of slip-weakening law and the initial stress of the fault (Te) on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> mode. For different Dc and Te, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modes are different, which are supershear-mode, subshear-mode and nonrupture-mode. When Te is high enough, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front in the in-plane direction becomes super-shear, which is observed in resent earthquakes and laboratory experiments. On the contrary, the seismic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> cannot expand out if Te is too low. From different precision, we find the criticalities between modes and seem to find a universal line to distinct the modes. In our numerical results, there seems to be an upper value of Dc. If Dc is higher than that, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> cannot expand out even though Te is very high. This is corresponding to the theoretical result of Andrews (Andrews, 1976) in same way.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xu, J.; Chen, X.; Hu, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12060311"> <span id="translatedtitle">Epidemiological features of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in West Africa (MOMA Study).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of the study was (1) to assess the incidence of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in West Africa; (2) to identify its risk factors there; (3) to assess their predictiveness. The study (MOMA study) was prospective and population based. Data on a large cohort of pregnant women were collected. Univariable and multivariable analysis was used including stepwise logistic regression. We identified 25 cases of clinically symptomatic uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a population of 20 326 pregnant women giving an incidence rate of 1.2 uterine <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> per 1000 deliveries. Five variables were significantly associated with uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (in both the univariable and multivariable analyses): uterine scars, malpresentation, limping, cephalopelvic disproportion and high parity (>or=7). In conclusion, the incidence of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is high in West Africa, even in large cities where essential obstetric care is available and despite the low prevalence of uterine scars. A uterine scar multiplies the risk of uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> by 11. Uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> cannot be predicted from currently known risk factors, including uterine scars. The high case fatality rate (33.3%) and the associated perinatal mortality (52%) bear witness to the absence or inadequacy of health facilities in providing essential obstetric care and to the poor quality of maternal health care, even in major cities. PMID:12060311</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ould El Joud, Dahada; Prual, Alain; Vangeenderhuysen, Charles; Bouvier-Colle, Marie-Hélène</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3518087"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous Uterine <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of an Unscarred Uterus before Labour</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a public health problem in developing countries. When it is spontaneous, it occurs most often during labor in a context of scarred uterus. Uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during pregnancy is a rare situation. The diagnosis is not always obvious and morbidity and maternal and fetal mortality is still high. We report a case of spontaneous uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during pregnancy at 35 weeks of an unscarred uterus before labour. This is an exceptional case that we observe for the first time in our unit.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gueye, Mamour; Mbaye, Magatte; Ndiaye-Gueye, Mame Diarra; Kane-Gueye, Serigne Modou; Diouf, Abdoul Aziz; Niang, Mouhamadou Mansour; Diaw, Hannegret; Moreau, Jean Charles</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3352738"> <span id="translatedtitle">TachoSil® for postinfarction ventricular free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Despite a decline in the last three decades, postinfarction ventricular free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> still complicates more than 3% of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarctions and remains a surgical challenge. TachoSil® (Nycomed, Zurich, Switzerland) is an equine collagen patch coated with human fibrinogen and human thrombin, which has recently been used for haemostasis in cardiovascular surgery, but its potential usefulness in free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has not been reported. Initial clinical experience with an on-pump sutureless technique without cardioplegia, using wide TachoSil® patching to achieve free wall <span class="hlt">rupture</span> repair, has been described.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pocar, Marco; Passolunghi, Davide; Bregasi, Alda; Donatelli, Francesco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21599415"> <span id="translatedtitle">Minimum energy path to membrane pore formation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We combine dynamic self-consistent field theory with the string method to calculate the minimum energy path to membrane pore formation and <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. In the regime where nucleation can occur on experimentally relevant time scales, the structure of the critical nucleus is between a solvophilic stalk and a locally thinned membrane. Classical nucleation theory fails to capture these molecular details and significantly overestimates the free energy barrier. Our results suggest that thermally nucleated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may be an important factor for the low <span class="hlt">rupture</span> strains observed in lipid membranes. PMID:21599415</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ting, Christina L; Appelö, Daniel; Wang, Zhen-Gang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10084857"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Surgical complications of tracheal intubation--tracheal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Authors present case report of 47-year-old woman with a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of trachea in its lower part after an intubation with a double-lumen tube without any problems. Tracheal lesion was discovered at the end of operation after an extirpation of mediastinal tumor and wedge resection of lung during the examination of hermeticity of lung mechanical suture. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> was cured by suture resorbable monofilamental material. Development after operation wasn't any different than a common lung resection. In the lecture authors discuss the possible causes of tracheal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, different kinds of therapy, and complications. PMID:10084857</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harustiak, S; Sabáková, L; Benej, R; Bohucký, S; Pereszlenyi, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1524690"> <span id="translatedtitle">Endovascular Repair of a <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Endovascular aneurysm repair has considerable potential advantages over the surgical approach as a treatment for thoracic aortic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, in part because open surgical repair of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> thoracic aortic aneurysms is associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. We describe the successful endovascular deployment of stent-grafts to repair a contained <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in an 86-year-old man whose comorbidities prohibited surgery. Two months after the procedure, magnetic resonance angiography showed a patent stent-graft, a patent left subclavian artery, and complete exclusion of the aneurysm.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">DeFrain, Michael; Strickman, Neil E.; Ljubic, Branimir J.; Dougherty, Kathryn G.; Gregoric, Igor D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1916959"> <span id="translatedtitle">Amebic pericarditis following <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> right liver lobe abscess.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present an unusual case of suppurative pericarditis following <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a solitary right lobe amebic liver abscess. The condition was treated successfully by drainage of the liver abscess alone. PMID:1916959</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Supe, A N; Sathe, S S; Redkar, R G; Dalvi, A N; Kulkarni, B A; Shah, P P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19785867"> <span id="translatedtitle">[The acute Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: new insights in the treatment].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The acute Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a typical sports injury, which most commonly occurs in men. The diagnosis is easy to make but there is no consensus on best treatment: surgical or conservative treatment? In the case of surgical repair, the risk of a re-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> is considerably smaller compared to conservative treatment by cast immobilisation. The results of conservative treatment using a functional brace are not good enough to serve as a good alternative for surgery. If surgical treatment is chosen, minimally invasive surgery should be performed. The risk of re-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> is the same as in open reconstruction but the risk of, a possibly severe, wound infection is smaller. Independent of the suture technique chosen, the postoperative rehabilitation should be functional as opposed to full immobilisation. Too little is currently known about the treatment of acute Achilles tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> for a broadly supported treatment guideline to be realised. PMID:19785867</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kolfschoten, Nicky; Metz, Roderik; Verleisdonk, Egbert-Jan M M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23113854"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous intraperitoneal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a hepatic hydatid cyst.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hydatid cysts, which are endemic to certain areas, typically are found in the liver. Spontaneous intraperitoneal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, which can be life threatening, is rare. This article presents a case of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a hydatid cyst in a 69-year-old woman who was admitted to the emergency department. The patient had no history of trauma. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography suggested <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a hydatid cyst. The patient underwent a partial cystectomy, and the cystic area was washed with hypertonic saline and the peritoneal cavity was washed with isotonic saline and drained. Postoperatively, the patient was treated with albendazole for 3 months. No additional pathology was observed at the 3-, 6-, and 9-month follow-ups. Although rare, a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> hydatid cyst should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the acute abdomen in a patient residing in an endemic area. PMID:23113854</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arikanoglu, Zulfu; Taskesen, Fatih; Aliosmano?lu, ?brahim; Gul, Mesut; Cetincakmak, Mehmet Guli; Onder, Akin; Kapan, Murat</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3723219"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous Intraperitoneal <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a Hepatic Hydatid Cyst</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hydatid cysts, which are endemic to certain areas, typically are found in the liver. Spontaneous intraperitoneal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, which can be life threatening, is rare. This article presents a case of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a hydatid cyst in a 69-year-old woman who was admitted to the emergency department. The patient had no history of trauma. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography suggested <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a hydatid cyst. The patient underwent a partial cystectomy, and the cystic area was washed with hypertonic saline and the peritoneal cavity was washed with isotonic saline and drained. Postoperatively, the patient was treated with albendazole for 3 months. No additional pathology was observed at the 3-, 6-, and 9-month follow-ups. Although rare, a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> hydatid cyst should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the acute abdomen in a patient residing in an endemic area.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arikanoglu, Zulfu; Taskesen, Fatih; Aliosmanoglu, Ibrahim; Gul, Mesut; Cetincakmak, Mehmet Guli; Onder, Akin; Kapan, Murat</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22314089"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pancreatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in four cats with high-rise syndrome.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pancreatic trauma and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are rare after feline high-rise syndrome; however, should it happen, pancreatic enzymes will leak into the abdominal cavity and may cause pancreatic autodigestion and fatty tissue saponification. If not diagnosed and treated, it can ultimately lead to multiorgan failure and death. In this case series, 700 records of high-rise syndrome cats that presented between April 2001 and May 2006 were analysed, and four cats with pancreatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> were identified. Clinical signs, diagnosis using ultrasonography and lipase activity in blood and abdominal effusion, and treatment modalities are reported. Three cats underwent surgical abdominal exploration, one cat was euthanased. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the left pancreatic limb was confirmed in all cases. Two of the operated cats survived to date. High-rise syndrome can lead to abdominal trauma, including pancreatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. A prompt diagnosis and surgical treatment should be considered. PMID:22314089</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liehmann, Lea M; Dörner, Judith; Hittmair, Katharina M; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Reifinger, Martin; Dupré, Gilles</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9570057"> <span id="translatedtitle">Conservative management of gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> following scuba diving.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gastric <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is an uncommon surgical problem which normally presents with an acute abdomen and peritonism. An unusual case following underwater ascent and its conservative management is presented. PMID:9570057</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hunter, J D; Roobottom, C A; Bryson, P J; Brown, C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30271032"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oral misoprostol for premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes at term</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">ObjectiveThe study was undertaken to compare the efficacy, safety, and maternal satisfaction of oral misoprostol and intravenous oxytocin for labor induction in women with premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes at term.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Joan M. G. Crane; Tina Delaney; Donna Hutchens</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010APS..DFD.HY003D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Suppressing van der Waals driven <span class="hlt">rupture</span> through shear</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A thin viscous film on a substrate is susceptible to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> instabilities driven by van der Waals attractions. When a sufficiently large shear is applied to the free surface, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> instability is suppressed in two dimensions for sufficiently large shear magnitude and replaced by a permanent finite amplitude travelling wave with speed approximately equal to the speed of the surface. For small amplitudes, the wave is governed by the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. If three- dimensional disturbances are allowed, the shear is decoupled from perpendicular disturbances to the flow, and line <span class="hlt">rupture</span> would occur. In this case, replacing the unidirectional shear with a rotating shear can suppress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> for suitable choices of shear magnitude and angular velocity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Davis, Michael; Gratton, Michael; Davis, Stephen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB267245"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prototype System for Plugging Leaks in <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Containers.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A development program was performed successfully to develop and test a prototype system for temporarily stopping the flow of hazardous materials spilling on land or underwater from <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> or damaged containers. The prototype system is portable, integrat...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. J. Vrolyk R. C. Mitchell R. W. Melvold</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2638962"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of dental amalgam under bending stress.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The bending creep of six different dental amalgams was continuously measured up to 30 days under different static loads. All six amalgams induced creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> within 30 days under 9 kgf of static load and some of them did under the lower static load. The high copper amalgams resisted for a longer period of time compared to the low copper amalgams. The admixed high copper amalgam had the highest creep value at <span class="hlt">rupture</span> under the same load, which indicates that this amalgam is more flexible under continuous loading than the other amalgams. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time was approximately proportional to the reciprocal of the creep rates and the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time drastically increased as the creep rate decreased. This result basically explains and supports the previously reported correlation between the compressive creep during a specific period of time and the marginal fracture of amalgam restorations. PMID:2638962</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ogura, H; Miyagawa, Y; Nakamura, K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/555362"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental investigation of creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of reactor vessel lower head</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper summarizes experiments on creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower heads under the thermal and pressure loads of a core meltdown accident. Lower head failure (LHF) is of importance to accident assessment and accident management.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chu, Tze Yao; Pilch, M.M.; Bentz, J.H. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10668020"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute cardiac <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during dobutamine-atropine echocardiography stress test.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report an acute cardiac <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during dobutamine-atropine echocardiography stress test on the sixth day after admission for an inferoposterior acute myocardial infarction complicated with mild pericardial effusion. PMID:10668020</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Orlandini, A D; Tuero, E I; Diaz, R; Vilamajó, O A; Paolasso, E A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1006346"> <span id="translatedtitle">Acute knee joint <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after yttrium 90 injection.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two cases of acute <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the knee joint are reported after the intra-articular injection of radioactive yttrium 90. It is suggested that this may be a complication of intra-articular radioactive injections.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Davis, P; Jayson, M I</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.T52A..04S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Laboratory investigation of the radiative energy transfer during <span class="hlt">rupture</span> nucleation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Triaxial compression experiments were performed on several materials (Glass, Granite, Basalt, Sandstone, Marble and Gypsum) at confining pressures ranging from 10 to 100MPa, and from room temperature to 70 degrees C. During each of these experiments, acoustic waves radiated from damage accumulation and fast crack propagation were continuously monitored thanks to a fast acoustic recorder, which enables to obtain continuous acoustogram of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> nucleation and propagation, without the limitations of former trigger systems. In our experiments, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> does not need to be slowed down, and the transition from quasi-static nucleation to dynamic propagation has now been systematically investigated.Comparing each material, three main observation can be drawn : - First, the amount of damage accumulation before the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation varies from material to material, and also depends on the pressure and temperature conditions. For instance, glass, granites and sandstones are typically materials where the nucleation involves a large amount of cracking prior to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. In contrast, <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in basalt at low confinement is not preceded by any damage accumulation. Finally, pre-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> damage accumulation can also be purely aseismic, which is the case of marble for instance. - Second, the brittle-ductile transition does not exactly overlaps the aseismic-seismic transition, at least in the conditions at which we performed our experiments. For example, marble deforms plastically beyond 50MPa, and although the deformation is ductile, a large amount of crack accumulates in the rock, which tends to make it unstable. In the same way, acoustic emissions decrease in gypsum with increasing pressure and temperatures. - Finally, the time during which <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagates depends largely on the rheology. For instance, and in the case of ductile failures such as in marble, dislocation and twin accumulation is such that cracks propagation steps are small and/or slow, and thus the radiated energy release rate remains small at early stages of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and increases with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speed. Put together, our observations clearly highlight the dependence of the radiated acoustic (and microseismic?) energy during <span class="hlt">rupture</span> nucleation and early stages of crack propagation not only on the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation speed and the slip velocity but most importantly on the rock’s lithology and rheology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schubnel, A. J.; Brantut, N.; Ougier-Simonin, A.; Adelinet, M.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.S12A..05H"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Source Physics of Large Earthquakes - Validating Spontaneous <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Methods</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Computer simulations of earthquake source <span class="hlt">rupture</span> physics started more than 20 years ago, and the now classic papers of Andrews [1976], Das and Aki [1977], Mikumo and Miyatake [1978], and Day [1982] are included in every new spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> modeler's required reading. Until 10 years ago, only a few researchers were able to numerically simulate spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation in 3D and the users of this methodology were primarily theoretical seismologists. In contrast, in current times numerous spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> computer codes are being developed by researchers around the world, and the results are starting to be implemented in earthquake hazard assessment, for both seismological and engineering applications. Since most of the problems simulated using this numerical approach have no analytical solutions, it is imperative to compare and validate the various versions of this research tool. To this end, a collaborative project of the Southern California Earthquake Center (funded by the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Science Foundation) is currently underway. Our first 3D simulation exercise occurred in the fall of 2003 and had participants with 8 operational 3D spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> codes; the most recent 2004 exercise involves participants with 10 operational codes. We have started with the basic problem of earthquake nucleation and spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation on a vertical strike-slip fault in a homogeneous material. We will soon be moving from comparison to validation, by comparing our simulation results with laboratory recordings of seismic motion due to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on a vertical strike-slip fault. Future simulation exercises will have increased complexity in fault geometry, material properties, stress conditions, and friction. Our overall objective is a complete understanding of the simulation methods and their ability to faithfully replicate our hypotheses about earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span> physics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harris, R. A.; Archuleta, R.; Aagaard, B.; Ampuero, J.; Andrews, D. J.; Dalguer, L.; Day, S.; Dunham, E.; Ely, G.; Kase, Y.; Lapusta, N.; Liu, Y.; Ma, S.; Oglesby, D.; Olsen, K.; Pitarka, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/hm41h50603232r6j.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of intrahepatic artery aneurysm with complicated vascular anomalies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An 18-year-old man developed a sudden onset of upper abdominal pain with vomiting. Ul-trasound and computed tomographic (CT) scans revealed the spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an intrahepatic artery aneurysm with subcapsular hematoma. A celiac arteriogram demonstrated a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> intrahepatic artery aneurysm in the right lobe of the liver, right extrahepatic artery aneurysm, obliteration of gastroduodenal artery, and abnormal flow pattern of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsutomu Namieno; Yoshinobu Hata; Junichi Uchino; Hiroshi Kondoh; Takemi Shibata; Tatsuya Satoh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22016169"> <span id="translatedtitle">Softball injury causing haemoperitoneum due to <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> Meckel's mesodiverticular band.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 16-year-old male sustained an intra-abdominal haemorrhage after diving for last base during a softball game. At laparotomy a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> patent mesodiverticular band supplying a large Meckel's diverticulum was found. Traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a mesodiverticular band leading to massive intra-abdominal haemorrhage is a rare event, and has never been reported as a single injury or in the context of a sport's injury. PMID:22016169</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Woodfield, Julie; Barnett, Mark; Shapkov, Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3249277"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm after Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In treating uncomplicated abdominal aortic aenurysm, endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) has been employed as a good alternative to open repair with low perioperative morbidity and mortality. However, the aneurysm can enlarge or <span class="hlt">rupture</span> even after EVAR as a result of device failure, endoleak, or graft migration. We experienced two cases of aneurismal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after EVAR, which were successfully treated by surgical extra-anatomic bypass.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, Chung Won; Kim, Jong Won; Kim, Sangpil; Bae, Mi Ju; Kim, Chang Won</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24151748"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surgical treatment of symptomatic and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> abdominal aortic aneurysms.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Despite the increased volume of patients undergoing selective reconstruction on the occasion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in the last decades, the number of patients with <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAA) is not significantly decreased. RAAA is catastrophic and life-threatening condition. It remains a challenge to every practitioner. To optimize the surgical practice we studied the literature for the treatment of symptomatic and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> aneurysm of the abdominal aorta. PMID:24151748</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tonev, A; Dimitrov, S; Shkvarla, L; Zahariev, T; Nachev, G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3660491"> <span id="translatedtitle">Paraplegia due to Spinal Epidermoid Cyst <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> at Asthma Attack</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spinal epidermoid cyst is less than 1% of the entire spinal cord tumor and a rare tumor. It is a slowly proliferating benign tumor and can be a result of either congenital or acquired factors. In particular, reports of acute paraplegia due to spinal epidermoid cyst <span class="hlt">rupture</span> are very rare. Since authors experienced paraplegia resulting from congenital spinal epidermoid cyst <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during an asthma attack, it is reported with a review of literature.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Kweon Young; Kang, Jung Hun; Choi, Dae Woo; Lee, Min Hong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6562254"> <span id="translatedtitle">Factors that predispose to premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the fetal membranes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Causes of premature <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the fetal membranes were explored in a study of 25,820 pregnancies. Fourteen risk factors were analyzed using multivariate analysis. The following maternal factors had a positive association with premature <span class="hlt">ruptures</span>: advanced maternal age, non-white race, multiparity, instrumentation of the cervix prior to pregnancy, cigarette smoking, incompetent cervix, low pregnancy weight gain, and recent coitus. PMID:6562254</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Flood, B; Naeye, R L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60202572"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dealing with a penstock <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: A success story</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Speed and safety are important considerations when repairing damaged penstocks. When the Control Gorge penstock in southern California <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, quick, successful action prevented complications. In the winter of 1991, a break occurred in the lower portion of the 8-foot-diameter Owens River Gorge penstock. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> created a vacuum, which caused about 1,500 feet of the pipe upstream of the break</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Siminski</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/a36635033v127t27.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Endovascular Treatment of <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Aortocaval Fistula</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aortocaval fistula (ACF) is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We report the endovascular repair of an\\u000a AAA <span class="hlt">rupture</span> into the inferior vena cava. A 78-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for acute hypotension. She presented\\u000a with a pulsatile abdominal mass and became rapidly anuric. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed an AAA <span class="hlt">rupture</span> into the\\u000a inferior vena</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Giuseppe Guzzardi; Rita Fossaceca; Ignazio Divenuto; Antonello Musiani; Piero Brustia; Alessandro Carriero</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1004677"> <span id="translatedtitle">Early aortic valve cusp <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in relapsing polychondritis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aortic regurgitation associated with relapsing polychondritis usually occurs late in the disease as a result of aortic root dilatation. A case where aortic regurgitation occurred early and was due to cusp <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with a normal aortic root is reported. The patient required urgent aortic valve replacement within six weeks of developing a murmur despite apparent control of inflammation with immunosuppressive treatment. The possibility of cusp <span class="hlt">rupture</span> with sudden haemodynamic deterioration should be considered in patients with relapsing polychondritis who develop aortic regurgitation. Images</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marshall, D A; Jackson, R; Rae, A P; Capell, H A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://www.bentham.org/cvp/sample/cvp3-1/005AD.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Macrophage Activation in Atherosclerosis: Pathogenesis and Pharmacology of Plaque <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atherosclerosis is still an important disease. It accounts for 39% of deaths in the U.K. and 12 million U.S citizens have atherosclerosis-associated disease. Atherosclerosis may exert clinical effects by slow narrowing, producing stable angina or dramatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, producing acute coronary syndromes such as unstable angina or myocardial infarction and death. Macrophages are abundant in <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> atherosclerotic plaques. Macrophages are innate</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. J. Boyle</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16409616"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the superficial dorsal vein of the penis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Unusual causes of acute penis, such as the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a superficial vein of the penis, can mimic fractured penis. The diagnosis in such cases is mostly after exploration. The author describes a case where a high index of clinical suspicion led to the diagnosis of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a superficial dorsal vein of the penis without exploration. The patient had a successful recovery with conservative management. PMID:16409616</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sharma, Gyanendra R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/43996970"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep and creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an advanced silicon nitride ceramic</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Creep and creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of an advanced silicon nitride ceramic were systematically characterized in the temperature range 1,150 to 1,300 C using uniaxial tensile creep tests. Absence of tertiary creep and the order-of-magnitude breaks in both creep rate and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lifetime at certain threshold combinations of stress and temperature were tow characteristic features of the creep behavior observed. Thermal</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jow-Lian Ding; Kenneth C. Liu; Karren L. More; C. R. Brinkman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/9p60kpv943240m50.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the right hemidiaphragm: Diagnosis by chest radiography</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sixteen cases of blunt trauma resulting in surgically confirmed traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the right hemidiaphragm were reviewed\\u000a from the Trauma Registry of Allegheny General Hospital. Only 10 of the 16 cases (63%) could be retrospectively diagnosed on\\u000a chest radiographs. We found that a diagnosis of right-sided diaphragmatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can be suggested when the apex of the right\\u000a hemidiaphragm is shifted</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bruce Baron; Richard H. Daffner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/442707j5034v1t45.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Conservative management of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the urinary bladder</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report a very rare case of intra-peritoneal spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the urinary bladder which was successfully managed conservatively\\u000a in a 77-year-old woman, who presented with lower abdominal pain, acute urinary retention and pelvic organ prolapse (POP).\\u000a Computed tomography raised the suspicion of bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> which was later confirmed by cystoscopy and cystogram. Following\\u000a 8 weeks of urinary catheterisation, the bladder</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ismaiel Abu Mahfouz; Tim Sayer; Christian Phillips</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10832302"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Liver <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in HELLP syndrome. Report of a case].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Liver <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and hemorrhage, are the most unusual and serious complications of HELLP syndrome (hemolysis--elevated liver enzymes--low platelet count). The management should be aggressive by treating coagulopathy and favouring a prompt delivery. Liver <span class="hlt">rupture</span> remains a surgical emergency with control of bleeding based on trauma surgery. The aggressive approach to the management of these patients led to a remarkable decrease of mortality rates. PMID:10832302</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Castriconi, M; Aragiusto, G; Ansalone, M; Aloj, G; Grasso, A; Bartone, G; Renda, F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/230715"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> strength of alloy 718</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Alloy 718 is the most widely used of the nickel-base superalloys in aerospace applications such as compressor and turbine disks, cases, compressor blades and fasteners in aircraft gas-turbine engines. Since the development of the superalloy by Inco Alloys International over 30 years ago, researchers have made many slight modifications in chemical composition, and have refined process techniques to achieve further improvements in performance. Relatively little information on the effects of phosphorus has been published, and the available information is contradictory. However, phosphorus in superalloys is generally considered detrimental, and by specification is controlled to a low maximum value (0.015% max, for example, in AMS5662 E). This lack of data is the basis of a study by Teledyne Allvac to determine the effects of the interaction of phosphorus, boron, and carbon on the mechanical properties, processing characteristics, and microstructure of Allvac 718. Results show that a significant improvement in stress-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties over those of a commercial Alloy 718 material is possible by optimizing phosphorus, boron, and carbon additions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kennedy, R.L.; Cao, W.D.; Thomas, W.M. [Teledyne Allvac, Monroe, NC (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhRvE..65c2502H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of viscoelastic fiber bundles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of bundles of viscoelastic fibers occurring under uniaxial constant tensile loading. A fiber bundle model is introduced that combines the viscoelastic constitutive behavior and the strain controlled breaking of fibers. Analytical and numerical calculations showed that above a critical external load the deformation of the system monotonically increases in time resulting in global failure at a finite time tf, while below the critical load the deformation tends to a constant value giving rise to an infinite lifetime. Our studies revealed that the nature of the transition between the two regimes, i.e., the behavior of tf at the critical load ?c, strongly depends on the range of load sharing: for global load sharing tf has a power law divergence at ?c with a universal exponent of 0.5, however, for local load sharing the transition becomes abrupt: at the critical load tf jumps to a finite value, analogous to second- and first-order phase transitions, respectively. The acoustic response of the bundle during creep is also studied.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hidalgo, Raul Cruz; Kun, Ferenc; Herrmann, Hans. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39853734"> <span id="translatedtitle">In-reactor creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of 20% cold-worked AISI 316 stainless steel</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results of an experiment designed to measure in-reactor stress-to-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties of 20% cold-worked AISI 316 stainless steel are reported. The in-reactor <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data are compared with postirradiation and unirradiated test results. In-reactor <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lives were found to exceed <span class="hlt">rupture</span> predictions of postirradiation tests. This longer in-reactor <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life is attributed to dynamic point defect generation which is absent during postirradiation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. J. Lovell; B. A. Chin; E. R. Gilbert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20540599"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sexual intercourse and cerebral aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: potential mechanisms and precipitants.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a significant cause of death in young and middle-aged individuals and causes tremendous morbidity in affected patients. Despite the identification of various risk factors, the series of events leading to the formation, growth, and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of intracranial aneurysms is poorly understood. Cerebral aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has been associated with sexual intercourse and other forms of physical exercise. In fact, multiple case series reported that coitus was the immediate preceding activity in 3.8-14.5% of patients suffering from aneurysmal SAH. This may be related to the large elevations in mean arterial blood pressure that occur in both males and females during sexual intercourse (130-175 and 125-160 mm Hg, respectively). While coitus and physical exercise share important physiological similarities, each may differentially affect the probability that a preformed aneurysm will <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. In this literature review and synthesis, the authors analyze the physiological human response to sexual intercourse in an effort to delineate those factors that may precipitate aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. The authors' analysis is based on the original data collected by Masters and Johnson. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first review to address the link between sexual intercourse and intracranial aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. While actual measurements of the physiological variables relevant to SAH were not performed in this article, the authors make reasonable assumptions based on the available data to help elucidate the mechanism of sexually induced aneurysmal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:20540599</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reynolds, Matthew R; Willie, Jon T; Zipfel, Gregory J; Dacey, Ralph G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991AIPC..217..165S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> predictions for tantalum alloy T-111</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A knowledge of the short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of Tantalum alloy T-111 is necessary to predict device integrity in the heat source section of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) at the end of service life, in the event of a fuel fire. High pressures exist in RTGs near the end of service life, these are caused by gas generation resulting from radioactive decay of the nuclear fuel. The internal pressure exerts a significant hoop stress on the T-111 alloy structural containment member. This paper analyses the short term creep behavior (<span class="hlt">rupture</span> times up to ~2×103 hrs.) of cold worked (CW) T-111 alloy, using the existing data of Stephenson (1967). Corellations for the time to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, time to 1% strain and minimum creep rate have been obtained from this data using multivariable linear regression analysis. These results are compared to other short term <span class="hlt">rupture</span> data for T-111 alloy. Finally, at the stress/temperature levels relevant to the RTG fuel fire scenario near the end of service life, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time correlation for T-111 alloy predicts a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> time of approximately 100 hrs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stephens, John J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3690211"> <span id="translatedtitle">Retrospective Review of Pectoralis Major <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> in Rodeo Steer Wrestlers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background. Pectoralis major tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> have been reported in the literature as occupational injuries, accidental injuries, and sporting activities. Few cases have been reported with respect to rodeo activities. Purpose. To describe a series of PM tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in professional steer wrestlers. Study Design. Case series, level of evidence, 4. Methods. A retrospective analysis of PM <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in a steer wrestling cohort was performed. Injury data between 1992 and 2008 were reviewed using medical records from the University of Calgary Sport Medicine Center. Results. Nine cases of pectoralis major <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> in professional steer wrestlers were identified. Injuries occurred during the throwing phase of the steer or while breaking a fall. All athletes reported unexpected or abnormal behavior of the steer that contributed to the mechanism of injury. Seven cases were surgically repaired, while two cases opted for nonsurgical intervention. Eight cases reported successful return to competition following the injury. Conclusion. Steer wrestlers represent a unique cohort of PM <span class="hlt">rupture</span> case studies. Steer wrestling is a demanding sport that involves throwing maneuvers that may predispose the muscle to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. All cases demonstrated good functional outcomes regardless of surgical or non-surgical treatment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lau, Breda H. F.; Butterwick, Dale J.; Lafave, Mark R.; Mohtadi, Nicholas G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70017559"> <span id="translatedtitle">The temporal distribution of seismic radiation during deep earthquake <span class="hlt">rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The time history of energy release during earthquakes illuminates the process of failure, which remains enigmatic for events deeper than about 100 kilometers. Stacks of teleseismic records from regional arrays for 122 intermediate (depths of 100 to 350 kilometers) and deep (depths of 350 to 700 kilometers) earthquakes show that the temporal pattern of short-period seismic radiation has a systematic variation with depth. On average, for intermediate depth events more radiation is released toward the beginning of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> than near the end, whereas for deep events radiation is released symmetrically over the duration of the event, with an abrupt beginning and end of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These findings suggest a variation in the style of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> related to decreasing fault heterogeneity with depth.The time history of energy release during earthquakes illuminates the process of failure, which remains enigmatic for events deeper than about 100 kilometers. Stacks of teleseismic records from regional arrays for 122 intermediate (depths of 100 to 350 kilometers) and deep (depths of 350 to 700 kilometers) earthquakes show that the temporal pattern of short-period seismic radiation has a systematic variation with depth. On average, for intermediate depth events more radiation is released toward the beginning of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> than near the end, whereas for deep events radiation is released symmetrically over the duration of the event, with an abrupt beginning and end of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These findings suggest a variation in the style of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> related to decreasing fault heterogeneity with depth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Houston, H.; Vidale, J. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1785/0120040111"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hypocenter locations in finite-source <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We use a database of more than 80 finite-source <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models for more than 50 earthquakes (Mw, 4.1-8.1) with different faulting styles occurring in both tectonic and subduction environments to analyze the location of the hypocenter within the fault and to consider the correlation between hypocenter location and regions of large slip. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in strike-slip and crustal dip-slip earthquakes tends to nucleate in the deeper sections of the fault; subduction earthquakes do not show this tendency. Ratios of the hypocentral slip to either the average or the maximum slip show that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> can nucleate at locations with any level of relative displacement. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> nucleates in regions of very large slip (D ??? 2/3 Dmax,) in only 16% of the events, in regions of large slip (1/3 Dmax < D < 2/3 Dmax,) in 35% of the events, and in regions of low slip (D ??? 1/3 Dmax) in 48% of the events. These percentages significantly exceed the percentages of fault area with very large (???7%) and large (???28%) slip. <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> that nucleate in regions of low slip, however, tend to nucleate close to regions of large slip and encounter a zone of very large slip within half the total <span class="hlt">rupture</span> length. Applying several statistical tests we conclude that hypocenters are not randomly located on a fault but are located either within or close to regions of large slip.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mai, P. M.; Spudich, P.; Boatwright, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22587121"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of a biomembrane under dynamic surface tension.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">How long will a fluid membrane vesicle stressed with a steady ramp of micropipette last before <span class="hlt">rupture</span>? Or conversely, how high should the surface tension be to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> such a membrane? To answer these challenging questions we developed a theoretical framework that allows for the description and reproduction of dynamic tension spectroscopy (DTS) observations. The kinetics of the membrane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> under ramps of surface tension is described as a succession of an initial pore formation followed by the Brownian process of the pore radius crossing the time-dependent energy barrier. We present the formalism and a derive (formal) analytical expression of the survival probability describing the fate of the membrane under DTS conditions. Using numerical simulations for the membrane prepared in an initial state with a given distribution of times for pore nucleation, we study the membrane lifetime (or inverse of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> rate) and distribution of membrane surface tension at <span class="hlt">rupture</span> as a function of membrane characteristics like pore nucleation rate, the energy barrier to failure, and tension loading rate. It is found that simulations reproduce the main features of DTS experiments, particularly the pore nucleation and pore-size diffusion-controlled limits of membrane <span class="hlt">rupture</span> dynamics. This approach can be adapted and applied to processes of permeation and pore opening in membranes (electroporation, membrane disruption by antimicrobial peptides, vesicle fusion). PMID:22587121</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bicout, D J; Kats, E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.S33C..03U"> <span id="translatedtitle">Supershear <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Propagation in Homogeneous, Monolithic Media: Experimental Observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds obtained by fracture experiments of monolithic brittle materials are usually by far lower than those predicted by theories and inferred from inversions of seismograms: Some seismic inversions even suggest the existence of supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds (i.e., <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagating faster than the relevant shear wave). Exceptionally, a few laboratory experiments of dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> on pre-cut interfaces do indicate that such high <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds can be achieved (e.g. Uenishi et al., BSSA, 1999; Rosakis, Adv. Phys., 2002), but the discrepancies of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds between theories and experiments (and numerical simulations) cannot always be attributed to the observations that real solids have every kind of defects such as pre-existing discontinuities or microcracks generated during <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. Moreover, even when we accept the existence of such extraordinary high <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds, the exact mechanism of the transition from sub-Rayleigh to supershear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> speeds has not been clarified yet, and the question of whether natural earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> can propagate at such high speeds is still under active debate (see e.g. Uenishi and Rossmanith, Acta Mech., 2002; Xia et al., Science, 2004). Recent large-scale atomistic simulations show that hyperelasticity, the nonlinear elasticity of large strains, may be able to play a governing role in the dynamics of brittle fracture (Buehler et al., Nature, 2003). This is in contrast to many existing theories of dynamic fracture where the linear elastic behavior of solids is usually assumed. Real solids like the crust, however, have elastic properties that are significantly different at various scales, for both small and large deformations. Here, we experimentally investigate dynamic fracture in hyperelastic materials in order to possibly explain the discrepancies described above. As a first step for further understanding of the effect of hyperelasticity on <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiation and propagation, we consider typical hyperelastic media, flat sheets of rubber (100mm high × 200mm wide × 0.1mm thick) and balloons, under static mode I loading conditions with crack- parallel (T-) stresses. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> (crack) initiation and propagation process is recorded utilizing a high- speed digital video camera at a frame rate of some microseconds. The results show that the dynamic crack behavior is more sensitive to the static loading conditions in the hyperelastic case than in the linear elastic case: (1) If the static T-stress is relatively small, upon crack initiation, the crack surfaces form an elliptical shape because large deformations are allowed in hyperelastic materials. Then, the crack wriggles and bifurcates, leaving a wavy pattern on the edges of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> fragments; (2) If the magnitude of the static T- stress is comparable to that of the remote mode-I loading stress, the crack propagates surprisingly straight and crack front, forming a very sharp wedge-shape, accelerates from sub-Rayleigh to a constant supershear speed and then captures the shear wave front generated upon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiation. These experimental results suggest - if the hyperelastic constitutive relation can be assumed - cracks may reach supershear speeds even when material heterogeneities do not exist, giving possibly a new hint on the question of whether natural earthquake <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> can really accelerate to such extraordinary high speeds as have been inferred from seismological inversions. u.ac.jp/~uenishi/</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Uenishi, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23843290"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous renal artery aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 without risk factors for renal artery aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vascular abnormalities in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) are rare but sometimes fatal. We report a case of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a left renal artery aneurysm in a patient with NF-1. A 41-year-old nonpregnant normotensive woman known to have NF-1 presented to our emergency department with left flank pain. Computed tomography showed a large retroperitoneal hematoma due to left renal artery aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. She was treated with selective transcatheter coil embolization and fully recovered. PMID:23843290</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Niwa, Naoya; Yanaihara, Hitoshi; Horinaga, Minoru; Nakahira, Yoko; Hanashima, Fuminari; Asakura, Hirotaka</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/43997000"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep and stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior of an advanced silicon nitride; Part 3: Stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and the Monkman-Grant relationship</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The applicability of the Monkman-Grant relationship to predict the stress <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life of NT154 silicon nitride is examined. The data show that the Monkman-Grant lines relating <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life to minimum creep rate are stratified with respect to temperature. A modification to the current expression for the Monkman-Grant relation is proposed to accommodate this temperature dependence. A phenomenological approach based on</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mamballykalathil N. Menon; Ho T. Fang; David C. Wu; Michael G. Jenkins; Mattison K. Ferber</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48048399"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the quadriceps tendon with contralateral patellar tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: an unusual case and a review of the literature</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of quadriceps tendon with contralateral patellar tendon is very rare. There are only two case reports\\u000a in English literature. We report the case of a healthy 41-year-old female with simultaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of her left quadriceps\\u000a tendon and right patellar tendon. There were no known precipitating factors for this injury. Surgical repair and early rehabilitation\\u000a achieved satisfactory outcome.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Jalgaonkar; A. Rafee; O. Haddo; S. Sarkar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/15152498"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonuniformity of the Constitutive Law Parameters for Shear <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> and Quasistatic Nucleation to Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span>: A Physical Model of Earthquake Generation Processes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Based on the recent high-resolution laboratory experiments on propagating shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, the constitutive law that governs shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span> processes is discussed in view of the physical principles and constraints, and a specific constitutive law is proposed for shear <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. It is demonstrated that nonuniform distributions of the constitutive law parameters on the fault are necessary for creating the nucleation process,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mitiyasu Ohnaka</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3021316"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hemodynamic-Morphologic Discriminants for Intracranial Aneurysm <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background and Purpose To identify significant morphologic and hemodynamic parameters that discriminate intracranial aneurysm (IA) <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status using 3D angiography and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Methods 119 IAs (38 <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, 81 unruptured) were analyzed from 3D angiographic images and CFD. Six morphologic and seven hemodynamic parameters were evaluated for significance with respect to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis identified area under the curve (AUC) and optimal thresholds separating <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> from unruptured aneurysms for each parameter. Significant parameters were examined by multivariate logistic regression analysis in 3 predictive models—morphology only, hemodynamics only, and combined—to identify independent discriminants, and the AUC-ROC of the predicted probability of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status was compared among these models. Results Morphologic parameters (Size Ratio [SR], Undulation Index, Ellipticity Index, and Nonsphericity Index) and hemodynamic parameters (Average Wall Shear Stress [WSS], Maximum intra-aneurysmal WSS, Low WSS Area, Average Oscillatory Shear Index [OSI], Number of Vortices, and Relative Resident Time) achieved statistical significance (p<0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated SR to be the only independently significant factor in the morphology model (AUC=0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75–0.91), whereas WSS and OSI were the only independently significant variables in the hemodynamics model (AUC=0.85, 95% CI 0.78–0.93). The combined model retained all three variables, SR, WSS, and OSI (AUC=0.89, 95% CI 0.82–0.96). Conclusion All three models—morphological (based on SR), hemodynamic (based on WSS and OSI), and combined—discriminate IA <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status with high AUC values. Hemodynamics is as important as morphology in discriminating aneurysm <span class="hlt">rupture</span> status.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xiang, Jianping; Natarajan, Sabareesh K.; Tremmel, Markus; Ma, Ding; Mocco, J; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Levy, Elad I.; Meng, Hui</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S53D..08D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Using Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Models to Explore Physical Controls on the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake <span class="hlt">Rupture</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seismic and geodetic recordings are routinely used to invert for kinematic source models of large earthquakes, which provide us with detailed images of slip distribution and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> evolution on causative faults. To gain insight into physical conditions that allow a fault to slip and a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to propagate in the way they did, we can resort to dynamic source models that obey physical laws in continuum mechanics and rock friction. Published kinematic models of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake reveal several features of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These features include 1) high static stress drop with large amounts of slip in a small area, 2) a weak initial phase, down-dip <span class="hlt">rupture</span> for the first 40 seconds, extensive shallow <span class="hlt">rupture</span> during 60 to 70 seconds, and continuing deeper <span class="hlt">rupture</span> lasting more than 100 seconds, and 3) systematically down-dip high-frequency radiation with respect to the hypocenter. In this study, we use spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models to explore what physical conditions, including the initial stress state and friction properties on the subducting fault, can reproduce these features, so that we can gain some physical insights into controls on this megathrust earthquake. Dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> simulations of this shallow dipping megathrust faulting at reasonable spatial and temporal resolutions require parallel computing on supercomputers. Our newly parallelized finite element method algorithm EQdyna allows us to simulate a large suite of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> models to examine the questions. In model setup, we use depth-dependence principal stresses and take into account variations in pore fluid pressure and frictional properties associated with subducted seafloor features such as seamounts. Our preliminary results suggest followings. First, a high strength and high stress drop patch (probably a subducted seamount or seamout chain) just above the hypocenter on the fault plane can delay up-dip <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and result in a concentrated large slip area. Second, significantly negative stress drop on the shallow portion of the subducting fault associated with the active accretionary prism is needed to reduce the amplitude of shallow slip and to confine shallow slip in a small area near the trench just up-dip of the region of maximum fault slip. Third, heterogeneities in the seismic strength parameter S down-dip of the hypocenter, probably due to both heterogeneous stresses from previous earthquakes and heterogeneous friction properties at the brittle and ductile transition zone, can produce large amounts of high-frequency radiations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Duan, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985JGR....90.6773B"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of the 1976 Mindanao Earthquake</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The large Mindanao earthquake (Mw = 8.1) of August 16, 1976, presents a complex <span class="hlt">rupture</span> history. The epicenter of this earthquake is located at the southern end of the 160×80 km2 aftershock area, and the thrust mechanism with a shallow NE dipping plane indicates the subduction of the North Celebes Sea beneath Mindanao. We have characterized both temporally and spatially the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of this event by deconvolving the source time functions from long-period P wave seismograms at 20 azimuthally well-distributed stations. The seismic moment is released in a jagged fashion in two main pulses. The observable directivity associated with these two pulses of moment release defines three segments on the fault: (1) from 0 to 54 km N-NW of the epicenter with ?½ of the moment release and an apparent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity of 2.0 km/s, (2) from 54 to 72 km N-NW of the epicenter with low to no resolvable moment release and an apparent <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity of 0.8 km/s, and (3) from 72 to 157 km N-NW of the epicenter with ?½ of the moment release and a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity of 3.3 km/s. Although the overall moment release is comparable in the first and second pulses, the second pulse has a substantially higher <span class="hlt">rupture</span> velocity and a higher level of short-period radiation. The sharp truncation of the second pulse generates the largest amplitudes in the P wave seismograms and is interpreted as the abrupt termination of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front against Mindanao Island, 160 km N-NW of the epicenter. An additional third pulse of moment release after the dominant truncation is identified at stations to the NW and SE. This additional moment release is located on a separate fault to the west which is probably strike-slip in nature and related to a large strike-slip aftershock along the coast of Mindanao. The jagged, multiple event moment release of the Mindanao earthquake is in sharp contrast to the smooth <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the 1979 Colombia subduction zone earthquake (Mw = 8.2), which resulted from the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a single large asperity ( ?60 km). Although these two earthquakes are both underthrusting events, they occur in very different tectonic settings. The Mindanao earthquake occurred at a relatively young subduction zone in a region with rapidly evolving plate boundaries, whereas the Colombia earthquake occurred at a well-established plate boundary.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Beck, Susan L.; Ruff, Larry. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3619046"> <span id="translatedtitle">A forgotten devil; <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of mitral valve papillary muscle</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary Background: Papillary muscle <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is one of the catastrophic mechanical complications following myocardial infarction. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> leads to acute mitral valve regurgitation, pulmonary edema, and cardiogenic shock. Survival is dependent on prompt recognition and surgical intervention. Cases Report: We present two cases where acute myocardial infarction was complicated by papillary muscle <span class="hlt">rupture</span> resulting in severe mitral regurgitation and cardiogenic shock. In both cases <span class="hlt">rupture</span> occurred within one week of infarction. Both patients did not receive coronary revascularization; one patient presented late after the onset of chest pain, the other patient percutaneous revascularization attempted and was not successful. Both patients suffered an inferior wall infarction. Echocardiogram demonstrated severe mitral regurgitation with a jet directed posteriorly. In both cases <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the posteromedial papillary muscle resulted in flail of the anterior mitral valve leaflet, thus serving as a reminder that both the anterior and the posterior leaflets attach to both papillary muscles. Conclusions: While one case had a good outcome, the other reinforces the fact that this is a very serious complication requiring prompt recognition and treatment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jain, Sachin Kumar Amruthlal; Larsen, Timothy R.; Darda, Saba; Saba, Souheil; David, Shukri</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.T43A1974L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geodynamics of Continental Lithospheric <span class="hlt">Rupturing</span>: Progress and Challenge</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The break-up and transition from rifting to drifting of continental lithosphere are vital for deciphering the formation and evolution of rift and ocean, marginal sea and associated resource consequences as well; however, the physics and mechanism of this <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> process are controversial. Thanks to the endeavors of international geoscience community with large research programs such as IODP and MARGINS and mass geophysical and geological observations available, prominent advancements on this issue have been made during recent decade. Here we briefly review related progress on continental lithosphere <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> and mainly focus on the topics as follows: nature of crustal structure of conjugated continental margin, conceptional model on continental lithospheric <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> and geodynamic modeling. The existence of zone of exhumed continental mantle in the oceanic-continental transition of non-volcanic type continental margin, composed by serpentinized peridotite, is emphasized here, regarding its relatively weak rheology that facilitates the break up of lithosphere. The fault system of diverse types, especially the concave downward fault, absorbing the deformation from rifting to drifting should be taken into account in constructing conceptional mode for lithospheric rupturin. The configuration of pre-rifting lithosphere, for instance, the rheological heterogeneity, thermal structure and tectonic inheritance, are the key factors that control the <span class="hlt">rupturing</span> process of continental lithosphere. Lastly, some challenges are all presented, and we conclude that multidisciplinary studies of the typical conjugated continental margins in the world are essential for better understanding on lithospheric <span class="hlt">rupturing</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8346768"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the triceps tendon associated with steroid injections.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of the triceps mechanism is an uncommon injury that has been recognized with increasing frequency in recent years. It has been proposed that such injuries commonly accompany fractures of the radial head and must be actively evaluated in the presence of such a fracture. We present a unique case of isolated <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the triceps tendon in an athlete who was lifting weights. This case was complicated by a history of olecranon bursitis that had been treated with numerous local steroid injections, as well as a history of anabolic steroid abuse. Both systemic steroids and local injections may predispose tendons to <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Triceps tendon <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> may result in uniformly good to excellent results if recognized and treated surgically. This case also serves as a reminder of the risks of treating inflamed tissues with local steroid injections, especially in strength athletes who place high demands on their musculoskeletal structures. Finally, this case documents a second case of triceps mechanism <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in an athlete who has abused anabolic steroids. A study by Hunter et al. suggests that oral steroid abuse may be associated with detrimental effects on the mechanical properties of connective tissue, demonstrating another negative effect of anabolic steroid use in athletes. PMID:8346768</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stannard, J P; Bucknell, A L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3587012"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous Atraumatic Extensor Pollicis Longus <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> in the Nonrheumatoid Population</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Introduction: Extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a well-described phenomenon in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Mechanisms of EPL tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in the nonrheumatoid population have also been described and include traumatic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, repetitive motion strain, and steroid injection into the tendon. Methods: The operative records for patients undergoing extensor pollicis longus reconstruction by the senior author were reviewed. Patients with a history of trauma to the wrist or inflammatory arthropathy were excluded. Results: We identified 3 patients who presented with spontaneous EPL tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. These patients reported no risk factors (as listed earlier) or inciting event. All 3 patients had some exposure to local steroids but this exposure was not at the site of subsequent tendon <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. All patients were operatively repaired and went on to full recovery of EPL function. Discussion: In patients with sudden loss of extension of the thumb interphalangeal joint, a thorough history of steroid exposure including local steroid exposure remote to the affected EPL tendon may be relevant.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rada, Erin M.; Shridharani, Sachin M.; Lifchez, Scott D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12048940"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Four cases of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the urinary bladder].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Between November 1997 and March 2001, 4 female patients from 44 to 65 years of age with a spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the urinary bladder were analyzed. They complained of abdominal pain and had undergone an intra-pelvic gynecological operation (3 for uterine cancer, 1 for an ovarian cyst) several years before. The three with uterine cancer had also received radiation therapy. For their present condition, spontaneous urinary bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, their treatment was indwelling a urethral catheter. Two of them have had no recurrence of urinary bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span> after one month since having the urethral catheter indwelt. One, however, had to have the catheter re-indwelt due to unsuccessful suturing of the urinary bladder wall. The fourth patient had bilateral nephrostomy tubes due to severe radiation cystitis. Thus, one can infer that intra-pelvic gynecological operations and radiation therapy are major factors causing spontaneous urinary bladder <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. While indwelling a urethral catheter may be effective for some patients with a spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the urinary bladder, it may be very difficult to treat more complicated cases. PMID:12048940</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Amano, Toshiyasu; Miwa, Sotaro; Takashima, Hiroshi; Takemae, Katsuro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6029436"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dealing with a penstock <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: A success story</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Speed and safety are important considerations when repairing damaged penstocks. When the Control Gorge penstock in southern California <span class="hlt">ruptured</span>, quick, successful action prevented complications. In the winter of 1991, a break occurred in the lower portion of the 8-foot-diameter Owens River Gorge penstock. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> created a vacuum, which caused about 1,500 feet of the pipe upstream of the break to collapse. Investigations by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) indicate that pressure surges in the penstock caused by rapid opening and closing of a turbine bypass-relief valve at the Control Gorge hydro plant and a defective weld at a manway (a small access that leads into the penstock) led to the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. Quick emergency repairs were required owing to the limited bypass capability around the penstock, the need for water flow for fish habitat in the lower sections of the Owens River, and water needs for Los Angeles. Within ten days, LADWP employees had temporarily repaired the penstock. In less than five months, workers had replaced the collapsed and <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> sections, and returned the penstock to full service. The penstock <span class="hlt">rupture</span> at Owens Gorge caused LADWP to recognize that older hydro plants may have hidden defects that would not have been left in place with current construction and inspection methods. Therefore, additional care should be taken during operation of these plants to avoid placing any unnecessary stresses on plant equipment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Siminski, D.R. (Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, CA (United States))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT........93B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> testing of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Carbon fiber is becoming more prevalent in everyday life. As such, it is necessary to have a thorough understanding of, not solely general mechanical properties, but of long-term material behavior. Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> testing of carbon fiber is very difficult due to high strength and low strain to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> properties. Past efforts have included testing upon strands, single tows and overwrapped pressure vessels. In this study, 1 inch wide, [0°/90°]s laminated composite specimens were constructed from fabric supplied by T.D. Williamson Inc. Specimen fabrication methods and gripping techniques were investigated and a method was developed to collect long term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> behavior data. An Instron 1321 servo-hydraulic material testing machine was used to execute static strength and short term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests. A hanging dead-weight apparatus was designed to perform long-term creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> testing. The testing apparatus, specimens, and specimen grips functioned well. Collected data exhibited a power law distribution and therefore, a linear trend upon a log strength-log time plot. Statistical analysis indicated the material exhibited slow degradation behavior, similar to previous studies, and could maintain a 50 year carrying capacity at 62% of static strength, approximately 45.7 ksi.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Burton, Kathryn Anne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JGRB..11610312D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of plastic deformation on bimaterial fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directivity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Material juxtapositions across mature faults are a common occurrence. Previous work has found that this elastic mismatch results in a <span class="hlt">rupture</span> that will preferentially propagate in the direction of slip displacement on the more compliant side of the fault, with more off-fault damage in the stiffer material. This result has implications for inferring preferred <span class="hlt">rupture</span> directions based on observations of damage zone asymmetry. We perform a complete numerical investigation of the role of the stress state on the distribution of plastic deformation and the direction of preferred <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation. We show that there are important factors, in addition to the elastic mismatch, which control the preferred direction of propagation as well as the side of the fault in which damage predominately accumulates. The orientation of the most compressive principal stress is the controlling factor in determining the location of plastic deformation. For different orientations, plastic deformation can accumulate in either the stiffer or the more compliant material. For high angles of most compressive stress, the aforementioned preferred <span class="hlt">rupture</span> direction prediction holds true. However, the off-fault plastic response can reverse that direction for low angles of most compressive stress so that <span class="hlt">rupture</span> will preferentially propagate in the direction of slip displacement in the stiffer material.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dedontney, Nora; Templeton-Barrett, Elizabeth L.; Rice, James R.; Dmowska, Renata</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7010205"> <span id="translatedtitle">Origin, growth, and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of saccular aneurysms: a review.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pathological and hemodynamic concepts regarding the origin, growth, and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of intracranial saccular aneurysms are reviewed. Aneurysms form as a result of an interplay between hemodynamic factors, such as axial stream impingement and the water hammer effect, and structural weaknesses at apices of arterial bifurcations, such as congenital and acquired medial defects, funnel-shaped dilatations, and areas of thinning. Hypertension and time aid the formation of aneurysms. Unknown factors in women and in some families also play a role. Enlargement of aneurysms results from an interplay between mechanical factors, such as self-excitation and resonance, that produce structural fatigue and pathological processes of repair of the aneurysmal wall. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of aneurysms is caused by the same hemodynamic factors that effect growth and is also influenced by extramural pressure. Pathologically, a major <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may be preceded by fibrinous and leukocytic infiltration of the wall, bleb formation, and a minor hemorrhage. Such minor leaks can be followed by healing and growth. Aneurysms that escape major hemorrhage or heal successfully after a hemorrhage can grow to giant proportions, but remain susceptible to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> despite their size, unless they become completely thrombosed. Intramural thrombosis may be stimulated by minor leaks and is dependent upon the physical characteristics of aneurysms. Experimental, angiographic, and clinical studies that pertain to the origin, growth, and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of aneurysms are also reviewed. PMID:7010205</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sekhar, L N; Heros, R C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/33201993"> <span id="translatedtitle">Profound Hypothermia and Circulatory Arrest with Skull Base Approaches for Treatment of Complex Posterior Circulation Aneurysms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary  ?Objective. Cardiopulmonary bypass with profound hypothermia and circulatory arrest has seen a resurgence as an adjunct technique in\\u000a neurological surgery. We report our experience with this technique in treating seven complex <span class="hlt">vertebro-basilar</span> aneurysms.\\u000a \\u000a ?Methods. Skull base approaches were used in all cases, providing excellent exposure and minimizing brain retraction. There were six\\u000a basilar artery aneurysms and one giant <span class="hlt">fusiform</span> <span class="hlt">vertebro-basilar</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. J. Sullivan; L. N. Sekhar; D. H. Duong; G. Mergner; D. Alyano</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000JOM....52a..40K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of alloy 718 after thermal aging</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Alloy 718 given the conventional 718/621°C age-hardening treatment was thermally aged at 593°C, 621°C, and 649°C for up to 50,000 h. These temperatures bracket the lowest of the duplex age-hardening temperatures. Subsequent creep-<span class="hlt">rupture</span> tests conducted at the same temperature of thermal aging show no detrimental effects of 593°C aging after 50,000 h. Material aged for 50,000 h and tested at 621°C shows the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life to be approximately 60 65% of the unaged material, but at 649°C, the aged-material <span class="hlt">rupture</span> life is on the order of 15% of the unaged material.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Korth, Gary E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10181223"> <span id="translatedtitle">Engineering evaluation of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> strainer in Building 309</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report deals with the consequences of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> steam strainer and is divided into two sections. Section 1 evaluates the engineering aspects of the <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> steam strainer, investigates the events that culminated in the damage and considers factors that may have contributed to the incident. Recommendations are presented to upgrade the system in Building 309 by incorporating hardware changes and proposes a change in operating procedures. Section 2 utilizes the findings presented in Section 1 as a basis for conducting a review on the remainder of the 300 Area steam system, in order to identify similar problem areas. Corrective action recommendations to reduce the risk of repeating component <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> from water hammer conditions were developed out of the survey and the associated review.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Papenfuss, J.N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> 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</span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.T14B..08H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> Segmentation Along The Nankai Trough, Southwest Japan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In southwest Japan, large devastating earthquakes (Mw>8) occurred along the Nankai subduction zone every 100-200 years (e.g. Ando, 1975, Tectonophys.; Ishibashi, 2004, Ann. Geophys.). Historical records revealed the segmented nature of the 600 km long seismogenic zone, producing Nankai and Tonankai earthquakes to occur separately or jointly at each cycle. The intersegment zone which separates Nankai and Tonankai source areas, near the Kii Peninsula, should have some special physical properties. In this study, we investigate the dynamic linkage of the coseismic slips on the Nankai and Tonankai segments, by modeling the spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> propagation on the subduction interface. To conduct a reliable modeling, the parameters’ lateral variations along the place interface are introduced by combining several geophysical observation data sets. First, we use a large-scale 3D geometry for the plate interface, inferred from seismicity; we also integrate the slip deficit distribution (Hashimoto et al., 2009, SSJ meeting) obtained by inversion of GPS data, to constrain the distribution of stress drop on the interface. This distribution is not uniform, and explains the 1st order asperities of the subduction zone: Hyuga, Nankai, Tonankai and Tokai areas appear clearly as loaded regions. In addition, a constitutive friction law is required to link fault slip and stress release. We compiled regional geophysical information relevant to the segmentation, to infer the distribution of the frictional parameters at seismogenic depths. We focused on areas where the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is known to have stopped. The barriers seem to be related to upper plate structure (Wells et al. 2003, JGR, Rosenau and Oncken 2009, JGR). Uplifted areas show common characteristics: end of seismogenic segments, underplating in the wedge, and higher density of the upper old wedge (granitic intrusions). Following above review, we introduced 3 barrier regions delimiting 2 asperity regions (Nankai and Tonankai). Inside the barrier, the fracture energy changes in regional scale, via a change of the critical slip distance scaling. The strength remains uniform along the interface. Asperities are produced by the initial stress distribution inferred from slip deficit. Using this model setting, we computed a few different spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> scenarios, by changing only the location of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiation. Remarkably, we could reproduce the segmentation of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, as observed during the 1940’s sequence, provided that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiates close to the Kii peninsula barrier area. However, if the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiate far from the Kii peninsula, close to Tokai or west of Muroto cape for instance, the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is more likely to break the full plate interface in a single <span class="hlt">rupture</span> event, consistently with what has been observed in the past. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> segmentation appears to be a consequence of the friction properties off-Kii Peninsula, as well as the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> initiation position. This work provides a reliable way to enlighten the conditional segmentation process, as a consequence of the earthquake dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hok, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Hashimoto, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23493246"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous liver <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: A report of two cases.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous bleeding due to a non traumatic liver <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare occurrence. However, it is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Usually the predisposing factors are like Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome in pregnant women and other liver diseases. It is generally diagnosed by imaging studies such as ultra sonogram or computerized tomogram (CT). Due to its rarity no standard treatment has been described. Here, we report two cases of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of normal liver in two young males. They presented with severe shock and hemoperitoneum. The diagnosis was confirmed by CT. They were managed surgically. In case of hemoperitoneum, spontaneous liver <span class="hlt">rupture</span> should be considered. An early aggressive resuscitation and appropriate intervention gives better outcome. PMID:23493246</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yacob, Myla; Jesudason, Mark R; Nayak, Sukria</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3589860"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spontaneous liver <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: A report of two cases</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous bleeding due to a non traumatic liver <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is a rare occurrence. However, it is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Usually the predisposing factors are like Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome in pregnant women and other liver diseases. It is generally diagnosed by imaging studies such as ultra sonogram or computerized tomogram (CT). Due to its rarity no standard treatment has been described. Here, we report two cases of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of normal liver in two young males. They presented with severe shock and hemoperitoneum. The diagnosis was confirmed by CT. They were managed surgically. In case of hemoperitoneum, spontaneous liver <span class="hlt">rupture</span> should be considered. An early aggressive resuscitation and appropriate intervention gives better outcome.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yacob, Myla; Jesudason, Mark R.; Nayak, Sukria</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21090753"> <span id="translatedtitle">Emergency Stenting of a <span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Infected Anastomotic Femoral Pseudoaneurysm</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 74-year-old man presented with a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> infected anastomotic femoral pseudoaneurysm. Due to severe medical comorbidities he was considered unsuitable for conventional surgical management and underwent an emergency endovascular repair with a balloon-expandable covered stent. The pseudoaneurysm was excluded successfully and the patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery with long-term suppressive antimicrobials. He remained well for 10 months after the procedure with no signs of recurrent local or systemic infection and finally died from an acute myocardial infarction. To our knowledge, emergency endovascular treatment of a free <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> bleeding femoral artery pseudoaneurysm has not been documented before in the English literature. This case illustrates that endovascular therapy may be a safe and efficient alternative in the emergent management of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> infected anastomotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysms when traditional open surgery is contraindicated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Klonaris, Chris, E-mail: chris_klonaris@yahoo.com; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Giannopoulos, Athanasios; Tsigris, Chris; Papadopouli, Katerina ['LAIKON' Hospital, Athens University Medical School, 1st Department of Surgery, Vascular Division (Greece); Tsiodras, Sotiris [Attikon Hospital, Athens University Medical School, 4th Academic Department of Internal Medicine (Greece); Bastounis, Elias ['LAIKON' Hospital, Athens University Medical School, 1st Department of Surgery, Vascular Division (Greece)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-11-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AGUFM.S21G..06R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Numerical Models of Stopping <span class="hlt">Ruptures</span> on a Bimaterial Interface</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using a cross-correlation earthquake relocation technique, Rubin and Gillard (2000) and Rubin (2002) found that the nearest aftershocks of microearthquakes on the San Andreas fault were much more likely (by a ratio of nearly 3:1) to occur to the NW of the mainshock than to the SE. They attributed this asymmetry to the material contrast across the fault and the resulting dynamical reduction in normal stress near the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front propagating to the SE (the front moving in the direction of slip of the more compliant medium). Specifically, it was hypothesized that regions of the fault far enough from failure to resist this extra dynamical "kick" would be that much farther from failure once those dynamical stresses decayed. However, analytical (steady-state) models of propagating slip on a bimaterial interface (Weertman, 1980) show that, as with the static stress field, normal stress changes occur only behind the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front. The proposed explanation works most simply if the region ahead of the SE <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front experiences a transient stress favorable for slip. In principal this stress transient could be associated with either <span class="hlt">rupture</span> growth or arrest. To investigate this further, we ran 2-D numerical models of slip on a bimaterial interface with slip-weakening friction, using the code of Cochard and Rice (2000). The <span class="hlt">ruptures</span> spontaneously accelerate to the generalized Rayleigh wave speed of the medium, when such exists. During this growth phase, large tensile stresses are indeed restricted to regions of large slip velocity behind the SE-propagating <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front. Ahead of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front the normal stresses are smaller and compressive. If the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front is stopped abruptly, the short-wavelength tensile stress pulse continues to propagate at roughly the same velocity. The above comments also apply in an anti-symmetric sense to the NW <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front, although there the slip speeds and normal stress changes are lower. If the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is stopped by a more gradual reduction in the loading stress, the moving tensile pulse can spawn a decaying slip pulse at the SE front but not the NW. If this slip pulse marks the furthest extent of slip, the resulting static stress field is quite asymmetric even for a symmetric initial stress, lying on the failure envelope at the NW end of the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> but well below it at the SE end. These results are at least permissive of the explanation proposed by Rubin and Gillard. For weaker slip pulses (due to any of a number of factors contributing to smaller maximum slip speeds), the furthest extent of slip near the SE <span class="hlt">rupture</span> front can be driven by the stopping phase arriving from the NW end of the crack. Under such conditions the final stress field is more symmetric. We will be running models using heterogeneous stress fields to explore these questions further, and hope to use rate-and-state friction to investigate the observed temporal decay of the aftershock asymmetry.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rubin, A. M.; Ampuero, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70026333"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluating fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> hazard for strike-slip earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present fault displacement data, regressions, and a methodology to calculate in both a probabilistic and deterministic framework the fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> hazard for strike-slip faults. To assess this hazard we consider: (1) the size of the earthquake and probability that it will <span class="hlt">rupture</span> to the surface, (2) the rate of all potential earthquakes on the fault (3) the distance of the site along and from the mapped fault, (4) the complexity of the fault and quality of the fault mapping, (5) the size of the structure that will be placed at the site, and (6) the potential and size of displacements along or near the fault. Probabilistic fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> hazard analysis should be an important consideration in design of structures or lifelines that are located within about 50m of well-mapped active faults.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Petersen, M.; Cao, T.; Dawson, T.; Frankel, A.; Wills, C.; Schwartz, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10920498"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Chronic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of abdominal aortic aneurysms. (Report of 3 cases)].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of an abdominal aortic aneurysm often presents with an abdominal pain, hypotension and a pulsatile abdominal mass. In the last years same clinical reports describe patients with less apparent clinical signs who were found later in their evaluation to have a contained <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The diagnosis may be delayed by consideration of other disease causing similar symptoms (herniated disc, renal colic). In these patients with confusing abdominal symptoms CT scan provides a rapid and noninvasive diagnosis. We report three cases of contained <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of an abdominal aortic aneurysm evaluated by computed tomography with different clinical presentation: back pain for erosion into the lumbar vertebral bodies, lower extremity neuropathy and obstructive jaundice. All patients were operated on within 24 hours on admission; there was no operative mortality and survival was 100% at one year. PMID:10920498</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dorrucci, V; Veraldi, G F; Dusi, R; Rombolà, G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">428</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8269162"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mitral regurgitation from papillary muscle <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: role of transesophageal echocardiography.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A case of a 61 year old male with lateral myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure and fever of days is presented. The exact etiology of this patient's heart failure was established with the application of transesophageal echocardiography. The transthoracic two-dimensional and Doppler echo showed a mobile echogenic density attached to the tip of the anterior mitral leaflet accompanied by moderate mitral regurgitation. Transesophageal echocardiography attributed this echogenic density to a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> head of the anterolateral papillary muscle, resulting in severe mitral regurgitation. Cardiac catheterization confirmed the severe mitral regurgitation and uncovered significant stenotic lesions of the coronary arteries. The resultant surgical treatment for the replacement of the mitral valve and coronary artery by-pass confirmed the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the head of the anterolateral papillary muscle. It is suggested that transesophageal echocardiography is particularly capable of providing a definitive and prompt diagnosis of papillary muscle <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. PMID:8269162</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kranidis, A; Koulouris, S; Filippatos, G; Sideris, A; Anthopoulos, L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">429</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2492588"> <span id="translatedtitle">Contemporary Diagnosis and Management of Preterm Premature <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of Membranes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of membranes (ROM) is a normal component of labor and delivery. Premature ROM (PROM) refers to <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the fetal membranes prior to the onset of labor irrespective of gestational age. Once the membranes <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, delivery is recommended when the risk of ascending infection outweighs the risk of prematurity. When PROM occurs at term, labor typically ensues spontaneously or is induced within 12 to 24 hours. The management of pregnancies complicated by preterm PROM (defined as PROM occurring prior to 37 weeks of gestation) is more challenging. Preterm PROM complicates 2% to 20% of all deliveries and is associated with 18% to 20% of perinatal deaths. Management options include admission to hospital, amniocentesis to exclude intra-amniotic infection, and administration of antenatal corticosteroids and broad-spectrum antibiotics, if indicated. This article reviews in detail the contemporary diagnosis and management of preterm PROM.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Caughey, Aaron B; Robinson, Julian N; Norwitz, Errol R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">430</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19225999"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of latissimus dorsi muscle in a tennis player.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the latissimus dorsi muscle is a rare injury, and few reported cases were avulsion injuries at their humeral insertion. Seven cases of spontaneous <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the latissimus dorsi muscle have been reported, but only 1 occurred at the myotendinous junction. The mechanism of this injury is reported to be forceful resisted arm adduction or extension, and reported injuries were rock climbing and attempting to pull up on an overhead handhold, waterskiing injury during pull-up with ski rope, overuse in golf in the leading arm, and abduction-external rotation with horizontally extended arm during a professional steer wrestling performance. The latissimus dorsi muscle is not a critical muscle for activities of daily living; however, the significance of the muscle is increased in professional or elite athletes. This article presents a case of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the latissimus dorsi muscle at the myotendinous junction that occurred during a sports activity. PMID:19225999</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, Jin-Young; Lhee, Sang-Hoon; Keum, Jeong-Sup</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">431</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19965786"> <span id="translatedtitle">Endovascular repair of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> giant popliteal artery aneurysm.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report presents the first reported case of an endovascular repair of a <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> giant popliteal artery aneurysm. The patient, an 86-year-old man, presented emergently with a free <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of a 7-cm left popliteal artery aneurysm and a large hematoma in his left thigh of approximately 20 cm in diameter. The patient was considered to be at high risk for open surgery and therefore underwent endovascular repair of his <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> popliteal artery aneurysm using two 8 mm x 15 mm Viabahn endografts. At one month follow-up, the large hematoma in the left thigh had completely resolved, the patient was ambulating without pain or difficulty and had palpable pedal pulses on physical examination. One year following the procedure, the endografts remained patent without endoleak. PMID:19965786</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rits, Yevgeniy; Erben, Young; Ricotta, Joseph J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">432</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PhDT.......248K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigating <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of Parkfield seismicity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this dissertation the result of four studies regarding earthquake source parameter determination, and three-dimensional (3D) wave propagation are presented. I have developed finite-source models for the September 28, 2004 M6 Parkfield earthquake using GPS and InSAR geodetic data, and seismic strong motion waveform data inverted both separately and jointly. The preferred model from the joint inversion shows that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is predominantly unilateral to the NW with a small component to the SE. There are two primary high slip asperities one around the hypocenter and the other between 10 and 23 km to the NW both within the depth range of 5--13 km. The results from detailed sensitivity analyses indicate that the developed finite-source slip model is stable and the kinematic parameters are well resolved. I also examined the effect of the assumed velocity structure and corresponding Green's functions on the finite source inversion for the 2004 Parkfield earthquake using near-fault strong motion data with 1D and 3D velocity models. Using either the 1D or 3D velocity structures produce similar results, however there are significant differences in detail, where slip using 3D Green's functions is more compact, and the peak slip occurs in the hypocentral asperity in contrast to the 1D case where peak slip is located in the NW asperity. A comparison of seismic waveform derived slip models reveals that the 3D Green's function model predicts the GPS data significantly better. Both 1D and 3D Green's function models failed to model the strong motion waveform data from stations located very close to or within the fault-zone. Forward modeling revealed that accounting for a narrow low-velocity zone improves the fit to the data from these near-fault sites. Synthetic tests show that the influence of such fault-zone structure decreases rapidly with distance suggesting that excluding fault-zone stations from inversions and focusing on data from more distant stations may lead to less structure biased results, though additional work is needed to confirm this. In another study I investigated the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of micro-earthquakes (M2 target events) at Parkfield using nearly collocated smaller earthquakes as empirical Green's functions (eGf). The result of synthetic tests shows that a direct eGf waveform inversion method predicts the slip model, and the target event waveforms better than a eGf deconvolution approach to invert recovered moment rate functions. I applied the direct eGf waveform inversion to the M2 SAFOD repeating earthquakes, and found that the events have a roughly circular slip distribution with small dimension, high slip amplitude, and corresponding very high stress drop that indicate that high strength asperities exist on the San Andreas fault. Finally, I performed 3D ground motion simulations for 10 small to moderate earthquakes (Mw 4.1--5.4) in the San Francisco Bay Area to evaluate two versions of the USGS 3D velocity model (Brocher, 2005; Jachens et al., 2006; Brocher, 2008) in terms of modeling phase arrival timing, peak ground motion amplitudes, and the capability of the models to simulate strong ground motions for earthquake hazard scenarios. P and S wave timing are well modeled by the velocity models, however, there remain discrepancies in estimated amplitudes and durations that require further calibration. Simulated pseudo spectral acceleration at long period (1 and 3 seconds) compared well with observation. The comparison of peak ground velocity (PGV) for both models reveals that both predict the observed PGV well over four orders of magnitude, however there is an approximate 3-fold dispersion between predicted and observed values due to unaccounted for 3D structure and site effects. Keeping in mind the dispersion, due to the long-period nature of PGV the strong correlation between observed and predicted motions indicate that the 3D models are suitable for scenario earthquake PGV ground motion simulation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Ah Yi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">433</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.S31B1904Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Source mechanism and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of Wenchuan great earthquake</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On May 12, 2008, occurred a disastrous earthquake, whose magnitude was later modified to be Ms8.0. Focal mechanism and <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of the event were determined by inverting long period waveforms from the world-wide stations. The focal mechanism was obtained by a technique of moment tensor inversion considering source time complexity, indicating that the earthquake was a thrust-dominant event with quite right-lateral component. Based on one of the inverted fault planes, which was of strike 230°/dip35°/rake123°, we selected an area with a length of 510 km in strike direction and a width of 50 km in dip direction and divided it into 255 subfaults of 10 km x 10km for inversion of <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process. The inverted results showed that the source time function was consisted of at least 3 bigger sub-events with a total duration time of 90s, and the maximum slip value is about 7.3 m and the average slip value is 2.4 m, corresponding the maximum stress drop of 53 MPa and the average stress drop of 18 MPa, respectively. From the static slip dislocation distribution, there were mainly 2 slip-concentrated areas located in Wenchuan and Beichuan, respectively. The <span class="hlt">rupture</span> broke the ground surface and resulted in the maximum slip of 6.1 m in Wenchuan and 5.6 m in Beichuan, respectively. From the slip-rate snapshots, there existed an evident phenomenon that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> strongly extended to SW in 15 s-30 s after the earthquake started, which implied that the <span class="hlt">rupture</span> have ever come back for some time in the whole <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of propagating to NE direction. Also, we calculated the near-fault co-seismic displacement field based on the inverted static slip distribution, and the calculated displacement field well featured the observed intensity contours.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Y.; Liu, C.; Chen, Y.; Feng, W.; Xu, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">434</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003PEPI..137..213L"> <span id="translatedtitle">The hierarchical <span class="hlt">rupture</span> process of a fault: an experimental study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We describe the detailed faulting process of a naturally healed fault containing geometric and mechanical asperities in a granitic porphyry sample, based on data collected with a high-speed acoustic emission (AE) waveform recording system. Asperity failure is examined using the detailed spatio-temporal distribution of AE hypocenters. The initial phase of AE activity is also examined using high dynamic range waveforms. Our experimental results indicate that quasi-static nucleation of the heterogeneous fault is associated with the failure of asperities on the fault plane. The fracturing of an asperity is characterized by a dense spatial clustering of AE events and a changing b-value ( b, hereinafter), which is manifest in three typical stages of failure as follows: (1) foreshocks exhibiting a decrease in b, (2) a period of mainshocks corresponding to a minimum in b, and (3) aftershocks of increasing b. The progressive fracture of several coupled asperities results in short-term precursory fluctuations in both b and AE rate. Furthermore, some AE events possess similar dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> features to those of earthquakes, having an initial phase associated with the transition from quasi-dynamic to dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span>. We conclude based on these experimental observations that fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> has hierarchical characteristics. Quasi-static nucleation of fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> represents dynamic fracture of the asperities on the fault plane; likewise, a quasi-static nucleation process characterized by dynamic microfracturing precedes the fracture of an asperity. Since dynamic motions are easier to detect remotely than static deformations, understanding the hierarchical processes underlying fault <span class="hlt">rupture</span> may thus be helpful for elucidating quasi-static nucleation at larger scales in terms of the dynamic <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of the asperities at smaller scales. Careful studies of asperity failure in the lab may guide future seismic studies of large asperities on natural faults, potentially making it possible to recognize the final preparation stage before a large earthquake.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lei, Xinglin; Kusunose, Kinichiro; Satoh, Takashi; Nishizawa, Osamu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">435</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18320869"> <span id="translatedtitle">Umbilical cord <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: a case report and review of literature.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The umbilical cord acts as a mechanical conduit between the fetus and placenta, allowing movement of water and nutrient substances between the fetal circulation and the amniotic fluid. Complications can occur antenatally or intranatally and are usually acute events that require immediate delivery to prevent intrauterine death. Even though the majority of the cord complications are unpreventable, significant improvement in perinatal mortality and morbidity can be achieved if such an event can be predicted. Umbilical cord <span class="hlt">rupture</span> is not uncommon, but significantly underreported. We present an unusual cause of umbilical cord <span class="hlt">rupture</span> and a review of literature. PMID:18320869</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Naidu, Madhusudhan; Nama, Vivek; Karoshi, Mahantesh; Kakumani, Vijayasri; Worth, Richard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">436</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3439684"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> hemiarch and descending thoracic aorta aneurysm: hybrid treatment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> aortic arch aneurysm is a life threatening disease. Surgical repair has an high perioperative mortality rate and totally endovascular treatment is a challenge. Hybrid repair has been proposed as a valuable approach. We report the case of a patient with a contained <span class="hlt">rupture</span> of aortic arch aneurysm. We treated him with a debranching of supraortic vessels with carotid-carotid and carotid-subclavian bypass and deployment of two enodgrafts in two different times. We consider hybrid treatment for arch and hemiarch a feasible option for aortic arch aneurysms in non emergent and in an emergency setting with an improvement in perioperative morbidity and mortality.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">437</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22568164"> <span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of renal artery aneurysm into the renal pelvis].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report a case of <span class="hlt">ruptured</span> renal artery aneurysm into the renal pelvis. A 48-year-old woman presented with complaints of gross hematuria and right back pain. Abdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the aneurysm, which was 5 x 5 cm in diameter. Enhansed CT revealed blood flow from the renal artery aneurysm into the renal pelvis. Radical nephrectomy was performed. <span class="hlt">Rupture</span> of renal artery aneurysm into the renal pelvis is the 3rd case in the Japanese literatures. Pathogenesis and management of this rare condition are discussed. PMID:22568164</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Suzuki, Takahisa; Kurita, Yutaka; Shinbo, Hitoshi; Imanishi, Takeshi; Ushiyama, Tomomi; Mugiya, Soichi; Ozono, Seiichiro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">438</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3578668"> <span id="translatedtitle">Duodenal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> secondary to blunt trauma from a football</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Duodenal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> secondary to blunt trauma is a relatively uncommon event and is usually a result of a road traffic accident. As the duodenum is a retroperitoneal organ, delays in diagnosis can occur, as the patient may present with vague abdominal symptoms and other non-specific signs. Computed tomographic scanning is therefore a useful tool in the diagnosis of this condition. We present a 19-year-old girl who was hit in the abdomen with a football and subsequently had a duodenal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Luther, Alison; Mann, Christopher; Hart, Colin; Khalil, Khalil</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">439</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22228286"> <span id="translatedtitle">Iatrogenic tracheal <span class="hlt">rupture</span>: bovine pericardial patch repair without flap reinforcement.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We describe a case of an extensive post-intubation membranous tracheal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> in a 67-year old patient after emergency intubation. This was managed surgically by bovine pericardial patch repair. Other cases of autologous and bovine patch repair of tracheal lacerations exist in the literature, and we believe this is the first report of successful bovine patch repair without accessory autologous tissue reinforcement. This technique may be used in surgically managed cases of membranous tracheal <span class="hlt">rupture</span> where primary repair is unsuitable, thereby reducing procedural complexity. PMID:22228286</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carter, Jacob J; Evans, David; Shah, Pallav; Ura, Masashi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">440</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3502781"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Ruptured</span> Ectopic Pregnancy in Caesarean Section Scar: A Case Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pregnancy implantation within previous caesarean scar is one of the rarest locations for an ectopic pregnancy. Incidence of caesarean section is increasing worldwide and with more liberal use of transvaginal sonography, more cases of caesarean scar pregnancy are being diagnosed in early pregnancy thus allowing preservation of uterus and fertility. However, a delay in either diagnosis or treatment can lead to uterine <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, hysterectomy, and significant maternal morbidity. We are reporting a rare case of first trimester caesarean scar pregnancy with viable fetus in the process of <span class="hlt">rupture</span>, where uterine repair could be done, thus preserving the future fertility.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Singh, Kamal; Soni, Anjali; Rana, Shelly</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_22 div --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDi