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Sample records for russak rita nmmela

  1. 27 CFR 9.162 - Sta. Rita Hills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sta. Rita Hills. 9.162.... Rita Hills. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sta. Rita Hills”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Sta. Rita Hills” is a term of viticultural significance....

  2. 27 CFR 9.162 - Sta. Rita Hills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sta. Rita Hills. 9.162.... Rita Hills. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sta. Rita Hills”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Sta. Rita Hills” is a term of viticultural significance....

  3. 27 CFR 9.162 - Sta. Rita Hills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sta. Rita Hills. 9.162.... Rita Hills. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sta. Rita Hills”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Sta. Rita Hills” is a term of viticultural significance....

  4. 27 CFR 9.162 - Sta. Rita Hills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sta. Rita Hills. 9.162.... Rita Hills. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sta. Rita Hills”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Sta. Rita Hills” is a term of viticultural significance....

  5. 27 CFR 9.162 - Sta. Rita Hills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sta. Rita Hills. 9.162.... Rita Hills. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sta. Rita Hills”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Sta. Rita Hills” is a term of viticultural significance....

  6. Lens proteome map and alpha-crystallin profile of the catfish Rita rita.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Bimal Prasanna; Bhattacharjee, Soma; Das, Manas Kumar

    2011-02-01

    Crystallins are a diverse group of proteins that constitute nearly 90% of the total soluble proteins of the vertebrate eye lens and these tightly packed crystallins are responsible for transparency of the lens. These proteins have been studied in different model and non-model species for understanding the modifications they undergo with ageing that lead to cataract, a disease of protein aggregation. In the present investigation, we studied the lens crystallin profile of the tropical freshwater catfish Rita rita. Profiles of lens crystallins were analyzed and crystallin proteome maps of Rita rita were generated for the first time. alphaA-crystallins, member of the alpha-crystallin family, which are molecular chaperons and play crucial role in maintaining lens transparency were identified by 1- and 2-D immunoblot analysis with anti-alphaA-crystallin antibody. Two protein bands of 19-20 kDa were identified as alphaA-crystallins on 1-D immunoblots and these bands separated into 10 discrete spots on 2-D immunoblot. However, anti-alphaB-crystallin and antiphospho-alphaB-crystallin antibodies were not able to detect any immunoreactive bands on 1- and 2-D immunoblots, indicating alphaB-crystallin was either absent or present in extremely low concentration in Rita rita lens. Thus, Rita rita alpha-crystallins are more like that of the catfish Clarias batrachus and the mammal kangaroo in its alphaA- and alphaB-crystallin content (contain low amount from 5-9% of alphaB-crystallin) and unlike the dogfish, zebrafish, human, bovine and mouse alpha-crystallins (contain higher amount of alphaB-crystallin from 25% in mouse and bovine to 85% in dogfish). Results of the present study can be the baseline information for stimulating further investigation on Rita rita lens crystallins for comparative lens proteomics. Comparing and contrasting the alpha-crystallins of the dogfish and Rita rita may provide valuable information on the functional attributes of alphaA- and alphaB-isoforms, as

  7. AmeriFlux US-SRC Santa Rita Creosote

    SciTech Connect

    Kurc, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-SRC Santa Rita Creosote. Site Description - Part of the Santa Rita Experimental Range since 1901; Site vegetation has been dominated by Creosote bush since at least 1934

  8. AmeriFlux US-SRG Santa Rita Grassland

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Russell

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-SRG Santa Rita Grassland. Site Description - Semidesert C4 grassland, lies in Pasture 1 on the Santa Rita Experimental Range. This is the companion site for US-SRM, but has much less mesquite encroachment.

  9. Children and Trauma: A Post-Katrina and Rita Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Barbara B.; Ballard, Mary B.

    2007-01-01

    Many children have struggled to cope with the traumatic experiences brought about by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. This article recounts how the authors intervened in the lives of children and families after the storms. (Contains 3 figures.)

  10. Impact of detergents on the protein histochemistry of various cell types of the gill epithelium of Rita rita.

    PubMed

    Roy, D

    1988-04-01

    Fish, Rita rita, were exposed to an anionic detergent, dodecylbenzene sodium sulfonate, 6.9 mg per litre of tap water (96-hr LC50 of the detergent). A gradual decrease in the protein constituents of the major cell types, viz, the epithelial cells and the goblet mucous cells in the epithelium lining the gill arch, gill filament, and club cells present only in the gill arch epithelium has been observed by using a series of histochemical techniques. PMID:3378537

  11. Mapping Hurricane Rita inland storm tide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, Charles; Mason, Jr., Robert R.; Blanchard, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    Flood-inundation data are most useful for decision makers when presented in the context of maps of effected communities and (or) areas. But because the data are scarce and rarely cover the full extent of the flooding, interpolation and extrapolation of the information are needed. Many geographic information systems (GIS) provide various interpolation tools, but these tools often ignore the effects of the topographic and hydraulic features that influence flooding. A barrier mapping method was developed to improve maps of storm tide produced by Hurricane Rita. Maps were developed for the maximum storm tide and at 3-hour intervals from midnight (0000 hour) through noon (1200 hour) on September 24, 2005. The improved maps depict storm-tide elevations and the extent of flooding. The extent of storm-tide inundation from the improved maximum storm-tide map was compared to the extent of flood-inundation from a map prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The boundaries from these two maps generally compared quite well especially along the Calcasieu River. Also a cross-section profile that parallels the Louisiana coast was developed from the maximum storm-tide map and included FEMA high-water marks.

  12. Mapping hurricane rita inland storm tide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, C.; Mason, R.R., Jr.; Blanchard, S.F.

    2009-01-01

    Flood-inundation data are most useful for decision makers when presented in the context of maps of affected communities and (or) areas. But because the data are scarce and rarely cover the full extent of the flooding, interpolation and extrapolation of the information are needed. Many geographic information systems provide various interpolation tools, but these tools often ignore the effects of the topographic and hydraulic features that influence flooding. A barrier mapping method was developed to improve maps of storm tide produced by Hurricane Rita. Maps were developed for the maximum storm tide and at 3-h intervals from midnight (00:00 hours) through noon (12:00 hours) on 24 September 2005. The improved maps depict storm-tide elevations and the extent of flooding. The extent of storm-tide inundation from the improved maximum storm-tide map was compared with the extent of flood inundation from a map prepared by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The boundaries from these two maps generally compared quite well especially along the Calcasieu River. Also a cross-section profile that parallels the Louisiana coast was developed from the maximum storm-tide map and included FEMA high-water marks. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Detergent-induced changes in the protein constituents of various cell types of opercular epidermis of Rita rita.

    PubMed

    Roy, D

    1990-09-01

    Fish (Rita rita) were exposed to an anionic detergent, dodecylbenzene sodium sulfonate, at a concentration of 6.9 mg/liter (96-hr LC50 of the detergent). A series of histochemical techniques, used in this study for the demonstration of various protein constituents, indicated a gradual decrease in the intensity of staining reactions of the cytoplasmic material, suggesting a loss of protein moieties from the club cells and the epithelial cells of the opercular epidermis as a result of detergent exposure. PMID:2252548

  14. AmeriFlux US-SRM Santa Rita Mesquite

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Russell

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-SRM Santa Rita Mesquite. Site Description - Semidesert grassland encroached by mesquite (Prosopis velutina) trees. Please see Scott et al. 2009 JGR-Biogeo, 114, G04004

  15. Resilience of Professional Counselors Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Simone F.; Lawson, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Professional counselors who provided services to those affected by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita completed the K6+ (screen for severe mental illness), the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory, and the Professional Quality of Life Scale. Results indicated that participants who survived the hurricanes had higher levels of posttraumatic growth than…

  16. Lightning and radar observations of hurricane Rita landfall

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Bradley G; Suszcynsky, David M; Hamlin, Timothy E; Jeffery, C A; Wiens, Kyle C; Orville, R E

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) owns and operates an array of Very-Low Frequency (VLF) sensors that measure the Radio-Frequency (RF) waveforms emitted by Cloud-to-Ground (CG) and InCloud (IC) lightning. This array, the Los Alamos Sferic Array (LASA), has approximately 15 sensors concentrated in the Great Plains and Florida, which detect electric field changes in a bandwidth from 200 Hz to 500 kHz (Smith et al., 2002). Recently, LANL has begun development of a new dual-band RF sensor array that includes the Very-High Frequency (VHF) band as well as the VLF. Whereas VLF lightning emissions can be used to deduce physical parameters such as lightning type and peak current, VHF emissions can be used to perform precise 3d mapping of individual radiation sources, which can number in the thousands for a typical CG flash. These new dual-band sensors will be used to monitor lightning activity in hurricanes in an effort to better predict intensification cycles. Although the new LANL dual-band array is not yet operational, we have begun initial work utilizing both VLF and VHF lightning data to monitor hurricane evolution. In this paper, we present the temporal evolution of Rita's landfall using VLF and VHF lightning data, and also WSR-88D radar. At landfall, Rita's northern eyewall experienced strong updrafts and significant lightning activity that appear to mark a transition between oceanic hurricane dynamics and continental thunderstorm dynamics. In section 2, we give a brief overview of Hurricane Rita, including its development as a hurricane and its lightning history. In the following section, we present WSR-88D data of Rita's landfall, including reflectivity images and temporal variation. In section 4, we present both VHF and VLF lightning data, overplotted on radar reflectivity images. Finally, we discuss our observations, including a comparison to previous studies and a brief conclusion.

  17. How Schools Responded to Student Mental Health Needs Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RAND Corporation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This fact sheet summarizes a study that examined how schools in the U.S. Gulf Coast region perceived the mental health needs of students after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and how schools responded. According to the report, despite strong initial efforts to support the mental health needs of students displaced by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, many…

  18. Shelf sediment transport during hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kehui; Mickey, Rangley C.; Chen, Qin; Harris, Courtney K.; Hetland, Robert D.; Hu, Kelin; Wang, Jiaze

    2016-05-01

    Hurricanes can greatly modify the sedimentary record, but our coastal scientific community has rather limited capability to predict hurricane-induced sediment deposition. A three-dimensional sediment transport model was developed in the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) to study seabed erosion and deposition on the Louisiana shelf in response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in the year 2005. Sensitivity tests were performed on both erosional and depositional processes for a wide range of erosional rates and settling velocities, and uncertainty analysis was done on critical shear stresses using the polynomial chaos approximation method. A total of 22 model runs were performed in sensitivity and uncertainty tests. Estimated maximum erosional depths were sensitive to the inputs, but horizontal erosional patterns seemed to be controlled mainly by hurricane tracks, wave-current combined shear stresses, seabed grain sizes, and shelf bathymetry. During the passage of two hurricanes, local resuspension and deposition dominated the sediment transport mechanisms. Hurricane Katrina followed a shelf-perpendicular track before making landfall and its energy dissipated rapidly within about 48 h along the eastern Louisiana coast. In contrast, Hurricane Rita followed a more shelf-oblique track and disturbed the seabed extensively during its 84-h passage from the Alabama-Mississippi border to the Louisiana-Texas border. Conditions to either side of Hurricane Rita's storm track differed substantially, with the region to the east having stronger winds, taller waves and thus deeper erosions. This study indicated that major hurricanes can disturb the shelf at centimeter to meter levels. Each of these two hurricanes suspended seabed sediment mass that far exceeded the annual sediment inputs from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, but the net transport from shelves to estuaries is yet to be determined. Future studies should focus on the modeling of sediment exchange between

  19. Conversacion sobre "Tres tristes tigres". Una entrevista de Rita Guibert (A Conversation about "Three Sad Tigers". An Interview with Rita Guibert)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrera Infante, Guillermo

    1971-01-01

    Interview took place in London, England, on October 5, 1970 between Cuban writer Guillermo Cabrera Infante and journalist Rita Guibert. Special issue dedicated to contemporary Spanish American literature. (DS)

  20. 75 FR 7467 - Gary E. Hall and Rita C. Hall; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing With the Commision...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Gary E. Hall and Rita C. Hall; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing.... Applicant: Gary E. Hall and Rita C. Hall. e. Name of Project: Potter Creek Hydroelectric Project. f...: Mr. Gary E. Hall and Ms. Rita C. Hall, P.O. Box 133, Olney, MT 59927, (406) 881-2345. i. FERC...

  1. In Brief: Rita Colwell receives National Medal of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2007-07-01

    Rita Colwell, director of the U.S. National Science Foundation from 1998 to 2004, was awarded a U.S. National Medal of Science in a White House ceremony on 27 July 2007. Colwell, currently a professor of microbiology and biotechnology at the University of Maryland at College Park and a professor at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, received the award for her research on global infectious diseases and marine microbes, specifically the bacterium that causes pandemic cholera. The National Medal of Science is the United States' highest honor for scientific achievement. Colwell currently serves on AGU's development board.

  2. Integration& Operation of a Microgrid at Santa Rita Jail

    SciTech Connect

    Chevron Energy Solutions; Alameda County; DeForest, Nicholas; Lai, Judy; Stadler, Michael; Mendes, Goncalo; Marnay, Chris; Donadee, Jon

    2011-05-01

    Santa Rita Jail is a 4,500 inmate facility located in Dublin CA, approximately 40 miles (65 km) east of San Francisco. Over the past decade, a series of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) installations and efficiency measures have been undertaken to transform the 3MW facility into a"Green Jail". These include a 1.2MW rated rooftop PV system installed in 2002, a 1MW molten carbonate fuel cell with CHP, and retrofits to lighting and HVAC systems to reduce peak loads. With the upcoming installation of a large-scale battery and fast static disconnect switch, Santa Rita Jail will become a true microgrid, with full CERTS Microgrid functionality. Consequently, the jail will be able to seamlessly disconnect from the grid and operate as an island in the event of a disturbance, reconnecting again once the disturbance has dissipated. The extent to which that jail is capable of islanding is principally dependant on the energy capacity of the battery-one focus of this investigation. Also presented here are overviews of the DER currently installed at the jail, as well as the value it provides by offsetting the purchase of electricity under the current Pacific Gas& Electric (PG&E) tariff.

  3. A Green Prison: The Santa Rita Jail Campus Microgrid

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, Chris; DeForest, Nicholas; Lai, Judy

    2012-01-22

    A large microgrid project is nearing completion at Alameda County’s twenty-two-year-old 45 ha 4,000-inmate Santa Rita Jail, about 70 km east of San Francisco. Often described as a green prison, it has a considerable installed base of distributed energy resources (DER) including an eight-year old 1.2 MW PV array, a five-year old 1 MW fuel cell with heat recovery, and considerable efficiency investments. A current US$14 M expansion adds a 2 MW-4 MWh Li-ion battery, a static disconnect switch, and various controls upgrades. During grid blackouts, or when conditions favor it, the Jail can now disconnect from the grid and operate as an island, using the on-site resources described together with its back-up diesel generators. In other words, the Santa Rita Jail is a true microgrid, or μgrid, because it fills both requirements, i.e. it is a locally controlled system, and it can operate both grid connected and islanded. The battery’s electronics includes Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology (CERTS) Microgrid technology. This enables the battery to maintain energy balance using droops without need for a fast control system.

  4. Land Area Change and Fractional Water Maps in the Chenier Plain, Louisiana, following Hurricane Rita (2005)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palaseanu-Lovejoy, Monica; Kranenburg, Christine J.; Brock, John C.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we estimated the changes in land and water coverage of a 1,961-square-kilometer (km2) area in Louisiana's Chenier Plain. The study area is roughly centered on the Sabine National Wildlife Refuge, which was impacted by Hurricane Rita on September 24, 2005. The objective of this study is twofold: (1) to provide pre- and post-Hurricane Rita moderate-resolution (30-meter (m)) fractional water maps based upon multiple source images, and (2) to quantify land and water coverage changes due to Hurricane Rita.

  5. Mold exposure and health effects following hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, Deborah N; Grimsley, L Faye; White, LuAnn E; El-Dahr, Jane M; Lichtveld, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    The extensive flooding in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita created conditions ideal for indoor mold growth, raising concerns about the possible adverse health effects associated with indoor mold exposure. Studies evaluating the levels of indoor and outdoor molds in the months following the hurricanes found high levels of mold growth. Homes with greater flood damage, especially those with >3 feet of indoor flooding, demonstrated higher levels of mold growth compared with homes with little or no flooding. Water intrusion due to roof damage was also associated with mold growth. However, no increase in the occurrence of adverse health outcomes has been observed in published reports to date. This article considers reasons why studies of mold exposure after the hurricane do not show a greater health impact. PMID:20070193

  6. Te Rita Papesch: Case Study of an Exemplary Learner of Maori as an Additional Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratima, Matiu Tai; Papesch, Te Rita

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the life experiences of one exemplar adult second language Maori learner--Te Rita Papesch. Te Rita was one of 17 participants who were interviewed as a part of the first author's PhD study which sought to answer the question: what factors lead to the development of proficiency in te reo Maori amongst adult…

  7. Toxic effects of an anionic detergent on the lipid constituents of various cell types of the gill epithelium of Rita rita: a histochemical investigation.

    PubMed

    Roy, D

    1989-12-01

    Rita rita exposed to a concentration of 6.9 mg per liter (96-h LC50 of an anionic detergent, dodecylbenzene sodium sulfonate) exhibited a gradual decrease in the lipid moieties of the epithelial cells, club cells, and goblet mucous cells lining the gill arch and gill filament epithelium. However, in time, no reaction of any of the lipid moieties could be observed, indicating the absence of the same, using various histochemical techniques. The results are discussed in light of the mechanistic understanding of detergent action. PMID:2604897

  8. Statistical analysis of anionic detergent-induced changes in the goblet mucous cells of opercular epidermis and gill epithelium of Rita rita (Ham.) (Bagridae: Pisces).

    PubMed

    Roy, D

    1988-06-01

    Rita rita exposed to 96-hr LC50 (6.9 mg/liter) of an anionic detergent, dodecylbenzene sodium sulfonate, show significant changes in the number and size of goblet mucous cells in the opercular epidermis as well as in the lining epithelium of the gill arch and the gill filament at different time intervals of treatment. A shift in the staining nature of these cells from acidic glycoprotein to neutral glycoprotein, acidic glycosaminoglycans in the opercular epidermis and acidic glycoprotein to neutral glycoprotein and then again to acidic glycoprotein + acidic glycosaminoglycans in the gill filament epithelium reflects a change in the physiological status of fish. PMID:3168874

  9. Monitoring Inland Storm Surge and Flooding from Hurricane Rita

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, Benton D.; Tollett, Roland W.; Mason, Jr., Robert R.

    2006-01-01

    Pressure transducers (sensors) and high-water marks were used to document the inland water levels related to storm surge generated by Hurricane Rita in southwestern Louisiana and southeastern Texas. On September 22-23, 2005, an experimental monitoring network of sensors was deployed at 33 sites over an area of about 4,000 square miles to record the timing, extent, and magnitude of inland hurricane storm surge and coastal flooding. Sensors were programmed to record date and time, temperature, and barometric or water pressure. Water pressure was corrected for changes in barometric pressure and salinity. Elevation surveys using global-positioning systems and differential levels were used to relate all storm-surge water-level data, reference marks, benchmarks, sensor measuring points, and high-water marks to the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88). The resulting data indicated that storm-surge water levels over 14 feet above NAVD 88 occurred at three locations, and rates of water-level rise greater than 5 feet per hour occurred at three locations near the Louisiana coast.

  10. 44 CFR 206.209 - Arbitration for Public Assistance determinations related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Major...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Arbitration for Public Assistance determinations related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Major disaster declarations DR-1603, DR... determinations related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Major disaster declarations DR-1603, DR-1604, DR-1605,...

  11. 44 CFR 206.209 - Arbitration for Public Assistance determinations related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Major...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Arbitration for Public Assistance determinations related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Major disaster declarations DR-1603, DR... determinations related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Major disaster declarations DR-1603, DR-1604, DR-1605,...

  12. 44 CFR 206.209 - Arbitration for Public Assistance determinations related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Major...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Arbitration for Public Assistance determinations related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Major disaster declarations DR-1603, DR... determinations related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Major disaster declarations DR-1603, DR-1604, DR-1605,...

  13. 44 CFR 206.209 - Arbitration for Public Assistance determinations related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Major...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Arbitration for Public Assistance determinations related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Major disaster declarations DR-1603, DR... determinations related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Major disaster declarations DR-1603, DR-1604, DR-1605,...

  14. Hurricane Rita Track Radar Image with Topographic Overlay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Animation

    About the animation: This simulated view of the potential effects of storm surge flooding on Galveston and portions of south Houston was generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Although it is protected by a 17-foot sea wall against storm surges, flooding due to storm surges caused by major hurricanes remains a concern. The animation shows regions that, if unprotected, would be inundated with water. The animation depicts flooding in one-meter increments.

    About the image: The Gulf Coast from the Mississippi Delta through the Texas coast is shown in this satellite image from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) overlain with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), and the predicted storm track for Hurricane Rita. The prediction from the National Weather Service was published Sept. 22 at 4 p.m. Central Time, and shows the expected track center in black with the lighter shaded area indicating the range of potential tracks the storm could take.

    Low-lying terrain along the coast has been highlighted using the SRTM elevation data, with areas within 15 feet of sea level shown in red, and within 30 feet in yellow. These areas are more at risk for flooding and the destructive effects of storm surge and high waves.

    Data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between

  15. 75 FR 14442 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowances-Relocation Income Tax Allowance (RITA) Tables

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... Amendment 2008-04 in the Federal Register (73 FR 35952) specifying that GSA would no longer publish the RITA tables found in 41 CFR Part 301-17, Appendices A through D. The tables are instead published at http... Bulletins may be found at http://www.gsa.gov/federaltravelregulation . DATES: This notice is effective...

  16. "Making Lemonade from Lemons:" Early Childhood Teacher Educators' Programmatic Responses to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Cynthia F.; Burts, Diane C.; Buchanan, Teresa K.; Aghayan, Carol; Benedict, Joan

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how early childhood teacher education faculty at one university responded in the aftermath of hurricanes Katrina and Rita and used the disaster to enhance their undergraduate and graduate programs. They explain how they modeled developmentally appropriate practices while responding to community needs. Four companion articles…

  17. Lightcurves for Shape Modeling: 852 Wladilena, 1089 Tama, and 1180 Rita

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polishook, David

    2012-10-01

    The folded lightcurves and synodic periods of 852 Wladilena, 1089 Tama, and 1180 Rita are reported. The data are used by Hanus et al. (2012) to derive the rotation axis and to construct a shape model by applying the inversion lightcurve technique.

  18. 75 FR 22770 - Gary E. Hall and Rita Hall; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Gary E. Hall and Rita Hall; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment April 22, 2010. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended,...

  19. Missed by the Mass Media: The Houma, Pointe-au-Chien, and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Robert Keith

    2008-01-01

    This case study investigates the media discourse from Houma and Pointe-au-Chien tribal leaders in Louisiana on their experiences with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. One section briefly engages the discourse as discernable from the reports found in Native American and non-Native American news media. Included is a brief yet close examination of these…

  20. The Impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on Louisiana School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Lisa; Myers, Rachel; Meaux, Julie

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2005, the coast of Louisiana was devastated by two hurricanes, Katrina and Rita. Not only did these natural disasters have detrimental effects for those directly in their path, the storms had an impact on the lives of everyone in Louisiana. The professional practice of many Louisiana school nurses was affected by several factors,…

  1. REMOTE SENSING DAMAGE ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL PLANTS AND REFINERIES FOLLOWING HURRICANES KATRINA AND RITA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The massive destruction brought by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita also impacted the many chemical plants and refineries in the region. The achievement of this rapid analysis capability highlights the advancement of this technology for air quality assessment and monitoring. Case st...

  2. The impact of Hurricane Rita on an academic institution: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Beggan, Dominic M

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of Hurricane Rita on one of the many universities along the Gulf Coast of the United States: Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas. Hurricane Rita, which made landfall between Sabine Pass, Texas, and Johnson's Bayou, Louisiana, on 24 September 2005, is the fourth strongest Atlantic Ocean hurricane on record and the most intense tropical cyclone ever observed in the Gulf of Mexico. This paper assesses the tasks that confronted the administration, faculty, and students of Lamar University in the days and weeks after the event. It concludes that the one factor that will influence more than any other the degree of success after any disaster is whether all levels of the administrative command institutionalise, endorse, promote, and encourage the adopted recovery plan. The research seeks to share valuable insights on the vulnerabilities that academic institutions face during natural disasters and to highlight some of the many lessons learned. PMID:19624700

  3. Effects of Marsh Pond Terracing on Coastal Wintering Waterbirds Before and After Hurricane Rita

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Jessica L.; Nyman, John A.

    2011-11-01

    From February to March 2005-2006, we surveyed wintering waterbirds to test effects of terracing on coastal pond use before and after Hurricane Rita. Marsh terracing is intended to slow coastal marsh loss in the Chenier Plain by slowing marsh erosion and encouraging vegetation expansion. Terraces also increase marsh edge in ponds, possibly benefiting waterbirds. We monitored paired terraced and unterraced ponds in three sites within southwestern Louisiana's Chenier Plain. Waterbirds were 75% more numerous in terraced than unterraced ponds. Waterbird richness was similar among ponds when corrected for number of individuals, suggesting terracing increased bird density but did not provide habitat unique from unterraced ponds. Birds were 93% more numerous following Hurricane Rita, mostly due to an influx of migrating waterfowl. Year round residents were similar in number before and after Hurricane Rita. Resident richness did not differ among years after correcting for number of observed individuals. Wading and dabbling foragers were more abundant in terraced ponds and these two guilds represented 74% of birds observed. We detected no difference among ponds for other guilds, i.e., probing, aerial, and diving foragers. Increasing proportion of mash edge increased bird density disproportionately: On average ponds with 10% edge had 6 birds observed and ponds with 30% edge had 16 birds observed. Terraces increased habitat interspersion and were an effective tool for increasing numbers of wintering waterfowl and wading birds. The extent to which terraces were sustainable following hurricane forces is unknown.

  4. Sediment deposition from Hurricane Rita on Hackberry Beach chenier in southwestern Louisiana: Chapter 6E in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faulkner, Stephen; Barrow, Wylie; Doyle, Thomas; Baldwin, Michael; Michot, Thomas; Wells, Christopher; Jeske, Clint

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Rita significantly impacted the chenier forests of southwestern Louisiana, an important habitat for Neotropical migratory birds. Sediment deposition was measured along transects at Hackberry Beach chenier, and Rita's effects on chenier structure and morphology were determined.

  5. Damage to offshore infrastructure in the Gulf of Mexico by hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, A. M.; Krausmann, E.

    2009-04-01

    The damage inflicted by hurricanes Katrina and Rita to the Gulf-of-Mexico's (GoM) oil and gas production, both onshore and offshore, has shown the proneness of industry to Natech accidents (natural hazard-triggered hazardous-materials releases). In order to contribute towards a better understanding of Natech events, we assessed the damage to and hazardous-materials releases from offshore oil and natural-gas platforms and pipelines induced by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Data was obtained through a review of published literature and interviews with government officials and industry representatives from the affected region. We also reviewed over 60,000 records of reported hazardous-materials releases from the National Response Center's (NRC) database to identify and analyze the hazardous-materials releases directly attributed to offshore oil and gas platforms and pipelines affected by the two hurricanes. Our results show that hurricanes Katrina and Rita destroyed at least 113 platforms, and severely damaged at least 53 others. Sixty percent of the facilities destroyed were built 30 years ago or more prior to the adoption of the more stringent design standards that went into effect after 1977. The storms also destroyed 5 drilling rigs and severely damaged 19 mobile offshore drilling units (MODUs). Some 19 MODUs lost their moorings and became adrift during the storms which not only posed a danger to existing facilities but the dragging anchors also damaged pipelines and other infrastructure. Structural damage to platforms included toppling of sections, and tilting or leaning of platforms. Possible causes for failure of structural and non-structural components of platforms included loading caused by wave inundation of the deck. Failure of rigs attached to platforms was also observed resulting in significant damage to the platform or adjacent infrastructure, as well as damage to equipment, living quarters and helipads. The failures are attributable to tie-down components

  6. The Response of the National School Lunch Program and Food Stamp Program in Southern Louisiana in the Wake of Hurricances Katrina and Rita

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to identify the successes and barriers to implementing the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and Food Stamp Program (FSP) after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Hurricanes Katrina and Rita decimated the Gulf Coast in August and September 2005. To identify the successes and barriers...

  7. Dissolved and colloidal trace elements in the Mississippi River Delta outflow after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shim, Moo-Joon; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Shiller, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    The Mississippi River delta outflow region is periodically disturbed by tropical weather systems including major hurricanes, which can terminate seasonal bottom water hypoxia and cause the resuspension of shelf bottom sediments which could result in the injection of trace elements into the water column. In the summer of 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita passed over the Louisiana Shelf within a month of each other. Three weeks after Rita, we collected water samples in the Mississippi River delta outflow, examining the distributions of trace elements to study the effect of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. We observed limited stratification on the shelf and bottom waters that were no longer hypoxic. This resulted, for instance, in bottom water dissolved Mn being lower than is typically observed during hypoxia, but with concentrations still compatible with Mn–O2 trends previously reported. Interestingly, for no element were we able to identify an obvious effect of sediment resuspension on its distribution. In general, elemental distributions were compatible with previous observations in the Mississippi outflow system. Co and Re, which have not been reported for this system previously, showed behavior consistent with other systems: input for Co likely from desorption and conservative mixing for Re. For Cs, an element for which there is little information regarding its estuarine behavior, conservative mixing was also observed. Our filtration method, which allowed us to distinguish the dissolved (<0.02 μm) from colloidal (0.02–0.45 μm) phase, revealed significant colloidal fractions for Fe and Zn, only. For Fe, the colloidal phase was the dominant fraction and was rapidly removed at low salinity. Dissolved Fe, in contrast, persisted out to mid-salinities, being removed in a similar fashion to nitrate. This ability to distinguish the smaller Fe (likely dominantly organically complexed) from larger colloidal suspensates may be useful in better interpreting the

  8. Dissolved and colloidal trace elements in the Mississippi River delta outflow after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Moo-Joon; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Shiller, Alan M.

    2012-07-01

    The Mississippi River delta outflow region is periodically disturbed by tropical weather systems including major hurricanes, which can terminate seasonal bottom water hypoxia and cause the resuspension of shelf bottom sediments which could result in the injection of trace elements into the water column. In the summer of 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita passed over the Louisiana Shelf within a month of each other. Three weeks after Rita, we collected water samples in the Mississippi River delta outflow, examining the distributions of trace elements to study the effect of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. We observed limited stratification on the shelf and bottom waters that were no longer hypoxic. This resulted, for instance, in bottom water dissolved Mn being lower than is typically observed during hypoxia, but with concentrations still compatible with Mn-O2 trends previously reported. Interestingly, for no element were we able to identify an obvious effect of sediment resuspension on its distribution. In general, elemental distributions were compatible with previous observations in the Mississippi outflow system. Co and Re, which have not been reported for this system previously, showed behavior consistent with other systems: input for Co likely from desorption and conservative mixing for Re. For Cs, an element for which there is little information regarding its estuarine behavior, conservative mixing was also observed. Our filtration method, which allowed us to distinguish the dissolved (<0.02 μm) from colloidal (0.02-0.45 μm) phase, revealed significant colloidal fractions for Fe and Zn, only. For Fe, the colloidal phase was the dominant fraction and was rapidly removed at low salinity. Dissolved Fe, in contrast, persisted out to mid-salinities, being removed in a similar fashion to nitrate. This ability to distinguish the smaller Fe (likely dominantly organically complexed) from larger colloidal suspensates may be useful in better interpreting the bioavailablity

  9. Effects of hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the chemistry of bottom sediments in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, P.C.; Horowitz, A.J.; Mahler, B.J.; Foreman, W.T.; Fuller, C.C.; Burkhardt, M.R.; Elrick, K.A.; Furlong, E.T.; Skrobialowski, S.C.; Smith, J.J.; Wilson, J.T.; Zaugg, S.D.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the subsequent unwatering of New Orleans, Louisiana, on the sediment chemistry of Lake Pontchartrain were evaluated by chemical analysis of samples of street mud and suspended and bottom sediments. The highest concentrations of urban-related elements and compounds (e.g., Pb, Zn, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and chlordane) in bottom sediments exceeded median concentrations in U.S. urban lakes and sediment-quality guidelines. The extent of the elevated concentrations was limited, however, to within a few hundred meters of the mouth of the 17th Street Canal, similar to results of historical assessments. Chemical and radionuclide analysis of pre- and post-Hurricane Rita samples indicates that remobilization of near-shore sediment by lake currents and storms is an ongoing process. The effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the sediment chemistry of Lake Pontchartrain are limited spatially and are most likely transitory. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  10. EMC tests on the RITA Ion Propulsion Assembly for the ARTEMIS satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, H.; Kukies, R.; Bassner, H.

    1992-07-01

    Objectives and results of EMC tests performed on the RITA Ion Propulsion Assembly to demonstrate its compatibility with the requirements of ARTEMIS are discussed. The tested configuration included the RIT 10 thruster, neutralizer, RF generator, power supply and control unit, and electrical ground support equipment. Test results show that the RIT 10 thruster fulfils the EMC requirements for radiated emission in the critical frequency ranges (L/S/KU bands). The emitted E- and H-fields are not expected to disturb the satellite electronics, and no special shielding or other measures to protect the antennas are needed.

  11. saRNA-guided Ago2 targets the RITA complex to promoters to stimulate transcription

    PubMed Central

    Portnoy, Victoria; Lin, Szu Hua Sharon; Li, Kathy H; Burlingame, Alma; Hu, Zheng-Hui; Li, Hao; Li, Long-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Small activating RNAs (saRNAs) targeting specific promoter regions are able to stimulate gene expression at the transcriptional level, a phenomenon known as RNA activation (RNAa). It is known that RNAa depends on Ago2 and is associated with epigenetic changes at the target promoters. However, the precise molecular mechanism of RNAa remains elusive. Using human CDKN1A (p21) as a model gene, we characterized the molecular nature of RNAa. We show that saRNAs guide Ago2 to and associate with target promoters. saRNA-loaded Ago2 facilitates the assembly of an RNA-induced transcriptional activation (RITA) complex, which, in addition to saRNA-Ago2 complex, includes RHA and CTR9, the latter being a component of the PAF1 complex. RITA interacts with RNA polymerase II to stimulate transcription initiation and productive elongation, accompanied by monoubiquitination of histone 2B. Our results establish the existence of a cellular RNA-guided genome-targeting and transcriptional activation mechanism and provide important new mechanistic insights into the RNAa process. PMID:26902284

  12. Secondary eyewall formation in WRF simulations of Hurricanes Rita and Katrina (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarca, Sergio F.; Corbosiero, Kristen L.

    2011-04-01

    An analysis is presented of two high-resolution hurricane simulations of Katrina and Rita (2005) that exhibited secondary eyewall formation (SEF). The results support the notion of vortex Rossby waves (VRWs) having an important role in SEF and suggest that VRW activity is a defining aspect of the moat. SEF occurs at a radius of ˜65 (80) km in Katrina (Rita), close to the hypothesized stagnation radius of VRWs. VRW activity appears to be the result of eye-eyewall mixing events, themselves a product of the release of barotropic instability. The convection in the radial region that becomes the moat is mainly in the form of VRWs propagating radially outward from the primary eyewall until the negative radial gradient of potential vorticity is no longer conducive for their propagation. These convectively coupled waves, originating and being expelled from the eyewall, are rotation dominated and have the coherency necessary to survive their passage through the strain-dominated region outside the eyewall.

  13. 44 CFR 206.209 - Arbitration for Public Assistance determinations related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Major...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Arbitration for Public Assistance determinations related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Major disaster declarations DR-1603, DR-1604, DR-1605, DR-1606, and DR-1607). 206.209 Section 206.209 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...

  14. When the Saints Come Marching In. Effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on Student Evacuees. NBER Working Paper No. 14385

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacerdote, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    I examine academic performance and college going for public school students affected by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Students who are forced to switch schools due to the hurricanes experience sharp declines in test scores in the first year following the hurricane. However, by the second and third years after the disaster, Katrina evacuees…

  15. Children's Reactions to Katrina and Rita: A Ph.D. Student's Reflection after Observing His Own Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durham, R. Sean

    2007-01-01

    A graduate student in early childhood education discusses observations of his children during and after Hurricanes Rita and Katrina struck the Gulf Coast. He relates his use of responsive parenting and provides examples of his children's learning and play that emerged after the storms. He reflects upon how aspects of developmentally appropriate…

  16. Positive Traits versus Previous Trauma: Racially Different Correlates with PTSD Symptoms among Hurricane Katrina-Rita Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ai, Amy L.; Plummer, Carol; Kanno, Hanae; Heo, Grace; Appel, Hoa B.; Simon, Cassandra E.; Spigner, Clarence

    2011-01-01

    This study compared risks and protective factors for acquiring symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) between African-American (n = 299) and European-American (n = 206) student volunteers 3 months after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (H-KR). Respondents retrospectively provided information on peritraumatic emotional reactions and previous…

  17. Rising Above the Water: New Orleans Implements Energy Efficiency and Sustainability Practices Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the technical assistance that the U.S. Department of Energy, through its National Renewable Energy Laboratory, provided to New Orleans, Louisiana, which helped the city incorporate energy efficiency into its rebuilding efforts for K-12 schools and homes following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. NREL also provided support and analysis on energy policy efforts.

  18. Traumatic Loss and Natural Disaster: A Case Study of a School-Based Response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clettenberg, Stacey; Gentry, Judy; Held, Matthew; Mock, Lou Ann

    2011-01-01

    This article tracks the trajectory and impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the communities of Houston/Harris County, Texas, USA, the schools, children, and families; along with the community partnerships that addressed the trauma and upheaval. Following the influx of individuals and families who were displaced by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita…

  19. Mental Health, Substance Use, and Adaptive Coping among Social Work Students in the Aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemieux, Catherine M.; Plummer, Carol A.; Richardson, Roslyn; Simon, Cassandra E.; Ai, Amy L.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined mental health symptomology, substance use, and adaptive coping among 416 social work students following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Among participants, 47% scored at or above the clinical level for depression, with 6% of students showing clinical PTSD-like symptoms, and 16.9% reporting substance use. Two thirds (66.9%)…

  20. A Prospective Study of Religiousness and Psychological Distress Among Female Survivors of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Jean E.; Pérez, John E.

    2013-01-01

    This prospective study examined the pathways by which religious involvement affected the post-disaster psychological functioning of women who survived Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The participants were 386 low-income, predominantly Black, single mothers. The women were enrolled in the study before the hurricane, providing a rare opportunity to document changes in mental health from before to after the storm, and to assess the protective role of religious involvement over time. Results of structural equation modeling indicated that, controlling for level of exposure to the hurricanes, pre-disaster physical health, age, and number of children, pre-disaster religiousness predicted higher levels of post-disaster (1) social resources and (2) optimism and sense of purpose. The latter, but not the former, was associated with better post-disaster psychological outcome. Mediation analysis confirmed the mediating role of optimism and sense of purpose. PMID:21626083

  1. The impact of hurricanes Katrina and Rita on Louisiana school nurses.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Lisa; Myers, Rachel; Meaux, Julie

    2008-04-01

    In the fall of 2005, the coast of Louisiana was devastated by two hurricanes, Katrina and Rita. Not only did these natural disasters have detrimental effects for those directly in their path, the storms had an impact on the lives of everyone in Louisiana. The professional practice of many Louisiana school nurses was affected by several factors, including a sudden influx of students with no medical records. A qualitative descriptive study was conducted to gain an understanding of school nurses' feelings and experiences related to the hurricanes and their aftermath. Forty-one school nurses participated in the study, and findings revealed significant effects on their personal and professional lives. Themes within each area were identified: uncertainty, hopelessness and helplessness, thankfulness, practice challenges, and practice rewards. Implications for school nursing practice include the need for support during natural disasters and the importance of school nurse involvement in disaster preparedness. PMID:18363442

  2. Satellite Images and Aerial Photographs of the Effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on Coastal Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barras, John A.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the eastern coastline of Louisiana on August 29, 2005; Hurricane Rita made landfall on the western coastline of Louisiana on September 24, 2005. Comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite imagery acquired before and after the landfalls of Katrina and Rita and classified to identify land and water demonstrated that water area increased by 217 mi2 (562 km2) in coastal Louisiana as a result of the storms. Approximately 82 mi2 (212 km2) of new water areas were in areas primarily impacted by Hurricane Katrina (Mississippi River Delta basin, Breton Sound basin, Pontchartrain basin, and Pearl River basin), whereas 99 mi2 (256 km2) were in areas primarily impacted by Hurricane Rita (Calcasieu/Sabine basin, Mermentau basin, Teche/Vermilion basin, Atchafalaya basin, and Terrebonne basin). Barataria basin contained new water areas caused by both hurricanes, resulting in some 18 mi2 (46.6 km2) of new water areas. The fresh marsh and intermediate marsh communities' land areas decreased by 122 mi2 (316 km2) and 90 mi2 (233.1 km2), respectively, and the brackish marsh and saline marsh communities' land areas decreased by 33 mi2 (85.5 km2) and 28 mi2 (72.5 km2), respectively. These new water areas represent land losses caused by direct removal of wetlands. They also indicate transitory changes in water area caused by remnant flooding, removal of aquatic vegetation, scouring of marsh vegetation, and water-level variation attributed to normal tidal and meteorological variation between satellite images. Permanent losses cannot be estimated until several growing seasons have passed and the transitory impacts of the hurricanes are minimized. The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary information on water area changes in coastal Louisiana acquired shortly after the landfalls of both hurricanes (detectable with Landsat TM imagery) and to serve as a regional baseline for monitoring posthurricane wetland recovery. The land

  3. Gravity and Magnetic Surveys Over the Santa Rita Fault System, Southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hegmann, Mary

    2001-01-01

    Gravity and magnetic surveys were performed in the northeast portion of the Santa Rita Experimental Range, in southeastern Arizona, to identify faults and gain a better understanding of the subsurface geology. A total of 234 gravity stations were established, and numerous magnetic data were collected with portable and truck-mounted proton precession magnetometers. In addition, one line of very low frequency electromagnetic data was collected together with magnetic data. Gravity anomalies are used to identify two normal faults that project northward toward a previously identified fault. The gravity data also confirm the location of a second previously interpreted normal fault. Interpretation of magnetic anomaly data indicates the presence of a higher-susceptibility sedimentary unit located beneath lowersusceptibility surficial sediments. Magnetic anomaly data identify a 1-km-wide negative anomaly east of these faults caused by an unknown source and reveal the high variability of susceptibility in the Tertiary intrusive rocks in the area.

  4. A prospective study of religiousness and psychological distress among female survivors of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    PubMed

    Chan, Christian S; Rhodes, Jean E; Pérez, John E

    2012-03-01

    This prospective study examined the pathways by which religious involvement affected the post-disaster psychological functioning of women who survived Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The participants were 386 low-income, predominantly Black, single mothers. The women were enrolled in the study before the hurricane, providing a rare opportunity to document changes in mental health from before to after the storm, and to assess the protective role of religious involvement over time. Results of structural equation modeling indicated that, controlling for level of exposure to the hurricanes, pre-disaster physical health, age, and number of children, pre-disaster religiousness predicted higher levels of post-disaster (1) social resources and (2) optimism and sense of purpose. The latter, but not the former, was associated with better post-disaster psychological outcome. Mediation analysis confirmed the mediating role of optimism and sense of purpose. PMID:21626083

  5. Religion and Coping with Trauma: Qualitative Examples from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    PubMed Central

    Tausch, Christina; Marks, Loren D.; Brown, Jennifer Silva; Cherry, Katie E.; Frias, Tracey; McWilliams, Zia; Melancon, Miranda; Sasser, Diane D.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we consider the intersection of religious coping and the experience of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in a lifespan sample of adults living in South Louisiana during the 2005 storms. Participants were young, middle-age, older, and oldest-old adults who were interviewed during the post-disaster recovery period. Qualitative analyses confirmed that three dimensions of religion were represented across participants’ responses. These dimensions included: 1) faith community, in relation to the significant relief effort and involvement of area churches; 2) religious practices, in the sense of participants’ behavioral responses to the storms, such as prayer; and c) spiritual beliefs, referring to faith as a mechanism underlying individual and family-level adjustment, acceptance and personal growth in the post-disaster period. Implications for future disaster preparedness are considered. PMID:23335865

  6. Bacteriological water quality in the Lake Pontchartrain basin Louisiana following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, September 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoeckel, Donald M.; Bushon, Rebecca N.; Demcheck, Dennis K.; Skrobialowski, Stanley C.; Kephart, Christopher M.; Bertke, Erin E.; Mailot, Brian E.; Mize, Scott V.; Fendick, Robert B., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality, monitored bacteriological quality of water at 22 sites in and around Lake Pontchartrain, La., for three consecutive weeks beginning September 13, 2005, following hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the associated flooding. Samples were collected and analyzed by USGS personnel from the USGS Louisiana Water Science Center and the USGS Ohio Water Microbiology Laboratory. Fecal-indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli, enterococci, and fecal coliform) concentrations ranged from the detection limit to 36,000 colony-forming units per 100 milliliters. Data are presented in tabular form and as plots of data in the context of available historical data and water-quality standards and criteria for each site sampled. Quality-control data were reviewed to ensure that methods performed as expected in a mobile laboratory setting.

  7. Airborne mapping of chemical plumes in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Paul E.; Thomas, Mark J.; Kroutil, Robert T.; Combs, Roger; Cummings, Alan S.; Miller, Dave; Curry, Tim; Shen, Sylvia S.

    2006-05-01

    Infrared airborne spectral measurements were collected over the Gulf Coast area during the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. These measurements allowed surveillance for potentially hazardous chemical vapor releases from industrial facilities caused by storm damage. Data was collected with a mid-longwave infrared multispectral imager and a hyperspectral Fourier transform infrared spectrometer operating in a low altitude aircraft. Signal processing allowed detection and identification of targeted spectral signatures in the presence of interferents, atmospheric contributions, and thermal clutter. Results confirmed the presence of a number of chemical vapors. All detection results were immediately passed along to emergency first responders on the ground. The chemical identification, location, and vapor species concentration information were used by the emergency response ground teams for identification of critical plume releases and subsequent mitigation.

  8. Mapping and Visualization of Storm-Surge Dynamics for Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gesch, Dean B.

    2009-01-01

    The damages caused by the storm surges from Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita were significant and occurred over broad areas. Storm-surge maps are among the most useful geospatial datasets for hurricane recovery, impact assessments, and mitigation planning for future storms. Surveyed high-water marks were used to generate a maximum storm-surge surface for Hurricane Katrina extending from eastern Louisiana to Mobile Bay, Alabama. The interpolated surface was intersected with high-resolution lidar elevation data covering the study area to produce a highly detailed digital storm-surge inundation map. The storm-surge dataset and related data are available for display and query in a Web-based viewer application. A unique water-level dataset from a network of portable pressure sensors deployed in the days just prior to Hurricane Rita's landfall captured the hurricane's storm surge. The recorded sensor data provided water-level measurements with a very high temporal resolution at surveyed point locations. The resulting dataset was used to generate a time series of storm-surge surfaces that documents the surge dynamics in a new, spatially explicit way. The temporal information contained in the multiple storm-surge surfaces can be visualized in a number of ways to portray how the surge interacted with and was affected by land surface features. Spatially explicit storm-surge products can be useful for a variety of hurricane impact assessments, especially studies of wetland and land changes where knowledge of the extent and magnitude of storm-surge flooding is critical.

  9. Public Response to Hurricane Rita Forecasts Along the Texas Coast: An Undergraduate Research Study Linking Science and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morss, R. E.; Zhang, F.

    2006-12-01

    One mechanism for creating more usable science is familiarizing scientists with societal use of and needs for scientific information. We will describe an effort to so in the university educational system, through a semester-long class for meteorology students that involved a research project on public perception and use of hurricane forecasts. Hurricane Rita made landfall near the Texas-Louisiana border in September 2005, causing major damage and disruption. As Rita approached the Gulf Coast, significant uncertainties in the track and intensity forecasts, combined with the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, led to major evacuations along the Texas coast and significant traffic jams in the broader Houston area. In the spring semester of 2006, seven undergraduate and three graduate meteorology students at Texas A&M University participated in a student research project to investigate the societal impacts of Hurricane Rita and its forecasts. The research team, including the students, developed a structured interview questionnaire to explore coastal residents' hurricane preparation and evacuation decisions and their use and perception of Hurricane Rita forecasts. The students then conducted 120 in-person interviews in the Texas Gulf Coast cities of Galveston, Port Arthur, and Houston. The study was designed to both answer key research questions and provide students with first- hand knowledge about how the public perceives hurricane risk and uses weather forecasts. We will report findings from the survey, as well as the educational benefits described by the students. We hope that the project can serve as a model for classroom-based student research projects at other universities, to give more science students opportunities to learn first-hand about people's perceptions and use of scientific information.

  10. Dissolved and Colloidal Trace Elements in the Mississippi River Delta Outflow after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, M.; Swarzenski, P. W.; Shiller, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Mississippi River (MR) plays an important role as a major fluvial source of dissolved and particulate materials for the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). This region is periodically disturbed by tropical weather systems including major hurricanes. Such storms have the potential to stir up the normally stratified water column of the Louisiana Shelf and thus can serve as a mechanism for the abrupt termination of seasonal bottom water hypoxia. Additionally, strong tropical systems can cause the resuspension of shelf bottom sediments which could result in the injection of trace elements into the water column. In the summer of 2005, two major hurricanes, Katrina and Rita, passed over the Louisiana Shelf within a month of each other. Three weeks after Rita, we participated in a survey of the waters of the Mississippi River delta outflow, examining the distributions of trace elements (including Ba, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Re, U, V, and Zn) in a comparison with previous results in this area. We indeed observed that there was limited stratification on the shelf and that bottom waters were no longer hypoxic. This resulted, for instance, in bottom water dissolved Mn being lower than is typically observed during hypoxia, but with concentrations still compatible with Mn-O2 trends previously reported. Interestingly, for no element were we able to identify an obvious effect of sediment resuspension on its distribution. In general, elemental distributions were compatible with previous observations in the Mississippi outflow system. Co and Re, which have not been reported for this system previously, showed behavior consistent with other systems: input for Co likely from desorption and conservative mixing for Re. For Cs, an element for which there is little information regarding its estuarine behavior, conservative mixing was also observed. Our filtration method, which allowed us to distinguish the dissolved (<0.02 µm) from colloidal (0.02 - 0.45 µm) phase, revealed significant

  11. Identification of differentially expressed genes associated with the enhancement of X-ray susceptibility by RITA in a hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell line (FaDu)

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Jinwei; Li, Xianglan; Guo, Rutao; Liu, Shanshan; Luo, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Next generation sequencing and bio-informatic analyses were conducted to investigate the mechanism of reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosis (RITA)-enhancing X-ray susceptibility in FaDu cells. Materials and methods The cDNA was isolated from FaDu cells treated with 0 X-ray, 8 Gy X-ray, or 8 Gy X-ray + RITA. Then, cDNA libraries were created and sequenced using next generation sequencing, and each assay was repeated twice. Subsequently, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using Cuffdiff in Cufflinks and their functions were predicted by pathway enrichment analyses. Genes that were constantly up- or down-regulated in 8 Gy X-ray-treated FaDu cells and 8 Gy X-ray + RITA-treated FaDu cells were obtained as RITA genes. Afterward, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) relationships were obtained from the STRING database and a PPI network was constructed using Cytoscape. Furthermore, ClueGO was used for pathway enrichment analysis of genes in the PPI network. Results Total 2,040 and 297 DEGs were identified in FaDu cells treated with 8 Gy X-ray or 8 Gy X-ray + RITA, respectively. PARP3 and NEIL1 were enriched in base excision repair, and CDK1 was enriched in p53 signaling pathway. RFC2 and EZH2 were identified as RITA genes. In the PPI network, many interaction relationships were identified (e.g., RFC2-CDK1, EZH2-CDK1 and PARP3-EZH2). ClueGO analysis showed that RFC2 and EZH2 were related to cell cycle. Conclusions RFC2, EZH2, CDK1, PARP3 and NEIL1 may be associated, and together enhance the susceptibility of FaDu cells treated with RITA to the deleterious effects of X-ray. PMID:27247549

  12. Impact of Hurricane Rita storm surge on sugarcane borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) management in Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Beuzelin, J M; Reagan, T E; Akbar, W; Cormier, H J; Flanagan, J W; Blouin, D C

    2009-06-01

    Twelve thousand to 16,000 ha of Louisiana sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) fields were flooded by saltwater from the Hurricane Rita storm surge in September 2005. A four treatment, 12-replication study comparing storm surge flooded and nonflooded plant and ratoon sugarcane fields was conducted during summer 2006 to assess sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F.), pest severity, pest control actions, and soil-associated arthropod abundance and diversity. Even with a significant 2.4-fold increase in the average number of insecticide applications used for D. saccharalis management in flooded fields, growers still incurred higher injury. A significant 2.8-fold reduction in the predaceous red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren, was associated with the storm surge, whereas no reduction in abundance of other soil-associated arthropods was recorded. Arthropod diversity measured by the Shannon diversity index significantly increased by a factor of 1.3 in sugarcane fields flooded by the storm surge. Increase in D. saccharalis pest severity associated with the storm surge caused an estimated loss in revenue between $1.9 and $2.6 million to the Louisiana sugarcane industry for the 2006 production season. PMID:19610419

  13. The multiple life of nerve growth factor: tribute to rita levi-montalcini (1909-2012).

    PubMed

    Aloe, Luigi; Chaldakov, George N

    2013-03-01

    At the end of the 19(th) century, it was envisaged by Santiago Ramon y Cajal, but not, proven, that life at the neuronal level requires trophic support. The proof was obtained in the early 1950's by work initiated by Rita Levi-Montalcini (RLM) discovering the nerve growth factor (NGF). Today, NGF and its relatives, collectively designated neurotrophins, are well recognized as mediators of multiple biological phenomena in health and disease, ranging from the neurotrophic through immunotrophic and epitheliotrophic to metabotrophic effects. Consequently, NGF and other neurotrophins are implicated in the pathogenesis of a large spectrum of neuronal and non-neuronal diseases, from Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases to atherosclerosis and other cardiometabolic diseases. Recent studies demonstrated the therapeutic potentials of NGF in these diseases, including ocular and cutaneous diseases. Furthermore, NGF TrkA receptor antagonists emerged as novel drugs for pain, prostate and breast cancer, melanoma, and urinary bladder syndromes. Altogether, NGF's multiple potential in health and disease is briefly described here. PMID:25207059

  14. Recovery Migration After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita: Spatial Concentration and Intensification in the Migration System.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Katherine J; Fussell, Elizabeth; DeWaard, Jack

    2015-08-01

    Changes in the human migration systems of the Gulf of Mexico coastline counties affected by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita provide an example of how climate change may affect coastal populations. Crude climate change models predict a mass migration of "climate refugees," but an emerging literature on environmental migration suggests that most migration will be short-distance and short-duration within existing migration systems, with implications for the population recovery of disaster-stricken places. In this research, we derive a series of hypotheses on recovery migration predicting how the migration system of hurricane-affected coastline counties in the Gulf of Mexico was likely to have changed between the pre-disaster and the recovery periods. We test these hypotheses using data from the Internal Revenue Service on annual county-level migration flows, comparing the recovery period migration system (2007-2009) with the pre-disaster period (1999-2004). By observing county-to-county ties and flows, we find that recovery migration was strong: the migration system of the disaster-affected coastline counties became more spatially concentrated, while flows within it intensified and became more urbanized. Our analysis demonstrates how migration systems are likely to be affected by the more intense and frequent storms anticipated by climate change scenarios, with implications for the population recovery of disaster-affected places. PMID:26084982

  15. Homage to Rita Levi-Montalcini, the queen of modern neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Aloe, Luigi; Chaldakov, George N

    2013-08-01

    The first cell growth factor, nerve growth factor (NGF), was discovered by Rita Levi-Montalcini (RLM) in the early 1950s. Originally identified as neurite outgrowth-stimulating factor, later studies revealed that non-neuronal cells, including immune cells, endothelial cells, cardiomyocytes, pancreatic beta cells, prostate epithelial and adipose tissue cells, were also targets for and/or sources of NGF. Nerve growth factor is well recognised as mediating multiple biological phenomena, ranging from the neurotrophic through immunotrophic and epitheliotrophic to metabotrophic effects. Consequently, NGF and other members of the neurotrophin family are implicated in the pathogenesis of a large spectrum of neuronal and non-neuronal diseases, ranging from Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases to atherosclerosis and cardiometabolic disorders. Recent studies have demonstrated the therapeutic potentials of NGF in these conditions, including ocular and cutaneous diseases. NGF TrkA receptor antagonists emerged as novel drugs for pain, prostate and breast cancer, melanoma and urinary bladder syndromes. Here, we briefly describe the 'unpredictable' ideogenesis of the discovery of NGF, a eureka in the neuroscience. PMID:23520136

  16. A Green Prison: Santa Rita Jail Creeps Towards Zero Net Energy (ZNE)

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, Chris; DeForest, Nicholas; Stadler, Michael; Donadee, Jon; Dierckxsens, Carlos; Mendes, Goncalo; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo Ferreira

    2011-03-18

    A large project is underway at Alameda County's twenty-year old 45 ha 4,000-inmate Santa Rita Jail, about 70 km east of San Francisco. Often described as a green prison, it has a considerable installed base of distributed energy resources including a seven-year old 1.2 MW PV array, a four-year old 1 MW fuel cell with heat recovery, and efficiency investments. A current US$14 M expansion will add approximately 2 MW of NaS batteries, and undetermined wind capacity and a concentrating solar thermal system. This ongoing effort by a progressive local government with considerable Federal and State support provides some excellent lessons for the struggle to lower building carbon footprint. The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) finds true optimal combinations of equipment and operating schedules for microgrids that minimize energy bills and/or carbon emissions without 2 of 12 significant searching or rules-of-thumb prioritization, such as"efficiency first then on-site generation." The results often recommend complex systems, and sensitivities show how policy changes will affect choices. This paper reports an analysis of the historic performance of the PV system and fuel cell, describes the complex optimization applied to the battery scheduling, and shows how results will affect the jail's operational costs, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. DER-CAM is used to assess the existing and proposed DER equipment in its ability to reduce tariff charges.

  17. Impacts of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the microbial landscape of the New Orleans area

    PubMed Central

    Sinigalliano, C. D.; Gidley, M. L.; Shibata, T.; Whitman, D.; Dixon, T. H.; Laws, E.; Hou, A.; Bachoon, D.; Brand, L.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gast, R. J.; Steward, G. F.; Nigro, O. D.; Fujioka, R.; Betancourt, W. Q.; Vithanage, G.; Mathews, J.; Fleming, L. E.; Solo-Gabriele, H. M.

    2007-01-01

    Floodwaters in New Orleans from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita were observed to contain high levels of fecal indicator bacteria and microbial pathogens, generating concern about long-term impacts of these floodwaters on the sediment and water quality of the New Orleans area and Lake Pontchartrain. We show here that fecal indicator microbe concentrations in offshore waters from Lake Pontchartrain returned to prehurricane concentrations within 2 months of the flooding induced by these hurricanes. Vibrio and Legionella species within the lake were more abundant in samples collected shortly after the floodwaters had receded compared with samples taken within the subsequent 3 months; no evidence of a long-term hurricane-induced algal bloom was observed. Giardia and Cryptosporidium were detected in canal waters. Elevated levels of fecal indicator bacteria observed in sediment could not be solely attributed to impacts from floodwaters, as both flooded and nonflooded areas exhibited elevated levels of fecal indicator bacteria. Evidence from measurements of Bifidobacterium and bacterial diversity analysis suggest that the fecal indicator bacteria observed in the sediment were from human fecal sources. Epidemiologic studies are highly recommended to evaluate the human health effects of the sediments deposited by the floodwaters. PMID:17488814

  18. Recovery Migration after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita: Spatial Concentration and Intensification in the Migration System

    PubMed Central

    Fussell, Elizabeth; DeWaard, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the human migration systems of Hurricane Katrina- and Rita-affected Gulf of Mexico coastline counties provide an example of how climate change may affect coastal populations. Crude climate change models predict a mass migration of “climate refugees,” but an emerging literature on environmental migration suggests most migration will be short-distance and short-duration within existing migration systems, with implications for the population recovery of disaster-struck places. In this research, we derive a series of hypotheses on recovery migration predicting how the migration system of hurricane-affected coastline counties in the Gulf of Mexico was likely to have changed between the pre-disaster and the recovery periods. We test these hypotheses using data from the Internal Revenue Service on annual county-level migration flows, comparing the recovery period migration system (2007–2009) to the pre-disaster period (1999–2004). By observing county-to-county ties and flows we find that recovery migration was strong, as the migration system of the disaster-affected coastline counties became more spatially concentrated while flows within it intensified and became more urbanized. Our analysis demonstrates how migration systems are likely to be affected by the more intense and frequent storms anticipated by climate change scenarios with implications for the population recovery of disaster-affected places. PMID:26084982

  19. Chemical contamination assessment of Gulf of Mexico oysters in response to hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W E; Kimbrough, K L; Lauenstein, G G; Christensen, J

    2009-03-01

    Hurricane Katrina made landfall on August 29, 2005 and caused widespread devastation along the central Gulf Coast states. Less than a month later Hurricane Rita followed a similar track slightly west of Katrina's. A coordinated multi-agency response followed to collect water, sediment and tissue samples for a variety of chemical, biological and toxicological indicators. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Status and Trends Program (NS&T) participated in this effort by measuring chemical contamination in sediment and oyster tissue as part of the Mussel Watch Program, a long-term monitoring program to assess spatial and temporal trends in a wide range of coastal pollutants. This paper describes results for contaminants measured in oyster tissue collected between September 29 and October 10, 2005 and discusses the results in the context of Mussel Watch and its 20-year record of chemical contamination in the region and the nation. In general, levels of metals in oyster tissue were higher then pre- hurricane levels while organic contaminants were at or near record lows. No contaminant reported here exceeded the FDA action level for food safety. PMID:19051046

  20. Nephrologic Impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in Areas Not Directly Affected.

    PubMed

    Dossabhoy, Neville R; Qadri, Mashood; Beal, Lauren M

    2015-01-01

    Hurricanes Katrina and Rita resulted in enormous loss of life and disrupted the delivery of health care in areas affected by them. In causing mass movements of patients, natural disasters can overwhelm the resources of nephrology communities in areas not suffering direct damage. The following largely personal account evaluates the impact these hurricanes had upon the nephrology community, patients and health care providers alike, in areas not directly affected by the storms. Mass evacuation of hundreds of dialysis patients to surrounding areas overwhelmed the capacity of local hemodialysis centers. Non-availability of medical records in patients arriving without a supply of their routine medications led to confusion and sub-optimal treatment of conditions such as hypertension and congestive heart failure. Availability of cadaveric organs for transplantation was reduced in the surrounding areas, as the usual lines of communication and transportation were severed for several weeks. All of these issues led to prolong waiting times for patients on the transplant list. The hurricanes severely disrupted usual supply lines of medications to hospitals; certain rare conditions may be seen in higher numbers as a result of the shortages induced. We present the interesting surge in cases of acute kidney injury secondary to use of intravenous immune globulin. PMID:26741684

  1. Geomorphic and ecological effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on coastal Louisiana marsh communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piazza, Sarai C.; Steyer, Gregory D.; Cretini, Kari F.; Sasser, Charles E.; Visser, Jenneke M.; Holm, Guerry O.; Sharp, Leigh Anne; Evers, D. Elaine; Meriwether, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Hurricanes Katrina and Rita made landfall in 2005, subjecting the coastal marsh communities of Louisiana to various degrees of exposure. We collected data after the storms at 30 sites within fresh (12), brackish/intermediate (12), and saline (6) marshes to document the effects of saltwater storm surge and sedimentation on marsh community dynamics. The 30 sites were comprised of 15 pairs. Most pairs contained one site where data collection occurred historically (that is, prestorms) and one Coastwide Reference Monitoring System site. Data were collected from spring 2006 to fall 2007 on vegetative species composition, percentage of vegetation cover, aboveground and belowground biomass, and canopy reflectance, along with discrete porewater salinity, hourly surface-water salinity, and water level. Where available, historical data acquired before Hurricanes Katrina and Rita were used to compare conditions and changes in ecological trajectories before and after the hurricanes. Sites experiencing direct and indirect hurricane influences (referred to in this report as levels of influence) were also identified, and the effects of hurricane influence were tested on vegetation and porewater data. Within fresh marshes, porewater salinity was greater in directly impacted areas, and this heightened salinity was reflected in decreased aboveground and belowground biomass and increased cover of disturbance species in the directly impacted sites. At the brackish/intermediate marsh sites, vegetation variables and porewater salinity were similar in directly and indirectly impacted areas, but porewater salinity was higher than expected throughout the study. Interestingly, directly impacted saline marsh sites had lower porewater salinity than indirectly impacted sites, but aboveground biomass was greater at the directly impacted sites. Because of the variable and site-specific nature of hurricane influences, we present case studies to help define postdisturbance baseline conditions in

  2. Hurricane Rita surge data, southwestern Louisiana and southeastern Texas, September to November 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, Benton D.; Goree, Burl B.; Tollett, Roland W.; Woodward, Brenda K.; Kress, Wade H.

    2006-01-01

    Pressure transducers and high-water marks were used to document the inland water levels related to storm surge generated by Hurricane Rita in southwestern Louisiana and southeastern Texas. On September 22-23, 2005, an experimental monitoring network consisting of 47 pressure transducers (sensors) was deployed at 33 sites over an area of about 4,000 square miles to record the timing, extent, and magnitude of inland hurricane storm surge and coastal flooding. Sensors were programmed to record date and time, temperature, and barometric or water pressure. Water pressure was corrected for changes in barometric pressure and salinity. Elevation surveys using global-positioning systems and differential levels were used to relate all storm-surge water-level data, reference marks, benchmarks, sensor measuring points, and high-water marks to the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88). The resulting data indicated that storm-surge water levels over 14 feet above NAVD 88 occurred at three locations and rates of water-level rise greater than 5 feet per hour occurred at three locations near the Louisiana coast. Quality-assurance measures were used to assess the variability and accuracy of the water-level data recorded by the sensors. Water-level data from sensors were similar to data from co-located sensors, permanent U.S. Geological Survey streamgages, and water-surface elevations performed by field staff. Water-level data from sensors at selected locations were compared to corresponding high-water mark elevations. In general, the water-level data from sensors were similar to elevations of high quality high-water marks, while reporting consistently higher than elevations of lesser quality high-water marks.

  3. Effects of hurricanes Katrina and Rita on Louisiana black bear habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Joseph D.; Murrow, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    The Louisiana black bear (Ursus americanus luteolus) is comprised of 3 subpopulations, each being small, geographically isolated, and vulnerable to extinction. Hurricanes Katrina and Rita struck the Louisiana and Mississippi coasts in 2005, potentially altering habitat occupied by this federally threatened subspecies. We used data collected on radio-telemetered bears from 1993 to 1995 and pre-hurricane landscape data to develop a habitat model based on the Mahalanobis distance (D2) statistic. We then applied that model to post-hurricane landscape data where the telemetry data were collected (i.e., occupied study area) and where bear range expansion might occur (i.e., unoccupied study area) to quantify habitat loss or gain. The D2 model indicated that quality bear habitat was associated with areas of high mast-producing forest density, low water body density, and moderate forest patchiness. Cross-validation and testing on an independent data set in central Louisiana indicated that prediction and transferability of the model were good. Suitable bear habitat decreased from 348 to 345 km2 (0.9%) within the occupied study area and decreased from 34,383 to 33,891 km2 (1.4%) in the unoccupied study area following the hurricanes. Our analysis indicated that bear habitat was not significantly degraded by the hurricanes, although changes that could have occurred on a microhabitat level would be more difficult to detect at the resolution we used. We suggest that managers continue to monitor the possible long-term effects of these hurricanes (e.g., vegetation changes from flooding, introduction of toxic chemicals, or water quality changes).

  4. Mineral, Energy, and Fertilizer Resources of the North Coast of Peru: Perspective from the Santa Rita B Archaeological Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, William E.; Kent, Jonathan D.; Willett, Jason C.

    2004-01-01

    The Santa Rita B archaeological site is in the Chao Valley, approximately 65 km southeast of Trujillo, northern Peru. Location of Santa Rita B at the emergence of several drainages from the Andean cordillera is an important factor in the almost continuous occupation of the site over the past 3,000 years. Mineral resources are abundant throughout the Andes; however, the north coast of Peru was an important center for pre-Columbian mining, metallurgy, and craftsmanship. Success of the Chavin, Moche, Chimu, and other north coast cultures is directly related to the availability and exploitation of mineral and energy resources that include: gold (?silver), as electrum, mainly from placers, and copper from local oxide and carbonate occurrences and from sulfides related to copper porphyry occurrences in the cordillera. An alloy of these three metals is referred to as tumbaga, which is the primary material for Andean metalcraft. Anthracite was used for mirrors by north coast cultures and is available near Rio Chicama, Rio Santa, and east of Santa Rita B. These outcrops are a part of the Alto Chicama, Peru's largest coalfield, which extends from Rio Chicama, in the north, for 200 km southward to Rio Santa. Charcoal from the algorrobo tree and llama dung are considered to be the common pre-Columbian energy sources for cooking and metalwork; however, availability and the higher heat content of anthracite indicate that it was used in metallurgical applications. Bitumen is available from petroleum seeps near Talara, north of the study area, and may have been used as glue or as cement. Hematite, goethite, limonite, and manganese oxides from clay-altered volcanic rock may have provided color and material for ceramics. Guano from the Islas Gua?apes, Chinchas, and Ballestas was used as fertilizer for cotton and other crops.

  5. Sediment discharge in the Upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Sediment data collected in the upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins, San Luis Obispo County, California, during the 1968-73 water years were analyzed to determine total sediment discharge at four stations in the basins. Water discharge and total sediment discharge at these stations, representative of the 1943-72 period, were estimated from long-term flow data for nearby gaging stations and water-sediment discharge relations determined for the 1968-73 water years. Most of the total annual sediment discharge at each station occurs during a few days each year. The quantity of sediment transported in a single day often accounts for more than 40 percent of the total annual sediment discharge. Estimated sediment discharge for the upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins during the 1943-72 water years averaged 53,000 tons and 23,000 tons per year. Long-term sediment deposition in Lopez Reservoir, which is in the southern part of the upper Arroyo Grande basin, was estimated to be 35 acre-feet per year. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Hurricane Rita and the destruction of Holly Beach, Louisiana: Why the chenier plain is vulnerable to storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H.; Wright, C.W.; Doran, K.; Guy, K.; Morgan, K.

    2009-01-01

    Hurricane Rita devastated gulf-front communities along the western Louisiana coast in 2005. LIDAR (light detection and ranging) topographic surveys and aerial photography collected before and after the storm showed the loss of every structure within the community of Holly Beach. Average shoreline change along western Louisiana's 140-km-long impacted shore was -23.3 ?? 30.1 m of erosion, although shoreline change in Holly Beach was substantially less, and erosion was not pervasive where the structures were lost. Before the storm, peak elevations of the dunes, or berms in the absence of dunes, along the impacted shore averaged 1.6 m. The storm surge, which reached 3.5 m just east of Holly Beach, completely inundated the beach systems along the impacted western Louisiana shore. The high surge potential and low land elevations make this coast extremely vulnerable to hurricanes. In fact, most of the western Louisiana shore impacted by Rita will be completely inundated by the storm surge of a worst-case Saffi r-Simpson category 1 hurricane. All of this shore will be inundated by worst-case category 2-5 storms. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  7. Regeneration of coastal marsh vegetation impacted by hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of plant regeneration via seed and vegetative spread in coastal wetlands dictate the nature of community reassembly that takes place after hurricanes or sea level rise. The objectives of my project were to evaluate the potential effects of saltwater intrusion and flooding of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on seedling regeneration in coastal wetlands of the Gulf Coast. Specifically I tested hypotheses to determine for species in fresh, brackish and salt marshes of the Gulf Coast if 1) the pattern of seed germination and seedling recruitment differed with distance from the shoreline, and 2) seed germination and seedling recruitment for various species were reduced in higher levels of water depth and salinity. Regarding Hypothesis 1, seedling densities increased with distance from the shoreline in fresh and brackish water marshes while decreasing with distance from the shoreline in salt marshes. Also to test Hypothesis 1, I used a greenhouse seed bank assay to examine seed germination from seed banks collected at distances from the shoreline in response to various water depths and salinity levels using a nested factorial design. For all marsh types, the influence of water level and salinity on seed germination shifted with distance from the shoreline (i.e., three way interaction of the main effects of distance nested within site, water depth, and salinity). Data from the seed bank assay were also used to test Hypothesis 2. The regeneration of species from fresh, brackish, and salt marshes were reduced in conditions of high salinity and/or water, so that following hurricanes or sea level rise, seedling regeneration could be reduced. Among the species of these coastal marshes, there was some flexibility of response, so that at least some species were able to germinate in either high or low salinity. Salt marshes had a few fresher marsh species in the seed bank that would not germinate without a period of fresh water input (e.g., Sagittaria lancifolia) as well

  8. EAARL coastal topography and imagery–Western Louisiana, post-Hurricane Rita, 2005: First surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel-Cormier, Jamie M.; Wright, Wayne C.; Fredericks, Alexandra M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Nagle, Doug B.; Sallenger, Asbury H.; Brock, John C.

    2013-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced color-infrared (CIR) imagery and elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography datasets were produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, Florida, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Louisiana coastline beachface, acquired post-Hurricane Rita on September 27-28 and October 2, 2005. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color-infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL

  9. The Walnut Gulch - Santa Rita Wildland Watershed-Scale LTAR Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, D. C.; Heilman, P.; Scott, R. L.; Nearing, M. A.; Moran, M. S.; Nichols, M.; Vivoni, E. R.; Archer, S. R.; Biederman, J.; Naito, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    The 150 km2 Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW), a Long-Term Agroecosystem Research (LTAR) site, near Tombstone, Arizona was established in 1953 by the USDA-ARS Southwest Watershed Research Center in Tucson. It is one of the most intensively instrumented semiarid experimental watersheds in the world with elevation ranging from 1220 to 1950 m with mean annual temperature and precipitation equal to 17.7°C and 312 mm. Desert shrubs dominate the lower two thirds of the watershed and grasses the upper third. Spatial variation in precipitation is measured with a network of 88 weighing-type recording rain gauges. Surface runoff is quantified over a range of scales (0.002 to 0.06 km2) to characterize interactions between rainfall intensity, soils and vegetation at nine sub-watersheds. Channel network processes and rainfall spatial variability are studied using 11 nested watersheds (2 to 150 km2). Sediment from the small sub-watersheds is sampled. Meteorological, soil moisture and temperature, and energy/water/CO2 flux measurements are made within two vegetation/soil complexes. Parallel investigations dating back to 1974 have also been conducted on eight small experimental watersheds at the Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER) 80 km west of Walnut Gulch. In contrast to the creosote bush-grass WGEW, the mesquite-grass SRER is publicly owned, which ensures control and consistent reporting of management for research purposes. A key LTAR objective is to contrast a "business as usual" to an alternate management strategy presumed to have the potential of significantly improving forage and livestock production and diversification of ecosystem services. Consequently, a new ARS-U. of Arizona-Arizona State U. partnership will assess the watershed-scale impacts of brush management, a common land use practice typically applied in conjunction with livestock grazing, on a suite of ecosystem services at the SRER including provisioning (forage production, water yield), supporting

  10. Hurricanes Katrina and Rita: Temporary Emergency Impact Aid Provided Education Support for Displaced Students. Report to the Congressional Requesters. GAO-11-839

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, George A.

    2011-01-01

    In August and September 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita devastated large portions of the U.S. Gulf Coast, resulting in nearly 2,000 deaths and severe damage to 305,000 houses and apartments. Thousands of families relocated to communities throughout the United States and enrolled their children in local public or private schools. Some families…

  11. Impacts of Hurricane Rita on the beaches of western Louisiana: Chapter 5D in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockdon, Hilary F.; Fauver, Laura A.; Sallenger,, Asbury H., Jr.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Rita made landfall as a category 3 storm in western Louisiana in late September 2005, 1 month following Hurricane Katrina's devastating landfall in the eastern part of the State. Large waves and storm surge inundated the lowelevation coastline, destroying many communities and causing extensive coastal change including beach, dune, and marsh erosion.

  12. Potential consequences of saltwater intrusion associated with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita: Chapter 6C in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steyer, Gregory D.; Perez, Brian C.; Piazza, Sarai C.; Suir, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Hurricanes Katrina and Rita pushed salt water from the Gulf of Mexico well inland into freshwater marsh communities in coastal Louisiana. This paper describes the spatial extent of saltwater intrusion and provides an initial assessment of impacts (salt stress) to coastal marsh vegetation communities.

  13. Satellite Assessment of Bio-Optical Properties of Northern Gulf of Mexico Coastal Waters Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    PubMed Central

    Lohrenz, Steven E.; Cai, Wei-Jun; Chen, Xiaogang; Tuel, Merritt

    2008-01-01

    The impacts of major tropical storms events on coastal waters include sediment resuspension, intense water column mixing, and increased delivery of terrestrial materials into coastal waters. We examined satellite imagery acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) ocean color sensor aboard the Aqua spacecraft following two major hurricane events: Hurricane Katrina, which made landfall on 29 August 2005, and Hurricane Rita, which made landfall on 24 September. MODIS Aqua true color imagery revealed high turbidity levels in shelf waters immediately following the storms indicative of intense resuspension. However, imagery following the landfall of Katrina showed relatively rapid return of shelf water mass properties to pre-storm conditions. Indeed, MODIS Aqua-derived estimates of diffuse attenuation at 490 nm (K_490) and chlorophyll (chlor_a) from mid-August prior to the landfall of Hurricane Katrina were comparable to those observed in mid-September following the storm. Regions of elevated K_490 and chlor_a were evident in offshore waters and appeared to be associated with cyclonic circulation (cold-core eddies) identified on the basis of sea surface height anomaly (SSHA). Imagery acquired shortly after Hurricane Rita made landfall showed increased water column turbidity extending over a large area of the shelf off Louisiana and Texas, consistent with intense resuspension and sediment disturbance. An interannual comparison of satellite-derived estimates of K_490 for late September and early October revealed relatively lower levels in 2005, compared to the mean for the prior three years, in the vicinity of the Mississippi River birdfoot delta. In contrast, levels above the previous three year mean were observed off Texas and Louisiana 7-10 d after the passage of Rita. The lower values of K_490 near the delta could be attributed to relatively low river discharge during the preceding months of the 2005 season. The elevated levels off Texas and

  14. Post-hurricane Rita mosquito surveillance and the efficacy of Air Force aerial applications for mosquito control in east Texas.

    PubMed

    Breidenbaugh, Mark S; Haagsma, Karl A; Walker, Wes W; Sanders, David M

    2008-06-01

    Post-Hurricane Rita mosquito surveillance was carried out in 4 east Texas counties to determine mosquito abundance, species composition, and need for mosquito control. Subsequently, aerial applications of naled (Dibrom) for mosquito control were made by the Air Force Aerial Spray Flight, while continued surveillance documented the efficacy of the applications. Psorophora columbiae was the predominant species in landing counts. Twenty-two mosquito species were represented in light trap collections with Aedes atlanitcus/tormentor, Culex nigripalpus, Ae. vexans, and Ps. columbiae making up 91% of the total. A total of 102,001 ha (252,052 acres) were aerially treated based on high mosquito abundance, exposure of first responders and residents to nuisance biting, and local interruption of electric utilities. A significant 90% decline in mosquito abundance was observed posttreatment. PMID:18666545

  15. The Law and Emergencies: Surveillance for Public Health–Related Legal Issues During Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Rachel I.; McKie, Karen L.; Goodman, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Law influenced every aspect of the public health response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, from evacuation orders, to waivers of medical licensing requirements, to the clean-up of public health threats on private property. We used public health surveillance of news reports to identify and characterize legal issues arising during the disaster response in 5 Gulf Coast states. Data collected from news reports of the events in real time were followed-up by interviews with selected state legal and emergency management officials. Our analysis indicates the value of surveillance during and after emergency responses in identifying public health–related legal issues and helps to inform the strengthening of legal preparedness frameworks for future disasters. PMID:17413083

  16. Characterization of airborne molds, endotoxins, and glucans in homes in New Orleans after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    PubMed

    Rao, Carol Y; Riggs, Margaret A; Chew, Ginger L; Muilenberg, Michael L; Thorne, Peter S; Van Sickle, David; Dunn, Kevin H; Brown, Clive

    2007-03-01

    In August and September 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita caused breeches in the New Orleans, LA, levee system, resulting in catastrophic flooding. The city remained flooded for several weeks, leading to extraordinary mold growth in homes. To characterize the potential risks of mold exposures, we measured airborne molds and markers of molds and bacteria in New Orleans area homes. In October 2005, we collected air samples from 5 mildly water-damaged houses, 15 moderately to heavily water-damaged houses, and 11 outdoor locations. The air filters were analyzed for culturable fungi, spores, (1-->3,1-->6)-beta-D-glucans, and endotoxins. Culturable fungi were significantly higher in the moderately/heavily water-damaged houses (geometric mean=67,000 CFU/m3) than in the mildly water-damaged houses (geometric mean=3,700 CFU/m3) (P=0.02). The predominant molds found were Aspergillus niger, Penicillium spp., Trichoderma, and Paecilomyces. The indoor and outdoor geometric means for endotoxins were 22.3 endotoxin units (EU)/m3 and 10.5 EU/m3, respectively, and for (1-->3,1-->6)-beta-D-glucans were 1.7 microg/m3 and 0.9 microg/m3, respectively. In the moderately/heavily water-damaged houses, the geometric means were 31.3 EU/m3 for endotoxins and 1.8 microg/m3 for (1-->3,1-->6)-beta-D-glucans. Molds, endotoxins, and fungal glucans were detected in the environment after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in New Orleans at concentrations that have been associated with health effects. The species and concentrations were different from those previously reported for non-water-damaged buildings in the southeastern United States. PMID:17209066

  17. USGS environmental characterization of flood sediments left in the New Orleans area after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, 2005--Progress Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Lovelace, John K.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Furlong, Edward T.; Demas, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The flooding in the greater New Orleans area that resulted from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in September, 2005, left behind accumulations of sediments up to many centimeters thick on streets, lawns, parking lots, and other flat surfaces. These flood sediment deposits have been the focus of extensive study by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) due to concerns that the sediments may contain elevated levels of heavy metals, organic contaminants, and microbes. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is characterizing a limited number of flood sediment samples that were collected on September 15-16 and October 6-7, 2005, from the greater New Orleans area by personnel from the USGS Louisiana Water Science Center in Baton Rouge. Small samples (< 3 pints each) of wet to dry flood sediment were collected from 11 localities around downtown New Orleans on September 15, 2005, and two large samples (40 pints each) of wet flood sediment were collected from the Chalmette area on September 16. Twelve additional samples (8-10 pints each) were collected from New Orleans, Slidell, Rigolets, and Violet on October 6 and 7. The USGS characterization studies of these flood sediments are designed to produce data and interpretations regarding how the sediments and any contained contaminants may respond to environmental processes. This information will be of use to cleanup managers and DoI/USGS scientists assessing environmental impacts of the hurricanes and subsequent cleanup activities.

  18. The Muralla Pircada: an ancient Andean debris flow retention dam, Santa Rita B archaeological site, Chao Valley, Northern Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, William E.; Willett, Jason C.; Kent, Jonathan D.; Vasquez, Victor; Rosales, Teresa

    2005-01-01

    Debris flows caused by El Niño events, earthquakes, and glacial releases have affected northern Perú for centuries. The Muralla Pircada, a northeast-trending, 2.5 km long stone wall east of the Santa Rita B archaeological site (Moche-Chimú) in the Chao Valley, is field evidence that ancient Andeans recognized and, more importantly, attempted to mitigate the effects of debris flows. The Muralla is upstream from the site and is perpendicular to local drainages. It is 1–2 m high, up to 5 m wide, and is comprised of intentionally-placed, well-sorted, well-rounded, 20–30 cm cobbles and boulders from nearby streams. Long axes of the stones are gently inclined and parallel local drainage. Case-and-fill construction was used with smaller cobbles and pebbles used as fill. Pre-Muralla debris flows are indicated by meter-sized, angular boulders that were incorporated in-place into construction of the dam and are now exposed in breeches in the dam. Post-Muralla debris flows in the Chao Valley are indicated by meter-sized, angular boulders that now abut the retention dam.

  19. First manned submersible dives on the East Pacific Rise at 21°N (project RITA): general results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francheteau, Jean; Needham, H.D.; Choukroune, P.; Juteau, Tierre; Seguret, M.; Ballard, Richard D.; Fox, P.J.; Normark, W.R.; Carranza, A.; Cordoba, D.; Guerrero, J.; Rangin, C.

    1981-01-01

    A submersible study has been conducted in February–March 1978 at the axis of the East Pacific Rise near 21°N. The expedition CYAMEX, the first submersible program to be conducted on the East Pacific Rise, is part of the French-American-Mexican project RITA (Rivera-Tamayo), a 3-year study devoted to detailed geological and geophysical investigations of the East Pacific Rise Crest. On the basis of the 15 dives made by CYANA in the axial area of the Rise, a morphological and tectonic zonation can be established for this moderately-fast spreading center. A narrow, 0.6 to 1.2 km wide zone of extrusion (zone 1), dominated by young lava flows, is flanked by a highly fissured and faulted zone of extension (zone 2) with a width of 1 to 2 km. Further out, zone 3 is dominated by outward tilted blocks bounded by inward-facing fault scarps. Active or recent faults extend up to 12 km from the axis of extrusion of the East Pacific Rise. This represents the first determination from direct field evidence of the width of active tectonism associated with an accreting plate boundary. Massive sulfide deposits, made principally of zinc, copper and iron, were found close to the axis of the Rise. Other signs of the intense hydrothermal activity included the discovery of benthic fauna of gian size similar to that found at the axis of the Galapagos Rift. We emphasize the cyclic character of the volcanicity. The main characteristics of the geology of this segment of the East Pacific Rise can be explained by the thermal structure at depth below this moderately-fast spreading center. The geological observations are compatible with the existence of a shallow magma reservoir centered at the axis of the Rise with a half-width of the order of 10 km.

  20. Data access and dissemination for emergency response and long-term recovery efforts related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita: Chapter 4B in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Scott; Cretini, Chris

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Wetlands Research Center (NWRC) responded to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita by providing geospatial support to Federal, State, and local partners. The NWRC used its data and information management systems to deliver aerial photography and maps to emergency responders in a time of critical need.

  1. Radiofrequency interstitial tumor ablation (RITA) is a possible new modality for treatment of renal cancer: ex vivo and in vivo experience.

    PubMed

    Zlotta, A R; Wildschutz, T; Raviv, G; Peny, M O; van Gansbeke, D; Noel, J C; Schulman, C C

    1997-08-01

    Small renal tumors are increasingly diagnosed and are frequently treated by nephron-sparing surgery. Tumors can be ablated by radiofrequency (RF) energy, which allows the operator to create very localized necrotic lesions. Radiofrequency interstitial tumor ablation (RITA) has been used in human kidneys in an ex vivo experiment to assess the necrotic lesions produced in a model close to physiologic conditions and then in three patients with localized renal cancer prior to radical nephrectomy. In the ex vivo model, four freshly removed kidneys were treated. Bipolar RF energy was delivered by a generator connected to two needles introduced parallel to each other into the renal parenchyma. A thermocouple was inserted between the two active electrodes. The renal artery at physiologic conditions was maintained at a constant temperature of perfusion of 37 degrees C by a computer-assisted Hot-line monitor. Two lesions were produced in each pole of each kidney including the cortex and the medulla. In an initial human study focusing on safety, feasibility, and pathology, three patients were treated by RITA with bipolar and monopolar energy. One patient with a peripheral 2-cm upper-pole tumor was treated percutaneously under ultrasound guidance with local anesthesia only 1 week prior to surgery. The other patients, with 3- and 5-cm tumors, were treated during surgery under general anesthesia just before nephrectomy. Ex vivo, the maximum temperature at the active needles ranged from 84 degrees C to 130 degrees C with 10 to 14 W applied during 10 to 14 minutes. Lesions were on average 2.2 x 3 x 2.5 cm.3 Microscopic examination showed stromal edema with intensive pyknosis. No damage was seen to adjacent untreated tissue. In the in vivo procedure, tolerance of RTA as an anesthesia-free procedure was excellent. The size of the observed lesions was comparable to the forecast size depending on the needle deployment. No side effects were noted, and no adjacent structures were

  2. Mapping the spatial and temporal dynamics of the velvet mesquite with MODIS and AVIRIS: Case study at the Santa Rita Experimental Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaurivi, Jorry Zebby Ujama

    The general objective of this research is to develop a methodology that will allow mapping and quantifying shrub encroachment with remote sensing. The multitemporal properties of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) -250m, 16-day vegetation index products were combined with the hyperspectral and high spatial resolution (3.6m) computation of the Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) to detect the dynamics of mesquite and grass/soil matrix at two sites of high (19.5%) and low (5.7%) mesquite cover in the Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER). MODIS results showed separability between grassland and mesquite based on phenology. Mesquite landscapes had longer green peak starting in April through February, while the grassland only peaked during the monsoon season (July through October). AVIRIS revealed spectral separability, but high variation in the data implicated high heterogeneity in the landscape. Nonetheless, the methodology for larger data was developed in this study and combines ground, air and satellite data.

  3. Chemical constituents in sediment in Lake Pontchartrain and in street mud and canal sediment in New Orleans, Louisiana, following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Wilson, Jennifer T.; Horowitz, Arthur J.; Skrobialowski, Stanley C.; Foreman, William T.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Burkhardt, Mark R.; Elrick, Kent A.; Mahler, Barbara J.; Smith, James J.; Zaugg, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    Samples of street mud, suspended and bottom sediment in canals discharging to Lake Ponchartrain, and suspended and bottom sediment in the lake were collected and analyzed for chemical constituents to help evaluate the effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the subsequent unwatering of New Orleans, Louisiana. The approach used for sampling and analysis of chemical data for the study is presented herein. Radionuclides, major and trace elements, and numerous organic compounds in sediment were analyzed. The organic compounds include organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, urban waste indicator compounds, and current-use pesticides. Methods for the analysis of urban waste indicator compounds and current-use pesticides in sediment were developed only recently.

  4. Land area changes in coastal Louisiana after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita: Chapter 5B in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barras, John A.

    2007-01-01

    Comparison of classified Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite imagery acquired before and after the landfalls of Hurricanes Katrina (August 29, 2005) and Rita (September 24, 2005) demonstrated that water area increased by 217 mi2 (562 km2) in coastal Louisiana. Approximately 82 mi2 (212 km2) of new water areas were in areas primarily impacted by Katrina (Mississippi River Delta basin, Breton Sound basin, Pontchartrain basin, Pearl River basin), whereas 117 mi2 (303 km2) were in areas primarily impacted by Rita (Calcasieu/ Sabine basin, Mermentau basin, Teche/Vermilion basin, Atchafalaya basin, Terrebonne basin). Barataria basin contained new water areas caused by both hurricanes, resulting in some 18 mi2 (46.6 km2) of new water areas. The fresh marsh and intermediate marsh communities' land areas decreased by 122 mi2 (316 km2) and 90 mi2 (233.1 km2), respectively. The brackish marsh and saline marsh communities' land areas decreased by 33 mi2 (85.5 km2) and 28 mi2 (72.5 km2), respectively. These new water areas identify permanent losses caused by direct removal of wetlands. They also indicate transitory water area changes caused by remnant flooding, removal of aquatic vegetation, scouring of marsh vegetation, and water-level variation attributed to normal tidal and meteorological variation between satellite images. Permanent losses cannot be estimated until several growing seasons have passed and the transitory impacts of the hurricanes are minimized. The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary information on water area changes in coastal Louisiana acquired shortly after both hurricanes' landfalls (detectable with Landsat TM imagery) and to serve as a regional baseline for monitoring posthurricane wetland recovery.

  5. Drug resistance to inhibitors of the human double minute-2 E3 ligase is mediated by point mutations of p53, but can be overcome with the p53 targeting agent RITA.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard J; Bjorklund, Chad C; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Kuhn, Deborah J; Orlowski, Robert Z

    2012-10-01

    The human double minute (HDM)-2 E3 ubiquitin ligase plays a key role in p53 turnover and has been validated preclinically as a target in multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). HDM-2 inhibitors are entering clinical trials, and we therefore sought to understand potential mechanisms of resistance in lymphoid models. Wild-type p53 H929 MM and Granta-519 MCL cells resistant to MI-63 or Nutlin were generated by exposing them to increasing drug concentrations. MI-63-resistant H929 and Granta-519 cells were resistant to Nutlin, whereas Nutlin-resistant cells displayed cross-resistance to MI-63. These cells also showed cross-resistance to bortezomib, doxorubicin, cisplatin, and melphalan, but remained sensitive to the small molecule inhibitor RITA (reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosis). HDM-2 inhibitor-resistant cells harbored increased p53 levels, but neither genotoxic nor nongenotoxic approaches to activate p53 induced HDM-2 or p21. Resequencing revealed wild-type HDM-2, but mutations were found in the p53 DNA binding and dimerization domains. In resistant cells, RITA induced a G(2)-M arrest, upregulation of p53 targets HDM-2, PUMA, and NOXA, and PARP cleavage. Combination regimens with RITA and MI-63 resulted in enhanced cell death compared with RITA alone. These findings support the possibility that p53 mutation could be a primary mechanism of acquired resistance to HDM-2 inhibitors in MCL and MM. Furthermore, they suggest that simultaneous restoration of p53 function and HDM-2 inhibition is a rational strategy for clinical translation. PMID:22933706

  6. Drug Resistance to Inhibitors of the Human Double Minute-2 E3 Ligase is Mediated by Point Mutations of p53, but can be Overcome with the p53 Targeting Agent RITA

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Richard J.; Bjorklund, Chad C.; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Kuhn, Deborah J.; Orlowski, Robert Z.

    2012-01-01

    The human double minute (HDM)-2 E3 ubiquitin ligase plays a key role in p53 turnover, and has been validated pre-clinically as a target in multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). HDM-2 inhibitors are entering clinical trials, and we therefore sought to understand potential mechanisms of resistance in lymphoid models. Wild-type p53 H929 MM and Granta-519 MCL cells resistant to MI-63 or Nutlin were generated by exposing them to increasing drug concentrations. MI-63-resistant H929 and Granta-519 cells were resistant to Nutlin, while Nutlin-resistant cells displayed cross-resistance to MI-63. These cells also showed cross-resistance to bortezomib, doxorubicin, cisplatin, and melphalan, but remained sensitive to the small molecule inhibitor RITA. HDM-2 inhibitor-resistant cells harbored increased p53 levels, but neither genotoxic nor non-genotoxic approaches to activate p53 induced HDM-2 or p21. Resequencing revealed wild-type HDM-2, but mutations were found in the p53 DNA binding and dimerization domains. In resistant cells, RITA induced a G2/M arrest, up-regulation of p53 targets HDM-2, PUMA, and NOXA, and PARP cleavage. Combination regimens with RITA and MI-63 resulted in enhanced cell death compared to RITA alone. These findings support the possibility that p53 mutation could be a primary mechanism of acquired resistance to HDM-2 inhibitors in MCL and MM. Furthermore, they suggest that simultaneous restoration of p53 function and HDM-2 inhibition is a rational strategy for clinical translation. PMID:22933706

  7. Riems influenza a typing array (RITA): An RT-qPCR-based low density array for subtyping avian and mammalian influenza a viruses.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Hoffmann, Donata; Henritzi, Dinah; Beer, Martin; Harder, Timm C

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and sensitive diagnostic approaches are of the utmost importance for the detection of humans and animals infected by specific influenza virus subtype(s). Cascade-like diagnostics starting with the use of pan-influenza assays and subsequent subtyping devices are normally used. Here, we demonstrated a novel low density array combining 32 TaqMan(®) real-time RT-PCR systems in parallel for the specific detection of the haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) subtypes of avian and porcine hosts. The sensitivity of the newly developed system was compared with that of the pan-influenza assay, and the specificity of all RT-qPCRs was examined using a broad panel of 404 different influenza A virus isolates representing 45 different subtypes. Furthermore, we analysed the performance of the RT-qPCR assays with diagnostic samples obtained from wild birds and swine. Due to the open format of the array, adaptations to detect newly emerging influenza A virus strains can easily be integrated. The RITA array represents a competitive, fast and sensitive subtyping tool that requires neither new machinery nor additional training of staff in a lab where RT-qPCR is already established. PMID:27256976

  8. An interpretation of the 1996 aeromagnetic data for the Santa Cruz basin, Tumacacori Mountains, Santa Rita Mountains, and Patagonia Mountains, south-central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    High resolution aeromagnetic survey data flown at 250 m above the terrain and 250 m line spacing over the Santa Cruz Valley and the surrounding Tumacacori, Patagonia, and Santa Rita Mountains has been interpreted by correlation of the magnetic anomaly field and various derivative maps with geologic maps. Measurements of in-situ magnetic properties of several of the map units determined whether or not mapped lithologies were responsible for observed anomalies. Correlation of the magnetic anomaly field with mapped geology shows that numerous map units of volcanic and intrusive rocks from Jurassic Middle Tertiary in age are reversely polarized, some of which have not been previously reported. Trends derived from the magnetic anomaly data correlate closely with structures from major tectonic events in the geologic history of the area including Triassic-Jurassic crustal accretion and magmatism, Laramide magmatism and tectonism, northeast-southwest Mid-Tertiary extension, and east-west Basin and Range extension. Application of two textural measures to the magnetic anomaly data, number of peaks and troughs per km (a measure of roughness) and Euclidean length per km (a measure of amplitude), delineated areas of consistent magnetic anomaly texture. These measures were successful at the delineation of areas of consistent magnetic lithology both on the surface and in the subsurface beneath basin fill. Several areas of basement prospective for mineral resources beneath basin fill were identified.

  9. Riems influenza a typing array (RITA): An RT-qPCR-based low density array for subtyping avian and mammalian influenza a viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Hoffmann, Donata; Henritzi, Dinah; Beer, Martin; Harder, Timm C.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and sensitive diagnostic approaches are of the utmost importance for the detection of humans and animals infected by specific influenza virus subtype(s). Cascade-like diagnostics starting with the use of pan-influenza assays and subsequent subtyping devices are normally used. Here, we demonstrated a novel low density array combining 32 TaqMan® real-time RT-PCR systems in parallel for the specific detection of the haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) subtypes of avian and porcine hosts. The sensitivity of the newly developed system was compared with that of the pan-influenza assay, and the specificity of all RT-qPCRs was examined using a broad panel of 404 different influenza A virus isolates representing 45 different subtypes. Furthermore, we analysed the performance of the RT-qPCR assays with diagnostic samples obtained from wild birds and swine. Due to the open format of the array, adaptations to detect newly emerging influenza A virus strains can easily be integrated. The RITA array represents a competitive, fast and sensitive subtyping tool that requires neither new machinery nor additional training of staff in a lab where RT-qPCR is already established. PMID:27256976

  10. Looking for the Silver Lining: Benefit Finding after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in Middle-Aged, Older, and Oldest-Old Adults

    PubMed Central

    Stanko, Katie E.; Cherry, Katie E.; Ryker, Kyle S.; Mughal, Farra; Marks, Loren D.; Brown, Jennifer Silva; Gendusa, Patricia F.; Sullivan, Marisa C.; Bruner, John; Welsh, David A.; Su, L. Joseph; Jazwinski, S. Michal

    2016-01-01

    Looking for potentially positive outcomes is one way that people cope with stressful events. In two studies, we examined perceived “silver linings” after the 2005 Hurricanes Katrina and Rita among indirectly affected adults. In Study 1, middle-aged (ages 47–64 years), older (ages 65–89 years), and oldest-old (ages 90–95 years) adults in the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (LHAS) responded to an open-ended question on perceived silver linings in a longitudinal assessment carried out during the immediate impact (1 to 4 months after landfall) and post-disaster recovery phase (6 to 14 months post-storm). Qualitative grounded theory methods were employed to analyze these narrative data. Team-based coding yielded three core themes: (1) learning experience and better preparedness for future disasters, (2) having improved cities (Baton Rouge and New Orleans), and (3) an increase in “Good Samaritan” acts such as strangers helping one another. Responses were similar across age groups, although older adults were the least likely to report positive outcomes. Study 2 was a conceptual replication using a different sample of adults (ages 31 to 82 years) tested at least five years after the storms. A learning experience and preparedness core theme replicated Study 1’s findings while improved social cohesion amongst family and friends emerged as a new core theme in Study 2. These data indicate that identifying lessons learned and potentially positive outcomes are psychological reactions that may facilitate post-disaster coping and foster resilience for indirectly affected adults in the years after disaster. PMID:27440961

  11. Cheniere forest as stopover habitat for migrant landbirds: Immediate effects of Hurricane Rita: Chapter 6D in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrow, Wylie, Jr.; Chadwick, Paul; Couvillion, Brady R.; Doyle, Thomas; Faulkner, Stephen; Jeske, Clint; Michot, Tommy; Randall, Lori; Wells, Chris; Wilson, Scott

    2007-01-01

    It is not known whether en route fall migratory birds (August-October) are likely to suffer more from direct or secondary effects of hurricanes. On September 24, 2005, Hurricane Rita wreaked havoc on Louisiana's coast by toppling trees over vast areas and by stripping away microhabitats that harbor the invertebrates and produce the fruits upon which migrant landbirds depend (e.g., canopy foliage, vine tangles, epiphytes, leaf litter, and thickets of perennial plant species). Such transient effects of a hurricane on wildlife food resources are poorly understood, but these effects may have longterm consequences for some wildlife species.

  12. Environmental chemical data for perishable sediments and soils collected in New Orleans, Louisiana, and along the Louisiana Delta following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witt, Emitt C.; Shi, Honglan; Karstensen, Krista A.; Wang, Jianmin; Adams, Craig D.

    2008-01-01

    In October 2005, nearly one month after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, a team of scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and the Missouri University of Science and Technology deployed to southern Louisiana to collect perishable environmental data resulting from the impacts of these storms. Perishable samples collected for this investigation are subject to destruction or ruin by removal, mixing, or natural decay; therefore, collection is time-critical following the depositional event. A total of 238 samples of sediment, soil, and vegetation were collected to characterize chemical quality. For this analysis, 157 of the 238 samples were used to characterize trace element, iron, total organic carbon, pesticide, and polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations of deposited sediment and associated shallow soils. In decreasing order, the largest variability in trace element concentration was detected for lead, vanadium, chromium, copper, arsenic, cadmium, and mercury. Lead was determined to be the trace element of most concern because of the large concentrations present in the samples ranging from 4.50 to 551 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). Sequential extraction analysis of lead indicate that 39.1 percent of the total lead concentration in post-hurricane sediment is associated with the iron-manganese oxide fraction. This fraction is considered extremely mobile under reducing environmental conditions, thereby making lead a potential health hazard. The presence of lead in post-hurricane sediments likely is from redistribution of pre-hurricane contaminated soils and sediments from Lake Pontchartrain and the flood control canals of New Orleans. Arsenic concentrations ranged from 0.84 to 49.1 mg/kg. Although Arsenic concentrations generally were small and consistent with other research results, all samples exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Human Health Medium-Specific Screening Level of 0.39 mg/kg. Mercury concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 1.30 mg

  13. Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) - laser-plasma accelerated quasi-monoenergetic GeV ion-beams with existing lasers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Aakash A.

    2013-10-01

    laser's push is controlled by the electrostatic space-charge pull by the immobile background ions. In the rest-frame of the laser, the electrostatic-potential that the ions create to balance the ponderomotive force on e-s, scales as the effective vector potential, aplasma . This potential hill, due to snowplowed e-s, co-propagating with the rising laser can reflect protons and light-ions (Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration, RITA). Desired proton or light-ion energies can be achieved by controlling the velocity of the snowplow, which is shown to scale inversely with the rise-time of the laser (higher energies for shorter pulses) and directly with the scale-length of the plasma density gradient. Similar acceleration can be produced by controlling the increase of the laser frequency (Chirp Induced Transparency Acceleration, ChITA). Work supported by the National Science Foundation under NSF- PHY-0936278. Also, NSF-PHY-0936266 and NSF-PHY-0903039; the US Department of Energy under DEFC02-07ER41500, DE- FG02-92ER40727 and DE-FG52-09NA29552.

  14. Characterization of flood sediments from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and potential implications for human health and the environment: Chapter 7I in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Foreman, William T.; Griffin, Dale W.; Lovelace, John K.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Demas, Charles R.

    2007-01-01

    The flooding in the greater New Orleans, La., area that resulted from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in August and September 2005 left behind accumulations of sediments up to many centimeters thick on streets, lawns, parking lots, and other flat surfaces (fig. 1). During the flood dewatering and subsequent cleanup, there were concerns that these sediments might contain pathogens and chemical contaminants that would pose a health risk to emergency responders, cleanup workers, and local residents who came into contact with the wet sediments or inhaled dusts generated from dried sediments. In response to these concerns, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists and colleagues characterized the potential environmental and health hazards of hurricane flood sediments from the greater New Orleans and Slidell, La., area.

  15. Bacteriological water quality in and around Lake Pontchartrain following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita: Chapter 7H in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demcheck, Dennis K.; Stoeckel, Donald M.; Bushon, Rebecca N.; Blehert, David S.; Hippe, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    Following the Louisiana landfalls of Katrina on August 29 and Rita on September 24, 2005, the local population and the American public were concerned about the effects the hurricanes might have on water quality in Lake Pontchartrain. The lake is a major recreational resource for the region and an important fishery. Contamination carried by the storm surge—along with runoff and water pumped from flooded areas of New Orleans—was considered a serious threat to the water body. The USGS, in collaboration with the LDEQ, monitored the sanitary quality of water at 22 sites in and around Lake Pontchartrain, La., for 3 consecutive weeks from September 13 to 29, 2005 (fig. 1). A subsequent multipleagency survey of 30 sites within Lake Pontchartrain was undertaken by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the USGS, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration during the week of October 11–14, 2005, to evaluate the effects of the hurricanes and overall levels of fecal contamination on the water quality of the lake (see Heitmuller and Perez, this volume). In addition, the EPA monitored fecal-indicator concentrations at a variety of sites in New Orleans, surrounding areas, and the Mississippi River between September 3 and October 22, 2005 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2006). This article describes fecal-indicator bacteria concentration results collected by USGS in the context of other existing data.

  16. Public Talks and Science Listens: A Community-Based Participatory Approach to Characterizing Environmental Health Risk Perceptions and Assessing Recovery Needs in the Wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, J.; Parras, B.; St. Marie, R.; Subra, W.; Petronella, S.; Gorenstein, J.; Fuchs-Young, R.; Santa, R.K.; Chavarria, A.; Ward, J.; Diamond, P.

    2009-01-01

    In response to the human health threats stemming from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, inter-disciplinary working groups representing P30-funded Centers of the National Institute Environmental Health Sciences were created to assess threats posed by mold, harmful alga blooms, chemical toxicants, and various infectious agents at selected sites throughout the hurricane impact zone. Because of proximity to impacted areas, UTMB NIEHS Center in Environmental Toxicology was charged with coordinating direct community outreach efforts, primarily in south Louisiana. In early October 2005, UTMB/NIEHS Center Community Outreach and Education Core, in collaboration with outreach counterparts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center @ Smithville TX/Center for Research in Environmental Disease sent two groups into southern Louisiana. One group used Lafourche Parish as a base to deliver humanitarian aid and assess local needs for additional supplies during local recovery/reclamation. A second group, ranging through New Iberia, New Orleans, Chalmette, rural Terrebonne, Lafourche and Jefferson Parishes and Baton Rouge met with community environmental leaders, emergency personnel and local citizens to 1) sample public risk perceptions, 2) evaluate the scope and reach of ongoing risk communication efforts, and 3) determine how the NIEHS could best collaborate with local groups in environmental health research and local capacity building efforts. This scoping survey identified specific information gaps limiting efficacy of risk communication, produced a community “wish list” of potential collaborative research projects. The project provided useful heuristics for disaster response and management planning and a platform for future collaborative efforts in environmental health assessment and risk communication with local advocacy groups in south Terrebonne-Lafourche parishes. PMID:20508756

  17. Public talks and science listens: a community-based participatory approach to characterizing environmental health risk perceptions and assessing recovery needs in the wake of hurricanes katrina and rita.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, J; Parras, B; St Marie, R; Subra, W; Petronella, S; Gorenstein, J; Fuchs-Young, R; Santa, R K; Chavarria, A; Ward, J; Diamond, P

    2009-01-01

    In response to the human health threats stemming from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, inter-disciplinary working groups representing P30-funded Centers of the National Institute Environmental Health Sciences were created to assess threats posed by mold, harmful alga blooms, chemical toxicants, and various infectious agents at selected sites throughout the hurricane impact zone. Because of proximity to impacted areas, UTMB NIEHS Center in Environmental Toxicology was charged with coordinating direct community outreach efforts, primarily in south Louisiana. In early October 2005, UTMB/NIEHS Center Community Outreach and Education Core, in collaboration with outreach counterparts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center @ Smithville TX/Center for Research in Environmental Disease sent two groups into southern Louisiana. One group used Lafourche Parish as a base to deliver humanitarian aid and assess local needs for additional supplies during local recovery/reclamation. A second group, ranging through New Iberia, New Orleans, Chalmette, rural Terrebonne, Lafourche and Jefferson Parishes and Baton Rouge met with community environmental leaders, emergency personnel and local citizens to 1) sample public risk perceptions, 2) evaluate the scope and reach of ongoing risk communication efforts, and 3) determine how the NIEHS could best collaborate with local groups in environmental health research and local capacity building efforts. This scoping survey identified specific information gaps limiting efficacy of risk communication, produced a community "wish list" of potential collaborative research projects. The project provided useful heuristics for disaster response and management planning and a platform for future collaborative efforts in environmental health assessment and risk communication with local advocacy groups in south Terrebonne-Lafourche parishes. PMID:20508756

  18. The influence of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the inflammatory cytokine response and protein expression in A549 cells exposed to PM2.5 collected in the Baton Rouge-Port Allen industrial corridor of Southeastern Louisiana in 2005.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Brian; Owens, John Wesley

    2014-03-01

    Hurricanes Katrina and Rita hit the coast of Louisiana in 2005 and killed more than 2000 people. The two storms resulted in a significant spike in particulate matter (PM2.5) levels across the state of Louisiana. This report focuses on PM2.5 samples collected in 2005 from two monitoring sites in the neighboring cities of Baton Rouge and Port Allen, Louisiana. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) revealed the presence of PM2.5-adsorbed representative and Fenton-active transition metals. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses revealed the presence of 23 PAH compounds. Endotoxins were also detected. Metals and endotoxins were extracted with water. PAH were extracted with dichloromethane. In order to assess cytotoxicity, aqueous PM2.5 extracts were introduced to A549 Human Epithelial Lung Carcinoma Cells. Results indicated decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, with an LC50 of 235 µg/ml and 250 µg/ml, respectively, for the two sites featured here. Endotoxins alone were not cytotoxic. The concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and released LDH activity increased following exposure of A549 cells to aqueous PM2.5 extracts. Fluorescence microscopy revealed apoptotic and necrotic cell death mechanisms. ELISA revealed increased secretion of primary pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α. Global PCR gene expression revealed up-regulation of proteins associated with the cytokine storm; e.g. interleukins, chemokines, and TNF-α. Global antibody microarray was consistent with an inflammatory response, with up-regulation of cytokines involved in the down-field activation of the caspase cascade and kinase pathways. The up-regulation of metal-redox sensitive transcription factors, NF-κβ and AP-1, is consistent with a cell death mechanism initiated by Fenton-active transition metal redox catalysis. PMID:24401135

  19. Educating Rita and Her Sisters. Women and Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benn, Roseanne, Ed.; Elliott, Jane, Ed.; Whaley, Pat, Ed.

    This book contains 17 papers examining the various roles--learner, teacher, researcher, manager--that women have played in the development of lifelong learning. The following papers are included: "Introduction: Women and Continuing Education--Where Are We Now?" (Roseanne Benn, Jane Elliott, Pat Whaley); "Dancing into the Future: Developments in…

  20. Toxicity of an anionic detergent, dodecylbenzene sodium sulfonate, to a freshwater fish, Rita rita: determination of LC50 values by different methods.

    PubMed

    Roy, D

    1988-04-01

    LC50 values and their 95% confidence limits for various intervals of exposure to an anionic detergent, dodecylbenzene sodium sulfonate, have been determined using recommended methods. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods are discussed in light of the variations in the values. Different visible behaviors of the fish under the influence of the detergent have also been explained. PMID:3378536

  1. 76 FR 16629 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Relocation Allowances-Relocation Income Tax Allowance (RITA) Tables

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... Register (73 FR 35952) specifying that the General Services Administration (GSA) would no longer publish.... FTR Bulletin 11-05 and all other FTR Bulletins can be found at http://www.gsa.gov/ftrbulletin . The RIT allowance tables are located at http://www.gsa.gov/relocationpolicy . DATES: This notice...

  2. Educating Rita and Her Sisters: Using Drama to Reimagine Femininities in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This article examines drama in relation to girls' education, and considers some of the ways in which drama might be applied in schools to challenge limiting hegemonic narratives about gender and support the emerging understandings and performances of femininities of adolescent girls. It reports on case study research conducted with a Year 9 Drama…

  3. Disaster preparedness: occupational and environmental health professionals' response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Bonnie; Lawhorn, Elizabeth

    2007-05-01

    In disaster-related events such as these, this survey demonstrates clear need for improved preparedness efforts and communication strategies to help reduce health risks for at-risk populations. The role of occupational health nurses and occupational and environmental medicine physicians requires knowledge and skills in many areas. This includes not only clinical skills related to illness and injury that will occur, but also skills in such areas as surveillance, management, community coordination, risk management and risk communication, and health protection. The psychological impact of disasters will have far-reaching effects resulting in emotional and behavioral changes requiring both immediate and long-term interventions. Comprehensive disaster management guidance should be in place to assist health care providers and workers in pre-event, event, and post-event phases of the disaster. PMID:17526297

  4. Metal distributions in New Orleans following hurricanes Katrina and Rita: A continuation study.

    PubMed

    Cobb, George P; Abel, Michael T; Rainwater, Thomas R; Austin, Galen P; Cox, Stephen B; Kendall, Ronald J; Marsland, Eric J; Anderson, Todd A; Leftwich, Blair D; Zak, John C; Presley, Steven M

    2006-08-01

    In late October 2005, twenty-seven metals were determined in soils and sediment layers deposited by floodwaters (flood sediments) within New Orleans, Louisiana. Samples originated from 43 sites along four transects, at an industrial canal, and near the Superdome. The sampling design encompassed flooded and nonflooded areas as well as differing economic strata within the city. Results from this effort confirmed findings of our previous study designed to quantify contaminant profiles in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. The expanded sampling from this most recent investigation revealed that arsenic (As) and lead (Pb) concentrations exceeded United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) soil screening criteria indiscriminately throughout the city. However, As and Pb concentrations were lower along St. Charles Avenue, an area largely unaffected by hurricane related flooding. Toxicant concentrations did not exceed soil screening criteria values for lead within any flood sediments or for 32 of 37 soil samples, but arsenic concentrations in 40 of 43 samples exceeded screening criteria. PMID:16913108

  5. A GLIMPSE INTO THE EYE OF THE EMERGENCY RESPONSE AT EPA KATRINA AND RITA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation was given at the Texas Environmental Health Association Annual Meeting in Round Rock, TX on October 12, 2005. The keynote address was focused on the conditions after Katrins, organizing response, field response, EPA's role in emergency response, what is EPA doi...

  6. Cenozoic rocks of the Santa Rita Mountains, southeast of Tucson, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drewes, Harald

    1972-01-01

    the interpretations of the geologic record of the rocks themselves. The rocks of the greatest potential economic interest are the Greaterville intrusives of the Helvetia and Greaterville mining districts and the quartz vein swarm of the Tyndall and Wrightson mining districts.

  7. Somatic Experiencing Treatment with Social Service Workers Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitch, M. Laurie; Vanslyke, Jan; Allen, Marisa

    2009-01-01

    In a disaster, social service workers are often survivors themselves. This study examines whether somatic intervention using a brief (one to two session) stabilization model now called the Trauma Resiliency Model[TM] (TRM), which uses the skills of Somatic Experiencing[R] (SE), can reduce the postdisaster symptoms of social service workers…

  8. The Local Curriculum in Mozambique: The Santa Rita Community School in Xinavane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhorsan, Adelaide; Chachuaio, Albertina Moreno

    2008-01-01

    In 1983, Mozambique started reviewing the education system that it had inherited from the Portuguese colonial administration. One of the innovations introduced into basic education is the time allocated to the local curriculum (LC) within the national curriculum (NC). The LC enables the communities, including the poorest and those furthest removed…

  9. "I Was at War--but It Was a Gentle War": The Power of the Positive in Rita Joe's Autobiography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mckegney, Sam

    2006-01-01

    Canada's official residential school policy, functioning between 1879 and 1986, acted as a weapon in a calculated attack on indigenous cultures, seeking--through such now infamous procedures as familial separation, forced speaking of non-Native languages, and propagandist derogation of precontact modes of existence and Native spiritual systems--to…

  10. Temporal and Spatial Variability in Culturable Pathogenic Vibrio spp. in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Olivia D.; Hou, Aixin; Vithanage, Gayatri; Fujioka, Roger S.; Steward, Grieg F.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the abundance, distribution, and virulence gene content of Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus in the waters of southern Lake Pontchartrain in Louisiana on four occasions from October 2005 to September 2006, using selective cultivation and molecular assays. The three targeted pathogenic vibrios were generally below the detection level in January 2006, when the water was cold (13°C), and most abundant in September 2006, when the lake water was warmest (30°C). The maximum values for these species were higher than reported previously for the lake by severalfold to orders of magnitude. The only variable consistently correlated with total vibrio abundance within a single sampling was distance from shore (P = 0.000). Multiple linear regression of the entire data set revealed that distance from shore, temperature, and turbidity together explained 82.1% of the variability in total vibrio CFU. The log-transformed mean abundance of V. vulnificus CFU in the lake was significantly correlated with temperature (P = 0.014), but not salinity (P = 0.625). Virulence-associated genes of V. cholerae (ctx) and V. parahaemolyticus (trh and tdh) were not detected in any isolates of these species (n = 128 and n = 20, respectively). In contrast, 16S rRNA typing of V. vulnificus (n = 298) revealed the presence of both environmental (type A) and clinical (type B) strains. The percentage of the B-type V. vulnificus was significantly higher in the lake in October 2005 (35.8% of the total) than at other sampling times (P ≤ 0.004), consistent with the view that these strains represent distinct ecotypes. PMID:21642406

  11. 75 FR 2477 - Plan Development for Kiowa, Rita Blanca, Black Kettle and McClellan Creek National Grasslands...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... using the provisions of the 1982 planning rule. Authority: 16 U.S.C. 1600-1614; 36 CFR 219.35 (74 FR... eligible Wild and Scenic Rivers; addressed travel management issues and oil and gas leasing stipulations... National Grasslands and will not be considered. In addition, some issues, such as wild and scenic...

  12. Expediting the Analysis of Qualitative Data in Evaluation: A Procedure for the Rapid Identification of Themes from Audio Recordings (RITA)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Jennifer Watling; Neal, Zachary P.; VanDyke, Erika; Kornbluh, Mariah

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative data offer advantages to evaluators, including rich information about stakeholders' perspectives and experiences. However, qualitative data analysis is labor-intensive and slow, conflicting with evaluators' needs to provide punctual feedback to their clients. In this method note, we contribute to the literature on rapid…

  13. The Rita Network.: how the High Energy Tools can BE Used in Order to Transmit Clinical Hadrontherapic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, M.; Risso, P.; Squarcia, S.

    We present the realization done for the organization, selection, transmission of Radiotherapy's data and images. The choice of a standard healthcare records, based on the stereotactic and/or conformational radiotherapy, the implementation of the healthcare file into a distributed data-base using the World Wide Web platform for data presentation and transmission and the availability in the network is presented. The solution chosen is a good example of technology transfert from High Energy physics and Medicine and opens new interesting ways in this field.

  14. The Impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on People with Disabilities: A Look Back and Remaining Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Robyn; Gilbert, Sheldon

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the effects of the hurricanes on people with all types of disabilities. The National Council on Disability (NCD) released another report that addressed in detail the specific challenges for people with psychiatric disabilities. Please refer to "The Needs of People with Psychiatric Disabilities During and After Hurricanes…

  15. Hurricanes Katrina and Rita: role of individuals and collaborative networks in mobilizing/coordinating societal and professional resources for major disasters

    PubMed Central

    Mattox, Kenneth L

    2006-01-01

    The medical support for the coordinated effort for Harris County Texas (Houston) to rescue evacuees from New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina was part of an integrated collaborative network. Both public health and operational health care was structured to custom meet the needs of the evacuees and to create an exit strategy for the clinic and shelter. Integrating local hospital and physician resources into the Joint Incident Command was essential. Outside assistance, including federal and national resources must be coordinated through the local incident command. PMID:16420647

  16. Hurricanes Katrina and Rita: role of individuals and collaborative networks in mobilizing/coordinating societal and professional resources for major disasters.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Kenneth L

    2006-02-01

    The medical support for the coordinated effort for Harris County Texas (Houston) to rescue evacuees from New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina was part of an integrated collaborative network. Both public health and operational health care was structured to custom meet the needs of the evacuees and to create an exit strategy for the clinic and shelter. Integrating local hospital and physician resources into the Joint Incident Command was essential. Outside assistance, including federal and national resources must be coordinated through the local incident command. PMID:16420647

  17. Monitoring Hurricane Rita Inland Storm Surge: Chapter 7J in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, Benton D.; Tollett, Roland W.; Goree, Burl B.

    2007-01-01

    Pressure transducers (sensors) are accurate, reliable, and cost-effective tools to measure and record the magnitude, extent, and timing of hurricane storm surge. Sensors record storm-surge peaks more accurately and reliably than do high-water marks. Data collected by sensors may be used in storm-surge models to estimate when, where, and to what degree stormsurge flooding will occur during future storm-surge events and to calibrate and verify stormsurge models, resulting in a better understanding of the dynamics of storm surge.

  18. Ground-water quality in the Santa Rita, Buellton, and Los Olivos hydrologic subareas of the Santa Ynez River basin, Santa Barbara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamlin, S.N.

    1985-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the upper Santa Ynez River Valley in Santa Barbara County has degraded due to both natural and anthropogenic causes. The semiarid climate and uneven distribution of rainfall has limited freshwater recharge and caused salt buildup in water supplies. Tertiary rocks supply mineralized water. Agricultural activities (irrigation return flow containing fertilizers and pesticides, cultivation, feedlot waste disposal) are a primary cause of water quality degradation. Urban development, which also causes water quality degradation (introduced contaminants, wastewater disposal, septic system discharge, and land fill disposal of waste), has imposed stricter requirements on water supply quality. A well network was designed to monitor changes in groundwater quality related to anthropogenic activities. Information from this network may aid in efficient management of the groundwater basins as public water supplies, centered around three basic goals. First is to increase freshwater recharge to the basins by conjunctive surface/groundwater use and surface-spreading techniques. Second is to optimize groundwater discharge by efficient timing and spacing of pumping. Third is to control and reduce sources of groundwater contamination by regulating wastewater quality and distribution and, preferably, by exporting wastewaters from the basin. (USGS)

  19. Reskilling Rita. Women's Access to TAFE in Australia: An Evaluation of Re-Entry Courses for Mature-Age Women, and Their Links to Further Study and Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binns, Jennifer

    An evaluation of the New Opportunities for Women (NOW) program in Western Australia was undertaken. Questionnaires were mailed to a stratified random sample of NOW enrollees. Responses were received from 308 women, a 45.7 percent response rate. Findings included the following: 81 percent of NOW students went on either to paid employment or further…

  20. 75 FR 25284 - Tracking the Use of CDBG Homeowners and Small Landlords Disaster Assistance Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... housing recovery in the three states most affected by hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Louisiana, Mississippi... funding in housing recovery in the three states most affected by hurricanes Katrina and Rita...

  1. Just a Little of Statins' Effect Enough to Help Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... 20 online edition of JAMA Internal Medicine . Dr. Rita Redberg, who co-wrote an accompanying editorial, said ... cardiology, NYU School of Medicine, New York City; Rita Redberg, M.D., cardiologist, UCSF Medical Center, San ...

  2. 78 FR 42944 - Notification of a Public Meeting of the Great Lakes Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ... CONTACT: Any member of the public wishing further information regarding this meeting may contact Rita...-6815 or email at cestaric.rita@epa.gov . General information on the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.... Interested parties should contact Rita Cestaric in writing (preferably via email) at the contact...

  3. 78 FR 26636 - Notification of a Public Meeting of the Great Lakes Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... public wishing further information regarding this meeting may contact Rita Cestaric, Designated Federal Officer (DFO), GLAB, by telephone at (312) 886-6815 or email at ] cestaric.rita@epa.gov . General.... Interested parties should contact Rita Cestaric, DFO, in writing (preferably via email) at the...

  4. 41 CFR 302-3.101 - As a transferred employee what relocation allowances must my agency pay or reimburse me for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... incentives (part 302-14 of this chapter). 7. Relocation income tax allowance (RITA) (part 302-17 of this... chapter). 5. Relocation income tax allowance (RITA) (part 302-17 of this chapter) 1 5. Home marketing... chapter) 7. Relocation income tax allowance (RITA) (part 302-17 of this chapter) 1 Note to Column 1,...

  5. 41 CFR 302-3.101 - As a transferred employee what relocation allowances must my agency pay or reimburse to me?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) 6. Home marketing incentives (part 302-14 of this chapter). 7. Relocation income tax allowance (RITA... transfer is to Alaska or Hawaii (part 302-12 of this chapter). 5. Relocation income tax allowance (RITA... (RITA) (part 302-17 of this chapter) 1 Note to Column 1, item 2: A TQSA under the DSSR may be...

  6. 78 FR 77096 - Newspapers Used for Publication of Legal Notices in the Southwestern Region, Which Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... Mexico. Rita Blanca National Grassland in Cimarron County, Oklahoma notices published in:--``Boise City News'', Boise City, Oklahoma. Rita Blanca National Grassland in Dallam County, Texas notices published...:--``Union County Leader'', Clayton, New Mexico. Rita Blanca National Grassland in Cimarron County,...

  7. 41 CFR 302-3.101 - As a transferred employee what relocation allowances must my agency pay or reimburse me for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... incentives (part 302-14 of this chapter). 7. Relocation income tax allowance (RITA) (part 302-17 of this... chapter). 5. Relocation income tax allowance (RITA) (part 302-17 of this chapter) 1 5. Home marketing... chapter) 7. Relocation income tax allowance (RITA) (part 302-17 of this chapter) 1 Note to Column 1,...

  8. 41 CFR 302-3.101 - As a transferred employee what relocation allowances must my agency pay or reimburse to me?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) 6. Home marketing incentives (part 302-14 of this chapter). 7. Relocation income tax allowance (RITA... transfer is to Alaska or Hawaii (part 302-12 of this chapter). 5. Relocation income tax allowance (RITA... (RITA) (part 302-17 of this chapter) 1 Note to Column 1, item 2: A TQSA under the DSSR may be...

  9. 77 FR 73412 - Newspapers Used for Publication of Legal Notices in the Southwestern Region, Which Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... in:--``Union County Leader'', Clayton New Mexico. Rita Blanca National Grassland in Cimarron County, Oklahoma notices published in:--``Boise City News'', Boise City, Oklahoma. Rita Blanca National Grassland... Mexico published in:--``Union County Leader'', Clayton, New Mexico. Rita Blanca National Grassland...

  10. 41 CFR 302-3.101 - As a transferred employee what relocation allowances must my agency pay or reimburse to me?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) 6. Home marketing incentives (part 302-14 of this chapter). 7. Relocation income tax allowance (RITA... transfer is to Alaska or Hawaii (part 302-12 of this chapter). 5. Relocation income tax allowance (RITA... (RITA) (part 302-17 of this chapter) 1 Note to Column 1, item 2: A TQSA under the DSSR may be...

  11. 75 FR 9244 - Fungibility Plan and Follow-Up Reporting To Implement Section 901 on Voucher Funds for Displaced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... Displaced Hurricane Katrina and Rita Families AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION... impacted by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita will submit a Notice of Intent and Section 901 Fungibility Plan to... Displaced by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. OMB Approval Number: 2577-0245. Form Numbers: None. Description...

  12. Using geospatial technology to process 911 calls after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita: Chapter 3B in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conzelmann, Craig P.; Sleavin, William; Couvillion, Brady R.

    2007-01-01

    The flooding that ensued in the Greater New Orleans area after Hurricane Katrina left thousands of victims trapped and in need of emergency rescue. This paper describes the processing of raw 911-call data into search and rescue products used by emergency responders after the storm.

  13. Wind damage and salinity effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on coastal baldcypress forests of Louisiana: Chapter 6F in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Thomas W.; Conner, William H.; Day, Richard H.; Krauss, Ken W.; Swarzenski, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    The frequency of hurricane landfall in a given coastal stretch may play a more important role in the ecology of coastal forests than previously thought because of direct and indirect impacts of fallen trees and the introduction of salt water that lingers long after the storm passes. Findings show that surge events can inundate interior freshwater forests many miles from the coast and elevate soil salinities twofold to threefold. These elevated salinities may contribute to delayed mortality of certain tree species and set the stage for eventual forest decline and dieback.

  14. Water quality of Lake Pontchartrain and outlets to the Gulf of Mexico following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita: Chapter 7E in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skrobialowski, Stanley C.; Green, W. Reed; Galloway, Joel M.

    2007-01-01

    Water-quality samples collected from drainage canals, from Lake Pontchartrain, La., and from flood waters contained contaminants typically found in waters influenced by urban runoff. Pesticides and wastewater compounds were detected in all water samples, but none exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) drinking water or aquatic life criteria. Although metals were detected in all samples, copper, nickel, and silver occurred in concentrations greater than water-quality criteria for salt water. Salinity levels in the freshwater marshes south of New Orleans were typical of Gulf of Mexico waters for an extended period of time, and levels did not return to prehurricane levels until February 2006.

  15. Effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the chemistry of bottom sediments in Lake Pontchartrain, La.: Chapter 7F in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Horowitz, Arthur J.; Mahler, Barbara J.; Foreman, William T.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Burkhardt, Mark R.; Elrick, Kent A.; Furlong, Edward T.; Skrobialowski, Stanley C.; Smith, James J.; Wilson, Jennifer T.; Zaugg, Stephen D.

    2007-01-01

    Concerns about the effect of pumping contaminated flood waters into Lake Pontchartrain following the hurricanes of 2005 prompted the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to sample street mud, canal-suspended sediment, and bottom sediment in Lake Pontchartain. The samples were analyzed for a wide variety of potential inorganic and organic contaminants. Results indicate that contamination of lake sediment relative to other urban lakes and to accepted sedimentquality guidelines was limited to a relatively small area offshore from the Metairie Outfall Canal (popularly known as the 17th Street Canal) and that this contamination is probably transient.

  16. 76 FR 26291 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ...; suggest alternatives and substitute language for your requested changes. iv. Describe any assumptions and..., spanish lime, starfruit, sugar apple, wax jambu, rambutan, and persimmon. Contact: Rita...

  17. 77 FR 2072 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Prevalence, Incidence, Epidemiology and Molecular Variants...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-13

    ...-sensitive enzyme immunoassay (``detuned'' Enzyme Immunoassay). RITA testing will be performed by the Blood... of information is necessary for the proper performance of the function of the agency,...

  18. 75 FR 21716 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Airline Service Quality Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... (RITA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In compliance with the... INFORMATION CONTACT: Bernie Stankus, Office of Airline Information, RTS-42, Room E36-303, RITA, BTS, 1200 New... Performance--Part 234. Form No.: BTS Form 234. Type of Review: Extension of a currently approved...

  19. 76 FR 39153 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Report of Traffic and Capacity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... soliciting comments on the following collection of information was published on January 27, 2011 (76 FR 4994... Administration (RITA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In compliance... INFORMATION CONTACT: Marianne Seguin, Office of Airline Information, RTS-42, Room E34-418, RITA, BTS, 1200...

  20. 76 FR 4992 - Agency Information Collection: Activity Under OMB Review: Report of Financial and Operating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... & Innovative Technology Administration (RITA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice... continuing need for and usefulness of BTS collecting financial data from large certificated air carriers... Airline Information, RTS-42, Room E36-303, RITA, BTS, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC...

  1. 76 FR 39152 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Report of Financial and Operating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... soliciting comments on the following collection of information was published on January 27, 2011 (76 FR 4993... Technology Administration (RITA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In... INFORMATION CONTACT: Jennifer Fabrizi, Office of Airline Information, RTS-42, Room E34-420, RITA, BTS,...

  2. 76 FR 39155 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Report of Financial and Operating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... (76 FR 4992). The Bureau of Economic Analysis at the Department of Commerce submitted comments in... & Innovative Technology Administration (RITA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice... E34-414, RITA, BTS, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590-0001, Telephone Number (202)...

  3. RBP-J-interacting and tubulin-associated protein induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human hepatocellular carcinoma by activating the p53–Fbxw7 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haihe; Yang, Zhanchun; Liu, Chunbo; Huang, Shishun; Wang, Hongzhi; Chen, Yingli; Chen, Guofu

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • RITA overexpression increased protein expression of p53 and Fbxw7 and downregulated the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, Hes-1 and NF-κB p65. • RITA can significantly inhibit the in vitro growth of SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells. • RITA exerts tumor-suppressive effects in hepatocarcinogenesis through induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and suggest a therapeutic application of RITA in HCC. - Abstract: Aberrant Notch signaling is observed in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and has been associated with the modulation of cell growth. However, the role of Notch signaling in HCC and its underlying mechanism remain elusive. RBP-J-interacting and tubulin-associated (RITA) mediates the nuclear export of RBP-J to tubulin fibers and downregulates Notch-mediated transcription. In this study, we found that RITA overexpression increased protein expression of p53 and Fbxw7 and downregulated the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, Hes-1 and NF-κB p65. These changes led to growth inhibition and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells. Our findings indicate that RITA exerts tumor-suppressive effects in hepatocarcinogenesis through induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and suggest a therapeutic application of RITA in HCC.

  4. Computer-Assisted Reading Intervention in a Secondary School: An Evaluation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Lisa; Fawcett, Angela J.; Nicolson, Roderick I.

    2000-01-01

    RITA (Reader's Interactive Teaching Assistant) is a computer-based literacy support system that assists, rather than replaces, the teacher in providing support tailored to each child's profile of reading attainments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of RITA in secondary school with 8 children having very seriously disadvantaged literacy…

  5. Evaluation of a Computer-based Reading Intervention in Infant and Junior Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolson, Roderick; Fawcett, Angela; Nicolson, Margaret

    2000-01-01

    Present studies using the RITA (Readers' Interactive Teaching Assistant) computer-based literacy support system. Notes that the RITA system assists, rather than replaces, the teacher in providing support tailored to each child's profile of reading attainments. Suggests that computer-assisted reading support can be effective in supporting children…

  6. 78 FR 59765 - Proposed Information Collections; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... that revised 27 CFR Part 19, Distilled Spirits Plants (see T.D. TTB-92, February 16, 2011, 76 FR 9080.... ADDRESSES: You may send comments to Rita D. Butler, Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, at any of... instructions, or copies of any comments received, contact Rita D. Butler, Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and...

  7. Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio Cholerae Paradigm (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, Rita

    2012-06-01

    Rita Colwell on "Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio cholerae paradigm" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  8. Current Perspectives on Pronunciation. Practices Anchored in Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morley, Joan, Ed.

    A collection of essays on pronunciation instruction theory and practice includes: "Teaching Pronunciation as Communication" (Marianne Celce-Murcia); "Learner Variables and Prepronunciation Considerations in Teaching Pronunciation" (Rita Wong); "Pronunciation and Listening Comprehension" (Judy B. Gilbert); "Pronunciation Tutorials for Nonnative…

  9. 78 FR 43272 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Report of Passengers Denied Confirmed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ...; Report of Passengers Denied Confirmed Space--BTS Form 251 AGENCY: Research & Innovative Technology Administration (RITA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In compliance... BTS collecting reports on the number of passengers holding confirmed reservations that voluntarily...

  10. Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio Cholerae Paradigm (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Colwell, Rita [University of Maryland

    2013-02-12

    Rita Colwell on "Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio cholerae paradigm" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  11. Celebrating Leadership in Public Health and Medicine Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM) | NIH ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Michael E. DeBakey Medical Librarian Award Rita B. Smith, MLIS, AHIP, Outreach and Education Coordinator, Mercer University Medical Library and LRC Ms. Smith was honored for her outstanding service to the ...

  12. NASA Meteor Cam Video of June 2, 2016 Arizona Fireball

    NASA Video Gallery

    Video obtained from the NASA meteor camera situated at the MMT Observatory on the site of the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, located on Mount Hopkins, Arizona, in the Santa Rita Mountains. Cred...

  13. The 'Anglo' Revolution in New Mexico Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Thomas K.

    1978-01-01

    First in a three-part series of case studies tracing the impact of the "Anglo Revolution" on New Mexico, this article deals with copper mining in New Mexico, particularly the Santa Rita del Cobre copper mine. (NQ)

  14. 77 FR 54605 - Longworth Low-Effect Habitat Conservation Plan for the Morro Shoulderband Snail, Community of Los...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... Service as endangered on December 15, 1994 (59 FR 64613). Section 9 of the Act and its implementing... application from Scott and Rita Longworth for a 10-year incidental take permit under the Endangered...

  15. 27 CFR 9.97 - Sonoita.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... area is located in Arizona. The starting point of the following boundary description is the summit of Mount Wrightson (9,543 feet) in the Santa Rita Mountains. (2) Boundary Description—(i) From the...

  16. 78 FR 28943 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Passenger Origin-Destination Survey Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... Research & Innovative Technology Administration Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Passenger Origin-Destination Survey Report AGENCY: Research & Innovative Technology Administration (RITA... including, but not limited to, publication of both Respondent's identity and its data, submission of...

  17. 77 FR 21785 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Prevalence, Incidence, Epidemiology and Molecular...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ...-sensitive enzyme immunoassay (``detuned'' Enzyme Immunoassay). RITA testing will be performed by the Blood...) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the function...

  18. What Is the Best Proximal Anastomosis for the Free Right Internal Thoracic Artery during Bilateral Internal Thoracic Artery Revascularization? A Prospective, Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Neragi-Miandoab, S; Michler, R E; Lalezarzadeh, F; Bello, R; Derose, J J

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Bilateral internal thoracic artery (BITA) grafting provides improved graft patency and potential survival advantage in selected patients as compared to single left internal thoracic artery (LITA) revascularization. The ideal functional BITA configuration remains controversial. Methods. Patients undergoing planned BITA revascularization with greater than 75% stenosis in both the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and in a circumflex branch were prospectively randomized to one of two proximal free right internal thoracic artery (RITA) connections directly off the aorta (Ao) (n = 12) or as a "t" graft off the LITA (t) (n = 12). The LITA was placed to the LAD in all cases, and the RITA was placed to a single lateral wall vessel. Intraoperative transit time flow measurements of all arterial grafts were performed, and RITA fractional flow parameters were compared between the 2 groups. Results. There were no differences in preoperative patient variables between the two groups. Cross-clamp times (91.5 + 15.3 versus 68.0 + 12.5 minutes, P < 0.01) and total cardiopulmonary bypass times (109.0 + 16.2 versus 85.0 + 15.1 minutes, P < 0.01) were shorter in the t group. The Ao group demonstrated significantly higher mean RITA flow (38.3 ± 13.5 versus 22.1 ± 9.5, P < 0.01), mean RITA conductance (flow/mean arterial pressure) (0.45 ± 0.16 versus 0.28 ± 0.11, P < 0.01), RITA fractional flow (0.52 ± 0.15 versus 0.36 ± 0.11, P < 0.01), and RITA fractional conductance (0.51 ± 0.15 versus 0.36 ± 0.11, P < 0.01) than the "t" grafted patients. Thirty-day mortality and wound infection were 0% for each group. Over an average of 42.8 + 6.6 months of followup there were no mortalities in either group. Repeat angiography were performed in 4 patients (33%) in the Ao group and 2 patients in the t group (16%). One occluded RITA graft and one ostial RITA stenosis were detected in the Ao group. Conclusions. Acute flow measurements indicate that the free RITA anastomosed to the

  19. REE, trace elements, Sr, Pb, C, and O isotopes in a zoned skarn ore deposit

    SciTech Connect

    Langmuir, C.; LeHuray, A.; Fairbanks, R.; Meinert, L.

    1985-01-01

    The Groundhog skarn in the Central Mining District, New Mexico, is zoned along its >2km length adjacent to a dike swarm which trends NE toward the Santa Rita porphyry Cu deposit. Isotopes and trace elements in whole rocks and mineral separates from skarn and adjacent carbonate allow the study of the source of the metals and the systematics of trace element behavior in a skarn system. (1) /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios are uniform (.7083 +/- 1) in the carbonate host, but they range up to .714 in hydrothermal calcite and pyx from the skarn, values distinct from both Santa Rita (.706) and carbonate. (2) delta/sup 18/O (SMOW) in carbonate ranges from (+6.3 -+ 23) and is correlated positively with delta/sup 13/C (-5.6-+2.4) and negatively with /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr. Several trace elements also correlate with delta/sup 18/O. (3) Pb isotopes in galenas lie on the regression line for southwestern New Mexico Proterozoic crust. PbS from the skarn closest to Santa Rita has isotope ratios identical to PbS from the Santa Rita pit. (4) Most of the REE are not in gar or pyx. REE abundances are <1X chondrites after HC1 leaches, but in unleached samples can be >20X chondrites. All pyx separates have deep negative Ce and very deep Eu anomalies. Sr isotopes show that neither Santa Rita magma nor carbonate is the sole source of Sr. Pb isotopes are consistent with a Santa Rita source. The Ce anomaly suggests a seawater source for the REE. The data show that many of the metals in the skarn are not derived from the Santa Rita porphyry, and suggest that different elements may be derived from different source rocks.

  20. From Solar Dimming to Solar Brightening: Observations, Modeling, Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, M.; Ohmura, A.; Feichter, J.; Stier, P.; Robock, A.; Li, H.

    2005-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the amount of solar radiation reaching the earth surface is not stable over time but exhibits significant decadal variations. These variations, in addition to the changes in thermal radiation induced by alterations in greenhouse gases, cause changes in radiative forcings which may significantly affect surface climate. Observations from the Global Energy Balanced Archive (GEBA) and Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) databases at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology suggest that surface solar radiation, after decades of dimming, reversed into a brightening since the mid 1980s at widespread locations. These changes are in line with a recovery of atmospheric transparency, possibly related to reduced aerosol loadings due to air pollution control and the breakdown of industry in formerly Communist countries. Not many GCMs currently represent aerosol effects with a degree of sophistication to capture such effects, but we used a special version of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology GCM which includes a detailed aerosol scheme, ECHAM5-HAM, to investigate the observed trends. In addition, we investigate the potential impact of the variations in surface radiation on other elements of the climate system, such as soil moisture, which shows changes in line with the changes in radiation. Reference: Wild, M., Gilgen, H., Roesch, A., Ohmura, A., Long, C., Dutton, E., Forgan, B., Kallis, A., Russak, V., Tsvetkov, A., 2005: From dimming to brightening: Decadal changes in solar radiation at the Earth's surface. Science , 308, 847-850

  1. Beetles that live with ants (Carabidae, Pseudomorphini, Pseudomorpha Kirby, 1825): A revision of the santarita species group

    PubMed Central

    Erwin, Terry L.; Amundson, Lauren M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Western Hemisphere genus Pseudomorpha Kirby 1825 was last revised by Notman in 1925 based on only a few known species (22) and paltry few specimens (73); other authors have added an additional six species represented by 53 additional specimens since 1925. Baehr (1997) assigned three species from Australia to this genus, albeit in a new subgenus, Austropseudomorpha Baehr 1997. A recent study of collections from throughout the Americas (1757 specimens) has revealed numerous new species that can be arrayed across 19 species groups based on a suite of attributes, some used by Notman and others newly discovered. A taxonomic revision of the species contained in one of these species groups, santarita, is provided herein, as well as a distributional synopsis of the remaining 18 species groups. New species described herein are as follows, each with its type locality: Pseudomorpha huachineras p. n., Arroyo El Cocono, Sierra Huachinera, Sonora, México; P. patagonia sp. n., Madera Canyon, Santa Rita Mountains, Arizona; P.penablanca sp. n., Peña Blanca Lake, Arizona; P. pima sp. n., Madera Canyon (lower), Santa Rita Mountains, Arizona; P. santacruz sp. n., Madera Canyon, Santa Rita Mountains, Arizona; and P. santarita sp. n., Santa Rita Ranch, Santa Rita Mountains, Arizona. PMID:24363599

  2. Co-operative Learning for Students with Difficulties in Learning: A Description of Models and Guidelines for Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Ellen; Grey, Ian M.; Honan, Rita

    2005-01-01

    As part of a larger study regarding the inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream classroom settings, Ellen Murphy, of the D Clin Psych programme at NUI Galway, with Ian Grey and Rita Honan, from Trinity College, Dublin, reviewed existing literature on co-operative learning in the classroom. In this article, they identify four models…

  3. Matryoshka: A new floral mutant in wild potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A population of the wild potato S. stoloniferum form fendleri (PI 660270) was collected as botanical seeds in the Santa Rita Mountains near Green Valley, Arizona, USA in fall 2010. Original seeds planted for multiplication at the genebank produced two plants with extra whorls of petals, sometimes fu...

  4. 75 FR 18567 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Omnibus Household Survey Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ... comments on the following collection of information was published on February 2, 2010 (75 FR 5370) and the... Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with the requirements of section... Manager, BTS, RITA, Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Ave. SE., Room E32-318, Washington,...

  5. 78 FR 60997 - Agency Information Collection: Activity Under OMB Review: Report of Passengers Denied Confirmed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... comments on the following collection of information was published on July 19, 2013 (FR Vol 78, No 139-43272...: Report of Passengers Denied Confirmed Space--BTS Form 251 AGENCY: Research & Innovative Technology Administration (RITA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In...

  6. 75 FR 21717 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Report of Passengers Denied Confirmed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... OMB Review; Report of Passengers Denied Confirmed Space--BTS Form 251 AGENCY: Research & Innovative Technology Administration (RITA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In... need for and usefulness of BTS collecting reports on the number of passengers holding...

  7. 78 FR 25352 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Preservation of Air carrier Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... collection of information was published on February 13, 2013 (74 FR 59018). No comments were received. DATES... Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of... of Airline Information, RTS-42, Room E34-414, RITA, BTS, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington,...

  8. 75 FR 42818 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Collection of Safety Culture Data for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... on March 12, 2010 (75 FR 11988) and the comment period ended on May 11, 2010. The 60-day notice... Administration (RITA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In compliance... important component of BTS' responsibility to the transportation community and is authorized in...

  9. 77 FR 52109 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Revision of Currently-Approved Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... the former Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), now part of the Research and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA), to former chapter XI, subchapter B of 49 CFR part 1420 (63 FR 52192). On... responsibilities (69 FR 51009). On August 10, 2006, the Secretary published a final rule (71 FR 45740)...

  10. 75 FR 3275 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Part 249, Preservation of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... the following collection of information was published on November 16, 2009 (74 FR 59018). DATES...), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In compliance with the Paperwork..., Office of Airline Information, RTS-42, Room E34-409, RITA, BTS, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE.,...

  11. 76 FR 4994 - Agency Information Collection: Activity Under OMB Review; Report of Traffic and Capacity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... Traffic and Capacity Statistics--The T-100 System AGENCY: Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT... Airline Information, RTS-42, Room E36-303, RITA, BTS, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590... statistical agency to clearly identify information it collects for non-statistical purposes. BTS...

  12. 75 FR 3274 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Passenger Origin-Destination Survey Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... the following collection of information was published on November 16, 2009 (74 FR 59018-59019). DATES...), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In compliance with the Paperwork..., Office of Airline Information, RTS-42, Room E34-409, RITA, BTS, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE.,...

  13. 75 FR 65049 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Omnibus Household Survey Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... comments on ] the following collection of information was published on February 2, 2010 (75 FR 5370) and... Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with the requirements of section... Program Manager, BTS, RITA, Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Ave. SE., Room...

  14. We're Born to Learn: Using the Brain's Natural Learning Process to Create Today's Curriculum. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smilkstein, Rita

    2011-01-01

    This updated edition of the bestselling book on the brain's natural learning process brings new research results and applications in a power-packed teacher tool kit. Rita Smilkstein shows teachers how to create and deliver curricula that help students become the motivated, successful, and natural learners they were born to be. Updated features…

  15. Vulnerable Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochner, Arthur P.

    2009-01-01

    In "Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness," Rita Charon paints an original and humane portrait of what it can mean to be a doctor, to live a life immersed in sickness and dedicated to wellness. Charon drops the veil, inviting readers to look at the secret, subjective, emotional face of medicine, a zone of self-censored feelings and…

  16. 77 FR 56840 - Environmental Impacts Statements; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... 202-493-6381. Revision to FR Notice Published 07/20/2012; Extending Comments Period from 09/20/2012 to..., Rita Blanca, Black Kettle, and McClellan Creek National Grasslands Land and Resource Management Plan... Activity Bethesda, Montgomery County, MD, Comment Period Ends: 10/29/2012, Contact: Joseph Macri 301-...

  17. Black Appalachians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waage, Fred, Ed.; Cabbell, Ed, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    This issue of "Now and Then" focuses on black Appalachians, their culture, and their history. It contains local histories, articles, and poems and short stories by Appalachian blacks. Articles include: "A Mountain Artist's Landscape," a profile of artist Rita Bradley by Pat Arnow; "A Part and Apart," a profile of black historian Ed Cabbell by Pat…

  18. Call for Papers. Correctional Education Association 1986 Annual Conference (Cincinnati, Ohio, July 6-9, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, John F., Ed.

    The 13 papers in this volume are: "Behind Bars with CBE--Look What's Happening to Inmate Training" (Beverly A. Stitt, Rita Noel); "Communication Skills: Relevance, Respect, Responsibility and the Process of Change" (Meredith Whaley); "The Educational Needs of Inmates in the Kingston Prison for Women" (Richard Volpe, Colleen Kearney); "The Effects…

  19. Reading Improvement through Art Replicator Manual of Instruction, 3rd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Sylvia K., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The Reading Improvement Through Art (RITA) program, an interdisciplinary approach to remedial reading that combines reading and visual arts activities, was evaluated in nine New York City high schools. A total of 240 students participating in the program were pre and post-tested during the Fall 1975 and Spring 1976 semesters. The results of this…

  20. "You Are a Flaw in the Pattern": Difference, Autonomy and Bullying in YA Fiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Ropero, Lourdes

    2012-01-01

    Though portrayals of bullying in children's books stretch back to Victorian public school stories, this article sees a new subgenre about bullying in young adult novels emerging in the post-Columbine years. Selected works by Jerry Spinelli, Walter Dean Myers, Jaime Adoff, Carol Plum-Ucci and Rita Williams-Garcia are examined, although the article…

  1. Academic Performance, School Desertion and Emotional Paradigm in University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa, Emma Rosa Cruz; Barrientos, Laura Gática; Castro, Patricia Eugenia García; García, Jesús Hernández

    2010-01-01

    The present work aims to describe academic performance, school desertion and the emotional paradigm of the university students of the accounting school of the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (FCPBUAP). We have found that low academic performance is related to students' economic deficiency, which affects their concentration on their…

  2. Proceedings of the Rural Early Childhood Forum on Hurricane Recovery and Emergency Preparedness (Mobile, Alabama, December 5, 2005). Rural Early Childhood Report No. 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shores, Elizabeth F., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    When Hurricanes Katrina and Rita struck the Gulf Coast of the United States in August and September 2005, it was arguably the worst calamity to strike the region in history. Less well known than the loss in life or property from these storms are the effects on early care and education. Those who work with or on behalf of young children found in…

  3. Africa Curriculum. World Neighbors in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Neighbors, Inc., Oklahoma City, OK.

    This collection of lessons about the geography, languages, and social issues of several African countries is intended for use with students in grades 6-12. The collection contains five lesson plans: (1) "Africa Physically" (Mark Stahl); (2) "Comparisons of Education in Burkina Faso, Kenya, and Oklahoma" (Rita Geiger) (Handout 1: Comparisons of…

  4. From Hospital to College: Black Nurse Leaders and the Rise of Collegiate Nursing Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hine, Darlene Clark

    1982-01-01

    Without the leadership of Estelle Osborne, Mable Staupers, Rita Miller, and Elizabeth Carnegie, Black women would have been frozen into the lowest strata of nursing at a time when White nursing leadership became convinced that nursing education belonged on college campuses rather than in hospitals. (Author/GC)

  5. Historical Trauma: Holocaust Victims, American Indians Recovering from Abuses of the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deschenie, Tina

    2006-01-01

    Natural disasters and terrorism have raised national awareness of major human trauma. In fall 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita forced hundreds of thousands of people to evacuate from their homes. Among American Indian people, these times bring to mind the trauma suffered by their ancestors: The Trail of Tears during the 1830s removed 18,000…

  6. 75 FR 60588 - Immediate Disaster Assistance Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... effects of hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma and, most recently, the Deepwater BP Oil Spill. SBA finds... loan is pending with SBA. DATES: Effective Date: October 1, 2010. Applicability Date: This rule is applicable for disasters declared on or after October 1, 2010. Comment Date: Comments must be received on...

  7. Rule-Directed Interactive Transaction Agents: An Approach to Knowledge Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterman, D. A.

    This report describes the development of computer programs called user agents, which, through interaction with users, can either learn new facts and store them in a data base or learn new procedures for data manipulation and represent them as programs. These programs are written in RITA, the Rule-directed Interactive Transaction Agent system, and…

  8. Achieving Educational Excellence in Majuro, RMI. Promising Practices in the Pacific Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Tim

    The Rita Christian School on Majuro in the Republic of the Marshall Islands is a comprehensive preK-8 program that has successfully combined factors that contribute to an effective school program for the Pacific region. Factors contributing to the school's success are community involvement, strong leadership, a committed and well-trained staff,…

  9. Language Crossings: Negotiating the Self in a Multicultural World. Language and Literacy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogulnick, Karen, Ed.

    This book includes 25 papers in 5 parts. Part 1, "Dislocations," includes (1) "Puzzle" (Myrna Nieves); (2) "No Language To Die In" (Greta Hofmann Nemiroff); (3) "Here's Your Change 'N Enjoy the Show" (Verena Stefan); (4) "The Vagabond Years" (Elizabeth Dykman); (5) "From Bayamon to Brooklyn" (Rita E. Negron Maslanek); (6) "Writing for Effect"…

  10. Crisis Data Management: A Forum Guide to Collecting and Managing Data about Displaced Students. NFES 2010-804

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Forum on Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In the aftermath of hurricanes Katrina and Rita, the immediate demand for data about displaced students overwhelmed many school districts that had gained or lost students because of the disasters. The scale of these crises and their effects on school operations and management were in many ways unprecedented. This guide reflects "lessons learned"…

  11. In the Eye of the Library: Poets at the Library of Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Ooge, Craig

    1998-01-01

    Chronicles the evolution of the position of consultant in poetry (in 1989, officially titled Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry) at the Library of Congress from the 1930s to the present. Poets highlighted include Howard Nemerov, Alan Tate, Robert Penn Warren, Robert Hayden, Joseph Brodsky, Rita Dove, and Stanley Kunitz. A sidebar discusses…

  12. The Practice of Poetry: Writing Exercises from Poets Who Teach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behn, Robin, Ed.; Twichell, Chase, Ed.

    Based on the idea that poetry, like any art, is best mastered through practice, this handbook for poets combines poetry-writing exercises with personal essays by each contributing poet. Some of the poets represented in the handbook are: Maxine Kumin, Rita Dove, Roger Mitchell, Carol Muske, Sydney Lea, and J. D. McClatchy. The exercises in the…

  13. Health Care Ethics: Dilemmas, Issues and Conflicts. Midwest Alliance in Nursing Annual Fall Workshop (6th, Indianapolis, Indiana, September 5-6, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prock, Valencia N., Ed.; And Others

    A variety of ethical issues confronting the nursing profession are examined in these proceedings. The following papers are presented: (1) "Ethics: Care & Conflict," by Leah Curtin; (2) "The Interface of Politics and Ethics in Nursing," by Mila Aroskar; (3) "Pluralistic Ethical Decision-Making," by Rita Payton; (4) "Compassion, Technology & the…

  14. Native American Languages Act. Hearing before the Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate. One Hundred Eighth Congress, First Session on S. 575 To Amend the Native American Languages Act To Provide for the Support of Native American Language Survival Schools (May 15, 2003).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs.

    This document includes statements given at this hearing by the following: William Y. Brown; John Cheek, Jennifer Chock; Rita Coosewon; David Dinwoodie; William Demmert, Jr.; Joycelyn DesRosier; Mary Hermes; Carla Herrera; Leanne Hinton; Holo Ho'opai; Hon. Daniel K. Inouye; Lawrence D. Kaplan; Keiki Kawaiaea; Rosalyn, LaPier; Lisa LaRonge; Vina…

  15. People

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    WORLD YEAR OF PHYSICS Around the world with physics Stuart Farmer; Leopold Mathelitsch; Rita Wodzinski and Michael Vollmer; Finn Ingebretsen; Mojca Cepic, Gorazd Planinsic and Mirko Cvahte; Ann-Marie Pendrill; Rajka Jurdana-Sepic INTERVIEW Close encounters of the cosmic kind David Smith talks to Frank Close BIOGRAPHIES Meet Physics Education’s family Steven Chapman and Andrea Pomroy

  16. Teachers as Leaders. Perspectives on the Professional Development of Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R., Ed.

    The 20 essays in this book provide diverse perspectives on the professional development of teachers and include: (1) "Attracting the Best and Brightest to the Teaching Profession" (James R. Hutto); (2) "Attracting Talented African-American High School Students to Careers in Education" (Rita G. Greer); (3) "A Grassroots Approach to the Recruitment…

  17. Educators Reach out to Katrina Victims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    The emotional trauma of recent events may never go away. A million people were uprooted by Hurricane Katrina, including an estimated 372,000 children of school age. Three weeks later, Hurricane Rita slammed into the Texas-Louisiana coastline, forcing thousands more to evacuate. Acute symptoms of trauma range from confusion, nightmares, and…

  18. Campus as Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current Issues in Catholic Higher Education, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Issues in Catholic higher education are considered in several articles. In "Catholic Students and Catholic Higher Education," Rita A. Scherrei summarizes research findings regarding the characteristics of incoming Catholic college students and how they compare with Jews and Traditional Protestants. Among the results are that Catholic colleges are…

  19. The CATESOL Journal, Volume 10 Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CATESOL Journal, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Articles in this issue of the professional journal of California Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (CATESOL) include: "A High School/University E-mail Partnership Project" (Rita El-Wardi, Ann Johns); "Asian International Students' Preferences for Learning in American Universities" (Jose Galvan, Yoshifumi Fukada); "Mishearings of…

  20. 75 FR 4097 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment: Tracking the Use of CDBG Homeowner...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ..., Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma caused massive devastation in the Gulf region. As of February 2006, FEMA estimated that more than 300,000 homes suffered major or severe damage from the storm. In response to the... affecting property owners' willingness and ability to rebuild or repair their storm-damaged properties....

  1. Perspectives on Current Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Hank; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Encapsulates several brief articles providing perspectives from the states, the 104th Congress, the Supreme Court, and the White House. Issues covered include the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act and the White House attempts to reduce the federal workforce. Authors include Hank Brown, Rita G. Koman, James L. Martin, and Joseph R. Marbach. (MJP)

  2. Fundraising Advice for College and University Presidents: An Insider's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Rita

    2011-01-01

    In these financially challenging times, chief executive officers of today's colleges and universities are expected to serve as their institutions' lead fundraisers. Still, many presidents remain uncomfortable in this essential role. With wisdom and insight, Rita Bornstein offers advice on how to identify, cultivate, and successfully solicit gifts…

  3. Schools Get Katrina Aid, Uncertainty: $645 Million May Not Cover Costs of Displaced Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2006-01-01

    As federal aid for students uprooted by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita begins making its way to cash-strapped school districts, many educators are worried that the money Congress allocated will fall well short of their costs. Since the hurricanes damaged hundreds of schools in the Gulf Coast region and initially dispersed nearly 375,000 students,…

  4. Hurricane Aid Is on the Way to Districts, Private Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.; Davis, Michelle R.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education in early January of 2006 sent out the first installment--more than $250 million--in education aid to states affected by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, just days after President Bush signed the measure into law. The $1.6 billion relief package has drawn fire from some education groups because it provides aid not just…

  5. Restructuring, Restoring and Rebuilding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kendra

    2006-01-01

    The 27 institutions damaged by hurricanes Katrina or Rita--there were 14 in Mississippi, 12 in Louisiana and one in Alabama--estimate their combined physical damages at $1.4 billion. But rather than providing aid, the Louisiana Legislature was forced to call for $77 million in cuts in November, leading to a wrenching gut-check on many campuses.…

  6. Citizenship: My Father's Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Paula

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experience teaching at Rita Cannan Elementary, in Reno, Nevada, and describes how she and her colleagues teach lessons on citizenship education that are part of their social studies program. She describes an approach she used, which focused on student leadership rather than teacher intervention, that led to…

  7. Helping Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Esther

    2005-01-01

    For people who are living in North America, the destruction caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita has shown them both the humbling power of natural forces and the fragility of man-made structures. The devastation to the Gulf Coast of the United States has left destruction and damage to schools and colleges and the displacement of 372,000 K-12…

  8. Politician of the Year 2008: Lifting Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2008-01-01

    This article features Mitch Landrieu and his contributions to the upliftment of Louisiana through libraries. After the onslaught of hurricanes Katrina and Rita, Landrieu said they realized how important libraries are. Now in his second term as lieutenant governor of Louisiana, Landrieu oversees the Office of the State Library along with the…

  9. Interview: Professor Helle Neergaard, President of the European Council for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, on the Nature of Creativity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industry and Higher Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    On August 13, 2014, Rita G. Klapper conducted a Skype interview with Helle Neergaard. Neergaard is not only President of the European Council for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, but also Docent at the Hanken School of Economics, and Professor at iCARE, Department of Business Administration, School of Business and Social Sciences, University…

  10. Authentic Collaborative Inquiry: Initiating and Sustaining Partner Research in the PDS Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Jennifer Hauver; Kobe, Jessica; Shealey, Glennda; Foretich, Rita; Sabatini, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    This is the story of our collaborative work as educators and researchers. Because writing as a collective is challenging, we have elected Jenn to serve as narrator, but the story is ours collectively. We are Glennda and Rita, elementary school teachers, Ellen, principal, and Jess, graduate research assistant. The story told here is distilled from…

  11. Reading Improvement through Art Replicator Manual of Instruction, 3rd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Sylvia K., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Reading Improvement Through Art (RITA) program is an interdisciplinary approach to literacy that blends visual art with reading comprehension, evaluated in nine New York City urban high schools. 240 problem readers participating in the pilot program were pre- and post-tested in the Fall 1975 and Spring 1976 semesters. The testing showed the 9th…

  12. All (Librarian) Hands on Deck: Librarians Lead the Way on the Long Journey to Recovery and Rebuilding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Marylaine; Kim, Ann

    2006-01-01

    This article describes how librarians stepped up to the plate to rescue materials and meet the needs of thousands of uprooted evacuees from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, employing their unique skills and resources to put forth a humane and herculean effort. In Houston and Austin, Texas; Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Memphis; Fayetteville, Arkansas; and…

  13. "Achtung" Maybe: A Case Study of the Role of Personal Connection and Art in the Literary Engagement of Students with Attentional Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smagorinsky, Peter; Cameron, Tricia; O'Donnell-Allen, Cindy

    2007-01-01

    This study examines a collaborative reading of John Keats's poem, "When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be," by two high school seniors with attentional difficulties in a mainstream British Literature class, with a focus on one of the students, Rita. The data consist of a retrospective verbal protocol during which the students recounted their…

  14. Schooling the Forgotten Kids of Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about students being taking in public schools in Houston and Dallas, as well as other states, after evacuating from New Orleans which was struck by Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita. For students displaced by the storm, mobility is as constant as stability is elusive. Already traumatized and faced with the loss…

  15. 49 CFR 1.25a - Redelegations by the Under Secretary of Transportation for Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...). (4) As supplemented by 14 CFR Part 385, and except as provided in §§ 1.99 (RITA), and 1.27 (General... aircraft with respect to Transportation Order T-1 (44 CFR chapter IV) under the Defense Production Act of 1950, as amended, Public Law 81-774, 64 Stat. 798 and Executive Order 10480 (3 CFR, 1949-1953 comp.,...

  16. Hurricanes' Aftermath Is Ongoing: States Work on Details for Graduations, Funds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda

    2006-01-01

    As students displaced by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita continue returning to their home school districts in Louisiana and Mississippi, tens of thousands remain scattered elsewhere in those states, in nearby states, and across the nation. Months after schools began rolling out the welcome mat for families fleeing New Orleans and other storm-ravaged…

  17. When Disaster Strikes, Move Your School Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPrairie, Kimberly N.; Hinson, Janice M.

    2007-01-01

    Hurricanes Katrina and Rita displaced thousands of K-12 students and demonstrated that when K-12 schools close unexpectedly and indefinitely, educational chaos results. Events such as deadly flu outbreaks or bioterrorist attacks will have the same impact on education. These possibilities demonstrate the need for state and local officials to begin…

  18. Sheltering Children from the Whole Truth: A Critical Analysis of an Informational Picture Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamme, Linda; Fu, Danling

    2001-01-01

    Uses Orbis Pictus Award Committee criteria (accuracy, organization, design, and style) to examine an informational book, "Rice Is Life," by Rita Golden Gelman. Subjects the book to a deeper critical analysis. Suggests that it is important to help students become critical thinkers about everything they read, including informational books. (SG)

  19. Early Literacy and Assessment for Learning (K-3) Series: Exploring Comprehension through Retelling: A Teacher's Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Resources for Education and Learning (PREL), 2005

    2005-01-01

    Rita is a Pacific island grade 2 teacher in a local village school. She has established a 90-minute daily literacy block in which she focuses on literacy-related activities. As she sits with her students during the literacy block, she realizes some of them are having difficulty comprehending text, and many are unable to retell the stories…

  20. Effect of hurricane paths on storm surge response at Tianjin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xingru; Yin, Baoshu; Yang, Dezhou

    2012-06-01

    A hurricane induced storm surge simulation system was developed for Tianjin coast, which consists of a hurricane model and a storm surge model. The peak storm surge result of the simulation agreed well with that of the observation. Three observed paths (Rita, Mimie and WINNIE) and a hypothetical path (Rita2) were chosen as the selective hurricane paths according to their positions relative to Tianjin. The sensitivity of Tianjin storm surge to the four paths was investigated using the validated storm surge simulation system. Three groups of experiments were done. In group one, the models were forced by the wind field and air pressure; in group two and three the models were forced by the wind only and the air pressure only respectively. In the experiments, the hurricane moved with a fixed speed and an intensity of 50 year return period. The simulation results show that path of the type Rita2 is the easiest to cause storm surge disaster in Tianjin, and the effect of air pressure forcing is most evident for path of the type Rita in Tianjin storm surge process. The above conclusions were analyzed through the evolution of the wind fields and the air pressure distributions. Comparing the experiment results of Group one, two and three, it can be seen that the storm surge is mainly induced by the wind forcing and the nonlinear interaction between the effect of wind forcing and air pressure forcing on the storm surge tends to weaken the storm surge.

  1. Talking with Children about Natural Disasters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodkin, Adele M.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of Hurricane Katrina, Hurricane Rita, and other natural disasters will be felt by young children in the affected areas for a long time to come. This article offers tips on how to talk with children about natural disasters in order to clear up any confusion they might have, how to answer their questions with sensitivity, and how to…

  2. 49 CFR 1.25a - Redelegations by the Under Secretary of Transportation for Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...). (4) As supplemented by 14 CFR Part 385, and except as provided in §§ 1.99 (RITA), and 1.27 (General... aircraft with respect to Transportation Order T-1 (44 CFR chapter IV) under the Defense Production Act of 1950, as amended, Public Law 81-774, 64 Stat. 798 and Executive Order 10480 (3 CFR, 1949-1953 comp.,...

  3. Reflecting on "Project Katrina" and Developmentally Appropriate Practices: A Graduate Student's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellhaas, Andree; Burts, Diane C.; Aghayan, Carol

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the independent study project of a student who was a graduate assistant in a child development laboratory preschool when Hurricanes Katrina and Rita struck the Gulf Coast area. Through her experiences with "Project Katrina" she deepens her understanding of developmentally appropriate practices as she learns firsthand about…

  4. Katrina's Children: Evidence on the Structure of Peer Effects from Hurricane Evacuees. NBER Working Paper No. 15291

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imberman, Scott; Kugler, Adriana D.; Sacerdote, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, hurricanes Katrina and Rita forced many children to relocate across the Southeast. While schools quickly enrolled evacuees, receiving families worried about the impact of evacuees on non-evacuee students. Data from Houston and Louisiana show that, on average, the influx of evacuees moderately reduced elementary math test scores in…

  5. Introducing the Lifetime Exercise and Physical Activity Service-Learning (LE PAS) Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Russell L.

    2008-01-01

    In August and September 2005, two violent hurricanes--Katrina and Rita--hit Louisiana. Hundreds of thousands of residents were relocated to temporary living communities, where most of the economically poor remain today. This state's largest trailer community, "Renaissance Village," was erected almost overnight in a cow pasture in Baker, Louisiana.…

  6. Workshop Summaries: Excite Students with Tech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Augusta; Sonstrom, Stefanie; Silvey, Patricia; Boscarino, Maryanne; Shea, Ida; Trusz, Jean; Perugini, Dorie; Krzemien, Marta; Caplette, Pamela; Lindsey, Barbara; Lindstrom, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Glastonbury Public Schools hosted the NNELL Northeast Regional Workshop on September 24, 2011 in which the theme was "Engaging Digital Natives". Rita A. Oleksak, Director of Foreign Languages/ELL and NNELL vice-president delivered the keynote speech motivating the teachers to engage foreign language learners within the classroom and across their…

  7. The Invitation of Life and Deciding How to Respond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parham, William D.

    2008-01-01

    Local, national, and global events that dominate today's media (e.g., war in Iraq, genocide in Darfur, historical lack of confidence in national political leadership, Katrina/Rita aftermath, etc.) represent open and ever-present personal invitations to "wake up" to the complex challenges that increasingly define communities across dimensions of…

  8. Gulf Coast Hurricanes: Lessons Learned for Protecting and Educating Children. Briefing for Congressional Staff. GAO-06-680R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Government Accountability Office, 2006

    2006-01-01

    In August and September 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita caused devastating damage to states along the Gulf Coast. In the aftermath of the storms, many questions were raised about the status of the thousands of children living in the affected areas. The US Government Accountability Office (GAO) prepared this preliminary information under the…

  9. Telling Katrina Stories: Problems and Opportunities in Engaging Disaster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Michael S.; Bowman, Ruth Laurion

    2010-01-01

    As the fifth anniversary of life-changing events like Hurricanes Katrina and Rita approaches, the authors talk about the problems those who reside at the site of the disaster face in keeping those events alive in public memory and in making them an ongoing issue for deliberation in the public sphere. In short, then, the authors address the…

  10. Autistic Spectrum Disorders: A Challenge and a Model for Inclusion in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Rita

    2008-01-01

    Rita Jordan, Professor in Autism Studies at the School of Education, University of Birmingham, gave last year's Gulliford Lecture at the University of Birmingham on 4 October 2007. This article is based upon that lecture. In it, Professor Jordan discusses the role of education in the lives of people with autistic spectrum disorders. She traces the…

  11. 20 African-Americans Your Students Should Meet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardeen, Tara

    2008-01-01

    There is more to Black History Month than honoring Martin Luther King Jr. Black History Month is a time to honor the significant contributions of African-Americans throughout history. This article presents 20 super-achievers new generation of African-Americans heroes students should meet: (1) Kimberly Oliver; (2) John Lewis; (3) Rita Dove; (4)…

  12. Weathering the Storms: Acknowledging Challenges to Learning in Times of Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubschman, Betty; Lutz, Marilyn; King, Christine; Wang, Jia; Kopp, David

    2006-01-01

    Students and faculty have had numerous disruptions this academic year with Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma developing into major stressors. During this innovative session, we will examine some of the challenges and strategies used by faculty to work with students to maintain empathy and academic rigor in times of stress and disruption, and…

  13. 78 FR 32645 - Notification of a Public Teleconference of the Great Lakes Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... GLAB held a teleconference and meeting on May 21-22, 2013 (as noticed in 78 FR 26636-26637) to discuss...: Any member of the public wishing further information regarding this teleconference may contact Rita Cestaric, Designated Federal Officer (DFO), GLAB, by telephone at (312) 886-6815 or email at...

  14. 49 CFR 1.25a - Redelegations by the Under Secretary of Transportation for Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...). (4) As supplemented by 14 CFR Part 385, and except as provided in §§ 1.99 (RITA), and 1.27 (General... aircraft with respect to Transportation Order T-1 (44 CFR chapter IV) under the Defense Production Act of 1950, as amended, Public Law 81-774, 64 Stat. 798 and Executive Order 10480 (3 CFR, 1949-1953 comp.,...

  15. 76 FR 18231 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... to HHS, addressed to Theresa Rita, Division of Property Management, Program Support Center, HHS, room..., DC 20405: (202) 501-0084; Interior: Mr. Michael Wright, Acquisition & Property Management, Department... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of...

  16. 76 FR 34093 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... to HHS, addressed to Theresa Rita, Division of Property Management, Program Support Center, HHS, Room... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the... identifies unutilized, underutilized, excess, and surplus Federal property reviewed by HUD for...

  17. 76 FR 3921 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-21

    ... to HHS, addressed to Theresa Rita, Division of Property Management, Program Support Center, HHS, room... Wright, Acquisition & Property Management, Department of the Interior, 1849 C Street, NW., Washington, DC... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of...

  18. Workplace/Women's Place: An Anthology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Dana

    The following papers are included: "Foreword" (Paula England); "Introduction to the Study of Women and Work" (Dana Dunn); "Gender Culture and Socialization" (Rita Mae Kelly); "Parental Influence and Women's Careers" (Sue Joan Mendelson Freeman); "Shortchanging Girls: Gender Socialization in Schools" (Peggy Orenstein); "Factors Affecting Female…

  19. Five Who Make a Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Ellen; Beatty, Mary Lou

    1997-01-01

    Profiles this year's winners of the Charles Frankel Prize, awarded to individuals who have stimulated and expanded public understanding of the humanities. The recipients are Rita Dove (poet), Doris Kearns Goodwin (historian/author), Daniel Kemmis (mayor/author), Arturo Madrid (professor), and Bill Moyers (television producer). (MJP)

  20. Scholars Who Teach: The Art of College Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahn, Steven M., Ed.

    In essays on a variety of disciplines, seven college teachers discuss the art of inspiring enthusiasm in college students. The topics are: history (Russell H. Bostert); English (Edward B. Partridge); mathematics (Robert H. Gurland); science (Arnold B. Arons); social science (Rita W. Cooley); foreign language and literature (John G. Weiger); and…

  1. A new species of Clepsis Guenee, 1845 (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) from the Sky Islands of southeastern Arizona

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clepsis sangreyana, new species, is described and illustrated from the “sky islands” (i.e., Chiricahua, Huachuca, and Santa Rita mountains) of southeastern Arizona, U.S.A. Superficially, it is most similar to Argyrotaenia dorsalana (Dyar, 1903), but it is assigned unambiguously to Clepsis Guenée on ...

  2. Literacy Instruction: Practices, Problems, Promises. Proceedings of the Annual Conference and Course on Literacy (37th, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, June 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Caryn M., Comp.; Bean, Rita M., Comp.

    This conference proceedings document contains 18 papers focusing on ideas and strategies for effective literacy instruction. Following opening remarks by Rita M. Bean, are four keynote addresses: "Toward Uncommon Sense Literacy Learning; Integrating Reading and Writing" (John Mayher); "Literacy Learning in At-Risk First Graders" (Diane DeFord);…

  3. "Feel Good" Goals of Education Schools Miss the Point, Critic Says.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicklin, Julie L

    1991-01-01

    Rita Kramer, author of "Ed School Follies," argues that education schools contribute to education's problems through poor teacher preparation and overemphasis helping students feel good about themselves. Rather than training teachers to help students master knowledge, she says, the schools are transformed into agents of social change. (MSE)

  4. 7 CFR 1430.600 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... losses and dairy spoilage losses in eligible counties as a result of Hurricanes Katrina, Ophelia, Rita, and Wilma or conditions related to those hurricanes. (b) To be eligible for this program, a producer... a 2005 hurricane or related condition thereof, or in a contiguous county to a county that...

  5. Contribution of soil lead in children: A study from New Orleans, LA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the last four years, a significant number of environmental studies have been conducted in New Orleans, LA and surrounding Gulf Coast areas due in part to the occurrence of hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Data collected from studies in the New Orleans area indicate that inorganic contaminants in...

  6. 7 CFR 1430.600 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... losses and dairy spoilage losses in eligible counties as a result of Hurricanes Katrina, Ophelia, Rita, and Wilma or conditions related to those hurricanes. (b) To be eligible for this program, a producer... a 2005 hurricane or related condition thereof, or in a contiguous county to a county that...

  7. The Impact of Child-Related Stressors on the Psychological Functioning of Lower-Income Mothers after Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Sarah R.; Chan, Christian S.; Rhodes, Jean E.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, the authors examined the role of child-related stressors in the psychological adjustment of lower-income, primarily unmarried and African American, mothers (N = 386). All participants lived in areas affected by Hurricane Katrina, and about a third were also exposed to Hurricane Rita (30.3%, n = 117). Lacking knowledge of a…

  8. 7 CFR 1430.600 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... losses and dairy spoilage losses in eligible counties as a result of Hurricanes Katrina, Ophelia, Rita, and Wilma or conditions related to those hurricanes. (b) To be eligible for this program, a producer... a 2005 hurricane or related condition thereof, or in a contiguous county to a county that...

  9. 7 CFR 1430.600 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... losses and dairy spoilage losses in eligible counties as a result of Hurricanes Katrina, Ophelia, Rita, and Wilma or conditions related to those hurricanes. (b) To be eligible for this program, a producer... a 2005 hurricane or related condition thereof, or in a contiguous county to a county that...

  10. Democrats Seek Education Department "Recovery Czar"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Michelle R.

    2006-01-01

    As congressional Democrats declared last week that federal efforts to help Gulf Coast schools with hurricane recovery aren't working, school officials from the region hit by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita last year urged lawmakers to provide more regulatory flexibility and more money. On April 26, 2006, House Democrats released a report criticizing…

  11. Revisiting the Gulf Coast after Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In August 2005, the world witnessed one of the most destructive natural disasters on America's mainland. Hurricane Katrina, followed a month later by Hurricane Rita, brought more than broken levees, flooded streets and homes, and destroyed businesses. It caused changes in the dynamics and the demographic and cultural makeup of the region. One of…

  12. School Nurse Resilience: Experiences after Multiple Natural Disasters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Lisa; Myers, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative descriptive study explored the experiences of school nurses in coastal Louisiana, who were affected by Hurricanes Gustav and Ike in 2008 and who had also been in the path of destruction caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. The purpose of the study was to describe the experiences of school nurses affected by repeated…

  13. Watered by Tempests: Hurricanes in the Cultural Fabric of the United Houma Nation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Oney, J. Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Hurricanes Katrina and Rita affected hundreds of thousands in southern Louisiana. To say that they touched people of every stripe and color dramatically is a gross understatement. Aside from the loss of life and property damage, families were uprooted, traditions disrupted, and one of the largest migrations in American history forced on a state…

  14. 7 CFR 1430.600 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... losses and dairy spoilage losses in eligible counties as a result of Hurricanes Katrina, Ophelia, Rita, and Wilma or conditions related to those hurricanes. (b) To be eligible for this program, a producer... a 2005 hurricane or related condition thereof, or in a contiguous county to a county that...

  15. Steps to Developing the New Orleans Strategic Energy Plan (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation was given by NREL's Elizabeth Doris (Brown) to the New Orleans City Council in January 2008. NREL was funded by DOE to provide technical assistance to New Orleans after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The presentation provides an overview of strategic energy planning, case studies, and suggested next steps for implementing energy efficiency and renewable energy into the city's rebuilding efforts.

  16. 78 FR 18445 - Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Capital Financing Program; Modification of Terms...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... and Conditions of Gulf Hurricane Disaster Loans; Notice #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No. 58...; Modification of Terms and Conditions of Gulf Hurricane Disaster Loans AGENCY: Department of Education... institutions affected by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita under the Historically Black College and University...

  17. 75 FR 362 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Great Lakes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... Accountability System; EPA ICR No. 2379.01, OMB Control No. 2005-NEW AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA...; telephone number: (312) 886-6815; fax number: (312) 697-2014; e- mail address: cestaric.rita@epa.gov or... Initiative funding. Title: Great Lakes Accountability System. ICR numbers: EPA ICR No. 2379.01, OMB...

  18. Adult Education Research Conference. Proceedings (26th, Tempe, Arizona, March 22-24, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Univ., Tempe.

    These proceedings contain the texts of the following 44 papers: "Adult Development in Midlife, Childless Women" (Rita Keneipp); "Analysis of the Relationship between Cognitive Style (Field Dependence-Field Independence) and Level of Learning" (Eugene Tootle); "Reconceptualizing Adult Education Participation" (Peter Cookson); "Adulthood:…

  19. 77 FR 38803 - Request for Nominations to the Great Lakes Advisory Board (GLAB)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... AGENCY Request for Nominations to the Great Lakes Advisory Board (GLAB) AGENCY: Environmental Protection.... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is seeking nominations from a diverse range of qualified candidates to be... nominations by mail to: Rita Cestaric, Designated Federal Officer, US Environmental Protection......

  20. Seroconverting Blood Donors as a Resource for Characterising and Optimising Recent Infection Testing Algorithms for Incidence Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Kassanjee, Reshma; Welte, Alex; McWalter, Thomas A.; Keating, Sheila M.; Vermeulen, Marion; Stramer, Susan L.; Busch, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Biomarker-based cross-sectional incidence estimation requires a Recent Infection Testing Algorithm (RITA) with an adequately large mean recency duration, to achieve reasonable survey counts, and a low false-recent rate, to minimise exposure to further bias and imprecision. Estimating these characteristics requires specimens from individuals with well-known seroconversion dates or confirmed long-standing infection. Specimens with well-known seroconversion dates are typically rare and precious, presenting a bottleneck in the development of RITAs. Methods The mean recency duration and a ‘false-recent rate’ are estimated from data on seroconverting blood donors. Within an idealised model for the dynamics of false-recent results, blood donor specimens were used to characterise RITAs by a new method that maximises the likelihood of cohort-level recency classifications, rather than modelling individual sojourn times in recency. Results For a range of assumptions about the false-recent results (0% to 20% of biomarker response curves failing to reach the threshold distinguishing test-recent and test-non-recent infection), the mean recency duration of the Vironostika-LS ranged from 154 (95% CI: 96–231) to 274 (95% CI: 234–313) days in the South African donor population (n = 282), and from 145 (95% CI: 67–226) to 252 (95% CI: 194–308) days in the American donor population (n = 106). The significance of gender and clade on performance was rejected (p−value = 10%), and utility in incidence estimation appeared comparable to that of a BED-like RITA. Assessment of the Vitros-LS (n = 108) suggested potentially high false-recent rates. Discussion The new method facilitates RITA characterisation using widely available specimens that were previously overlooked, at the cost of possible artefacts. While accuracy and precision are insufficient to provide estimates suitable for incidence surveillance, a low-cost approach for preliminary

  1. Bioinvasion: a paradigm shift from marine to inland ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Neeshma; Malhotra, Anshu; Malhotra, Sandeep K

    2016-06-01

    Anisakidosis is one of the most fearsome zoonotic food borne disease in aquaculture. The natural infections by anisakidoids or related variety in freshwater fish are not known, though sporadic experimental reports are available abroad (Butcher and Shamsi 2011). Invasive severity of anisakidoids in fish from Gangetic riverine ecosystems, i.e., in river Ganges at Fatehpur and Allahabad, as well as in river Yamuna at Allahabad, and molecular heterogeneity among these worms have been extensively investigated. The pathways of transmission of non-native alien species due to long distance migratory habits of Rita rita, man-made alterations including dredging in long stretches of the river bed of Ganges to facilitate ballast water transfer mechanism owing to the commercial ship movements between Haldia and Allahabad; and sudden water chemistry (salinity, hardness, alkalinity) alteration (due particularly to rainy period) oriented micro-fauna interchange are identified, and remedial measures suggested. PMID:27413303

  2. Withholding nutrition on the conscious mentally disabled patient: a review and commentary.

    PubMed

    Veatch, Robert M

    2002-01-01

    A recent important and poorly publicized legal case in California raised the question of whether the wife of a severely mentally disabled man could intentionally withhold medically supplied nutrition from him on the grounds that it was no longer providing benefits. Rita L. Marker has published a detailed case report and analysis. The readers of the Newsletter on Ethics and Intellectual Disability should know about her analysis. A summary is presented here together with some observations about the issues the case raises. Readers are encouraged to consult the original article: Rita L. Marker, "Mental Disability and Death by Dehydration." National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 2 (Spring 2002): 125-36. All quotations are from the Marker analysis. PMID:16018105

  3. Tactile Sensory Supplementation of Gravitational References to Optimize Sensorimotor Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Paloski, W. H.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Wood, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    Integration of multi-sensory inputs to detect tilts relative to gravity is critical for sensorimotor control of upright orientation. Displaying body orientation using electrotactile feedback to the tongue has been developed by Bach-y- Rita and colleagues as a sensory aid to maintain upright stance with impaired vestibular feedback. This investigation has explored the effects of Tongue Elecrotactile Feedback (TEF) for control of posture and movement as a sensorimotor countermeasure, specifically addressing the optimal location of movement sensors.

  4. Disaster Relief Informatics: Access to KatrinaHealth.org Prescription Data via OQO Ultra Mobile PC and Cellular Wireless Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Enoch

    2006-01-01

    The flooding brought on by the twin storms of Katrina & Rita wrecked havoc on the healthcare delivery system of New Orleans. A million patients were displaced, and their paper records were rendered useless by water damage. Many physicians volunteered their efforts at caring for the displaced but very few had access to the patient prescription records aggregated by the DHHS at the KatrinaHealth.org website. PMID:17238507

  5. The Road to Remarkable: Directed by Vision, Driven by Strength--2010 Five-Year Report of the Policy and Planning Board

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Policy and Planning Board of the American Psychological Association (APA) was chaired by Elena J. Eisman, EdD. Other members of the board included Gwyneth M. Boodoo, PhD; G. Rita Dudley-Grant, PhD; Beverly Greene, PhD; Christopher W. Loftis, PhD; Michael J. Murphy, PhD; Paul D. Nelson, PhD; Kurt Salzinger, PhD; and Michael Wertheimer,…

  6. Caring about community, ecology and the lives of women.

    PubMed

    Severinghaus, Margarita Ruiz

    2013-10-01

    The front lines of caring extend far beyond U.S. borders. Some holistic nurses are using their skill and knowledge to create sustainable change in other countries. With the help of her local Vermont community, AHNA member Margarita (Rita) Severinghaus is applying the principles and values of holistic nursing to improve women's lives in her mother's childhood village in the Dominican Republic. PMID:24575518

  7. Occurrence, bioaccumulation and risk assessment of dioxin-like PCBs along the Chenab river, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah; Cincinelli, Alessandra; Mehmood, Adeel; Malik, Riffat Naseem; Zhang, Gan

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to assess the occurrence, distribution and dietary risks of seven dl-PCBs (dioxin-like PCBs) in eleven collected fish species from Chenab river, Pakistan. ∑7dl-PCBs (ng g(-1), wet weight) burden was species-specific and the maximum average concentrations were found in Mastacembelus armatus (5.43), and Rita rita (5.1). Correlation of each dl-PCBs with δ(15)N%, indicated a food chain accumulation process of these chemicals into Chenab river, Pakistan. Species-specific toxicity of each dl-PCBs (WHO-PCBs TEQ) was calculated and higher values were found in three carnivore fish species i.e., M. armatus (2.5 pg TEQ g(-1)), R. rita (2.47 pg TEQ g(-1)), Securicola gora (2.98 pg TEQ g(-1)) and herbivore fish species i.e., Cirrhinus mrigala (2.44 pg TEQ g(-1)). The EDI (Estimated Daily Intake) values in most cases exceeded the WHO benchmark (4 pg WHO-TEQ kg(-1) bw d(-1)) evidencing a potential health risk for consumers via fish consumption from Chenab river. PMID:26342456

  8. Motion of the plasma critical layer during relativistic-electron laser interaction with immobile and comoving ion plasma for ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, Aakash A.

    2014-05-15

    We analyze the motion of the plasma critical layer by two different processes in the relativistic-electron laser-plasma interaction regime (a{sub 0}>1). The differences are highlighted when the critical layer ions are stationary in contrast to when they move with it. Controlling the speed of the plasma critical layer in this regime is essential for creating low-β traveling acceleration structures of sufficient laser-excited potential for laser ion accelerators. In Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) scheme, the heavy plasma-ions are fixed and only trace-density light-ions are accelerated. The relativistic critical layer and the acceleration structure move longitudinally forward by laser inducing transparency through apparent relativistic increase in electron mass. In the Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) scheme, the whole plasma is longitudinally pushed forward under the action of the laser radiation pressure, possible only when plasma ions co-propagate with the laser front. In RPA, the acceleration structure velocity critically depends upon plasma-ion mass in addition to the laser intensity and plasma density. In RITA, mass of the heavy immobile plasma-ions does not affect the speed of the critical layer. Inertia of the bared immobile ions in RITA excites the charge separation potential, whereas RPA is not possible when ions are stationary.

  9. Autophagy induced by p53-reactivating molecules protects pancreatic cancer cells from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Claudia; Menegazzi, Marta; Padroni, Chiara; Dando, Ilaria; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Gregorelli, Alex; Costanzo, Chiara; Palmieri, Marta; Donadelli, Massimo

    2013-03-01

    TP53 mutations compromising p53 transcriptional function occur in more than 50 % of human cancers, including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and render cancer cells more resistant to conventional therapy. In the last few years, many efforts have been addressed to identify p53-reactivating molecules able to restore the wild-type transcriptionally competent conformation of the mutated proteins. Here, we show that two of these compounds, CP-31398 and RITA, induce cell growth inhibition, apoptosis, and autophagy by activating p53/DNA binding and p53 phosphorylation (Ser15), without affecting the total p53 amount. These effects occur in both wild-type and mutant p53 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, whereas they are much less pronounced in normal human primary fibroblasts. Furthermore, CP-31398 and RITA regulate the axis SESN1-2/AMPK/mTOR by inducing AMPK phosphorylation on Thr172, which has a crucial role in the autophagic response. The protective role of autophagy in cell growth inhibition by CP-31398 and RITA is supported by the finding that the AMPK inhibitor compound C or the autophagy inhibitors chloroquine or 3-methyladenine sensitize both pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines to the apoptotic response induced by p53-reactivating molecules. Our results demonstrate for the first time a survival role for autophagy induced by p53-reactivating molecules, supporting the development of an anti-cancer therapy based on autophagy inhibition associated to p53 activation. PMID:23238993

  10. Landscape-Scale Analysis of Wetland Sediment Deposition from Four Tropical Cyclone Events

    PubMed Central

    Tweel, Andrew W.; Turner, R. Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Gustav, and Ike deposited large quantities of sediment on coastal wetlands after making landfall in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We sampled sediments deposited on the wetland surface throughout the entire Louisiana and Texas depositional surfaces of Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Gustav, and the Louisiana portion of Hurricane Ike. We used spatial interpolation to model the total amount and spatial distribution of inorganic sediment deposition from each storm. The sediment deposition on coastal wetlands was an estimated 68, 48, and 21 million metric tons from Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Gustav, respectively. The spatial distribution decreased in a similar manner with distance from the coast for all hurricanes, but the relationship with distance from the storm track was more variable between events. The southeast-facing Breton Sound estuary had significant storm-derived sediment deposition west of the storm track, whereas sediment deposition along the south-facing coastline occurred primarily east of the storm track. Sediment organic content, bulk density, and grain size also decreased significantly with distance from the coast, but were also more variable with respect to distance from the track. On average, eighty percent of the mineral deposition occurred within 20 km from the coast, and 58% was within 50 km of the track. These results highlight an important link between tropical cyclone events and coastal wetland sedimentation, and are useful in identifying a more complete sediment budget for coastal wetland soils. PMID:23185635

  11. Motion of the plasma critical layer during relativistic-electron laser interaction with immobile and comoving ion plasma for ion accelerationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Aakash A.

    2014-05-01

    We analyze the motion of the plasma critical layer by two different processes in the relativistic-electron laser-plasma interaction regime (a0>1). The differences are highlighted when the critical layer ions are stationary in contrast to when they move with it. Controlling the speed of the plasma critical layer in this regime is essential for creating low-β traveling acceleration structures of sufficient laser-excited potential for laser ion accelerators. In Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) scheme, the heavy plasma-ions are fixed and only trace-density light-ions are accelerated. The relativistic critical layer and the acceleration structure move longitudinally forward by laser inducing transparency through apparent relativistic increase in electron mass. In the Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) scheme, the whole plasma is longitudinally pushed forward under the action of the laser radiation pressure, possible only when plasma ions co-propagate with the laser front. In RPA, the acceleration structure velocity critically depends upon plasma-ion mass in addition to the laser intensity and plasma density. In RITA, mass of the heavy immobile plasma-ions does not affect the speed of the critical layer. Inertia of the bared immobile ions in RITA excites the charge separation potential, whereas RPA is not possible when ions are stationary.

  12. CRISPR-Cas9-based target validation for p53-reactivating model compounds

    PubMed Central

    Wanzel, Michael; Vischedyk, Jonas B; Gittler, Miriam P; Gremke, Niklas; Seiz, Julia R; Hefter, Mirjam; Noack, Magdalena; Savai, Rajkumar; Mernberger, Marco; Charles, Joël P; Schneikert, Jean; Bretz, Anne Catherine; Nist, Andrea; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor by Mdm2 is one of the most frequent events in cancer, so compounds targeting the p53-Mdm2 interaction are promising for cancer therapy. Mechanisms conferring resistance to p53-reactivating compounds are largely unknown. Here we show using CRISPR-Cas9–based target validation in lung and colorectal cancer that the activity of nutlin, which blocks the p53-binding pocket of Mdm2, strictly depends on functional p53. In contrast, sensitivity to the drug RITA, which binds the Mdm2-interacting N terminus of p53, correlates with induction of DNA damage. Cells with primary or acquired RITA resistance display cross-resistance to DNA crosslinking compounds such as cisplatin and show increased DNA cross-link repair. Inhibition of FancD2 by RNA interference or pharmacological mTOR inhibitors restores RITA sensitivity. The therapeutic response to p53-reactivating compounds is therefore limited by compound-specific resistance mechanisms that can be resolved by CRISPR-Cas9-based target validation and should be considered when allocating patients to p53-reactivating treatments. PMID:26595461

  13. Building Energy-Efficient Schools in New Orleans: Lessons Learned (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This case study presents the lessons learned from incorporating energy efficiency in the rebuilding and renovating of New Orleans K-12 schools after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Hurricane Katrina was the largest natural disaster in the United States, striking the Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, and flooding 80% of New Orleans; to make matters worse, the city was flooded again only three weeks later by the effects of Hurricane Rita. Many of the buildings, including schools, were heavily damaged. The devastation of schools in New Orleans from the hurricanes was exacerbated by many years of deferred school maintenance. This case study presents the lessons learned from incorporating energy efficiency in the rebuilding and renovating of New Orleans K-12 schools after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The experiences of four new schools-Langston Hughes Elementary School, Andrew H. Wilson Elementary School (which was 50% new construction and 50% major renovation), L.B. Landry High School, and Lake Area High School-and one major renovation, Joseph A. Craig Elementary School-are described to help other school districts and design teams with their in-progress and future school building projects in hot-humid climates. Before Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans had 128 public schools. As part of the recovery planning, New Orleans Public Schools underwent an assessment and planning process to determine how many schools were needed and in what locations. Following a series of public town hall meetings and a district-wide comprehensive facility assessment, a Master Plan was developed, which outlined the renovation or construction of 85 schools throughout the city, which are expected to be completed by 2017. New Orleans Public Schools expects to build or renovate approximately eight schools each year over a 10-year period to achieve 21st century schools district-wide. Reconstruction costs are estimated at nearly $2 billion.

  14. Rep. Bill Nelson during space food and consumables orientation and suit fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Rita Rapp, a flight coordinator, briefs U.S. Rep. Bill Nelson (D.-Florida) on space food during an orientation session in the life sciences laboratory at JSC (27753); Rep. Nelson tries on a glove during a suit fitting session (27754); Rep. Nelson samples a package of re-hydratable fruit in the life sciences laboratory during early STS 61-C training (27755); Rep. Nelson listens to Laura Louviere brief him on hygiene articles soon after reporting to Houston for STS 61-C training. On the table in front of him is a tube marked Palmalive, a tube marked Gillette and various other articles (27756).

  15. The failed attribution of the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology to Viktor Hamburger for the discovery of Nerve Growth Factor.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-06-01

    The announcement in October 1986 that the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine was to awarded to Rita Levi Montalcini and Stanley Cohen for the discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and epidermal growth factor, respectively, caused many to wonder why Viktor Hamburger in whose laboratory the initial work was done had not been included in the award. This article try to reconstruct the history of the discovery of NGF with the aim to re-establish a correct dynamic of the events. PMID:26930162

  16. Whole-House Design and Commissioning in the Project Home Again Hot-Humid New Construction Community

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrigan, Philip

    2012-09-01

    Building Science Corporation has been working with Project Home Again since 2008 and has consulted on the design of around 100 affordable, energy efficient new construction homes for victims of hurricanes Katrina and Rita. This report details the effort on the final two phases of the project: Phases V and VI, which resulted in a total of 25 homes constructed in 2011. The goal of this project was to develop and implement an energy efficiency package that will achieve at least 20% whole house source energy savings improvement over the B10 Benchmark.

  17. Whole-House Design and Commissioning in the Project Home Again Hot-Humid New Construction Community

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrigan, P.

    2012-09-01

    BSC has been working with Project Home Again since 2008 and has consulted on the design of around 100 affordable, energy efficient new construction homes for victims of hurricanes Katrina and Rita. This report details the effort on the final two phases of the project: Phases V and VI which resulted in a total of 25 homes constructed in 2011. The goal of this project was to develop and implement an energy efficiency package that will achieve at least 20% whole house source energy savings improvement over the B10 Benchmark.

  18. [Women in natural sciences--Nobel Prize winners].

    PubMed

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Mustajbegović, Jadranka; Lipozencić, Jasna; Kolcić, Ivana; Spoljar-Vrzina, Sanja; Polasek, Ozren

    2006-01-01

    Alfred Bernhard Nobel was the founder of the Nobel Foundation, which has been awarding world-known scientists since 1901, for their contribution to the welfare of mankind. The life and accomplishments of Alfred Bernhard Nobel are described as well as scientific achivements of 11 women, Nobel prize winners in the field of physics, chemistry, physiology and/or medicine. They are Marie Sklodowska Curie, Maria Goeppert Mayer, Irene Joliot-Curie, Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, Gerty Theresa Radnitz Cori, Rosalyn Sussman Yalow, Barbara McClintock, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Gertrude Elion, Christine Nusslein-Volhard and Linda B. Buck. PMID:16802565

  19. Evaluation of reforestation using remote sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Filho, P. H.; Shimabukuro, Y. E.; Dossantos, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The utilization of remotely sensed orbital data for forestry inventory. The study area (approximately 491,100 ha) encompasses the municipalities of Ribeirao Preto, Altinopolis, Cravinhos, Serra Azul, Luis Antonio, Sao Simao, Sant Rita do Passa Quatro and Santa Rosa do Viterbo (Sao Paulo State). Materials used were LANDSAT data from channels 5 and 7 (scale 1:250,000) and CCT's. Visual interpretation of the imagery showed that for 1977 a total of 37,766.00 ha and for 1979 38,003.75 ha were reforested with Pinus and Eucalyptus within the area under study. The results obtained show that LANDSAT data can be used efficiently in forestry inventory studies.

  20. Predicting fluoride and chloride concentrations of hydrothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Chen )

    1992-01-01

    A new method of predicting F and Cl concentrations of hydrothermal fluids has been developed, which can be used to study water-rock interactions in a variety of hydrothermal, metamorphic, and magnetic processes. This method is based on a comprehensive assessment of thermodynamic partitioning of F-Cl-OH between minerals and hydrothermal fluids. The calculation method is explained. Fluid compositions obtained by applying this method to amphibolites from Hunts Brook Fault Zone, Connecticut, and to Santa Rita porphyry copper deposits, New Mexico, are similar to results obtained by metasomatism modeling and from fluid inclusion studies.

  1. Lagrangian coherent structures in hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipinski, Doug; Mohseni, Kamran

    2011-11-01

    We present the results of a ``surface tracking'' algorithm for efficiently computing Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) surfaces in three dimensions. The algorithm is applied to data from a Weather Research and Forecasting simulation of hurricane Rita. The highly complicated LCS surfaces reveal complex dynamics and transport in the hurricane, particularly in the lower atmosphere boundary layer and the upper level outflow. The lower level transport in the hurricane is of particular importance for accurate intensity prediction in hurricane forecasts due to the uncertainty in the ocean-atmosphere interaction. Understanding the lower level transport and mixing behavior in hurricanes could lead to significant advances in hurricane intensity prediction.

  2. Coastal hurricane damage assessment via wavelet transform of remotely sensed imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowsey, Ricky Carl

    This dissertation uses post storm imagery processed using wavelet transforms to investigate the capability of wavelet transform-based methods to classify post storm damage of residential areas. Five level Haar, Meyer, Symlets, and Coiflets wavelet transform decompositions of the post storm imagery are inputs to damage classification models of post hurricane and tornado damage. Hurricanes Ike, Rita, Katrina, and Ivan are examined as are the 2011 Joplin and Tuscaloosa tornadoes. Wavelet transform-based classification methods yielded varying classification accuracies for the four hurricanes examined, ranging from 67 percent to 89 percent classification accuracy for classification models informed by samples from the storms classified. Classification accuracies fall when the samples being classified are from a hurricane not informing the classification model, from 17 percent for Rita classified with an Ike-based model, 41 percent for Rita classified with an Ike-Katrina-based model, to 69 percent for Rita classified with an Ike-Katrina-Ivan-based model. The variability within and poor classification accuracy of these models can be attributed to the large variations in the four hurricane events studied and the significant differences in impacted land cover for each of these storms. Classification accuracies improved when these variations were limited via examination of residential areas impacted by 2011 Joplin and Tuscaloosa tornadoes. Damage classification models required as few as nineteen to as many as fifty nine wavelet coefficients to explain the variability in the hurricane storm data samples, and included all four wavelet functions studied. A similar analysis of the tornado damaged areas resulted in a damage classification model with only six wavelet coefficients, four Meyer-based, one Symlets-based and one Haar-based. Classification accuracies ranged from 96 percent for samples included in the model formation to 85 percent for samples not included in the model

  3. Crustal strain accumulation on Southern Basin and Range Province faults modulated by distant plate boundary earthquakes? Evidence from geodesy, seismic imaging, and paleoseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, R. A.; Shirzaei, M.; Broermann, J.; Spinler, J. C.; Holland, A. A.; Pearthree, P.

    2014-12-01

    GPS in Arizona reveals a change in the pattern of crustal strain accumulation in 2010 and based on viscoelastic modeling appears to be associated with the distant M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah (EMC) earthquake in Baja California, Mexico. GPS data collected between 1999 and 2009 near the Santa Rita normal fault in SE Arizona reveal a narrow zone of crustal deformation coincident with the fault trace, delineated by W-NW facing Pleistocene fault scarps of heights 1 to 7 m. The apparent deformation zone is also seen in a preliminary InSAR interferogram. Total motion across the zone inferred using an elastic block model constrained by the pre-2010 GPS measurements is ~1 mm/yr in a sense consistent with normal fault motion. However, continuous GPS measurements throughout Arizona reveal pronounced changes in crustal velocity following the EMC earthquake, such that the relative motion across the Santa Rita fault post-2010 is negligible. Paleoseismic evidence indicates that mapped Santa Rita fault scarps were formed by two or more large magnitude (M6.7 to M7.6) surface rupturing normal-faulting earthquakes 60 to 100 kyrs ago. Seismic refraction and reflection data constrained by deep (~800 m) well log data provide evidence of progressive, possibly intermittent, displacement on the fault through time. The rate of strain accumulation observed geodetically prior to 2010, if constant over the past 60 to 100 kyrs, would imply an untenable minimum slip rate deficit of 60 to 100 m since the most recent earthquake. One explanation for the available geodetic, seismic, and paleoseismic evidence is that strain accumulation is modulated by viscoelastic relaxation associated with frequent large magnitude earthquakes in the Salton Trough region, episodically inhibiting the accumulation of elastic strain required to generate large earthquakes on the Santa Rita and possibly other faults in the Southern Basin and Range. An important question is thus for how long the postseismic velocity changes

  4. The X-Ray Spectra of Blazars: Analysis of the Complete EXOSAT Archive: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Barr, Paul; Giommi, Paolo; Maraschi, Laura; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Treves, Aldo

    1995-07-01

    In the paper "The X-Ray Spectra of Blazars: Analysis of the Complete EXOSAT Archive" by Rita M. Sambruna, Paul Barr, Paolo Giommi, Laura Maraschi, Gianpiero Tagliaferri, and Aldo Treves (ApJS, 95,371 [1994]), the section regarding the object PKS 1510-08 (Section 4.4.14) contains an erroneous quotation. K. P. Singh, A.R. Rao, and M.N. Vahia (ApJ, 365,455 [1990]) in fact detected: emission line only in the 1984 data, and not in the 1985 spectrum, as stated.

  5. Estimating reforestation by means of remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Filho, P. H.; Shimabukuro, Y. E.; Dossantos, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    LANDSAT imagery at the scale of 1:250.000 and obtained from bands 5 and 7 as well as computer compatible tapes were used to evaluate the effectiveness of remotely sensed orbital data in inventorying forests in a 462,100 area of Brazil emcompassing the cities of Ribeirao, Altinopolis Cravinhos, Serra Azul, Luis Antonio, Sao Simao, Santa Rita do Passa Quatro, and Santa Rosa do Viterbo. Visual interpretation of LANDSAT imagery shows that 37,766 hectares (1977) and 38,003.75 hectares (1979) were reforested areas of pine and eucalyptus species. An increment of 237.5 hectares was found during this two-year time lapse.

  6. A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Spears, Michael; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-10-01

    The report outlines the methodology used to develop a web-based tool to assess the formaldehyde exposure of the occupants of Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) temporary housing units (THUs) after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. Linear regression models were built using available data to retrospectively estimate the indoor temperature and relative humidity, formaldehyde emission factors and concentration, and hence the formaldehyde exposures. The interactive web-tool allows the user to define the inputs to the model to evaluate formaldehyde exposures for different scenarios.

  7. Surviving the storms: Emergency preparedness in Texas nursing facilities and assisted living facilities.

    PubMed

    Castro, Carmen; Persson, Diane; Bergstrom, Nancy; Cron, Stanley

    2008-08-01

    This study assesses the preparedness of long-term care facilities in Texas responding to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. A 41-item questionnaire was mailed to facilities; the response rate was 42%. Among responding facilities, 4513 residents were evacuated, and 6% of respondents reported resident death. Financial losses were reported by 8% of nursing facilities and 45% of assisted living facilities due to transportation and staff overtime. Respondents indicated the need for improved disaster preparednesstraining, better coordination, and transportation. Changes in policy and practice will lead to better trained staff who will provide the care residents need for improved health outcomes during future public health disasters. PMID:18714601

  8. Effects of solar dimming and brightening on the terrestrial carbon sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, L.; Bellouin, N.; Sitch, S.; Boucher, O.; Huntingford, C.; Wild, M.; Cox, P. M.

    2009-04-01

    photosynthesis for climate model applications. Tellus Series B-Chemical and Physical Meteorology, 59, 553-565. Niyogi D., Chang H.I., Saxena V.K., Holt T., Alapaty K., Booker F., Chen F., Davis K.J., Holben B., Matsui T., Meyers T., Oechel W.C., Pielke R.A., Wells R., Wilson K. & Xue Y.K. (2004) Direct observations of the effects of aerosol loading on net ecosystem CO2 exchanges over different landscapes. Geophysical Research Letters, 31. Oliveira P.H.F., Artaxo P., Pires C., De Lucca S., Procopio A., Holben B., Schafer J., Cardoso L.F., Wofsy S.C. & Rocha H.R. (2007) The effects of biomass burning aerosols and clouds on the CO2 flux in Amazonia. Tellus Series B-Chemical and Physical Meteorology, 59, 338-349. Roderick M.L., Farquhar G.D., Berry S.L. & Noble I.R. (2001) On the direct effect of clouds and atmospheric particles on the productivity and structure of vegetation. Oecologia, 129, 21-30. Stanhill G. & Cohen S. (2001) Global dimming: a review of the evidence for a widespread and significant reduction in global radiation with discussion of its probable causes and possible agricultural consequences. 107, 255-278. Wild M., Gilgen H., Roesch A., Ohmura A., Long C.N., Dutton E.G., Forgan B., Kallis A., Russak V. & Tsvetkov A. (2005) From dimming to brightening: Decadal changes in solar radiation at Earth's surface. Science, 308, 847-850.

  9. Changes in Surface Radiation and Associated Effects on Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, M.

    2005-12-01

    recent absence of solar dimming may have allowed the greenhouse effect to finally develop at full size, as seen in accelerated temperature increases in the 1990s. The rate of temperature change at land surfaces has increased by an order of magnitude in the period 1985-2002 where solar dimming was absent, compared to the period with significant dimming (1958-1985). In the 1990s, more energy may therefore have been available at the surface compared to earlier decades, favoring, for example, an accelerated retreat of worldwide glaciers, or higher evaporation in areas of unlimited water supply and associated reduced soil moisture tendencies, with associated implications for the global hydrological cycle. Reference: Wild, M., Gilgen, H., Roesch, A., Ohmura, A., Long, C., Dutton, E., Forgan, B., Kallis, A., Russak, V., Tsvetkov, A., 2005: From dimming to brightening: Decadal changes in solar radiation at the Earth's surface. Science , 308, 847-850.

  10. Photodynamic injury of isolated crayfish neuron and surrounding glial cells: the role of p53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifulina, S. A.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    The pro-apoptotic transcription factor p53 is involved in cell responses to injurious impacts. Using its inhibitor pifithrin- α and activators tenovin-1, RITA and WR-1065, we studied its potential participation in inactivation and death of isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor neuron and satellite glial cells induced by photodynamic treatment, a strong inducer of oxidative stress. In dark, p53 activation by tenovin-1 or WR-1065 shortened activity of isolated neurons. Tenovin-1 and WR-1065 induced apoptosis of glial cells, whereas pifithrin-α was anti-apoptotic. Therefore, p53 mediated glial apoptosis and suppression of neuronal activity after axotomy. Tenovin-1 but not other p53 modulators induced necrosis of axotomized neurons and surrounding glia, possibly, through p53-independent pathway. Under photodynamic treatment, p53 activators tenovin-1 and RITA enhanced glial apoptosis indicating the pro-apoptotic activity of p53. Photoinduced necrosis of neurons and glia was suppressed by tenovin-1 and, paradoxically, by pifithrin-α. Modulation of photoinduced changes in the neuronal activity and necrosis of neurons and glia was possibly p53-independent. The different effects of p53 modulators on neuronal and glial responses to axotomy and photodynamic impact were apparently associated with different signaling pathways in neurons and glial cells.

  11. The Clustering of Galaxies and Dark Matter at Intermediate Redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Bhuvnesh; Szalay, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Theoretical work in the study of weak lensing was begun while the Scientific PI (Jain) was at the Johns Hopkins University. A new postdoctoral fellow, Rita Kim, was hired to work for 0.5 years on the proposed research. She was unable to join JHU until March 2001 owing to delays in her PhD work. Meanwhile PI Jain moved to the University of Pennsylvania in January 2001. Owing to the above circumstances, the work for the proposed research was delayed and was expected to be carried out in the remainder of 2001. New measures of lensing based on the magnification effect were to be investigated by Drs. Jain and Kim. The simulations needed to test the analytical computations were already in place; hence the work was expected to proceed fairly rapidly. Owing to the close proximity of JHU and UPenn, the collaborative work was expected to proceed smoothly. It was requested therefore that the funds for the first grant year (2000-2001) be transferred to the second year. Part of the funding was spent at JHU on the salary for the Postdoctoral Fellow, Rita Kim, and the remainder at the University of Pennsylvania. The work from this grant is incomplete and will be continued under another grant.

  12. Immunosympathectomy as the first phenotypic knockout with antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, Antonino

    2013-01-01

    In a PNAS Classic Article published in 1960, Rita Levi-Montalcini offered formal and conclusive proof that endogenous NGF was responsible for the survival of sympathetic neurons in vivo. Thus ended an experimental tour de force lasting a decade, starting with the demonstration that a humoral factor, produced from a tumor transplanted in a chicken embryo, was responsible for stimulating outgrowth of nerve fibers from sympathetic and sensory neurons. From a more general methodological point of view, this work provided a breakthrough in the quest to achieve targeted loss of function and experimentally validate the function of biological molecules. Finally, this work provided an example of the ablation of a specific neuronal subpopulation in an otherwise intact nervous system, an immunological knife of unsurpassed effectiveness and precision. The novelty and the importance of the PNAS Classic Article is discussed here, collocating it within the context of the particular moment of the NGF discovery saga, of Rita Levi-Montalcini's scientific and academic career, and of the general scientific context of those years. This seminal work, involving the use of antibodies for phenotypic knockout in vivo, planted seeds that were to bear new fruit many years later with the advent of monoclonal antibodies and recombinant antibody technologies. PMID:23515328

  13. Surgical anatomy of the internal thoracic arteries and their branching pattern: a cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Paliouras, Dimitrios; Rallis, Thomas; Gogakos, Apostolos; Asteriou, Christos; Chatzinikolaou, Fotios; Georgios, Tagarakis; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andreas; Sachpekidis, Nikolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Organtzis, John; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Barbetakis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to review the anatomic characteristics of internal thoracic artery (ITA) and its branches, in order to pursue the extension of its utilization and avoid intraoperative and postoperative complications. Methods The study was carried out on anterior chest walls obtained during routine autopsies of 50 specimens (30 male, 20 female). Macroscopic and microscopic dissection was performed and the following were studied: origin, length and termination of ITA, size and distance from the sternum, and types of branches. Results From the origin to the termination point, the length of the left internal thoracic artery (LITA) varied from 159 to 220 mm; with a mean of 182.60 mm. The length of the right internal thoracic artery (RITA) varied from 150 to 231 mm; with a mean of 185 mm. Four types of branches were distinguished. The RITA mean diameter was 2.31 mm, measured at the 2nd intercostal space, while the distance from the sternum was 12.77 mm, measured at the 3rd intercostal space. The LITA mean diameter was 1.98 mm with the distance from the sternum measured at 12.01 mm. Conclusions ITA has become the primary conduit for cardiac bypass surgery; many studies have generated fundamental anatomical knowledge for its clinical utilization, which is always useful in order to avoid intraoperative and postoperative complications. PMID:26488008

  14. Aerial rapid assessment of hurricane damages to northern Gulf coastal habitats: Chapter 5A in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michot, Thomas C.; Wells, Christopher J.; Chadwick, Paul C.

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina made landfall in southeast Louisiana on August 29, 2005, and Hurricane Rita made landfall in southwest Louisiana on September 24, 2005. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) flew aerial surveys to assess damages to natural resources and to lands owned and managed by the U.S. Department of the Interior and other agencies. Flights were made on eight dates from August 27 through October 4, including one pre-Katrina, three post-Katrina, and four post-Rita surveys. The geographic area surveyed extended from Galveston, Tex., to Gulf Shores, Ala., and from the Gulf of Mexico shoreline inland 5-75 mi (8-121 km). Impacts to barrier island habitats were severe, especially at the Chandeleur Islands, which were reduced in land area by roughly 50 percent. Marsh impacts varied but were greatest in St. Bernard and Cameron Parishes, where much emergent vegetation was scoured or killed. Forested wetlands were impacted heavily, especially in the Pearl River basin and on the cheniers of southwest Louisiana.

  15. U.S. IOOS coastal and ocean modeling testbed: Inter-model evaluation of tides, waves, and hurricane surge in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, P. C.; Donahue, A. S.; Westerink, J. J.; Luettich, R. A.; Zheng, L. Y.; Weisberg, R. H.; Huang, Y.; Wang, H. V.; Teng, Y.; Forrest, D. R.; Roland, A.; Haase, A. T.; Kramer, A. W.; Taylor, A. A.; Rhome, J. R.; Feyen, J. C.; Signell, R. P.; Hanson, J. L.; Hope, M. E.; Estes, R. M.; Dominguez, R. A.; Dunbar, R. P.; Semeraro, L. N.; Westerink, H. J.; Kennedy, A. B.; Smith, J. M.; Powell, M. D.; Cardone, V. J.; Cox, A. T.

    2013-10-01

    A Gulf of Mexico performance evaluation and comparison of coastal circulation and wave models was executed through harmonic analyses of tidal simulations, hindcasts of Hurricane Ike (2008) and Rita (2005), and a benchmarking study. Three unstructured coastal circulation models (ADCIRC, FVCOM, and SELFE) validated with similar skill on a new common Gulf scale mesh (ULLR) with identical frictional parameterization and forcing for the tidal validation and hurricane hindcasts. Coupled circulation and wave models, SWAN+ADCIRC and WWMII+SELFE, along with FVCOM loosely coupled with SWAN, also validated with similar skill. NOAA's official operational forecast storm surge model (SLOSH) was implemented on local and Gulf scale meshes with the same wind stress and pressure forcing used by the unstructured models for hindcasts of Ike and Rita. SLOSH's local meshes failed to capture regional processes such as Ike's forerunner and the results from the Gulf scale mesh further suggest shortcomings may be due to a combination of poor mesh resolution, missing internal physics such as tides and nonlinear advection, and SLOSH's internal frictional parameterization. In addition, these models were benchmarked to assess and compare execution speed and scalability for a prototypical operational simulation. It was apparent that a higher number of computational cores are needed for the unstructured models to meet similar operational implementation requirements to SLOSH, and that some of them could benefit from improved parallelization and faster execution speed.

  16. Secondary eyewall formation as a progressive boundary layer response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarca, S. F.; Montgomery, M. T.; Bell, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    The robust observational (satellite based) evidence that secondary eyewalls are common features in major hurricanes contrasts with the scarce in situ observations of the phenomena and its life cycle. This lack of observations has resulted in an incomplete understanding of the dynamics of secondary eyewall formation (SEF). A wide variety of physical processes have been invoked to explain SEF, but only the recently proposed theory of a progressive boundary layer control in SEF has been supported by a variety of full physics mesoscale numerical integrations. The RAINEX field project provided unique observations of the secondary eyewall of Hurricane Rita (2005) both before and during the time Rita exhibited a clear secondary eyewall structure. These observations have contributed to the advancement of the understanding of the secondary eyewall phenomenon. However, in the RAINEX experiment, there was limited data sampling during the development of the secondary wind maxima, thereby precluding a complete observational investigation of the dynamics of SEF. In this presentation we adopt an azimuthally-averaged perspective of the flow dynamics and we test the newly proposed theory of a progressive boundary layer control on SEF. Specifically, we use both RAINEX data as well as data from high resolution, full physics mesoscale numerical simulations to initialize and force an axisymmetric slab boundary layer model with radial diffusion included. The objective is to investigate whether such a reduced boundary layer model can generate secondary wind maxima as a response to environments like those that result in SEF in nature and in full physics simulations.

  17. Monitoring duration and extent of storm-surge and flooding in Western Coastal Louisiana marshes with Envisat ASAR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, E.; Lu, Zhiming; Suzuoki, Y.; Rangoonwala, A.; Werle, D.

    2011-01-01

    Inundation maps of coastal marshes in western Louisiana were created with multitemporal Envisat Advanced Synthetic Aperture (ASAR) scenes collected before and during the three months after Hurricane Rita landfall in September 2005. Corroborated by inland water-levels, 7 days after landfall, 48% of coastal estuarine and palustrine marshes remained inundated by storm-surge waters. Forty-five days after landfall, storm-surge inundated 20% of those marshes. The end of the storm-surge flooding was marked by an abrupt decrease in water levels following the passage of a storm front and persistent offshore winds. A complementary dramatic decrease in flood extent was confirmed by an ASAR-derived inundation map. In nonimpounded marshes at elevations 80cm during the first month after Rita landfall. After this initial period, drainage from marshes-especially impounded marshes-was hastened by the onset of offshore winds. Following the abrupt drops in inland water levels and flood extent, rainfall events coinciding with increased water levels were recorded as inundation re-expansion. This postsurge flooding decreased until only isolated impounded and palustrine marshes remained inundated. Changing flood extents were correlated to inland water levels and largely occurred within the same marsh regions. Trends related to incremental threshold increases used in the ASAR change-detection analyses seemed related to the preceding hydraulic and hydrologic events, and VV and HH threshold differences supported their relationship to the overall wetland hydraulic condition. ?? 2010 IEEE.

  18. Building capacity for health disparity research at minority institutions.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, J; Flagg-Newton, J L

    2001-11-01

    The science and technology enterprise of the United States has consistently produced seminal work and cutting-edge technologies. It has responded promptly to both new opportunities and urgent crises. The success of this enterprise derives largely from the diversity of the types of institutions doing the work and from the many sources of public and private funding available to accomplish it. To those who argue that public-sector funds should support only the best science at the premier research institutions on the nation's East and West coasts, Dr. Rita Colwell, the director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) eloquently responds, "No one region, no one group of institutions, and no special communities have a corner on the market of good and great ideas, smart people, or outstanding researchers. Great ideas can come from just about anywhere." PMID:11721796

  19. Building capacity for health disparity research at minority institutions.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, J; Flagg-Newton, J L

    2001-11-01

    The science and technology enterprise of the United States has consistently produced seminal work and cutting-edge technologies. It has responded promptly to both new opportunities and urgent crises. The success of this enterprise derives largely from the diversity of the types of institutions doing the work and from the many sources of public and private funding available to accomplish it. To those who argue that public-sector funds should support only the best science at the premier research institutions on the nation's East and West coasts, Dr. Rita Colwell, the director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) eloquently responds, "No one region, no one group of institutions, and no special communities have a corner on the market of good and great ideas, smart people, or outstanding researchers. Great ideas can come from just about anywhere." PMID:11876184

  20. Leaf development in Xylopia aromatica (Lam) Mart. (Annonaceae): implications for palatability to Stenoma scitiorella Walker 1864 (Lepidoptera: Elachistidae).

    PubMed

    Varanda, E M; Costa, A A; Barosela, J R

    2008-11-01

    Variations in specific foliar mass and water content, nitrogen, soluble carbohydrates and tannins were studied during the growth and maturation processes of the Xylopia aromatica leaves, to determine the effects of such alterations on the herbivory of Stenoma scitiorella caterpillars. This work was carried out in the physiognomy of the typical cerrado of the Parque Estadual de Vassununga, Gleba Pé-de Gigante, Santa Rita do Passa Quatro, São Paulo State, Brazil. While nutritional quality (water and nitrogen) decreases during expansion and maturation of Xylopia aromatica leaves, the chemical (tannins) and physical (sclerophylly) defenses are raised. In agreement with the observations on herbivory, the results support the hypothesis that the reduction in palatability and increase in chemical defenses of Xylopia aromatica leaves account for the caterpillars' preference for young expanding leaves. PMID:19197502

  1. Mineral resources of Peru's ancient societies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, W.E.

    2003-01-01

    Northern Peru has an exceptionally rich archaeological heritage that includes metalwork, ceramics and textiles. The success of at least a half-dozen pre-Columbian societies dating back 3,000 years and subsequent Spanish colonization in the 1400s has rested on the effective use of northern Peru's abundant resources. In the summer of 2000, my son Matt and I learned about that connection firsthand by volunteering at the Santa Rita B archaeological site in the Chao Valley near Trujillo in northern Peru. Riding donkey-back through the Andes and talking with local people, we got our hands dirty in the rich archaeology and geology of the area. We were able to correlate mineral occurrences to their various roles in society - opening a window into the region's fascinating past. From construction to metallurgy, pre-Columbian societies flourished and advanced because of their understanding and use of the available mineral resources.

  2. 'P-cadherin functional role is dependent on E-cadherin cellular context: a proof of concept using the breast cancer model'.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    This article corrects: P-cadherin functional role is dependent on E-cadherin cellular context: a proof of concept using the breast cancer model Volume 229, Issue 5, 705–718, Article first published online: 24 January 2013. By Ana Sofia Ribeiro, Bárbara Sousa, Laura Carreto, Nuno Mendes, Ana Rita Nobre, Sara Ricardo, André Albergaria, Jorge F Cameselle-Teijeiro, Rene Gerhard, Ola Söderberg, Raquel Seruca, Manuel A Santos, Fernando Schmitt and Joana Paredes, J Pathol 2013; 229: 708–718. DOI: 10.1002/path.4143. The above article, published online on 24 January 2013 on Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). The funding information, “This work was also funded by FEDER funds through the Operational Programme for Competitiveness Factors - COMPETE (FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-021209).” was omitted from the Acknowledgements section. We apologise for any inconvenience caused. PMID:27071484

  3. The Entrance of Quantum Mechanics in Italy:. from Garbasso to Fermi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Matteo; Robotti, Nadia

    2006-06-01

    The first steps of quantum mechanics in Italy will be here discussed, through the use of the available archives and printed sources. As it will be shown, this development was closely linked with a spectroscopy tradition of research, whose major protagonists were three physicists working in Tuscany during the first two decades of the century, namely Antonio Garbasso, who worked in Arcetri (Florence) on the theoretical basis of the recently discovered Stark Effect (1913-14); Rita Brunetti, in Arcetri as well, who made use of the quantum theory in order to explain the X-rays emission (1918-20); and, finally, the young Enrico Fermi, who paid attention to the quantum theory since his days at the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa (1918-22).

  4. Freshwater river diversions for marsh restoration in Louisiana: Twenty-six years of changing vegetative cover and marsh area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, Michael S.; Riter, J. C. Alexis; Turner, R. Eugene

    2011-08-01

    The restoration of Louisiana's coastal wetlands will be one of the largest, most costly and longest environmental remediation projects undertaken. We use Landsat data to show that freshwater diversions, a major restoration strategy, have not increased vegetation and marsh coverage in three freshwater diversions operating for ˜19 years. Two analytic methods indicate no significant changes in either relative vegetation or overall marsh area from 1984 to 2005 in zones closest to diversion inlets. After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, these zones sustained dramatic and enduring losses in vegetation and overall marsh area, whereas the changes in similar marshes of the adjacent reference sites were relatively moderate and short-lived. We suggest that this vulnerability to storm damage reflects the introduction of nutrients in the freshwater diversions (that add insignificant amounts of additional sediments), which promotes poor rhizome and root growth in marshes where below-ground biomass historically played the dominant role in vertical accretion.

  5. Hurricane Influences on Vegetation Community Change in Coastal Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steyer, Gregory D.; Cretini, Kari Foster; Piazza, Sarai C.; Sharp, Leigh Anne; Snedden, Gregg A.; Sapkota, Sijan

    2010-01-01

    The impacts of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 on wetland vegetation were investigated in Louisiana coastal marshes. Vegetation cover, pore-water salinity, and nutrients data from 100 marsh sites covering the entire Louisiana coast were sampled for two consecutive growing seasons after the storms. A mixed-model nested ANOVA with Tukey's HSD test for post-ANOVA multiple comparisons was used to analyze the data. Significantly (p<0.05) lower vegetation cover was observed within brackish and fresh marshes in the west as compared to the east and central regions throughout 2006, but considerable increase in vegetation cover was noticed in fall 2007 data. Marshes in the west were stressed by prolonged saltwater logging and increased sulfide content. High salinity levels persisted throughout the study period for all marsh types, especially in the west. The marshes of coastal Louisiana are still recovering after the hurricanes; however, changes in the species composition have increased in these marshes.

  6. Perception-action relationships reconsidered in light of spatial display instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebilske, Wayne L.

    1989-01-01

    Spatial display instruments convey information about both the identity and the location of objects in order to assist surgeons, astronauts, pilots, blind individuals, and others in identification, remote manipulations, navigation, and obstacle avoidance. Scientists believe that these instruments have not reached their full potential and that progress toward new applications, including the possibility of restoring sight to the blind, will be accelerated by advancing the understanding of perceptual processes. This stimulating challenge to basic researchers was advanced by Paul Bach-Y-Rita (1972) and by the National Academy of Science (1986) report on Electronic Aids for the Blind. Although progress has been made, new applications of spatial display instruments in medicine, space, aviation, and rehabilitation await improved theoretical and empirical foundations.

  7. Protecting worker and public health during responses to catastrophic disasters-learning from the World Trade Center experience.

    PubMed

    Newman, David M

    2014-11-01

    Despite incremental lessons learned since 9/11, responder and community health remain at unnecessary risk during responses to catastrophic disasters, as evidenced during the BP Deepwater Horizon spill and Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Sandy. Much of the health harm that occurs during disaster response, as distinct from during the disaster event itself, is avoidable. Protection of public health should be an integral component of disaster response, which should "do no additional harm." This commentary examines how challenges and gaps the World Trade Center response resulted in preventable occupational and environmental health harm. It proposes changes in disaster response policies to better protect the health of rescue and recovery workers, volunteers, and impacted worker and residential communities. PMID:25255981

  8. Active Atlantic Basin Hurricane Forecast Adds to Concerns About Gulf Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-06-01

    During the 6-month Atlantic Basin hurricane season that began on 1 June, there could be between 14 and 23 named storms with top winds of at least 39 miles per hour (mph) in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, according to a forecast issued in late May by the Climate Prediction Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service. The forecast indicates that the named storms could include eight to 14 hurricanes with top winds of at least 74 mph and three to seven major hurricanes with top winds of at least 111 mph. In comparison, the seasonal average is 11 named storms, six hurricanes, and two major hurricanes. The busiest hurricane season on record was 2005, with 28 named storms, including hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

  9. Coherence of Auger and inter-Coulombic decay processes in the photoionization of Ar@C60 versus Kr@C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; De, Ruma; Javani, Mohammad H.; Madjet, Mohamed E.; Manson, Steven T.; Chakraborty, Himadri S.

    2016-04-01

    For the asymmetric spherical dimer of an endohedrally confined atom and a host fullerene, an innershell vacancy of either system can decay through the continuum of an outer electron hybridized between the systems. Such decays, viewed as coherent superpositions of the single-center Auger and two-center inter-Coulombic (ICD) amplitudes, are found to govern leading decay mechanisms in noble-gas endofullerenes, and are likely omnipresent in this class of nanomolecules. A comparison between resulting autoionizing resonances calculated in the photoionization of Ar@C60 and Kr@C60 exhibits details of the underlying processes. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  10. Numerical models of cell death in RF ablation with monopolar and bipolar probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Benjamin M.; Pearce, John A.

    2013-02-01

    Radio frequency (RF) is used clinically to treat unresectible tumors. Finite element modeling has proven useful in treatment planning and applicator design. Typically isotherms in the middle 50s °C have been used as the parameter of assessment in these models. We compare and contrast isotherms for multiple known Arrhenius thermal damage predictors including collagen denaturation, vascular disruption, liver coagulation and cell death. Models for RITA probe geometries are included in the study. Comparison to isotherms is sensible when the activation time is held constant, but varies considerably when heating times vary. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of looking at specific processes and keeping track of the methods used to derive the Arrhenius coefficients in order to study the extremely complex cell death processes due to thermal therapies.

  11. Microgrid Reliability Modeling and Battery Scheduling Using Stochastic Linear Programming

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; DeForest, Nicholas; Barbosa-Povoa, Ana; Ferrao, Paulo

    2013-05-23

    This paper describes the introduction of stochastic linear programming into Operations DER-CAM, a tool used to obtain optimal operating schedules for a given microgrid under local economic and environmental conditions. This application follows previous work on optimal scheduling of a lithium-iron-phosphate battery given the output uncertainty of a 1 MW molten carbonate fuel cell. Both are in the Santa Rita Jail microgrid, located in Dublin, California. This fuel cell has proven unreliable, partially justifying the consideration of storage options. Several stochastic DER-CAM runs are executed to compare different scenarios to values obtained by a deterministic approach. Results indicate that using a stochastic approach provides a conservative yet more lucrative battery schedule. Lower expected energy bills result, given fuel cell outages, in potential savings exceeding 6percent.

  12. Investigation into impact of tropical cyclones on the ionosphere using GPS sounding and NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakova, A. S.; Perevalova, N. P.

    2011-10-01

    Ionospheric response to tropical cyclones (TCs) was estimated experimentally on the example of three powerful cyclones - KATRINA (23-31 August 2005), RITA (18-26 September 2005), and WILMA (15-25 October 2005). These TCs were active near the USA Atlantic coast. Investigation was based on Total Electron Content (TEC) data from the international network of two-frequency ground-based GPS receivers and the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis data. We studied the spatial-temporal dynamics of wave TEC disturbances over two periods of ranges (02-20 min and 20-60 min). To select the ionospheric disturbances which were most likely to be associated with the cyclones, maps of TEC disturbances were compared with those of meteorological parameters.

  13. The reduction of storm surge by vegetation canopies: Three-dimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y. Peter; Lapetina, Andrew; Ma, Gangfeng

    2012-10-01

    Significant buffering of storm surges by vegetation canopies has been suggested by limited observations and simple numerical studies, particularly following recent Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma. Here we simulate storm surge and inundation over idealized topographies using a three-dimensional vegetation-resolving storm surge model coupled to a shallow water wave model and show that a sufficiently wide and tall vegetation canopy reduces inundation on land by 5 to 40 percent, depending upon various storm and canopy parameters. Effectiveness of the vegetation in dissipating storm surge and inundation depends on the intensity and forward speed of the hurricane, as well as the density, height, and width of the vegetation canopy. Reducing the threat to coastal vegetation from development, sea level rise, and other anthropogenic factors would help to protect many coastal regions against storm surges.

  14. The hyperfine excitation of OH radicals by He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinakis, Sarantos; Kalugina, Yulia; Lique, François

    2016-04-01

    Hyperfine-resolved collisions between OH radicals and He atoms are investigated using quantum scattering calculations and the most recent ab initio potential energy surface, which explicitly takes into account the OH vibrational motion. Such collisions play an important role in astrophysics, in particular in the modelling of OH masers. The hyperfine-resolved collision cross sections are calculated for collision energies up to 2500 cm-1 from the nuclear spin free scattering S-matrices using a recoupling technique. The collisional hyperfine propensities observed are discussed. As expected, the results from our work suggest that there is a propensity for collisions with ΔF = Δj. The new OH-He hyperfine cross sections are expected to significantly help in the modelling of OH masers from current and future astronomical observations. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  15. Gulf of Mexico Initiative: NASA Capacity Building in the Gulf Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D.; Graham, W. D.; Searby, N. D.

    2012-12-01

    In the wake of hurricanes Katrina and Rita, NASA created the Gulf of Mexico Initiative (GOMI) to help the region recover and to build the capacity of local and regional organizations to utilize NASA Earth science assets to establish effective policies, encourage sustainable natural resource management and utilization, and to expeditiously respond to crises. GOMI worked closely with the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA), a regional collaboration of the five US Gulf states and 13 federal agencies, to select projects that addressed high priority issues of the region. Many capabilities developed by this initiative have been adopted by end-users and have been leveraged to respond to other natural and man made disasters such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (2010), record breaking floods along the Mississippi River (2011), unprecedented tornado supercells (2011), and extreme drought (2012). Examples of successful capacity building projects will be presented and the lessons learned from these projects will be discussed.

  16. Correlation equation for the marine drag coefficient and wave steepness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, Richard J.; Emeis, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    This work questions, starting from dimensional considerations, the generality of the belief that the marine drag coefficient levels off with increasing wind speed. Dimensional analysis shows that the drag coefficient scales with the wave steepness as opposed to a wave-age scaling. A correlation equation is employed here that uses wave steepness scaling at low aspect ratios (inverse wave steepnesses) and a constant drag coefficient at high aspect ratios. Invoked in support of the correlation are measurements sourced from the literature and at the FINO1 platform in the North Sea. The correlation equation is then applied to measurements recorded from buoys during the passage of hurricanes Rita, Katrina (2005) and Ike (2008). Results show that the correlation equation anticipates the expected levelling off in deeper water, but a drag coefficient more consistent with a Charnock type relation is also possible in more shallower water. Some suggestions are made for proceeding with a higher-order analysis than that conducted here.

  17. Improving Scatterometry Retrievals of Wind in Hurricanes Using Non-Simultaneous Passive Microwave Estimates of Precipitation and a Split-Step Advection/Convection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fore, Alex; Haddad, Ziad S.; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Rodgridez, Ernesto

    2012-03-01

    One of the current problems in the accurate estimation of over-ocean wind from scatterometry observations is the proper accounting for precipitation. Specific cases such as hurricanes are particularly difficult, because precipitation in the eye wall and rain bands can be quite heavy, and therefore, affect the scatterometer signatures so drastically that a category-4 hurricane can appear, to the scatterometer, to have category-1 winds. We have developed an approach to infer and account for the signature of the precipitation from non-simultaneous passive-microwave measurements of rain, with the help of geostationary IR measurements. In this note, we describe the basic approach, and the results of applying it to the data taken by the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission Microwave Imager measurements several hours before and after the QuikSCAT observation of Hurricane Rita in September 2005. We also describe how we are enhancing the approach with more realism in the assimilation of the IR information.

  18. Web-based CERES Clouds QC Property Viewing Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Churngwei Chu1, Rita Smith1, Sunny Sun-Mack1, Yan Chen1, Elizabeth Heckert1, Patrick Minnis21 Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton, Virginia2 NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia This presentation will display the capabilities of a web-based CERES cloud property viewer. Aqua/Terra/NPP data will be chosen for examples. It will demonstrate viewing of cloud properties in gridded global maps, histograms, time series displays, latitudinal zonal images, binned data charts, data frequency graphs, and ISCCP plots. Images can be manipulated by the user to narrow boundaries of the map as well as color bars and value ranges, compare datasets, view data values, and more. Other atmospheric studies groups will be encouraged to put their data into the underlying NetCDF data format and view their data with the tool.

  19. Return or relocate? An inductive analysis of decision-making in a disaster.

    PubMed

    Henry, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    This paper proposes an inductive analysis of the decision as to whether to return or to relocate by persons in the State of Louisiana, United States, who evacuated after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in August and September 2005, respectively. Drawing on interviews with evacuees in these events and extensive fieldwork in the impacted area, the paper seeks to identify the folk dimensions of the decision-making process, assess their arrangements, and situate the process in the larger context of risk and resilience in an advanced society. It suggests that, despite the material and emotional upheaval experienced by affected persons, the decision-making process is a rational endeavour combining a definite set of tightly interconnected factors, involving material dimensions and substantive values that can act in concert or in conflict. In addition, it indicates that there are significant variations by geographic areas, homeownership, and kind of decision. Some theoretical implications, practical measures, and suggestions for future research are examined. PMID:23278427

  20. Comprehensive care for vulnerable elderly veterans during disasters.

    PubMed

    Claver, Maria; Dobalian, Aram; Fickel, Jacqueline J; Ricci, Karen A; Mallers, Melanie Horn

    2013-01-01

    Despite problematic evacuation and sheltering of nursing home residents during Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, an exploration of the experiences of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) nursing homes (VANHs) is necessary for a comprehensive examination of the healthcare community's response to these disasters. VANH evacuations during these hurricanes have not been widely studied. This exploratory project aimed to provide information about the evacuation experiences and characteristics of vulnerable nursing home residents. Interviews with key informants from VHA facilities with nursing home staff and representatives revealed that physical harm, psychological distress, cognitive decline and increased social isolation were areas that deserved special attention for this vulnerable population. Moreover, physical, psychological and social needs were interconnected in that each influenced the others. Findings contribute to the general conversation about meeting the biopsychosocial needs of nursing home residents in an integrated healthcare delivery system and more broadly, the role of long-term care facilities in general in planning for future disasters. PMID:22901664

  1. Tour by Saudi prince Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud prior to mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Tour by Saudi prince Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud, payload specialists for STS 51-G mission, prior to mission. Al-Saud and Abdulmohsen Hamad Al-Bassam, the backup payload specialist, man the controls on the flight deck of the crew compartment trainer in the Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory (29788); the Saudi payload specialists share the hatch of the crew compartment trainer (29789); Portrait view of Abdulmohsen Hamad Al-Bassam during a visit to the Shuttle mockup and integraion laboratory (29790); Don Sirroco, left, explains the middeck facilities in the Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory (29791); Portrait view of Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud in the Shuttle Mockup and Integration laboratory (29792); The Saudi payload specialists witness a space food demonstration in the life sciences laboratory at JSC. Al-Saud (left) and Al-Bassam (second left) listen as Rita M. Rapp, food specialist, discusses three preparations of re-hydratable food for space travelers. Lynn S. Coll

  2. Forecasting hurricane impact on coastal topography: Hurricane Ike

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Stockdon, Hilary F.; Sallenger,, Asbury H., Jr.; Turco, Michael J.; East, Jeffery W.; Taylor, Arthur A.; Shaffer, Wilson A.

    2010-01-01

    Extreme storms can have a profound impact on coastal topography and thus on ecosystems and human-built structures within coastal regions. For instance, landfalls of several recent major hurricanes have caused significant changes to the U.S. coastline, particularly along the Gulf of Mexico. Some of these hurricanes (e.g., Ivan in 2004, Katrina and Rita in 2005, and Gustav and Ike in 2008) led to shoreline position changes of about 100 meters. Sand dunes, which protect the coast from waves and surge, eroded, losing several meters of elevation in the course of a single storm. Observations during these events raise the question of how storm-related changes affect the future vulnerability of a coast.

  3. Reasons for declining computerized insulin protocol recommendations: application of a framework

    PubMed Central

    Sward, K.; Orme, J.; Sorenson, D.; Baumann, L.; Morris, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical decision support systems (CDS) can interpret detailed treatment protocols for ICU care providers. In open loop systems, clinicians can decline protocol recommendations. We capture their reasons for declining as part of ongoing, iterative protocol validation and refinement processes. Even though our protocol was well-accepted by clinicians overall, noncompliance patterns revealed potential protocol improvement targets, and suggested ways to reduce barriers impeding software use. We applied Rita Kukafka and colleagues' (2003) IT implementation framework to identify and categorize reasons documented by ICU nurses when declining recommendations from an insulin-titration protocol. Two methods were used to operationalize the framework: reasons for declining recommendations from actual software use, and a nurse questionnaire. Applying the framework exposed limitations of our data sources, and suggested ways to address those limitations; and facilitated our analyses and interpretations. PMID:18499528

  4. Delivery of Mental Health Care in a Large Disaster Shelter.

    PubMed

    North, Carol S; King, Richard V; Fowler, Raymond L; Kucmierz, Rita; Wade, Jess D; Hogan, Dave; Carlo, John T

    2015-08-01

    Large numbers of evacuees arrived in Dallas, Texas, from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita just 3 weeks apart in 2005 and from Hurricanes Gustav and Ike just 3 weeks apart again in 2008. The Dallas community needed to locate, organize, and manage the response to provide shelter and health care with locally available resources. With each successive hurricane, disaster response leaders applied many lessons learned from prior operations to become more efficient and effective in the provision of services. Mental health services proved to be an essential component. From these experiences, a set of operating guidelines for large evacuee shelter mental health services in Dallas was developed, with involvement of key stakeholders. A generic description of the processes and procedures used in Dallas that highlights the important concepts, key considerations, and organizational steps was then created for potential adaptation by other communities. PMID:26008136

  5. Restoring resilience to the Gulf of Mexico coast: Chapter 1A in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Gregory J.

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina and its destructive aftermath in 2005 were unprecedented. Hurricanes Dennis, Rita, and Wilma were also powerful hurricanes affecting the Gulf of Mexico that year. These storms highlighted the need to integrate science that supports restoration of natural landscapes with intelligent coastal planning. The following essay describes both the value and vulnerability of the Gulf of Mexico's northern coast before the storms and the current need to connect science to the human dimension of restoring the coastal landscape. Readers are invited to ponder these concepts as they read the rest of the articles in this report that describe the scientific activities that the U.S. Geological Survey performed in late 2005 and early 2006.

  6. Testing the Pairs-Reflection Model with X-Ray Spectral Variability and X-Ray Properties of Complete Samples of Radio-Selected BL Lacertae Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urry, C. Megan

    1997-01-01

    This grant was awarded to Dr. C. Megan Urry of the Space Telescope Science Institute in response to two successful ADP proposals to use archival Ginga and Rosat X-ray data for 'Testing the Pairs-Reflection model with X-Ray Spectral Variability' (in collaboration with Paola Grandi, now at the University of Rome) and 'X-Ray Properties of Complete Samples of Radio-Selected BL Lacertae Objects' (in collaboration with then-graduate student Rita Sambruna, now a post-doc at Goddard Space Flight Center). In addition, post-docs Joseph Pesce and Elena Pian, and graduate student Matthew O'Dowd, have worked on several aspects of these projects. The grant was originally awarded on 3/01/94; this report covers the full period, through May 1997. We have completed our project on the X-ray properties of radio-selected BL Lacs.

  7. KSC-03PD-1308

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Cutting the exhibitors ribbon for the opening of the 40th Space Congress, held April 28-May 1, 2003, in Cape Canaveral, Fla., are (left to right), Brig. Gen. J. Gregory Pavlovich, commander, 45th Space Wing; Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; U.S. Representative Tom Feeney; Vice Chair of the Space Congress Committee Rita Willcoxon; Mayor of Cape Canaveral Rocky Randels; General Chair of the Space Congress Committee Kevin Hoshstrasser; and U.S. Representative Dave Weldon. The Space Congress is an international conference that gathers attendees from the scientific community, the space industry workforce, educators and local supporting industries. This year's event commemorated the 40th anniversary of the Kennedy Space Center and the Centennial of Flight. The theme for the Space Congress was 'Linking the Past to the Future: A Celebration of Space.'

  8. The impact of pet loss on the perceived social support and psychological distress of hurricane survivors.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Sarah R; Rhodes, Jean E; Zwiebach, Liza; Chan, Christian S

    2009-06-01

    Associations between pet loss and posthurricane perceived social support and psychological distress were explored. Participants (N = 365) were primarily low-income African American single mothers who were initially part of an educational intervention study. All participants were exposed to Hurricane Katrina, and 47% experienced Hurricane Rita. Three waves of survey data, two from before the hurricanes, were included. Sixty-three participants (17.3%) reported losing a pet due to the hurricanes and their aftermath. Pet loss significantly predicted postdisaster distress, above and beyond demographic variables, pre- and postdisaster perceived social support, predisaster distress, hurricane-related stressors, and human bereavement, an association that was stronger for younger participants. Pet loss was not a significant predictor of postdisaster perceived social support, but the impact of pet loss on perceived social support was significantly greater for participants with low levels of predisaster support. PMID:19462438

  9. The Impact of Child-Related Stressors on the Psychological Functioning of Lower-Income Mothers After Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Sarah R; Chan, Christian S; Rhodes, Jean E

    2011-10-01

    In the present study, the authors examined the role of child-related stressors in the psychological adjustment of lower-income, primarily unmarried and African American, mothers (N = 386). All participants lived in areas affected by Hurricane Katrina, and about a third were also exposed to Hurricane Rita (30.3%, n = 117). Lacking knowledge of a child's safety during the hurricanes was a significant predictor of heightened postdisaster psychological distress and posttraumatic stress, even after controlling for demographic variables, predisaster psychological distress, evacuation timing, and bereavement. From interviews with a subset of the participants (n = 57), we found that mothers consistently put their own needs behind those of their children. The authors recommend policies that promptly reunite mothers with missing children and support lower-income mothers in caring for their children during natural disasters and the aftermath. PMID:22383861

  10. p53 Transactivation and the Impact of Mutations, Cofactors and Small Molecules Using a Simplified Yeast-Based Screening System

    PubMed Central

    Bisio, Alessandra; Lion, Mattia; Jordan, Jennifer; Fronza, Gilberto; Menichini, Paola; Resnick, Michael A.; Inga, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Background The p53 tumor suppressor, which is altered in most cancers, is a sequence-specific transcription factor that is able to modulate the expression of many target genes and influence a variety of cellular pathways. Inactivation of the p53 pathway in cancer frequently occurs through the expression of mutant p53 protein. In tumors that retain wild type p53, the pathway can be altered by upstream modulators, particularly the p53 negative regulators MDM2 and MDM4. Methodology/Principal Findings Given the many factors that might influence p53 function, including expression levels, mutations, cofactor proteins and small molecules, we expanded our previously described yeast-based system to provide the opportunity for efficient investigation of their individual and combined impacts in a miniaturized format. The system integrates i) variable expression of p53 proteins under the finely tunable GAL1,10 promoter, ii) single copy, chromosomally located p53-responsive and control luminescence reporters, iii) enhanced chemical uptake using modified ABC-transporters, iv) small-volume formats for treatment and dual-luciferase assays, and v) opportunities to co-express p53 with other cofactor proteins. This robust system can distinguish different levels of expression of WT and mutant p53 as well as interactions with MDM2 or 53BP1. Conclusions/Significance We found that the small molecules Nutlin and RITA could both relieve the MDM2-dependent inhibition of WT p53 transactivation function, while only RITA could impact p53/53BP1 functional interactions. PRIMA-1 was ineffective in modifying the transactivation capacity of WT p53 and missense p53 mutations. This dual-luciferase assay can, therefore, provide a high-throughput assessment tool for investigating a matrix of factors that can influence the p53 network, including the effectiveness of newly developed small molecules, on WT and tumor-associated p53 mutants as well as interacting proteins. PMID:21674059

  11. Characterization of Airborne Molds, Endotoxins, and Glucans in Homes in New Orleans after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita▿

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Carol Y.; Riggs, Margaret A.; Chew, Ginger L.; Muilenberg, Michael L.; Thorne, Peter S.; Van Sickle, David; Dunn, Kevin H.; Brown, Clive

    2007-01-01

    In August and September 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita caused breeches in the New Orleans, LA, levee system, resulting in catastrophic flooding. The city remained flooded for several weeks, leading to extraordinary mold growth in homes. To characterize the potential risks of mold exposures, we measured airborne molds and markers of molds and bacteria in New Orleans area homes. In October 2005, we collected air samples from 5 mildly water-damaged houses, 15 moderately to heavily water-damaged houses, and 11 outdoor locations. The air filters were analyzed for culturable fungi, spores, (1→3,1→6)-β-d-glucans, and endotoxins. Culturable fungi were significantly higher in the moderately/heavily water-damaged houses (geometric mean = 67,000 CFU/m3) than in the mildly water-damaged houses (geometric mean = 3,700 CFU/m3) (P = 0.02). The predominant molds found were Aspergillus niger, Penicillium spp., Trichoderma, and Paecilomyces. The indoor and outdoor geometric means for endotoxins were 22.3 endotoxin units (EU)/m3 and 10.5 EU/m3, respectively, and for (1→3,1→6)-β-d-glucans were 1.7 μg/m3 and 0.9 μg/m3, respectively. In the moderately/heavily water-damaged houses, the geometric means were 31.3 EU/m3 for endotoxins and 1.8 μg/m3 for (1→3,1→6)-β-d-glucans. Molds, endotoxins, and fungal glucans were detected in the environment after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in New Orleans at concentrations that have been associated with health effects. The species and concentrations were different from those previously reported for non-water-damaged buildings in the southeastern United States. PMID:17209066

  12. Use of Semiflexible Applicators for Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffke, G. Gebauer, B.; Knollmann, F.D.; Helmberger, T.; Ricke, J.; Oettle, H.; Felix, R.; Stroszczynski, C.

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility and potential advantages of the radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors using new MRI-compatible semiflexible applicators in a closed-bore high-field MRI scanner. Methods. We treated 8 patients with 12 malignant liver tumors of different origin (5 colorectal carcinoma, 2 cholangiocellular carcinoma, 1 breast cancer) under MRI guidance. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was performed using 5 cm Rita Starburst Semi-Flex applicators (Rita Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI, USA) which are suitable for MR- and CT-guided interventions and a 150 W RF generator. All interventions were performed in a closed-bore 1.5 T high-field MRI scanner for MRI-guided RFA using fast T1-weighted gradient echo sequences and T2-weighted ultra-turbo spin echo sequences. Control and follow-up MRI examinations were performed on the next day, at 6 weeks, and every 3 months after RFA. Control MRI were performed as double-contrast MRI examinations (enhancement with iron oxide and gadopentetate dimeglumine). All interventions were performed with the patient under local anesthesia and analgo-sedation. Results. The mean diameter of the treated hepatic tumors was 2.4 cm ({+-}0.6 cm, range 1.0-3.2 cm). The mean diameter of induced necrosis was 3.1 cm ({+-}0.4 cm). We achieved complete ablation in all patients. Follow-up examinations over a duration of 7 months ({+-}1.3 months, range 4-9 month) showed a local control rate of 100% in this group of patients. All interventions were performed without major complications; only 2 subcapsular hematomas were documented. Conclusion. RFA of liver tumors using semiflexible applicators in closed-bore 1.5 T scanner systems is feasible. These applicators might simplify the RFA of liver tumors under MRI control. The stiff distal part of the applicator facilitates its repositioning.

  13. Impact of hurricanes storm surges on the groundwater resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Biersel, T. P.; Carlson, D.A.; Milner, L.R.

    2007-01-01

    Ocean surges onto coastal lowlands caused by tropical and extra tropical storms, tsunamis, and sea level rise affect all coastal lowlands and present a threat to drinking water resources of many coastal residents. In 2005, two such storms, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita struck the Gulf Coast of the US. Since September 2005, water samples have been collected from water wells impacted by the hurricanes' storm surges along the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain in southeastern Louisiana. The private and public water wells tested were submerged by 0.6-4.5 m of surging saltwater for several hours. The wells' casing and/or the associated plumbing were severely damaged. Water samples were collected to determine if storm surge water inundated the well casing and, if so, its effect on water quality within the shallow aquifers of the Southern Hills Aquifer System. In addition, the samples were used to determine if the impact on water quality may have long-term implication for public health. Laboratory testing for several indicator parameters (Ca/Mg, Cl/Si, chloride, boron, specific conductance and bacteria) indicates that surge water entered water wells' casing and the screened aquifer. Analysis of the groundwater shows a decrease in the Ca/Mg ratio right after the storm and then a return toward pre-Katrina values. Chloride concentrations were elevated right after Katrina and Rita, and then decreased downward toward pre-Katrina values. From September 2005 to June 2006, the wells showed improvement in all the saltwater intrusion indicators. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Reconnaissance of alluvial fans as potential sources of gravel aggregate, Santa Cruz River valley, Southeast Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, David A.; Melick, Roger

    2002-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to provide information on the aggregate potential of alluvial fan sediments in the Santa Cruz River valley. Pebble lithology, roundness, and particle size were determined in the field, and structures and textures of alluvial fan sediments were photographed and described. Additional measurements of particle size on digital photographs were made on a computer screen. Digital elevation models were acquired and compiled for viewing the areal extent of selected fans. Alluvial fan gravel in the Santa Cruz River valley reflects the lithology of its source. Gravel derived from granitic and gneissic terrane of the Tortolita, Santa Catalina, and Rincon Mountains weathers to grus and is generally inferior for use as aggregate. Gravel derived from the Tucson, Sierrita, and Tumacacori Mountains is composed mostly of angular particles of volcanic rock, much of it felsic in composition. This angular volcanic gravel should be suitable for use in asphalt but may require treatment for alkali-silica reaction prior to use in concrete. Gravel derived from the Santa Rita Mountains is of mixed plutonic (mostly granitic rocks), volcanic (mostly felsic rocks), and sedimentary (sandstone and carbonate rock) composition. The sedimentary component tends to make gravel derived from the Santa Rita Mountains slightly more rounded than other fan gravel. The coarsest (pebble, cobble, and boulder) gravel is found near the heads (proximal part) of alluvial fans. At the foot (distal part) of alluvial fans, most gravel is pebble-sized and interbedded with sand and silt. Some of the coarsest gravel was observed near the head of the Madera Canyon, Montosa Canyon, and Esperanza Wash fans. The large Cienega Creek fan, located immediately south and southeast of Tucson, consists entirely of distal-fan pebble gravel, sand, and silt.

  15. Evaluation of Thyroid Disorders During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy by Using Functional Analysis and Ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhshandeh, Mohsen; Hashemi, Bijan; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabie; Nikoofar, Alireza; Edraki, Hamid Reza; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate thyroid function and vascular changes during radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients treated with primary or postoperative radiotherapy for various cancers in the head and neck region were prospectively evaluated. The serum samples (triiodothyronine [T3], thyroxine [T4], thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free triiodothyronine [FT3], and free thyroxine [FT4]), the echo level of the thyroid gland, and color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU) parameters of the right inferior thyroid artery (RITA) of the patients were measured before and at regular intervals during radiotherapy. The thyroid gland dose-volume histograms of the patients were derived from their computed tomography-based treatment plans. Results: There was a significant fall in TSH level (p < 0.0001) but an increase in FT4 (p < 0.0001) and T4 (p < 0.022) levels during the radiotherapy course. The threshold dose required to produce significant changes was 12 Gy (Biologically Effective Dose in 2-Gy fractions, BED{sub 2}). There were significant rises in the patients' pulsatility index, resistive index, peak systolic velocity, blood volume flow levels, and RITA diameter (p < 0.0001), as detected by CDU during radiotherapy, compared to those parameters measured before the treatment. Hypoechogenicity and irregular echo patterns (p < 0.0001) were seen during radiotherapy compared to those before treatment. There was significant Pearson's correlation between the CDU parameters and T4, FT4, and TSH levels. Conclusions: Radiation-induced thyroiditis is regarded as primary damage to the thyroid gland. Thyroiditis can subsequently result in hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Our results demonstrated that changes in thyroid vessels occur during radiotherapy delivered to patients. Vessel changes also can be attributed to the late effect of radiation on the thyroid gland. The hypoechogenicity and irregular echo patterns observed in patients may result

  16. Is global dimming and brightening limited to urban areas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Katsumasa; Imamovic, Adel; Folini, Doris; Ohmura, Atsumu; Wild, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Industrial Era. Journal of Climate, 20, 4874-4883. Ohmura A (2009) Observed decadal variations in surface solar radiation and their causes. Journal of Geophysical Research, 114, D00D05. Ohmura A, Lang H (1989) Secular variation of global radiation over Europe. In: Lenoble J, Geleyn JF, Deepak A (eds) Current Problems in Atmospheric Radiation. Hampton, pp 98-301. Shepherd JM (2005) A Review of Current Investigations of Urban-Induced Rainfall and Recommendations for the Future. Earth Interactions, 9, 1-27. Skeie RB, Berntsen TK, Myhre G, Tanaka K, Kvalevåg MM, Hoyle CR (2011) Anthropogenic radiative forcing time series from pre-industrial times until 2010. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11, 11827-11857. Wild M (2009) Global dimming and brightening: A review. Journal of Geophysical Research, 114, D00D16. Wild M, Gilgen H, Roesch A, Ohmura A, Long CN, Dutton EG, Forgan B, Kallis A, Russak V, Tsvetkov A (2005) From Dimming to Brightening: Decadal Changes in Solar Radiation at Earth's Surface. Science, 308, 847-850.

  17. PREFACE: Third Congress on Materials Science and Engineering (CNCIM-Mexico 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Coss, Romeo; Murrieta-Hernández, Gabriel; Aguayo-González, Aarón; Rubio-Rosas, Efraín; Chigo-Anota, Ernesto; Vigueras-Santiago, Enrique

    2013-06-01

    The Third Congress on Material Science and Engineering (CNCIM-México 2012), which took place in Mérida, México, from 27 February to 2 March 2012 was organized by three research groups (cuerpos académicos) from the Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán: Ingeniería Física (UADY-CA-27), Modelado y Simulación Computacional de Sistemas Físicos (UADY-CA-101) and Química Fundamental y Aplicada (UADY-CA-32), in collaboration with the Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav-Mérida). The First Congress in Material Science and Engineering (CNCIM-2010), was organized in Puebla, México in February 2010. This was followed by CNCIM-2011 held in Toluca, México in February 2011. The CNCIM-México 2012 Conference consisted of plenary talks (8), invited talks (10), oral contributions (54) and poster presentations (70). The topics of the Conference were: Synthesis and Preparation of Materials: Organic and Inorganic Characterization of Materials: Novel Methods and Techniques Applications of Materials: Environment, Medicine, Pharmacy, Technology, Food and Renewable Energy New Materials: Composites, Nanostructures, and from Natural Sources Theory: New Methods and Computer Simulations We want to thank the Organizing Committee, the Institutions and Sponsors supporting the Conference, and everyone who contributed to the organization of this meeting, for their invaluable efforts in order to guarantee the complete success of this conference. Editors Romeo de Coss Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N. (Cinvestav-Mérida) A.P. 73 Cordemex 97310, Mérida, Yucatán, México decoss@mda.cinvestav.mx Gabriel Murrieta-Hernández Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán Calle 60 No. 491-A, Centro Histórico, C.P. 97000, Mérida, Yucatán, México murrieta@uady.mx Aarón Aguayo-González Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán Calle 60 No. 491-A, Centro Histórico, C.P. 97000, Mérida, Yucatán, México aguayo@uady.mx Efraín Rubio-Rosas Benemérita Universidad Aut

  18. Meurigite, a new fibrous iron phosphate resembling kidwellite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birch, W.D.; Pring, A.; Self, P.G.; Gibbs, R.B.; Keck, E.; Jensen, M.C.; Foord, E.E.

    1996-01-01

    Meurigite is a new hydrated potassium iron phosphate related to kidwellite and with structural similarities to other late-stage fibrous ferric phosphate species. It has been found at four localities so far - the Santa Rita mine, New Mexico, U.S.A.; the Hagendorf-Sud pegmatite in Bavaria, Germany; granite pegmatite veins at Wycheproof, Victoria. Australia; and at the Gold Quarry Mine, Nevada, U.S.A. The Santa Rita mine is the designated type locality. Meurigite occurs as tabular, elongated crystals forming spherical and hemispherical clusters and drusy coatings. The colour ranges from creamy white to pale yellow and yellowish brown. At the type locality, the hemispheres may reach 2 mm across, but the maximum diameter reached in the other occurrences is usually less than 0.5 mm. A wide variety of secondary phosphate minerals accompanies meurigite at each locality, with dufrenite, cyrilovite. beraunite, rockbridgeite and leucophosphite amongst the most common. Vanadates and uranates occur with meurigite at the Gold Quarry mine. Electron microprobe analysis and separate determination of H2O and CO2 on meurigite from the type locality gave a composition for which several empirical formulae could be calculated. The preferred formula, obtained on the basis of 35 oxygen atoms, is (K0.85Na0.03)??0.88(Fe7.013+Al0.16Cu0.02)??7.19 (PO4)5.11(CO3)0.20(OH) 6.7??7-7.25H2O, which simplifies to KFe73+(PO4)5(OH) 7??8H2O. Qualitative analyses only were obtained for meurigite from the other localities, due to the softness and openness of the aggregates. Because of the fibrous nature of meurigite, it was not possible to determine the crystal structure, hence the exact stoichiometry remains uncertain. The lustre of meurigite varies from vitreous to waxy for the Santa Rita mine mineral, to silky for the more open sprays and internal surfaces elsewhere. The streak is very pale yellow to cream and the estimated Mohs hardness is about 3. Cleavage is perfect on {001] and fragments from the

  19. Development of coffee somatic and zygotic embryos to plants differs in the morphological, histochemical and hydration aspects.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Hervé; Bertrand, Benoît; Georget, Frédéric; Lartaud, Marc; Montes, Fabienne; Dechamp, Eveline; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Barry-Etienne, Dominique

    2013-06-01

    In Coffea arabica L., the development of direct sowing of somatic embryos (SE) in planting substrate, with subsequent nursery production of plants, has promoted the industrialization of somatic embryogenesis. However, plant conversion rates are still low and require improvements to enhance the cost-effectiveness of commercial micropropagation. With the aim of improving plant regeneration from SE, we studied the morphological and histological criteria and water characteristics during germination and plant conversion of zygotic embryos (ZE) and SE. At the cotyledonary stage, SE produced in a 1 l RITA(®) temporary immersion bioreactor (area 55.8 cm(2)) were morphologically similar in size (2-3 mm) but abnormal as compared with mature ZE. Protein and starch reserve levels were extremely low throughout germination and conversion to plantlets, while the water status remained steady [water content (WC) from 76 to 87%, Ψ from -0.37 to -0.47 MPa, pressure potential from 0.69 to 0.24 MPa]. In ZE, spectacular hydration occurred during the first 3 weeks (WC from 37 to 75%; Ψ from -6.24 to -1.0 MPa). Cotyledons remained undifferentiated for 10 weeks after sowing. Conversely, after only 3 weeks under germination conditions in a RITA(®) bioreactor, spongy and palisade parenchyma and stomata formed in SE cotyledons. The ZE plant conversion was faster than that of SE (14 vs. 22 weeks) and more efficient (rates 96 vs. 55%), with much more substantial hypocotyl and cotyledon development. The use of a new 5 l MATIS(®) bioreactor (area 355 cm(2)), designed especially to favor embryo dispersion and light transmittance to SE, markedly improved the embryo-to-plantlet conversion rate (91%). These results highlight the morphological heterogeneity and lack of protein reserves in SE at the beginning of the germination phase and marked differences in water characteristics. However, they also reveal high phenotypic plasticity, leading to a highly efficient plantlet conversion rate due to

  20. Methyl mercury in fish--a case study on various samples collected from Ganges river at West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Pal, Moumita; Ghosh, Santinath; Mukhopadhyay, Madhumita; Ghosh, Mahua

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the presence of total mercury (Hg) and organic mercury levels in the muscle of 19 common fresh water fish species captured from river Ganges, West Bengal, India. The total mercury level found in our study may not cause any toxic effect, but the methyl mercury (MeHg) level in some freshwater fish species was surprisingly very high and toxically unacceptable. The results of mercury analysis in various specimens indicated that some fish muscles tended to accumulate high levels of Hg, and approximately 50-84% of Hg was organic mercury. A strong positive correlation between mercury levels in muscle with food habit and fish length (age) was found. Wallago attu possessed the highest amount of organic mercury in their muscle tissues, and it was 0.93 ± 0.61 μg Hg/g of wet weight. Whereas in small-sized fishes Eutropiichthys murius, Puntius sarana, Cirrhinus mrigala, Mystus vittatus or Mystus gulio, and Tilapia mossambicus, it was below the detection limit. Contamination in Catla catla (0.32 ± 0.11), Anguilla bengalensis bengalensis (0.26 ± 0.07 μg Hg/g), Chitala chitala (0.25 ± 0.18), Rita rita (0.34 ± 0.14), and Ompok pabda (0.26 ± 0.04) was also above the 0.25 μg Hg/g of wet weight, the limit set by the PFA for the maximum level for consumption of fish exposed to MeHg. Though in Labeo rohita (0.12 ± 0.03), Mastacembelus armatus (0.17 ± 0.02), Pangasius pangasius (0.12 ± 0.16), Bagarius bagarius (0.12 ± 0.01), and Clupisoma garua (0.1 ± 0.01), concentration was below the recommended level, in Lates calcarifer (0.23 ± 0.0) and Mystus aor (0.23 ± 0.1), it was threatening. Interestingly, a low concentration of Hg was found in post-monsoon samples. PMID:21713467

  1. Relativistically induced transparency acceleration of light ions by an ultrashort laser pulse interacting with a heavy-ion-plasma density gradient.

    PubMed

    Sahai, Aakash A; Tsung, Frank S; Tableman, Adam R; Mori, Warren B; Katsouleas, Thomas C

    2013-10-01

    The relativistically induced transparency acceleration (RITA) scheme of proton and ion acceleration using laser-plasma interactions is introduced, modeled, and compared to the existing schemes. Protons are accelerated with femtosecond relativistic pulses to produce quasimonoenergetic bunches with controllable peak energy. The RITA scheme works by a relativistic laser inducing transparency [Akhiezer and Polovin, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz 30, 915 (1956); Kaw and Dawson, Phys. Fluids 13, 472 (1970); Max and Perkins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 27, 1342 (1971)] to densities higher than the cold-electron critical density, while the background heavy ions are stationary. The rising laser pulse creates a traveling acceleration structure at the relativistic critical density by ponderomotively [Lindl and Kaw, Phys. Fluids 14, 371 (1971); Silva et al., Phys. Rev. E 59, 2273 (1999)] driving a local electron density inflation, creating an electron snowplow and a co-propagating electrostatic potential. The snowplow advances with a velocity determined by the rate of the rise of the laser's intensity envelope and the heavy-ion-plasma density gradient scale length. The rising laser is incrementally rendered transparent to higher densities such that the relativistic-electron plasma frequency is resonant with the laser frequency. In the snowplow frame, trace density protons reflect off the electrostatic potential and get snowplowed, while the heavier background ions are relatively unperturbed. Quasimonoenergetic bunches of velocity equal to twice the snowplow velocity can be obtained and tuned by controlling the snowplow velocity using laser-plasma parameters. An analytical model for the proton energy as a function of laser intensity, rise time, and plasma density gradient is developed and compared to 1D and 2D PIC OSIRIS [Fonseca et al., Lect. Note Comput. Sci. 2331, 342 (2002)] simulations. We model the acceleration of protons to GeV energies with tens-of-femtoseconds laser pulses of a few

  2. Monsoon dependent ecosystems: Implications of the vertical distribution of soil moisture on land surface-atmosphere interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Mejia, Zulia M.

    Uncertainty of predicted change in precipitation frequency and intensity motivates the scientific community to better understand, quantify, and model the possible outcome of dryland ecosystems. In pulse dependent ecosystems (i.e. monsoon driven) soil moisture is tightly linked to atmospheric processes. Here, I analyze three overarching questions; Q1) How does soil moisture presence or absence in a shallow or deep layer influence the surface energy budget and planetary boundary layer characteristics?, Q2) What is the role of vegetation on ecosystem albedo in the presence or absence of deep soil moisture?, Q3) Can we develop empirical relationships between soil moisture and the planetary boundary layer height to help evaluate the role of future precipitation changes in land surface atmosphere interactions? . To address these questions I use a conceptual framework based on the presence or absence of soil moisture in a shallow or deep layer. I define these layers by using root profiles and establish soil moisture thresholds for each layer using four years of observations from the Santa Rita Creosote Ameriflux site. Soil moisture drydown curves were used to establish the shallow layer threshold in the shallow layer, while NEE (Net Ecosystem Exchange of carbon dioxide) was used to define the deep soil moisture threshold. Four cases were generated using these thresholds: Case 1, dry shallow layer and dry deep layer; Case 2, wet shallow layer and dry deep layer; Case 3, wet shallow layer and wet deep layer, and Case 4 dry shallow and wet deep layer. Using this framework, I related data from the Ameriflux site SRC (Santa Rita Creosote) from 2008 to 2012 and from atmospheric soundings from the nearby Tucson Airport; conducted field campaigns during 2011 and 2012 to measure albedo from individual bare and canopy patches that were then evaluated in a grid to estimate the influence of deep moisture on albedo via vegetation cover change; and evaluated the potential of using a

  3. Relativistically induced transparency acceleration of light ions by an ultrashort laser pulse interacting with a heavy-ion-plasma density gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Aakash A.; Tsung, Frank S.; Tableman, Adam R.; Mori, Warren B.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.

    2013-10-01

    The relativistically induced transparency acceleration (RITA) scheme of proton and ion acceleration using laser-plasma interactions is introduced, modeled, and compared to the existing schemes. Protons are accelerated with femtosecond relativistic pulses to produce quasimonoenergetic bunches with controllable peak energy. The RITA scheme works by a relativistic laser inducing transparency [Akhiezer and Polovin, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz 30, 915 (1956); Kaw and Dawson, Phys. FluidsPFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1692942 13, 472 (1970); Max and Perkins, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.27.1342 27, 1342 (1971)] to densities higher than the cold-electron critical density, while the background heavy ions are stationary. The rising laser pulse creates a traveling acceleration structure at the relativistic critical density by ponderomotively [Lindl and Kaw, Phys. FluidsPFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1693437 14, 371 (1971); Silva , Phys. Rev. E1063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.59.2273 59, 2273 (1999)] driving a local electron density inflation, creating an electron snowplow and a co-propagating electrostatic potential. The snowplow advances with a velocity determined by the rate of the rise of the laser's intensity envelope and the heavy-ion-plasma density gradient scale length. The rising laser is incrementally rendered transparent to higher densities such that the relativistic-electron plasma frequency is resonant with the laser frequency. In the snowplow frame, trace density protons reflect off the electrostatic potential and get snowplowed, while the heavier background ions are relatively unperturbed. Quasimonoenergetic bunches of velocity equal to twice the snowplow velocity can be obtained and tuned by controlling the snowplow velocity using laser-plasma parameters. An analytical model for the proton energy as a function of laser intensity, rise time, and plasma density gradient is developed and compared to 1D and 2D PIC OSIRIS [Fonseca , Lect. Note Comput. Sci.9783

  4. Modified Methodology for Projecting Coastal Louisiana Land Changes over the Next 50 Years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartley, Steve B.

    2009-01-01

    The coastal Louisiana landscape is continually undergoing geomorphologic changes (in particular, land loss); however, after the 2005 hurricane season, the changes were intensified because of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The amount of land loss caused by the 2005 hurricane season was 42 percent (562 km2) of the total land loss (1,329 km2) that was projected for the next 50 years in the Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA), Louisiana Ecosystem Restoration Study. The purpose of this study is to provide information on potential changes to coastal Louisiana by using a revised LCA study methodology. In the revised methodology, we used classified Landsat TM satellite imagery from 1990, 2001, 2004, and 2006 to calculate the 'background' or ambient land-water change rates but divided the Louisiana coastal area differently on the basis of (1) geographic regions ('subprovinces') and (2) specific homogeneous habitat types. Defining polygons by subprovinces (1, Pontchartrain Basin; 2, Barataria Basin; 3, Vermilion/Terrebonne Basins; and 4, the Chenier Plain area) allows for a specific erosion rate to be applied to that area. Further subdividing the provinces by habitat type allows for specific erosion rates for a particular vegetation type to be applied. Our modified methodology resulted in 24 polygons rather than the 183 that were used in the LCA study; further, actively managed areas and the CWPPRA areas were not masked out and dealt with separately as in the LCA study. This revised methodology assumes that erosion rates for habitat types by subprovince are under the influence of similar environmental conditions (sediment depletion, subsidence, and saltwater intrusion). Background change rate for three time periods (1990-2001, 1990-2004, and 1990-2006) were calculated by taking the difference in water or land among each time period and dividing it by the time interval. This calculation gives an annual change rate for each polygon per time period. Change rates for each time period

  5. Linkage of Rainfall-Runoff and Hurricane Storm Surge in Galveston Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deitz, R.; Christian, J.; Wright, G.; Fang, N.; Bedient, P.

    2012-12-01

    In conjunction with the SSPEED Center, large rainfall events in the upper Gulf of Mexico are being studied in an effort to help design a surge gate to protect the Houston Ship Channel during hurricane events. The ship channel is the world's second largest petrochemical complex and the Coast Guard estimates that a one-month closure would have a $60 billion dollar impact on the national economy. In this effort, statistical design storms, such as the 24-hour PMP, as well as historical storms, like Hurricane Ike, Hurricane Katrina, and Hurricane Rita, are being simulated in a hydrologic/hydraulic model using radar and rain gauge data. VfloTM, a distributed hydrologic model, is being used to quantify the effect that storm size, intensity, and location has on timing and peak flows in the in the upper drainage area. These hydrographs were input to a hydraulic model with various storm surges from Galveston Bay. Results indicate that there is a double peak phenomenon with flows from the west draining days earlier than flows from the north. With storm surge typically lasting 36-48 hours, this indicates the flows from the west are interacting with the storm surge, whereas flows from the north would arrive once the storm surge is receding. Gate operations were optimized in the model to account for the relative timing of upland runoff and hurricane surge, and to quantify the capability of the gate structure to protect the Ship Channel industry.

  6. Disasters, women's health, and conservative society: working in Pakistan with the Turkish Red Crescent following the South Asian Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew C; Arquilla, Bonnie

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, numerous catastrophic disasters caused by natural hazards directed worldwide attention to medical relief efforts. These events included the: (1) 2003 earthquake in Bam, Iran; (2) 2004 earthquake and tsunami in Southeast Asia; (3) Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in the southern United States in 2005; (4) 2005 south Asian earthquake; and (5) 2006 Indonesian volcanic eruption and earthquakes. Health disparities experienced by women during relief operations were a component of each of these events. This article focuses on the response of the Turkish Red Crescent Society's field hospital in northern Pakistan following the South Asian Earthquake of October 2005, and discusses how the international community has struggled to address women's health issues during international relief efforts. Furthermore, since many recent disasters occurred in culturally conservative South Asia and the local geologic activity indicates similar disaster-producing events are likely to continue, special emphasis is placed on response efforts. Lessons learned in Pakistan demonstrate how simple adjustments in community outreach, camp geography, staff distribution, and supplies can enhance the quality, delivery, and effectiveness of the care provided to women during international relief efforts. PMID:18019091

  7. Vegetation structure in cerrado physiognomies in south-eastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Batalha, M A; Mantovani, W; de Mesquita Júnior, H N

    2001-08-01

    We studied three cerrado physiognomies (campo cerrado, a savanna woodland; cerrado sensu stricto, a woodland; and cerradão, a tall woodland) in a reserve with 1,225 ha, in Santa Rita do Passa-Quatro (21 degrees 36-38'S and 47 degrees 36-39'W), São Paulo State, South-eastern Brazil, to compare plant communities structure. As descriptors of the vegetation structure, we used richness, density, basal area, cylindrical volume, and diversity. Ten 40 m2 quadrats were placed randomly in each physiognomy, in which we sampled the woody plants with stem diameter equal or larger than 1 cm (woody component), and ten 2.5 m2 quadrats, in which we sampled the woody plants with stem diameter smaller than 1 cm and all the non-woody individuals (herbaceous component). In the woody component, we found significant differences among the physiognomies for richness, density and cylindrical volume. Cylindrical volume increased from campo cerrado to cerradão, but richness and density were higher in cerrado sensu stricto. In the herbaceous component, we detected differences for all variables, which were higher in the savanna physiognomies, campo cerrado and cerrado sensu stricto, than in the forest physiognomy, cerradão. Cylindrical volume was the best variable to distinguish the physiognomies. Floristic similarity followed the campo cerrado-cerrado sensu stricto-cerradão gradient, and beta diversity was higher in the herbaceous component. PMID:11706576

  8. National mass care strategy: a national integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Mintz, Amy; Gonzalez, Waddy

    2013-01-01

    Mass care refers to a wide range of humanitarian activities that collectively provide life- sustaining services, such as emergency sheltering, feeding, reunification, distribution of emergency supplies and recovery information, before or in the aftermath of an emergency or disaster. Most services are coordinated and provided by non-governmental organisations and/or local government. Based on the lessons learned in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, the American Red Cross, the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters joined efforts to expand national mass care capabilities in order to support survivors in the wake of catastrophic events, as well as to enhance the integration of volunteers and non-governmental organisations into the broader national effort. These efforts resulted in the creation of the National Mass Care Council in 2010, with representatives of Federal and State agencies, voluntary organisations and the private sector working together to develop a unified approach to mass care and to ensure the provision of consistent and uniform services across the USA, regardless of the magnitude of the event. PMID:24113635

  9. Reproductive biology and population structure in the rare copper moss, Scopelophila cataractae

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J.; Davenport, C.L.; Bartow, S.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Scopelophila cataractae is one of about seven species of bryophytes that ar known as copper mosses because of their ecological association with copper or other metals. Like other copper mosses, S. cataractae is geographically widespread, occurring in North and South America, Europe and Asia, but is extremely rare throughout its range and is disjunct across tremendous distances. In North America, the species occurs at only a few localities in California, Arizona, Texas, Tennessee, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania, and an absence of sporophytes indicates that sexual reproduction does not occur here. Plants from both metal-contaminated and uncontaminated soils exhibit tolerance of metals and there is no evidence of differentiation among populations in terms of substrate requirements or tolerances. All North American plants studied thus far are monomorphic at eight enzyme loci, except those from the Texas populations, which differ at one peroxidase locus. Plants from anthropogenic metal-contaminated sites in the eastern US are uniformly male (or sterile) whereas those from natural sites in the southern Appalachians (North Carolina), Cumberland Plateau (Tennessee), and Santa Rita Mountains (Arizona) are uniformly female (or sterile). All plants from California and Texas are completely sterile. Geographic disjunctions between male and female plants explains the absence of sexual reproduction, and suggests episodes of long distance dispersal.

  10. Theoretically Investigating the Nature of Spacetime- A grand definition of what clocks measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egie, Meru

    Einstein's special theory of relativity established time as a dimension of reality, explaining physically the mathematical stipulations of Lorentz transformation equations that are required to keep the validity of Maxwell's equations of light and explain the null result of Michelson-Morley experiment. Our current understanding of time is relativistic, that is time is not absolute but runs differently depending on the frame of reference, yet this description uncovers so little about the fundamental reality of time. Using mathematical arguments derived from a simple thought experiment, both Lorentz transformation equations and Einstein's far reaching conclusions of his 1905 paper on the electrodynamics of moving bodies are obtained with arguments that suggest no prior knowledge of both Einstein and Lorentz works. This work attempts uncovering the fundamental nature of what clocks measure and a major implication of this is that the fourth dimension could just be a persistent illusion caused by the existence of space. Gratitude to Mr. Jon Egie for his support and Aghogo Rita for her listening ears.

  11. Proceedings of the third annual fuel cells contractors review meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, W.J.

    1991-06-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop the essential technology for private sector characterization of the various fuel cell electrical generation systems. These systems promise high fuel to electricity efficiencies (40 to 60 percent), distinct possibilities for cogeneration applications, modularity of design, possibilities of urban siting, and environmentally benign emissions. The purpose of this meeting was to provide the research and development (R D) participants in the DOE/Fossil Energy-sponsored Fuel Cells Program with the opportunity to present key results of their research and to establish closer business contacts. Major emphasis was on phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, and solid oxide technology efforts. Research results of the coal gasification and gas stream cleanup R D activities pertinent to the Fuel Cells Program were also highlighted. Two hundred seventeen attendees from industry, utilities, academia, and Government participated in this 2-day meeting. Twenty-three papers were given in three formal sessions: molten carbonate fuel cells R D (9 papers), solid oxide fuel cells (8 papers), phosphoric acid fuel cells R D (6 papers). In addition to the papers and presentations, these proceedings also include comments on the Fuel Cells Program from the viewpoint of DOE/METC Fuel Cell Overview by Rita A. Bajura, DOE/METC Perspective by Manville J. Mayfield, Electric Power Research Institute by Daniel M. Rastler, Natural Gas by Hugh D. Guthrie, and Transportation Applications by Pandit G. Patil.

  12. NASA, Remote Sensing and Archaeology: An Example from Southeast Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giardino, Marco J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Stennis Space Center, located in Mississippi, USA, undertook an archaeological survey of the southeastern Louisiana marshes beginning in 2003. Progress on this activity was severely hampered by the 2005 hurricane season when both Katrina and Rita devastated the study area. In 2008, the NASA team reinitiated the analysis of the project data and that work continues today. The project was conducted initially in partnership with the U.S. Army, Corps of Engineers New Orleans District and Tulane University. NASA and its partners utilized a wide variety of satellite and airborne remote sensing instruments combined with field verification surveys to identify prehistoric archeological sites in the Southeastern Louisiana delta, both known and still undiscovered. The main approach was to carefully map known sites and use the spectral characteristics of these sites to locate high probability targets elsewhere in the region. The archaeological activities were conducted in support of Coast 2050 whose stated goals is to sustain and restore a coastal ecosystem that supports and protects the environment, economy and culture of southern Louisiana. As the Coast 2050 report states: [T]he rate of coastal land loss in Louisiana has reached catastrophic proportions. Within the last 50 years, land loss rates have exceeded 40 square miles per year, and in the 1990's the rate has been estimated to be between 25 and 35 square miles each year. This loss represents 80% of the coastal wetland loss in the entire continental United States.

  13. The prolyl-isomerase Pin1 activates the mitochondrial death program of p53.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, G; Mioni, M; Giorgi, C; Ruggeri, N; Pinton, P; Moll, U; Mantovani, F; Del Sal, G

    2013-02-01

    In response to intense stress, the tumor protein p53 (p53) tumor suppressor rapidly mounts a direct mitochondrial death program that precedes transcription-mediated apoptosis. By eliminating severely damaged cells, this pathway contributes to tumor suppression as well as to cancer cell killing induced by both genotoxic drugs and non-genotoxic p53-reactivating molecules. Here we have explored the role had in this pathway by the prolyl-isomerase Pin1 (peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase, NIMA-interacting 1), a crucial transducer of p53's phosphorylation into conformational changes unleashing its pro-apoptotic activity. We show that Pin1 promotes stress-induced localization of p53 to mitochondria both in vitro and in vivo. In particular, we demonstrate that upon stress-induced phosphorylation of p53 on Ser46 by homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2, Pin1 stimulates its mitochondrial trafficking signal, that is, monoubiquitination. This pathway is induced also by the p53-activating molecule RITA, and we demonstrate the strong requirement of Pin1 for the induction of mitochondrial apoptosis by this compound. These findings have significant implications for treatment of p53-expressing tumors and for prospective use of p53-activating compounds in clinics. PMID:22935610

  14. Targeting p53 by small molecules in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Saha, Manujendra N; Qiu, Lugui; Chang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    p53 is a powerful tumor suppressor and is an attractive cancer therapeutic target. A breakthrough in cancer research came from the discovery of the drugs which are capable of reactivating p53 function. Most anti-cancer agents, from traditional chemo- and radiation therapies to more recently developed non-peptide small molecules exert their effects by enhancing the anti-proliferative activities of p53. Small molecules such as nutlin, RITA, and PRIMA-1 that can activate p53 have shown their anti-tumor effects in different types of hematological malignancies. Importantly, nutlin and PRIMA-1 have successfully reached the stage of phase I/II clinical trials in at least one type of hematological cancer. Thus, the pharmacological activation of p53 by these small molecules has a major clinical impact on prognostic use and targeted drug design. In the current review, we present the recent achievements in p53 research using small molecules in hematological malignancies. Anticancer activity of different classes of compounds targeting the p53 signaling pathway and their mechanism of action are discussed. In addition, we discuss how p53 tumor suppressor protein holds promise as a drug target for recent and future novel therapies in these diseases. PMID:23531342

  15. Crafting a science life: Learning from twentieth century women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Michele Ann

    This study examined how women in the field of science craft a science life. Within a historical and cultural framework, the study analyzed the autobiographies, biographies, and other written works of five noted women scientists who lived during the time period of 1878 through 1992. The women scientists chosen for the study were Lise Meitner, Florence Seibert, Barbara McClintock, Rita Levi-Montalcini, and Rosalind Franklin. Together they represented the three major science disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. I attempted to make sense of my own science life using the stories of the women scientists as a framework. Situating my experiences within the context of the lives of the women scientists allowed me to use a phenomenological approach to discern commonalities within their lives and my own. The results indicated that the women scientists and myself encountered multiple obstacles in terms of access and equity. However, it was also indicated that all of the women in the study developed a variety of techniques, including resistance and accommodation, in order to navigate these obstacles while still being able to pursue their chosen career path. These women did, however, make great sacrifices that cost them personally, emotionally, financially, and even in terms of their career advancement. Their success was closely tied to their ability to forge their own path, to create their own way of living, and to accept themselves as nonconformists.

  16. Quantifying favorableness for occurrence of a mineral deposit type using fuzzy logic; an example from Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, Mark E.; Bultman, Mark W.

    1993-01-01

    An application of possibility theory from fuzzy logic to the quantification of favorableness for quartz-carbonate vein deposits in the southern Santa Rita Mountains of southeastern Arizona is described. Three necessary but probably not sufficient conditions for the formation of these deposits were defined as the occurrence of carbonate berain rocks within hypabyssal depths, significant fracturing of the rocks, and proximity to a felsic intrusive. The quality of data available to evaluate these conditions is variable over the study area. The possibility of each condition was represented as a fuzzy set enumerated over the area. The intersection of the sets measures the degree of simultaneous occurrence of hte necessary factors and provides a measure of the possibility of deposit occurrence. Using fuzzy set technicques, the effect of one or more fuzzy sets relative to the others in the intersection can be controlled and logical combinations of the sets can be used to impose a time sequential constraint on the necessary conditions. Other necessary conditions, and supplementary conditions such as variable data quality or intensity of exploration can be included in the analysis by their proper representation as fuzzy sets.

  17. UFO-a multi-analyser option for IN12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Wolfgang; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.; Raymond, Stephane; Ohl, Michael

    2004-07-01

    The IN12 instrument is operated by FZ Jülich in collaboration with CEA Grenoble as a CRG-B instrument at the Institut Laue Langevin in Grenoble. As a three-axis spectrometer for cold neutrons it is dedicated for high-resolution studies of low-energy excitations. In the past years the instrument has been continuously improved and it has demonstrated its excellent performance for neutron scattering research. To meet further challenges as a state-of-the-art instrument in the next funding period we will propose to upgrade IN12 with a multi-analyser option similar to planned or existing RITA-type instruments. IN12 will then be optionally equipped with an array of individual analyser blades which can be positioned separately in order to map the scattered beam on a user-chosen path in (Q,ω)-space. We refer to this set-up as IN12-UFO (universal focusing option). Both, the feasibility and the scientific case are currently being studied. On the conference we will show details of the planned instrumental set-up and demonstrate its flexibility and multiplex advantages for specific physical applications.

  18. Introduction to the special issue on “Understanding and predicting change in the coastal ecosystems of the northern Gulf of Mexico”

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Barras, John A.; Williams, S. Jeffress

    2013-01-01

    The coastal region of the northern Gulf of Mexico owes its current landscape structure to an array of tectonic, erosional and depositional, climatic, geochemical, hydrological, ecological, and human processes that have resulted in some of the world's most complex, dynamic, productive, and threatened ecosystems. Catastrophic hurricane landfalls, ongoing subsidence and erosion exacerbated by sea-level rise, disintegration of barrier island chains, and high rates of wetland loss have called attention to the vulnerability of northern Gulf coast ecosystems, habitats, built infrastructure, and economy to natural and anthropogenic threats. The devastating hurricanes of 2005 (Katrina and Rita) motivated the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Program and partnering researchers to pursue studies aimed at understanding and predicting landscape change and the associated storm hazard vulnerability of northern Gulf coast region ecosystems and human communities. Attaining this science goal requires increased knowledge of landscape evolution on geologic, historical, and human time scales, and analysis of the implications of such changes in the natural and built components of the landscape for hurricane impact susceptibility. This Special Issue of the Journal of Coastal Research communicates northern Gulf of Mexico research results that (1) improve knowledge of prior climates and depositional environments, (2) assess broad regional ecosystem structure and change over Holocene to human time scales, (3) undertake process studies and change analyses of dynamic landscape components, and (4) integrate framework, climate, variable time and spatial scale mapping, monitoring, and discipline-specific process investigations within interdisciplinary studies.

  19. Utility of high-altitude infrared spectral data in mineral exploration: Application to Northern Patagonia Mountains, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, B.R.; King, T.V.V.; Morath, L.C.; Phillips, J.D.

    2003-01-01

    Synoptic views of hydrothermal alteration assemblages are of considerable utility in regional-scale minerals exploration. Recent advances in data acquisition and analysis technologies have greatly enhanced the usefulness of remotely sensed imaging spectroscopy for reliable alteration mineral assemblages mapping. Using NASA's Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) sensor, this study mapped large areas of advanced argillic and phyllic-argillic alteration assemblages in the southeastern Santa Rita and northern Patagonia mountains, Arizona. Two concealed porphyry copper deposits have been identified during past exploration, the Red Mountain and Sunnyside deposits, and related published hydrothermal alteration zoning studies allow the comparison of the results obtained from AVIRIS data to the more traditional field mapping approaches. The AVIRIS mapping compares favorably with field-based studies. An analysis of iron-bearing oxide minerals above a concealed supergene chalcocite deposit at Red Mountain also indicates that remotely sensed data can be of value in the interpretation of leached caps above porphyry copper deposits. In conjunction with other types of geophysical data, AVIRIS mineral maps can be used to discriminate different exploration targets within a region.

  20. The Value of Wetlands in Protecting Southeast Louisiana from Hurricane Storm Surges

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Edward B.; Georgiou, Ioannis Y.; Enchelmeyer, Brian; Reed, Denise J.

    2013-01-01

    The Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004 and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 have spurred global interest in the role of coastal wetlands and vegetation in reducing storm surge and flood damages. Evidence that coastal wetlands reduce storm surge and attenuate waves is often cited in support of restoring Gulf Coast wetlands to protect coastal communities and property from hurricane damage. Yet interdisciplinary studies combining hydrodynamic and economic analysis to explore this relationship for temperate marshes in the Gulf are lacking. By combining hydrodynamic analysis of simulated hurricane storm surges and economic valuation of expected property damages, we show that the presence of coastal marshes and their vegetation has a demonstrable effect on reducing storm surge levels, thus generating significant values in terms of protecting property in southeast Louisiana. Simulations for four storms along a sea to land transect show that surge levels decline with wetland continuity and vegetation roughness. Regressions confirm that wetland continuity and vegetation along the transect are effective in reducing storm surge levels. A 0.1 increase in wetland continuity per meter reduces property damages for the average affected area analyzed in southeast Louisiana, which includes New Orleans, by $99-$133, and a 0.001 increase in vegetation roughness decreases damages by $24-$43. These reduced damages are equivalent to saving 3 to 5 and 1 to 2 properties per storm for the average area, respectively. PMID:23536815

  1. Economics of disaster risk, social vulnerability, and mental health resilience.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Sammy; Peek, Lori; Snodgrass, Jeffrey G; Weiler, Stephan; Hempel, Lynn

    2011-07-01

    We investigate the relationship between exposure to Hurricanes Katrina and/or Rita and mental health resilience by vulnerability status, with particular focus on the mental health outcomes of single mothers versus the general public. We advance a measurable notion of mental health resilience to disaster events. We also calculate the economic costs of poor mental health days added by natural disaster exposure. Negative binomial analyses show that hurricane exposure increases the expected count of poor mental health days for all persons by 18.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.44-31.14%), and by 71.88% (95% CI, 39.48-211.82%) for single females with children. Monthly time-series show that single mothers have lower event resilience, experiencing higher added mental stress. Results also show that the count of poor mental health days is sensitive to hurricane intensity, increasing by a factor of 1.06 (95% CI, 1.02-1.10) for every billion (U.S.$) dollars of damage added for all exposed persons, and by a factor of 1.08 (95% CI, 1.03-1.14) for single mothers. We estimate that single mothers, as a group, suffered over $130 million in productivity loss from added postdisaster stress and disability. Results illustrate the measurability of mental health resilience as a two-dimensional concept of resistance capacity and recovery time. Overall, we show that natural disasters regressively tax disadvantaged population strata. PMID:21303401

  2. Comparison of Hard Surface and Soft Soil Impact Performance of a Crashworthy Composite Fuselage Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sareen, Ashish K.; Sparks, Chad; Mullins, B. R., Jr.; Fasanella, Edwin; Jackson, Karen

    2002-01-01

    A comparison of the soft soil and hard surface impact performance of a crashworthy composite fuselage concept has been performed. Specifically, comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse duration, and onset rate at specific locations on the fuselage were evaluated. In a prior research program, the composite fuselage section was impacted at 25 feet per second onto concrete at the Impact Dynamics Research Facility (IDRF) at NASA Langley Research Center. A soft soil test was conducted at the same impact velocity as a part of the NRTC/RITA Crashworthy and Energy Absorbing Structures project. In addition to comparisons of soft soil and hard surface test results, an MSC. Dytran dynamic finite element model was developed to evaluate the test analysis correlation. In addition, modeling parameters and techniques affecting test analysis correlation are discussed. Once correlated, the analytical methodology will be used in follow-on work to evaluate the specific energy absorption of various subfloor concepts for improved crash protection during hard surface and soft soil impacts.

  3. Autoionization following nanoplasma formation in atomic and molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütte, Bernd; Lahl, Jan; Oelze, Tim; Krikunova, Maria; Vrakking, Marc J. J.; Rouzée, Arnaud

    2016-05-01

    Nanoplasmas resulting from the ionization of nano-scale particles by intense laser pulses are typically described by quasiclassical models, where electron emission is understood to take place via thermal processes. Recently, we discovered that, following the interaction of intense near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses with molecular oxygen clusters, electron emission from nanoplasmas can also occur from atomic bound states via autoionization [Schütte et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 123002 (2015)]. Here we extend these studies and demonstrate that the formation and decay of doubly-excited atoms and ions is a very common phenomenon in nanoplasmas. We report on the observation of autoionization involving spin-orbit excited states in molecular oxygen and carbon dioxide clusters as well as in atomic krypton and xenon clusters ionized by intense NIR pulses, for which we find clear bound-state signatures in the electron kinetic energy spectra. By applying terahertz (THz) streaking, we show that the observed autoionization processes take place on a picosecond to nanosecond timescale after the interaction of the NIR laser pulse with the clusters. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  4. Chronic disaster syndrome: Displacement, disaster capitalism, and the eviction of the poor from New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Adams, Vincanne; VAN Hattum, Taslim; English, Diana

    2009-11-01

    Many New Orleans residents who were displaced in 2005 by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the subsequent levee failures and floods are still displaced. Living with long-term stress related to loss of family, community, jobs, and social security as well as the continuous struggle for a decent life in unsettled life circumstances, they manifest what we are calling "chronic disaster syndrome." The term refers not only to the physiological and psychological effects generated at the individual level by ongoing social disruption but also to the nexus of socioeconomic and political conditions that produce this situation as a long-term and intractable problem. Chronic disaster syndrome emerges from the convergence of three phenomena that create a nexus of displacement: long-term effects of personal trauma (including near loss of life and loss of family members, homes, jobs, community, financial security, and well-being); the social arrangements that enable the smooth functioning of what Naomi Klein calls "disaster capitalism," in which "disaster" is prolonged as a way of life; and the permanent displacement of the most vulnerable populations from the social landscape as a perceived remedy that actually exacerbates the syndrome. PMID:20161644

  5. The IFN-gamma +874T/A gene polymorphism is associated with retinochoroiditis toxoplasmosis susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Maíra Cavalcanti de; Aleixo, Ana Luisa Quintella do Couto; Benchimol, Eliezer Israel; Leandro, Ana Cristina Câmara S; das Neves, Leandro Batista; Vicente, Regiane Trigueiro; Bonecini-Almeida, Maria da Glória; Amendoeira, Maria Regina Reis

    2009-05-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide zoonosis that generally produces an asymptomatic infection. In some cases, however, toxoplasmosis infection can lead to ocular damage. The immune system has a crucial role in both the course of the infection and in the evolution of toxoplasmosis disease. In particular, IFN-gamma plays an important role in resistance to toxoplasmosis. Polymorphisms in genes encoding cytokines have been shown to have an association with susceptibility to parasitic diseases. The aim of this work was to analyse the occurrence of polymorphisms in the gene encoding IFN-gamma (+874T/A) among Toxoplasma gondii seropositive individuals, including those with ocular lesions caused by the parasite, from a rural population of Santa Rita de Cássia, Barra Mansa, state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Further, we verified which of these polymorphisms could be related to susceptibility to the development of ocular toxoplasmosis. This study included 34 individuals with ocular toxoplasmosis (ocular group) and 134 without ocular lesions (control group). The differences between A and T allele distributions were not statistically significant between the two groups. However, we observed that a higher frequency of individuals from the ocular group possessed the A/A genotype, when compared with the control group, suggesting that homozygocity for the A allele could enhance susceptibility to ocular toxoplasmosis in T. gondii infection. PMID:19547871

  6. Hydrogenated pyrene: Statistical single-carbon loss below the knockout threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Michael; Giacomozzi, Linda; Gatchell, Michael; de Ruette, Nathalie; Stockett, Mark H.; Schmidt, Henning T.; Cederquist, Henrik; Zettergren, Henning

    2016-04-01

    An ongoing discussion revolves around the question of what effect hydrogenation has on carbon backbone fragmentation in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In order to shed more light on this issue, we have measured absolute single carbon loss cross sections in collisions between native or hydrogenated pyrene cations (C16H+10+m, m = 0, 6, 16) and He as functions of center-of-mass energies down to 20 eV. Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations give further insight into energy transfer processes and also yield m-dependent threshold energies for prompt (femtoseconds) carbon knockout. Such fast, non-statistical fragmentation processes dominate CHx-loss for native pyrene (m = 0), while much slower statistical fragmentation processes contribute significantly to single-carbon loss for the hydrogenated molecules (m = 6 and m = 16). The latter is shown by measurements of large CHx-loss cross sections far below the MD knockout thresholds for C16H+16 and C16H+26. Contribution to the "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  7. CAMEA--A novel multiplexing analyzer for neutron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Groitl, Felix; Graf, Dieter; Birk, Jonas Okkels; Markó, Márton; Bartkowiak, Marek; Filges, Uwe; Niedermayer, Christof; Rüegg, Christian; Rønnow, Henrik M

    2016-03-01

    The analyzer detector system continuous angle multiple energy analysis will be installed on the cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer RITA-2 at SINQ, PSI. CAMEA is optimized for efficiency in the horizontal scattering plane enabling rapid and detailed mapping of excitations. As a novelty the design employs a series of several sequential upward scattering analyzer arcs. Each arc is set to a different, fixed, final energy and scatters neutrons towards position sensitive detectors. Thus, neutrons with different final energies are recorded simultaneously over a large angular range. In a single data-acquisition many entire constant-energy lines in the horizontal scattering plane are recorded for a quasi-continuous angular coverage of about 60°. With a large combined coverage in energy and momentum, this will result in a very efficient spectrometer, which will be particularly suited for parametric studies under extreme conditions with restrictive sample environments (high field magnets or pressure cells) and for small samples of novel materials. In this paper we outline the concept and the specifications of the instrument currently under construction. PMID:27036821

  8. Evaluating post-disaster ecosystem resilience using MODIS GPP data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, Amy E.; Renschler, Chris S.; Miles, Scott B.

    2013-04-01

    An integrated community resilience index (CRI) quantifies the status, exposure, and recovery of the physical, economic, and socio-cultural capital for a specific target community. However, most CRIs do not account for the recovery of ecosystem functioning after extreme events, even though many aspects of a community depend on the services provided by the natural environment. The primary goal of this study was to monitor the recovery of ecosystem functionality (ecological capital) using remote sensing-derived gross primary production (GPP) as an indicator of 'ecosystem-wellness' and assess the effect of resilience of ecological capital on the recovery of a community via an integrated CRI. We developed a measure of ecosystem resilience using remotely sensed GPP data and applied the modeling prototype ResilUS in a pilot study for a four-parish coastal community in southwestern Louisiana, USA that was impacted by Hurricane Rita in 2005. The results illustrate that after such an extreme event, the recovery of ecological capital varies according to land use type and may take many months to return to full functionality. This variable recovery can potentially impact the recovery of certain businesses that rely heavily on ecosystem services such as agriculture, forestry, fisheries, and tourism.

  9. Saline Infusion Markedly Reduces Impedance and Improves Efficacy of Pulmonary Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gananadha, Sivakumar Morris, David Lawson

    2004-08-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a relatively new technique that has been investigated for the treatment of lung tumors. We evaluated for the first time the in vivo use of saline infusion during radiofrequency ablation of sheep lung. We performed RFA on 5 sheep using open and closed chest RFA and the RITA starburst XL and Xli probes using saline infusion with the Xli probe. The impedance and volume of ablation were compared. A total of 16 ablations were produced, 5 percutaneously and 11 open. The impedance during percutaneous and open RFA without saline infusion was 110 {+-} 16.2 and 183.3 {+-} 105.8 O, respectively. With the saline infusion the impedance was 71.3 {+-} 22O and 103.6 {+-} 37.5O. The effect of this was a significantly larger volume of ablation using the saline infusion during percutaneous RFA (90.6 {+-} 23 cm{sup 3} vs 10.47 {+-} 2.9 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.01) and open RFA (107.8 {+-} 25.8 cm{sup 3} vs 24.9 {+-} 19.3 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.0002). Saline infusion during RFA is associated with lower impedance, higher power delivery and larger lesion size.

  10. Osteoid Osteoma: Experience with Laser- and Radiofrequency-Induced Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gebauer, Bernhard Tunn, Per-Ulf; Gaffke, Gunnar; Melcher, Ingo; Felix, Roland; Stroszczynski, Christian

    2006-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome of osteoid osteoma treated by thermal ablation after drill opening. A total of 17 patients and 20 procedures were included. All patients had typical clinical features (age, pain) and a typical radiograph showing a nidus. In 5 cases, additional histological specimens were acquired. After drill opening of the osteoid osteoma nidus, 12 thermal ablations were induced by laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) (9F Power-Laser-Set; Somatex, Germany) and 8 ablations by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (RITA; StarBurst, USA). Initial clinical success with pain relief has been achieved in all patients after the first ablation. Three patients had an osteoid osteoma recurrence after 3, 9, and 10 months and were successfully re-treated by thermal ablation. No major complication and one minor complication (sensible defect) were recorded. Thermal ablation is a safe and minimally invasive therapy option for osteoid osteoma. Although the groups are too small for a comparative analysis, we determined no difference between laser- and radiofrequency-induced ablation in clinical outcome after ablation.

  11. Chronic disaster syndrome: Displacement, disaster capitalism, and the eviction of the poor from New Orleans

    PubMed Central

    ADAMS, VINCANNE; VAN HATTUM, TASLIM; ENGLISH, DIANA

    2009-01-01

    Many New Orleans residents who were displaced in 2005 by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the subsequent levee failures and floods are still displaced. Living with long-term stress related to loss of family, community, jobs, and social security as well as the continuous struggle for a decent life in unsettled life circumstances, they manifest what we are calling “chronic disaster syndrome.” The term refers not only to the physiological and psychological effects generated at the individual level by ongoing social disruption but also to the nexus of socioeconomic and political conditions that produce this situation as a long-term and intractable problem. Chronic disaster syndrome emerges from the convergence of three phenomena that create a nexus of displacement: long-term effects of personal trauma (including near loss of life and loss of family members, homes, jobs, community, financial security, and well-being); the social arrangements that enable the smooth functioning of what Naomi Klein calls “disaster capitalism,” in which “disaster” is prolonged as a way of life; and the permanent displacement of the most vulnerable populations from the social landscape as a perceived remedy that actually exacerbates the syndrome. PMID:20161644

  12. Effect of temperature and humidity on formaldehyde emissions in temporary housing units.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L; Russell, Marion L; Apte, Michael G

    2011-06-01

    The effect of temperature and humidity on formaldehyde emissions from samples collected from temporary housing units (THUs) was studied. The THUs were supplied by the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) to families that lost their homes in Louisiana and Mississippi during the Hurricane Katrina and Rita disasters. On the basis of a previous study, four of the composite wood surface materials that dominated contributions to indoor formaldehyde were selected to analyze the effects of temperature and humidity on the emission factors. Humidity equilibration experiments were carried out on two of the samples to determine how long the samples take to equilibrate with the surrounding environmental conditions. Small chamber experiments were then conducted to measure emission factors for the four surface materials at various temperature and humidity conditions. The samples were analyzed for formaldehyde via high-performance liquid chromatography. The experiments showed that increases in temperature or humidity contributed to an increase in emission factors. A linear regression model was built using the natural log of the percent relative humidity (RH) and inverse of temperature (in K) as independent variables and the natural log of emission factors as the dependent variable. The coefficients for the inverse of temperature and log RH with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all of the samples at the 95% confidence level. This study should assist in retrospectively estimating indoor formaldehyde exposure of occupants of THUs. PMID:21751584

  13. Formaldehyde levels in FEMA-supplied travel trailers, park models, and mobile homes in Louisiana and Mississippi.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M W; Lando, J F; Kieszak, S M; Sutter, M E; Noonan, G P; Brunkard, J M; McGeehin, M A

    2013-04-01

    In 2006, area physicians reported increases in upper respiratory symptoms in patients living in U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)-supplied trailers following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. One potential etiology to explain their symptoms included formaldehyde; however, formaldehyde levels in these occupied trailers were unknown. The objectives of our study were to identify formaldehyde levels in occupied trailers and to determine factors or characteristics of occupied trailers that could affect formaldehyde levels. A disproportionate random sample of 519 FEMA-supplied trailers was identified in Louisiana and Mississippi in November 2007. We collected and tested an air sample from each trailer for formaldehyde levels and administered a survey. Formaldehyde levels among all trailers in this study ranged from 3 parts per billion (ppb) to 590 ppb, with a geometric mean (GM) of 77 ppb [95% confidence interval (CI): 70-85; range: 3-590 ppb]. There were statistically significant differences in formaldehyde levels between trailer types (P < 0.01). The GM formaldehyde level was 81 ppb (95% CI: 72-92) among travel trailers (N = 360), 57 ppb (95% CI: 49-65) among mobile homes (N = 57), and 44 ppb (95% CI: 38-53) among park models (N = 44). Among travel trailers, formaldehyde levels varied significantly by brand. While formaldehyde levels varied by trailer type, all types tested had some levels ≥ 100 ppb. PMID:22804791

  14. Sonoma Persistent Surveillance System

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, D M

    2006-03-24

    Sonoma offers the first cost-effective, broad-area, high-resolution, real-time motion imagery system for surveillance applications. Sonoma is unique in its ability to provide continuous, real-time video imagery of an area the size of a small city with resolutions sufficient to track 8,000 moving objects in the field of view. At higher resolutions and over smaller areas, Sonoma can even track the movement of individual people. The visual impact of the data available from Sonoma is already causing a paradigm shift in the architecture and operation of other surveillance systems. Sonoma is expected to cost just one-tenth the price of comparably sized sensor systems. Cameras mounted on an airborne platform constantly monitor an area, feeding data to the ground for real-time analysis. Sonoma was designed to provide real-time data for actionable intelligence in situations such as monitoring traffic, special events, border security, and harbors. If a Sonoma system had been available in the aftermath of the Katrina and Rita hurricanes, emergency responders would have had real-time information on roads, water levels, and traffic conditions, perhaps saving many lives.

  15. SURA-IOOS Coastal Inundation Testbed Inter-Model Evaluation of Tides, Waves, and Hurricane Surge in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, P. C.; Donahue, A.; Westerink, J. J.; Luettich, R.; Zheng, L.; Weisberg, R. H.; Wang, H. V.; Slinn, D. N.; Davis, J. R.; Huang, Y.; Teng, Y.; Forrest, D.; Haase, A.; Kramer, A.; Rhome, J.; Feyen, J. C.; Signell, R. P.; Hanson, J. L.; Taylor, A.; Hope, M.; Kennedy, A. B.; Smith, J. M.; Powell, M. D.; Cardone, V. J.; Cox, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    The Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA), in collaboration with the NOAA Integrated Ocean Observing System program and other federal partners, developed a testbed to help accelerate progress in both research and the transition to operational use of models for both coastal and estuarine prediction. This testbed facilitates cyber-based sharing of data and tools, archival of observation data, and the development of cross-platform tools to efficiently access, visualize, skill assess, and evaluate model results. In addition, this testbed enables the modeling community to quantitatively assess the behavior (e.g., skill, robustness, execution speed) and implementation requirements (e.g. resolution, parameterization, computer capacity) that characterize the suitability and performance of selected models from both operational and fundamental science perspectives. This presentation focuses on the tropical coastal inundation component of the testbed and compares a variety of model platforms as well as grids in simulating tides, and the wave and surge environments for two extremely well documented historical hurricanes, Hurricanes Rita (2005) and Ike (2008). Model platforms included are ADCIRC, FVCOM, SELFE, SLOSH, SWAN, and WWMII. Model validation assessments were performed on simulation results using numerous station observation data in the form of decomposed harmonic constituents, water level high water marks and hydrographs of water level and wave data. In addition, execution speed, inundation extents defined by differences in wetting/drying schemes, resolution and parameterization sensitivities are also explored.

  16. A spatial correlation of the flow distribution on the outer continental shelf of Louisiana during the major hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico during the 2005 season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coor, J. L.; Li, C. Y.; Rouse, L. J.

    2007-12-01

    The 2005 hurricane season was unusually active, producing 31 named storms in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico. Of these 31 storms, 11 entered the Gulf of Mexico, the most notable of which were Hurricanes Cindy, Dennis, Katrina, and Rita. Data were collected during these storms by acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) based on 58 oil and gas platforms scattered across the outer continental shelf (OCS) region of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Nine to 31 ADCPs were active and recording data during each major storm passage through the Gulf of Mexico. Data were recorded from depths of 60 to 70m down to 1100 to 1200m, with a few extending to depths around 2000m. From these data, the flow distribution of the OCS region was studied with the use of time series and spectrum analysis. Preliminary analysis has shown temporal variations in the vertical structure, increased diurnal oscillation current velocities (by a factor of approximately two), near-inertial oscillations, and variations in the overall direction of the flow before, during, and after the passage of the hurricanes. Methods of harmonic analysis and rotary spectra were implemented in this study. These data and results provide an estimate of the spatial extent to which a hurricane influences subsurface currents.

  17. Evaluating the effectiveness of the customized Unna boot when treating patients with venous ulcers*

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Bruna Suelen Raymundo; Araujo, Cristina Souza; Atzingen, Dênia Amélia Novato Castelli Von; Mendonça, Adriana Rodrigues dos Anjos; Mesquita Filho, Marcos; de Medeiros, Mauricéia Lins

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lower limb ulcers are a serious medical and socioeconomic problem throughout the world. One type of chronic wound of the lower extremities is the venous ulcer. Therapeutic methods for treating venous ulcer include the use of the Unna boot. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the effectiveness of the customized Unna boot in the treatment of venous ulcers and to monitor the subsequent development and healing of the lesions. METHODS Prospective exploratory and quantitative longitudinal study, conducted at the "Outpatients Department (Wound Care) of the Grupo da Fraternidade Espírita Irmão Alexandre" in the city of Pouso Alegre (MG), Brazil, in 2008. The sample consisted of 32 patients with venous ulcers who underwent treatment with the Unna boot and 11 patients (control group), who used a simple bandage application. The patients'lesions were monitored over a three month period. RESULTS The average age of the predominently female (65.1%) patients was 61.88. From observing the differences in healing times at the three evaluation stages, it was clear that after the initial evaluation the wound area decreased in Groups 1 and 2 (p>0.05). CONCLUSION The use of the customized Unna boot contributes to quicker healing. However, over a period of three months the simple bandage applications were seen to be just as effective as the Unna boot method. PMID:23539002

  18. A low dose pre-irradiation induces radio- and heat-resistance via HDM2 and NO radicals, and is associated with p53 functioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, T.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this work was to clarify the effect of low dose pre-irradiation on radio- and heat-sensitivity. Wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 cells derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line were used. The parental H1299 cell line is p53-null. Cellular sensitivities were determined with a colony-forming assay. When wtp53 cells were exposed to a low dose X-irradiation, induction of radio- and heat-resistance was observed only in the absence of RITA (an inhibitor of p53-HDM2 interactions), aminoguanidine (an iNOS inhibitor) and c-PTIO (an NO radical scavenger). In contrast, the induced radio- and heat-resistance was not observed under similar conditions in mp53 cells. Moreover, heat-resistance as well as radio-resistance developed when wtp53 cells were treated with ISDN (an NO generating agent) alone. These findings suggest that NO radicals are an initiator of radio- and heat-resistance, and function through the activation of HDM2 and the depression of p53 accumulation.

  19. [Video-assisted thoracoscopic implantation of left ventricular pacing lead;usefulness of CARTO system;report of a case].

    PubMed

    Anraku, Yuriko; Mikamo, Akihito; Nakamura, Tamami; Tanaka, Yuya; Kurazumi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryou; Takahashi, Masaya; Shirasawa, Bungo; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2013-11-01

    A 70-year-old man, with a history of broad anterior myocardial infarction and repeated several hospitalizations due to heart failure, was referred to our institution for cardiac resynchronization therapy. However, as intravenous implantation of the left ventricular pacemaker lead was not possible, the patient underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic (VAT) implantation. We noted broad myocardial scarring and patent grafts, along with previously bypassed left internal thoracic artery( LITA)-left anterior descending artery (LAD) and right internal thoracic artery (RITA)-D1;thus, the area suitable for implantation of the left ventricule (LV) pacemaker was believed to be restricted. Therefore, we decided to determine the viable myocardial area by using CARTO system and identify the appropriate access port positions for the subsequent VAT surgery. After the LV pacemaker lead was implanted, the recorded pacing threshold was found to be <1.2 V at 0.5 ms. Thus, the CARTO system might be useful to preoperatively identify an area suitable for surgical implantation of a LV pacemaker lead in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:24322318

  20. Iatrogenic left main-stem dissection extending to the circumflex artery and retrogradely involving the left and non-coronary sinuses of Valsalva: iatrogenic aortocoronary dissection.

    PubMed

    Zwoliński, Radosław; Marcinkiewicz, Anna; Szymczyk, Konrad; Pietruszyński, Robert; Jaszewski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 57-year-old female who experienced iatrogenic left main-stem (LMS) dissection during elective coronary angiography. The dissection immediately affected the circumflex artery (Cx), causing its total distal occlusion, and the left anterior descending artery (LAD), in which a metal stent, implanted six months earlier, provided blood flow. The dissection spread retrogradely to the left and non-coronary sinuses of Valsalva (SV). Ventricular fibrillation (VF) occurred but the patient was successfully defibrillated. The subsequent introduction of a catheter resulted in recurrent VF, again successfully defibrillated. Total arterial myocardial revascularisation with double skeletonised internal thoracic arteries was performed without complications and SV repair was avoided. At the one-year follow up, a control multi-slice CT (MSCT) angiography was conducted, revealing complete healing of the SV and LMS dissections. It also showed native blood flow, the left internal thoracic artery (LITA) graft to the Cx occlusion, and a patent right internal thoracic artery (RITA) graft implanted to the LAD. PMID:26659650

  1. Prevention of Biliary Lesions That May Occur During Radiofrequency Ablation of the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Marchal, Frédéric; Elias, Dominique; Rauch, Philippe; Zarnegar, Rasa; Leroux, Agnès; Stines, Joseph; Verhaeghe, Jean-Luc; Guillemin, François; Carteaux, Jean Pierre; Villemot, Jean Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To prevent bile duct injury by using a cold 5% glucose isotonic solution cooling in the bile ducts when radiofrequency (RF) is performed in a porcine model. Summary Background Data: Complications that may arise during liver RF ablation include biliary stenosis and abscesses. Methods: The RITA 1500 generator was used for the experiments. Two lesions were performed in the left liver. The pigs were killed 1 or 3 weeks after the procedure. An ex vivo cholangiogram was obtained by direct injection into the main bile duct. Samples of RF lesions, of liver parenchyma near and at a distance from the RF lesions, underwent pathologic studies. Two groups of 20 pigs each were treated: one without perfusion of the bile ducts and the other with perfusion of cold 5% glucose isotonic solution into the bile ducts. The Pringle maneuver was used in 50% of the RF procedures. Radiologic lesions were classified as biliary stenosis, complete interruption of the bile duct, or extravasation of the radiologic contrast liquid. Results: Histologic lesions of the bile ducts were observed near the ablated RF lesion site and at a distance from the RF lesions when a Pringle maneuver was performed. Radiologic and histologic lesions of the bile ducts were significantly reduced (P < 0.0001) when the bile ducts were cooled. Conclusions: Cooling of the bile ducts with a cold 5% glucose isotonic solution significantly protects the intrahepatic bile ducts from damages caused by the heat generated by RF when performed close to the bile ducts. PMID:16371740

  2. Reading the World through the Skin and Ears: A New Perspective on Sensory Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Deroy, Ophelia; Auvray, Malika

    2012-01-01

    Sensory substitution devices aim at replacing or assisting one or several functions of a deficient sensory modality by means of another sensory modality. Despite the numerous studies and research programs devoted to their development and integration, sensory substitution devices have failed to live up to their goal of allowing one to “see with the skin” (White et al., 1970) or to “see with the brain” (Bach-y-Rita et al., 2003). These somewhat peremptory claims, as well as the research conducted so far, are based on an implicit perceptual paradigm. Such perceptual assumption accepts the equivalence between using a sensory substitution device and perceiving through a particular sensory modality. Our aim is to provide an alternative model, which defines sensory substitution as being closer to culturally implemented cognitive extensions of existing perceptual skills such as reading. In this article, we will show why the analogy with reading provides a better explanation of the actual findings, that is, both of the positive results achieved and of the limitations noticed across the field of research on sensory substitution. The parallel with the most recent two-route and interactive models of reading (e.g., Dehaene et al., 2005) generates a radically new way of approaching these results, by stressing the dependence of integration on the existing perceptual-semantic route. In addition, the present perspective enables us to generate innovative research questions and specific predictions which set the stage for future work. PMID:23162506

  3. Understanding the spatiotemporal distribution of soil moisture in a southern Arizonan dryland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, T. E.; Zreda, M. G.; Ferre, P. A.; Zweck, C.

    2011-12-01

    The spatiotemporal distribution of soil moisture is critical for partitioning the water, energy, and carbon cycles at a variety of scales. In drylands, soil moisture is intimately linked to rainfall recycling shown through autocorrelation with future events. In this research, we present a suite of soil moisture datasets at various scales from the Santa Rita Experimental Range in southern Arizona. Over the course of one dry and wet season we present a series of coupled soil moisture measurements at the hectare scale from volumetric, TDT, EMI, and cosmic ray probe techniques. In addition, we are able to quantify the uncertainty and support volume of each measurement type from laboratory and modeling experiments. Of particular importance, we investigate the relationship between neutron counts and average soil moisture via the neutron particle transport code MCNPx. By utilizing and understanding this key relationship, we are able to provide a global constraint to the more unconstrained EMI observations allowing us to better construct a spatiotemporal picture of infiltration, evapotranspiration, and redistribution of subsurface water around the footprint. With the improved understanding of cosmic ray probes we are closer to establishing a more formal and robust framework for coupled inversion techniques.

  4. Quantifying the influence of deep soil moisture on ecosystem albedo: The role of vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Mejia, Zulia Mayari; Papuga, Shirley Anne; Swetish, Jessica Blaine; van Leeuwen, Willem Jan Dirk; Szutu, Daphne; Hartfield, Kyle

    2014-05-01

    As changes in precipitation dynamics continue to alter the water availability in dryland ecosystems, understanding the feedbacks between the vegetation and the hydrologic cycle and their influence on the climate system is critically important. We designed a field campaign to examine the influence of two-layer soil moisture control on bare and canopy albedo dynamics in a semiarid shrubland ecosystem. We conducted this campaign during 2011 and 2012 within the tower footprint of the Santa Rita Creosote Ameriflux site. Albedo field measurements fell into one of four Cases within a two-layer soil moisture framework based on permutations of whether the shallow and deep soil layers were wet or dry. Using these Cases, we identified differences in how shallow and deep soil moisture influence canopy and bare albedo. Then, by varying the number of canopy and bare patches within a gridded framework, we explore the influence of vegetation and soil moisture on ecosystem albedo. Our results highlight the importance of deep soil moisture in land surface-atmosphere interactions through its influence on aboveground vegetation characteristics. For instance, we show how green-up of the vegetation is triggered by deep soil moisture, and link deep soil moisture to a decrease in canopy albedo. Understanding relationships between vegetation and deep soil moisture will provide important insights into feedbacks between the hydrologic cycle and the climate system.

  5. Dynamics of the Stratiform Sector of a Tropical Cyclone Rainband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didlake, A. C.; Houze, R.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne Doppler radar collected observations of the stationary rainband complex of Hurricane Rita (2005) in exceptional detail. Dynamics of the stationary rainband complex play a large role in the evolution of the tropical cyclone's internal structure. The stratiform sector of the stationary rainband complex occurs on the downwind end of the complex. This stratiform rainband is a mesoscale feature consisting of nearly uniform precipitation and weak vertical velocities from collapsing convective cells. Upward transport and associated latent heating occur within the stratiform cloud layer in the form of rising radial outflow. Below the cloud layer, descending radial inflow was driven by horizontal buoyancy gradients, and thus horizontal vorticity generation, introduced by regions of sublimational and melting cooling. The organization of this transport initially is robust but fades downwind as the convection dissipates. This descending inflow advected higher angular momentum inward, which resulted in the development of a midlevel tangential jet and broadening of the tangential wind field. This circulation may have also contributed to ventilation of the eyewall as inflow of low-entropy air continued past the rainband in both the boundary layer and midlevels. Given the expanse of the stratiform rainband region, its thermodynamic and kinematic impacts likely help to modify the structure and intensity of the overall storm.

  6. Comparative rates of wind versus water erosion from a small semiarid watershed in southern Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.-G.; Nearing, M. A.; Liu, B. Y.; Van Pelt, R. S.; Stone, J. J.; Wei, H.; Scott, R. L.

    2011-11-01

    The relative erosion rates of wind and water erosion have rarely been studied simultaneously and are poorly quantified. In this study, wind and water erosion rates were simultaneously measured and compared over 2 yrs for a small rangeland watershed in the Santa Rita Experimental Range in southern Arizona. Average horizontal, wind-driven sediment flux was 7.0 g m -1 d -1 during the study period. The combined soil erosion rate by water and wind was 7.60 t ha -1 yr -1, with only 0.08 t ha -1 yr -1 attributed to wind during the 2 yrs. The results of this study showed that rates of soil erosion by water greatly exceeded rates of erosion by wind during the study period in this small watershed. Comparison between these results and other recent studies in the same area suggest that measurements of horizontal sediment fluxes by wind and water are not necessarily indicative of relative net soil erosion rates on a unit area basis because the measurements of the wind flux sediment cannot be considered as mass of soil loss per unit area per unit time.

  7. CAMEA—A novel multiplexing analyzer for neutron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groitl, Felix; Graf, Dieter; Birk, Jonas Okkels; Markó, Márton; Bartkowiak, Marek; Filges, Uwe; Niedermayer, Christof; Rüegg, Christian; Rønnow, Henrik M.

    2016-03-01

    The analyzer detector system continuous angle multiple energy analysis will be installed on the cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer RITA-2 at SINQ, PSI. CAMEA is optimized for efficiency in the horizontal scattering plane enabling rapid and detailed mapping of excitations. As a novelty the design employs a series of several sequential upward scattering analyzer arcs. Each arc is set to a different, fixed, final energy and scatters neutrons towards position sensitive detectors. Thus, neutrons with different final energies are recorded simultaneously over a large angular range. In a single data-acquisition many entire constant-energy lines in the horizontal scattering plane are recorded for a quasi-continuous angular coverage of about 60°. With a large combined coverage in energy and momentum, this will result in a very efficient spectrometer, which will be particularly suited for parametric studies under extreme conditions with restrictive sample environments (high field magnets or pressure cells) and for small samples of novel materials. In this paper we outline the concept and the specifications of the instrument currently under construction.

  8. Effect of solar activity on the repetitiveness of some meteorological phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorović, Nedeljko; Vujović, Dragana

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we research the relationship between solar activity and the weather on Earth. This research is based on the assumption that every ejection of magnetic field energy and particles from the Sun (also known as Solar wind) has direct effects on the Earth's weather. The impact of coronal holes and active regions on cold air advection (cold fronts, precipitation, and temperature decrease on the surface and higher layers) in the Belgrade region (Serbia) was analyzed. Some active regions and coronal holes appear to be in a geo-effective position nearly every 27 days, which is the duration of a solar rotation. A similar period of repetitiveness (27-29 days) of the passage of the cold front, and maximum and minimum temperatures measured at surface and at levels of 850 and 500 hPa were detected. We found that 10-12 days after Solar wind velocity starts significantly increasing, we could expect the passage of a cold front. After eight days, the maximum temperatures in the Belgrade region are measured, and it was found that their minimum values appear after 12-16 days. The maximum amount of precipitation occurs 14 days after Solar wind is observed. A recurring period of nearly 27 days of different phases of development for hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma was found. This analysis confirmed that the intervals of time between two occurrences of some particular meteorological parameter correlate well with Solar wind and A index.

  9. Measurements with the TRITEL system in the Columbus Laboratory of the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirn, Attila; Reitz, Guenther; Zabori, Balazs; Palfalvi, Jozsef K.; Burmeister, Soenke; Pazmandi, Tamas; Apathy, Istvan; Szanto, Peter; Deme, Sandor; Csoke, Antal

    In cooperation with BL-Electronics Ltd. a three-dimensional silicon detector telescope (TRITEL) was developed at MTA Centre for Energy Research (MTA EK, the former MTA KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute) in the past years. The main objective of the instrument was to measure not only the absorbed dose in the cosmic radiation field, but also the linear energy (LET) spectrum of the charged particles and their average quality factor in three mutually orthogonal directions in order to give an estimation of the equivalent dose, too. In the frame of the EC project SURE the TRITEL system was delivered to the European Columbus Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) in October 31, 2012 and it was operated there between November 6, 2012 and May 10, 2013. Our presentation addresses the main characteristics of the TRITEL-SURE dosimetry system and the first measurement results obtained in the Columbus module. The TRITEL-SURE experiment is co-funded by the EC project SURE, contract number RITA-CT-2006-026069 and by the Government of Hungary through ESA Contracts 98057 and 4000108072/13/NL/KML under the PECS (Plan for European Cooperating States). The view expressed herein can in no way be taken to reflect the official opinion of the European Space Agency.

  10. Structure and Evolution of Band-shaped Convective Rainbands in Typhoon Marokot (2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Typhoon Morakot struck Taiwan on the night of Friday 7 August 2009 as a Category 1 storm (with sustained winds of 80 knots). Although the center made landfall in Hualien county along the central east coast of Taiwan, it was southern Taiwan that received the heaviest rainfall (2878 mm of rain in three days), resulting in the worst flooding over Taiwan in 50 years. This record-breaking rainfall is produced by the continuous impingement of typhoon rainbands with the steep terrain along the southern Central Mountain Range (CMR). In this study, rainband structures of Typhoon Morakot (2009) are analyzed and compared with the observations using outputs from the cloud-resolving WRF model with high spatial resolution (1-km horizontal grid spacing). The characteristics of the unique band-shaped convective rainband in TC Morakot are explained with respect to the following details: (i) horizontal shape, (ii) structure, and (iii) development and evolution process. The kinematic and precipitation structures of convective-scale elements in the Morakot rainbands are analyzed and compared with those of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (2005).

  11. The value of wetlands in protecting southeast louisiana from hurricane storm surges.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Edward B; Georgiou, Ioannis Y; Enchelmeyer, Brian; Reed, Denise J

    2013-01-01

    The Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004 and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 have spurred global interest in the role of coastal wetlands and vegetation in reducing storm surge and flood damages. Evidence that coastal wetlands reduce storm surge and attenuate waves is often cited in support of restoring Gulf Coast wetlands to protect coastal communities and property from hurricane damage. Yet interdisciplinary studies combining hydrodynamic and economic analysis to explore this relationship for temperate marshes in the Gulf are lacking. By combining hydrodynamic analysis of simulated hurricane storm surges and economic valuation of expected property damages, we show that the presence of coastal marshes and their vegetation has a demonstrable effect on reducing storm surge levels, thus generating significant values in terms of protecting property in southeast Louisiana. Simulations for four storms along a sea to land transect show that surge levels decline with wetland continuity and vegetation roughness. Regressions confirm that wetland continuity and vegetation along the transect are effective in reducing storm surge levels. A 0.1 increase in wetland continuity per meter reduces property damages for the average affected area analyzed in southeast Louisiana, which includes New Orleans, by $99-$133, and a 0.001 increase in vegetation roughness decreases damages by $24-$43. These reduced damages are equivalent to saving 3 to 5 and 1 to 2 properties per storm for the average area, respectively. PMID:23536815

  12. Reclamation of saltwater-contaminated soil in Big Lake field

    SciTech Connect

    Weathers, M.L.; Moore, K.M.; Ford, D.L.; Curlee, C.K.

    1994-12-31

    Since the oil discovery at Santa Rita No. 1 in 1923, Big Lake in Reagan County, Texas, has produced 135 million bbl of oil and 1 billion bbl of saltwater. Until the early 1960`s, the accepted disposal method for saltwater was surface discharge to evaporation ponds north of the field. Approximately 200 million bbl of saltwater was discharged, resulting in 11 mi{sup 2} of barren landscape characterized by saline soils incapable of supporting vegetation. In 1989 an experimental project was initiated to reclaim 0.5 mi{sup 2} of affected area to rangeland productivity. An underground drainage system was installed to drain near-surface, salt-saturated perched water. Earthern terrances were constructed to reduce rainfall runoff and increase percolation to facilitate leaching of salts from the surface soil. Salt-saturated groundwater is drained by the system and pumped to injection wells for disposal. The excellent revegetation that has occurred over the test area after 2 years of operations is encouraging and has shown the need for enhancing the existing system with supplemental water from fresh-water wells, application of soil amending agents, and selective planting of salt-tolerant species.

  13. Memories and Promises of the Enteric Nervous System and Its Functions.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    This is a very personal reminiscence of the long period of Enteric Nervous System research in which I have been involved. I started to work on the gut in the early 60s really because in Turin when I arrived from Argentina, where my family migrated temporarily after the WWII, nobody was seriously working on the brain. In Anatomy they were studying the neural "intramural plexuses" and that for me was close enough to the nervous system. I grew up in the mountains near Turin near the French border where our ex-family house still bears our name. I joined the Department of Anatomy as an intern student and I was privileged to seat at a desk where a previous generation of young scientists, who studied under the professor of Anatomy A. Levi, the founder of the methods for culturing neural tissue. They were Salvador Luria, Renato Dulbecco and Rita Levi-Montalcini, who, after migrating to the USA, were each were given the Noble prize. PMID:27379629

  14. Hurricane-induced failure of low salinity wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Howes, Nick C.; FitzGerald, Duncan M.; Hughes, Zoe J.; Georgiou, Ioannis Y.; Kulp, Mark A.; Miner, Michael D.; Smith, Jane M.; Barras, John A.

    2010-01-01

    During the 2005 hurricane season, the storm surge and wave field associated with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita eroded 527 km2 of wetlands within the Louisiana coastal plain. Low salinity wetlands were preferentially eroded, while higher salinity wetlands remained robust and largely unchanged. Here we highlight geotechnical differences between the soil profiles of high and low salinity regimes, which are controlled by vegetation and result in differential erosion. In low salinity wetlands, a weak zone (shear strength 500–1450 Pa) was observed ∼30 cm below the marsh surface, coinciding with the base of rooting. High salinity wetlands had no such zone (shear strengths > 4500 Pa) and contained deeper rooting. Storm waves during Hurricane Katrina produced shear stresses between 425–3600 Pa, sufficient to cause widespread erosion of the low salinity wetlands. Vegetation in low salinity marshes is subject to shallower rooting and is susceptible to erosion during large magnitude storms; these conditions may be exacerbated by low inorganic sediment content and high nutrient inputs. The dramatic difference in resiliency of fresh versus more saline marshes suggests that the introduction of freshwater to marshes as part of restoration efforts may therefore weaken existing wetlands rendering them vulnerable to hurricanes. PMID:20660777

  15. The conserved Trp114 residue of thioredoxin reductase 1 has a redox sensor-like function triggering oligomerization and crosslinking upon oxidative stress related to cell death

    PubMed Central

    Xu, J; Eriksson, S E; Cebula, M; Sandalova, T; Hedström, E; Pader, I; Cheng, Q; Myers, C R; Antholine, W E; Nagy, P; Hellman, U; Selivanova, G; Lindqvist, Y; Arnér, E S J

    2015-01-01

    The selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) has several key roles in cellular redox systems and reductive pathways. Here we discovered that an evolutionarily conserved and surface-exposed tryptophan residue of the enzyme (Trp114) is excessively reactive to oxidation and exerts regulatory functions. The results indicate that it serves as an electron relay communicating with the FAD moiety of the enzyme, and, when oxidized, it facilitates oligomerization of TrxR1 into tetramers and higher multimers of dimers. A covalent link can also be formed between two oxidized Trp114 residues of two subunits from two separate TrxR1 dimers, as found both in cell extracts and in a crystal structure of tetrameric TrxR1. Formation of covalently linked TrxR1 subunits became exaggerated in cells on treatment with the pro-oxidant p53-reactivating anticancer compound RITA, in direct correlation with triggering of a cell death that could be prevented by antioxidant treatment. These results collectively suggest that Trp114 of TrxR1 serves a function reminiscent of an irreversible sensor for excessive oxidation, thereby presenting a previously unrecognized level of regulation of TrxR1 function in relation to cellular redox state and cell death induction. PMID:25611390

  16. The prolyl-isomerase Pin1 activates the mitochondrial death program of p53

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, G; Mioni, M; Giorgi, C; Ruggeri, N; Pinton, P; Moll, U; Mantovani, F; Del Sal, G

    2013-01-01

    In response to intense stress, the tumor protein p53 (p53) tumor suppressor rapidly mounts a direct mitochondrial death program that precedes transcription-mediated apoptosis. By eliminating severely damaged cells, this pathway contributes to tumor suppression as well as to cancer cell killing induced by both genotoxic drugs and non-genotoxic p53-reactivating molecules. Here we have explored the role had in this pathway by the prolyl-isomerase Pin1 (peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase, NIMA-interacting 1), a crucial transducer of p53's phosphorylation into conformational changes unleashing its pro-apoptotic activity. We show that Pin1 promotes stress-induced localization of p53 to mitochondria both in vitro and in vivo. In particular, we demonstrate that upon stress-induced phosphorylation of p53 on Ser46 by homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2, Pin1 stimulates its mitochondrial trafficking signal, that is, monoubiquitination. This pathway is induced also by the p53-activating molecule RITA, and we demonstrate the strong requirement of Pin1 for the induction of mitochondrial apoptosis by this compound. These findings have significant implications for treatment of p53-expressing tumors and for prospective use of p53-activating compounds in clinics. PMID:22935610

  17. Shoemaker-Levy 9 Comet Impact Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A press conference held on July 21, 1994, about the impact of some of the fragments from Comet Shoemaker Levy is presented. The press conference opened with a still of Jupiter, showing the impact site of several fragments. The following people were on the panel: (1) Hal Weaver, from the Space Telescope Science Institute, (2) Rita Beebe from New Mexico State University, (3) Lucy McFadden from the University of California and the University of Maryland, (4) David Levy, the co-discoverer of the Shoemaker-Levy comet. The moderator was Eugene Shoemaker. The discussion was about the impact of the fragments on Jupiter. There were 21 pieces that were counted from earlier observations. There was some discussion about the further fragmentation of Q into two pieces. There was also some discussion about the impact on the planet of several fragments. These were due to hit ten hours apart on about the same spot. There were reports from the observatories around the world, including a tape from the Lowell Observatory, a summary of the views from the Galileo orbiter, a video of the impacts from the G fragment, and views of the results from the impact of the C and G fragments as viewed from Australia.

  18. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY ON FORMALDEHYDE EMISSIONS IN TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-04-01

    The effect of temperature and humidity on formaldehyde emissions from samples collected from temporary housing units (THUs) was studied. The THUs were supplied by the U.S Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) to families that lost their homes in Louisiana and Mississippi during the Hurricane Katrina and Rita disasters. Based on a previous study 1, 2, four of the composite wood surface materials that dominated contributions to indoor formaldehyde were selected to analyze the effects of temperature and humidity on the emission factors. Humidity equilibration experiments were carried out on two of the samples to determine how long the samples take to equilibrate with the surrounding environmental conditions. Small chamber experiments were then conducted to measure emission factors for the four surface materials at various temperature and humidity conditions. The samples were analyzed for formaldehyde via high performance liquid chromatography. The experiments showed that increases in temperature or humidity contributed to an increase in emission factors. A linear regression model was built using natural log of percentage relative humidity (RH) and inverse of temperature (in K) as predictor variables, and natural log of emission factors as the target variable. The coefficients of both inverse temperature and log relative humidity with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. This study should assist to retrospectively estimate indoor formaldehyde exposures of occupants of temporary housing units (THUs).

  19. Challenges of deflecting an asteroid or cometary nucleus with a nuclear burst

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Paul A; Plesko, Cathy S; Clement, Ryan R C; Conlon, Leann M; Weaver, Robert P; Guzik, Joyce A; Pritchett - Sheets, Lori A; Huebner, Walter F

    2009-01-01

    There are many natural disasters that humanity has to deal with over time. These include earthquakes, tsunami, hurricanes, floods, asteroid strikes, and so on. Many of these disasters occur slowly enough that some advance warning of which areas will be affected is possible. However, in almost all cases, the response is to evacuate the area to be affected and deal with the damage later. The evacuations for hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the US Gulf Coast in 2005 demonstrated the chaos that can result. In contrast with other natural disasters. it is likely that an asteroid or cometary nucleus on a collision course with Earth is likely to be detected with enough warning time to possibly deflect it away from the collision course. Thanks to near-Earth object (NEO) surveys, people are working towards a goal of cataloging at least 90% of all near-Earth objects with diameters larger than {approx}140 meters in the next decade. The question is how to mitigate the threat from an asteroid or cometary nucleus found to be on a collision course. We briefly review some possible methods, describing their good and bad points, and then embark on a more detailed description of using a nuclear munition in standoff mode to deflect an asteroid or cometary nucleus before it can hit Earth.

  20. Assessing O&M Practices at Federal Facilities - What do the ESET Data Tell Us

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, W. D.

    2008-02-22

    In late 2005, the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Energy Saving Expert Teams (ESET) conducted assessments at 28 Federal sites. These assessments were directed by President Bush in a memorandum to Federal agencies in response to projected natural gas shortages resulting from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The primary focus of the ESET assessments was to identify low-cost and no-cost (operations and maintenance-oriented) energy efficiency measures that the sites could quickly and easily adopt to relieve the expected supply shortfall, while also realizing significant energy and cost savings. The assessments successfully identified large potential natural gas savings opportunities available at low-cost/no-cost through energy efficiency measures such as boiler tune-ups, repair of steam and condensate leaks, repair of missing and/or damaged insulation, adjusting temperature and setback setpoints, and modifying equipment operating schedules. Because these savings opportunities were largely anticipated, the issue now becomes one of helping facility managers more easily identify and address these opportunities as they arise.

  1. Challenges of deflecting an asteroid or comet nucleus with a nuclear burst

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Paul A; Plesko, Cathy S; Clement, Ryan R. C.; Conlon, Le Ann M; Weaver, Robert P; Guzik, Joyce A; Pritchett - Sheets, Lori A; Huebner, Walter F

    2009-01-01

    There are many natural disasters that humanity has to deal with over time. These include earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, floods, asteroid strikes, and so on. Some of these disasters occur slowly enough that some advance warning is possible for affected areas. In this case, the response is to evacuate the affected area and deal wilh the damage later. The Katrina and Rita hurricane evacuations on the U.S. Gulf Coasl in 2005 demonstrated the chaos that can result from such a response. In contrast with other natural disasters, it is likely that an asteroid or comet nucleus on a collision course with Earth will be detected with enough warning time to possibly deflect it away. Thanks to Near-Earth Object (NED) surveys, people are working towards a goal of cataloging at least 90% of all near-Earth objects with diameters larger than {approx} 140 meters in the next fifteen years. The important question then, is how to mitigate the threat from an asteroid or comet nucleus found to be on a collision course with Earth. In this paper. we briefly review some possible deflection methods, describe their good and bad points, and then embark on a more detailed description of using nuclear munitions in a standoff mode to deflect the asteroid or comet nucleus before it can hit Earth.

  2. Assessing O&M Practices at Federal Facilities - What do the ESET Data Tell Us

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, W. D.

    2006-09-13

    In late 2005, the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Energy Saving Expert Teams (ESET) conducted assessments at 28 Federal sites. These assessments were directed by President Bush in a memorandum to Federal agencies in response to projected natural gas shortages resulting from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The primary focus of the ESET assessments was to identify low-cost and no-cost (operations and maintenance-oriented) energy efficiency measures that the sites could quickly and easily adopt to relieve the expected supply shortfall, while also realizing significant energy and cost savings. The assessments successfully identified large potential natural gas savings opportunities available at low-cost/no-cost through energy efficiency measures such as boiler tune-ups, repair of steam and condensate leaks, repair of missing and/or damaged insulation, adjusting temperature and setback setpoints, and modifying equipment operating schedules. Because these savings opportunities were largely anticipated, the issue now becomes one of helping facility managers more easily identify and address these opportunities as they arise.

  3. Influence of sparkle and saccades on tongue electro-stimulation-based vision substitution of 2D vectors.

    PubMed

    Chekhchoukh, Abdessalem; Glade, Nicolas

    2012-06-01

    Vision substitution by electro-stimulation has been studied since the 60s beginning with P. Bach-y-Rita. Camera pictures or movies encoded in gray levels are displayed using an electro-stimulation display device on the surface of a body part, such as the skin or the tongue. Medical-technical devices have been developed on this principle to compensate for sensory-motor disabilities such as blindness or loss of balance, or to guide specific actions, such as surgery. However, the electrical signals of stationary or moving slowly moving objects, displayed on a Tongue display unit (TDU), are quickly lost due to saturation of receptors undergoing electrostimulation. We propose to add random saccades or sparkle to the displayed visual scene to increase the quality of pattern recognition by the subjects. In the present experimental trimodal study (normal vision, TDU vision substitution, or both), we show that the presence of a moderate sparkle level enhances the perception of the direction of lines drawn on a TDU and reduces the response time. PMID:22302363

  4. Biophysical characterization and management effects on semiarid rangeland observed from Landsat ETM+ data

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Hongliang; Liang, Shunlin; McClaran, Mitchell P.; van Leeuwen, Willem J. D.; Drake, Sam; Marsh, Stuart E.; Thomson, Allison M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Rosenberg, Norman J.

    2005-01-20

    Semi-arid rangelands are very sensitive to global climatic change; studies of their biophysical attributes are crucial to understanding the dynamics of rangeland ecosystems under human disturbance. In the Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER), Arizona, the vegetation has changed considerably and there have been many management activities applied. This study calculates seven surface variables: the enhanced vegetation index (EVI), the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), surface albedos (total shortwave, visible and near-infrared), leaf area index (LAI) and the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by green vegetation (FPAR) from the Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) data. Comparison with the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) vegetation index and albedo products indicate they agree well with our estimates from ETM+ while their LAI and FPAR are larger than ETM+. Human disturbance has significantly changed the cover types and biophysical conditions. Statistical tests indicate that surface albedos increased and FPAR decreased at all sites. The recovery will require more than 67 years, and is about 50% complete within 40 years at the higher elevation. Grass cover, vegetation indices, albedos and LAI recovered from cutting faster at the higher elevation. Woody plants, vegetation indices and LAI have recovered to their original characteristics after 65 years at the lower elevation. More studies are needed to examine the spectral characteristics of different ground components.

  5. The US Air Force Aerial Spray Unit: a history of large area disease vector control operations, WWII through Katrina.

    PubMed

    Breidenbaugh, Mark; Haagsma, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The US Air Force has had a long history of aerial applications of pesticides to fulfill a variety of missions, the most important being the protection of troops through the minimization of arthropod vectors capable of disease transmission. Beginning in World War II, aerial application of pesticides by the military has effectively controlled vector and nuisance pest populations in a variety of environments. Currently, the military aerial spray capability resides in the US Air Force Reserve (USAFR), which operates and maintains C-130 airplanes capable of a variety of missions, including ultra low volume applications for vector and nuisance pests, as well as higher volume aerial applications of herbicides and oil-spill dispersants. The USAFR aerial spray assets are the only such fixed-wing aerial spray assets within the Department of Defense. In addition to troop protection, the USAFR Aerial Spray Unit has participated in a number of humanitarian/relief missions, most recently in the response to the 2005 Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, which heavily damaged the Gulf Coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas. This article provides historical background on the Air Force Aerial Spray Unit and describes the operations in Louisiana in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. PMID:20088030

  6. Earth Scientists and Public Policy: Have We Failed New Orleans?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Timothy H.; Dokka, Roy K.

    2008-03-01

    Earth scientists rarely influence public policy or urban planning. In defiance of geologic reality, cities are established on or expanded into floodplains, wetlands, earthquake faults, and active volcanoes. One exception to our lack of influence is that shortly after a major natural disaster, there is a brief window of heightened public awareness that may lead to sensible regulation or relocation of infrastructure. After the 1933 Long Beach earthquake, for example, California building codes were improved to reduce earthquake hazard. After Mississippi River flooding in 1993, several U.S. cities designated parts of their low-lying floodplain as green space. How have we done with New Orleans and southern Louisiana, devastated by hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005? Unfortunately, not very well. In the aftermath of those storms, an opportunity existed to educate engineers, policy makers, and the public about long-term hazards associated with land subsidence and sea level rise. This message was not conveyed, and expensive rebuilding has proceeded under the false assumption of relative coastal stability and slow sea level rise.

  7. Kidney patient care in disasters: lessons from the hurricanes and earthquake of 2005.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Jeffrey B; Ball, Lynda K; Cohen, Andrew; Kenney, Robert J; Lempert, Kenneth D; Miller, Paul E; Muntner, Paul; Qureshi, Nauman; Yelton, Sarah A

    2007-07-01

    The active 2005 hurricane season alerted Americans to the pressing need for a more effective response to mass casualty incidents. The kidney patient community was particularly affected. Ninety-four dialysis facilities in the Gulf Coast states closed for at least 1 wk in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, and additional units were affected by evacuation of dialysis patients. Dialysis units along the Gulf Coast were also affected by Hurricanes Rita and Wilma. Existing emergency response plans were inadequate in providing continuity of care for kidney patients. The Kashmir, South Asia, earthquake of October 2005 killed 97,000 individuals. Building collapse was associated with widespread crush injury, and many patients required temporary hemodialysis. Several regions of the United States have the potential for catastrophic earthquakes. The Kidney Community Emergency Response Coalition has recently issued recommendations for patients, dialysis facilities, and providers, with a goal to improve care of kidney patients in future domestic disasters. With suitable planning, the nephrology community can do much to ensure the continuity of medical care for kidney patients in the face of a wide range of possible natural and human-made disasters. PMID:17699499

  8. Assimilation of hyperspectral satellite radiance observations within tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Haidao

    The availability of high resolution temperature and water vapor data is critical for the study of mesoscale scale weather phenomena (e.g., convective initiations, and tropical cyclones). As hyperspectral infrared sounders, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) could provide high resolution atmospheric profiles by measuring radiations in many thousands of different channels. This work focuses on the assessment of the potential values of satellite hyperspectral radiance data on the study of convective initiations (CI) and the assimilation of AIRS radiance observations within tropical storms. First, the potential capability of hyperspectral infrared measurements (GIFTS) to provide convective precipitation forecasts has been studied and assessed. Using both the observed and the model-predicted profiles as input to the GIFTS radiative transfer model (RTM), it is shown that the simulated GIFTS radiance could capture the high vertical and temporal variability of the real and modeled atmosphere prior to a convective initiation, as well as the differences between observations and model forecasts. This study suggests the potential for hyperspectral infrared radiance data to make an important contribution to the improvement of the forecast skill of convective precipitation. Second, as the first step toward applying AIRS data to tropical cyclone (TC) prediction, a set of dropsonde profiles during Hurricane Rita (2005) is used to simulate AIRS radiance data and to assess the ability of AIRS data in capturing the vertical variability within TCs through one-dimensional variational (1D-Var) twin experiments. The AIRS observation errors and background errors are first estimated. Five sets of 1D-Var twin experiments are then performed using different combinations of AIRS channels. Finally, results from these 1D-Var experiments are analyzed. Major findings are: (1) AIRS radiance data contain useful information about

  9. Assessment of local seismic response of the Stracciacappa maar (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscatelli, Massimiliano; Simionato, Maurizio; Gaudiosi, Iolanda; Sottili, Gianluca; Pagliaroli, Alessandro; Sirianni, Pietro; Pileggi, Domenico; Avalle, Alessandra; Giallini, Silvia; Razzano, Roberto; Mancini, Marco; Vignaroli, Gianluca; Piscitelli, Sabatino; Bellanova, Jessica; Calamita, Giuseppe; Perrone, Angela; Lanzo, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we face the definition of a subsoil model aimed at the local seismic response assessment of the Stracciacappa maar (Sabatini Volcanic District, central Italy) (e.g., De Rita and Zanetti, 1986; Marra et al., 2014). The pyroclastic succession of Stracciacappa records two main hydromagmatic eruptive phases ended about 0.09 Ma ago (e.g., Sottili et al., 2010). The preserved crater, with a diameter of about 1500 meters and a crater floor of about 30-40 m, hosted a lake until it was drained in AD 1834. In the framework of the cooperation between CNR IGAG and Italian Department of Civil Protection (DPC) of the Presidency of Council of Ministers (DPC funds 2014), a multidisciplinary approach including detailed stratigraphic and geophysical study has been carried out in the Stracciacappa maar and surrounding areas. New geological map and cross sections illustrate the complex geometric relationships between the thick pyroclastic surge succession, showing diffuse sandwave structures, and even meter-sized lava ballistic. A composite interdigitation between lacustrine and epiclastic debris sediments fills the crater floor. A continuous coring borehole was drilled inside the crater, 45 meters deep from the wellhead, with sampling of undisturbed samples. In addition, four MASW and one SCPTU test were carried out, in order to define the velocity profile of the s-waves within the lacustrine deposits. This Vs profile was then extended at higher depths by using the results of four 2D seismic passive arrays. Moreover, in order to define the resonance frequency of sedimentary covers via the HVSR technique, twenty-eight measurements were carried out with digital sensor Tromino® and seven measurements were performed with a Lennartz® Le-3D/5s sensor with Lennartz Marslite® digitizer. Finally, three electrical resistivity tomography tests, with a total length of about 3500 meters, were carried out with the purpose of constraining the subsoil model. Regarding the non linear

  10. A prospective population based study of changes in alcohol use and binge drinking after a mass traumatic event*

    PubMed Central

    Cerdá, Magdalena; Tracy, Melissa; Galea, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have assessed changes in alcohol use before and after a massive disaster. We investigated the contribution of exposure to traumatic events and stressors related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita to alcohol use and binge drinking. We used data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics collected in Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama on adults aged 18–85 (n=439): 1) data from 1968–2005 on household income; 2) data from 2005 and 2007 on total number of drinks per year and number of days the respondent binged; and 3) data from 2007 on exposure to hurricane-related traumatic events and post-hurricane stressors. Exposure to each additional hurricane-related traumatic event was associated with 79.2 more drinks and 2.46 times higher odds of binge drinking for more days in the past year (95% CI: 1.09, 5.55), while more post-disaster stressors were associated with 16.5 more drinks and 1.23 times higher odds of binge drinking for more days in the past year (95% CI: 0.99, 1.51). Respondents who had followed a lower lifetime income trajectory and were exposed to more lifetime traumatic events experienced the highest risk of reporting increased alcohol use given exposure to hurricane-related traumatic events and post-hurricane stressors. Disaster-related traumatic events and the proliferation of post-disaster stressors may result in increased post-disaster alcohol use and abuse. Disaster-related exposures may have a particularly strong impact among individuals with a history of social and economic adversity, widening preexisting health disparities. PMID:20977977

  11. Report on DOE support for GSC13 travel award

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Jack Anthony

    2012-04-18

    Consortium. The 3-day conference was held at the Kingkey Palace Hotel, Shenzhen, China, on March 5-7th, 2012, and was hosted by the Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI). The meeting was entitled ‘From Genomes to Interactions to Communities to Models’ and aimed to be a scientific meeting that highlighted the role of data standards associated with genomic, metagenomic and amplicon sequence data, and the contextual information associated with the sample that data was generated from. To this end the meeting focused on genomic projects for animals, plants, fungi and viruses, metagenomic studies in host-microbe interactions, and community dynamics in microbial communities. In addition the meeting hosted a Genomic Observatories Network session, a GSC biodiversity working group session, and a Microbiology of the Built Environment session sponsored by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The meeting was very well organized by the local hosts at BGI, and all attendees reported that they were very happy with the outcome, service and quality of the science presented. Highlights were keynotes by Rita Colwell, Mitch Sogin and Jim Tiedje. The 5 attendees paid for by the DOE award were Daniel Smith and Jared Wilkening (University of Chicago); Patrick Chain (Los Alamos National Laboratory), Austin Davis-Richardson (University of Florida) and Greg Caporoaso (University of Northern Arizona). Each attendee was able to either present or become involved with the attending scientists, and each reported that they had got something significant out of the meeting. Here are detailed their personal accounts of the GSC13 meeting. We thank DOE for the helping to fund this valuable outreach initiative, and for supporting the attendance of these bright young scientists at this important meeting.

  12. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Brownfields/ land-reuse site tool.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Gary D; Berman, Laurel; Leann, Kathryn; Bing, Lemley

    2012-12-01

    As part of our continuing effort to highlight innovative approaches to improving the health and environment of communities, the Journal is pleased to bring back the bimonthly column from the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). The ATSDR, based in Atlanta, Georgia, is a federal public health agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and shares a common office of the Director with the National Center for Environmental Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). ATSDR serves the public by using the best science, taking responsive public health actions, and providing trusted health information to prevent harmful exposures and diseases related to toxic substances. The purpose of this column is to inform readers of ATSDR's activities and initiatives to better understand the relationship between exposure to hazardous substances in the environment and their impact on human health and how to protect public health. We believe that the column will provide a valuable resource to our readership by helping to make known the considerable resources and expertise that ATSDR has available to assist communities, states, and others to assure good environmental health practice for all is served. The conclusions of this article are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the views of ATSDR, CDC, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Gary D. Perlman is an environmental health scientist for ATSDR. He is a commissioned officer with the U.S. Public Health Service and has been deployed in support of numerous environmental disasters including hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Isabelle, and Irene, as well as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Laurel Berman is the national brownfields coordinator with ATSDR. She coordinates the ATSDR Brownfields/Land-Reuse Health Initiative. Kathryn Leann Lemley Bing is an environmental health scientist and an ATSDR regional representative in Atlanta. She has specialized

  13. Doubled haploid production from Spanish onion (Allium cepa L.) germplasm: embryogenesis induction, plant regeneration and chromosome doubling

    PubMed Central

    Fayos, Oreto; Vallés, María P.; Garcés-Claver, Ana; Mallor, Cristina; Castillo, Ana M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of doubled haploids in onion breeding is limited due to the low gynogenesis efficiency of this species. Gynogenesis capacity from Spanish germplasm, including the sweet cultivar Fuentes de Ebro, the highly pungent landrace BGHZ1354 and the two Valenciana type commercial varieties Recas and Rita, was evaluated and optimized in this study. The OH-1 population, characterized by a high gynogenesis induction, was used as control. Growing conditions of the donor plants were tested with a one-step protocol and field plants produced a slightly higher percentage of embryogenesis induction than growth chamber plants. A one-step protocol was compared with a two-step protocol for embryogenesis induction. Spanish germplasm produced a 2–3 times higher percentage of embryogenesis with the two-step protocol, Recas showing the highest percentage (2.09%) and Fuentes de Ebro the lowest (0.53%). These percentages were significantly lower than those from the OH-1 population, with an average of 15% independently of the protocol used. The effect of different containers on plant regeneration was tested using both protocols. The highest percentage of acclimated plants was obtained with the two-step protocol in combination with Eco2box (70%), whereas the lowest percentage was observed with glass tubes in the two protocols (20–23%). Different amiprofos-methyl (APM) treatments were applied to embryos for chromosome doubling. A similar number of doubled haploid plants were recovered with 25 or 50 μM APM in liquid medium. However, the application of 25 μM in solid medium for 24 h produced the highest number of doubled haploid plants. Somatic regeneration from flower buds of haploid and mixoploid plants proved to be a successful approach for chromosome doubling, since diploid plants were obtained from the four regenerated lines. In this study, doubled haploid plants were produced from the four Spanish cultivars, however further improvements are needed to increase their gynogenesis

  14. Mesozoic igneous activity in the southern Cordillera of North America: Implications for tectonics and magma genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Asmerom, Y.

    1988-01-01

    A representative section in Santa Rita Mountains is dated using the zircon U-Th-Pb isotopic method. The oldest unit, the lower member of the Mt. Wrightson Formation, is concordantly dated at 210 {plus minus} 3 Ma. Initial basaltic andesite to andesite volcanism was followed by deposition of red beds and associated volcanic rocks that are dated at 200 Ma. Felsic volcanism and eolian sand deposition may have spanned from 190 to 170 Ma. The Piper Gulch Granodiorite, representing the earliest Mesozoic intrusive equivalent, gives concordant dates of 188 {plus minus}2 Ma. A second cycle of andesite and rhyolitic volcanism and sedimentation is dated at 151 {plus minus} 5 Ma using the whole-rock Rb-Sr isotopic method. The Hovatter Volcanics in the Little Harquahala Mountains, southwestern Arizona is dated at 165 Ma. Whole-rock Rb-Sr isotopic method on the same rocks gives a coherent reset isochron of 70 {plus minus} 3 Ma. A new stratigraphic correlation is proposed based on the dating data. This part of the Cordillera was an uplifted arc terrane during the Early Mesozoic and may have provided volcanic detritus to the Late Triassic Chinle Formation in the Colorado Plateau. The second part deals with magma evolution and crust modification during arc magmatism. Rocks in southeastern Arizona have {sub Nd} values of {minus}3.4 to {minus}6.4, while rocks to the west have {sub Nd} values ranging from {minus}8.5 to {minus}9.2. Combined REE and isotopic data indicate that assimilation of lower crust by mantle melts followed by fractional crystallization took place.

  15. Chemical plants remain vulnerable to terrorists: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Lippin, Tobi Mae; McQuiston, Thomas H; Bradley-Bull, Kristin; Burns-Johnson, Toshiba; Cook, Linda; Gill, Michael L; Howard, Donna; Seymour, Thomas A; Stephens, Doug; Williams, Brian K

    2006-09-01

    U.S. chemical plants currently have potentially catastrophic vulnerabilities as terrorist targets. The possible consequences of these vulnerabilities echo from the tragedies of the Bhopal incident in 1984 to the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001 and, most recently, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Findings from a 2004 nationwide participatory research study of 125 local union leaders at sites with very large volumes of highly hazardous chemicals suggest that voluntary efforts to achieve chemical plant security are not succeeding. Study respondents reported that companies had only infrequently taken actions that are most effective in preventing or in preparing to respond to a terrorist threat. In addition, companies reportedly often failed to involve key stakeholders, including workers, local unions, and the surrounding communities, in these efforts. The environmental health community thus has an opportunity to play a key role in advocating for and supporting improvements in prevention of and preparation for terrorist attacks. Policy-level recommendations to redress chemical site vulnerabilities and the related ongoing threats to the nation's security are as follows: a) specify detailed requirements for chemical site assessment and security ; b) mandate audit inspections supported by significant penalties for cases of noncompliance ; c) require progress toward achieving inherently safer processes, including the minimizing of storage of highly hazardous chemicals ; d) examine and require additional effective actions in prevention, emergency preparedness, and response and remediation ; e) mandate and fund the upgrading of emergency communication systems ; and f) involve workers and community members in plan creation and equip and prepare them to prevent and respond effectively to an incident. PMID:16966080

  16. Combined measurement and modeling of the hydrological impact of hydraulic redistribution using CLM4.5 at eight AmeriFlux sites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fu, Congsheng; Wang, Guiling; Goulden, Michael L.; Scott, Russell L.; Bible, Kenneth; G. Cardon, Zoe

    2016-05-17

    Effects of hydraulic redistribution (HR) on hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological processes have been demonstrated in the field, but the current generation of standard earth system models does not include a representation of HR. Though recent studies have examined the effect of incorporating HR into land surface models, few (if any) have done cross-site comparisons for contrasting climate regimes and multiple vegetation types via the integration of measurement and modeling. Here, we incorporated the HR scheme of Ryel et al. (2002) into the NCAR Community Land Model Version 4.5 (CLM4.5), and examined the ability of the resulting hybrid model to capture themore » magnitude of HR flux and/or soil moisture dynamics from which HR can be directly inferred, to assess the impact of HR on land surface water and energy budgets, and to explore how the impact may depend on climate regimes and vegetation conditions. Eight AmeriFlux sites with contrasting climate regimes and multiple vegetation types were studied, including the Wind River Crane site in Washington State, the Santa Rita Mesquite savanna site in southern Arizona, and six sites along the Southern California Climate Gradient. HR flux, evapotranspiration (ET), and soil moisture were properly simulated in the present study, even in the face of various uncertainties. Our cross-ecosystem comparison showed that the timing, magnitude, and direction (upward or downward) of HR vary across ecosystems, and incorporation of HR into CLM4.5 improved the model-measurement matches of evapotranspiration, Bowen ratio, and soil moisture particularly during dry seasons. Lastly, our results also reveal that HR has important hydrological impact in ecosystems that have a pronounced dry season but are not overall so dry that sparse vegetation and very low soil moisture limit HR.« less

  17. Temperature Measurement During Polymerization of Bone Cement in Percutaneous Vertebroplasty: An In Vivo Study in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo Manca, Antonio; Kanika, Khanna; Murphy, Kieran; Eminefendic, Haris; Masala, Salvatore; Regge, Daniele

    2009-05-15

    Aim of the study was to 'in vivo' measure temperature, during percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV), within a vertebral body injected with different bone cements. According to the declaration of Helsinki, 22 women (60-80 years; mean, 75 years) with painful osteoporotic vertebral collapse underwent bilateral transpedicular PV on 22 lumbar vertebrae. Two 10-G vertebroplasty needles were introduced into the vertebra under digital fluoroscopy; a 16-G radiofrequency thermoablation needle (Starburst XL; RITA Medical System Inc., USA), carrying five thermocouples, was than coaxially inserted. Eleven different bone cements were injected and temperatures were measured every 30 s until temperatures dropped under 45{sup o}C. After the thermocouple needle was withdrawn, bilateral PV was completed with cement injection through the vertebroplasty needle. Unpaired Student's t-tests, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used to evaluate significant differences (p < 0.05) in peak temperatures, variations between cements, and clinical outcome. All procedures were completed without complications, achieving good clinical outcomes (p < 0.0001). Regarding average peak temperature, cements were divided into three groups: A (over 60{sup o}C), B (from 50{sup o} to 60{sup o}C), and C (below 50{sup o}C). Peak temperature in Group A (86.7 {+-} 10.7{sup o}C) was significantly higher (p = 0.0172) than that in Groups B (60.5 {+-} 3.7{sup o}C) and C (44.8 {+-} 2.6{sup o}C). The average of all thermocouples showed an extremely significant difference (p = 0.0002) between groups. None of the tested cements maintained a temperature {>=}45{sup o}C for more than 30 min. These data suggest that back-pain improvement is obtained not by thermal necrosis but by mechanical consolidation only. The relative necrotic thermal effect in vertebral metastases seems to confirm that analgesia must be considered the main intent of PV.

  18. Short-term effects of hurricane disturbance on food availability for migrant songbirds during autumn stopover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dobbs, R.C.; Barrow, W.C., Jr.; Jeske, C.W.; Dimiceli, J.; Michot, T.C.; Beck, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the consequences of hurricanes on the food resources available to neotropical-nearctic migrant songbirds may provide important insight into the effects of hurricanes on migratory populations. During autumn migration 2006 we investigated the foraging ecology of two species of insectivorous migrants, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) and Yellow Warbler (Dendroica petechia), and the availability of their foraging substrates and arthropod food resources in two coastal forests in western Louisiana, which were impacted to different degrees by Hurricane Rita in autumn 2005. Both migrant species attacked prey on bark substrates significantly more frequently, and on live foliage less frequently, in severely damaged forest than in lightly damaged forest (??2 tests, P < 0.05). However, both species attacked prey on bark less than expected given its availability (i.e., migrants avoided bark), and attacked prey on live foliage more than expected given its availability (i.e., migrants selected live foliage), in severely damaged forest (??2 tests, P < 0.03). Branch-clipping revealed that arthropod biomass on live hackberry (Celtis laevigata) and sweet acacia (Acacia farnesiana) branches was significantly higher in severely damaged forest than in lightly damaged forest (Mann-Whitney test, P < 0.01). However, because live foliage was significantly less available in severely damaged forest, overall food availability for migrants was lower in severely damaged forest than in lightly damaged forest. Migrant use of, and arthropod biomass on, bark and live-foliage substrates were thus dependent on the availability of those substrates, which differed between sites as a result of hurricane-related habitat disturbance. These results demonstrate that severe hurricane disturbance reduces food availability for insectivorous songbirds during migratory stopover by reducing the availability of preferred foraging substrates. ?? 2009 The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  19. Understanding impacts of tropical storms and hurricanes on submerged bank reefs and coral communities in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo-Fernández, A.; Gravois, M.

    2010-06-01

    A 100-year climatology of tropical storms and hurricanes within a 200-km buffer was developed to study their impacts on coral reefs of the Flower Garden Banks (FGB) and neighboring banks of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The FGB are most commonly affected by tropical storms from May through November, peaking in August-September. Storms approach from all directions; however, the majority of them approach from the southeast and southwest, which suggests a correlation with storm origin in the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico. A storm activity cycle lasting 30-40 years was identified similar to that known in the Atlantic basin, and is similar to the recovery time for impacted reefs. On average there is 52% chance of a storm approaching within 200 km of the FGB every year, but only 17% chance of a direct hit every year. Storm-generated waves 5-25 m in height and periods of 11-15 s induce particle speeds of 1-4 m s -1 near these reefs. The wave-current flow is capable of transporting large (˜3 cm) sediment particles, uplifting the near-bottom nepheloid layer to the banks tops, but not enough to break coral skeletons. The resulting storm-driven turbulence induces cooling by heat extraction, mixing, and upwelling, which reduces coral bleaching potential and deepens the mixed layer by about 20 m. Tropical storms also aid larvae dispersal from and onto the FGB. Low storm activity in 1994-2004 contributed to an 18% coral cover increase, but Hurricane Rita in 2005 reduced it by 11% and brought coral cover to nearly pre-1994 levels. These results suggest that the FGB reefs and neighboring reef banks act as coral refugia because of their offshore location and deep position in the water column, which shields them from deleterious effects of all but the strongest hurricanes.

  20. The HO2 + (H2O)n + O3 reaction: an overview and recent developments*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viegas, Luís P.; Varandas, António J. C.

    2016-03-01

    The present work is concerned with the reaction of the hydroperoxyl radical with ozone, which is key in the atmosphere. We first give a brief overview which emphasizes theoretical work developed at the authors' Group, considering not only the naked reaction (n = 0) but also the reaction with one water molecule added to the reactants (n = 1). Aiming at a broad and contextual understanding of the role of water, we have also very recently published the results of the investigation considering the addition of water dimers (n = 2) and trimers (n = 3) to the reactants. Such results are also succinctly addressed before we present our latest and unpublished research endeavors. These consist of two items: the first one addresses a new mechanistic pathway for hydrogen-abstraction in n = 2-4 cases, in which we observe a Grotthuss-like hydrogen shuttling mechanism that interconverts covalent and hydrogen bonds (water molecules are no longer spectators); the second addresses our exploratory calculations of the HO2 + O3 reaction inside a (H2O)20 water cage, where we strive to give a detailed insight of the molecular processes behind the uptake of gas-phase molecules by a water droplet. Supplementary material in the form of one zip file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2016-60733-5Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  1. Refining estimates of public health spending as measured in national health expenditures accounts: the United States experience.

    PubMed

    Sensenig, Arthur L

    2007-01-01

    Providing for the delivery of public health services and understanding the funding mechanisms for these services are topics of great currency in the United States. In 2002, the Department of Homeland Security was created and the responsibility for providing public health services was realigned among federal agencies. State and local public health agencies are under increased financial pressures even as they shoulder more responsibilities as the vital first link in the provision of public health services. Recent events, such as hurricanes Katrina and Rita, served to highlight the need to accurately access the public health delivery system at all levels of government. The National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA), prepared by the National Health Statistics Group, measure expenditures on healthcare goods and services in the United States. Government public health activity constitutes an important service category in the NHEA. In the most recent set of estimates, Government Public Health Activity expenditures totaled $56.1 billion in 2004, or 3.0 percent of total US health spending. Accurately measuring expenditures for public health services in the United States presents many challenges. Among these challenges is the difficult task of defining what types of government activity constitute public health services. There is no clear-cut, universally accepted definition of government public health care services, and the definitions in the proposed International Classification for Health Accounts are difficult to apply to an individual country's unique delivery systems. Other challenges include the definitional issues associated with the boundaries of healthcare as well as the requirement that census and survey data collected from government(s) be compliant with the Classification of Functions of Government (COFOG), an internationally recognized classification system developed by the United Nations. PMID:17299313

  2. Coastal Vulnerability and Load Induced Subsidence of the Modern Mississippi River Delta and Environs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokka, R. K.; Ivins, E. R.; Blom, R. G.

    2006-12-01

    The disasters wrought by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita along the northern Gulf coast have heightened our awareness of the vulnerability of this low-lying landscape to storm surge. Although topographically subdued, the surface is the product of the dynamic interplay between the processes of subsidence, sediment accretion, and eustasy. Quantification and determination of causative processes of subsidence are thus essential as Society rebuilds and protects communities and contemplates restoration of the coastal ecosystem. Previous models for subsidence have emphasized the roles of shallow compaction and anthropomorphic effects. We agree that these processes are important, but also note that the isostatic impact of both the load of the delta sediments and the effects of water loading following glacial intervals have never been integrated into landscape models. It is thus not surprising that previous models cannot explain the recent geodetic measurements that show that subsidence is geographically more extensive and has been occurring at rates faster than previously anticipated. Here, we explore the combined 3-D physical implications of both sediment loading (delta) and water loading (eustasy) in south Louisiana and Mississippi over the course of the last several glacial cycles. Our models are based on a viscoelastic Earth and successfully explain the gross magnitude of modern subsidence measured by GPS, leveling, InSAR, and mareographs throughout the region. In areas of significant anomalies (spikes in observed subsidence rates that cannot be explained by load models), most can be explained as consequences of local processes such as faulting, fluid withdrawal (generally water), and drainage projects. The models suggest the possibility that additional loads (alluvial valley of the Mississippi River and offshore deposits) also play a role in subsidence.

  3. Guideline for assessing the performance of electric power systems in natural hazard and human threat events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, W.U.; Nishenko, S.P.; Honegger, D.G.; Kempner, L., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Electric power utilities are familiar with and skilled in preparing for and responding to almost-routine natural hazard events such as strong wind and ice storms and seasonal floods, as well as intentional human acts such as vandalism. Recent extreme weather (hurricanes Katrina and Rita), extremely destructive international earthquakes (in Sumatra and Pakistan), and nation-wide concerns regarding future terrorist attacks have increased the pressure on utilities to take appropriate steps to avoid being overwhelmed by such infrequent and exceedingly severe events. Determining what constitutes the appropriate steps to take requires various levels of understanding of the specific hazards and the risks faced by the utility. The American Lifelines Alliance (www. americanlifelinesalliance.org) has prepared a Guideline that provides clear, concise, and nationally-applicable guidance on determining the scope and level of effort necessary to assess power system performance in the wide range of natural hazard or human threat events. Included in this Guideline are specific procedures to follow and information to consider in performing standardized assessments. With the results of such assessments, utility owners can effectively establish and carry out risk management programs that will lead to achieving appropriate levels of performance in future events. The Guideline incorporates an inquiry-driven process with a two-phase performance assessment that can be applied to power systems of any size. The screening phase enables systems or components that are clearly not at risk to be screened out early. The subsequent analysis phase uses results from the screening phase to prioritize and allocate resources for more detailed assessments of hazard, vulnerability, and system performance. This process helps assure that the scope of the assessment meets the specific performance objectives of the inquiry. A case history is presented to illustrate the type of experience with an inquiry

  4. Two new species of Seira Lubbock (Collembola, Entomobryidae, Seirini) from South Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cipola, Nikolas Gioia; De Morais, José Wellington; Bellini, Bruno Cavalcante

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of Seira, Seira tinguira sp. nov. and Seira paulae sp. nov. from Atlantic Rainforest Phytogeographic Domain in Paraná State, southern Brazil, are described and illustrated, with dorsal chaetotaxy labeled in detail. The general morphology of S. tinguira sp. nov. resembles S. frater (Bonet) and S. oceanica Yosii, however differs by chaeta Pa4 present in head, three extra macrochaetae (m1i2, p1i2 and one extranumerary) in mesothorax; four (a3, p2e, p2ea and a4) in metathorax; one (m3ep) in the second abdominal segment , among other morphological features. Seira paulae sp. nov. is similar to S. atrolutea (Arlé) in body colour, however dorsal chaetoxy resembles S. mendoncea Bellini & Zeppelini and S. ritae Bellini & Zeppelini. On the other hand, the new species clearly differs from other similar taxa by the presence of cephalic macrochaeta M2; three macrochaetae (M2, M1 and M2i) in mesothorax and p2p as microchaeta; one extra macrochaeta (p1i) in metathorax and two (a1 and p2ea) as macro or microchaetae; macrochaeta m3ep missing in the second abdominal segment; macrochaeta am6 present in the third abdominal segment among other features. Seira tinguira sp. nov. was found in different habitats of Paraná State while S. paulae sp. nov. was recorded only in its type locality. A distribution map is provided for both species. With the presented description there are now four recorded species of Seira from south Brazil. PMID:24870158

  5. Mitigation of hurricane storm surge impacts: Modeling scenarios over wide continental shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima Rego, Joao; Li, Chunyan

    2010-05-01

    The improvement of present understanding of surge dynamics over wide and shallow shelves is vital for the improvement of our ability to forecast storm surge impacts to coastal regions, particularly the low-lying land areas that are most vulnerable to hurricane flooding (e.g. the Northern Gulf of Mexico, coastal Bangladesh, the Southeast China sea). Given the increase of global sea-surface temperature, both the total number and proportion of intense tropical cyclones have increased notably since 1970 (Emanuel, 2005; Nature). Therefore, more intense hurricanes may hit densely populated coastal regions, and this problem may be aggravated by the prospect of accelerated sea-level rise in the 21st century. This presentation offers a review of recent work on hurricane-induced storm surge. The finite-volume coastal ocean model ("FVCOM", by Chen et al., 2003; J. Atmos. Ocean Tech.) was applied to the storm surge induced by Hurricanes Rita and Ike along the coasts of Louisiana and Texas in 2005 and 2008, respectively, to study coastal storm surge dynamics. The sensitivity analysis of Rego and Li (2009; Geophys. Res. Lett.) demonstrated how stronger, wider or faster tropical cyclones would affect coastal flooding. Li, Weeks and Rego (2009; Geophys. Res. Lett) looked into how hurricane flooding and receding dynamics differ, concluding that the overland flow in the latter stage is of considerable importance. Rego and Li (2010; J. Geophys. Res.) showed how extreme events may result of a combination of non-extreme factors, by studying the nonlinear interaction of tide and hurricane surge. The ability of models to reproduce these extreme events and to proactive plan for damage reduction is covered in Rego and Li's (2010; J. Marine Syst.) study of how barrier island systems protect coastal bays from offshore surge propagation. Here we combine these results for a wider perspective on how hurricane flooding could be mitigated under changing conditions.

  6. Hdm2 and Nitric Oxide Radicals Contribute to the P53-Dependent Radioadaptive Response

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Matsumoto, Hideki; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to characterize the radioadaptive response at the molecular level. Methods and Materials: We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53-containing cells derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53-null. Cellular radiation sensitivities were determined with a colony-forming assay. The accumulations of p53, the human homolog of endogenous murine double minute 2 (Hdm2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase were analyzed with Western blotting. Quantification of chromosomal aberrations was estimated by scoring dicentrics per cell. Results: In wtp53 cells, it was demonstrated that the lack of p53 accumulation was coupled with the activation of Hdm2 after low-dose irradiation (0.02 Gy). Although NO radicals were only minimally induced in wtp53 cells irradiated with a challenging irradiation (6 Gy) alone, NO radicals were seen to increase about two- to fourfold after challenging irradiation subsequent to a priming irradiation (0.02 Gy). Under similar irradiation conditions with a priming and challenging irradiation in wtp53 cells, induction of radioresistance and a depression of chromosomal aberrations were observed only in the absence of 5, 5'-(2, 5-Furanidiyl)bis-2-thiophenemethanol (RITA) or Nutlin-3 (p53-Hdm2 interaction inhibitors), aminoguanidine (an inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), and c-PTIO (an NO radical scavenger). On the other hand, in p53 dysfunctional cells, a radioadaptive response was not observed in the presence or absence of those inhibitors. Moreover radioresistance developed when wtp53 cells were treated with isosorbide dinitrate (an NO-generating agent) alone. Conclusions: These findings suggest that NO radicals are initiators of the radioadaptive response, acting through the activation of Hdm2 and the depression of p53 accumulations.

  7. Secondary eyewall formation in high resolution, realistic hurricane simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarca Fuente, Sergio Federico

    This dissertation explores the dynamics of secondary eyewall formation (SEF) through the analysis of high resolution (1.33 km), realistic integrations of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Advanced Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting model. Numerical simulations of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (2005) and Igor (2010) are analyzed. The evolution of these storms was well captured by the model and each simulation exhibited a secondary eyewall (SE): a ring of deep convection separate from the primary eyewall that develops a strong acceleration of the tangential wind. This acceleration manifests itself as an abrupt radial expansion of the tangential wind field, sometimes followed by an independent wind maximum. The convective and wind structures of the SE in the simulations are shown to be consistent with observations. The results presented suggest that unbalanced dynamic processes are fundamental in SEF. It is shown that vortical hot towers (VHTs) are the convective structures that constitute the SE. Their collective effects account for, (a) the establishment of the convective maximum, (b) the weakening of the primary eyewall through competition for inflow (that may culminate with an eyewall replacement cycle) and (c) the wind acceleration, that may or may not express itself as an independent secondary maximum in the tangential wind field. It is shown that the establishment of the VHTs that constitute the SE can be the result of different processes: (1) the release of large amounts of buoyant energy at the radius of the SE; and (2) the accumulation of potential vorticity at the stagnation radius of vortex Rossby waves. In either case, the SE is characterized by a positive potential vorticity anomaly in the lower troposphere that is further enhanced by VHT activity and the axisymmetrization of their remnants, increasing the likelihood for future convection to occur.

  8. New Challenges in High-Resolution Modeling of Hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. S.

    2006-12-01

    The extreme active Atlantic hurricane seasons in recent years have highlighted the urgent need for a better understanding of the factors that contribute to hurricane intensity and for development of the corresponding advanced hurricane prediction models to improve intensity forecasts. The lack of skill in present forecasts of hurricane structure and intensity may be attributed in part to deficiencies in the current prediction models: insufficient grid resolution, inadequate surface and boundary layer formulations, and the lack of full coupling to a dynamic ocean. The extreme high winds, intense rainfall, large ocean waves, and copious sea spray in hurricanes push the surface-exchange parameters for temperature, water vapor, and momentum into untested regimes. The recent modeling effort is to develop and test a fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean modeling system that is capable of resolving the eye and eyewall in a hurricane at ~1 km grid resolution. The new challenges for these very high resolution models are the corresponding physical representations at 1-km scale, including microphysics, sub-grid turbulence parameterization, atmospheric boundary layer, physical processes at the air-sea interface with surface waves among others. The lack of accurate initial conditions for high-resolution hurricane modeling presents another major challenge. Improvements in initial conditions rest on the use of more airborne and remotely sensed observations in high-resolution assimilation systems and on the application of advanced assimilation schemes to hurricanes. This study aimed to provide an overview of these new challenges using high-resolution model simulations of Hurricanes Isabel (2003), Frances (2004), Katrina and Rita (2005) that were observed extensively by two recent field programs, namely, the Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST)-Hurricane in 2003-2004 and the Hurricane Rainbands and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX) in 2005.

  9. New Challenges in High-Resolution Modeling and Data Assimilation of Hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. S.

    2007-12-01

    The extreme active Atlantic hurricane seasons in recent years have highlighted the urgent need for a better understanding of the factors that contribute to hurricane intensity and for development of the corresponding advanced hurricane prediction models to improve intensity forecasts. The lack of skill in present forecasts of hurricane structure and intensity may be attributed in part to deficiencies in the current prediction models: insufficient grid resolution, inadequate surface and boundary layer formulations, and the lack of full coupling to a dynamic ocean. The extreme high winds, intense rainfall, large ocean waves, and copious sea spray in hurricanes push the surface-exchange parameters for temperature, water vapor, and momentum into untested regimes. The recent modeling effort is to develop and test a fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean modeling system that is capable of resolving the eye and eyewall in a hurricane at ~1 km grid resolution. The new challenges for these very high resolution models are the corresponding physical representations at 1-km scale, including microphysics, sub-grid turbulence parameterization, atmospheric boundary layer, physical processes at the air-sea interface with surface waves among others. The lack of accurate initial conditions for high-resolution hurricane modeling presents another major challenge. Improvements in initial conditions rest on the use of more airborne and remotely sensed observations in high-resolution data assimilation systems and on the application of advanced assimilation schemes to hurricanes. This study aimed to provide an overview of these new challenges using high-resolution model simulations of Hurricanes Isabel (2003), Frances (2004), Katrina and Rita (2005) that were observed extensively by two recent field programs, namely, the Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST)-Hurricane in 2003-2004 and the Hurricane Rainbands and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX) in 2005. Data assimilation

  10. The p53-dependent radioadaptive response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    We already reported that conditioning exposures at low doses, or at low dose-rates, lowered radiation-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in cultured cells in vitro and in the spleens of mice in vivo. In this study, the aim was to characterize the p53-dependent radioadaptive response at the molecular level. We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 containing cells derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53-null. Cellular radiation sensitivities were determined with a colony-forming assay. The accumulation of p53, Hdm2, and iNOS was analyzed with Western blotting. The quantification of chromosomal aberrations was estimated by scoring dicentrics per cell. In wtp53 cells, it was demonstrated that the lack of p53 accumulation was coupled with the activation of Hdm2 after low dose irradiation (0.02 Gy). Although NO radicals were only minimally induced in wtp53 cells irradiated with a challenging irradiation (6 Gy) alone, NO radicals were seen to increase about 2-4 fold after challenging irradiation following a priming irradiation (0.02 Gy). Under similar irradiation conditions with a priming and challenging irradiation in wtp53 cells, induction of radioresistance and a depression of chromosomal aberrations were observed only in the absence of Pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor), RITA or Nutlin-3 (p53-Hdm2 interaction inhibitors), aminoguanidine (an iNOS inhibitor) and c-PTIO (an NO radical scavenger). On the other hand, in p53 dysfunctional cells, a radioadaptive response was not observed in the presence or absence of those inhibitors. Moreover, radioresistance developed when wtp53 cells were treated with ISDN (an NO generating agent) alone. These findings suggest that NO radicals are an initiator of the radioadaptive response acting through the activation of Hdm2 and the depression of p53 accumulations.

  11. Emergency and crisis management: critical incident stress management for first responders and business organisations.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, Daniel H

    2012-01-01

    A literature review was performed on critical incident stress after September 11th, 2001 (9/11), and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, which focused on the need to implement a holistic critical incident stress management programme for first responders and business organisations. Critical incident stress management is required to handle acute stress and other distress in the face of natural or man-made disasters, including terrorist attacks. A holistic approach to community resilience through a well-planned and implemented critical incident stress management programme has been shown in the literature to promote self-help and self-efficacy of individuals and organisations. The interventions and programme elements defined clearly show how a number of different intervention and prevention strategies will promote business and community resilience and also self-efficacy in a culturally-diverse community and organisation. Implementing a critical incident stress management programme within a responding business organisation is critical because of the fact that first responders are the most susceptible every day to exposure to critical incidents that will affect their mental health; and business employees will suffer some of the same maladies as first responders in the event of a disaster or crisis. Utilising the framework provided, a holistic critical incident stress management programme can be implemented to help reduce the effects of burnout, absenteeism, acute stress, post-traumatic stress, substance use and traumatic stress, and to work to promote community resilience and toughen individuals against the effects of stress. Taking care of the needs of the employees of a business organisation, and of those of first responders, is clearly required. PMID:22576135

  12. Does a skeletonized internal thoracic artery give fewer postoperative complications than a pedicled artery for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting?

    PubMed

    Fouquet, Olivier; Tariel, François; Desulauze, Pierre; Mével, Gwenaël

    2015-05-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'Does a skeletonized internal thoracic artery (ITA) give fewer postoperative complications than a pedicled artery for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting?' Altogether, 98 papers were found using the reported search, of which 11 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. Papers about patency of skeletonized versus pedicled internal thoracic artery were excluded. The analysed complications were essentially mediastinitis, superficial sternal infection, wound infection, chest pain and pulmonary function. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Grafts used were either single ITA (LITA or RITA, left or right, respectively) or bilateral ITAs (BITAs). One prospective randomized controlled trial was identified, which found that benefits of skeletonized harvesting included increased graft length, increased graft flow and decreased incidence of mediastinitis. All of the six studies concerning wound infection demonstrate fewer complications when ITA is skeletonized. One of the three papers describing postoperative mortality demonstrated lower 30-day mortality, but there was no long-term analysis. Three studies describing postoperative chest pain reported a lower score on the visual analogue scale (VAS) within 30 days. One of them indicates that the pedicled group has a significantly greater VAS, pain disability index and short-form McGill Pain questionnaire score at 1 and 3 months. The hospital stay was shorter for three studies conducted on this subject. One study about pulmonary function reported a better ratio of pre- versus postoperative values of forced vital capacity. Despite longer operating times, skeletonization leads to fewer wound infections, reduced chest pain, allows a shorter hospital stay and better

  13. Dynamic Pulse-Driven Flowering Phenology in a Semiarid Shrubland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krell, N.; Papuga, S. A.; Kipnis, E. L.; Nelson, K.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated springtime temperature has been convincingly linked to an increasingly earlier onset of phenological activity. Studies highlighting this phenomenon have generally been conducted in ecosystems where energy is the primary limiting factor. Importantly, phenological studies in semiarid ecosystems where water is the major limiting factor are rare. In semiarid ecosystems, the timing of phenological activity is also highly sensitive to discrete moisture pulses from infrequent precipitation events. The objective of this study is to identify the triggers of flowering phenology in a semiarid creosotebush-dominated ecosystem. Creosotebush (Larrea tridentata) is a repeat-flowering evergreen shrub that is the dominant species in three of the North American deserts. We present results from six years of daily meteorological and phenological data collected within the Santa Rita Experimental Range in southern Arizona. Our site is equipped with an eddy covariance tower providing estimates of water and carbon fluxes and associated meteorological variables including precipitation and soil moisture at multiple depths. Additionally, three digital cameras distributed within the footprint of the eddy provide daily images of phenological activity. Our results highlight substantial interannual variability in flowering phenology, both in spring and summer flowering. We show that spring flowering activity tends to be associated with energy triggers (e.g. temperature, growing degree days), whereas summer flowering activity tends to be associated with moisture triggers (e.g. large precipitation events, deep soil moisture). Our study suggests that changes in frequency and duration of precipitation events will impact timing of phenological activity resulting in important consequences for vegetation dynamics and pollinator behavior.

  14. Comparing different treatment modalities for partial nephrectomies without ischemic period: laser, Hydro-Jet and RF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boorder, Tjeerd; Boeken Kruger, Arto; Klaessens, John; Grimbergen, Matthijs; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf

    2008-02-01

    The treatment of partial nefrectomies is usually performed under a warm ischemic period. Recently, various treatment modalities have become available to perform a partial nefrectomy without clamping off the blood circulation. We have studied three devices in laboratory setting, investigating the thermal and high speed imaging techniques in tissue models and consequently, applying the instruments in the clinic during open procedures especially looking at efficacy and blood loss. The continuous wave 2.0 micron laser of 70 W (Revolix, LISA laser) is used as a fiber delivered knife cutting through circulated tissue with controlled hemostasis for vessels up to 3 mm diameter. The 2 μm wavelength effectively vaporizes tissue water and coagulates the smaller vessels. The Hydro-Jet (ERBE, Germany) uses high pressure (20-80 bar) to ejects a water jet of 40 um diameter at high velocity (10-30 m/s). The parenchyma is resected while vessels are preserved. Consequently, the exposed vessels can be coagulated in a controlled way with minimal blood loss. The water jet showed to induce cavitation bubbles that resect the soft tissue from the matrix leaving the elastic microvessels intact. Various systems are based on bipolar RF technology. We are using the Habib device (Rita 1500X RF generator) to create a coagulation zone around the tumor. Subsequently, the tumor can be resected along the coagulation zone with minimal bleeding. The treatment modalities investigated, have their own advantages and, stand-alone or in combination, can facilitate laparoscopic partial nephrectomies without an ischemic period.

  15. Analysis of Dynamics in Bays and Coastal Waters Impacted by Hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Lin, H.; Chen, C.

    2012-12-01

    The dynamical processes in coastal bays/estuaries and continental shelf are mostly tidally and wind driven. Under severe weather conditions such as hurricanes and tropical storms, the process is much more dynamic and variable. In an attempt to illustrate the dynamical regimes in coastal bays and adjacent coastal ocean, we have simulated circulation and storm tides in the northern Gulf of Mexico forced by 49 hurricanes, respectively; among which 4 are the most recent real hurricanes: Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita of 2005, and Hurricane Gustav and Hurricane Ike of 2008. The other 45 hurricanes are hypothetical in their tracks, but based on the real hurricanes in terms of forcing conditions. More specifically, these 45 hurricanes are divided into five groups, each corresponding to one of these four real hurricanes plus a group for hypothetical Category 5 hurricanes, based on the information of Hurricane Katrina, except that the strength of the hurricane is increased to Category 5. Using otherwise the same forcing conditions of the hurricanes, we apply variations of each of the hurricane tracks with roughly the same moving speed. Each group has a total of 9 simulations (with 9 different tracks). Our model allows inundation of wetland, and low lying lands on the coast and around the Louisiana Bays. The model for the hurricane storm tide was done with an implementation of the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model, or FVCOM. Our analysis of the results reveals rich dynamical processes in the bays and estuaries and on the adjacent continental shelf. It involves various oscillations, depending on the hurricane conditions and track history and positions, long waves, under the influence of earth rotation, and currents. The protruding delta, bathymetry, and the setup of the bays all play some roles in shaping the dynamics, water movement, inundation, and receding of the storm surges.

  16. Tropical Cyclone Induced Air-Sea Interactions Over Oceanic Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, L. K.

    2012-12-01

    Recent severe tropical cyclones underscore the inherent importance of warm background ocean fronts and their interactions with the atmospheric boundary layer. Central to the question of heat and moisture fluxes, the amount of heat available to the tropical cyclone is predicated by the initial mixed layer depth and strength of the stratification that essentially set the level of entrainment mixing at the base of the mixed layer. In oceanic regimes where the ocean mixed layers are thin, shear-induced mixing tends to cool the upper ocean to form cold wakes which reduces the air-sea fluxes. This is an example of negative feedback. By contrast, in regimes where the ocean mixed layers are deep (usually along the western part of the gyres), warm water advection by the nearly steady currents reduces the levels of turbulent mixing by shear instabilities. As these strong near-inertial shears are arrested, more heat and moisture transfers are available through the enthalpy fluxes (typically 1 to 1.5 kW m-2) into the hurricane boundary layer. When tropical cyclones move into favorable or neutral atmospheric conditions, tropical cyclones have a tendency to rapidly intensify as observed over the Gulf of Mexico during Isidore and Lili in 2002, Katrina, Rita and Wilma in 2005, Dean and Felix in 2007 in the Caribbean Sea, and Earl in 2010 just north of the Caribbean Islands. To predict these tropical cyclone deepening (as well as weakening) cycles, coupled models must have ocean models with realistic ocean conditions and accurate air-sea and vertical mixing parameterizations. Thus, to constrain these models, having complete 3-D ocean profiles juxtaposed with atmospheric profiler measurements prior, during and subsequent to passage is an absolute necessity framed within regional scale satellite derived fields.

  17. Empirical relationships between soil moisture, albedo, and the planetary boundary layer height: a two-layer bucket model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Mejia, Z. M.; Papuga, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    In semiarid regions, where water resources are limited and precipitation dynamics are changing, understanding land surface-atmosphere interactions that regulate the coupled soil moisture-precipitation system is key for resource management and planning. We present a modeling approach to study soil moisture and albedo controls on planetary boundary layer height (PBLh). We used data from the Santa Rita Creosote Ameriflux site and Tucson Airport atmospheric sounding to generate empirical relationships between soil moisture, albedo and PBLh. We developed empirical relationships and show that at least 50% of the variation in PBLh can be explained by soil moisture and albedo. Then, we used a stochastically driven two-layer bucket model of soil moisture dynamics and our empirical relationships to model PBLh. We explored soil moisture dynamics under three different mean annual precipitation regimes: current, increase, and decrease, to evaluate at the influence on soil moisture on land surface-atmospheric processes. While our precipitation regimes are simple, they represent future precipitation regimes that can influence the two soil layers in our conceptual framework. For instance, an increase in annual precipitation, could impact on deep soil moisture and atmospheric processes if precipitation events remain intense. We observed that the response of soil moisture, albedo, and the PBLh will depend not only on changes in annual precipitation, but also on the frequency and intensity of this change. We argue that because albedo and soil moisture data are readily available at multiple temporal and spatial scales, developing empirical relationships that can be used in land surface - atmosphere applications are of great value.

  18. Electron impact ionization cross sections of beryllium-tungsten clusters*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukuba, Ivan; Kaiser, Alexander; Huber, Stefan E.; Urban, Jan; Probst, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We report calculated electron impact ionization cross sections (EICSs) of beryllium-tungsten clusters, BenW with n = 1,...,12, from the ionization threshold to 10 keV using the Deutsch-Märk (DM) and the binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The positions of the maxima of DM and BEB cross sections are mostly close to each other. The DM cross sections are more sensitive with respect to the cluster size. For the clusters smaller than Be4W they yield smaller cross sections than BEB and vice versa larger cross sections than BEB for clusters larger than Be6W. The maximum cross section values for the singlet-spin groundstate clusters range from 7.0 × 10-16 cm2 at 28 eV (BeW) to 54.2 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (Be12W) for the DM cross sections and from 13.5 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (BeW) to 38.9 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (Be12W) for the BEB cross sections. Differences of the EICSs in different isomers and between singlet and triplet states are also explored. Both the DM and BEB cross sections could be fitted perfectly to a simple expression used in modeling and simulation codes in the framework of nuclear fusion research. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2015-60583-7

  19. Emergent properties of climate-vegetation feedbacks in the North American Monsoon Macrosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathias, A.; Niu, G.; Zeng, X.

    2012-12-01

    The ability of ecosystems to adapt naturally to climate change and associated disturbances (e.g. wildfires, spread of invasive species) is greatly affected by the stability of feedback interactions between climate and vegetation. In order to study climate-vegetation interactions, such as CO2 and H2O exchange in the North American Monsoon System (NAMS), we plan to couple a community land surface model (NoahMP or CLM) used in regional climate models (WRF) with an individual based, spatially explicit vegetation model (ECOTONE). Individual based modeling makes it possible to link individual plant traits with properties of plant communities. Community properties, such as species composition and species distribution arise from dynamic interactions of individual plants with each other, and with their environment. Plants interact with each other through intra- and interspecific competition for resources (H2O, nitrogen), and the outcome of these interactions depends on the properties of the plant community and the environment itself. In turn, the environment is affected by the resulting change in community structure, which may have an impact on the drivers of climate change. First, we performed sensitivity tests of ECOTONE to assess its ability to reproduce vegetation distribution in the NAMS. We compared the land surface model and ECOTONE with regard to their capability to accurately simulate soil moisture, CO2 flux and above ground biomass. For evaluating the models we used the eddy-correlation sensible and latent heat fluxes, CO2 flux and observations of other climate and environmental variables (e.g. soil temperature and moisture) from the Santa Rita experimental range. The model intercomparison helped us understand the advantages and disadvantages of each model, providing us guidance for coupling the community land surface model (NoahMP or CLM) with ECOTONE.

  20. The relationship between hurricane wind fields and the associated disturbance in US forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negron Juarez, R. I.; Chambers, J. Q.; Hurtt, G. C.; Fisk, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    Tropical cyclones are recurrent in the U. S. Gulf Coast and produce drastic disturbance to the forest ecosystem by altering forest structure, species composition, nutrient cycling, biomass accumulation, etc. The recurrent characteristics of these events demand a rapid yet reliable assessment of forest disturbance in order to provide better management decisions, as well as to evaluate damage to the landscape, biomass loss and the associated impacts to the regional carbon budget. In this study we present a methodology for rapid assessment of forest disturbance produced by tropical cyclones based on maximum sustained wind swaths (H*wind), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer)-derived disturbances and field-measured tree mortality collected in Gulf Coast forests. MODIS images in May (the month of maximum greenness) before the disturbance and in May of the year following the disturbance were processed using spectral mixture analysis (SMA) using image derived end-members. The changes in non-photosynthetic vegetation (ΔNPV, related to wood, dead vegetation and surface litter) from one year to the next was used as the disturbance metric. A strong correlation was found between H*wind and MODIS ΔNPV for hurricanes Charley (2004), Katrina (2005), Rita (2005), and Gustav (2008). In turn, MODIS ΔNPV was shown to have a strong correlation with field-measured mortality. The forest disturbance estimates based on hurricane wind-field and MODIS ΔNPV agree with those published in our previous studies. This study establishes an important relationship that could be incorporated into earth system models to improve our understanding of the effect of tropical cyclones on terrestrial ecosystems and their associated feedbacks within the climate system.

  1. Small watershed response to porous rock check dams in a semiarid watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Mary; Polyakov, Viktor; Nearing, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Rock check dams are used throughout the world as technique for mitigating erosion problems on degraded lands. Increasingly, they are being used in restoration efforts on rangelands in the southwestern US, however, their impact on watershed response and channel morphology is not well quantified. In 2008, 37 porous rock structures were built on two small (4.0 and 3.1 ha) instrumented watersheds on an alluvial fan at the base of the Santa Rita Mountains in southern Arizona, USA. 35 years of historical rainfall and runoff, and sediment data are available to compare with 7 years of data collected after check dam construction. In addition, post construction measurements of channel geometry and longitudinal channel profiles were compared with pre-construction measurements to characterize the impact of check dams on sediment retention and channel morphology. The primary impact of the check dams is was retention of channel sediment and reduction in channel gradient; however response varied between the proximal watersheds with 80% of the check dams on one of the watersheds filled to 100% of their capacity after 7 runoff seasons. In addition, initial impact on precipitation runoff ratios is was not persistent. The contrasting watershed experiences lower sediment yields and only 20% of the check dams on this watershed are were filled to capacity and continue to influence runoff during small events. Within the watersheds the mean gradient of the channel reach immediately upstream of the structures has been reduced by 35% (from 0.061 to 0.039) and 34% on (from 0.071 to 0.047).

  2. Watershed-Scale Ecohydrological Studies of Woody Plant Encroachment in Sonoran and Chihuahuan Desert Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivoni, E.; Pierini, N.; Anderson, C.; Schreiner-McGraw, A.; Robles-Morua, A.; Mendez-barroso, L. A.; Templeton, R. C.

    2013-05-01

    The causes and consequences of woody shrub and tree encroachment onto historical grasslands in arid and semiarid areas have been studied for over a century. Despite significant progress, the scientific community has not addressed the problem from a hydrologic perspective at a scale that integrates both vertical and lateral processes. The hydrologic budget of a small watershed can provide a strong constraint for other measured ecohydrological fluxes as well as help to link ecosystem transitions to changes in landscape properties. In this study, we present the measurement and modeling of ecohydrological processes in two watersheds in the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts at the Santa Rita Experimental Range (Green Valley, AZ) and the Jornada Experimental Range (Las Cruces, NM). In each watershed, a similar set of observations are obtained from a high-resolution sensor network consisting of six rain gauges, forty soil moisture and temperature profiles, four channel runoff flumes, a COSMOS sensor and an eddy covariance tower. In addition, high-resolution digital terrain models and image orthomosaics were obtained from an aircraft with Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) measurements or an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) with a digital camera. Based on these datasets, a distributed hydrologic model has been applied and tested to reproduce spatiotemporal patterns in the watershed ecohydrological processes. We compare and contrast the observations and model simulations for two summer periods (2011 and 2012) when both watersheds responded to the precipitation availability during the North American monsoon. Activities at both sites will provide a foundation for synthesizing the role of woody plant encroachment on watershed hydrology with broad implications for the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts.

  3. Tropical Cyclone Induced Air-Sea Interactions Over Oceanic Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, L.

    2012-04-01

    Recent severe tropical cyclones underscore the inherent importance of warm background ocean fronts and their interactions with the atmospheric boundary layer. Central to the question of heat and moisture fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere, the amount of heat available to the tropical cyclone is predicated by the initial depth of the mixed layer and strength of the stratification level that set the level of entrainment mixing at the base of the oceanic mixed layer. For example in oceanic regimes where the ocean mixed layers are thin, shear-induced mixing tends to cool the upper ocean (and sea surface temperatures) quickly which reduces the air-sea fluxes. This is an example of negative feedback from the ocean to the atmosphere. By contrast, in regimes where the ocean mixed layers are deep (usually along the western part of the gyres), warm water advection by the nearly steady currents reduces the levels of turbulent mixing by shear instabilities. As these strong near-inertial shears are arrested, more heat and moisture is available through the sea surface. When tropical cyclones move into favorable or neutral atmospheric conditions (low vertical shear, anticyclonic circulation aloft), tropical cyclones have a tendency to rapidly intensify as observed over the Gulf of Mexico during Isidore and Lili in 2002, Katrina and Rita in 2005, Dean and Felix in 2007 in the Caribbean Sea, and Earl in 2010 just north of the Caribbean Islands. To predict these tropical cyclone deepening (as well as weakening) cycles, coupled models must have ocean models with realistic ocean conditions and accurate air-sea and vertical mixing parameterizations. These effects and possible impact on TC deepening and weakening underscores the necessity of having complete 3-D ocean measurements juxtaposed with atmospheric profiler measurements.

  4. Closing the water balance with cosmic-ray soil moisture measurements and assessing their relation to evapotranspiration in two semiarid watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner-McGraw, A. P.; Vivoni, E. R.; Mascaro, G.; Franz, T. E.

    2016-01-01

    Soil moisture dynamics reflect the complex interactions of meteorological conditions with soil, vegetation and terrain properties. In this study, intermediate-scale soil moisture estimates from the cosmic-ray neutron sensing (CRNS) method are evaluated for two semiarid ecosystems in the southwestern United States: a mesquite savanna at the Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER) and a mixed shrubland at the Jornada Experimental Range (JER). Evaluations of the CRNS method are performed for small watersheds instrumented with a distributed sensor network consisting of soil moisture sensor profiles, an eddy covariance tower, and runoff flumes used to close the water balance. We found a very good agreement between the CRNS method and the distributed sensor network (root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.009 and 0.013 m3 m-3 at SRER and JER, respectively) at the hourly timescale over the 19-month study period, primarily due to the inclusion of 5 cm observations of shallow soil moisture. Good agreement was also obtained in soil moisture changes estimated from the CRNS and watershed water balance methods (RMSE of 0.001 and 0.082 m3 m-3 at SRER and JER, respectively), with deviations due to bypassing of the CRNS measurement depth during large rainfall events. Once validated, the CRNS soil moisture estimates were used to investigate hydrological processes at the footprint scale at each site. Through the computation of the water balance, we showed that drier-than-average conditions at SRER promoted plant water uptake from deeper soil layers, while the wetter-than-average period at JER resulted in percolation towards deeper soils. The CRNS measurements were then used to quantify the link between evapotranspiration and soil moisture at a commensurate scale, finding similar predictive relations at both sites that are applicable to other semiarid ecosystems in the southwestern US.

  5. Electronic quantum confinement in cylindrical potential well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltenkov, Arkadiy S.; Msezane, Alfred Z.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of quantum confinement on the momentum distribution of electrons confined within a cylindrical potential well have been analyzed. The motivation is to understand specific features of the momentum distribution of electrons when the electron behavior is completely controlled by the parameters of a non-isotropic potential cavity. It is shown that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries have been considered and the corresponding wave functions have been calculated; the behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well has been analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states have been calculated. The limiting cases of the ratio of the cylinder length H and its radius R0 have been considered; when the cylinder length H significantly exceeds its radius R0 and when the cylinder radius is much greater than its length. The cylindrical quantum confinement effects on the momentum distribution of electrons in these potential wells have been analyzed. The possible application of the results obtained here for the description of the general features in the behavior of electrons in nanowires with metallic type of conductivity (or nanotubes) and ultrathin epitaxial films (or graphene sheets) are discussed. Possible experiments are suggested where the quantum confinement can be manifested. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  6. Closing the water balance with cosmic-ray soil moisture measurements and assessing their spatial variability within two semiarid watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner-McGraw, A. P.; Vivoni, E. R.; Mascaro, G.; Franz, T. E.

    2015-06-01

    Soil moisture dynamics reflect the complex interactions of meteorological conditions with soil, vegetation and terrain properties. In this study, intermediate scale soil moisture estimates from the cosmic-ray sensing (CRS) method are evaluated for two semiarid ecosystems in the southwestern United States: a mesquite savanna at the Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER) and a mixed shrubland at the Jornada Experimental Range (JER). Evaluations of the CRS method are performed for small watersheds instrumented with a distributed sensor network consisting of soil moisture sensor profiles, an eddy covariance tower and runoff flumes used to close the water balance. We found an excellent agreement between the CRS method and the distributed sensor network (RMSE of 0.009 and 0.013 m3 m-3 at SRER and JER) at the hourly time scale over the 19-month study period, primarily due to the inclusion of 5 cm observations of shallow soil moisture. Good agreement was obtained in soil moisture changes estimated from the CRS and watershed water balance methods (RMSE = 0.001 and 0.038 m3 m-3 at SRER and JER), with deviations due to bypassing of the CRS measurement depth during large rainfall events. This limitation, however, was used to show that drier-than-average conditions at SRER promoted plant water uptake from deeper layers, while the wetter-than-average period at JER resulted in leakage towards deeper soils. Using the distributed sensor network, we quantified the spatial variability of soil moisture in the CRS footprint and the relation between evapotranspiration and soil moisture, in both cases finding similar predictive relations at both sites that are applicable to other semiarid ecosystems in the southwestern US. Furthermore, soil moisture spatial variability was related to evapotranspiration in a manner consistent with analytical relations derived using the CRS method, opening up new possibilities for understanding land-atmosphere interactions.

  7. Effect of Check Dams on Erosion and Flow Dynamics on Small Semi-Arid Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, V.; Nearing, M.; Nichols, M.; McClaran, M. P.

    2012-12-01

    Erosion dynamics in semi-arid environments is defined by high magnitude, low frequency rainfalls that produce runoff with high sediment concentration. Check dams were shown to be an effective sedimentation mitigation technique on small watersheds. Constructed of rocks, or other materials placed across the flow and anchored into the bottom and sides of the channel, these barriers produce upstream and downstream effects. By impounding runoff they reduce flow velocity, increase infiltration and allow sediment settling thus decreasing channel slope. Decreased sediment load downstream of the dam may result in accelerated channel scouring. While the effect of check dams on channel stability has been studied extensively their impact on overall watershed sediment balance is not well known. In 2008 a total of 37 loose rock semi permeable check dams were installed on two small (4.0 and 3.1 ha) watersheds located on the alluvial fan of the Santa Rita Mountains in southern Arizona, USA. Each watershed was equipped with high resolution weighing type rain gauge a supercritical flow flume and sediment sampler. Hyetographs, hydrographs, and sediment load data for the watersheds were collected since 1975. The erosion dynamics and flow characteristics following the check dam installation were compared with historical records. The volume of the sediment retained upstream of each dam was calculated through survey. After 4 years the check dams were filled to over 80% of their capacity and no significant increase in downstream scouring has been observed. Maximum 30-min intensity (I30) was overall best predictor variable for total runoff. After check dam installation the number ratio of runoff to rainfall events has been reduced by half. However, runoff peak rates were not significantly effected.

  8. Marsh loss from 1984 - 2011 in the Breton Sound, Barataria and Terrebonne Basins, Louisiana, U.S.A.: Impacts of hurricanes and excess nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riter, J. C.; Kearney, M. S.; Turner, R.

    2012-12-01

    Twenty-four Landsat data sets (1984-2011), collected as close to peak vegetation growth as possible, were used to evaluate marsh vegetation health and marsh loss in Terrebonne, Barataria, and Breton Sound Basins. Marsh loss varies spatially and temporally in the basins: freshwater and most intermediate marshes located west of the Mississippi River and more than 40 km from the coast were determined to be more stable than marshes closer to the coast. In most areas of the three basins, vegetation health and marsh area from 1984-1992 were relatively stable with minor inter-annual fluctuations throughout each basin and only a few areas of localized marsh loss. By 1994, shoreline erosion, tidal creek erosion, and erosion of soil banks adjacent to canals had increased in marshes located <40 km from the Gulf of Mexico, although some sites suffered substantially greater erosion than most coastal areas. Wave erosion also increased around the shores of Lakes Salvador, Cataouatche, Levy and other large lakes by 1994. Marsh loss also occurred in marshes immediately west of the Mississippi River, especially in areas close to diversion inlets. Hurricane Ivan in 2004 produced little sustained widespread damage in the basin marshes. However, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 and Gustav and Ike in 2008 caused extensive erosion of vegetation and the marsh substrate, especially near the inlet to Caernarvon diversion, but also near the Naomi and West Point a La Hache diversions inlets. We attribute the significant marsh damage from hurricanes to greater flooding, and greater wave and storm surge impacts due to diminished marsh soil strength from the effects of excess nutrients causing lower rhizome and root biomass and increased substrate decomposition rates.

  9. Observations of a two-layer soil moisture influence on surface energy dynamics and planetary boundary layer characteristics in a semiarid shrubland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Mejia, Zulia Mayari; Papuga, Shirley A.

    2014-01-01

    We present an observational analysis examining soil moisture control on surface energy dynamics and planetary boundary layer characteristics. Understanding soil moisture control on land-atmosphere interactions will become increasingly important as climate change continues to alter water availability. In this study, we analyzed 4 years of data from the Santa Rita Creosote Ameriflux site. We categorized our data independently in two ways: (1) wet or dry seasons and (2) one of the four cases within a two-layer soil moisture framework for the root zone based on the presence or absence of moisture in shallow (0-20 cm) and deep (20-60 cm) soil layers. Using these categorizations, we quantified the soil moisture control on surface energy dynamics and planetary boundary layer characteristics using both average responses and linear regression. Our results highlight the importance of deep soil moisture in land-atmosphere interactions. The presence of deep soil moisture decreased albedo by about 10%, and significant differences were observed in evaporative fraction even in the absence of shallow moisture. The planetary boundary layer height (PBLh) was largest when the whole soil profile was dry, decreasing by about 1 km when the whole profile was wet. Even when shallow moisture was absent but deep moisture was present the PBLh was significantly lower than when the entire profile was dry. The importance of deep moisture is likely site-specific and modulated through vegetation. Therefore, understanding these relationships also provides important insights into feedbacks between vegetation and the hydrologic cycle and their consequent influence on the climate system.

  10. Fusing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Imagery with High Resolution Hydrologic Modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivoni, E. R.; Pierini, N.; Schreiner-McGraw, A.; Anderson, C.; Saripalli, S.; Rango, A.

    2013-12-01

    After decades of development and applications, high resolution hydrologic models are now common tools in research and increasingly used in practice. More recently, high resolution imagery from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) that provide information on land surface properties have become available for civilian applications. Fusing the two approaches promises to significantly advance the state-of-the-art in terms of hydrologic modeling capabilities. This combination will also challenge assumptions on model processes, parameterizations and scale as land surface characteristics (~0.1 to 1 m) may now surpass traditional model resolutions (~10 to 100 m). Ultimately, predictions from high resolution hydrologic models need to be consistent with the observational data that can be collected from UAVs. This talk will describe our efforts to develop, utilize and test the impact of UAV-derived topographic and vegetation fields on the simulation of two small watersheds in the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts at the Santa Rita Experimental Range (Green Valley, AZ) and the Jornada Experimental Range (Las Cruces, NM). High resolution digital terrain models, image orthomosaics and vegetation species classification were obtained from a fixed wing airplane and a rotary wing helicopter, and compared to coarser analyses and products, including Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR). We focus the discussion on the relative improvements achieved with UAV-derived fields in terms of terrain-hydrologic-vegetation analyses and summer season simulations using the TIN-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator (tRIBS) model. Model simulations are evaluated at each site with respect to a high-resolution sensor network consisting of six rain gauges, forty soil moisture and temperature profiles, four channel runoff flumes, a cosmic-ray soil moisture sensor and an eddy covariance tower over multiple summer periods. We also discuss prospects for the fusion of high resolution models with novel

  11. An assessment of change in risk perception and optimistic bias for hurricanes among Gulf Coast residents.

    PubMed

    Trumbo, Craig; Meyer, Michelle A; Marlatt, Holly; Peek, Lori; Morrissey, Bridget

    2014-06-01

    This study focuses on levels of concern for hurricanes among individuals living along the Gulf Coast during the quiescent two-year period following the exceptionally destructive 2005 hurricane season. A small study of risk perception and optimistic bias was conducted immediately following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Two years later, a follow-up was done in which respondents were recontacted. This provided an opportunity to examine changes, and potential causal ordering, in risk perception and optimistic bias. The analysis uses 201 panel respondents who were matched across the two mail surveys. Measures included hurricane risk perception, optimistic bias for hurricane evacuation, past hurricane experience, and a small set of demographic variables (age, sex, income, and education). Paired t-tests were used to compare scores across time. Hurricane risk perception declined and optimistic bias increased. Cross-lagged correlations were used to test the potential causal ordering between risk perception and optimistic bias, with a weak effect suggesting the former affects the latter. Additional cross-lagged analysis using structural equation modeling was used to look more closely at the components of optimistic bias (risk to self vs. risk to others). A significant and stronger potentially causal effect from risk perception to optimistic bias was found. Analysis of the experience and demographic variables' effects on risk perception and optimistic bias, and their change, provided mixed results. The lessening of risk perception and increase in optimistic bias over the period of quiescence suggest that risk communicators and emergency managers should direct attention toward reversing these trends to increase disaster preparedness. PMID:24286290

  12. Real-time data collection technologies: Enhanced decision-making and cost savings January, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Rust, T.L.; Vu, H.Q.

    2006-07-01

    Hand-held computers, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and wireless communication devices are rapidly replacing traditional methods for field monitoring and data collection. Although pencil and paper remain important means of data transcription, field technicians can now use Personal Digital Assistants (PDA) to record their field notes and monitoring data. As data are uploaded wirelessly from the field, decision-makers can view realtime reports and maps that identify sample locations and monitoring results. The combination of PDAs, wireless communications, and web-based GIS provides field personnel and decision-makers many benefits throughout the life cycle of a project, including improved data consistency, real-time transfer of data from field locations to centralized databases, input validation, elimination of transcription errors, and cost savings. Concerns have been expressed however, about investing in hardware, software, and training for a new technology. This paper, based on several years of experience using wireless technologies for dozens of projects, is focused specifically on two case studies. The first case study is a large lead removal site in the Midwest at which real-time data collection technologies were used throughout the project to collect thousands of data points. The second is the Hurricane Katrina/Rita emergency response requiring rapid data collection under extraordinary circumstances. At both sites, the use of real-time data collection technologies significantly improved the data management process which reduced overall costs and increased efficiency. These results could not have been achieved using traditional data collection procedures. The oral presentation will focus on the advantages and disadvantages of the real-time data collection technologies, lessons learned, and planning considerations. A live demonstration, following a typical data collection scenario in which data are collected and plotted on a GIS map in near real

  13. Sonoran Desert Vegetation Shifts and Watershed-Scale Ecohydrological Dynamics during the North-American Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, N. A.; Templeton, R. C.; Robles-Morua, A.; Vivoni, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    Semiarid ecosystems are shaped and constrained by water availability. In the Arizona Sonoran desert, rainfall often occurs in short, high intensity summer storms associated with the North American monsoon. Along with natural or anthropogenic disturbances, monsoon conditions have acted to transform these landscapes from desert grassland to woody savannas over the last century. Changes in vegetation properties, structure and patterns in turn impact critical zone water and energy fluxes, including soil moisture and temperature dynamics, evapotranspiration and runoff production. In this study, we present observational and modeling activities conducted in a small watershed located in the Santa Rita Experimental Range, AZ. The desert basin is representative of the landscape vegetation shift and has been characterized by hydrologic and photographic observations over the last 30 years. More recently, we deployed a high-resolution environmental sensor network consisting of 6 rain gauges, 21 soil moisture and temperature profiles, 4 channel runoff flumes and an eddy covariance tower with a complete set of radiation, energy, carbon and water fluxes. In addition, a high-resolution digital terrain model was obtained from LiDAR measurements and a field dGPS survey, allowing characterization of the watershed terrain and plant cover distributions. Using the network, we present preliminary analyses of the temporal and spatial distributions of rainfall, soil moisture and temperature, and channel runoff in the watershed during the summer 2011, as well as land-atmosphere fluxes at the tower location. The field observations are also used for one-dimensional simulations of the TIN-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator (tRIBS) designed to explore the influence of the vegetation shifts on the landscape dynamics. Ultimately, applications of the distributed model in the desert basin will allow us to gain insight on the impact of shifting vegetation patterns on the watershed

  14. A Symposium Associated with the Opening of the Play Copenhagen in Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Brian

    2002-12-31

    On March 2, 2002 a special all day symposium was held in conjunction with the opening of the play Copenhagen in Washington. The play Copenhagen reenacts the 1941 visit of Werner Heisenberg, who was then in charge of the Nazi nuclear power program, to Niels Bohr, his mentor, and collaborator in creating quantum mechanics, complementarity, and the uncertainty principle, in German-occupied Denmark. The symposium entitled: THE COPENHAGEN INTERPRETATION: SCIENCE AND HISTORY ON STAGE was presented at the Baird Auditorium, in the National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution. The program consisted of three two-hour sessions: (1) The Science of Copenhagen and its Influence of the 20th Century. (2) Bohr and Heisenberg: A strong Interaction. (3) Theater as Science ??? Science as Theater. The speakers included: Robert C. Card, Under Secretary of Energy; Ulrik Federspiel, Danish Ambassador to the US; John Marburger, III, Science Advisor President Bush; Jerome I. Friedman, MIT; Lene Vestergaard Hau, Harvard University; Richard Rhodes, Author; Rita Colwell, Director, NSF; Jeremy Bernstein, Author; Jochen H. Heisenberg, University of New Hampshire; Finn Aaserud, Director of the Niels Bohr Archive; Vilhelm A. Bohr, NIH; Thomas Powers, Author; Paul Lawrence Rose, Penn State University; Steven Barfield, University of Westminster, Jennifer Uphoff Gray, Associate Director, Copenhagen; Elizabeth Ireland McCann, Producer, Copenhagen; Lloyd Rose, Washington Post. Details of he program and useful information on the play Copenhagen are available on the web site http://web.gc.cuny.edu/ashp/nml/artsci/copenhagen.shtml . The complete symposium was video recorded and the set of 3 two-hour tapes can be obtained through the web site. The symposium was organized by Brian Schwartz, The Graduate Center, CUNY, Harry Lustig, Provost Emeritus at the City College of New York and Arthur Molella, Director, Lemelson Center, Smithsonian Institution. For further information contact Brian

  15. [An illustrious unknown. Giuseppe Levi among science, anti-fascism and Nobel Prizes].

    PubMed

    Grignolio, Andrea; De Sio, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    The anatomist Giuseppe Levi (1872-1965) is unanimously considered one of the major figures of Italian biomedical sciences in the 20th century. His fame, however, is mainly derived from having nurtured three Nobel Prize winners, namely Salvador E. Luria, Rita Levi Montalcini and Renato Dulbecco. In reappraising Levi's role in the development of Italian science and culture in general, this article aims at questioning both the narrowness of earlier accounts and a certain kind of genealogical approach to the history of scientific disciplines and academic schools. We will here consider Giuseppe Levi as an instance of two major cultural phenomena: the development of experimental biology in Italy and continental Europe and the anti-fascist socialist culture expressed by a part of the Italian intellectuals. In so doing, we will reassess the historical specificity of the scientific maturation of Levi's three famous students, on the one hand, while on the other we will consider in some depth the cultural and moral environment in which Levi thrived and his role as a moral example for his students. Such revision, we will argue, have a direct bearing on more general historiographical issues, namely, the need for a stronger contextualization of the birth and consolidation of research traditions, implying a rejection of simplistic genealogical reconstructions, and the role of academic schools and institutional settings in the definition of novel, multidisciplinary scientific approaches. Finally, the following will highlight the importance of a more careful outlook on the master-pupil relationship in academic context, addressing issues of both continuity and rupture. The article is subdivided in two main sections, the first devoted to Levi as a scientist, the second to his Anti-fascism. PMID:21563384

  16. Recent wetland land loss due to hurricanes: improved estimates based upon multiple source images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kranenburg, Christine J.; Palaseanu-Lovejoy, Monica; Barras, John A.; Brock, John C.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a moderate resolution 30-m fractional water map of the Chenier Plain for 2003, 2006 and 2009 by using information contained in high-resolution satellite imagery of a subset of the study area. Indices and transforms pertaining to vegetation and water were created using the high-resolution imagery, and a threshold was applied to obtain a categorical land/water map. The high-resolution data was used to train a decision-tree classifier to estimate percent water in a lower resolution (Landsat) image. Two new water indices based on the tasseled cap transformation were proposed for IKONOS imagery in wetland environments and more than 700 input parameter combinations were considered for each Landsat image classified. Final selection and thresholding of the resulting percent water maps involved over 5,000 unambiguous classified random points using corresponding 1-m resolution aerial photographs, and a statistical optimization procedure to determine the threshold at which the maximum Kappa coefficient occurs. Each selected dataset has a Kappa coefficient, percent correctly classified (PCC) water, land and total greater than 90%. An accuracy assessment using 1,000 independent random points was performed. Using the validation points, the PCC values decreased to around 90%. The time series change analysis indicated that due to Hurricane Rita, the study area lost 6.5% of marsh area, and transient changes were less than 3% for either land or water. Hurricane Ike resulted in an additional 8% land loss, although not enough time has passed to discriminate between persistent and transient changes.

  17. Leaf gas exchange and water status responses of a native and non-native grass to precipitation across contrasting soil surfaces in the Sonoran Desert.

    PubMed

    Ignace, Danielle D; Huxman, Travis E; Weltzin, Jake F; Williams, David G

    2007-06-01

    Arid and semi-arid ecosystems of the southwestern US are undergoing changes in vegetation composition and are predicted to experience shifts in climate. To understand implications of these current and predicted changes, we conducted a precipitation manipulation experiment on the Santa Rita Experimental Range in southeastern Arizona. The objectives of our study were to determine how soil surface and seasonal timing of rainfall events mediate the dynamics of leaf-level photosynthesis and plant water status of a native and non-native grass species in response to precipitation pulse events. We followed a simulated precipitation event (pulse) that occurred prior to the onset of the North American monsoon (in June) and at the peak of the monsoon (in August) for 2002 and 2003. We measured responses of pre-dawn water potential, photosynthetic rate, and stomatal conductance of native (Heteropogon contortus) and non-native (Eragrostis lehmanniana) C(4) bunchgrasses on sandy and clay-rich soil surfaces. Soil surface did not always amplify differences in plant response to a pulse event. A June pulse event lead to an increase in plant water status and photosynthesis. Whereas the August pulse did not lead to an increase in plant water status and photosynthesis, due to favorable soil moisture conditions facilitating high plant performance during this period. E. lehmanniana did not demonstrate heightened photosynthetic performance over the native species in response to pulses across both soil surfaces. Overall accumulated leaf-level CO(2) response to a pulse event was dependent on antecedent soil moisture during the August pulse event, but not during the June pulse event. This work highlights the need to understand how desert species respond to pulse events across contrasting soil surfaces in water-limited systems that are predicted to experience changes in climate. PMID:17333286

  18. Does Tropical Cyclone Modification Make Sense? A Decision-Analytic Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klima, K.; Morgan, M. G.; Grossmann, I.

    2009-12-01

    Since the demise of project Stormfury in 1983, little attention has been devoted to the possibility of intentionally modifying tropical cyclones (TC). However, following Hurricane Katrina and three other Category 5 hurricanes (Emily, Rita, and Wilma), which together resulted in at least 2,280 deaths and over $120-billion in damages (Blake et al., 2007), the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has recently begun to support an effort to identify and evaluate hurricane mitigation strategies through Project HURRMIT ([http://www.ofcm.noaa.gov/ihc09/Presentations/Session10/s10-01Woodley.ppt]). Using a decision analytic framing and FEMA's HAZUS-MH MR3 damage model (http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/hazus/]), this paper asks, how sure must one be that an intervention will reduce TC damages before choosing to undertake a program of modification? The analysis is formulated in probabilistic terms, and assesses net benefits. In contrast to a much earlier application of decision analysis to TC-modification (Howard et al., 1972) , this work uses census data on the value of property at risk, and prior distributions on changing storm behavior based on data from hurricanes approaching the east coast of Florida since 1953. Even before considering both issues of liability that may arise from the fact that a modified storm is no longer "an act of God" as well as unforeseen environmental consequences, our results suggest that while TC modification techniques will likely alter TC behavior, one will have to be significantly more confident of the predictability and effectiveness of modification methods before their use can be justified. This work is supported by the Climate Decision Making Center through a cooperative agreement between the National Science Foundation (SES-0345798) and Carnegie Mellon University.

  19. Combined measurement and modeling of the hydrological impact of hydraulic redistribution using CLM4.5 at eight AmeriFlux sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Congsheng; Wang, Guiling; Goulden, Michael L.; Scott, Russell L.; Bible, Kenneth; Cardon, Zoe G.

    2016-05-01

    Effects of hydraulic redistribution (HR) on hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological processes have been demonstrated in the field, but the current generation of standard earth system models does not include a representation of HR. Though recent studies have examined the effect of incorporating HR into land surface models, few (if any) have done cross-site comparisons for contrasting climate regimes and multiple vegetation types via the integration of measurement and modeling. Here, we incorporated the HR scheme of Ryel et al. (2002) into the NCAR Community Land Model Version 4.5 (CLM4.5), and examined the ability of the resulting hybrid model to capture the magnitude of HR flux and/or soil moisture dynamics from which HR can be directly inferred, to assess the impact of HR on land surface water and energy budgets, and to explore how the impact may depend on climate regimes and vegetation conditions. Eight AmeriFlux sites with contrasting climate regimes and multiple vegetation types were studied, including the Wind River Crane site in Washington State, the Santa Rita Mesquite savanna site in southern Arizona, and six sites along the Southern California Climate Gradient. HR flux, evapotranspiration (ET), and soil moisture were properly simulated in the present study, even in the face of various uncertainties. Our cross-ecosystem comparison showed that the timing, magnitude, and direction (upward or downward) of HR vary across ecosystems, and incorporation of HR into CLM4.5 improved the model-measurement matches of evapotranspiration, Bowen ratio, and soil moisture particularly during dry seasons. Our results also reveal that HR has important hydrological impact in ecosystems that have a pronounced dry season but are not overall so dry that sparse vegetation and very low soil moisture limit HR.

  20. Lung Radiofrequency Ablation: In Vivo Experimental Study with Low-Perfusion-Rate Multitined Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura Lencioni, Riccardo; Bozzi, Elena; Sbrana, Alberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of lung radiofrequency (RF) ablation by using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes in an in vivo animal model. Ten New Zealand White rabbits underwent RF ablation using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes (Starburst Talon; RITA Medical Systems, Mountain View, CA) and a 200-W RF generator. The electrode was positioned under fluoroscopy guidance and a single percutaneous RF ablation was performed. Saline perfusate was doped with nonionic iodinated contrast agent to render it visible on computed tomography (CT). The pump infused the saline doped with contrast agent into the lateral tines at a rate of 0.1ml/min. The planned ablation was of 3 min, with the hooks deployed to 2 cm at a target temperature of 105{sup o}C. An immediate posttreatment CT scan documented the distribution of the doped saline and the presence of immediate complications. The animals were monitored for delayed complications and sacrificed within 72 h (n = 4), 2 weeks (n = 3), or 4 weeks (n = 3). Assessment of ablation zone and adjacent structures was done at autopsy. Major complications consisted of pneumothorax requiring drainage (n = 2) and skin burn (n = 1). Immediately after the procedure the area of ablation was depicted at CT as a round, well-demarcated area, homogeneously opacified by iodinated contrast medium (mean size, 2.3 {+-} 0.8 cm). The presence of a sharply demarcated area of coagulation necrosis (mean size, 2.1 {+-} 0.4 cm) without severe damage to adjacent structures was confirmed at autopsy. In one case, euthanized at 4 weeks, in whom pneumothorax and pleural effusion were depicted, pleural fibrinous adhesions were demonstrated at autopsy. In conclusion, lung RF ablation performed in an in vivo animal model using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes is feasible and safe. No severe damage to adjacent structures was demonstrated.

  1. A modeling study of coastal inundation induced by storm surge, sea-level rise, and subsidence in the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kraucunas, Ian P.; Rice, Jennie S.; Preston, Benjamin; Wilbanks, Thomas

    2013-12-10

    The northern coasts of the Gulf of Mexico are highly vulnerable to the direct threats of climate change, such as hurricane-induced storm surge, and such risks can be potentially exacerbated by land subsidence and global sea level rise. This paper presents an application of a coastal storm surge model to study the coastal inundation process induced by tide and storm surge, and its response to the effects of land subsidence and sea level rise in the northern Gulf coast. An unstructured-grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model was used to simulate tides and hurricane-induced storm surges in the Gulf of Mexico. Simulated distributions of co-amplitude and co-phase of semi-diurnal and diurnal tides are in good agreement with previous modeling studies. The storm surges induced by four historical hurricanes (Rita, Katrina, Ivan and Dolly) were simulated and compared to observed water levels at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tide stations. Effects of coastal subsidence and future global sea level rise on coastal inundation in the Louisiana coast were evaluated using a parameter “change of inundation depth” through sensitivity simulations that were based on a projected future subsidence scenario and 1-m global sea level rise by the end of the century. Model results suggested that hurricane-induced storm surge height and coastal inundation could be exacerbated by future global sea level rise and subsidence, and that responses of storm surge and coastal inundation to the effects of sea level rise and subsidence are highly nonlinear and vary on temporal and spatial scales.

  2. Older doctors and progression through specialty training in the UK: a cohort analysis of General Medical Council data

    PubMed Central

    Pyne, Yvette; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether older age at graduation is associated with any difference in outcomes from the annual specialty training progression assessment. Design An open cohort of 38 308 doctors who graduated from a UK medical school with annual assessments of progression in their specialty training programme with data centrally collected by the General Medical Council between 5 August 2009 to 31 July 2012. Results Mature junior doctors (≥29 years at graduation) were more likely to have problems with progression on their annual review of competence progression record of in training assessment (ARCP/RITA) than their younger colleagues (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.49, p<0.001). This association was, if anything, even stronger (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.41 to 1.74, p<0.001) after adjustment for gender, ethnicity, type of University and specialty. The same was true when only looking at the most extreme ARCP outcome (4) which is being asked to leave their specialist programme (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.34 to 2.44, p<0.001). Conclusions Mature doctors are a growing part of the medical workforce and they are likely to broaden the spectrum of doctors by bring different life experience to the profession. These results suggest that they are more likely to have problems with progressing through their specialist training programme. More research is required to determine the reasons behind these associations and how mature doctors can be supported both in choosing the best training programme and in coping with the complex demands of higher training at a later stage in their lives. PMID:25649208

  3. Engineering Complex Tissues

    PubMed Central

    MIKOS, ANTONIOS G.; HERRING, SUSAN W.; OCHAREON, PANNEE; ELISSEEFF, JENNIFER; LU, HELEN H.; KANDEL, RITA; SCHOEN, FREDERICK J.; TONER, MEHMET; MOONEY, DAVID; ATALA, ANTHONY; VAN DYKE, MARK E.; KAPLAN, DAVID; VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC, GORDANA

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes the views expressed at the third session of the workshop “Tissue Engineering—The Next Generation,” which was devoted to the engineering of complex tissue structures. Antonios Mikos described the engineering of complex oral and craniofacial tissues as a “guided interplay” between biomaterial scaffolds, growth factors, and local cell populations toward the restoration of the original architecture and function of complex tissues. Susan Herring, reviewing osteogenesis and vasculogenesis, explained that the vascular arrangement precedes and dictates the architecture of the new bone, and proposed that engineering of osseous tissues might benefit from preconstruction of an appropriate vasculature. Jennifer Elisseeff explored the formation of complex tissue structures based on the example of stratified cartilage engineered using stem cells and hydrogels. Helen Lu discussed engineering of tissue interfaces, a problem critical for biological fixation of tendons and ligaments, and the development of a new generation of fixation devices. Rita Kandel discussed the challenges related to the re-creation of the cartilage-bone interface, in the context of tissue engineered joint repair. Frederick Schoen emphasized, in the context of heart valve engineering, the need for including the requirements derived from “adult biology” of tissue remodeling and establishing reliable early predictors of success or failure of tissue engineered implants. Mehmet Toner presented a review of biopreservation techniques and stressed that a new breakthrough in this field may be necessary to meet all the needs of tissue engineering. David Mooney described systems providing temporal and spatial regulation of growth factor availability, which may find utility in virtually all tissue engineering and regeneration applications, including directed in vitro and in vivo vascularization of tissues. Anthony Atala offered a clinician’s perspective for functional tissue

  4. A Virtual National Laboratory for Predicting Hurricane Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogden, Philip

    2006-11-01

    The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season was the most active in recorded history. Collectively, the 2005 hurricanes caused more than 2,280 deaths and record damages of over 100 billion dollars. Of the storms that made landfall, Dennis, Emily, Katrina, Rita, and Wilma caused most of the destruction. Accurate predictions of water level, wave height, and inundation can save lives and reduce recovery costs, provided the information gets to emergency responders in a timely manner. The information must be received well in advance of a storm making landfall, so that responders can weigh the costs of unnecessary evacuation (estimated at over 1 million dollars per mile of coastline) against the costs of inadequate preparation. Tracking large storms is already challenging; predicting the impacts days before the storm makes landfall imposes enormous new challenges. This requires an entirely different approach than is usually involved in producing the single best forecast for a specific event. Hazard planning requires an estimate of the uncertainty in the forecast. Calculating such probabilities requires that computer simulations be run not once, but many hundreds or thousands of times---once for each plausible outcome---creating huge computational demands. Add the requirement for real-time observations needed to increase predictive capability and the complexity of the information flow grows to include a wide variety of ocean-based sensor platforms. From ocean-bound sensors to supercomputers to the decision-maker's desk, the predictions must be turned around in a matter of hours if they are to affect decision-making. Scientists from universities across the Southeast are creating a cyberinfrastructure---a virtual and distributed laboratory -- that combines the knowledge, data-integration capacity, and computational power necessary for real-time environmental prediction and hazard planning. This vision supports a national, multi-agency initiative called the Integrated Ocean Observing

  5. Restoring p53 function in cancer: novel therapeutic approaches for applying the brakes to tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Di Cintio, Alessandra; Di Gennaro, Elena; Budillon, Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    p53 tumor suppressor gene encodes for a critical cellular protein that regulate the integrity of the cell and can induce cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis upon cellular stresses of several origins, including chemotherapeutics. Loss of p53 function occurs in an estimated 50% of all cancers by mutations and deletions while in the presence of wild-type p53 alleles other mechanisms may affect the expression and activity of p53. Alternate mechanisms include methylation of the promoter of p53, deletion or epigenetic inactivation of the p53-positive regulator p14/ARF, elevated expression of the p53 regulators murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and MDMX, or alteration of upstream regulators of p53 such as the kinase ATM. MDM2 is a p53 E3 ubiquitin ligase that mediates the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of p53 while p14/ARF is a small MDM2-binding protein that controls the activity of MDM2 by displacing p53 and preventing its degradation. MDMX antagonize p53-dependent transcriptional control by interfering with p53 transactivation function. The understanding of the key role of p53 inactivation in cancer development generated considerable interest in developing compounds that are capable of restoring the p53 functions. Several patents have been issued on such compounds. Adenovirus-based p53 gene therapy as well as small molecules such as PRIMA that can restore the transcriptional transactivation function to mutant p53, or NUTLIN and RITA that interfere with MDM2-directed p53 degradation, have tested in a preclinical setting and some of these approaches are currently in clinical development. PMID:19663772

  6. Identifying Risk Factors for Recent HIV Infection in Kenya Using a Recent Infection Testing Algorithm: Results from a Nationally Representative Population-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Andrea A.; Parekh, Bharat S.; Umuro, Mamo; Galgalo, Tura; Bunnell, Rebecca; Makokha, Ernest; Dobbs, Trudy; Murithi, Patrick; Muraguri, Nicholas; De Cock, Kevin M.; Mermin, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A recent infection testing algorithm (RITA) that can distinguish recent from long-standing HIV infection can be applied to nationally representative population-based surveys to characterize and identify risk factors for recent infection in a country. Materials and Methods We applied a RITA using the Limiting Antigen Avidity Enzyme Immunoassay (LAg) on stored HIV-positive samples from the 2007 Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey. The case definition for recent infection included testing recent on LAg and having no evidence of antiretroviral therapy use. Multivariate analysis was conducted to determine factors associated with recent and long-standing infection compared to HIV-uninfected persons. All estimates were weighted to adjust for sampling probability and nonresponse. Results Of 1,025 HIV-antibody-positive specimens, 64 (6.2%) met the case definition for recent infection and 961 (93.8%) met the case definition for long-standing infection. Compared to HIV-uninfected individuals, factors associated with higher adjusted odds of recent infection were living in Nairobi (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 11.37; confidence interval [CI] 2.64–48.87) and Nyanza (AOR 4.55; CI 1.39–14.89) provinces compared to Western province; being widowed (AOR 8.04; CI 1.42–45.50) or currently married (AOR 6.42; CI 1.55–26.58) compared to being never married; having had ≥ 2 sexual partners in the last year (AOR 2.86; CI 1.51–5.41); not using a condom at last sex in the past year (AOR 1.61; CI 1.34–1.93); reporting a sexually transmitted infection (STI) diagnosis or symptoms of STI in the past year (AOR 1.97; CI 1.05–8.37); and being aged <30 years with: 1) HSV-2 infection (AOR 8.84; CI 2.62–29.85), 2) male genital ulcer disease (AOR 8.70; CI 2.36–32.08), or 3) lack of male circumcision (AOR 17.83; CI 2.19–144.90). Compared to HIV-uninfected persons, factors associated with higher adjusted odds of long-standing infection included living in Coast (AOR 1.55; CI 1.04–2

  7. Representations of epilepsy on the stage: From the Greeks to the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Trimble, Michael; Hesdorffer, Dale C

    2016-04-01

    Epilepsy is a disorder that has been used by dramatists in various ways over the ages and therefore highlights the views of the disorder as people saw it at the time the plays were written and performed. In the 6th century BC, links between tragedy and epilepsy were developed by Greek playwrights, especially Euripides, in Iphigenia among the Taureans and Heracles where epilepsy and madness associated with extreme violence occur together. Both Heracles and Orestes have episodes after a long period of physical exhaustion and nutritional deprivation. During the Renaissance, Shakespeare wrote plays featuring different neurological disorders, including epilepsy. Epilepsy plays a crucial part in the stories of Julius Caesar and Othello. Julius Caesar is a play about politics, and Caesar's epilepsy is used to illustrate his weakness and vulnerability which stigmatizes him and leads to his assassination. Othello is a play about jealousy, and Othello, an outsider, is stigmatized by his color, his weakness, and his 'seizures' as a form of demonic possession. In modern times, Night Mother portrays the hard life of Jessie, who lives with her mother. Jessie has no friends, her father has abandoned the family, and she has no privacy and is ashamed. Stigma and social pressures lead her to commit suicide. Henry James' novella, The Turn of the Screw, portrays a governess with dream-like states, déjà vu, and loss of temporal awareness who has been sent to the country to look after two small children and ends up killing one. This novella was turned into an opera by Benjamin Britten. Most recently, performance art has been portraying epilepsy as the reality of a personally provoked seizure. Both Allan Sutherland and Rita Marcalo have purposely provoked themselves to have a seizure in front of an audience. They do this to show that seizures are just one disability. Whether this provokes stigma in audiences is unknown. Whether the performance artists understand the potential for

  8. ASPECT Emergency Response Chemical and Radiological Mapping

    ScienceCinema

    LANL

    2009-09-01

    Ike, was sent to the EPA Region 6 Rapid Needs Assessment and the State of Texas Joint Field Office in Austin, Texas. It appears that though there is considerable damage in Galveston and Texas City, there are fewer chemical leaks than during either hurricanes Katrina or Rita. Specific information gathered from the data was reported out to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Headquarters, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Department of Homeland Security, and the State of Texas Emergency Management Agency.

  9. Anticipating and Communicating Plausible Environmental and Health Concerns Associated with Future Disasters: The ShakeOut and ARkStorm Scenarios as Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Morman, S. A.; Alpers, C. N.; Hoefen, T. M.; Meeker, G. P.

    2010-12-01

    Disasters commonly pose immediate threats to human safety, but can also produce hazardous materials (HM) that pose short- and long-term environmental-health threats. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has helped assess potential environmental health characteristics of HM produced by various natural and anthropogenic disasters, such as the 2001 World Trade Center collapse, 2005 hurricanes Katrina and Rita, 2007-2009 southern California wildfires, various volcanic eruptions, and others. Building upon experience gained from these responses, we are now developing methods to anticipate plausible environmental and health implications of the 2008 Great Southern California ShakeOut scenario (which modeled the impacts of a 7.8 magnitude earthquake on the southern San Andreas fault, http://urbanearth.gps.caltech.edu/scenario08/), and the recent ARkStorm scenario (modeling the impacts of a major, weeks-long winter storm hitting nearly all of California, http://urbanearth.gps.caltech.edu/winter-storm/). Environmental-health impacts of various past earthquakes and extreme storms are first used to identify plausible impacts that could be associated with the disaster scenarios. Substantial insights can then be gleaned using a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach to link ShakeOut and ARkStorm effects maps with data extracted from diverse database sources containing geologic, hazards, and environmental information. This type of analysis helps constrain where potential geogenic (natural) and anthropogenic sources of HM (and their likely types of contaminants or pathogens) fall within areas of predicted ShakeOut-related shaking, firestorms, and landslides, and predicted ARkStorm-related precipitation, flooding, and winds. Because of uncertainties in the event models and many uncertainties in the databases used (e.g., incorrect location information, lack of detailed information on specific facilities, etc.) this approach should only be considered as the first of multiple steps

  10. Geophysical Character and Geochemical Evolution of the Mesoproterozoic Figueira Branca Intrusive Suite, SW Amazon Craton (Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louro, Vinicius; Cawood, Peter; Mantovani, Marta

    2016-04-01

    mantle under Jauru Terrain to form the FBS and nearby suites, but also under the subducting Rio Alegre Terrain, producing the magma that formed the 1412 Ma to 1380 Ma Santa Rita Suite in the Rio Alegre Terrain, which has a juvenile ɛNd(t) signature (+3.6). Thus in summary out data indicate that the FBS was part of the origin and evolution of the magmatic suites of the Rio Alegre and Jauru Terrains.

  11. Impact of vegetation on the hydrodynamics and morphological changes of the Wax Lake Delta during hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, F.; Kettner, A. J.; Syvitski, J. P.; Ye, Q.; Bevington, A.; Twilley, R.; Atkinson, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Coastal wetlands are natural barriers for storms, but have become more vulnerable especially when considering sea level rise and intensification of hurricanes due to global climate change. We use the numerical model Delft3D, which incorporates a newly developed vegetation routine to analyze the impact of natural vegetation on the morphological changes of coastal wetlands. The vegetation routine takes into account: 1) the influence of vertically oriented stems of plants as well as horizontally oriented stems (bent or broken but still attached to the belowground roots and rhizomes) on the flow turbulence as well as flow momentum, and 2) the influence of plant roots on the submerged soil strength. The model is applied to the Wax Lake Delta, a river-dominated delta that is part of the larger Mississippi River Delta system, during extreme events (hurricane Katrina and Rita (2005)). Hydrodynamic components as well as waves and salinity are included in the Delft3D model simulation. Results reveal that the submerged aboveground plant stems significantly decrease flow velocity and protect the wetland from erosion. When flow velocity exceeds a critical value, plant stems start to orient horizontally and lie on the bed, which changes the 3D vertical flow structure to free water condition (log profile), and also increases the bed roughness on the wetlands. Roots help to increase the soil strength, reducing erosion of the wetlands. However, roots can also intensify erosion if they got pulled out of the soil during storm events. Typically the whole root system of plants will be pulled out together, leading to a mat of soil that is eroded. This process has been observed for some parts of the Mississippi Delta during severe hurricanes like hurricane Katrina. Storm surges generated by hurricanes can push a large amount of saline water into the freshwater wetlands. The high salinity water increases flocculation and therefore sedimentation. Overall, plants have a complex impact on

  12. F-Cl-OH partitioning between biotite and apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen; Sverjensky, Dimitri A.

    1992-09-01

    An assessment of F-C1-OH partitioning between natural apatite and biotite in a variety of rocks was used to evaluate reciprocal (Mg, Fe 2+, Al VI) (F, Cl, OH) mixing properties for biotite according to the reciprocal salt solution model of WOOD and NICHOLLS (1978). Ideal mixing of F-C1-OH and Fe-Mg-Al VI in the hydroxyl and octahedral sites is assumed for biotites with dilute Cl concentrations. The reciprocal interaction parameters, in terms of Gibbs free energies, for the reactions KMg3[ AlSi3O10]( OH) 2 + KFe3[ AlSi3O10]( F) 2 = KMg3[ AlSi3O10]( F) 2 + KFe3[ AlSi3O10]( OH) 2 Phl Fann Fphl Ann and KMg3[ AlSi3O10]( Cl) 2 + KFe3[ AlSi3O10]( OH) 2 = KMg3[ AlSi3O10]( OH) 2 + KFe3[ AlSi3O10] ( Cl) 2 Clphl Ann Phl Clann are about -10 kcal/mol and -4.5 kcal/mol, respectively. These mixing properties are consistent with standard state thermodynamic properties for F and Cl endmember phases from ZHU and SVERJENSKY (1991). The approach of studying F-C1-OH partitioning between biotite and apatite permits distinguishing the reciprocal effects from the effects of temperature, pressure, and fluid composition. The resultant mixing properties are consistent with observations both in hydrothermal experiments and in natural mineral assemblages. The mixing properties presented in this study enable us now to predict F and Cl concentrations of hydrothermal fluids from the measured F and Cl concentrations in biotite with variable Fe-Mg-Al VI proportions. A case study of the Santa Rita porphyry copper deposits, New Mexico, shows that hydrothermal fluids responsible for the phyllic alteration had a salinity about 3 molal Cl -, in agreement with fluid inclusion studies. Our internally consistent standard thermodynamic properties and solid solution models also lead to recalibration of the apatite-biotite geothermometer. The revised geothermometer predicts temperatures that agree with those estimated from other independent geothermometers. The large reciprocal effects in biotite also point

  13. Clinical short-term results of radiofrequency ablation in liver cancers

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong-Chi; Liu, Lian-Xin; Piao, Da-Xun; Xu, Jun; Zheng, Min; Zhu, An-Long; Qi, Shu-Yi; Zhang, Wei-Hui; Wu, Lin-Feng

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study local therapeutic efficacy, side effects, and complications of radiofrequency ablation (RFA), which is emerging as a new method for the treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis and metastatic liver cancer. METHODS: Thirty-six patients with primary and secondary liver cancers (21 with primary hepatocellular carcinoma, 12 with colorectal cancer liver metastases and 3 with other malignant liver metastases), which were considered not suitable for curative resection, were include in this study. They were treated either with RFA (RITA2000, Mountain View, California, USA) percutaneously (n = 20) or intraoperatively (n = 16). The procedures were performed using the ultrasound guidance. The quality of RFA were based on monitoring of equipments and subject feeling of the practitioners. Patients treated with RFA was followed according to clinical findings, radiographic images, and tumor markers. RESULTS: Thirty-six patients underwent RFA for 48 nodules. RFA was used to treat an average 1.3 lesions per patient, and the median size of treated lesions was 2.5 cm (range, 0.5-9 cm). The average hospital stay was 5.6 d overall (2.8 d for percutaneous cases and 7.9 d for open operations). Seven patients underwent a second RFA procedure (sequential ablations). Sixteen HCC patients with a high level of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and 9 colorectal cancer liver metastases patients with a high level of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) have a great reduction benefited from RFA. Four (11.1%) patients had complications: one skin burn; one postoperative hemorrhage; one cholecystitis and one hepatic abscess associated with percutaneous ablations of a large lesion. There were 4 deaths: 3 patients died from local and system diseases (1 at 7 month, 1 at 9 month, and 1 at 12 month), 1 patients died from cardiovascular shock, but no RFA-related death. At a median follow-up of 10 mo (range, 1-24 mo), 6 patients (16.7%) had

  14. Hurricane Wave Power Extremes Along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromirski, P. D.; Kossin, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Extremes in wave power generated by tropical cyclones (TCs) will have an increasingly greater coastal impact as mean sea level rises. The Gulf 98th percentile (3 m) deep-water significant wave height, HS, measured at four open ocean NOAA buoys along the U.S. Atlantic coast and three Gulf buoys identifies extreme TC-generated wave events during the June-November hurricane season. Since 1978, there were substantially more significant HS events along the Atlantic coast than in the Gulf, with almost three times as many extreme wave events during September. The monthly distribution along both coasts peaks in September, with an equally likely chance of a significant TC wave event occurring during October as during August over the 1978-2006 data record. However, no clear trend in TC-generated extreme wave heights is observed. In general, the Atlantic buoys show a significant increase in seasonal wave power, PW, since 1995. PW during six of the hurricane seasons since 1995 exceeds all prior years at at least one of the Atlantic group buoys. In contrast to the Atlantic buoys, the Gulf buoys show exceptional seasonal PW levels only during the 2005 hurricane season when major Hurricanes Dennis, Emily, Katrina, Rita, and Wilma tracked trough the Gulf. The exceptional PW levels observed in the Gulf during 2005 were exceeded in the Atlantic during 1999, and approached during 1995 and 1996, attesting to a greater frequency of extreme TC-associated extreme wave events along the East Coast compared to the Gulf during the last four decades. A TC wave power index (WPI) increases significantly in the Atlantic during the mid-1990s, resulting largely from an increase in mid-to-late hurricane season TCs. The WPI is related to TC strength, size, duration, and frequency, and is highly correlated with the TC power dissipation index (PDI, Emanuel 2005). The close association of the WPI to hurricane activity implies that significant coastal impacts will increase as the PDI increases

  15. Use of thermal infrared remote sensing data for fisheries, environmental monitoring, oil and gas exploration, and ship routing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roffer, M. A.; Gawlikowski, G.; Muller-Karger, F.; Schaudt, K.; Upton, M.; Wall, C.; Westhaver, D.

    2006-12-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) and ocean color remote sensing data (1.1 - 4.0 km) are being used as the primary data source in decision making systems for fisheries management, commercial and recreational fishing advisory services, fisheries research, environmental monitoring, oil and gas operations, and ship routing. Experience over the last 30 years suggests that while ocean color and other remote sensing data (e.g. altimetry) are important data sources, TIR presently yields the most useful data for studying ocean surface circulation synoptically on a daily basis. This is due primarily to the greater temporal resolution, but also due to one's better understanding of the dynamics of sea surface temperature compared with variations in ocean color and the spatial limitations of altimeter data. Information derived from commercial operations and research is being used to improve the operational efficiency of fishing vessels (e.g. reduce search time and increase catch rate) and to improve our understanding of the variations in catch distribution and rate needed to properly manage fisheries. This information is also being used by the oil and gas industry to minimize transit time and thus, save costs (e.g., tug charter, insurance), to increase production and revenue up to 500K dollars a day. The data are also be used to reduce the risk of equipment loss, loss of time and revenue to sudden and unexpected currents such as eddies. Sequential image analysis integrating TIR and ocean color provided near-real time, synoptic visualization of the rapid and wide dispersal of coastal waters from the northern Gulf of Mexico following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in September 2005. The satellite data and analysis techniques have also been used to monitor the effects and movement of other potential environmentally damaging substances, such as dispersing nutrient enriched waste water offshore. A review of our experience in several commercial applications and research efforts will reinforce the

  16. UAVSAR and TerraSAR-X Based InSAR Detection of Localized Subsidence in the New Orleans Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, R. G.; An, K.; Jones, C. E.; Latini, D.

    2014-12-01

    Vulnerability of the US Gulf coast to inundation has received increased attention since hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Compounding effects of sea level rise, wetland loss, and regional and local subsidence makes flood protection a difficult challenge, and particularly for the New Orleans area. Key to flood protection is precise knowledge of elevations and elevation changes. Analysis of historical and continuing geodetic measurements show surprising complexity, including locations subsiding more rapidly than considered during planning of hurricane protection and coastal restoration projects. Combining traditional, precise geodetic data with interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) observations can provide geographically dense constraints on surface deformation. The Gulf Coast environment is challenging for InSAR techniques, especially with systems not designed for interferometry. We use two InSAR capable systems, the L- band (24 cm wavelength) airborne JPL/NASA UAVSAR, and the DLR/EADS Astrium spaceborne TerraSAR X-band (3 cm wavelength), and compare results. First, we are applying pair-wise InSAR to the longer wavelength UAVSAR data to detect localized elevation changes potentially impacting flood protection infrastructure from 2009 - 2014. We focus on areas on and near flood protection infrastructure to identify changes indicative of subsidence, structural deformation, and/or seepage. The Spaceborne TerraSAR X-band SAR system has relatively frequent observations, and dense persistent scatterers in urban areas, enabling measurement of very small displacements. We compare L-band UAVSAR results with permanent scatterer (PS-InSAR) and Short Baseline Subsets (SBAS) interferometric analyses of a stack composed by 28 TerraSAR X-band images acquired over the same period. Thus we can evaluate results from the different radar frequencies and analyses techniques. Preliminary results indicate subsidence features potentially of a variety of causes, including ground water

  17. Distributed Modeling Reveals the Ecohydrological Dynamics Linked with Woody Plant Encroachment in the Sonoran Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, N. A.; Vivoni, E. R.; Anderson, C.; Saripalli, S.; Robles-Morua, A.

    2012-12-01

    Woody plant encroachment is an important issue facing semiarid ecosystems in the southwestern United States that is associated with grazing pressures, fire suppression, and the invasion of shrub species into historical grasslands. In this study, we present observational and distributed modeling activities conducted in two small rangeland watersheds of the Santa Rita Experimental Range, Arizona. This Sonoran Desert landscape is representative of the vegetation shift from grasslands to a woody savanna due to the encroachment of velvet mesquite (Prosopis velutina). The paired basins are similar in size and in close proximity, leading to equivalent meteorological and soil conditions. Nevertheless, they vary substantially in mesquite cover, with one basin having undergone a removal treatment several decades ago, while the other watershed represents the regional encroachment process. This distinction presents an excellent case study for analyzing the effects of mesquite encroachment on dryland ecohydrological dynamics. Observational datasets are obtained from a high-resolution environmental sensor network consisting of six rain gauges, twenty-one soil moisture and temperature profiles, five channel runoff flumes and an eddy covariance tower with a complete set of radiation, energy, carbon and water fluxes. In addition, high-resolution digital terrain models and image orthomosaics were obtained from a piloted aircraft with Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) measurements and an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) with a digital camera. These two remote sensing platforms allowed characterizing the topography, stream network and plant species distributions at a high resolution (<1 m) in both basins. Using the sensor network, we present comparative analyses of watershed rainfall-runoff transformation in the paired basins, illustrating the role that mesquite trees have in runoff generation at the two outlet flumes. We further explore the impact of mesquite trees on the soil

  18. Gulf Coast Subsidence: Integration of Geodesy, Geophysical Modeling, and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, R. G.; Chapman, B. D.; Deese, R.; Dokka, R. K.; Fielding, E. J.; Hawkins, B.; Hensley, S.; Ivins, E. R.; Jones, C. E.; Kent, J. D.; Liu, Z.; Lohman, R.; Zheng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The vulnerability of the US Gulf Coast has received increased attention in the years since hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Agencies responsible for the long-term protection of lives and infrastructure require precise estimates of future subsidence and sea level rise. A quantitative, geophysically based methodology can provide such estimates by incorporating geological data, geodetic measurements, geophysical models of non-elastic mechanical behavior at depth, and geographically comprehensive deformation monitoring made possible with measurements from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). To be effective, results must be available to user agencies in a format suitable for integration within existing decision-support processes. Work to date has included analysis of historical and continuing ground-based geodetic measurements. These reveal a surprising degree of complexity, including regions that are subsiding at rates faster than those considered for hurricane protection planning of New Orleans and other coastal communities (http://www.mvn.usace.army.mil/pdf/hps_verticalsettlement.pdf) as well as Louisiana's coastal restoration strategies (http://www.coast2050.gov/2050reports.htm) (Dokka, 2011, J. Geophys. Res., 116, B06403, doi:10.1029/2010JB008008). Traditional geodetic measurements provide precise information at single points, while InSAR observations provide geographically comprehensive measurements of surface deformation at lower vertical precision. Available InSAR data sources include X-, C- and L-band satellite, and NASA/JPL airborne UAVSAR L-band data. The Gulf Coast environment is very challenging for InSAR techniques, especially with systems not designed for interferometry. For example, the shorter wavelength C-band data decorrelates over short time periods requiring more elaborate time-series analysis techniques, with which we've had some success. Meanwhile, preliminary analysis of limited L-Band ALOS/PALSAR satellite data show promise

  19. Remote sensing of plant emissions of volatile isoprenoids with PRI. Prospects for upscaling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penuelas, J.

    2013-12-01

    Josep Peñuelas*1,2, Giovanni Marino1,2,3,4, Joan LLusia1,2, Catherine Morfopoulos1,2,5, Gerard Farre-Armengol1,2, Shawn Kefauver, Alex Guenther6 , Francesca Rapparini7 , Roger Seco1,2,6, Marc Estiarte1,2, Mónica Mejia-Chang1,2, Romà Ogaya1,2, Jordi Sardans1,2 , Andrew Turnipseed6, Peter Harley6, Osvaldo Facini7, Rita Baraldi7, Jim Greenberg6 , Iolanda Filella1,2 1 CSIC, Global Ecology Unit CREAF-CEAB-UAB, Cerdanyola del Vallés 08193, Catalonia, Spain 2 CREAF, Cerdanyola del Vallés 08193, Catalonia, Spain 3 Dipartimento di Bioscienze e Territorio, Università degli Studi del Molise, Contrada Fonte Lappone, 86090 Pesche (IS), Italy 4 Institute for Plant Protection, National Research Council, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI), Italy 5 Division of Ecology and Evolution, Imperial College, Silwood Park, Ascot, SL5 7PY, UK 6 Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000, USA 7 Biometeorology Institute, IBIMET-CNR, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna, Italy Abstract Terrestrial plants re-emit around 1-2% of the carbon they fix as isoprene and monoterpenes. These emissions play major roles in the ecological relationships among living organisms and in atmospheric chemistry and climate, and yet their actual quantification at the ecosystem level in different regions is far from being resolved. Phenomenological models are used to estimate the emission rates, but the limited understanding of the function and regulation of these emissions leads to large uncertainties in such estimations. Many measurements have been made at the foliar but few at the ecosystem level, and those that do exist are limited in space and time. We here provide evidence that a simple remote sensing index, the photochemical reflectance index (PRI), which is indicative of light use efficiency (LUE), is a good indirect estimator of foliar isoprenoid emissions and therefore can be used to sense them remotely. These results open

  20. Quantifying the influence of deep soil moisture on ecosystem albedo: the role of vegetation Zulia M. Sánchez-Mejía 1 and Shirley A. Papuga1 1School of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Mejia, Z. M.; Papuga, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Water limited ecosystems in arid and semiarid regions are characterized by sparse vegetation and a relatively large fraction of bare soil. Importantly, the land surface in these dryland regions is highly sensitive to pulses of moisture that affect the vegetation canopy in density and color, as well as the soil color. Changes in surface conditions due to these pulses have been shown to affect the surface energy fluxes and atmospheric processes in these regions. For instance, previous studies have shown that shallow soil moisture ( < 20 cm below the surface) significantly changes surface albedo (a= SWup/ SWin). Recent studies have highlighted the importance of deep soil moisture ( > 20 cm below the surface) for vegetation dynamics in these regions. We hypothesize that deep soil moisture will change vegetation canopy density and color enough that changes in albedo will be observable at the surface, therefore linking deep soil moisture and albedo. We adopt a conceptual framework to address this hypothesis, where at any point in time the soil profile falls into one of four cases: (1) dry shallow soil and dry deep soil; (2) wet shallow soil and dry deep soil; (3) wet shallow soil and wet deep soil; and (4) dry shallow soil and wet deep soil. At a creosotebush dominated ecosystem of the Santa Rita Experimental Range, southern Arizona during summers of 2011 and 2012, we took albedo measurements during these cases at multiple bare and vegetated patches within the footprint of an eddy covariance tower. We found that when the soil is completely dry (Case 1) albedo is highest in both bare and vegetated patches. Likewise, when the soil is wet in both the shallow and deep regions (Case 3), albedo is lowest in both bare and vegetated patches. Interestingly, we also found that albedo is significantly lower for vegetated patches when the deep soil is wet and shallow soil is dry (Case 4). These results imply that deep soil moisture can be important in altering ecosystem level albedo