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Sample records for russian channels angers

  1. Anger Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porterfield, Kitty; Carnes, Meg

    2009-01-01

    School leaders are reporting an uptick in anger in their communities these days--often diffuse, unfocused anger--among staff members, parents and neighbors. In the face of threat, the first impulse of education leaders is to toughen up, tighten down and begin broadcasting their messages. Since anxiety and rage come with uncertain times, the…

  2. Anger management in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Tuthill, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    Anger is not necessarily bad, according to the author. There are times when it is appropriate. At other times it can escalate unpleasantly. The article describes the different stages of anger and the author's advice on the proper response at each stage. He also lists anger reducing and anger enhancing response behaviors to be aware of. PMID:12371249

  3. Anger Management Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochman, John E.; Palardy, Nicole R.; McElroy, Heather K.; Phillips, Nancy; Holmes, Khiela J.

    2004-01-01

    Two anger management interventions for aggressive children, Anger Coping and Coping Power, are described in this review article, including conceptual underpinnings, session format and content, and outcome research findings. Important issues and considerations in the implementation of such interventions are also presented. Overall, Anger Coping and…

  4. Anger in Black and White: Race, Alienation, and Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabry, J. Beth; Kiecolt, K. Jill

    2005-01-01

    Using data from the 1996 General Social Survey and the 1973 Chicago Crowding Study, we test the hypotheses that African Americans feel and express more anger than whites, that sense of control (versus powerlessness) lessens anger and mistrust increases anger, and that these indicators of alienation affect anger differently for African Americans…

  5. Anger and ventricular arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Lampert, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Although anecdotal evidence has long suggested links between emotion and ventricular arrhythmia, more recent studies have prospectively demonstrated the arrhythmogenic effects of anger, as well as mechanisms underlying these effects. Recent findings Epidemiological studies reveal that psychological stress increases sudden death, as well as arrhythmias, in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, in populations during emotionally devastating disasters such as earthquake or war. Diary-based studies confirm that anger and other negative emotions can trigger potentially lethal ventricular arrhythmias. Anger alters electrophysiological properties of the myocardium, including T-wave alternans, a measure of heterogeneity of repolarization, suggesting one mechanistic link between emotion and arrhythmia. Pilot studies of behavioral interventions have shown promise in decreasing arrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. Summary Anger and other strong emotions can trigger polymorphic, potentially life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in vulnerable patients. Through autonomic changes including increased sympathetic activity and vagal withdrawal, anger leads to increases in heterogeneity of repolarization as measured by T-wave alternans, known to be associated with arrhythmogenesis, as well as increasing inducibility of arrhythmia. Further delineation of mechanisms linking anger and arrhythmia, and of approaches to decrease the detrimental effects of anger and other negative emotions on arrhythmogenesis, are important areas of future investigation. PMID:19864944

  6. Driving anger in Ukraine: Appraisals, not trait driving anger, predict anger intensity while driving.

    PubMed

    Stephens, A N; Hill, T; Sullman, M J M

    2016-03-01

    Trait driving anger is often, but not always, found to predict both the intensity of anger while driving and subsequent crash-related behaviours. However, a number of studies have not found support for a direct relationship between one's tendency to become angry and anger reported while driving, suggesting that other factors may mediate this relationship. The present self-report study investigated whether, in anger provoking driving situations, the appraisals made by drivers influence the relationship between trait and state anger. A sample of 339 drivers from Ukraine completed the 33-item version of the Driver Anger Scale (DAS; Deffenbacher et al., 1994) and eight questions about their most recent experience of driving anger. A structural equation model found that the intensity of anger experienced was predicted by the negative evaluations of the situation, which was in turn predicted by trait driving anger. However, trait driving anger itself did not predict anger intensity; supporting the hypothesis that evaluations of the driving situation mediate the relationship between trait and state anger. Further, the unique structure of the DAS required to fit the data from the Ukrainian sample, may indicate that the anger inducing situations in Ukraine are different to those of a more developed country. Future research is needed to investigate driving anger in Ukraine in a broader sample and also to confirm the role of the appraisal process in the development of driving anger in both developed and undeveloped countries. PMID:26710267

  7. Driving anger in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sullman, Mark J M; Stephens, Amanda N; Yong, Michelle

    2014-10-01

    The present study examined the types of situations that cause Malaysian drivers to become angry. The 33-item version of the driver anger scale (Deffenbacher et al., 1994) was used to investigate driver anger amongst a sample of 339 drivers. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the fit of the original six-factor model (discourtesy, traffic obstructions, hostile gestures, slow driving, illegal driving and police presence), after removing one item and allowing three error pairs to covary, was satisfactory. Female drivers reported more anger, than males, caused by traffic obstruction and hostile gestures. Age was also negatively related to five (discourtesy, traffic obstructions, hostile gestures, slow driving and police presence) of the six factors and also to the total DAS score. Furthermore, although they were not directly related to crash involvement, several of the six forms of driving anger were significantly related to the crash-related conditions of: near misses, loss of concentration, having lost control of a vehicle and being ticketed. Overall the pattern of findings made in the present research were broadly similar to those from Western countries, indicating that the DAS is a valid measure of driving anger even among non-European based cultures. PMID:24863369

  8. Understanding Clinical Anger and Violence: The Anger Avoidance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Frank L.; Moore, Zella E.

    2008-01-01

    Although anger is a primary emotion and holds clear functional necessities, the presence of anger and its behavioral manifestations of aggression/violence can have serious emotional, health, and social consequences. Despite such consequences, the construct of clinical anger has to date suffered from few theoretical and treatment advancements and…

  9. Anger Management in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazak, Daniel L.

    This presentation offered counselors and therapists an opportunity to comment on the invisible aspects of anger in the workplace. An argument is made that anxiety is a foundational construct that supports rage, violence, and anger. An audience of 35 participants were asked to describe the one situation that best illustrated the most anger observed…

  10. Imaging phoswich anger camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, R. K.; Sood, R. K.

    1991-08-01

    High angular resolution and low background are the primary requisites for detectors for future astronomy experiments in the low energy gamma-ray region. Scintillation counters are still the only available large area detector for studies in this energy range. Preliminary details of a large area phoswich anger camera designed for coded aperture imaging is described and its background and position characteristics are discussed.

  11. Anger Camera Firmware

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-11-19

    The firmware is responsible for the operation of Anger Camera Electronics, calculation of position, time of flight and digital communications. It provides a first stage analysis of 48 signals from 48 analog signals that have been converted to digital values using A/D convertors.

  12. Sex, Anger and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Robin W.; Lively, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    A social problem that has preoccupied sociologists of gender and mental health is the higher rate of depression found among women. Although a number of hypotheses about this health disparity between men and women have been advanced, none consider the importance of subjectively experienced anger. Drawing on theoretical and empirical insights from…

  13. Art and Anger Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Judi; Huber, Tonya

    2003-01-01

    Considers if the creative process is a viable tool in anger management. Explores whether a summer art program made a difference in the lives of a class of troubled youth. Uses art-based educational research methods from the qualitative inquiry paradigm to assist the exploration. Presents the authors' reflections on the program. Concludes that art…

  14. Position Ring System using Anger Type Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Joel S. Karp, principal investigator

    2004-12-14

    The overall objective of our project was to develop PET scanners and imaging techniques that achieve high performance and excellent image quality. Our approach was based upon 3-D imaging (no septa) with position-sensitive Anger-logic detectors, whereby the encoding ratio of resolution elements to number of photo-multiplier tube channels is very high. This design led to a series of PET systems that emphasized cost-effectiveness and practicality in a clinical environment.

  15. Understanding Anger: Managing This Constant Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the psychology of anger as a basis for dealing with anger-related problems that arise at camp. Camp staff may have problems with anger that are not identified by staff screening. The camp staff manual should contain a written policy regarding overt displays of anger. Guidelines suggest the use of anger during conflict resolution. (CDS)

  16. Anger in the combat zone.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Valvincent A; Hicklin, Thomas A

    2005-06-01

    A U.S. Army Reserve Combat Stress Control prevention team was dispatched to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom to provide preventative mental health care to a U.S. Army airborne division and Special Operations forces. The team's mission was to ensure mental health readiness of units in the area of operations. In Bagram, Afghanistan, the Combat Stress Control team identified anger as a very prevalent emotion in the combat zone. Anger management interventions with individual and group counseling were implemented to help soldiers cope with anger. Of 7,000 military personnel stationed there during the team's rotation, there was not one completed suicide or homicide. This article describes how the 113th Medical Company identified, treated, and controlled anger at Bagram Airbase, Afghanistan, between June 20, 2002, and December 20, 2002, with anger management interventions. This article does not address the psychophysiological features of anger. PMID:16001596

  17. Anger in Elderly Patients with Depressive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Baeg, Sengmi; Wang, Seong Keun; Chee, Ik Seung; Kim, Soo Yeong

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to investigate anger in elderly patients with depressive disorders. Methods The subjects included 216 elderly patients with depression and 198 controls. All subjects were assessed by the State and Trait Anger Inventory (STAXI), Aggression Questionnaire (AQ), Reaction Inventory (RI). Results Elderly patients with depressive disorder showed lower levels of trait anger and anger expression on the STAXI, lower levels of verbal aggression and hostility on the AQ, and lower levels of anger reaction to the unpredictable disruption and disturbances factor, the embarrassing circumstances factor, and the personal disrespect factor on the RI than the controls. In the depression group, the severity of their depression was positively correlated with the trait anger, state anger, anger expression (except 'anger control') scores on the STAXI; the physical aggression, anger, and hostility scores on the AQ; and the anger reaction to unpredictable disruption and disturbances factor, the embarrassing circumstances factor, and the personal disrespect factor scores on the RI. However, the severity of depression negatively correlated with only anger control on the STAXI. In the linear logistic regression analysis, as there were higher levels of state anger seen in the STAXI, anger on the AQ, anger reaction to unpleasant factors on the RI, and therefore the likelihood of depression would be higher. Conclusion Elderly depressive patients are less likely to have anger traits and to express anger than normal elderly. However, in elderly depressive patients, the higher they have severity of depressive symptoms, the higher they reported anger experience and anger expression. PMID:21994504

  18. German and Russian Adolescents' Environmental Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szagun, Gisela; Pavlov, Vladimir I.

    German (n=610) and Russian (n=610) adolescents in 3 age groups, 12, 15, and 18 years, were given a questionnaire assessing their feelings towards environmental destruction, their readiness for pro-environmental action, and their ethical attitude toward nature. In both nationalities anxiety, sadness, and anger about environmental destruction were…

  19. Anger Style, Psychopathology, and Regional Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Jennifer L.; Levin, Rebecca L.; Sass, Sarah M.; Heller, Wendy; Miller, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Depression and anxiety often involve high levels of trait anger and disturbances in anger expression. Reported anger experience and outward anger expression have recently been associated with left-biased asymmetry of frontal cortical activity, assumed to reflect approach motivation. However, different styles of anger expression could presumably involve different brain mechanisms and/or interact with psychopathology to produce various patterns of brain asymmetry. The present study explored these issues by comparing resting regional electroencephalographic activity in participants high in trait anger who differed in anger expression style (high anger-in, high anger-out, both) and participants low in trait anger, with depression and anxiety systematically assessed. Trait anger, not anger-in or anger-out, predicted left-biased asymmetry at medial frontal EEG sites. The anger-in group reported higher levels of anxious apprehension than did the anger-out group. Furthermore, anxious apprehension moderated the relationship between trait anger, anger-in, and asymmetry in favor of the left hemisphere. Results suggest that motivational direction is not always the driving force behind the relationship of anger and left frontal asymmetry. Findings also support a distinction between anxious apprehension and anxious arousal. PMID:18837620

  20. Learn to manage your anger

    MedlinePlus

    ... a good way to react most of the time. You have little or no control over the things that cause your anger. But can you learn to control your reaction. Who Needs Anger Management Some people seem to be more prone to ...

  1. Anger Communication in Bicultural Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novin, Sheida; Rieffe, Carolien

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about bicultural adolescents' emotional competence. The aim of the present study was to examine anger communication by comparing thirty-eight 16-year-old Moroccan-Dutch adolescents with 40 Dutch and 40 Moroccan peers using hypothetical anger-eliciting vignettes. Findings show that although Moroccan and Dutch adolescents were…

  2. Irrational Beliefs, Anger, and Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwemer, Weare A.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.

    1984-01-01

    Administered the Irrational Beliefs Test, Anger Inventory, and Trait Anxiety Inventory to 382 students. Results revealed that personal perfection, anxious overconcern, blame pronenes, and catastrophizing were predictors of general anger. Anxious overconcern, problem avoidance, catastrophizing, and personal perfection were significant regression…

  3. The Colors of Anger, Envy, Fear, and Jealously: A Cross-Cultural Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hupka, Ralph B.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Studies to what extent emotion words--anger, envy, fear, and jealousy--reminded samples of Americans, Germans, Mexicans, Poles and Russians, of 12 terms of color. Responses from 661 undergraduates suggest that cross-modal associations originate in universal human experiences and in culture-specific variables, such as language, mythology, and…

  4. Understanding Children's Anger: Recognizing and Working with Young Children's Anger and Frustration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling; Miller, Susan A.; Church, Ellen Booth

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the causes of anger and frustrations of children at different ages. Honig discusses understanding children's anger from ages 0-2 and gives suggestions on how to cope with anger. Miller discusses how children ages 3-4 provoke to anger, and recommends ways to prevent it. Church discusses the cause of anger in 5- and 6-year old…

  5. Russian Folktales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of Russian folktales suggests a structured approach to introducing the characters, settings, and motifs in an elementary classroom. Highlights include beginner-level texts; connections to Russian culture; writing connections; activities; and an annotated bibliography of 32 titles. (LRW)

  6. Learn to manage your anger

    MedlinePlus

    ... 18, 2015. Suls J. Anger and the heart: perspectives on cardiac risk, mechanisms and interventions. Prog Cardiovasc Dis . 2013 May-Jun;55(6):538-47. PMID: 23621963 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23621963 .

  7. Anger profiles in social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Versella, Mark V; Piccirillo, Marilyn L; Potter, Carrie M; Olino, Thomas M; Heimberg, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) exhibit elevated levels of anger and anger suppression, which are both associated with increased depression, diminished quality of life, and poorer treatment outcomes. However, little is known about how anger experiences differ among individuals with SAD and whether any heterogeneity might relate to negative outcomes. This investigation sought to empirically define anger profiles among 136 treatment-seeking individuals with SAD and to assess their association with distress and impairment. A latent class analysis was conducted utilizing the trait subscales of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 as indicators of class membership. Analysis revealed four distinct anger profiles, with greatest distress and impairment generally demonstrated by individuals with elevated trait anger, a greater tendency to suppress the expression of anger, and diminished ability to adaptively control their anger expression. These results have implications for tailoring more effective interventions for socially anxious individuals. PMID:26590429

  8. Trait Anger, Anger Expression, and Suicide Attempts among Adolescents and Young Adults: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Stephanie S.; Goldston, David B.; Erkanli, Alaattin; Franklin, Joseph C.; Mayfield, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies of the relationship between anger, anger expression, and suicidal behavior have been largely cross-sectional and have yielded mixed findings. In a prospective, naturalistic study, we examined how trait anger and anger expression influenced the likelihood of suicide attempts among 180 adolescents followed for up to 13.3 years after…

  9. Primary School Teachers' Restricted and Elaborated Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farouk, Shaalan

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the cognitive appraisals associated with the emotion of anger based on interviews with teachers. An analysis of these appraisals demonstrated that teachers experienced different forms of anger depending on whether they were relating to other adults or their pupils. Anger in relation to children was based on persistent goal…

  10. High and Low Trait Anger, Angry Thoughts, and the Recognition of Anger Problems.

    PubMed

    Alcázar-Olán, Raúl J; Deffenbacher, Jerry L; Hernández Guzmán, Laura; Jurado Cárdenas, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    This research had two goals: (1) it tested hypotheses of the State-Trait Model of anger, and (2) it explored characteristics that may distinguish individuals with high trait anger who recognize problems with their anger from those who do not recognize anger problems. Regarding the first goal, findings supported three hypotheses tested. In particular, compared to those low in trait anger, individuals with high trait anger reported: (a) more intense anger (intensity hypothesis), p < .001, effect size (η(2)) = .109; (b) more thoughts involving pejorative labeling/denigration, p < .001, η(2) = .280, thoughts of revenge, p < .001, η(2) = .170, more outward, negative anger expression (anger-out), p < .001, η(2) = .229, and more physically aggressive expression, p < .001, η(2) = .046-.123, (aggression hypothesis); and (c) more anger suppression (anger-in), p < .001, η(2) = .231, and fewer thoughts of self-control, p < .001, η(2) = .088, and behavioral efforts to control angry feelings (anger control-in), p < .001, η(2) = .116, and behavior (anger control-out), p < .001, η(2) = .260 (reduced positive coping hypothesis). For the second goal we employed two types of individuals, both with high trait anger: those who identified anger as a personal problem and wanted help, and those who did not identify anger as a personal issue. As a result, compared to those who did not report anger problems, those who reported anger problems demonstrated a higher overall propensity to experience anger (i.e., higher trait anger), p < .01, η(2) = .028, greater anger suppression and harboring grudges (anger-in), p < .001, η(2) = .035, fewer thoughts of self-control, p < .05, η(2) = .015, and attempts to control their angry feelings (anger-control-in), p < .05, η(2) = .016, and behavior (anger-control-out), p < .001, η(2) = .054. Gender was not associated with trait anger or anger problem recognition. Findings were discussed in terms of State-Trait Theory and implications for

  11. Ways to defuse miners' anger

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    The violence and riots which often occur with mining personnel are considered. The emotions and feelings which miners often experience because of their work environment are dealth with. From recognizing the pressures, the article then works to present methods to help defuse the miners' hostility and anger.

  12. Irrational Beliefs and Anger Arousal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazaleus, Susan L.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.

    1985-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between irrational beliefs and anger arousal in college students (N=342) who completed two questionnaires. Results showed men were more likely to endorse irrational beliefs regarding blame proneness and helplessness. Women reported more endorsement of the irrational belief regarding dependency. (BH)

  13. Environmental Awareness: A Comparative Study of German and Russian Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szagun, Gisela; Pavlov, Vladimir I.

    1995-01-01

    Assesses the environmental awareness of 610 German and 610 Russian adolescents age 12, 15, and 18 years. In both countries, anxiety, sadness, and anger about environmental destruction were high, but hopelessness was rejected. Levels of environmental awareness were strongest for the youngest participants. (SLD)

  14. The Impact of Anger on Sexual Satisfaction in Marriage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belanger, Claude; Laughrea, Kathleen; Lafontaine, Marie-France

    2001-01-01

    Explored the effect of different forms of anger (state anger, trait anger, and anger expression) on sexual satisfaction in marriage, noting differences between the genders. Data on 192 French-Canadian heterosexual couples recruited from clinical and non-clinical populations highlighted several links between anger and sexual satisfaction as well as…

  15. Helping Young Children Deal with Anger. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, Marian

    Children's anger presents challenges to teachers committed to constructive, ethical, and effective child guidance. This Digest explores what is known about the components of children's anger, factors contributing to understanding and managing anger, and the ways teachers can guide children's expressions of anger. Anger is believed to have three…

  16. Anger and Paranoia in Mentally Disordered Offenders.

    PubMed

    Darch, Kayleigh; Ellett, Lyn; Fox, Simone

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have identified a positive relationship between aggression and paranoia, yet the relationship between the emotion of anger and paranoia in forensic populations has not been examined. Possible confounding variables, such as social desirability and mood, should also be considered. Sixty-six participants who had a violent conviction and mental disorder completed self-report questionnaires that measured anger, paranoid ideation, socially desirable responding, anxiety, and depression. The findings indicated that increased anger was associated with increased paranoia. Partial correlations showed that anger remained significantly associated with paranoia after socially desirable responding, anxiety, depression, gender, and violence history were controlled, suggesting anger and paranoia were not associated due to indirect relationships with these constructs. This could suggest that integrative psychological interventions that consider experiences of both anger and paranoia may be beneficial with forensic populations. PMID:26513511

  17. Trait Anger, Anger Expression, and Suicide Attempts among Adolescents and Young Adults: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Stephanie S.; Goldston, David B.; Erkanli, Alaattin; Franklin, Joseph C.; Mayfield, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of the relationship between anger, anger expression, and suicidal behavior have been largely cross-sectional and have yielded mixed findings. In a prospective, naturalistic study, we examined how trait anger and anger expression influenced the likelihood of suicide attempts among 180 adolescents followed for up to 13.3 years after discharge from an inpatient psychiatry unit. Results showed that higher trait anger and anger expressed outwardly over the follow-up was related to increased likelihood of suicide attempts among males. For girls, trait anger and both the inward and outward expression of anger moderated the risk for suicide attempts associated with major depression. These results are interpreted in light of theory regarding behavioral activation and behavioral inhibition systems. PMID:20183651

  18. Anger Suppression and Subsequent Pain Behaviors among Chronic Low Back Pain Patients: Moderating Effects of Anger Regulation Style

    PubMed Central

    Quartana, Phillip; Bruehl, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Background Suppression of anger is linked to subsequent pain intensity among chronic low back patients, but it is not clear whether anger regulation style (trait anger-out, anger-in) moderates these effects or if aroused anger accounts for links between anger regulation style and pain. Method Chronic low back pain patients (N=58) were assigned to Suppression or No Suppression conditions for a task with harassing confederate and then underwent structured pain behavior procedures. Spielberger Anger Expression Inventory tapped trait anger-out (AOS) and anger-in (AIS). Results Regressions tested Emotion Regulation condition × AOS and AIS effects on outcomes. AOS was related to grimacing and sighing for Suppression condition patients. AIS was related negatively to guarding and bracing for Suppression condition patients. Anger report partly mediated effects for AOS and AIS. Conclusions Anger regulation style moderated effects of state anger suppression on subsequent pain behaviors, effects that were partly explained by aroused anger. PMID:21544702

  19. The Influence of Counselor Trainee Anger-Proneness and Anger Discomfort on Reactions to an Angry Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharkin, Bruce S.; Gelso, Charles J.

    1993-01-01

    Explored relationship between counselor trainee anger-proneness and anger discomfort and trainees' reactions to angry client. Thirty-eight trainees viewed and gave reactions to videotape of angry client-actress. Trainee anger-proneness and anger discomfort scores were positively and significantly related to discomfort with and anger toward the…

  20. Considering anger from a cognitive neuroscience perspective.

    PubMed

    Blair, R J R

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to consider anger from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. Five main claims are made: First, reactive aggression is the ultimate behavioral expression of anger and thus we can begin to understand anger by understanding reactive aggression. Second, neural systems implicated in reactive aggression (amygdala, hypothalamus and periaqueductal gray; the basic threat system) are critically implicated in anger. Factors such as exposure to extreme threat that increase the responsiveness of these systems, should be (and are in the context of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder), associated with increased anger. Third, regions of frontal cortex implicated in regulating the basic threat system, when dysfunctional (e.g., in the context of lesions) should be associated with increased anger. Fourth, frustration occurs when an individual continues to do an action in the expectation of a reward but does not actually receive that reward, and is associated with anger. Individuals who show impairment in the ability to alter behavioral responding when actions no longer receive their expected rewards should be (and are in the context of psychopathy) associated with increased anger. Fifth, someone not doing what another person wants them to do (particularly if this thwarts the person's goal) is frustrating and consequently anger inducing. The response to such a frustrating social event relies on the neural architecture implicated in changing behavioral responses in non-social frustrating situations. PMID:22267973

  1. An Attachment Perspective on Anger among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konishi, Chiaki; Hymel, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    Extending John Bowlby's hypothesis that dysfunctional anger is a predictable outcome of insecure attachments to parents, this study investigated the relationship between current parent-adolescent attachment and both the experience and expression of anger. Participants included 776 students (379 boys and 397 girls) in grades 8-12. As predicted…

  2. Test Review: Anger Regulation and Expression Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavlazoglu, Baki; Erdogan, Niyazi; Paine, Taylor; Jones, Meredith

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the Anger Regulation and Expression Scale (ARES) which was developed by DiGiuseppe and Tafrate (2011) and published by Multi-Health Systems Inc. The ARES was designed to be a self-report measure of anger expression and regulation in youth aged 10 to 17 years and was intended to be used in screening, individual assessment,…

  3. Occupational Status and the Experience of Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collett, Jessica L.; Lizardo, Omar

    2010-01-01

    Current theories in the sociology of emotions posit contradictory expectations regarding the relationship between status and the relative experience of anger, with some predicting a negative relationship and others proposing a positive one. We test the compatibility of these opposing hypotheses by examining the relationship between anger and a key…

  4. Transdiagnostic cognitive processes in high trait anger.

    PubMed

    Owen, John M

    2011-03-01

    Trait anger is a personality construct that refers to stable individual differences in the propensity to experience anger as an emotional state. The objective of this paper is to review relevant empirical studies in order to determine whether the transdiagnostic cognitive processes that have been identified across the DSM-IV Axis I disorders (specifically, selective attention, memory biases, reasoning biases and recurrent negative thinking) are also an underlying characteristic of high trait anger. On the basis of the review it is concluded that, whilst the research base is limited, there is good evidence that high trait anger is associated with selective attention to hostile social cues, the tendency to interpret the behaviour of others as indicating potential hostility and the tendency to ruminate over past anger-provoking experiences. The range of cognitive processes identified in high trait anger is consistent with those identified in the Axis I disorders. It is concluded that these findings provide support for (i) the broad applicability of the transdiagnostic approach as a theoretical framework for understanding a range of psychological conditions, not limited to the Axis I disorders, and (ii) the validity of conceptualising high trait anger as an aspect of personality functioning that is maintained, at least in part, by cognitive processes. Cognitive and motivational factors (specifically, beliefs and goals) that may underlie the hostile information-processing biases and recurrent negative thinking associated with high trait anger are discussed, and consideration is given to the clinical relevance of the findings of the review. PMID:21094569

  5. Coping with Anger--Yours, Your Child's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caruso, Saf Lerman

    1989-01-01

    Children's feelings of anger, jealousy, and even hatred need to be acknowledged and accepted by parents. This article suggests methods for teaching acceptable ways to express strong feelings. Because parents are role models for children, guidelines are also provided for parents on coping with their own anger. (IAH)

  6. Anger Management: Immediate Intervention by Counselor Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besley, Kate R.

    1999-01-01

    Investigates whether a well-defined coaching process used at the moment of anger will help students internalize the cognitive processes learned in counseling sessions and enable them to use the anger management strategies independent of coaching. Offers school counselors reasons to implement such a model as an adjunct to individual or small group…

  7. Anger

    MedlinePlus

    ... by providing caring assistance and medical advocacy for military personnel and families with deployment-related health concerns. DHCC ... specialists about issues pertaining to the deployment of military personnel. The CDP is a tri-service center funded ...

  8. Anger

    MedlinePlus

    > Find Us On Facebook Twitter Pinterest Youtube Instagram Diabetes Stops Here Blog Online Community Site Menu Are You at Risk? Diagnosis Lower Your Risk Risk Test Alert Day Prediabetes My Health Advisor Tools to ...

  9. Anger in palliative care: a clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Philip, J; Gold, M; Schwarz, M; Komesaroff, P

    2007-01-01

    Anger in patients and families is a common problem in the care of persons with advanced disease. Whereas it is widely accepted that anger may be a justifiable reaction to significant illness and loss, it frequently creates difficulties for the doctors involved in care. In particular, there is often a personal impact on the doctor at whom anger is directed. This paper examines results of qualitative research with palliative care workers in the context of the broader published literature and the authors' clinical experiences. The ability to interact effectively with angry patients is a skill that is often learned with experience and is extremely useful in both transforming the patients' reaction into a more creative emotion and in developing a therapeutic relationship. Despite conscientious efforts, however, a few patients continue to be angry. A practical approach to anger, useful for the clinician directly involved in care, is outlined along with some strategies to adopt in the face of persistent anger. PMID:17199844

  10. Analysis of anger expression style--continuous anger and personality types of professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Mustafa; Sahan, Hasan; Tekin, Murat; Ulukan, Mehmet; Mehtap, Bekir

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the anger expression styles, the continuous anger and personality types of players who play football in the professional league. The research group consisted of 133 soccer players who are playing in sports teams in the Turkish Super League: Ankara Sport Club, Gençlerbirliği Sports Club and Hacettepe Sports Club in the first league, Turk Telekom sports in the second league, and Keçiören Gücü Sports and Ankarademir Sports playing in the third league in the 2008-2009 football season. The Eysenck personality inventory was modified to Turkish by Bayar in 1983, having been developed by Eysenck and Eysenck in 1975 and the continuous anger-anger style scale (SOTO) was modified to Turkish by Ozer in 1994. The state trait anger scale (STAS) was originally developed by Spielberger in 1983. All these were used on soccer players participating in the study to determine the continuous anger and anger styles in this study. In the interpretation of data, a meaningfulness of p < 0.05, was applied by using regression analysis, the Kruskal Wallis Test, the one-way variance analysis (ANOVA) test and the Tukey test to find the differences among the groups. The SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) programme was used to find the accounted values and to evaluate the data. According to the results of this study, regarding the education level variable, while there was a meaningful difference between the continuous anger sub-dimension and anger control sub-dimension than continuous anger-anger expression styles, no significant difference was found among personality type sub-dimensions (psychoticism, extrovert, neurotic, false). In addition, a significant relationship was found between psychoticism, extrovert, neurotic, and lie sub-dimensions and the personality type sub-dimensions of professional players' constant anger-anger expression styles. PMID:22397242

  11. RORSCHACH SPACE RESPONSES AND ANGER.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Anna Maria; Chiorri, Carlo; Denevi, Simona

    2015-08-01

    In this study, three different subtypes of Space responses to the Rorschach test were hypothesized: S-fusion, S-reversal, and S-integration. The relationship between these subtypes and feelings of anger and aggression was investigated. The Rorschach test, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-2 (STAXI-2), and the Aggression Questionnaire (AQ) were administered to 50 university students. Scores on the STAXI-2 were positively associated with S-fusion and negatively associated with S-integration. No significant associations of S subtypes with aggression were found. The findings support the hypothesis that different figure-ground relationships, shown in the subtypes of S responses, indicate different psychological processes. PMID:26107109

  12. An Investigation of Anger Styles in Adolescent Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burney, DeAnna McKinnie

    2006-01-01

    Four-hundred and eight 14 to 19-year-old adolescents in grades 9 through 12 participated in this study. The Adolescent Anger Rating Scale was used to assess differences in expressed anger among participants. Specific styles of anger were measured: reactive, instrumental, and anger control. Results of this study suggest that males demonstrate…

  13. Anger in School Managers: Continuity, Direction, Control and Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Mustafa; Iskender, Murat; Cardak, Mehmet; Dusunceli, Betul

    2012-01-01

    School managers undertake an important duty in structuring of education institutions. In the study carried out in this context; anger conditions, continuity, and direction of anger, anger control levels and anger styles of school managers who are the decision makers in schools were examined according to the ages, working periods, duty types, ways…

  14. Making Political Anger Possible: A Task for Civic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The article asks whether political anger has a legitimate place in a democracy, as this is a political system designed to resolve conflicts by peaceful negotiation. It distinguishes personal from social anger and political anger, to focus explicitly on the latter. It argues that both the feeling and expression of political anger are subject to…

  15. Unresolved Anger and Sadness: Identifying Vocal Acoustical Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochman, Daniel; Diamond, Gary M.; Amir, Ofer

    2008-01-01

    The authors conducted 2 studies to identify the vocal acoustical correlates of unresolved anger and sadness among women reporting unresolved anger toward an attachment figure. In Study 1, participants (N = 17) were induced to experience and express anger then sadness or sadness then anger. In Study 2, a 2nd group of participants (N = 22) underwent…

  16. Episodes of Anger on Prime Time Television: A Content Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baruch, Rhoda; Stutman, Suzanne

    Although anger is associated with risk of coronary heart disease, failed marriages, and suicide, angry exchanges are not always negative experiences but can be beneficial. Recently experts on anger concluded that television could portray anger constructively by using television characters who listened to the angry person, integrated anger and…

  17. Assessment of Mode of Anger Expression in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cautin, Robin L.; Overholser, James C.; Goetz, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated internalized and externalized anger in adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Results indicated that internalized anger led to depression and feelings of hopelessness and increased chances of suicide attempts. In contrast, externalized anger was related to alcohol-related problems. Thus, different modes of anger expression appear to be…

  18. Forgivingness, anger, and hostility in aggressive driving.

    PubMed

    Kovácsová, Natália; Rošková, Eva; Lajunen, Timo

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the relationship between trait forgivingness, general anger, hostility, driving anger, and self-reported aggressive driving committed by the driver him/herself ("self" scale) and perceiving him/herself as an object of other drivers' aggressive acts ("other" scale). The Slovak version of questionnaires was administrated to a sample of 612 Slovak and Czech drivers. First, the factor structure of the Driver Anger Indicators Scale (DAIS) was investigated. Factor analyses of the self and other parts of the DAIS resulted in two factors, which were named as aggressive warnings and hostile aggression and revenge. Next, the results showed that from all dependent variables (scales of the DAIS), self-reported aggressive warnings (self) on the road were predicted best by chosen person-related factors. The path model for aggressive warnings (self) suggested that trait forgivingness and general anger were fully mediated by driving anger whereas hostility proved to be a unique predictor of aggressive behavior in traffic. Driving anger was found to be the best predictor of perceptions that other drivers behave aggressively. PMID:24211562

  19. Extreme Metal Music and Anger Processing.

    PubMed

    Sharman, Leah; Dingle, Genevieve A

    2015-01-01

    The claim that listening to extreme music causes anger, and expressions of anger such as aggression and delinquency have yet to be substantiated using controlled experimental methods. In this study, 39 extreme music listeners aged 18-34 years were subjected to an anger induction, followed by random assignment to 10 min of listening to extreme music from their own playlist, or 10 min silence (control). Measures of emotion included heart rate and subjective ratings on the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS). Results showed that ratings of PANAS hostility, irritability, and stress increased during the anger induction, and decreased after the music or silence. Heart rate increased during the anger induction and was sustained (not increased) in the music condition, and decreased in the silence condition. PANAS active and inspired ratings increased during music listening, an effect that was not seen in controls. The findings indicate that extreme music did not make angry participants angrier; rather, it appeared to match their physiological arousal and result in an increase in positive emotions. Listening to extreme music may represent a healthy way of processing anger for these listeners. PMID:26052277

  20. Anger perceptually and conceptually narrows cognitive scope.

    PubMed

    Gable, Philip A; Poole, Bryan D; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2015-07-01

    For the last 50 years, research investigating the effect of emotions on scope of cognitive processing was based on models proposing that affective valence determined cognitive scope. More recently, our motivational intensity model suggests that this past work had confounded valence with motivational intensity. Research derived from this model supports the idea that motivational intensity, rather than affective valence, explains much of the variance emotions have on cognitive scope. However, the motivational intensity model is limited in that the empirical work has examined only positive affects high in approach and negative affects high in avoidance motivation. Thus, perhaps only approach-positive and avoidance-negative states narrow cognitive scope. The present research was designed to clarify these conceptual issues by examining the effect of anger, a negatively valenced approach-motivated state, on cognitive scope. Results revealed that anger narrowed attentional scope relative to a neutral state and that attentional narrowing to anger was similar to the attentional narrowing caused by high approach-motivated positive affects (Study 1). This narrowing of attention was related to trait approach motivation (Studies 2 and Study 3). Anger also narrowed conceptual cognitive categorization (Study 4). Narrowing of categorization related to participants' approach motivation toward anger stimuli. Together, these results suggest that anger, an approach-motivated negative affect, narrows perceptual and conceptual cognitive scope. More broadly, these results support the conceptual model that motivational intensity per se, rather than approach-positive and avoidance-negative states, causes a narrowing of cognitive scope. PMID:26011662

  1. Extreme Metal Music and Anger Processing

    PubMed Central

    Sharman, Leah; Dingle, Genevieve A.

    2015-01-01

    The claim that listening to extreme music causes anger, and expressions of anger such as aggression and delinquency have yet to be substantiated using controlled experimental methods. In this study, 39 extreme music listeners aged 18–34 years were subjected to an anger induction, followed by random assignment to 10 min of listening to extreme music from their own playlist, or 10 min silence (control). Measures of emotion included heart rate and subjective ratings on the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS). Results showed that ratings of PANAS hostility, irritability, and stress increased during the anger induction, and decreased after the music or silence. Heart rate increased during the anger induction and was sustained (not increased) in the music condition, and decreased in the silence condition. PANAS active and inspired ratings increased during music listening, an effect that was not seen in controls. The findings indicate that extreme music did not make angry participants angrier; rather, it appeared to match their physiological arousal and result in an increase in positive emotions. Listening to extreme music may represent a healthy way of processing anger for these listeners. PMID:26052277

  2. Anger regulation style, anger arousal and acute pain sensitivity: evidence for an endogenous opioid “triggering” model

    PubMed Central

    Burns, John W.; Bruehl, Stephen; Chont, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Findings suggest that greater tendency to express anger is associated with greater sensitivity to acute pain via endogenous opioid system dysfunction, but past studies have not addressed the role of anger arousal. We used a 2 × 2 factorial design with Drug Condition (placebo or opioid blockade with naltrexone) crossed with Task Order (anger-induction/pain-induction or pain-induction/anger-induction), and with continuous Anger-out Subscale scores. Drug × Task Order × Anger-out Subscale interactions were tested for pain intensity during a 4-min ischemic pain task performed by 146 healthy people. A significant Drug × Task Order × Anger-out Subscale interaction was dissected to reveal different patterns of pain intensity changes during the pain task for high anger-out participants who underwent pain-induction prior to anger-induction compared to those high in anger-out in the opposite order. Namely, when angered prior to pain, high anger-out participants appeared to exhibit low pain intensity under placebo that was not shown by high anger-out participants who received naltrexone. Results hint that people with a pronounced tendency to express anger may suffer from inadequate opioid function under simple pain-induction, but may experience analgesic benefit to some extent from the opioid triggering properties of strong anger arousal. PMID:23624641

  3. Experience and expression of anger among Australian prisoners and the relationship between anger and reintegration variables.

    PubMed

    Shinkfield, Alison J; Graffam, Joseph

    2014-04-01

    We examined the experience and expression of anger among a group of Australian prisoners prior to and following prison release, as well as the relationship between anger and several reintegration variables. Participants were 79 adult prisoners (54 male, 25 female) who completed the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI-2) 1 month prior to release and again at 1 to 4 weeks and 3 to 4 months post-release. A postrelease questionnaire was also administered at the two postrelease points focusing on the quality of life conditions experienced following release. Mean state and trait anger scores were significantly higher at pre-release than post-release. As well, higher levels of anger expression and anger control were reported at pre-release compared with post-release. Higher age was related to lower state anger at post-release, whereas several variables were related to trait anger at post-release. Theoretical implications for reintegration theory are discussed, together with practical applications. PMID:23267242

  4. Associations between daily chronic pain intensity, daily anger expression, and trait anger expressiveness: An ecological momentary assessment study

    PubMed Central

    Bruehl, Stephen; Liu, Xiaoxia; Burns, John W.; Chont, Melissa; Jamison, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Links between elevated trait anger expressiveness (anger-out) and greater chronic pain intensity are well documented, but pain-related effects of expressive behaviors actually used to regulate anger when it is experienced have been little explored. This study used ecological momentary assessment methods to explore prospective associations between daily behavioral anger expression and daily chronic pain intensity. Forty-eight chronic low back pain (LBP) patients and 36 healthy controls completed electronic diary ratings of momentary pain and behavioral anger expression in response to random prompts 4 times daily for 7 days. Across groups, greater trait anger-out was associated with greater daily behavioral anger expression (P < 0.001). LBP participants showed higher levels of daily anger expression than controls (P < 0.001). Generalized estimating equation analyses in the LBP group revealed a lagged main effect of greater behavioral anger expression on increased chronic pain intensity in the subsequent assessment period (P < 0.05). Examination of a trait × situation model for anger-out revealed prospective associations between elevated chronic pain intensity and later increases in behavioral anger expression that were restricted largely to individuals low in trait anger-out (P < 0.001). Trait × situation interactions for trait anger suppression (anger-in) indicated similar influences of pain intensity on subsequent behavioral anger expression occurring among low anger-in persons (P < 0.001). Overlap with trait and state negative affect did not account for study findings. This study for the first time documents lagged within-day influences of behavioral anger expression on subsequent chronic pain intensity. Trait anger regulation style may moderate associations between behavioral anger expression and chronic pain intensity. PMID:22940462

  5. Russians as People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Wright

    This analysis of the Russian character in various aspects of Soviet society in its daily activities focuses on the cultural rather than the political. Included in the study are sections on: (1) hibernation and awakening; (2) the Russian scene; (3) being a Russian; (4) Russian society--mass and minority; (5) manners, morals, and taste; and (6)…

  6. Aerobic Exercise Program Reduces Anger Expression Among Overweight Children

    PubMed Central

    Tkacz, Joseph; Young-Hyman, Deborah; Boyle, Colleen A.; Davis, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the effect of a structured aerobic exercise program on anger expression in healthy overweight children. Overweight, sedentary children were randomly assigned to an aerobic exercise program or a no-exercise control condition. All children completed the Pediatric Anger Expression Scale at baseline and posttest. Anger Out and Anger Expression scores were lower for the exercise condition at posttest. Fitness improvements contributed significantly to final models, and points earned for adherence correlated negatively with posttest Anger Out. An aerobic exercise program might be an effective strategy to reduce anger expression, including reduction of aggressive behavior, in overweight children. PMID:19168916

  7. Genome-Wide Association Study of Proneness to Anger

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Eric; McGough, James; Deutsch, Curtis K.; Frazier, Jean A.; Kennedy, David; Goldberg, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Community samples suggest that approximately 1 in 20 children and adults exhibit clinically significant anger, hostility, and aggression. Individuals with dysregulated emotional control have a greater lifetime burden of psychiatric morbidity, severe impairment in role functioning, and premature mortality due to cardiovascular disease. Methods With publically available data secured from dbGaP, we conducted a genome-wide association study of proneness to anger using the Spielberger State-Trait Anger Scale in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study (n = 8,747). Results Subjects were, on average, 54 (range 45–64) years old at baseline enrollment, 47% (n = 4,117) were male, and all were of European descent by self-report. The mean Angry Temperament and Angry Reaction scores were 5.8±1.8 and 7.6±2.2. We observed a nominally significant finding (p = 2.9E-08, λ = 1.027 - corrected pgc = 2.2E-07, λ = 1.0015) on chromosome 6q21 in the gene coding for the non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinase, Fyn. Conclusions Fyn interacts with NDMA receptors and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-gated channels to regulate calcium influx and intracellular release in the post-synaptic density. These results suggest that signaling pathways regulating intracellular calcium homeostasis, which are relevant to memory, learning, and neuronal survival, may in part underlie the expression of Angry Temperament. PMID:24489884

  8. Examining Player Anger in World of Warcraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Jane; Coulson, Mark; Foreman, Nigel

    This questionnaire study of the sources of anger in World of Warcraft applies classical quantitative measurement scale construction to a new problem, generating a host of questionnaire items that could find use in future studies, and identifying four major categories of events that cause negative effect among players. First, 33 players provided examples of in-game scenarios that had made them angry, and their responses were culled to create a 93-item battery rated by hundreds of player respondents in terms of anger intensity and anger frequency. An iterative process of factor analysis and scale reliability assessment led to a 28-item instrument measuring four anger-provoking factors: Raids/Instances, Griefers, Perceived Time Wasting, and Anti-social Players. These anger-causing scenarios were then illustrated by concrete examples from player and researcher experiences in World of Warcraft. One striking finding is that players become angry at other players' negative behavior, regardless of whether that behavior was intended to harm.

  9. Is cyberbullying related to trait or state anger?

    PubMed

    Lonigro, Antonia; Schneider, Barry H; Laghi, Fiorenzo; Baiocco, Roberto; Pallini, Susanna; Brunner, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Anger is a powerful emotion shared by victims and bullies in both physical and electronic forms of bullying. However, little is known about the specific roles of trait anger and state anger in involvement in bullying episodes. The purpose of this study was to verify which component of anger, trait or state, is more strongly related to physical and cyberbullying and victimization. Students between the ages 11-19 (N = 716, 392 female, 324 male) completed the state trait anger expression inventory-2 child and adolescent and a measure of victimization and bullying. Results for cyberbullying suggested a major vulnerability among bullies and victims to experience anger as a personality trait as well some links between state anger, cyberbullying and cybervictimization. Moreover, the outward, explosive expression of anger appears to be common among cyber and physical bullies. Implications for intervention programs are discussed. PMID:25081097

  10. Russian Translation.

    PubMed

    O'dette, R E

    1957-03-29

    This discussion has described the status of the large United States program for translation from the Russian. A partial description of what is being done or planned, and by whom, has been provided as a guide for those who wish to follow the subject further. The urge to pass on useful information has necessarily restricted the space which might also have been profitably devoted to the philosophic aspects of the problem. Although it is not said with any sense of pride in achievement-because much more remains to be done than has been done-it would seem fair to describe the current national translation activity, including all contributions to it, as a phenomenon. Phenomena in scientific communication are not common: a full appreciation of their significance requires more analysis than results from a simple listing of their outward characteristics. But a few observations might be made in conclusion. Most United States scientists probably feel that, as a nation, we are and should be world leaders in science, even though this feeling is neither nurtured nor expressed in a spirit of violent competition. If this assumption is allowed, the point which seems to remain is that the United States will not retain its position casually. Our scientists expect to maintain an awareness of the scientific achievements and failures of the other nations of the world. But we must especially become more aware of the advances of Soviet science, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The evidence points toward this last conclusion, regardless of whether one is concerned with the production of ideas or things, increase in man's knowledge of himself and his environment, conflict between idealisms, or simply the national security. PMID:17836422

  11. Cognitive-Behavioral Conceptualization and Treatment of Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deffenbacher, Jerry L.

    2011-01-01

    Anger is conceptualized within a broad cognitive-behavioral (CBT) framework emphasizing triggering events; the person's pre-anger state, including temporary conditions and more enduring cognitive and familial/cultural processes; primary and secondary appraisal processes; the anger experience/response (cognitive, emotional, and physiological…

  12. Role of Appraisals in Expressed Anger after Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, Diane; Bryant, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Anger is a common problem in trauma-exposed individuals. This study investigated factors that contribute to post-traumatic anger in civilian trauma survivors. Fifty-one trauma-exposed individuals were assessed for expressed anger, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), daily hassles, maladaptive cognitions and blame. PTSD and non-PTSD participants…

  13. Development of the Juvenile Justice Anger Management Treatment for Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Naomi E. S.; Serico, Jennifer M.; Riggs Romaine, Christina L.; Zelechoski, Amanda D.; Kalbeitzer, Rachel; Kemp, Kathleen; Lane, Christy

    2013-01-01

    Female juvenile offenders exhibit high levels of anger, relational aggression, and physical aggression, but the population has long been ignored in research and practice. No anger management treatments have been developed specifically for this population, and no established anger management treatments are empirically supported for use with…

  14. Anger and Political Culture: A Time for Outrage!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the role of political anger in democracy. It reviews the work of Stephane Hessel before examining the role and reception of anger in classical and modern thought. The author identifies two main traditions within which the concept of political anger can be located: revolutionary violence of the Marxist tradition and the…

  15. Age and Gender Differences with the Anger Expression Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoner, Sue B.; Spencer, W. Boyd

    1987-01-01

    The Anger Expression Scale (AX) was administered to 150 volunteers ranging in age from 21 to 83 years. The AX yields three scores, anger-in, anger-out, and total AX. Results indicated that both the young adult and middle age groups had higher total AX than the older group. (Author/BS)

  16. Changes in Anger in Relationship to Responsivity to PTSD Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Galovski, Tara E.; Elwood, Lisa S.; Blain, Leah M.; Resick, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the clinical course of different dimensions of anger and their relationship to change in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a sample of 139 female survivors of interpersonal violence suffering from PTSD. Specifically, this study evaluated differences in the rates of change in anger dimensions by responsivity to treatment status (responders, non-responders, and drop-outs). Responders and non-responders did not differ in rate of change on state anger and anger directed inward, suggesting that treatment led to improvements in these dimensions of anger regardless of final PTSD diagnosis. Responders did evidence statistically significantly more change in trait anger and control over one’s anger than did the non-responders, suggesting that changes in these dimensions of anger may be related to recovery from PTSD. Individuals who terminated therapy prematurely did not experience the same gains in state anger, trait anger, or anger-in as those who completed treatment. Differences in rates of change (linear versus quadratic growth patterns), particularly with respect to continued improvement in anger following treatment completion are discussed. PMID:25045416

  17. Driving Anger and Driving Behavior in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Tracy L.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; Rosen, Lee A.; Barkley, Russell A.; Rodricks, Trisha

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study assesses whether anger in the context of driving is associated with the negative driving outcomes experienced by individuals with ADHD. Method: ADHD adults (n = 56) complete measures of driving anger, driving anger expression, angry thoughts behind the wheel, and aggressive, risky, and crash-related behavior. Results are…

  18. Internalized and Externalized Anger in Adolescent Suicide Attempters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehnert, Kim L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Evaluated modes of anger expression in 104 adolescent suicide attempters and 323 high school students. Results indicated that, in comparison to the control group of high school students, suicidal adolescents displayed an increased likelihood of experiencing anger, reported significantly higher levels of both internalized and externalized anger,…

  19. Unscrewing Yourself: One Approach to Anger Management Groupwork with Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greif, Andy

    This paper describes an anger management group implemented with students in grades 7-12 enrolled in an alternative school. The majority of students at the school were identified as having difficulties managing their anger and handling conflict. The goal of the group was to have students understand their relationship with anger in order to…

  20. Assessment of Anger Coping Skills in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willner, P.; Brace, N.; Phillips, J.

    2005-01-01

    Recent controlled studies have supported the effectiveness of anger management training for people with intellectual disabilities (IDs). This report describes an evaluation instrument designed to assess their usage of specific anger coping skills. The Profile of Anger Coping Skills (PACS) is designed for completion by a staff member or carer.…

  1. The art of anger: reward context turns avoidance responses to anger-related objects into approach.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Henk; Ruys, Kirsten I; Veling, Harm; Renes, Robert A; de Groot, Jasper H B; van Nunen, Anna M; Geertjes, Sarit

    2010-10-01

    Anger has a special status among the emotions in that it can elicit avoidance as well as approach motivation. This study tested the ignored role of reward context in potentiating approach rather than avoidance responses toward objects associated with anger. In Experiment 1, angry and neutral facial expressions were parafoveally paired with common objects, and responses to the objects were assessed by subjective reports of motivation to obtain them. In Experiment 2, objects were again paired with angry or neutral faces outside of participants' awareness, and responses toward the objects were indexed by physical effort expended in attempting to win them. Results showed that approach motivation toward anger-related objects can be observed when responding is framed in terms of rewards that one can obtain, whereas avoidance motivation occurs in the absence of such a reward context. These findings point to the importance of a reward context in modulating people's responses to anger. PMID:20855898

  2. Children's Context Inappropriate Anger and Salivary Cortisol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Robin L.; Davidson, Richard J.; Kalin, Ned H.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2009-01-01

    Some children show emotion that is not consistent with normative appraisal of the context and can therefore be defined as context inappropriate (CI). The authors used individual growth curve modeling and hierarchical multiple regression analyses to examine whether CI anger predicts differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity, as…

  3. Individual Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, John L.; Dodd, Louise; Rose, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    There is growing evidence for the efficacy of programs to reduce inappropriate aggression in people with intellectual disabilities. These have been provided in groups and for individuals in forensic settings. People with intellectual disability and inappropriately expressed anger who were referred to a community psychology service were assigned to…

  4. Women's Feminist Consciousness, Anger, and Psychological Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Ann R.; Good, Glenn E.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this study was to bring together several lines of research and theory on women's feminist consciousness from psychology, sociology, and philosophy. Past literatures had suggested bivariate links between feminist identity development and psychological distress, feminist identity and anger, feminist identity and interpersonal conflict,…

  5. Anger Expression and Persistence in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Jie; Xu, Qinmei; Degnan, Kathryn Amey

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated anger expression during toy removal (TR) in 92 young Chinese children, two to five years of age, and its relations to their persistence in responding to obstacles during two challenging tasks with highly desirable goals [TR and locked box (LB)] and one challenging task with a less desirable goal [impossible perfect circles…

  6. Anger Management in Parent-Adolescent Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Susan B.

    1999-01-01

    Presents an outcome investigation of the role of anger management in parent-adolescent conflict. Eighteen parent-adolescent dyads were randomly assigned either to a conflict resolution group treatment or combined conflict management and conflict resolution group treatment. Findings suggest that the combination treatment group parents and teens…

  7. Browns in Anger: The Overlooked Minority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lara-Braud, Jorge

    This speech advocates that Mexican-Americans must undergo a process of radicalization to attempt to transfer anger from deeds to words. This minority is losing faith in speech as a means of redress, but corrective measures should come through dialogue and not collision. Few Mixican Americans designated themselves "browns" a year ago--but it is now…

  8. Application of Trait Anger and Anger Expression Styles Scale New Modelling on University Students from Various Social and Cultural Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Fethi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the differences in anger traits of university students and teacher candidates studying in various social and cultural regions, of Batman and Denizli, Turkey. Modelling anger and anger expression style scale according to some variables such as age, gender, education level, number of siblings, parents'…

  9. Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03693 Channel

    This channel is located south of Iani Chaos.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -10.9N, Longitude 345.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Expressing Anger Is More Dangerous than Feeling Angry when Driving

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Weina; Dai, Mengnuo; Zhao, Wenguo; Zhang, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Anger is an emotion that drivers often feel and express while driving, and it is believed by researchers to be an important cause of dangerous driving behavior. In this study, the relationships between driving trait anger, driving anger expression, and dangerous driving behaviors were analyzed. The Driving Anger Scale (DAS) was used to measure driving trait anger, whereas the Driving Anger Expression (DAX) Inventory was used to measure expressions of driving anger. A sample of 38 drivers completed the DAS, DAX, and a driving simulation session on a simulator where their driving behaviors were recorded. Correlation analysis showed that the higher scores on the DAS were associated with longer durations of speeding in the simulator. The more participants expressed their anger in verbal and physical ways, the more likely they were to crash the virtual vehicle during the simulation. Regression analyses illustrated the same pattern. The findings suggest that, although trait anger is related to speeding, the passive expression of anger is the real factor underling traffic accidents. This study extends findings about the predictive effects of self-report scales of driving behaviors to behaviors recorded on a simulator. Thus, if in traffic safety propaganda, guiding drivers to use positive ways to cope with driving anger is recommended by our findings. PMID:27258144

  11. Expressing Anger Is More Dangerous than Feeling Angry when Driving.

    PubMed

    Qu, Weina; Dai, Mengnuo; Zhao, Wenguo; Zhang, Kan; Ge, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Anger is an emotion that drivers often feel and express while driving, and it is believed by researchers to be an important cause of dangerous driving behavior. In this study, the relationships between driving trait anger, driving anger expression, and dangerous driving behaviors were analyzed. The Driving Anger Scale (DAS) was used to measure driving trait anger, whereas the Driving Anger Expression (DAX) Inventory was used to measure expressions of driving anger. A sample of 38 drivers completed the DAS, DAX, and a driving simulation session on a simulator where their driving behaviors were recorded. Correlation analysis showed that the higher scores on the DAS were associated with longer durations of speeding in the simulator. The more participants expressed their anger in verbal and physical ways, the more likely they were to crash the virtual vehicle during the simulation. Regression analyses illustrated the same pattern. The findings suggest that, although trait anger is related to speeding, the passive expression of anger is the real factor underling traffic accidents. This study extends findings about the predictive effects of self-report scales of driving behaviors to behaviors recorded on a simulator. Thus, if in traffic safety propaganda, guiding drivers to use positive ways to cope with driving anger is recommended by our findings. PMID:27258144

  12. A Teacher's Notebook: Russian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Independent Schools, Boston, MA.

    Articles written by teachers of Russian for their peers in similar classroom environments are intended to aid in the development of curricular innovation. The articles, all based on practical and direct experience, include: (1) "Direct Methods for Teaching Russian," (2) "The Eclectic Approach to Teaching Russian," (3) "So-Called Linguistic…

  13. Interacting Effects of Trait Anger and Acute Anger Arousal on Pain: The Role of Endogenous Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Bruehl, Stephen; Burns, John W.; Chung, Ok Yung; Chont, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Objective Elevated trait anger (TRANG; heightened propensity to experience anger) is associated with greater pain responsiveness, possibly via associations with deficient endogenous opioid analgesia. This study tested whether acute anger arousal moderates the impact of TRANG on endogenous opioid analgesia. Methods 94 chronic low back pain participants (LBP) and 85 healthy controls received opioid blockade (8mg naloxone) or placebo in randomized, counterbalanced order in separate sessions. Participants were randomly assigned to undergo either a 5-minute anger recall interview (ARI) or neutral control interview (NCI) across both drug conditions. Immediately following the assigned interview, participants engaged sequentially in finger pressure and ischemic forearm pain tasks. Opioid blockade effects were derived (blockade minus placebo condition pain ratings) to index opioid antinociceptive function. Results Placebo condition TRANG × Interview interactions (p’s<.05) indicated that TRANG was hyperalgesic only in the context of acute anger arousal (ARI condition; p’s<.05). Blockade effect analyses suggested these hyperalgesic effects were related to deficient opioid analgesia. Significant TRANG × Interview interactions (p’s<.05) for both pain tasks indicated that elevated TRANG was associated with smaller blockade effects (less endogenous opioid analgesia) only in the ARI condition (p’s<.05). Results for ischemic task VAS intensity blockade effects suggested that associations between TRANG and impaired opioid function were most evident in LBP participants when experiencing anger (Type × Interview × TRANG Interaction; p<.05). Conclusions Results indicate that hyperalgesic effects of TRANG are most prominent when acute anger is aroused, and suggest that endogenous opioid mechanisms contribute. PMID:21862829

  14. Anger in Adolescent Communities: How Angry Are They?

    PubMed

    Pullen, Lisa; Modrcin, Mary Anne; McGuire, Sandra L; Lane, Karen; Kearnely, Melissa; Engle, Sonya

    2015-01-01

    Anger is a common factor in two causes of death in adolescence: homicide and suicide. This study looked at the level of anger in non-clinical convenience sample of adolescents (N = 139) between the ages of 12 and 19 years (early: 12 to 14 years, mid: 15 to 16 years, late: 17 to 19 years) from a large Southeastern Baptist church. Participants completed the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory, Beck and Children's Depression Inventories, and Children of Alcoholics Screening Test (CAST). The level of self-reported anger was low. The difference in anger between the three age groups was not statistically significant. Differences in gender were generally not significant statistically. A strong correlation exists between stress and anger. A minor relationship between parental drinking behaviors, as measured by the CAST, and anger was found. A significant relationship between anger and depression, and frequency of participation in religious activity and decreased anger was established. By increasing the current knowledge of anger in adolescents, it may be possible to gain insight into risk factors or triggers that cause anger. Interventions must be implemented early to prevent juvenile detention and to help adolescents remain in the community. Public policies addressing anger in adolescents are essential. Health care providers must work together to identify adolescents with disorders or feelings of isolation or disconnect and provide treatment based in communities so adolescents can still function and not be isolated. It is relevant that a mentor or someone that can be trusted is provided to build a safe and secure environment. This greater knowledge may aid in assessment and treatment of adolescents with dysfunctional anger. PMID:26201172

  15. Status of the Los Alamos Anger camera

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, P.A.; Nutter, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Results of preliminary tests of the neutron Anger camera being developed at Los Alamos are presented. This detector uses a unique encoding scheme involving parellel processing of multiple receptive fields. Design goals have not yet been met, but the results are very encouraging and improvements in the test procedures are expected to show that the detector will be ready for use on a small-angle scattering instrument next year. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  16. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Todd E; Furenlid, Lars R

    2011-09-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous sodium iodide scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic. PMID:21828904

  17. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Todd E.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2011-09-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous sodium iodide scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic.

  18. SPECT detectors: the Anger Camera and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Todd E.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2011-01-01

    The development of radiation detectors capable of delivering spatial information about gamma-ray interactions was one of the key enabling technologies for nuclear medicine imaging and, eventually, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The continuous NaI(Tl) scintillator crystal coupled to an array of photomultiplier tubes, almost universally referred to as the Anger Camera after its inventor, has long been the dominant SPECT detector system. Nevertheless, many alternative materials and configurations have been investigated over the years. Technological advances as well as the emerging importance of specialized applications, such as cardiac and preclinical imaging, have spurred innovation such that alternatives to the Anger Camera are now part of commercial imaging systems. Increased computing power has made it practical to apply advanced signal processing and estimation schemes to make better use of the information contained in the detector signals. In this review we discuss the key performance properties of SPECT detectors and survey developments in both scintillator and semiconductor detectors and their readouts with an eye toward some of the practical issues at least in part responsible for the continuing prevalence of the Anger Camera in the clinic. PMID:21828904

  19. Anger in psychological disorders: Prevalence, presentation, etiology and prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ephrem; Johnson, Sheri L

    2016-06-01

    Anger is present as a key criterion in five diagnoses within DSM-5: Intermittent Explosive Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder and Bipolar Disorder. This review amasses scientific literature demonstrating that within each of these disorders, anger is a central clinical feature that is highly prevalent and predictive of important outcomes. For each disorder, we also discuss the phenomenology and etiology of anger. Although models of anger have been quite distinct across these disorders, few empirical studies have truly tested whether anger stems from different etiological factors across these different conditions. We end with a discussion of transdiagnostic research that draws from cognitive psychology, affective science, and the neuroscience of anger, and that also fits with integrative approaches to treatment. PMID:27188635

  20. Exploring relationships among anger, perceived organizational support, and workplace outcomes.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Olivia A; Vandenberg, Robert J; Dejoy, David M; Wilson, Mark G

    2009-07-01

    The present study examines anger within a perceived organizational support (POS) theory framework. Using structural equation modeling, the authors explored relationships among POS, anger, and workplace outcomes in a sample of 1,136 employees in 21 stores of a U.S. retail organization. At both individual and store levels, low POS was directly associated with greater anger. At the individual level, anger partially mediated relationships among low POS and turnover intentions, absences, and accidents on the job. Anger had direct and indirect effects on alcohol consumption and health-related risk taking. At the store level, anger had direct negative effects on inventory loss and turnover. The authors interpret these findings in light of social exchange theory and emotion regulation theory. PMID:19586225

  1. Russian RBMK reactor design information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document concerns the systems, design, and operations of the graphite-moderated, boiling, water-cooled, channel-type (RBMK) reactors located in the former Soviet Union (FSU). The Russian Academy of Sciences Nuclear Safety Institute (NSI) in Moscow, Russia, researched specific technical questions that were formulated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and provided detailed technical answers to those questions. The Russian response was prepared in English by NSI in a question-and-answer format. This report presents the results of that technical exchange in the context they were received from the NSI organization. Pacific Northwest Laboratory is generating this document to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) community in responding to requests from FSU states, which are seeking Western technological and financial assistance to improve the safety systems of the Russian-designed reactors. This report expands upon information that was previously available to the United States through bilateral information exchanges, international nuclear society meetings, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reactor safety programs, and Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE) reports. The response to the PNL questions have not been edited or reviewed for technical consistency or accuracy by PNL staff or other US organizations, but are provided for use by the DOE community in the form they were received.

  2. Anger in the trajectory of healing from childhood maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sandra P; Bannister, Sarah C; Hall, Joanne M

    2012-06-01

    When a girl is abused during childhood, she may not experience anger, only helplessness or numbness. Only later may the emotion of anger surface. Little is known about anger cognitions or behaviors as they occur across the years of the healing trajectory from childhood maltreatment. Data for the present secondary analysis were derived from a large narrative study of women thriving in adulthood despite childhood abuse. The purpose of this analysis was to examine the phenomenon of anger and its role in the recovery process of 6 midlife women. The 6 cases were purposefully selected because their interviews contained rich descriptions of anger experiences. Because each woman was interviewed 3 times over a 6- to 12-month period, 18 transcripts were available for in-depth examination. A typology was constructed, depicting 5 types of anger. Anger ranged from nonproductive, self-castigating behavior to empowering, righteous anger that enabled women to protect themselves from further abuse and to advocate for abused children. Study findings are relevant to extant theories of women's anger and feminist therapies. PMID:22633579

  3. Social Status and Anger Expression: The Cultural Moderation Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jiyoung; Kitayama, Shinobu; Markus, Hazel R.; Coe, Christopher L.; Miyamoto, Yuri; Karasawa, Mayumi; Curhan, Katherine B.; Love, Gayle D.; Kawakami, Norito; Boylan, Jennifer Morozink; Ryff, Carol D.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with lower social status have been reported to express more anger, but this evidence comes mostly from Western cultures. Here, we used representative samples of American and Japanese adults and tested the hypothesis that the association between social status and anger expression depends on whether anger serves primarily to vent frustration, as in the United States, or to display authority, as in Japan. Consistent with the assumption that lower social standing is associated with greater frustration stemming from life adversities and blocked goals, Americans with lower social status expressed more anger, with the relationship mediated by the extent of frustration. In contrast, consistent with the assumption that higher social standing affords a privilege to display anger, Japanese with higher social status expressed more anger, with the relationship mediated by decision-making authority. As expected, anger expression was predicted by subjective social status among Americans and by objective social status among Japanese. Implications for the dynamic construction of anger and anger expression are discussed. PMID:24098926

  4. Anger in the Trajectory of Healing from Childhood Maltreatment

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sandra P.; Bannister, Sarah C.; Hall, Joanne M.

    2011-01-01

    When a girl is abused during childhood, she may not experience anger, only helplessness or numbness. Only later may the emotion of anger surface. Little is known about anger cognitions or behaviors as they occur across the years of the healing trajectory from childhood maltreatment. Data for the present secondary analysis were derived from a large narrative study of women thriving in adulthood despite childhood abuse. The purpose of this analysis was to examine the phenomenon of anger and its role in the recovery process of 6 midlife women. The 6 cases were purposefully selected because their interviews contained rich descriptions of anger experiences. Because each woman was interviewed 3 times over a 6–12 month period, 18 transcripts were available for in-depth examination. A typology was constructed, depicting 5 types of anger. Anger ranged from nonproductive, self-castigating behavior to empowering, righteous anger that enabled women to protect themselves from further abuse and to advocate for abused children. Study findings are relevant to extant theories of women’s anger and feminist therapies. PMID:22633579

  5. Social status and anger expression: the cultural moderation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyoung; Kitayama, Shinobu; Markus, Hazel R; Coe, Christopher L; Miyamoto, Yuri; Karasawa, Mayumi; Curhan, Katherine B; Love, Gayle D; Kawakami, Norito; Boylan, Jennifer Morozink; Ryff, Carol D

    2013-12-01

    Individuals with lower social status have been reported to express more anger, but this evidence comes mostly from Western cultures. Here, we used representative samples of American and Japanese adults and tested the hypothesis that the association between social status and anger expression depends on whether anger serves primarily to vent frustration, as in the United States, or to display authority, as in Japan. Consistent with the assumption that lower social standing is associated with greater frustration stemming from life adversities and blocked goals, Americans with lower social status expressed more anger, with the relationship mediated by the extent of frustration. In contrast, consistent with the assumption that higher social standing affords a privilege to display anger, Japanese with higher social status expressed more anger, with the relationship mediated by decision-making authority. As expected, anger expression was predicted by subjective social status among Americans and by objective social status among Japanese. Implications for the dynamic construction of anger and anger expression are discussed. PMID:24098926

  6. Dimensions of driving anger and their relationships with aberrant driving.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingru; Chan, Alan H S; Zhang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between driving anger and aberrant driving behaviours. An internet-based questionnaire survey was administered to a sample of Chinese drivers, with driving anger measured by a 14-item short Driving Anger Scale (DAS) and the aberrant driving behaviours measured by a 23-item Driver Behaviour Questionnaire (DBQ). The results of Confirmatory Factor Analysis demonstrated that the three-factor model (hostile gesture, arrival-blocking and safety-blocking) of the DAS fitted the driving anger data well. The Exploratory Factor Analysis on DBQ data differentiated four types of aberrant driving, viz. emotional violation, error, deliberate violation and maintaining progress violation. For the anger-aberration relation, it was found that only "arrival-blocking" anger was a significant positive predictor for all four types of aberrant driving behaviours. The "safety-blocking" anger revealed a negative impact on deliberate violations, a finding different from previously established positive anger-aberration relation. These results suggest that drivers with different patterns of driving anger would show different behavioural tendencies and as a result intervention strategies may be differentially effective for drivers of different profiles. PMID:25984643

  7. The Relation between Anger Coping Strategies, Anger Mood and Somatic Complaints in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miers, Anne C.; Rieffe, Carolien; Terwogt, Mark Meerum; Cowan, Richard; Linden, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Attempts to explain the experience of somatic complaints among children and adolescents suggest that they may in part result from the influence of particular strategies for coping with anger on the longevity of negative emotions. To explore these relationships British (n = 393) and Dutch (n = 99) children completed a modified version of the…

  8. "Turning Anger into Knowledge": Exploring Anger and Advocacy with Women Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorney, Judith

    2000-01-01

    In exploring the connections among gender, schooling, and knowledge, this paper considers the relationships between, and the effects of silencing or expressing anger, in women and their work as educators. Data come from two action research projects: Women Teaching Girls retreats and the Exploring Gender and Knowledge. Each consisted of a series of…

  9. Anger Management Programs for Children and Teens: A Review of Eleven Anger Management Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jahnke, Kristine

    This document focuses on anger management programs utilized within and outside of school systems. Eleven programs are reviewed and delineated into the following categories: age/grade level, group size, target population, theoretical basis, techniques utilized, and skills acquired. Practical knowledge of the programs is presented in order to…

  10. The Anger Management Project: A Group Intervention for Anger in People with Physical and Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagiliassis, Nick; Gulbenkoglu, Hrepsime; Di Marco, Mark; Young, Suzanne; Hudson, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Background: This paper describes the evaluation of a group program designed specifically to meet the anger management needs of a group of individuals with various levels of intellectual disability and/or complex communication needs. Method: Twenty-nine individuals were randomly assigned to an intervention group or a waiting-list comparison group.…

  11. Self-reported anger in black high school adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jones, M B; Peacock, M K; Christopher, J

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the recognition and expression of anger in black high school adolescents. A total of 56 teens, aged 14-19 years, responded to questions about their recognition of anger, how and to whom they express anger, and to whom they refrain from expressing anger. They also stated their opinions about acceptable and unacceptable expressions of anger and its relationship to depression or suicide. Data were analyzed using frequency tabulations for all questions on the survey instrument. Specific variables of age, grade in school, gender, and family composition were analyzed by one-sample chi 2 tests (alpha set at 0.05). The study demonstrated 1) all the teens surveyed could recognize when they were angry; 2) most teens expressed anger to their friends, to their siblings, and to their mothers; 3) younger teens (ages 14-15 years) when compared to older teens (ages 18-19 years), identified mother as the one who made them angry; 4) females were more likely to feel like crying when angry; 5) females were more likely to feel like being silent when angry; 6) students from one- and two-parent homes did not differ in their expression of anger. Implications of this study include the recognition that anger is a natural, human emotion. Adolescents need to observe adults who can effectively manage behavior associated with anger. Problem solving skills, stress management techniques, and role play situations can be utilized as effective tools in the recognition and expression of anger in acceptable ways and in attempts at the prevention of dysfunctional anger. PMID:1390810

  12. Russian Teaching Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Betsy

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes two Russian teaching contracts, rhetorically comparing purpose and audience, culture, gender, and the role of the individual versus the state. Uses anecdotal episodes as a framework for examining Russian culture and analyzing university teaching contracts, concluding that the contracts are not only brief and factual but also reflect a…

  13. Russian Language Analysis Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serianni, Barbara; Rethwisch, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    This paper is the result of a language analysis research project focused on the Russian Language. The study included a diverse literature review that included published materials as well as online sources in addition to an interview with a native Russian speaker residing in the United States. Areas of study include the origin and history of the…

  14. Russian Supplementary Dialogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Ashgabat (Turkmenistan).

    This manual is designed for the Russian language training of Peace Corps volunteers serving in Turkmenistan, and focuses on daily communication skills needed in that context. It consists of nine topical lessons, each containing several brief dialogues targeting specific language competencies, and exercises. Text is entirely in Russian, except for…

  15. RUSSIAN FOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    THE NEW YORK STATE SYLLABUS FOR RUSSIAN IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS FOLLOWS THE SAME FORMAT AS THOSE FOR FRENCH, GERMAN, AND SPANISH, AND FOR COMPLETE TEXT, INCLUDING GENERAL SECTIONS ON TEACHING LANGUAGES, THE READER MUST REFER TO ONE OF THOSE THREE BOOKS. THIS GUIDE DELINEATES THE AIMS, TECHNIQUES, CONTENT, AND SCOPE OF RUSSIAN INSTRUCTION FOR A 6-YEAR…

  16. From Unresolved Anger to Sadness: Identifying Physiological Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochman, Daniel; Diamond, Gary M.

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to identify physiological correlates of unresolved anger and sadness, and the shift between these emotions, in a context similar to that of emotion-focused, experiential psychotherapy. Twenty-seven university students reporting unresolved anger toward an attachment figure were induced to experience and express unresolved…

  17. Infants' and Mothers' Vagal Reactivity in Response to Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Ginger A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Exposure to anger in the family is a risk factor for disruptive behavior disorders characterized by ineffective vagal regulation. Effects of anger on developing vagal regulation may be due to direct exposure or to effects on parents' regulation of emotion as parents support infants' regulation. Little is known about the impact of anger…

  18. The Social Antecedents of Anger Proneness in Young Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, R. Jay; Russell, David; Glover, Regan; Hutto, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Anger has been shown to be an important factor in occupational maladjustment, family conflict, physical and sexual assault, criminal behavior, and substance abuse. It has also been linked with such adverse health outcomes as hypertension, heart disease, and cancer. Focusing on anger proneness, conceptualized as a relatively enduring propensity to…

  19. The Application of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Problem Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eifert, Georg H.; Forsyth, John P.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to familiarize clinicians with the use of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for problem anger by describing the application of ACT to a case of a 45-year-old man struggling with anger. ACT is an approach and set of intervention technologies that support acceptance and mindfulness processes linked with commitment and…

  20. Attitudes toward Anger Management Scale: Development and Initial Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, David J.; Dahlen, Eric R.; Madson, Michael B.; Bullock-Yowell, Emily

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development and preliminary validation of the Attitudes Toward Anger Management Scale (ATAMS), a self-report measure of attitudes toward anger management services. Undergraduate volunteers ("N" = 415) completed an initial version of the instrument. Principal components analysis yielded a two-factor solution.…

  1. Relationship between Anger Expression and Stress in Predicting Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Daniel L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examines the relationship between anger expression and stressful life events as predictors of depression among college students. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that anger directed inward and stressful life events were significant predictors of depression. Because these factors are independent and additive predictors,…

  2. The Influence of Anger Expression on Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Gouin, Jean-Philippe; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.; Malarkey, William B.; Glaser, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Certain patterns of anger expression have been associated with maladaptive alterations in cortisol secretion, immune functioning, and surgical recovery. We hypothesized that outward and inward anger expression and lack of anger control would be associated with delayed wound healing. A sample of 98 community-dwelling participants received standardized blister wounds on their non-dominant forearm. After blistering, the wounds were monitored daily for eight days to assess speed of repair. Logistic regression was used to distinguish fast and slow healers based on their anger expression pattern. Individuals exhibiting lower levels of anger control were more likely to be categorized as slow healers. The anger control variable predicted wound repair over and above differences in hostility, negative affectivity, social support, and health behaviors. Furthermore, participants with lower levels of anger control exhibited higher cortisol reactivity during the blistering procedure. This enhanced cortisol secretion was in turn related to longer time to heal. These findings suggest that the ability to regulate the expression of one’s anger has a clinically relevant impact on wound healing. PMID:18078737

  3. Anger Proneness, Gender, and the Risk of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kucharska-Newton, Anna M.; Williams, Janice E.; Chang, Patricia P.; Stearns, Sally C.; Sueta, Carla A.; Blecker, Saul B.; Mosley, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence concerning the association of anger-proneness with incidence of heart failure is lacking. Methods Anger proneness was ascertained among 13,171 black and white participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study cohort using the Spielberger Trait Anger Scale. Incident heart failure events, defined as occurrence of ICD-9-CM code 428.x, were ascertained from participants’ medical records during follow-up 1990–2010. Relative hazard of heart failure across categories of trait anger was estimated from Cox proportional hazard models. Results Study participants (mean age 56.9 (SD 5.7) years) experienced 1,985 incident HF events during 18.5 (SD 4.9) years of follow-up. Incidence of HF was greater among those with high, as compared to those with low or moderate trait anger, with higher incidence observed for men as compared to women. The relative hazard of incident HF was modestly high among those with high trait anger, as compared to those with low or moderate trait anger (age-adjusted HR for men=1.44 (95% CI 1.23, 1.69). Adjustment for comorbidities and depressive symptoms attenuated the estimated age-adjusted relative hazard in men to 1.26 (95% CI 1.00, 1.60). Conclusion Assessment of anger proneness may be necessary in successful prevention and clinical management of heart failure, especially in men. PMID:25284390

  4. The Politics and Regulation of Anger in Urban China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Negative emotions such as anger, and community responses to their expression are culturally and politically conditioned, including by dominant medical discourse on anger's somatic and psychic effects. In this article I examine local genres of anger expression in Beijing, China, particularly among marginalized workers, and address culturally specific responses to them. Through majie (rant), xiangpi ren (silenced rage), and nande hutu (muddledness as a more difficult kind of smartness), workers strategically employ anger to seek redress for injustices and legitimate their moral indignation while challenging official psychotherapeutic interventions. Those who seek to regulate anger, mostly psychosocial workers acting as arm's-length agents of the state, use mixed methods that draw on Western psychotherapy and indigenous psychological resources to frame, medicalize or appease workers' anger in the name of health and social stability. I demonstrate how the two processes--anger expression and responses to it--create tensions and result in an ambiguous and multivalent social terrain which Chinese subjects must negotiate and which the state attempts to govern. I argue that the ambivalence and multi-valence of anger expressions and state-sponsored reactions to them render this emotion both subversive vis-à-vis power and subject to manipulations that maintain social order. PMID:26475789

  5. Women, Anger, and Aggression: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eatough, Virginia; Smith, Jonathan A.; Shaw, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    This study reports a qualitative phenomenological investigation of anger and anger-related aggression in the context of the lives of individual women. Semistructured interviews with five women are analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. This inductive approach aims to capture the richness and complexity of the lived experience of…

  6. Mad Kids: How To Help Your Child Manage Anger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beekman, Susan; Holmes, Jeanne

    2002-01-01

    Children move through the same anger cycle as adults and need similar coping strategies and problem solving skills. This paper presents pre-anger approaches, discussing what to do before the "boil-over" occurs, when the boiling point is reached, and after the boil-over. A sidebar presents a list of questions and activities parents can use with…

  7. Anger in Australian Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boman, Peter; Mergler, Amanda; Furlong, Michael; Caltabiano, Nerina

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive pilot study examined the cultural differences in the dimensions of self-reported anger in Indigenous and non-Indigenous (Caucasian) students aged 10-13 years in Far North Queensland, Australia. The Multidimensional School Anger Inventory-Revised (MSAI-R) (Boman, Curtis, Furlong, & Smith, 2006) was used to measure affective,…

  8. Urban Middle School Students Responses to Anger Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosworth, Kris; Hammer, Ronen

    The situations in which young adolescents identify anger and the strategies they use in response to anger were studied with students from a midwestern urban middle school health class. The sample included 53 sixth graders, 41 seventh graders, and 41 eighth graders. Responses to a one-page survey indicated that students reported more anger…

  9. In Control: Anger Management and the Development of Prosocial Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellner, Millicent H.; Salvador, Diana S.; Bry, Brenna H.

    This paper describes the preliminary results of a study of In Control, an anger management curriculum offered in the middle school of a therapeutic day school for children with severe emotional and behavioral disorders. Twenty students received the program, while 26 did not. Measures were number of anger logs students completed; institutional…

  10. Teaching kids to cope with anger: peer education.

    PubMed

    Puskar, Kathryn R; Stark, Kirsti H; Northcut, Terri; Williams, Rick; Haley, Tammy

    2011-03-01

    Anger could be an early warning signal of violent behavior. Early peer education health promotion in relation to anger management could help children before uncontrolled anger becomes a problem in adolescence and adulthood. Peer education has been identified as a viable intervention strategy worldwide with various prevention programs for youth. The purpose of this article is to describe an anger management program (Teaching Kids to Cope with Anger, TKC-A 4th-8th graders) co-led by high school peer educators in an urban school district's summer school enhancement program. A program of five modules will be described. This paper discusses the peer educator implementation and recommendations for future implementation. PMID:21088064

  11. Anger and effortful control moderate aggressogenic thought-behaviour associations.

    PubMed

    Roos, Sanna; Hodges, Ernest V E; Peets, Kätlin; Salmivalli, Christina

    2016-08-01

    The effects of anger and effortful control on aggressogenic thought-behaviour associations were investigated among a total of 311 Finnish fifth and sixth graders (mean age = 11.9 years). Self-reported aggressive cognitions (i.e., normative- and self-efficacy beliefs about aggression) were expected to be associated with higher peer-reported aggressive behaviour. Teacher reported anger and effortful control were hypothesised, and found, to moderate the effects of aggressive cognitions on aggression, such that the effects were strongest for children who were high in anger and low in effortful control, as compared to other conditions. Furthermore, under the conditions of high anger and high effortful control, self-efficacy was negatively related to aggression. Thus, aggression is a result of a complex, hierarchically organised motivational system, being jointly influenced by aggressive cognitions, anger and effortful control. The findings support the importance of examining cognitive and emotional structures jointly when predicting children's aggressive behaviour. PMID:26042460

  12. An Investigation of Anger and Anger Expression in Terms of Coping with Stress and Interpersonal Problem-Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Coskun

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the anger and anger expression styles with respect to coping with stress and interpersonal problem-solving. The participants were 468 (258 female and 210 male, between 17-30 years old) university students. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients and multiple hierarchical regression analysis were…

  13. Anger Management Effects on Middle School Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: Anger Log Use, Aggressive and Prosocial Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellner, Millicent H.; Bry, Brenna H.; Salvador, Diana S.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a classroom-based, 10-week, cognitive-behavioral, anger management program plus booster sessions on middle school students with emotional disorders attending a therapeutic day school. Forty-five students were in the study; 20 received the program. The program group completed significantly more anger logs compared…

  14. An Investigation of Violent and Nonviolent Adolescents' Family Functioning, Problems Concerning Family Members, Anger and Anger Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avci, Rasit; Gucray, Songul Sonay

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to (a) investigate the families of violent and nonviolent adolescents in terms of family functioning, trait anger and anger expression, and (b) compare incidence of psychological problems, alcohol usage and delinquent behaviors. The sample consisted of families of both violent (n = 54) and nonviolent adolescents (n =…

  15. Russian Federation. Health system review.

    PubMed

    Popovich, Larisa; Potapchik, Elena; Shishkin, Sergey; Richardson, Erica; Vacroux, Alexandra; Mathivet, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    the Russian health system, as most budget funding channelled through local government is input based. For this reason, the most recent reforms as well as legislation in the pipeline seek to ensure all health care funding is channelled through a strengthened MHI system with contracts for provider payments being made using output-based measures. PMID:22455875

  16. Russian Grouting Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    2002-10-15

    The final report on Russian Grouting experience provided an opportunity for international cooperation and access to Russian grouting/waste form experience. the data on radiolytic gas generation from grout mixtures was already used in evaluation of the source of hydrogen and methane generation detected in the sampling ports around the SRS high-level waste tanks in 2002. The concept of venting the radiolytic gases from a waste form by adding porous aggregate is being considered for future cement-based TRU waste forms at SRS. The objectives of this work were to document the Russian experience on grouting for waste forms and tank closures or other decommissioning applications.

  17. Research on Russian National Character

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Na, Zhuo

    2008-01-01

    The special geographical location Russia lies in creates the unique character of the Russian nation. Based on the dual nature of the Russian national character, the Russian geographical environment and the analysis of its social structure, this text tries to explore the reasons of the dual nature of Russian national character.

  18. Anger intensification with combat-related PTSD and depression comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Oscar I; Novaco, Raymond W; Reger, Mark A; Gahm, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Anger is becoming more widely recognized for its involvement in the psychological adjustment problems of current war veterans. Recent research with combat veterans has found anger to be related to psychological distress, psychosocial functioning, and harm risk variables. Using behavioral health data for 2,077 treatment-seeking soldiers who had been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, this study examined whether anger disposition was intensified for those who met screen-threshold criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). Anger was assessed with a 7-item screening measure previously validated with the study population. The study tested the hypothesis that anger would be highest when "PTSD & MDD" were conjoined, compared with "PTSD only," "MDD only," and "no PTSD, no MDD." PTSD and depression were assessed with well-established screening instruments. A self-rated "wanting to harm others" variable was also incorporated. Age, gender, race, military component, military grade, and military unit social support served as covariates. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to test the hypothesis, which was confirmed. Anger was intensified in the PTSD & MDD condition, in which it was significantly higher than in the other 3 conditions. Convergent support was obtained for "wanting to harm others" as an exploratory index. Given the high prevalence and co-occurrence of PTSD and MDD among veterans, the results have research and clinical practice relevance for systematic inclusion of anger assessment postdeployment from risk-assessment and screening standpoints. PMID:25961863

  19. Station Tour: Russian Segment

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams concludes her tour of the International Space Station with a visit to the Russian segment, which includes Zarya, the first segment of the station launched in 1...

  20. Russian Contract Procurement Document

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2010-03-29

    This contract supports the enhancement of physical protection or nuclear material control and accounting systems at institutes or enterprises of the newly independent states under the material protection control and accounting (MPC&A) program. The contract is entered into pursuant to the MPC&A Program, a gratuitous technical assistance program, in accordance with the bilateral Agreements between the Russian Federation and the United States of America concerning the Safe and Secure Transportation, Storage and Destruction of Weapons and the Prevention of Weapons Proliferation of June 1992, as extended and amended by Protocol signed of June 1999, Agreement between the Government of the Russian Federation regarding Cooperation in the Area of Nuclear Materials Physical Protection, Control and Accounting of October 1999 and the Russian Federation law of May 1999 on the taxation exemption of gratuitous technical assistance with Russian Federation under registration No.DOE001000.

  1. Save Russian science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigel'Man, Mikhail

    2007-03-01

    Despite 15 years of turbulent change, 'brain drain' and a shortage of research funds, Russian science has survived, although in a much diminished state. International investment and collaboration over the next ten years could bring it back from the brink.

  2. Association between Anger and Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit; Rooks, Cherie; Bremner, J. Douglas; Nye, Jonathon; Ibeanu, Ijeoma; Murrah, Nancy; Shallenberger, Lucy; Kelley, Mary; Raggi, Paolo; Vaccarino, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia is associated with adverse prognosis in coronary artery disease patients. Anger is thought to be a trigger of acute coronary syndromes and is associated with increased cardiovascular risk; however, little direct evidence exists for a link between anger and myocardial ischemia. Methods [99mTc]sestamibi single-photon emission tomography was performed at rest, after mental stress (a social stressor with a speech task), and after exercise/pharmacological stress. Summed scores of perfusion abnormalities were obtained by observer-independent software. A summed difference score, the difference between stress and rest scores, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Spielberger's State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory was used to assess different anger dimensions. Results The mean age was 50 years, 50% were female and 60% were non-white. After adjusting for demographic factors, smoking, coronary artery disease severity, depressive and anxiety symptoms, each interquartile range increment in state-anger score was associated with 0.36 units adjusted increase in ischemia as measured by the summed difference score (95% CI: 0.14-0.59); the corresponding association for trait-anger was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.21-1.69). Anger expression scales were not associated ischemia. None of the anger dimensions were related to ischemia during exercise/pharmacological stress. Conclusion Anger, both as an emotional state and as a personality trait, is significantly associated with propensity to develop myocardial ischemia during mental stress, but not during exercise/pharmacological stress. Patients with this psychological profile may be at increased risk for silent ischemia induced by emotional stress and this may translate into worse prognosis. PMID:25497256

  3. Racial Identity Status Profiles and Expressions of Anger in Black Americans: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Robert T.; Pieterse, Alex L.; Smith, Sidney, III

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between Black adult racial identity status profiles and anger expression was examined. Two profiles, Undifferentiated and Immersion-Emersion, emerged. A comparison of modes of anger expression revealed that the Immersion-Emersion dominant profile was associated with higher scores on Anger-Out and lower scores on Anger-Control.…

  4. The Effects of Cognitive--Behavioral Therapy on Trait Anger and Paranoid Ideation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Prendes, A. Antonio; Jozefowicz-Simbeni, Debra M. Hernandez

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluates a cognitive-behavioral anger treatment approach to reduce anger and paranoid ideation on men (n = 32) in treatment for anger problems and compares levels of paranoid ideation with a sample of men ( n = 27) who sought mental health treatment for non-anger issues. Method: A pre- and posttest design is used to evaluate…

  5. Anger Problem Profiles among Partner Violent Men: Differences in Clinical Presentation and Treatment Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Christopher M.; Taft, Casey T.; Eckhardt, Christopher I.

    2007-01-01

    Cluster analysis of 139 partner violent men's self-reports on the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory identified profiles reflecting pathological anger (PA), low anger control (LAC), and normal anger (NA). The PA group self-reported higher pretreatment partner abuse, interpersonal dysfunction, distress, and substance abuse and had lower…

  6. Children's Self-Reports about Anger Regulation: Direct and Indirect Links to Social Preference and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearing, Karen F.; And Others

    2002-01-01

    Assessed direct relations between three aspects of self-reported anger regulation and peer-rated social preference and aggression as well as indirect relations between these constructs as mediated by observed anger expression. Interviewed 274 second-graders following anger-arousing games. Found that anger regulation was only indirectly related to…

  7. Domestic violence and anger: what can primary care nurses do?

    PubMed

    Siddle, Ronald; Jones, Freda

    2002-08-01

    Patients with anger problems can cause difficulties for themselves, their families and society. Though psychological treatments are available, they are not always accessible. In order to help the victims of domestic violence, we focus here on working with perpetrators of violence. This article offers some statistics about the extent of the problem. It discusses difficulties in motivating patients for therapy and describes the cognitive model of anger. A number of intervention strategies based on this model are then discussed. The purpose is to assist clinicians with less experience of this patient group to help their patients minimize the frequency and severity of the anger incidents. Pointers for good practice are outlined. PMID:12192343

  8. Gurus, Mystics, and Medicine Men: On Transcending Anger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henschen, Thomas L.

    1978-01-01

    Many western writers urge expression of anger for healthy living. Other experts, who share a mystical orientation, offer a different perspective. The time is overdue for consideration of viable alternatives to expressing strong negative feelings. (Author/BP)

  9. Interpersonal Conflict: Effects of Variations in Manner of Expressing Anger and Justification for Anger upon Perceptions of Appropriateness, Competence, and Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sereno, Kenneth K.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examines how an expression of anger affects the receiver's perceptions of anger in a close interpersonal relationship. Reports that findings contradicted conventional wisdom and research findings on assertive communication. (MM)

  10. Psychometric Examination of an Arabic Version of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Motohiro; Bouanene, Ines; El-Mhamdi, Sana; Soltani, Mohamed; Bongard, Stephan; al’Absi, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to examine the psychometric properties of an Arabic version of the trait anger and anger expression scales of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI). Methods: This study took place between April 2005 and August 2014. Adults in Yemen (n = 334) and Tunisia (n = 200) were recruited from university campuses and a smoking cessation clinic, respectively. The STAXI was translated into Arabic using back-translation methods. An explanatory principal component analysis was conducted to explore the factor structure of the anger expression scale, utilising parallel analyses to determine the number of retained factors. Results: Good internal consistency of the trait anger scale was observed among the Yemeni (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.76) and Tunisian (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.86) samples. The parallel analysis suggested a three-factor solution for the anger expression scale (anger in, anger out and anger control), in accordance with the original STAXI. The internal consistency of anger in, anger out and anger control factors ranged between 0.51–0.79 in the Yemeni sample and 0.66–0.81 in the Tunisian sample. Overall, items loaded on the anger control factor included all items proposed by the original authors and this factor had higher reliability than the other two factors in both samples. Conclusion: The results of the current study provide initial support for the use of the trait anger and anger expression scales of the STAXI in Arabic-speaking countries. PMID:27606112

  11. ANGER CORRELATED WITH PSYCHOSOCIAL VARIABLES IN RURAL YOUTH

    PubMed Central

    Puskar, Kathryn; Ren, Dianxu; Bernardo, Lisa Marie; Haley, Tammy; Hetager Stark, Kirsti

    2009-01-01

    Uncontrolled anger is a contributing force in the three leading causes of adolescent death: homicide, suicide, and injuries. Anger may be one of the early warning signs which could lead to violent behavior. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between anger experience and expression with the potential correlates of life events, perceived social support, self-esteem, optimism, drug use, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in rural adolescents. The participants (n=193) were aged 14 to 17 years old in ninth through eleventh grades enrolled at three rural Western Pennsylvania public high schools. Participants completed nine questionnaires. Negative life events, anxiety, drug use, and depressive symptoms had significant positive correlations with anger. In addition, anger was found to have significant negative correlations with the adolescents’ perceived family support, self-esteem, and optimism. With this knowledge, health promotion programs conducted by pediatric nurses can target anxiety, drug use, and depressive symptoms while bolstering family support, self-esteem, and optimism to promote anger management in adolescent health care. PMID:18569198

  12. The Russian Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dluzhnevskaya, O. B.; Malkov, O. Yu.; Kilpio, A. A.; Kilpio, E. Yu.; Kovaleva, D. A.; Sat, L. A.

    The Russian Virtual Observatory (RVO) will be an integral component of the International Virtual Observatory (IVO). The RVO has the main goal of integrating resources of astronomical data accumulated in Russian observatories and institutions (databases, archives, digitized glass libraries, bibliographic data, a remote access system to information and technical resources of telescopes etc.), and providing transparent access for scientific and educational purposes to the distributed information and data services that comprise its content. Another goal of the RVO is to provide Russian astronomers with on-line access to the rich volumes of data and metadata that have been, and will continue to be, produced by astronomical survey projects. Centre for Astronomical Data (CAD), among other Russian institutions, has had the greatest experience in collecting and distributing astronomical data for more than 20 years. Some hundreds of catalogs and journal tables are currently available from the CAD repository. More recently, mirrors of main astronomical data resources (VizieR, ADS, etc) are now maintained in CAD. Besides, CAD accumulates and makes available for the astronomical community information on principal Russian astronomical resources.

  13. ANGER, ADIPOSITY, AND GLUCOSE CONTROL IN NONDIABETIC ADULTS: FINDINGS FROM MIDUS II

    PubMed Central

    Tsenkova, Vera K.; Carr, Deborah; Coe, Christopher L.; Ryff, Carol D.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Anger has been linked to cardiovascular disease, but few studies have examined the relationship between anger and type 2 diabetes. The aim was to investigate associations among different indicators of anger expression, adiposity, and nondiabetic glucose metabolism in a national survey of adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Participants were 939 adults without diabetes in the Midlife in the US study (MIDUS II). Glucose metabolism was characterized by fasting glucose, insulin, insulin resistance, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Spielberger’s Anger Expression inventory was used to measure suppressed anger (anger-in), expressed anger (anger-out), and controlled anger (anger-control). We investigated the relationship between anger and glucose metabolism, and whether anger amplified the adverse relationship between body weight distribution (body mass index=BMI and waist-to-hip ratio=WHR) and glucose metabolism. RESULTS Multivariate-adjusted analyses revealed an association between anger-out and both insulin and insulin resistance. As predicted, anger-in amplified the relationships between BMI and insulin and insulin resistance, while anger-out amplified the association between WHR and insulin and insulin resistance. Low anger-control was associated with higher glucose. None of the three anger measures was significantly associated with HbA1c. CONCLUSIONS Our findings extend previous research on anger as a potential risk factor for type 2 diabetes by demonstrating that anger expression is associated with clinical indicators of glycemic control, especially among those with pre-existing risk due to obesity and high central adiposity. PMID:23065351

  14. Anger and Postcombat Mental Health: Validation of a Brief Anger Measure with U.S. Soldiers Postdeployed from Iraq and Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novaco, Raymond W.; Swanson, Rob D.; Gonzalez, Oscar I.; Gahm, Gregory A.; Reger, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    The involvement of anger in the psychological adjustment of current war veterans, particularly in conjunction with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), warrants greater research focus than it has received. The present study concerns a brief anger measure, Dimensions of Anger Reactions (DAR), intended for use in large sample studies…

  15. Relevancies of multiple-interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio for Anger-logic based PET detector designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hao

    2015-10-01

    A fundamental challenge for PET block detector designs is to deploy finer crystal elements while limiting the number of readout channels. The standard Anger-logic scheme including light sharing (an 8 by 8 crystal array coupled to a 2×2 photodetector array with an optical diffuser, multiplexing ratio: 16:1) has been widely used to address such a challenge. Our work proposes a generalized model to study the impacts of two critical parameters on spatial resolution performance of a PET block detector: multiple interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The study consists of the following three parts: (1) studying light output profile and multiple interactions of 511 keV photons within crystal arrays of different crystal widths (from 4 mm down to 1 mm, constant height: 20 mm); (2) applying the Anger-logic positioning algorithm to investigate positioning/decoding uncertainties (i.e., "block effect") in terms of peak-to-valley ratio (PVR), with light sharing, multiple interactions and photodetector SNR taken into account; and (3) studying the dependency of spatial resolution on SNR in the context of modulation transfer function (MTF). The proposed model can be used to guide the development and evaluation of a standard Anger-logic based PET block detector including: (1) selecting/optimizing the configuration of crystal elements for a given photodetector SNR; and (2) predicting to what extent additional electronic multiplexing may be implemented to further reduce the number of readout channels.

  16. Context-inappropriate anger, emotion knowledge deficits, and negative social experiences in preschool.

    PubMed

    Locke, Robin L; Miller, Alison L; Seifer, Ronald; Heinze, Justin E

    2015-10-01

    This study examined contextually inappropriate (CI) anger in relation to emotion recognition and situation knowledge, negative social experiences, and externalizing behavior among low-income 4-year-olds attending Head Start (n = 134). Approximately 23% showed anger when presented with positive/neutral slides and videos (valence-incongruent CI anger), whereas 40% of children showed anger when presented with negative slides and videos (valence-congruent CI anger). Valence-incongruent CI anger was associated with lower emotion situation knowledge (for boys only), more self-reported peer rejection and loneliness, and greater negative nominations by teachers and peers. Both valence-incongruent and (for boys only) valence-congruent CI anger were positively associated with externalizing behavior. Overall, valence-incongruent CI anger was more strongly associated with negative child outcomes than valence-congruent CI anger. PMID:26376288

  17. Trait Anger Management Style Moderates Effects of Actual (″State″) Anger Regulation on Symptom-Specific Reactivity and Recovery Among Chronic Low Back Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Burns, John W.; Holly, Amanda; Quartana, Phillip; Wolff, Brandy; Gray, Erika; Bruehl, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We examined whether “state” anger regulation—inhibition or expression—among chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients would affect lower paraspinal (LP) muscle tension following anger-induction, and whether these effects were moderated by trait anger management style. Method Eighty-four CLBP patients underwent harassment, then they regulated anger under one of two conditions: half expressed anger by telling stories about people depicted in pictures, whereas half inhibited anger by only describing objects appearing in the same pictures. They completed the anger-out and anger-in subscales (AOS; AIS) of the anger expression inventory. Results General Linear Model procedures were used to test anger regulation condition by AOS/AIS by period interactions for physiological indexes. Significant three-way interactions were found such that: a) high trait anger-out patients in the inhibition condition appeared to show the greatest LP reactivity during the inhibition period followed by the slowest recovery; b) high trait anger-out patients in the expression condition appeared to show the greatest systolic blood pressure (SBP) reactivity during the expression period followed by rapid recovery. Conclusions Results implicate LP muscle tension as a potential physiological mechanism that links the actual inhibition of anger following provocation to chronic pain severity among CLBP patients. Results also highlight the importance of mismatch situations for patients who typically regulate anger by expressing it. These CLBP patients may be at particular risk for elevated pain severity if circumstances at work or home regularly dictate that they should inhibit anger expression. PMID:18725429

  18. Studying Russian and Soviet History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascher, Abraham, Ed.

    These essays were written to assist teachers in the task of making Russian history intelligible to young U.S. students. In "An Approach to Russian History," Edward Keenan proposes that students need to gain a better understanding of how Russians perceive themselves and their history. In "Pre-Petrine Russia," Andrzej S. Kaminski focuses on the…

  19. Binge eating & childhood emotional abuse: The mediating role of anger.

    PubMed

    Feinson, Marjorie C; Hornik-Lurie, Tzipi

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies reveal that childhood emotional abuse (CEA) is the trauma most clearly associated with adult eating pathology. Yet, relatively little is understood about psychological mechanisms linking these distal experiences. Anger's mediational role in the relationship between CEA and adult binge eating (BE) is explored in a community-based sample of 498 adult women (mean age 44). Detailed telephone interviews assess BE (7 items), CEA (single item), and unresolved anger (single item) along with self-criticism (modified Rosenberg self-esteem scale), depression and anxiety symptoms (BSI sub-scales). Statistical analyses include Pearson correlations, Baron and Kenny's steps for mediation, and Preacher and Hayes bootstrapping method to test proposed multiple mediators simultaneously. Findings reveal significantly more respondents (n = 476 with complete data) with serious BE behaviors report a history of CEA compared to women with considerable and/or minimal BE (53% vs 37%, p = 0.002 respectively). Significant correlations are found among all study variables. Mediation analyses focus on anger together with self-criticism, depression and anxiety. Findings reveal anger and self-criticism fully mediate the CEA-BE relationship. In contrast, depression and anxiety symptoms are not significant mediators in a model that includes anger and self-criticism. Although additional research is warranted to more fully understand complex causal processes, in the interim, treatment interventions should be broadened to include assessments of anger among adult women with BE behaviors, especially those with histories of childhood abuse. Additionally, prevention strategies that incorporate learning how to express anger directly and positively may be particularly effective in reducing various disordered eating behaviors among women and girls. PMID:27208594

  20. Teaching Russian Civilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vakar, Nicholas

    1949-01-01

    Prior to World War Two, Slavic studies in America treated history, literature, and language as isolated disciplines and often neglected the study of Russian literature written after 1917. The pragmatic necessities of the war questioned the relevance of this traditional approach and specialists appeared, concentrating their efforts on the recent…

  1. Russian Librarianship after Perestroika.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Boris

    1995-01-01

    Provides historical background and describes the change in the role of Russian libraries from conduits for party propaganda to organizations designed to serve the needs of their users. Considers problems for library educators in providing librarians with the skills needed in the new political and technological environment of post-Communist Russia.…

  2. Materazzi effect and the strategic use of anger in competitive interactions.

    PubMed

    Gneezy, Uri; Imas, Alex

    2014-01-28

    We propose that individuals use anger strategically in interactions. We first show that in some environments angering people makes them more effective in competitions, whereas in others, anger makes them less effective. We then show that individuals anticipate these effects and strategically use the option to anger their opponents. In particular, they are more likely to anger their opponents when anger negatively affects the opponents' performances. This finding suggests people understand the effects of emotions on behavior and exploit them to their advantage. PMID:24474756

  3. Adolescent Russian roulette deaths.

    PubMed

    Collins, Kim A

    2010-03-01

    Adolescence, between the ages of 10 and 19 years, is a unique period both physically and emotionally. During this time of life, individuals are known to experiment and engage in risky behavior, sometimes with unforeseen morbidity and mortality. We also see suicide emerge as a manner of death in this age group. The most common method is gunshot wound and sometimes in the form of Russian roulette. Few studies have looked at deaths by Russian roulette, the victims, and scenarios. In particular, no study examines the adolescent victim of Russian roulette. To better understand and classify this entity, adolescent Russian roulette autopsy cases over a 20-year period were examined looking at the victims, scenarios, autopsy findings, cause and manner of death, and the weapons. All victims were males, ages 13 to 19 years, with a Black-to-White ratio of 1:1. No victim had a previous psychiatric history. Toxicology was positive for alcohol and/or marijuana in 50% of the victims. Friends were present when the victim shot himself which occurred in the home the majority of the time. In all but 1 case, premeditation of the game was involved as the victim provided the weapon for the roulette. The cause of death was gunshot wound to the head (6 to the right side, 1 to the mouth, 1 to the forehead), and the manner of death was suicide in 6 cases and accident in 2 cases. A review of the literature discusses the adolescent victim, suicide, and Russian roulette. PMID:20010290

  4. Russian Basic Course. Naval Terminology Dictionary: Russian-English, English-Russian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This dictionary is a companion to "Naval Terminology," developed by the Defense Language Institute and printed in 1971. Cyrillic script is used for the Russian terminology. Two main sections define naval terms from Russian to English and from English to Russian. A list of abbreviations concludes the text. (RL)

  5. The effects of collective anger and fear on policy support in response to terrorist attacks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaeshin

    2016-01-01

    Both correlational and experimental studies examined how perceived emotional responses of the majority of Americans to 9/11 affect individuals' support for government counter-terrorism policies (i.e., military intervention, anti-immigration, restricting civil liberties). Study 1 found associations between perceived collective emotions (i.e., anger, fear) and individuals' own corresponding emotions and those between perceived collective anger and counter-terrorism policy support. Individuals' own anger mediated the associations of collective anger with policy support. Using experimental manipulations, Study 2 showed that collective anger had a significant effect on individuals' own anger and one significant and two marginal effects on counter-terrorism policy support. Individuals' own anger mediated one of the marginal effects of collective anger on policy support. Implications of these findings are discussed in the context of terrorist threat. PMID:26577154

  6. [The effects of self-anger on rumination and on mental health].

    PubMed

    Katsumata, Yuina

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of self-anger on rumination and mental health (depression and anxiety). In study 1, a scale to measure self-anger was developed by the review of previous studies and survey interviews. Exploratory factor analysis identified one factor of self-anger. The reliability and validity of the scale were confirmed by internal consistency measures and correlations with other anger-related scales. In study 2, which used the self-anger scale developed in study 1, undergraduate and graduate students completed a set of scales to measure self-anger, rumination, depression, anxiety, and five-factor personality traits. The results of mediation analysis indicated that self-anger effects depression and anxiety directly or through mediating rumination excluding the effect of sex and neuroticism. Finally, the possibility that self-anger management leads to the reduction of rumination and improvement of mental health was discussed. PMID:26562940

  7. Teaching Syntax in Elementary and Intermediate Russian Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Launer, Michael K.

    Most Russian courses suffer from an inadequate approach to the presentation of syntax even though continued emphasis on syntax from the beginning would help to remove the trial and error syndrome inherent in purely audiolingual methods and would channel the student's efforts to internalize and make automatic his answers in a relevant context, thus…

  8. Russian Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA engineers successfully tested a Russian-built rocket engine on November 4, 1998 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Engine Test Facility, which had been used for testing the Saturn V F-1 engines and Space Shuttle Main engines. The MSFC was under a Space Act Agreement with Lockheed Martin Astronautics of Denver to provide a series of test firings of the Atlas III propulsion system configured with the Russian-designed RD-180 engine. The tests were designed to measure the performance of the Atlas III propulsion system, which included avionics and propellant tanks and lines, and how these components interacted with the RD-180 engine. The RD-180 is powered by kerosene and liquid oxygen, the same fuel mix used in Saturn rockets. The RD-180, the most powerful rocket engine tested at the MSFC since Saturn rocket tests in the 1960s, generated 860,000 pounds of thrust.

  9. Russian Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA engineers successfully tested a Russian-built rocket engine on November 4, 1998 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Engine Test Facility, which had been used for testing the Saturn V F-1 engines and Space Shuttle Main engines. The MSFC was under a Space Act Agreement with Lockheed Martin Astronautics of Denver to provide a series of test firings of the Atlas III propulsion system configured with the Russian-designed RD-180 engine. The tests were designed to measure the performance of the Atlas III propulsion system, which included avionics and propellant tanks and lines, and how these components interacted with the RD-180 engine. The RD-180 is powered by kerosene and liquid oxygen, the same fuel mix used in Saturn rockets. The RD-180, the most powerful rocket engine tested at the MSFC since Saturn rocket tests in the 1960s, generated 860,000 pounds of thrust. The test was the first test ever anywhere outside Russia of a Russian designed and built engine.

  10. Expression of Anger in Depressed Adolescents: The Role of the Family Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jennifer; Kuppens, Peter; Sheeber, Lisa B.; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2011-01-01

    The expression of anger is considered to be abnormal in depression, yet its role is only poorly understood. In the present study we sought to clarify this role by examining the moderating influence of the family environment on overall levels of anger expression and anger reactivity in depressed and non-depressed adolescents during conflictual…

  11. A Comparison of Anger in Offenders and Non-Offenders Who Have Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicoll, Matthew; Beail, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence of the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy to treat anger in offenders with intellectual disabilities. The aim is to lower anger levels; the rationale is that this will reduce recidivism. However, the hypothesis that anger levels amongst offenders are higher than non-offenders has not been tested.…

  12. Anger, Hostility, and Aggression: Assessment, Prevention, and Intervention Strategies for Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlong, Michael J., Ed.; Smith, Douglas C., Ed.

    This book is designed to give those who work with youth the information they need on recent anger-related research. It presents practical information about critical assessment, prevention, and intervention by emphasizing the affective, attitudinal, and behavioral aspects of anger. Chapters include: (1) "Correlates of Anger, Hostility, and…

  13. Profiles of Observed Infant Anger Predict Preschool Behavior Problems: Moderation by Life Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooker, Rebecca J.; Buss, Kristin A.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Aksan, Nazan; Davidson, Richard J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2014-01-01

    Using both traditional composites and novel profiles of anger, we examined associations between infant anger and preschool behavior problems in a large, longitudinal data set (N = 966). We also tested the role of life stress as a moderator of the link between early anger and the development of behavior problems. Although traditional measures of…

  14. A Test of Spielberger’s State-Trait Theory of Anger with Adolescents: Five Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Colleen A.; Rollock, David; Vrana, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    Spielberger’s state-trait theory of anger was investigated in adolescents (n = 201, ages 10–18, 53% African American, 47% European American, 48% female) using Deffenbacher’s five hypotheses formulated to test the theory in adults. Self-reported experience, heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) responses to anger provoking imagery scripts found strong support for the application of this theory to adolescents. Compared to the low trait anger (LTA) group, adolescents with high trait anger (HTA) produced increased HR, SBP and DBP, and greater self-report of anger to anger imagery (intensity hypothesis) but not greater self-report or cardiovascular reactivity to fear or joy imagery (discrimination hypothesis). The HTA group also reported greater frequency and duration of anger episodes and had longer recovery of SBP response to anger (elicitation hypothesis). The HTA group was more likely to report negative health, social, and academic outcomes (consequence hypothesis). Adolescents with high hostility reported more maladaptive coping with anger, with higher anger-in and anger-out than adolescents with low hostility (negative expression hypothesis). The data on all five hypotheses supported the notion that trait anger is firmly entrenched by the period of adolescence, with few developmental differences noted from the adult literature. PMID:24040882

  15. Anger, Hostility, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Trauma-Exposed Adults: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orth, Ulrich; Wieland, Elias

    2006-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesizes the available data on the strength of association between anger and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and between hostility and PTSD, covering 39 studies with trauma-exposed adults. Effect sizes did not differ for anger and hostility, which could therefore be combined; effect sizes for anger expression variables…

  16. Progress in Treatment and Experienced and Expressed Anger among Incarcerated Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Henry; Kaplan, Myra; Kafami, Debra M.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the relationship of anger experience and expression with treatment progress in incarcerated male (N=56) volunteers. As predicted, subjects with greater treatment gains had significantly less anger experience and more anger control than low progress subjects did. These differences were not influenced by deception or impression management.…

  17. Assessment of Anger and Aggression in Male Offenders With Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novaco, Raymond W.; Taylor, John L.

    2004-01-01

    Systematic assessment of anger among people with developmental disabilities has been lacking, especially for hospital inpatients. Reliability and validity of anger self-report psychometric scales were investigated with 129 male patients, mostly forensic. Anger prevalence and its relationship to demographic, cognitive, and personality variables and…

  18. Anger-Control Group Counseling for Women Recovering from Alcohol or Drug Addiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Prendes, A. Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Two experimental conditions, a manualized cognitive-behavioral anger-control treatment incorporating empowerment strategies and a relapse-prevention treatment without the anger-control component, were compared to assess their impact on levels of trait anger and attributional styles of women recovering from alcohol and drug addiction. Participants…

  19. Rumination on Anger and Sadness in Adolescence: Fueling of Fury and Deepening of Despair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peled, Maya; Moretti, Marlene M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined anger rumination and sadness rumination in clinic-referred adolescents (N = 121). Factor analysis indicated that items from analogous anger and sadness rumination measures loaded onto 2 factors tapping anger rumination and sadness rumination, respectively. Structural equation modeling confirmed unique relations between each form of…

  20. Effects of Anger Management Training on Aggressive Behavior in Adolescent Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy-Tucker, Sherri; Gold, Andrew; Garcia, Enemencio III

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the impact of Anger Management Training on reducing aggressive behavior in court-referred adolescent males (N=20) in a residential treatment facility. Participants were involved in 12 anger management training sessions. Results show that anger management may be an effective treatment strategy for reducing aggressiveness among…

  1. Anger & Aggression Management in Young Adolescents: An Experimental Validation of the SCARE Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, D. Scott; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2003-01-01

    A study examined the validity of the SCARE program; an anger management program developed with high school students. Adolescents (n=207) exposed to the SCARE program had significantly lower levels of anger and aggression, slightly higher anger control, and lower scores on aggressive and violent attitudes a year after exposure. (Contains…

  2. Russian expats seek research reforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Over 170 Russian researchers working abroad have signed a letter addressed to the Russian president, Dmitry Medvedev, and prime minister Vladimir Putin raising concerns about "the catastrophic state of basic science" in the country. The letter, which appeared last month in the Moscow business paper Vedomosti, warns Russian leaders that unless urgent measures are implemented by the government, then science in the country may collapse.

  3. Russian electrometallurgy: Achievements, problems, prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utochkin, Yu. I.; Semin, A. E.

    2011-12-01

    The changes in the Russian metallurgy, in particular, electric furnace steelmaking, having occurred in the recent years are analyzed. The main increase in the steelmaking output is due to putting into operation of new electric furnaces in new miniworks and enterprises equipped earlier with open-hearth furnaces. Reaching the rated capacity of a furnace in Russia substantially lags behind foreign enterprises. Only 30-35% of the Russian market of corrosion-resistant steel are provided by Russian metal.

  4. When anger leads to aggression: induction of relative left frontal cortical activity with transcranial direct current stimulation increases the anger-aggression relationship.

    PubMed

    Hortensius, Ruud; Schutter, Dennis J L G; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2012-03-01

    The relationship between anger and aggression is imperfect. Based on work on the neuroscience of anger, we predicted that anger associated with greater relative left frontal cortical activation would be more likely to result in aggression. To test this hypothesis, we combined transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the frontal cortex with interpersonal provocation. Participants received insulting feedback after 15 min of tDCS and were able to aggress by administering noise blasts to the insulting participant. Individuals who received tDCS to increase relative left frontal cortical activity behaved more aggressively when they were angry. No relation between anger and aggression was observed in the increase relative right frontal cortical activity or sham condition. These results concur with the motivational direction model of frontal asymmetry, in which left frontal activity is associated with anger. We propose that anger with approach motivational tendencies is more likely to result in aggression. PMID:21421731

  5. Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Reduction of Persistent Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorenstein, Ethan E.; Tager, Felice A.; Shapiro, Peter A.; Monk, Catherine; Sloan, Richard P.

    2007-01-01

    Although persistent anger is not represented in "DSM-IV" as a psychiatric disorder, it is nevertheless a significant clinical problem. Based on our experience with both research and clinic patients from a diverse urban population, and drawing on methods utilized by others, we have refined and elaborated several treatment strategies that appear…

  6. Anger and Violence Prevention: Enhancing Treatment Effects through Booster Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Alysha; McWhirter, Paula T.; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of booster sessions on the maintenance of intervention gains following an anger management prevention program: "Student Created Aggression Replacement Education Program" ("SCARE"). Participants who had completed the "SCARE" program a year earlier were randomly assigned into either a booster…

  7. Social Support and Anger Expression among Incarcerated Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loper, Ann Booker; Gildea, Jennifer Whitney

    2004-01-01

    Incarcerated women at a maximum security state facility (N= 216) completed a questionnaire concerning their perceived social support within the prison, structured activities, and perceived support from prison surrogate families. A series of regression analyses evaluated the relationship between social support measures and anger, as measured by the…

  8. Addressing Anger Using Sensorimotor Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Sarah M.

    2010-01-01

    A young woman initiated counselling services at a community agency to address her explosive anger that was a remnant of childhood physical and emotional abuse. Sensorimotor psychotherapy was used to help this client learn how to monitor and regulate her sensorimotor processes. In conjunction with this approach, Cognitive behavioural therapy was…

  9. A Comprehensive Treatment Program for a Case of Disturbed Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGiuseppe, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    Santanello (2011) presented the case of a man with long-term anger problems who does not meet the criteria for any "DSM-IV-TR" diagnosis for treatment recommendations by several authors. This paper presents a comprehensive treatment package applied to this case. Of crucial importance is the building of a therapeutic alliance. In addition to…

  10. Anger after Childbirth: An Overlooked Reaction to Postpartum Stressors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Jennifer E.; Lobel, Marci; DeLuca, Robyn Stein

    2002-01-01

    Other than postpartum depression, little is known about women's emotional responses to childbirth and subsequent stressors. Anger was explored on the basis of theory and evidence that it is a likely emotional response in this context. During their third trimester of pregnancy and approximately six weeks after delivery, 163 participants completed…

  11. Effects of Habitual Anger on Employees’ Behavior during Organizational Change

    PubMed Central

    Bönigk, Mareike; Steffgen, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Organizational change is a particularly emotional event for those being confronted with it. Anger is a frequently experienced emotion under these conditions. This study analyses the influence of employees’ habitual anger reactions on their reported behavior during organizational change. It was explored whether anger reactions conducive to recovering or increasing individual well-being will enhance the likelihood of functional change behavior. Dysfunctional regulation strategies in terms of individual well-being are expected to decrease the likelihood of functional change behavior—mediated by the commitment to change. Four hundred and twelve employees of different organizations in Luxembourg undergoing organizational change participated in the study. Findings indicate that the anger regulation strategy venting, and humor increase the likelihood of deviant resistance to change. Downplaying the incident’s negative impact and feedback increase the likelihood of active support for change. The mediating effect of commitment to change has been found for humor and submission. The empirical findings suggest that a differentiated conceptualization of resistance to change is required. Specific implications for practical change management and for future research are discussed. PMID:24287849

  12. New Attacks on Animal Researchers Provoke Anger and Worry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guterman, Lila

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on firebomb attacks at the homes of two animal researchers which have provoked anger and unease. The firebomb attacks, which set the home of a neuroscientist at the University of California at Santa Cruz aflame and destroyed a car parked in the driveway of another university researcher's home, have left researchers and…

  13. Anger, preoccupied attachment, and domain disorganization in borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Jennifer Q.; Hill, Jonathan; Pilkonis, Paul A.; Yaggi, Kirsten; Broyden, Nichaela; Stepp, Stephanie; Reed, Lawrence Ian; Feske, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    Emotional dysregulation and attachment insecurity have been reported in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Domain disorganization, evidenced in poor regulation of emotions and behaviors in relation to the demands of different social domains, may be a distinguishing feature of BPD. Understanding the interplay between these factors may be critical for identifying interacting processes in BPD and potential subtypes of BPD. Therefore, we examined the joint and interactive effects of anger, preoccupied attachment, and domain disorganization on BPD traits in clinical sample of 128 psychiatric patients. The results suggest that these factors contribute to BPD both independently and in interaction, even when controlling for other personality disorder traits and Axis I symptoms. In regression analyses, the interaction between anger and domain disorganization predicted BPD traits. In recursive partitioning analyses, two possible paths to BPD were identified: high anger combined with high domain disorganization and low anger combined with preoccupied attachment. These results may suggest possible subtypes of BPD or possible mechanisms by which BPD traits are established and maintained. PMID:19538080

  14. Anger in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Parent's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Betty P. V.; Stephenson, Jennifer; Carter, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Anger related behaviours such as aggression are known to be an area of difficulty for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A national internet forum for parents of children with ASD was selected out of other similar forums from six English speaking countries. Information about the angry episodes of 121 children with ASD as described by…

  15. A Programme for Anger Management with Teenagers. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Neil; Findlay, Hazel

    This book describes a program of anger management for teenagers. Chapter 1 describes the OK Line, a strategy based on Rational Emotive Therapy (RET). The important concept in RET is: the way one thinks affects the way one feel, which affects what one does. If one is feeling angry and one's behavior is violent, then it becomes necessary to…

  16. Assessment of anger terms in Hebrew: a gender comparison.

    PubMed

    Sarid, Orly

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Appraisal of anger terms is based on past experience recollections, social norms, and gender roles. The objectives of this study were to find combinations of emotional components presented by a new composite variable that will exhibit differences between genders and differentiate between anger terms in Hebrew. The sample was comprised of forty students, Hebrew native speakers who participated in a web based study. Participants were asked to rate eight anger terms in Hebrew on a number of features that comprised five emotional components: subjective feelings states body reactions, expressions, action tendencies, and cognitive evaluations. A two-factor between-subjects multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was conducted. A simplified multivariate composite, defined as subjective experience minus regulation, explained 10% of the gender difference. Another simplified composite, which combines the additive effect of the subjective experience and the actions that accompany this emotional state, explained 14% of difference between the anger terms. The findings are discussed with respect to appraisal theory and social constructivist conceptualization. PMID:25590344

  17. Anger Management and Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamelin, Jeffery; Travis, Robert; Sturmey, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a systematic literature review of anger management in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). We identified 2 studies that used randomized controlled trials and 6 that used pretest-posttest nonequivalent control group designs. The mean between-group effect size was 1.52 for randomized controlled trials and 0.89 for the other…

  18. Principles of Empirically Supported Interventions Applied to Anger Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; Oetting, Eugene R.; DiGiuseppe, Raymond A.

    2002-01-01

    This article applies the Principles of Empirically Supported Interventions (PESI) in counseling psychology to anger management with adults. The review suggests that there is empirical support for cognitive-behavioral interventions generally and for four specific interventions (relaxation, cognitive, behavioral skill enhancement, and combinations…

  19. Anger Management 2: Counselors Strategies and Skills. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Eileen K.

    Many different strategies and skills for anger management intervention have been tried and tested. Some of the most empirically supported interventions are cognitive-behavioral interventions including relaxation coping skills, cognitive interventions, behavioral coping and social skills training, and problem-solving skills training. This digest…

  20. Anger in Middle School: The Solving Problems Together Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kimberly R.; Rushing, Jeri L.; Owens, Rachel B.

    2009-01-01

    Problem-focused interventions are considered to be one of the most effective group counseling strategies with adolescents. This article describes a problem-focused group counseling model, Solving Problems Together (SPT), with a small group of adolescent African American boys struggling with anger management. Adapted from the teaching philosophy of…

  1. Anger, PTSD, and the Nuclear Family: A Study of Cambodian Refugees

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Devon; Rasmussen, Andrew; Nou, Leakhena; Pollack, Mark; Mary-Jo, Good

    2009-01-01

    This study profiles the family-directed anger of traumatized Cambodian refugees, all survivors of the Pol Pot genocide (1975-1979), who were patients at a psychiatric clinic in Lowell, MA, USA. We focus on the nuclear family (NF) unit, the NF unit defined as the patient's “significant other” (i.e. spouse or boyfriend/girlfriend) and children. Survey data were collected from a convenience sample of 143 Cambodian refugee patients from October 2006 to August 2007. The study revealed that 48% (68/143) of the patients had anger directed toward a NF member in the last month, with anger directed toward children being particularly common (64 of the 143 patients, or 49% [64/131] of the patients with children). NF-type anger was severe, for example, almost always resulting in somatic arousal (e.g., causing palpitations in 91% [62/68] of the anger episodes) and often in trauma recall and fears of bodily dysfunction. Responses to open-ended questions revealed the causes of anger toward a significant other and children, the content of anger-associated trauma recall, and what patients did to gain relief from anger. A type of cultural gap, namely, a linguistic gap (i.e., the parent's lack of English language skills and the child's lack of Khmer language skills) seemingly played a role in generating conflict and anger. NF-type anger was associated with PTSD presence. The effect of anger on PTSD severity resulted in part from anger-associated trauma recall and fears of bodily dysfunction, with 54% of the variance in PTSD severity explained by that regression model. The study: 1) suggests that among traumatized refugees, family-related anger is a major clinical concern; 2) illustrates how family-related anger may be profiled and investigated in trauma-exposed populations; and 3) gives insights into how family-related anger is generated in such populations. PMID:19748169

  2. Clinical correlates of hwa-byung and a proposal for a new anger disorder.

    PubMed

    Min, Sung Kil

    2008-09-01

    This paper reviewed the studies on hwa-byung (HB), which literally means anger disorder and this is known as the culture-related chronic anger syndrome of Koreans. Based on these studies and a review of the literature on the anger syndromes of other cultures, I have proposed a new anger disorder. The rationale for this proposition is first that the clinical correlates of HB, including the epidemiological data, the etiological factors, the symptoms and the clinical course, are unique and different from those of the depressive disorders, which have been postulated to be similar to HB. Second, the symptoms of HB are characterized by pent-up anger and somatic and behavioral symptoms related to the release and suppression of anger. Third, a group of patients with only HB and who visit psychiatrists for treatment have been identified. Fourth, anger is thought to be the basic target of treatment for HB patients. Last, anger syndromes like HB have been identified, with various names, in other cultures. By reducing the cultural variation of HB and integrating the common clinical correlates of the syndromes related to anger, a new anger disorder for the mood of anger can be conceptualized, like that for other mood disorders for the corresponding pathological moods. The research diagnostic criteria for HB and the new anger disorder are also suggested. I propose that the new anger disorder to be included in the new international classification system as a member of the larger family of mood disorders. International collaborative studies are needed not only to identify such anger disorder in various cultures, but also to explore giving better treatment to these patients based on the bio-psycho-social model of anger disorder. PMID:20046356

  3. Clinical Correlates of Hwa-Byung and a Proposal for a New Anger Disorder

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviewed the studies on hwa-byung (HB), which literally means anger disorder and this is known as the culture-related chronic anger syndrome of Koreans. Based on these studies and a review of the literature on the anger syndromes of other cultures, I have proposed a new anger disorder. The rationale for this proposition is first that the clinical correlates of HB, including the epidemiological data, the etiological factors, the symptoms and the clinical course, are unique and different from those of the depressive disorders, which have been postulated to be similar to HB. Second, the symptoms of HB are characterized by pent-up anger and somatic and behavioral symptoms related to the release and suppression of anger. Third, a group of patients with only HB and who visit psychiatrists for treatment have been identified. Fourth, anger is thought to be the basic target of treatment for HB patients. Last, anger syndromes like HB have been identified, with various names, in other cultures. By reducing the cultural variation of HB and integrating the common clinical correlates of the syndromes related to anger, a new anger disorder for the mood of anger can be conceptualized, like that for other mood disorders for the corresponding pathological moods. The research diagnostic criteria for HB and the new anger disorder are also suggested. I propose that the new anger disorder to be included in the new international classification system as a member of the larger family of mood disorders. International collaborative studies are needed not only to identify such anger disorder in various cultures, but also to explore giving better treatment to these patients based on the bio-psycho-social model of anger disorder. PMID:20046356

  4. Others' Anger Makes People Work Harder Not Smarter: The Effect of Observing Anger and Sarcasm on Creative and Analytic Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miron-Spektor, Ella; Efrat-Treister, Dorit; Rafaeli, Anat; Schwarz-Cohen, Orit

    2011-01-01

    The authors examine whether and how observing anger influences thinking processes and problem-solving ability. In 3 studies, the authors show that participants who listened to an angry customer were more successful in solving analytic problems, but less successful in solving creative problems compared with participants who listened to an…

  5. Relationship between gender role, anger expression, thermal discomfort and sleep onset latency in women

    PubMed Central

    von Arb, Mariella; Gompper, Britta; Meyer, Andrea H; Stutz, Elisabeth Zemp; Orgül, Selim; Flammer, Josef; Kräuchi, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Background Women with thermal discomfort from cold extremities (hands and feet; TDCE) often suffer from prolonged sleep onset latency (SOL). Suppressed anger could contribute to the genesis of both TDCE and prolonged SOL. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis whether stereotypic feminine gender socialization (SFGS) is related to anger suppression (experienced anger inwards, Anger-In), which in turn could affect TDCE and SOL. Methods 148 women, a sub-sample of a larger survey carried out in the Canton Basel-Stadt (Switzerland), sent back detailed postal questionnaires about SOL, TDCE, anger expression (STAXI, state -trait -anger -expression -inventory) and SFGS using a gender power inventory, estimating the degree of gender specific power expression explicitly within women by stereotypic feminine or male attribution. Statistics was performed by path analysis. Results A significant direct path was found from stereotypic feminine attribution to Anger-In and prolonged SOL. Additionally, a further indirect path from Anger-In via TDCE to SOL was found. In contrast, stereotypic male attribution was not related to Anger-In but was significantly associated with outwardly expressed anger. Limitations Self-reported data, retrospective cross-sectional survey, prospective studies are required including physiological measurements. Conclusion Stereotypic feminine gender socialization may play an important determinant for anger suppression, which subsequently can lead to thermal discomfort from cold extremities and prolonged sleep onset latency. PMID:19825177

  6. Daily Associations among Anger Experience and Intimate Partner Aggression within Aggressive and Nonaggressive Community Couples

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Cory A.; Testa, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Anger is an empirically established precipitant to aggressive responding toward intimate partners. The current investigation examined the effects of anger, as experienced by both partners, as well as gender and previous aggression, on in vivo intimate partner aggression using a prospective daily diary methodology. Participants (N = 118 couples) individually provided 56 consecutive, daily reports of affective experience and partner aggression. Multilevel models were estimated using the Actor Partner Interdependence Model framework to analyze the daily associations between anger and partner aggression perpetration among male and female participants as moderated by aggression history. Results revealed that both Actor and Partner anger were generally associated with subsequently reported daily conflict. Further, increases in daily Partner anger were associated with corresponding increases in partner aggression among females who reported high anger and males, regardless of their own anger experience. Increases in Actor anger were associated with increases in daily partner aggression only among previously aggressive females. Previously aggressive males and females consistently reported greater perpetration than their nonaggressive counterparts on days of high Actor anger experience. Results emphasize the importance of both Actor and Partner factors in partner aggression and suggest that female anger may be a stronger predictor of both female-to-male and male-to-female partner aggression than male anger, when measured at the daily level. PMID:24866529

  7. Prevalence and Correlates of Anger in the Community: Results from a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Mayumi; Picazo, Julia; Olfson, Mark; Hasin, Deborah S.; Liu, Shang-Min; Bernardi, Silvia; Blanco, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about the prevalence and correlates of anger in the community. Methods We used data derived from a large national sample of the United States population which included more than 34,000 adults ages 18 years and older. We defined inappropriate, intense, or poorly controlled anger by means of self-report of: 1) anger that was triggered by small things or that was difficult to control; 2) frequent temper outbursts or anger that lead to loss of control; or 3) hitting people or throwing objects in anger. Results The overall prevalence of inappropriate, intense, or poorly controlled anger in the U.S. population was 7.8%. Anger was especially common among men and younger adults, and was associated with decreased psychosocial functioning. Significant and positive associations were evident between anger and parental factors, childhood, and adulthood adverse events. There were strong associations between anger and bipolar disorder, drug dependence, psychotic disorder, borderline, and schizotypal personality disorders. There was a dose-response relationship between anger and a broad range of psychopathology. Conclusions A rationale exists for developing screening tools and early intervention strategies, especially for young adults, to identify and help reduce anger. PMID:25831968

  8. Peeking into the black box: mechanisms of action for anger management treatment.

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, Margaret-Anne; Morland, Leslie A; Frueh, B Christopher; Greene, Carolyn J; Rosen, Craig S

    2014-10-01

    We investigated potential mechanisms of action for anger symptom reductions, specifically, the roles of anger regulation skills and therapeutic alliance on changes in anger symptoms, following group anger management treatment (AMT) among combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Data were drawn from a published randomized controlled trial of AMT conducted with a racially diverse group of 109 veterans with PTSD and anger symptoms residing in Hawaii. Results of latent growth curve models indicated that gains in calming skills predicted significantly larger reductions in anger symptoms at post-treatment, while the development of cognitive coping and behavioral control skills did not predict greater symptom reductions. Therapeutic alliance had indirect effects on all outcomes mostly via arousal calming skills. Results suggest that generalized symptom reduction may be mediated by development of skills in calming physiological arousal. In addition, arousal reduction skills appeared to enhance one's ability to employ other anger regulation skills. PMID:25124505

  9. Time course of anger and other emotions in women with borderline personality disorder: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Gitta A; Guenzler, Cindy; Zimmermann, Sabine; Scheel, Corinna N; Rüsch, Nicolas; Leonhart, Rainer; Nerb, Josef; Lieb, Klaus

    2008-09-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by emotional dysregulation including strong emotional reactions to emotional stimuli and a slow return to baseline emotions. Difficulties controlling anger are particularly prominent in BPD. To experimentally test emotional dysregulation with a special focus on anger, we investigated whether a standardized anger induction by a short story caused stronger and prolonged anger reactions in women with BPD (n=27) as compared to female healthy controls (n=26) and whether other emotions were affected by the anger induction. Although the anger reaction was not stronger in the BPD group, it was significantly prolonged. The BPD group showed also stronger negative emotions over the whole experiment. The study is the first to demonstrate prolonged anger reactions in BPD patients in an experimental setting. PMID:18171575

  10. An Analysis of Anger in Adolescent Girls Who Practice the Martial Arts

    PubMed Central

    Lotfian, Sara; Ziaee, Vahid; Amini, Homayoun; Mansournia, Mohammad-Ali

    2011-01-01

    The effect of martial arts on adolescents' behavior, especially aggression, is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess and compare anger ratings among adolescent girl athletes of different martial arts. 291 female adolescents between the ages of 11 and 19 were assessed according to the Adolescent Anger Rating Scale designed by DM Burney. In the case group, the martial arts practiced were either judo (n = 70) or karate (n = 66), while the control group was composed of swimmers (n = 59) and nonathletes (n = 96). Total anger scores showed statistically significant differences between the groups (P = 0.001) decreasing from girls who practiced judo to nonathletes, karate, and swimmers. Instrumental and reactive anger subscales also showed significant differences between the groups, but this difference was not found for anger control. As a conclusion, the anger rate did not differ between judoka and nonathletes, but that both of these groups received higher scores in total anger than karateka and swimmers. PMID:22164178

  11. Indigenous Adoption of Novaco's Model of Anger Management Among Individuals with Psychiatric Problems in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Naz, Sumara; Khalily, Muhammad Tahir

    2016-04-01

    The present study was designed to indigenously adopt Novaco's model of anger management and examine its efficacy among individuals with psychiatric problems in Pakistan. For the assessment of anger and psychiatric problems, Urdu-translated versions of Novaco Anger Inventory (NAI), Anger Self-Report Questionnaire (ASR) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale were used. A sample of 100 individuals was divided into two groups: a treatment group (received the indigenously adopted model of anger management) and a control group (received general counseling). Results of mixed repeated-measures ANOVA revealed that individuals in the treatment group significantly (p < .01) scored lower on the NAI and ASR (at post-assessment) as compared to the control group. Therefore, the indigenous model of anger management was shown to be more effective than general counseling for anger management. PMID:25667104

  12. Young Chinese Children's Anger and Distress: Emotion Category and Intensity Identified by the Time Course of Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Jie; Qiu, Peihua; Park, Ka Young; Xu, Qinmei; Potegal, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A hierarchical cluster analysis of the time course of the videotaped reactions of 75 Chinese 2-4-year olds to mothers' toy-removal identified Distress, Low Anger, and High Anger behavior clusters. Anger often begins at low intensity; some children then escalate. The face-validity of Low and High Anger-cluster classifications was supported in…

  13. Profiles of Anger Control in Second-Grade Children: Examination of Self-Report, Observational, and Physiological Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Marissa; Hubbard, Julie A.; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The current study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to examine anger control in 257 second-grade children (approximately 8 years of age). Anger was induced through losing a game and prize to a confederate who cheated. Three components of anger control were assessed: self-report of awareness of anger, observed intensity of angry facial…

  14. Examining the Links between Strain, Situational and Dispositional Anger, and Crime: Further Specifying and Testing General Strain Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Paul; Piquero, Alex R.; Capowich, George E.

    2003-01-01

    Explored whether relationships between strain, anger, and deviant outcomes varied when using trait- or situational-based measures of anger, noting whether people with higher trait anger had increased likelihood of experiencing strain, becoming angry from strain, and responding deviantly. Relying on trait-based static indicators of anger was…

  15. The Beliefs, Attitudes and Views of University Students about Anger and the Effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Oriented Anger Control and Anxiety Management Programs on Their Anger Management Skill Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karahan, T. Fikret; Yalçin, B. Murat; Erbas, Melda M.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed as a qualitative focus group using a randomized controlled trail with a mixed methodology. The study has dual aims. First we searched the beliefs, attitudes and views of 176 university students on how to deal with anger using eight focus discussion groups. The anxiety and anger levels of these students were investigated…

  16. Varieties of Anger and the Inverse Link between Education and Inflammation: Toward an Integrative Framework

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Jennifer Morozink; Ryff, Carol D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine multiple aspects of anger experience and expression (frequency, outward expression, suppression, control) as moderators of the association of social inequality as measured by educational status with inflammation and coagulation markers. Methods Following survey assessments via telephone and mail, MIDUS (Midlife in the U.S.) respondents (N = 1,054) participated in an overnight clinic visit, where they completed anger questionnaires and provided a fasting blood sample to measure IL-6, C-reactive protein (CRP), and fibrinogen. Results Educational status was linked to higher anger-control among men (B = .14, p = .001). Significant inverse correlations emerged between education and IL-6, CRP, and fibrinogen (r's ≥ -.09, p's < .004) and between anger-control and IL-6 and CRP (r's = -.07, p's <. 03). Controlling for demographic and health status covariates, anger-in predicted lower fibrinogen (p = .031). Interactions between education and anger measures were significant for education and trait anger as related to fibrinogen (p = .023), education and anger-out as related to IL-6 (p = 0.05) and fibrinogen (p = .05). As predicted, the inverse relationships between education and IL-6 and fibrinogen were stronger among individuals reporting high anger. Anger-control also moderated the association of education with IL-6 in women (p = .026), such that the link between education and IL-6 was attenuated among women with high anger-control. Conclusion Varieties of anger moderated educational gradients in inflammation: The inverse relationships between education and inflammation markers were strongest among individuals with high anger, and were attenuated among those with high anger control. PMID:23766379

  17. Clearing the Air: A Qualitative Investigation of Genetic Counselors' Experiences of Counselor-Focused Patient Anger.

    PubMed

    Schema, Lynn; McLaughlin, Michaela; Veach, Patricia McCarthy; LeRoy, Bonnie S

    2015-10-01

    Patient anger is challenging for healthcare professionals to manage, particularly when it is directed at them. This study comprises the first in-depth investigation of genetic counselors' experiences with patient anger. Using a brief survey and interview methods, this study explored prevalence and context of patient anger directed at the genetic counselor, how genetic counselors manage patient anger directed at them, and possible thematic differences due to genetic counseling experience. Individuals enrolled in the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) listserv were invited to participate in a study of their experiences with patient anger directed at them. A majority of survey respondents (95.7 %, 243/254) reported experiencing patient anger directed at them, and 19.4 % reported having feared for their safety because of patient anger. Twenty-two survey respondents were purposively selected to participate in individual interviews. Inductive and cross case analysis yielded prevalent themes concerning patient triggers for anger, including bad news, logistical mishaps, and perceived counselor characteristics. Interview results further suggest unaddressed patient anger negatively affected patient and counselor emotional well-being and hindered genetic counseling goals. Prevalent challenges included genetic counselor attempts to accurately recognize, understand, and effectively manage patient anger without taking it personally. Commonly recommended strategies for addressing anger were empathy (i.e., understanding origins of patient anger), anticipating and acknowledging anger, maintaining personal, professional and legal protection, and debriefing with colleagues. Themes were quite similar across counselor experience levels. The findings underscore the importance of training and continuing education regarding patient anger. Additional findings, practice implications, and research recommendations are presented. PMID:25651823

  18. Russian Lunar Space Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyi, Lev; Petrukovich, Anatoly; Khartov, Victor V.; Dolgopolov, Vladimir; Mitrofanov, Igor; Martunov, M.; Lukianchikov, A.; Shevchenko, Vladislav

    Russia had a great number of “firsts” in Lunar Studies (first soft landing, first pictures of the dark side of the moon, first sample return, first rover). Now after a long break the focus of Russian Space Program is again aimed to the lunar science investigations. These investigations have two aims: 1) to get answers to a principal questions of lunar formation and evolution, search for volatiles and regions with subsurface lunar permafrost, studies of lunar dust, electrostatic fields and magnetic anomalies. 2) Preparation to Lunar Exploration stage and search for most promising sites for future lunar habitable scientific stations. First stage of Russian Lunar program during this decade of 2 Lunar includes launches Landers and one Lunar orbiter, discussed in a preceding talks. Further steps during the next decade are related, first of all, with the cryogenic lunar sample return from a certain locations, hear South (or North ) poles, which according to the analysis of orbital observations are enriched by the subsurface water ice inclusions. Next steps, which are planned now are transitional to the exploration stage: delivery of a “ heavy rover“ to the specific site (thoroughly investigated during previous stages), accomplishment of technological experiments on the mitigation of lunar dust and space radiation hazards, simple initial experiments on radioastronomy and cosmic ray studies. It is a long and complicated path to go and quite naturally Russia considers that all important steps on this way will be done in international partnership.

  19. Anger, and plasma lipid, lipoprotein, and glucose levels in healthy women: the mediating role of physical fitness.

    PubMed

    Siegman, Aron Wolfe; Malkin, Amy R; Boyle, Stephen; Vaitkus, Mark; Barko, William; Franco, Edward

    2002-02-01

    The association between anger, lipid profiles, and glucose levels were examined in this study of 103 middle aged, healthy women. A principal component factor analysis of Spielberger's Trait Anger and Anger Expression scales yielded two anger factors: Impulsive Anger-Out and Neurotic Anger. Impulsive anger-out significantly predicted a negative lipid profile (high total serum cholesterol (TSC), low density lipoproteins (LDL), TSC/HDL (high density lipids), and triglyceride levels) and heightened glucose levels, but only in physically unfit women. Neurotic anger did not predict lipid and glucose levels. These findings parallel previous findings regarding the two anger dimensions and CHD, with only impulsive anger-out predicting CHD. Furthermore, our findings indicate that the protective effect of physical fitness, previously documented for men, also occurs in women. PMID:11845555

  20. Population heterogeneity of trait anger and differential associations of trait anger facets with borderline personality features, neuroticism, depression, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and alcohol problems.

    PubMed

    Lubke, Gitta H; Ouwens, Klaasjan G; de Moor, Marleen H M; Trull, Timothy J; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2015-12-15

    Anger is an emotion consisting of feelings of variable intensity ranging from mild irritation to intense fury. High levels of trait anger are associated with a range of psychiatric, interpersonal, and health problems. The objectives of this study were to explore heterogeneity of anger as measured by the Spielberger Trait Anger Scale (STAS), and to assess the association of the different anger facets with a selection of psychiatric disorders covering externalizing and internalizing problems, personality disorders, and substance use. Factor mixture models differentiated between a high and low scoring class (28% vs. 72%), and between three factors (anger-temperament, anger-reaction, and immediacy of an anger response). Whereas all psychiatric scales correlated significantly with the STAS total score, regressing the three STAS factors on psychiatric behaviors model showed a more detailed pattern. Only borderline affect instability and depression were significantly associated with all three factors in both classes whereas other problem behaviors were associated only with 1 or 2 of the factors. Alcohol problems were associated with immediacy only in the high scoring class, indicating a non-linear relation in the total sample. Taking into account these more specific associations is likely to be beneficial when investigating differential treatment strategies. PMID:26454404

  1. A thick anger camera for gamma-ray astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, W.R.; Finger, M.; Prince, T.A.

    1985-02-01

    The NaI(T1) Anger camera is a natural candidate for a position sensitive detector in imaging of astrophysical ..gamma..-ray sources. Here we present laboratory measurements of the response of a relatively thick (5.1 cm) NaI(T1) Anger camera designed for coded aperture imaging in the 50 keV to 2 MeV energy range. We obtained a position resolution of 10.5 mm FWHM at 122 keV and 6.3 mm FWHM at 662 keV. The energy resolution was 7% FWHM at 662 keV. We discuss the ability of the detector to resolve the depth of the ..gamma..-ray interaction and the use of this depth resolution to reduce back-incident and internal background.

  2. Differential effects of trait anger on optimism and risk behaviour.

    PubMed

    Pietruska, Karin; Armony, Jorge L

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that angry people exhibit optimistic risk estimates about future events and, consequently, are biased towards making risk-seeking choices. The goal of this study was to directly test the hypothesised effect of trait anger on optimism and risk-taking behaviour. One hundred healthy volunteers completed questionnaires about personality traits, optimism and risk behaviour. In addition their risk tendency was assessed with the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), which provides an online measure of risk behaviour. Our results partly confirmed the relation between trait anger and outcome expectations of future life events, but suggest that this optimism does not necessarily translate into actual risk-seeking behaviour. PMID:22780446

  3. A thick Anger camera for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. R.; Finger, M.; Prince, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    The NaI(Tl) Anger camera is a natural candidate for a position sensitive detector in imaging of astrophysical gamma-ray sources. Here laboratory measurements are presented of the response of a relatively thick (5.1 cm) NaI(Tl) Anger camera designed for coded aperture imaging in the 50 keV to 2 MeV energy range. A position resolution of 10.5 mm FWHM at 122 keV and 6.3 mm FWHM at 662 keV. The energy resolution was 7 percent FWHM at 662 keV. The ability of the detector to resolve the depth of the gamma-ray interaction and the use of this depth resolution to reduce back-incident and internal background is discussed.

  4. Emotion Knowledge and Attentional Differences in Preschoolers Showing Context-Inappropriate Anger.

    PubMed

    Locke, Robin L; Lang, Nichole J

    2016-08-01

    Some children show anger inappropriate for the situation based on the predominant incentives, which is called context-inappropriate anger. Children need to attend to and interpret situational incentives for appropriate emotional responses. We examined associations of context-inappropriate anger with emotion recognition and attention problems in 43 preschoolers (42% male; M age = 55.1 months, SD = 4.1). Parents rated context-inappropriate anger across situations. Teachers rated attention problems using the Child Behavior Checklist-Teacher Report Form. Emotion recognition was ability to recognize emotional faces using the Emotion Matching Test. Anger perception bias was indicated by anger to non-anger situations using an adapted Affect Knowledge Test. 28% of children showed context-inappropriate anger, which correlated with lower emotion recognition (β = -.28) and higher attention problems (β = .36). Higher attention problems correlated with more anger perception bias (β = .32). This cross-sectional, correlational study provides preliminary findings that children with context-inappropriate anger showed more attention problems, which suggests that both "problems" tend to covary and associate with deficits or biases in emotion knowledge. PMID:27417387

  5. Educational Status, Anger, and Inflammation in the MIDUS National Sample: Does Race Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Jennifer Morozink; Lewis, Tené T.; Coe, Christopher L.; Ryff, Carol D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Racial differences in anger frequency and expression styles have been found. Further, African Americans receive fewer health benefits from higher education than Whites. Purpose To investigate racial differences in how anger moderates the association between education and inflammation. Methods Midlife in the U.S. (MIDUS) participants (N = 1,200; 43.0% male; 18.5% African American) provided education and anger data via survey assessments. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and fibrinogen were determined from a fasting blood sample following an overnight clinic visit. Results African Americans reported higher anger-out, IL-6, and fibrinogen and lower anger-control than Whites. Anger-out predicted higher IL-6 and fibrinogen among African Americans with higher education, whereas trait anger and anger-out predicted lower fibrinogen among Whites with higher education. Anger-out marginally predicted higher IL-6 in less educated Whites. Conclusions Findings underscore racial differences in the benefits and consequences of educational attainment, and how social inequities and anger are manifest in inflammatory physiology. PMID:25715901

  6. COMT but not serotonin-related genes modulates the influence of childhood abuse on anger traits

    PubMed Central

    Perroud, Nader; Jaussent, Isabelle; Guillaume, Sébastien; Bellivier, Frank; Baud, Patrick; Jollant, Fabrice; Leboyer, Marion; Lewis, Cathryn; Malafosse, Alain; Courtet, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Anger-related traits are regulated by genes as well as early environmental factors. Both childhood maltreatment and genes underlie vulnerability to suicidal behaviors, possibly by affecting the constitution of intermediate phenotypes such as anger traits. The aim of this study was to test the interaction between nine candidate genes and childhood maltreatment in modulating anger-related traits in 875 adult suicide attempters. The State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire were used to examine anger traits and traumatic childhood experiences respectively. The functional polymorphism of the catecholamine-O-methyl-transferase (COMT) gene Val158Met significantly modulated the association between sexual abuse and anger-trait level (p=0.001). In the presence of sexual abuse, individuals carrying the Val high-activity allele displayed greater disposition towards anger than individuals homozygous for the Met allele (p=0.0003). Notably, none of the serotonin-related genes influenced the effect of childhood abuse on anger traits. The results of the present study suggest that anger-trait level is influenced by the interaction between childhood abuse and functional polymorphism in the COMT gene. This study was carried out in a population with a high frequency of childhood abuse and a high disposition towards anger, and replication in healthy subjects is needed. PMID:20002200

  7. The mediating role of anger in the relationship between PTSD symptoms and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Ateka A; Armour, Cherie; Wang, Xin; Forbes, David; Elhai, Jon D

    2015-03-01

    Research indicates a significant relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anger (Olatunji, Ciesielski, & Tolin, 2010; Orth & Wieland, 2006). Individuals may seek urgent coping to deal with the distress of anger, which is a mobilizing and action-oriented emotion (Novaco & Chemtob, 2002); possibly in the form of impulsive actions consistent with impulsivity's association with anger (Milligan & Waller, 2001; Whiteside & Lynam, 2001). This could be 1 of the explanations for the relationship between PTSD and impulsivity (Kotler, Julian, Efront, & Amir, 2001; Ledgerwood & Petry, 2006). The present study assessed the mediating role of anger between PTSD (overall scores and subscales of arousal and negative alterations in mood/cognitions) and impulsivity, using gender as a covariate of impulsivity. The PTSD Checklist for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5), Dimensions of Anger Reaction scale-5, and the UPPS Impulsivity Scale were administered to a sample of 244 undergraduate students with a trauma history. Results based on 1000 bootstrapped samples indicated significant direct effects of PTSD (overall and 2 subscales) on anger, of anger on impulsivity, and of PTSD (overall and 2 subscales) on impulsivity. Further, anger significantly mediated the relationship between PTSD (overall and 2 subscales) and impulsivity, consistent with the hypothesized models. Results suggest that impulsivity aims at coping with distressing anger, possibly explaining the presence of substance usage, and other impulsive behaviors in people with PTSD. Further, anger probably serves as a mobilizing and action-oriented emotion coupled with PTSD symptoms. PMID:25793689

  8. Anger in brain and body: the neural and physiological perturbation of decision-making by emotion.

    PubMed

    Garfinkel, Sarah N; Zorab, Emma; Navaratnam, Nakulan; Engels, Miriam; Mallorquí-Bagué, Núria; Minati, Ludovico; Dowell, Nicholas G; Brosschot, Jos F; Thayer, Julian F; Critchley, Hugo D

    2016-01-01

    Emotion and cognition are dynamically coupled to bodily arousal: the induction of anger, even unconsciously, can reprioritise neural and physiological resources toward action states that bias cognitive processes. Here we examine behavioural, neural and bodily effects of covert anger processing and its influence on cognition, indexed by lexical decision-making. While recording beat-to-beat blood pressure, the words ANGER or RELAX were presented subliminally just prior to rapid word/non-word reaction-time judgements of letter-strings. Subliminal ANGER primes delayed the time taken to reach rapid lexical decisions, relative to RELAX primes. However, individuals with high trait anger were speeded up by subliminal anger primes. ANGER primes increased systolic blood pressure and the magnitude of this increase predicted reaction time prolongation. Within the brain, ANGER trials evoked an enhancement of activity within dorsal pons and an attenuation of activity within visual occipitotemporal and attentional parietal cortices. Activity within periaqueductal grey matter, occipital and parietal regions increased linearly with evoked blood pressure changes, indicating neural substrates through which covert anger impairs semantic decisions, putatively through its expression as visceral arousal. The behavioural and physiological impact of anger states compromises the efficiency of cognitive processing through action-ready changes in autonomic response that skew regional neural activity. PMID:26253525

  9. Anger problems and posttraumatic stress disorder in male and female National Guard and Reserve Service members.

    PubMed

    Worthen, Miranda; Rathod, Sujit D; Cohen, Gregory; Sampson, Laura; Ursano, Robert; Gifford, Robert; Fullerton, Carol; Galea, Sandro; Ahern, Jennifer

    2014-08-01

    Anger is a common problem among veterans and has been associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study aimed to improve understanding of how anger and PTSD co-occur by examining gender differences and differences by whether the triggering traumatic event is deployment-related vs. civilian-related in current service members. A representative cohort of Reserve and National Guard service personnel (n = 1293) were interviewed to assess for deployment- or civilian-related traumas, PTSD, and anger. The prevalence of self-reported anger problems was estimated among male (n = 1036) and female (n = 257) service members. Log Poisson regression models with robust standard errors were used to estimate the associations of problems with anger with PTSD and PTSD symptom severity for men and women. Self-reported anger problems were common among male (53.0%) and female (51.3%) service members. Adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) showed associations between anger and PTSD connected to both civilian- and deployment-related traumas (PR were 1.77 (95% CI 1.52-2.05) and 1.85 (95% CI 1.62-2.12), respectively). PTSD symptom severity was also associated with anger. This study was cross-sectional and so a causal relationship between PTSD and anger cannot be established. Problems with anger are common among male and female current Guard and Reserve members. These findings suggest that anger treatment should be made available to current service members and that clinicians should assess anger problems irrespective of gender. Future research should examine the effectiveness of anger treatment protocols by gender. PMID:24755257

  10. Anger Problems and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Male and Female National Guard and Reserve Service Members

    PubMed Central

    Worthen, Miranda; Rathod, Sujit D.; Cohen, Gregory; Sampson, Laura; Ursano, Robert; Gifford, Robert; Fullerton, Carol; Galea, Sandro; Ahern, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Anger is a common problem among veterans and has been associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study aimed to improve understanding of how anger and PTSD co-occur by examining gender differences and differences by whether the triggering traumatic event is deployment-related vs. civilian-related in current service members. A representative cohort of Reserve and National Guard service personnel (n = 1,293) were interviewed to assess for deployment- or civilian-related traumas, PTSD, and anger. The prevalence of self-reported anger problems was estimated among male (n = 1,036) and female (n = 257) service members. Log Poisson regression models with robust standard errors were used to estimate the associations of problems with anger with PTSD and PTSD symptom severity for men and women. Self-reported anger problems were common among male (53.0%) and female (51.3%) service members. Adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) showed associations between anger and PTSD connected to both civilian- and deployment-related traumas (PR were 1.77 (95% CI 1.52 – 2.05) and 1.85 (95% CI 1.62 – 2.12), respectively). PTSD symptom severity was also associated with anger. This study was cross-sectional and so a causal relationship between PTSD and anger cannot be established. Problems with anger are common among male and female current Guard and Reserve members. These findings suggest that anger treatment should be made available to current service members and that clinicians should assess anger problems irrespective of gender. Future research should examine the effectiveness of anger treatment protocols by gender. PMID:24755257

  11. Secure Base Priming Diminishes Conflict-Based Anger and Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Donald G; Lane, René A; Koren, Tamara; Bartholomew, Kim

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the impact of a visual representation of a secure base (i.e. a secure base prime) on attenuating experimentally produced anger and anxiety. Specifically, we examined the assuaging of negative emotions through exposure to an image of a mother-infant embrace or a heterosexual couple embracing. Subjects seated at a computer terminal rated their affect (Pre Affect) using the Affect Adjective Checklist (AAC) then listened to two sets of intense two person conflicts. After the first conflict exposure they rated affect again (Post 1 AAC). Following the second exposure they saw a blank screen (control condition), pictures of everyday objects (distraction condition) or a photo of two people embracing (Secure Base Prime condition). They then reported emotions using the Post 2 AAC. Compared to either control or distraction subjects, Secure Base Prime (SBP) subjects reported significantly less anger and anxiety. These results were then replicated using an internet sample with control, SBP and two new controls: Smiling Man (to control for expression of positive affect) and Cold Mother (an unsmiling mother with infant). The SBP amelioration of anger and anxiety was replicated with the internet sample. No control groups produced this effect, which was generated only by a combination of positive affect in a physically embracing dyad. The results are discussed in terms of attachment theory and research on spreading activation. PMID:27606897

  12. Russian Orthography and Learning to Read

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerek, Eugenia; Niemi, Pekka

    2009-01-01

    The unique structure of Russian orthography may influence the organization and acquisition of reading skills in Russian. The present review examines phonemic-graphemic correspondences in Russian orthography and discusses its grain-size units and possible difficulties for beginning readers and writers. Russian orthography is governed by a…

  13. Maternal Depression and Trait Anger as Risk Factors for Escalated Physical Discipline

    PubMed Central

    Shay, Nicole L.; Knutson, John F.

    2008-01-01

    To test the hypothesized anger-mediated relation between maternal depression and escalation of physical discipline, 122 economically disadvantaged mothers were assessed for current and lifetime diagnoses of depression using the Current Depressive Episode, Past Depression, and Dysthymia sections of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and a measure of current depressive symptoms, the Beck Depression Inventory–Second Edition (BDI-II). Escalation of physical discipline was assessed using a video analog parenting task; maternal anger not specific to discipline was assessed using the Spielberger Trait Anger Expression Inventory. Reports of anger were associated with the diagnosis of depression and depressive symptoms. Bootstrap analyses of indirect effects indicated that the link between depression and escalated discipline was mediated by anger. Parallel analyses based on BDI-II scores identified a marginally significant indirect effect of depression on discipline. Findings suggest that anger and irritability are central to the putative link between depression and harsh discipline. PMID:18174347

  14. Assessing anger regulation in middle childhood: development and validation of a behavioral observation measure

    PubMed Central

    Rohlf, Helena L.; Krahé, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    An observational measure of anger regulation in middle childhood was developed that facilitated the in situ assessment of five maladaptive regulation strategies in response to an anger-eliciting task. 599 children aged 6–10 years (M = 8.12, SD = 0.92) participated in the study. Construct validity of the measure was examined through correlations with parent- and self-reports of anger regulation and anger reactivity. Criterion validity was established through links with teacher-rated aggression and social rejection measured by parent-, teacher-, and self-reports. The observational measure correlated significantly with parent- and self-reports of anger reactivity, whereas it was unrelated to parent- and self-reports of anger regulation. It also made a unique contribution to predicting aggression and social rejection. PMID:25964767

  15. Anger on the internet: the perceived value of rant-sites.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ryan C; Coyier, Kelsey Ryan; VanSistine, Leah M; Schroeder, Kelly L

    2013-02-01

    Despite evidence that anger is routinely expressed over the Internet via weblogs, social networking Web sites, and other venues, no published research has explored the way in which anger is experienced and expressed online. Consequently, we know very little about how anger is experienced in such settings. Two studies were conducted to explore how people experience and express their anger on a particular type of Web site, known as a rant-site. Study 1 surveyed rant-site visitors to better understand the perceived value of the Web sites and found that while they become relaxed immediately after posting, they also experience more anger than most and express their anger in maladaptive ways. Study 2 explored the emotional impact of reading and writing rants and found that for most participants, reading and writing rants were associated with negative shifts in mood. PMID:23249241

  16. Anger Expression and Ill-Health in Two Cultures: An Examination of Inflammation and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kitayama, Shinobu; Park, Jiyoung; Boylan, Jennifer Morozink; Miyamoto, Yuri; Levine, Cynthia S.; Markus, Hazel Rose; Karasawa, Mayumi; Coe, Christopher L.; Kawakami, Norito; Love, Gayle D.; Ryff, Carol D.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of anger is associated with biological health risk (BHR) in Western cultures. However, recent evidence documenting culturally divergent functions of anger expression suggests that the link between anger expression and BHR may be moderated by culture. To test this prediction, we examined large probability samples of both Japanese and Americans with multiple measures of BHR including pro-inflammatory markers (Interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein) and indices of cardiovascular malfunction (systolic blood pressure and Total/HDL cholesterol ratio). We found that the positive link between anger expression and increased BHR was robust for Americans. As predicted, however, this association was diametrically reversed for Japanese, with anger expression predicting reduced BHR. The pattern was unique to the expressive facet of anger and remained after controlling for age, gender, health status, health behaviors, social status, and reported experience of negative emotions. Implications for socio-cultural modulation of bio-physiological responses are discussed. PMID:25564521

  17. Assessing anger regulation in middle childhood: development and validation of a behavioral observation measure.

    PubMed

    Rohlf, Helena L; Krahé, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    An observational measure of anger regulation in middle childhood was developed that facilitated the in situ assessment of five maladaptive regulation strategies in response to an anger-eliciting task. 599 children aged 6-10 years (M = 8.12, SD = 0.92) participated in the study. Construct validity of the measure was examined through correlations with parent- and self-reports of anger regulation and anger reactivity. Criterion validity was established through links with teacher-rated aggression and social rejection measured by parent-, teacher-, and self-reports. The observational measure correlated significantly with parent- and self-reports of anger reactivity, whereas it was unrelated to parent- and self-reports of anger regulation. It also made a unique contribution to predicting aggression and social rejection. PMID:25964767

  18. Children's dynamic RSA change during anger and its relations with parenting, temperament, and control of aggression.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jonas G; Chocol, Caroline; Nuselovici, Jacob N; Utendale, William T; Simard, Melissa; Hastings, Paul D

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the moderating effects of child temperament on the association between maternal socialization and 4-6-year-old children's dynamic respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) change in response to anger-themed emotional materials (N=180). We used latent growth curve modeling to explore adaptive patterns of dynamic RSA change in response to anger. Greater change in RSA during anger-induction, characterized by more initial RSA suppression and a subsequent return to baseline, was related to children's better regulation of aggression. For anger-themed materials, low levels of authoritarian parenting predicted more RSA suppression and recovery for more anger-prone children, whereas more authoritative parenting predicted more RSA suppression and recovery for less anger-prone children. These findings suggest that children's adaptive patterns of dynamic RSA change can be characterized by latent growth curve modeling, and that these patterns may be differentially shaped by parent socialization experiences as a function of child temperament. PMID:23274169

  19. Young Children’s Adjustment as a Function of Maltreatment, Shame, and Anger

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, David S.; Sullivan, Margaret Wolan; Lewis, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Maltreated children are at increased risk for behavior problems. This study examines a model in which shame mediates the potential relation between maltreatment and anger, and anger mediates the potential relation between shame and behavior problems. Participants were 177 children (ages 3 to 7 years) and their mothers, 90 of whom had histories of perpetrating neglect and/or physical abuse. Physical abuse, but not neglect, was related to increased shame during an evaluative task; shame was related to increased anger; and anger to teacher ratings of total behavior problems and externalizing problems. Age moderated the relation between physical abuse and adjustment, as abuse was related to more total problems only among the younger children. Anger was a significant mediator of shame and both behavior problems and externalizing problems. Shame, anger, age, and type of maltreatment appear to be important factors in explaining variance in behavioral adjustment following a history of maltreatment. PMID:16204734

  20. Effects of online cognitive treatment for problematic anger: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Howie, Amanda J; Malouff, John M

    2014-01-01

    Problematic anger, which is common, has been associated with a wide range of negative interpersonal and intrapersonal consequences, including violent behaviour, relationship damage, health problems and low self-esteem. This article reports the results of the first randomized controlled trial of brief online cognitive treatment for anger. The sample included 75 adults who were randomly assigned to cognitive treatment or a waiting list control. The analyses with the 59 participants who completed the post-intervention assessment at four weeks after the beginning of the intervention showed that individuals who received the intervention reported significantly lower anger levels than the control group at post-assessment. The treatment group showed a substantial decrease in anger from pre to post. The results suggest that brief online cognitive treatment can be effective for reducing problematic anger in adults. These findings provide an initial support for the development of internet-based cognitive treatment for problematic anger. PMID:25065452

  1. Inside the Russian Soyuz Spacecraft

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this episode of NASA: Behind the Scenes, take a tour inside the Russian Soyuz, the vehicle which takes the expedition crews back and forth to the International Space Station. Astronaut Mike Finc...

  2. Study of genes associated with the ‘anger-in’ and ‘anger-out’ emotions of humans using a rat model

    PubMed Central

    GUO, YINGHUI; ZHANG, HUIYUN; GAO, JIE; WEI, SHENG; SONG, CHUNHONG; SUN, PENG; QIAO, MINGQI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the genes associated with ‘anger-in’ (tendency to suppress anger) and ‘anger-out’ (tendency to express anger through verbal or physical means) emotions in humans. Wistar rats were divided into five groups (n=10/group), based on the type of model and the Chinese medicinal formulation administered, and the rat models were established. The five groups were as follows: Normal control (control), anger-in model (AIM), anger-in Jingqianshu-administered (AIA), anger-out model (AOM) and anger-out Jingqianping-administered (AOA). Open-field, resident-intruder and aggressive behavior tests were carried out, as well as gene expression analysis, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses. The body weights of the rats in the AIM and AOM groups were significantly lower than those of the control group rats. The open-field test indicated that the scores in the AOM group were significantly higher (P<0.05) than those in the AIM group. The aggression scores of the rats in the AOM group were significantly higher than those of the AIM group rats. Jingqianshu and Jingqianping granules attenuated the behavioral changes of the rats. 5-Htr2C, GABABR2 and 5-Htr3B were associated with anger-in and anger-out emotions. Jingqianping and Jingqianshu granules attenuated the changes in the mRNA expression of 5-Htr2C, GABABR2 and 5-Htr3B, as indicated by RT-qPCR, and showed similar effects on protein expression, as demonstrated by western blot analysis. The present study demonstrated that the anger-in and anger-out emotions of rats are closely associated with 5-Htr2C, GABABR2 and 5-Htr3B genes, and that Jingqianshu and Jingqianping granules attenuate the abnormal behaviors of model rats. These findings may be useful for the treatment of emotional disorders associated with anger. PMID:25780450

  3. Relation of outbursts of anger and risk of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Maclure, Malcolm; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Muller, James E; Mittleman, Murray A

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the association between outbursts of anger and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) risk. Outbursts of anger are associated with an abrupt increase in cardiovascular events; however, it remains unknown whether greater levels of anger intensity are associated with greater levels of AMI risk or whether potentially modifiable factors can mitigate the short-term risk of AMI. We conducted a case-crossover analysis of 3,886 participants from the multicenter Determinants of Myocardial Infarction Onset Study, who were interviewed during the index hospitalization for AMI from 1989 to 1996. We compared the observed number and intensity of anger outbursts in the 2 hours preceding AMI symptom onset with its expected frequency according to each patient's control information, defined as the number of anger outbursts in the previous year. Of the 3,886 participants in the Determinants of Myocardial Infarction Onset Study, 1,484 (38%) reported outbursts of anger in the previous year. The incidence rate of AMI onset was elevated 2.43-fold (95% confidence interval 2.01 to 2.90) within 2 hours of an outburst of anger. The association was consistently stronger with increasing anger intensities (p trend <0.001). In conclusion, the risk of experiencing AMI was more than twofold greater after outbursts of anger compared with at other times, and greater intensities of anger were associated with greater relative risks. Compared with nonusers, regular β-blocker users had a lower susceptibility to heart attacks triggered by anger, suggesting that some drugs might lower the risk from each anger episode. PMID:23642509

  4. Russian Aviation and Space Agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Russian Space Agency (RKA) was created on 25 February 1992 by a decree issued by the President of the Russian Federation. It was formed after the break-up of the former Soviet Union and the dissolution of the Soviet space program. The RKA uses the technology and launch sites that belonged to the former Soviet space program. This includes payment to Kazakhstan for use of the Baikonur Cosmodrom...

  5. The Mu Opioid Receptor A118G Gene Polymorphism Moderates Effects of Trait Anger-Out on Acute Pain Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Bruehl, Stephen; Chung, Ok Y.; Burns, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Both trait anger-in (managing anger through suppression) and anger-out (managing anger through direct expression) are related to pain responsiveness, but only anger-out effects involve opioid mechanisms. Preliminary work suggested the effects of anger-out on post-operative analgesic requirements were moderated by the A118G single nucleotide polymorphism of the mu opioid receptor gene. This study further explored these potential genotype X phenotype interactions as they impact acute pain sensitivity. Genetic samples and measures of anger-in and anger-out were obtained in 87 subjects (from three studies) who participated in controlled laboratory acute pain tasks (ischemic, finger pressure, thermal). McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) Sensory and Affective ratings for each pain task were standardized within studies, aggregated across pain tasks, and combined for analyses. Significant anger-out X A118G interactions were observed (p’s<.05). Simple effects tests for both pain measures revealed that whereas anger-out was nonsignificantly hyperalgesic in subjects homozygous for the wild-type allele, anger-out was significantly hypoalgesic in those with the variant G allele (p’s<.05). For the MPQ-Affective measure, this interaction arose both from low pain sensitivity in high anger-out subjects with the G allele and heightened pain sensitivity in low anger-out subjects with the G allele relative to responses in homozygous wild-type subjects. No genetic moderation was observed for anger-in, although significant main effects on MPQ-Affective ratings were noted (p<.005). Anger-in main effects were due to overlap with negative affect, but anger-out X A118G interactions were not, suggesting unique effects of expressive anger regulation. Results support opioid-related genotype X phenotype interactions involving trait anger-out. PMID:18579306

  6. Symmetrical and asymmetrical outcomes of leader anger expression: A qualitative study of army personnel

    PubMed Central

    Lindebaum, Dirk; Jordan, Peter J; Morris, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the utility of anger at work, suggesting that anger can have positive outcomes. Using the Dual Threshold Model, we assess the positive and negative consequences of anger expressions at work and focus on the conditions under which expressions of anger crossing the impropriety threshold are perceived as productive or counterproductive by observers or targets of that anger. To explore this phenomenon, we conducted a phenomenological study (n = 20) to probe the lived experiences of followers (as observers and targets) associated with anger expressions by military leaders. The nature of task (e.g. the display rules prescribed for combat situations) emerged as one condition under which the crossing of the impropriety threshold leads to positive outcomes of anger expressions. Our data reveal tensions between emotional display rules and emotional display norms in the military, thereby fostering paradoxical attitudes toward anger expression and its consequences among followers. Within this paradoxical space, anger expressions have both positive (asymmetrical) and negative (symmetrical) consequences. We place our findings in the context of the Dual Threshold Model, discuss the practical implications of our research and offer avenues for future studies. PMID:26900171

  7. Spiritual Struggle Among Patients Seeking Treatment for Chronic Headaches: Anger and Protest Behaviors Toward God.

    PubMed

    Exline, Julie J; Krause, Steven J; Broer, Karen A

    2016-10-01

    This study examined anger and protest behaviors toward God among 80 US adults seeking treatment for chronic headaches (66 women, 14 men; 71 completed treatment). Measures were administered before and after an intensive 3-week outpatient treatment program. At both times, anger and protest toward God correlated with lower pain acceptance, more emotional distress, and greater perceived disability. However, when considered simultaneously, anger predicted sustained distress, whereas protest behaviors (e.g., complaining, questioning, arguing) predicted both reduced distress and an increased sense of meaning. These findings suggest the utility of distinguishing between anger toward God and behaviors suggesting assertiveness toward God. PMID:27216030

  8. The Anger Expression Scale for Children: Initial Validation among Healthy Children and Children with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Ric G.; Legerski, John-Paul; Nelson, Timothy D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the proposed structure of the Anger Expression Scale for Children (AESC) in samples of healthy children and those with cancer, and to examine correlations between AESC subscales and other indicators of anger and hostility. Method A total of 803 children from two independent studies of healthy and ill children (mean age = 12.7, SD = 3.1) completed the AESC and other measures of anger expression and hostility, and a sub-sample of 298 of their parents completed measures of anger expression and hostility. Results Results provided initial support for the proposed four-factor model of the AESC (Trait Anger, Anger Expression, Anger In, and Anger Control). Measurement invariance was established across groups using a series of nested tests. Correlations between AESC subscales and parent- and child-reported indices of anger, hostility, and aggression support the convergent validity of the scales. Conclusions Analyses supported the construct validity of the AESC and generalization of the factor structure across healthy and chronically ill children. PMID:18556672

  9. Profiles of observed infant anger predict preschool behavior problems: Moderation by life stress

    PubMed Central

    Brooker, Rebecca J.; Buss, Kristin A.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Aksan, Nazan; Davidson, Richard J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2014-01-01

    Using both traditional composites and novel profiles of anger, we examined associations between infant anger and preschool behavior problems in a large, longitudinal data set (N = 966). We also tested the role of life stress as a moderator of the link between early anger and the development of behavior problems. Although traditional measures of anger were largely unrelated to later behavior problems, profiles of anger that dissociated typical from atypical development predicted behavior problems during preschool. Moreover, the relation between infant anger profiles and preschool behavior problems was moderated such that, when early life stress was low, infants with atypical profiles of early anger showed more preschool behavior problems than did infants with normative anger profiles. However, when early life stress was high, infants with atypical and normative profiles of infant anger did not differ in preschool behavior problems. We conclude that a discrete emotions approach including latent profile analysis is useful for elucidating biological and environmental developmental pathways to early problem behaviors. PMID:25151247

  10. Does anger mediate between personality and eating symptoms in bulimia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Amianto, Federico; Siccardi, Sara; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Marech, Lucrezia; Barosio, Marta; Fassino, Secondo

    2012-12-30

    The goals of the study were to explore anger correlation with bulimic symptoms and to test the mediation power of anger between personality and eating psychopathology. A total of 242 bulimia nervosa (BN) outpatients and 121 healthy controls were recruited. Assessment was performed using Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI); State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory 2 (STAXI-2); Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2); Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ); Binge Eating Scale (BES); and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Mediation was tested on the whole BN group, on controls and on two BN subgroups based on a previous history of anorexia nervosa. Self-Directedness and Cooperativeness extensively relate to anger and psychopathology in bulimic group. Bulimic symptoms are related to Trait Reactive Anger. Trait Anger and Anger Expression fully mediate Cooperativeness effects on binge eating and Impulsiveness in the BN subjects. Anger Expression-In partially mediates between Harm Avoidance and Social Insecurity/Interpersonal Distrust in BN subjects. The comparison with controls and the analysis of subgroups underlines that these patterns are specific for BN. Anger mediation between Cooperativeness, and binge eating and impulsive behaviours confirm the relevance of relational dynamics in the expression of these core eating symptoms. Relational skills may represent a relevant target for the treatment of BN. PMID:22944222