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Sample records for ryanodine receptor isoform

  1. Amphibian ryanodine receptor isoforms are related to those of mammalian skeletal or cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Lai, F A; Liu, Q Y; Xu, L; el-Hashem, A; Kramarcy, N R; Sealock, R; Meissner, G

    1992-08-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR)-Ca2+ release channels of frog skeletal muscle have been purified as 30S protein complexes comprised of two high molecular weight polypeptides. The upper and lower bands of the frog doublet comigrated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacylamide gels with the mammalian skeletal and cardiac RyR polypeptides, respectively. Immunoblot analysis showed that a polyclonal antiserum to the rat skeletal RyR preferentially cross-reacted with the upper band, whereas monoclonal antibodies to the canine cardiac RyR preferentially cross-reacted with the lower band of the frog receptor doublet. Immunoprecipitation studies indicated the presence of two homooligomer 30S RyR complexes comprised of either the lower or upper polypeptide band of the frog doublet, and immunocytochemical staining revealed their colocalization in frog gastrocnemius muscle. After planar lipid bilayer reconstitution of the 30S frog RyR, single-channel currents were observed that exhibited a Na+ and Ca2+ conductance and pharmacological characteristics similar to those of the mammalian skeletal and cardiac Ca2+ release channels. These results suggest that amphibian skeletal muscle expresses two distinct RyR isoforms that share epitopes in common with the mammalian skeletal or cardiac RyR. PMID:1325114

  2. The unliganded long isoform of estrogen receptor beta stimulates brain ryanodine receptor single channel activity alongside with cytosolic Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Rybalchenko, Volodymyr; Grillo, Michael A.; Gastinger, Matthew J.; Rybalchenko, Nataliya; Payne, Andrew J.; Koulen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+ release from intracellular stores mediated by endoplasmic reticulum membrane ryanodine receptors (RyR) plays a key role in activating and synchronizing downstream Ca2+-dependent mechanisms, in different cells varying from apoptosis to nuclear transcription and development of defensive responses. Recently discovered, atypical “non-genomic” effects mediated by estrogen receptors (ER) include rapid Ca2+ release upon estrogen exposure in conditions implicitly suggesting involvement of RyRs. In the present study, we report various levels of co-localization between RyR type 2 (RyR2) and ER type β (ERβ) in the neuronal cell line HT-22, indicating a possible functional interaction. Electrophysiological analyses revealed a significant increase in single channel ionic currents generated by mouse brain RyRs after application of the soluble monomer of the long form ERβ (ERβ1). The effect was due to a strong increase in open probability of RyR higher open channel sublevels at cytosolic [Ca2+] concentrations of 100 nM, suggesting a synergistic action of ERβ1 and Ca2+ in RyR activation, and a potential contribution to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release rather than to basal intracellular Ca2+ concentration level at rest. This RyR/ERβ interaction has potential effects on cellular physiology, including roles of shorter ERβ isoforms and modulation of the RyR/ERβ complexes by exogenous estrogens. PMID:19899956

  3. Identification of ryanodine receptor isoforms in prostate DU-145, LNCaP, and PWR-1E cells.

    PubMed

    Kobylewski, Sarah E; Henderson, Kimberly A; Eckhert, Curtis D

    2012-08-24

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR) is a large, intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) channel that is associated with several accessory proteins and is an important component of a cell's ability to respond to changes in the environment. Three isoforms of the RyR exist and are well documented for skeletal and cardiac muscle and the brain, but the isoforms in non-excitable cells are poorly understood. The aggressiveness of breast cancers in women has been positively correlated with the expression of the RyR in breast tumor tissue, but it is unknown if this is limited to specific isoforms. Identification and characterization of RyRs in cancer models is important in understanding the role of the RyR channel complex in cancer and as a potential therapeutic target. The objective of this report was to identify the RyR isoforms expressed in widely used prostate cancer cell lines, DU-145 and LNCaP, and the non-tumorigenic prostate cell line, PWR-1E. Oligonucleotide primers specific for each isoform were used in semi-quantitative and real-time PCR to determine the identification and expression levels of the RyR isoforms. RyR1 was expressed in the highest amount in DU-145 tumor cells, expression was 0.48-fold in the non-tumor cell line PWR-1E compared to DU-145 cells, and no expression was observed in LNCaP tumor cells. DU-145 cells had the lowest expression of RyR2. The expression was 26- and 15-fold higher in LNCaP and PWR-1E cells, respectively. RyR3 expression was not observed in any of the cell lines. All cell types released Ca(2+) in response to caffeine showing they had functional RyRs. Total cellular RyR-associated Ca(2+) release is determined by both the number of activated RyRs and its accessory proteins which modulate the receptor. Our results suggest that the correlation between the expression of the RyR and tumor aggression is not related to specific RyR isoforms, but may be related to the activity and number of receptors. PMID:22846571

  4. Expression and function of ryanodine receptors in nonexcitable cells.

    PubMed

    Bennett, D L; Cheek, T R; Berridge, M J; De Smedt, H; Parys, J B; Missiaen, L; Bootman, M D

    1996-03-15

    We have used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to investigate the expression of ryanodine receptors in several excitable and nonexcitable cell types. Consistent with previous reports, we detected ryanodine receptor expression in brain, heart, and skeletal muscle. In addition, we detected ryanodine receptor expression in various other excitable cells including PC 12 and A7r5 cells. Several muscle cell lines (BC3H1, C2C12, L6, and Sol8) weakly expressed ryanodine receptor when undifferentiated but strongly expressed type 1 and type 3 ryanodine receptor isoforms when differentiated into a muscle phenotype. Only 2 (HeLa and LLC-PK1 cells) out of 11 nonexcitable cell types examined expressed ryanodine receptors. Expression of ryanodine receptors at the protein level in these cells was confirmed using [3H]ryanodine binding. We also investigated the function of ryanodine receptors in Ca2+ signaling in HeLa cells using single-cell Fura-2 imaging. Neither caffeine nor ryanodine caused a detectable elevation of cytoplasmic Ca2+ in single HeLa cells. However, ryanodine caused a significant decrease in the amplitude of Ca 2+ signals evoked by repetitive stimulation with ATP. These studies show that ryanodine receptors are expressed in some nonexcitable cell types and furthermore suggest that the ryanodine receptors may be involved in a subtle regulation of intracellular Ca2+ responses. PMID:8626432

  5. Physiological differences between the alpha and beta ryanodine receptors of fish skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, J; Valdivia, H H; Block, B A

    1995-01-01

    Two isoforms of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channel (ryanodine receptor or RYR) are expressed together in the skeletal muscles of most vertebrates. We have studied physiological properties of the two isoforms (alpha and beta) by comparing SR preparations from specialized fish muscles that express the alpha isoform alone to preparations from muscles containing both alpha and beta. Regulation of channel activity was assessed through [3H]ryanodine binding and reconstitution into planar lipid bilayers. Distinct differences were observed in the calcium-activation and -inactivation properties of the two isoforms. The fish alpha isoform, expressed alone in extraocular muscles, closely resembled the rabbit skeletal muscle RYR. Maximum [3H]ryanodine binding and maximum open probability (Po) of the alpha RYR were achieved from 1 to 10 microM free Ca2+. Millimolar Ca2+ reduced [3H]ryanodine binding and Po close to zero. The beta isoform more closely resembled the fish cardiac RYR in Ca2+ activation of [3H]ryanodine binding. The most prominent difference of the beta and cardiac isoforms from the alpha isoform was the lack of inactivation of [3H]ryanodine binding and Po by millimolar free Ca2+. Differences in activation of [3H]ryanodine binding by adenine nucleotides and inhibition by Mg2+ suggest that the beta and cardiac RYRs are not identical, however. [3H]ryanodine binding by the alpha RYR was selectively inhibited by 100 microM tetracaine, whereas cardiac and beta RYRs were much less affected. Tetracaine can thus be used to separate the properties of the alpha and beta RYRs in preparations in which both are present. The distinct physiological properties of the alpha and beta RYRs that are present together in most vertebrate muscles support models of EC coupling incorporating both directly coupled and Ca(2+)-coupled channels within a single triad junction. PMID:7696500

  6. Different Involvement of Type 1, 2, and 3 Ryanodine Receptors in Memory Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galeotti, Nicoletta; Quattrone, Alessandro; Vivoli, Elisa; Norcini, Monica; Bartolini, Alessandro; Ghelardini, Carla

    2008-01-01

    The administration of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) agonist 4-Cmc (0.003-9 nmol per mouse intracerebroventricularly [i.c.v.]) ameliorated memory functions, whereas the RyR antagonist ryanodine (0.0001-1 nmol per mouse i.c.v.) induced amnesia in the mouse passive avoidance test. The role of the type 1, 2, and 3 RyR isoforms in memory processes was…

  7. Arrhythmogenic mechanisms in ryanodine receptor channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-Ting; Valdivia, Carmen R; Gurrola, Georgina B; Hernández, Jonathan J; Valdivia, Héctor H

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are the calcium release channels of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) that provide the majority of calcium ions (Ca(2+)) necessary to induce contraction of cardiac and skeletal muscle cells. In their intracellular environment, RyR channels are regulated by a variety of cytosolic and luminal factors so that their output signal (Ca(2+)) induces finely-graded cell contraction without igniting cellular processes that may lead to aberrant electrical activity (ventricular arrhythmias) or cellular remodeling. The importance of RyR dysfunction has been recently highlighted with the demonstration that point mutations in RYR2, the gene encoding for the cardiac isoform of the RyR (RyR2), are associated with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT), an arrhythmogenic syndrome characterized by the development of adrenergically-mediated ventricular tachycardia in individuals with an apparently normal heart. Here we summarize the state of the field in regards to the main arrhythmogenic mechanisms triggered by RyR2 channels harboring mutations linked to CPVT. Most CPVT mutations characterized to date endow RyR2 channels with a gain of function, resulting in hyperactive channels that release Ca(2+) spontaneously, especially during diastole. The spontaneous Ca(2+) release is extruded by the electrogenic Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, which depolarizes the external membrane (delayed afterdepolarization or DAD) and may trigger untimely action potentials. However, a rare set of CPVT mutations yield RyR2 channels that are intrinsically hypo-active and hypo-responsive to stimuli, and it is unclear whether these channels release Ca(2+) spontaneously during diastole. We discuss novel cellular mechanisms that appear more suitable to explain ventricular arrhythmias due to RyR2 loss-of-function mutations. PMID:25480325

  8. Catecholamime Interactions with the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipp, Robert Carl

    The cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is a Ca2+ ion channel found in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), an intracellular membranous Ca2+ storage system. It is well known that a destabilization of RyR2 can lead to a Ca2+ flux out of the SR, which results in an overload of intracellular Ca2+; this can also lead to arrhythmias and heart failure. The catecholamines play a large role in the regulation of RyR2; stimulation of the beta-adrenergic receptor on the cell membrane can lead to a hyperphosphorylation of RyR2, making it more leaky to Ca2+. We have previously shown that strong electron donors will inhibit RyR2. It is hypothesized that the catecholamines, sharing a similar structure with other proven inhibitors of RyR2, will also inhibit RyR2. Here we confirm this hypothesis and show for the first time that the catecholamines, isoproterenol and epinephrine, act as strong electron donors and inhibit RyR2 activity at the single channel level. This data suggests that the catecholamines can influence RyR2 activity at two levels. This offers promising insight into the potential development of a new class of drugs to treat heart failure and arrhythmia; ones that can both prevent the hyperphosphorylation of RyR2 by blocking the beta-adrenergic receptor, but can also directly inhibit the release of Ca2+ from RyR2.

  9. Structure of a mammalian ryanodine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zalk, Ran; Clarke, Oliver B.; des Georges, Amédée; Grassucci, Robert A.; Reiken, Steven; Mancia, Filippo; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Frank, Joachim; Marks, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) mediate rapid release of calcium (Ca2+) from intracellular stores into the cytosol, which is essential for numerous cellular functions including excitation-contraction coupling in muscle. Lack of sufficient structural detail has impeded understanding of RyR gating and regulation. Here, we report the closed-state structure of the 2.3 MDa complex of the rabbit skeletal muscle type 1 RyR (RyR1), solved by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy at an overall resolution of 4.8 Å. We fitted a polyalanine-level model to all 3939 ordered residues in each protomer, defining the transmembrane pore in unprecedented detail and placing all cytosolic domains as tertiary folds. The cytosolic assembly is built on an extended α-solenoid scaffold connecting key regulatory domains to the pore. The RyR1 pore architecture places it in the six-transmembrane (6TM) ion channel superfamily. A unique domain inserted between the second and third transmembrane helices interacts intimately with paired EF-hands originating from the α-solenoid scaffold, suggesting a mechanism for channel gating by Ca2+. PMID:25470061

  10. Mutations to Gly2370, Gly2373 or Gly2375 in malignant hyperthermia domain 2 decrease caffeine and cresol sensitivity of the rabbit skeletal-muscle Ca2+-release channel (ryanodine receptor isoform 1).

    PubMed Central

    Du, G G; Oyamada, H; Khanna, V K; MacLennan, D H

    2001-01-01

    Mutations G2370A, G2372A, G2373A, G2375A, Y3937A, S3938A, G3939A and K3940A were made in two potential ATP-binding motifs (amino acids 2370-2375 and 3937-3940) in the Ca(2+)-release channel of skeletal-muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum (ryanodine receptor or RyR1). Activation of [(3)H]ryanodine binding by Ca(2+), caffeine and ATP (adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-methylene]triphosphate, AMP-PCP) was used as an assay for channel opening, since ryanodine binds only to open channels. Caffeine-sensitivity of channel opening was also assayed by caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release in HEK-293 cells expressing wild-type and mutant channels. Equilibrium [(3)H]ryanodine-binding properties and EC(50) values for Ca(2+) activation of high-affinity [(3)H]ryanodine binding were similar between wild-type RyR1 and mutants. In the presence of 1 mM AMP-PCP, Ca(2+)-activation curves were shifted to higher affinity and maximal binding was increased to a similar extent for wild-type RyR1 and mutants. ATP sensitivity of channel opening was also similar for wild-type and mutants. These observations apparently rule out sequences 2370-2375 and 3937-3940 as ATP-binding motifs. Caffeine or 4-chloro-m-cresol sensitivity, however, was decreased in mutants G2370A, G2373A and G2375A, whereas the other mutants retained normal sensitivity. Amino acids 2370-2375 lie within a sequence (amino acids 2163-2458) in which some eight RyR1 mutations have been associated with malignant hyperthermia and shown to be hypersensitive to caffeine and 4-chloro-m-cresol activation. By contrast, mutants G2370A, G2373A and G2375A are hyposensitive to caffeine and 4-chloro-m-cresol. Thus amino acids 2163-2458 form a regulatory domain (malignant hyperthermia regulatory domain 2) that regulates caffeine and 4-chloro-m-cresol sensitivity of RyR1. PMID:11695996

  11. Caveolin-3 is adjacent to a group of extradyadic ryanodine receptors.

    PubMed

    Scriven, David R L; Klimek, Agnieszka; Asghari, Parisa; Bellve, Karl; Moore, Edwin D W

    2005-09-01

    Caveolae are present in almost all cells and concentrate a wide variety of signaling molecules, receptors, transporters, and ion pumps. We have investigated the distribution of the ryanodine receptor, the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, the predominant Na(+) channel isoform rH1, and the L-type calcium channel, Ca(v)1.2, relative to the muscle-specific caveolin isoform, caveolin-3, in adult rat ventricular myocytes. Three-dimensional immunofluorescence images were deconvolved and analyzed. Caveolin-3 colocalizes with all of these molecules at the surface of the cell, but there is no significant colocalization between caveolin-3 and either the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger or the Na(+) channel in the cell interior. The distribution of the surface colocalization indicates that the caveolae that colocalize with each molecule form distinct populations. This organization indicates that there are multiple populations of caveolae separable by location and occupants. In the interior of the cell, caveolin-3 shows a marked colocalization with a population of ryanodine receptors that are separate from those within the dyad. Because of their location, the signaling molecules contained within these caveolae may have preferred access to the neighboring nondyadic ryanodine receptors. PMID:15980179

  12. CCDI: a new ligand that modulates mammalian type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1)

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Chengju; Shao, Chun Hong; Padanilam, Christina; Ezell, Edward; Singh, Jaipaul; Kutty, Shelby; Bidasee, Keshore R

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are Ca2+-release channels on the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum that modulate a wide array of physiological functions. Three RyR isoforms are present in cells: RyR1, RyR2 and RyR3. To date, there are no reports on ligands that modulate RyR in an isoform-selective manner. Such ligands are not only valuable research tools, but could serve as intermediates for development of therapeutics. Experimental approach Pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid and 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide were allowed to react in carbon tetrachloride for 24 h at low temperatures and pressures. The chemical structures of the two products isolated were elucidated using NMR spectrometry, mass spectrometry and elemental analyses. [3H]-ryanodine binding, lipid bilayer and time-lapsed confocal imaging were used to determine their effects on RyR isoforms. Key results The major product, 2-cyclohexyl-3-cyclohexylimino-2, 3, dihydro–pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazol-1-one (CCDI) dose-dependently potentiated Ca2+-dependent binding of [3H]-ryanodine to RyR1, with no significant effects on [3H]-ryanodine binding to RyR2 or RyR3. CCDI also reversibly increased the open probability (Po) of RyR1 with minimal effects on RyR2 and RyR3. CCDI induced Ca2+ transients in C2C12 skeletal myotubes, but not in rat ventricular myocytes. This effect was blocked by pretreating cells with ryanodine. The minor product 2-cyclohexyl-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazole-1,3-dione had no effect on either [3H]-ryanodine binding or Po of RyR1, RyR2 and RyR3. Conclusions and implications A new ligand that preferentially modulates RyR1 was identified. In addition to being an important research tool, the pharmacophore of this small molecule could serve as a template for the synthesis of other isoform-selective modulators of RyRs. PMID:24819467

  13. Functional ryanodine receptors in the membranes of neurohypophysial secretory granules

    PubMed Central

    McNally, James M.; Custer, Edward E.; Ortiz-Miranda, Sonia; Woodbury, Dixon J.; Kraner, Susan D.; Salzberg, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Highly localized Ca2+ release events have been characterized in several neuronal preparations. In mouse neurohypophysial terminals (NHTs), such events, called Ca2+ syntillas, appear to emanate from a ryanodine-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ pool. Traditional sources of intracellular Ca2+ appear to be lacking in NHTs. Thus, we have tested the hypothesis that large dense core vesicles (LDCVs), which contain a substantial amount of calcium, represent the source of these syntillas. Here, using fluorescence immunolabeling and immunogold-labeled electron micrographs of NHTs, we show that type 2 ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are localized specifically to LDCVs. Furthermore, a large conductance nonspecific cation channel, which was identified previously in the vesicle membrane and has biophysical properties similar to that of an RyR, is pharmacologically affected in a manner characteristic of an RyR: it is activated in the presence of the RyR agonist ryanodine (at low concentrations) and blocked by the RyR antagonist ruthenium red. Additionally, neuropeptide release experiments show that these same RyR agonists and antagonists modulate Ca2+-elicited neuropeptide release from permeabilized NHTs. Furthermore, amperometric recording of spontaneous release events from artificial transmitter-loaded terminals corroborated these ryanodine effects. Collectively, our findings suggest that RyR-dependent syntillas could represent mobilization of Ca2+ from vesicular stores. Such localized vesicular Ca2+ release events at the precise location of exocytosis could provide a Ca2+ amplification mechanism capable of modulating neuropeptide release physiologically. PMID:24863930

  14. Spatial localization of ryanodine receptors in human cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Vallmitjana, A; Nolla, C; Herraiz-Martínez, A; Hove-Madsen, L; Benítez, R

    2015-08-01

    We present a novel image processing method to determine the location of ryanodine receptors in cardiac cells. A semi-automatic manual validation by an expert has been used in order to establish the performance of the segmentation method. The approach provides high accuracy under different experimental conditions and it is robust to common sources of noise including experimental, molecular and biological fluctuations. PMID:26737732

  15. Involvement of ryanodine receptors in neurotrophin-induced hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial memory formation.

    PubMed

    Adasme, Tatiana; Haeger, Paola; Paula-Lima, Andrea C; Espinoza, Italo; Casas-Alarcón, M Mercedes; Carrasco, M Angélica; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2011-02-15

    Ryanodine receptors (RyR) amplify activity-dependent calcium influx via calcium-induced calcium release. Calcium signals trigger postsynaptic pathways in hippocampal neurons that underlie synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Recent evidence supports a role of the RyR2 and RyR3 isoforms in these processes. Along with calcium signals, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key signaling molecule for hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial memory. Upon binding to specific TrkB receptors, BDNF initiates complex signaling pathways that modify synaptic structure and function. Here, we show that BDNF-induced remodeling of hippocampal dendritic spines required functional RyR. Additionally, incubation with BDNF enhanced the expression of RyR2, RyR3, and PKMζ, an atypical protein kinase C isoform with key roles in hippocampal memory consolidation. Consistent with their increased RyR protein content, BDNF-treated neurons generated larger RyR-mediated calcium signals than controls. Selective inhibition of RyR-mediated calcium release with inhibitory ryanodine concentrations prevented the PKMζ, RyR2, and RyR3 protein content enhancement induced by BDNF. Intrahippocampal injection of BDNF or training rats in a spatial memory task enhanced PKMζ, RyR2, RyR3, and BDNF hippocampal protein content, while injection of ryanodine at concentrations that stimulate RyR-mediated calcium release improved spatial memory learning and enhanced memory consolidation. We propose that RyR-generated calcium signals are key features of the complex neuronal plasticity processes induced by BDNF, which include increased expression of RyR2, RyR3, and PKMζ and the spine remodeling required for spatial memory formation. PMID:21282625

  16. Involvement of ryanodine receptors in neurotrophin-induced hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Adasme, Tatiana; Haeger, Paola; Paula-Lima, Andrea C.; Espinoza, Italo; Casas-Alarcón, M. Mercedes; Carrasco, M. Angélica; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyR) amplify activity-dependent calcium influx via calcium-induced calcium release. Calcium signals trigger postsynaptic pathways in hippocampal neurons that underlie synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Recent evidence supports a role of the RyR2 and RyR3 isoforms in these processes. Along with calcium signals, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key signaling molecule for hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial memory. Upon binding to specific TrkB receptors, BDNF initiates complex signaling pathways that modify synaptic structure and function. Here, we show that BDNF-induced remodeling of hippocampal dendritic spines required functional RyR. Additionally, incubation with BDNF enhanced the expression of RyR2, RyR3, and PKMζ, an atypical protein kinase C isoform with key roles in hippocampal memory consolidation. Consistent with their increased RyR protein content, BDNF-treated neurons generated larger RyR-mediated calcium signals than controls. Selective inhibition of RyR-mediated calcium release with inhibitory ryanodine concentrations prevented the PKMζ, RyR2, and RyR3 protein content enhancement induced by BDNF. Intrahippocampal injection of BDNF or training rats in a spatial memory task enhanced PKMζ, RyR2, RyR3, and BDNF hippocampal protein content, while injection of ryanodine at concentrations that stimulate RyR-mediated calcium release improved spatial memory learning and enhanced memory consolidation. We propose that RyR-generated calcium signals are key features of the complex neuronal plasticity processes induced by BDNF, which include increased expression of RyR2, RyR3, and PKMζ and the spine remodeling required for spatial memory formation. PMID:21282625

  17. Inhibitory ryanodine prevents ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca²⁺ release without affecting endoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺ content in primary hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Adasme, Tatiana; Paula-Lima, Andrea; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2015-02-27

    Ryanodine is a cell permeant plant alkaloid that binds selectively and with high affinity to ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca(2+) release channels. Sub-micromolar ryanodine concentrations activate RyR channels while micromolar concentrations are inhibitory. Several reports indicate that neuronal synaptic plasticity, learning and memory require RyR-mediated Ca(2+)-release, which is essential for muscle contraction. The use of micromolar (inhibitory) ryanodine represents a common strategy to suppress RyR activity in neuronal cells: however, micromolar ryanodine promotes RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) depletion in muscle cells. Information is lacking in this regard in neuronal cells; hence, we examined here if addition of inhibitory ryanodine elicited Ca(2+) release in primary hippocampal neurons, and if prolonged incubation of primary hippocampal cultures with inhibitory ryanodine affected neuronal ER calcium content. Our results indicate that inhibitory ryanodine does not cause Ca(2+) release from the ER in primary hippocampal neurons, even though ryanodine diffusion should produce initially low intracellular concentrations, within the RyR activation range. Moreover, neurons treated for 1 h with inhibitory ryanodine had comparable Ca(2+) levels as control neurons. These combined findings imply that prolonged incubation with inhibitory ryanodine, which effectively abolishes RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release, preserves ER Ca(2+) levels and thus constitutes a sound strategy to suppress neuronal RyR function. PMID:25623539

  18. Ryanodine receptors are uncoupled from contraction in rat vena cava.

    PubMed

    Tykocki, N R; Thompson, J M; Jackson, W F; Watts, S W

    2013-02-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyR) are Ca(2+)-sensitive ion channels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane, and are important effectors of SR Ca(2+) release and smooth muscle excitation-contraction coupling. While the relationship between RyR activation and contraction is well characterized in arteries, little is known about the role of RyR in excitation-contraction coupling in veins. We hypothesized that RyR are present and directly coupled to contraction in rat aorta (RA) and vena cava (RVC). RA and RVC expressed mRNA for all 3 RyR subtypes, and immunofluorescence showed RyR protein was present in RA and RVC smooth muscle cells. RA and RVC rings contracted when Ca(2+) was re-introduced after stores depletion with thapsigargin (1μM), indicating both tissues contained intracellular Ca(2+) stores. To assess RyR function, contraction was then measured in RA and RVC exposed to the RyR activator caffeine (20mM). In RA, caffeine caused contraction that was attenuated by the RyR antagonists ryanodine (10μM) and tetracaine (100μM). However, caffeine (20mM) did not contract RVC. We next measured contraction and intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)(i)) simultaneously in RA and RVC exposed to caffeine. While caffeine increased Ca(2+)(i) and contracted RA, it had no significant effect on Ca(2+)(i) or contraction in RVC. These data suggest that ryanodine receptors, while present in both RA and RVC, are inactive and uncoupled from Ca(2+) release and contraction in RVC. PMID:23177664

  19. A procedure for purification of the ryanodine receptor from skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkes, M.J.; Diaz-Munoz, M.; Hamilton, S.L. )

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a simple and reproducible method for purifying large quantities of ryanodine receptor from skeletal muscle membranes. The procedure involves the use of ion exchange chromatography and sucrose gradient centrifugation to purify the protein which has been identified as the calcium release protein of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Addition of micromolar quantities of unlabeled ryanodine prior to solubilization and throughout the isolation procedure appears to stabilize the tetrameric structure of the ryanodine receptor. The purified receptor, consisting predominantly of a 400K polypeptide on SDS-PAGE, binds ({sup 3}H)ryanodine with a binding affinity similar to that in membranes. Overall recovery of ryanodine binding activity was 21% of the initial activity with a 30-fold purification of the receptor.

  20. The human cardiac muscle ryanodine receptor-calcium release channel: identification, primary structure and topological analysis.

    PubMed

    Tunwell, R E; Wickenden, C; Bertrand, B M; Shevchenko, V I; Walsh, M B; Allen, P D; Lai, F A

    1996-09-01

    Rapid Ca2+ efflux from intracellular stores during cardiac muscle excitation-contraction coupling is mediated by the ryanodine-sensitive calcium-release channel, a large homotetrameric complex present in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. We report here the identification, primary structure and topological analysis of the ryanodine receptor-calcium release channel from human cardiac muscle (hRyR-2). Consistent with sedimentation and immunoblotting studies on the hRyR-2 protein, sequence analysis of ten overlapping cDNA clones reveals an open reading frame of 14901 nucleotides encoding a protein of 4967 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 564 569 Da for hRyR-2. In-frame insertions corresponding to eight and ten amino acid residues were found in two of the ten cDNAs isolated, suggesting that novel, alternatively spliced transcripts of the hRyR-2 gene might exist. Six hydrophobic stretches, which are present within the hRyR-2 C-terminal 500 amino acids and are conserved in all RyR sequences, may be involved in forming the transmembrane domain that constitutes the Ca(2+)-conducting pathway, in agreement with competitive ELISA studies with a RyR-2-specific antibody. Sequence alignment of hRyR-2 with other RyR isoforms indicates a high level of overall identity within the RyR family, with the exception of two important regions that exhibit substantial variability. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the RyR-2 isoform diverged from a single ancestral gene before the RyR-1 and RyR-3 isoforms to form a distinct branch of the RyR family tree. PMID:8809036

  1. Ryanodine receptors contribute to the induction of ischemic tolerance.

    PubMed

    Nakamura-Maruyama, Emi; Miyamoto, Osamu; Okabe, Naohiko; Himi, Naoyuki; Feng, Lu; Narita, Kazuhiko; Keep, Richard F; Yamamoto, Tohru; Nakamura, Takehiro

    2016-04-01

    Ischemic tolerance (IT) is induced by a variety of insults to the brain (e.g., nonfatal ischemia, heat and hypoxia) and it provides a strong neuroprotective effect. Although the mechanisms are still not fully elucidated, Ca(2+) is regarded as a key mediator of IT. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are located in the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum membrane and are responsible for the release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores. In brain, neuronal RyRs are thought to play a role in various neuropathological conditions, including ischemia. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the involvement of RyRs in IT. Pretreatment with a RyR antagonist, dantrolene (25mg/kg, i.p), blocked IT in a gerbil global ischemia model, while a RyR agonist, caffeine (100mg/kg, i.p), stimulated the production of IT. In vitro, using rat hippocampal cells, short-term oxygen/glucose deprivation induced preconditioning and RyR antagonists, dantrolene (50 and 100μM) and ryanodine (100 and 200μM) prevented it. RyR protein and mRNA levels were transiently decreased after induction of IT. These results suggest that RyRs are involved in the induction of ischemic tolerance. PMID:26930163

  2. Identification of a critical region in the Drosophila ryanodine receptor that confers sensitivity to diamide insecticides.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yong; Gutteridge, Steven; Benner, Eric A; Wu, Lihong; Rhoades, Daniel F; Sacher, Matthew D; Rivera, Michel A; Desaeger, Johan; Cordova, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    Anthranilic diamides, which include the new commercial insecticide, chlorantraniliprole, are an exciting new class of chemistry that target insect ryanodine receptors. These receptors regulate release of stored intracellular calcium and play a critical role in muscle contraction. As with insects, nematodes express ryanodine receptors and are sensitive to the plant alkaloid, ryanodine. However the plant parasitic nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, is insensitive to anthranilic diamides. Expression of a full-length Drosophila melanogaster ryanodine receptor in an insect cell line confers sensitivity to the receptor agents, caffeine and ryanodine along with nanomolar sensitivity to anthranilic diamides. Replacement of a 46 amino acid segment in a highly divergent region of the Drosophila C-terminus with that from Meloidogyne results in a functional RyR which lack sensitivity to diamide insecticides. These findings indicate that this region is critical to diamide sensitivity in insect ryanodine receptors. Furthermore, this region may contribute to our understanding of the differential selectivity diamides exhibit for insect over mammalian ryanodine receptors. PMID:23806522

  3. Structural and functional characterization of the purified cardiac ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ release channel complex.

    PubMed

    Anderson, K; Lai, F A; Liu, Q Y; Rousseau, E; Erickson, H P; Meissner, G

    1989-01-15

    Using density gradient centrifugation and [3H]ryanodine as a specific marker, the ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ release channel complex from Chaps-solubilized canine cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) has been purified in the form of an approximately 30 S complex, comprised of Mr approximately 400,000 polypeptides. Purification resulted in a specific activity of approximately 450 pmol bound ryanodine/mg of protein, a 60-70% recovery of ryanodine binding activity, and retention of the high affinity ryanodine binding site (KD = 3 nM). Negative stain electron microscopy revealed a 4-fold symmetric, four-leaf clover structure, which could fill a box approximately 30 x 30 nm and was thus morphologically similar to the SR-transverse-tubule, junctionally associated foot structure. The structural, sedimentation, and ryanodine binding data strongly suggest there is one high affinity ryanodine binding site/30 S complex, comprised of four Mr approximately 400,000 subunits. Upon reconstitution into planar lipid bilayers, the purified complex exhibited a Ca2+ conductance (70 pS in 50 mM Ca2+) similar to that of the native cardiac Ca2+ release channel (75 pS). The reconstituted complex was also found to conduct Na+ (550 pS in 500 mM Na+) and often to display complex Na+ subconducting states. The purified channel could be activated by micromolar Ca2+ or millimolar ATP, inhibited by millimolar Mg2+ or micromolar ruthenium red, and modified to a long-lived open subconducting state by ryanodine. The sedimentation, subunit composition, morphological, and ryanodine binding characteristics of the purified cardiac ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ release channel complex were similar to those previously described for the purified ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ release channel complex from fast-twitch skeletal muscle. PMID:2463249

  4. Biochemical evidence for a complex involving dihydropyridine receptor and ryanodine receptor in triad junctions of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Marty, I; Robert, M; Villaz, M; De Jongh, K; Lai, Y; Catterall, W A; Ronjat, M

    1994-01-01

    Membrane vesicles enriched in both ryanodine receptor and dihydropyridine receptor were obtained from rabbit skeletal muscle and solubilized with 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate. Analysis of the sedimentation behavior of the solubilized proteins showed the existence of a population of alpha 1 subunits of the dihydropyridine receptor which cosedimented with the ryanodine receptor. Solubilized proteins were immunoprecipitated with antibodies directed against either the ryanodine receptor or the alpha 1, alpha 2, or beta subunits of the dihydropyridine receptor. Immunoprecipitated proteins were identified by Western blot analysis and by specific labeling with [3H]ryanodine or [3H]PN200-110. Immunoprecipitation of the solubilized proteins with antibodies directed against the dihydropyridine receptor led to the coimmunoprecipitation of the ryanodine receptor. Conversely, immunoprecipitation with antibodies directed against the ryanodine receptor led to an immune complex containing both receptors, but these antibodies were unable to precipitate purified dihydropyridine receptor. These results demonstrate that ryanodine receptor and dihydropyridine receptor are present in the triad membrane preparation in a complex which may play an important role in excitation-contraction coupling. Images PMID:8134386

  5. Coupled gating between cardiac calcium release channels (ryanodine receptors).

    PubMed

    Marx, S O; Gaburjakova, J; Gaburjakova, M; Henrikson, C; Ondrias, K; Marks, A R

    2001-06-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling in heart muscle requires the activation of Ca(2+)-release channels/type 2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2s) by Ca(2+) influx. RyR2s are arranged on the sarcoplasmic reticular membrane in closely packed arrays such that their large cytoplasmic domains contact one another. We now show that multiple RyR2s can be isolated under conditions such that they remain physically coupled to one another. When these coupled channels are examined in planar lipid bilayers, multiple channels exhibit simultaneous gating, termed "coupled gating." Removal of the regulatory subunit, the FK506 binding protein (FKBP12.6), functionally but not physically uncouples multiple RyR2 channels. Coupled gating between RyR2 channels may be an important regulatory mechanism in excitation-contraction coupling as well as in other signaling pathways involving intracellular Ca(2+) release. PMID:11397781

  6. Selective expression of the type 3 isoform of ryanodine receptor Ca{sup 2+} release channel (RyR3) in a subset of slow fibers in diaphragm and cephalic muscles of adult rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, Antonio; Reggiani, Carlo; Sorrentino, Vincenzo . E-mail: v.sorrentino@unisi.it

    2005-11-11

    The expression pattern of the RyR3 isoform of Ca{sup 2+} release channels was analysed by Western blot in neonatal and adult rabbit skeletal muscles. The results obtained show that the expression of the RyR3 isoform is developmentally regulated. In fact, RyR3 expression was detected in all muscles analysed at 2 and 15 days after birth while, in adult animals, it was restricted to a subset of muscles that includes diaphragm, masseter, pterygoideus, digastricus, and tongue. Interestingly, all of these muscles share a common embryonic origin being derived from the somitomeres or from the cephalic region of the embryo. Immunofluorescence analysis of rabbit skeletal muscle cross-sections showed that RyR3 staining was detected in all fibers of neonatal muscles. In contrast, in those adult muscles expressing RyR3 only a fraction of fibers was labelled. Staining of these muscles with antibodies against fast and slow myosins revealed a close correlation between expression of RyR3 and fibers expressing slow myosin isoform.

  7. Leaky ryanodine receptors contribute to diaphragmatic weakness during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Matecki, Stefan; Dridi, Haikel; Jung, Boris; Saint, Nathalie; Reiken, Steven R; Scheuermann, Valérie; Mrozek, Ségolène; Santulli, Gaetano; Umanskaya, Alisa; Petrof, Basil J; Jaber, Samir; Marks, Andrew R; Lacampagne, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction (VIDD) refers to the diaphragm muscle weakness that occurs following prolonged controlled mechanical ventilation (MV). The presence of VIDD impedes recovery from respiratory failure. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms accounting for VIDD are still not fully understood. Here, we show in human subjects and a mouse model of VIDD that MV is associated with rapid remodeling of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release channel/ryanodine receptor (RyR1) in the diaphragm. The RyR1 macromolecular complex was oxidized, S-nitrosylated, Ser-2844 phosphorylated, and depleted of the stabilizing subunit calstabin1, following MV. These posttranslational modifications of RyR1 were mediated by both oxidative stress mediated by MV and stimulation of adrenergic signaling resulting from the anesthesia. We demonstrate in the murine model that such abnormal resting SR Ca(2+) leak resulted in reduced contractile function and muscle fiber atrophy for longer duration of MV. Treatment with β-adrenergic antagonists or with S107, a small molecule drug that stabilizes the RyR1-calstabin1 interaction, prevented VIDD. Diaphragmatic dysfunction is common in MV patients and is a major cause of failure to wean patients from ventilator support. This study provides the first evidence to our knowledge of RyR1 alterations as a proximal mechanism underlying VIDD (i.e., loss of function, muscle atrophy) and identifies RyR1 as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27457930

  8. Architecture and conformational switch mechanism of the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Rouslan G; Leitner, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi; Raunser, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contraction is initiated by the release of calcium (Ca(2+)) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum into the cytoplasm of myocytes through ryanodine receptors (RyRs). RyRs are homotetrameric channels with a molecular mass of more than 2.2 megadaltons that are regulated by several factors, including ions, small molecules and proteins. Numerous mutations in RyRs have been associated with human diseases. The molecular mechanism underlying the complex regulation of RyRs is poorly understood. Using electron cryomicroscopy, here we determine the architecture of rabbit RyR1 at a resolution of 6.1 Å. We show that the cytoplasmic moiety of RyR1 contains two large α-solenoid domains and several smaller domains, with folds suggestive of participation in protein-protein interactions. The transmembrane domain represents a chimaera of voltage-gated sodium and pH-activated ion channels. We identify the calcium-binding EF-hand domain and show that it functions as a conformational switch allosterically gating the channel. PMID:25470059

  9. Ryanodine receptor physiology and its role in disease.

    PubMed

    Lanner, Johanna T

    2012-01-01

    The ryanodine receptors (RyRs) is the major intracellular Ca(2+) release channel localized in the plasma membrane of the endoplasmatic/sarcoplasmatic reticulum. RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release is crucial for every heart beat and skeletal muscle contraction and also important in learning and memory. Given the important role RyR has in physiological functions it is not surprising that dysregulation and impaired RyR channel function contributes to severe pathologies e.g. cardiac arrhythmias and Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in the RyR channels are associated with a number of human disorders e.g. malignant hyperthermia (MH) and central core disease (CCD), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD). RyRs are modulated directly and indirectly by various ions, small molecules and proteins and RyR structure and function are expected to be defined within this macromolecular set of interactions. This article discusses the physiological function of RyR and examines its role in disorders and diseases. PMID:22453944

  10. Intracellular Zinc Modulates Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor-mediated Calcium Release.

    PubMed

    Woodier, Jason; Rainbow, Richard D; Stewart, Alan J; Pitt, Samantha J

    2015-07-10

    Aberrant Zn(2+) homeostasis is a hallmark of certain cardiomyopathies associated with altered contractile force. In this study, we addressed whether Zn(2+) modulates cardiac ryanodine receptor gating and Ca(2+) dynamics in isolated cardiomyocytes. We reveal that Zn(2+) is a high affinity regulator of RyR2 displaying three modes of operation. Picomolar free Zn(2+) concentrations potentiate RyR2 responses, but channel activation is still dependent on the presence of cytosolic Ca(2+). At concentrations of free Zn(2+) >1 nm, Zn(2+) is the main activating ligand, and the dependence on Ca(2+) is removed. Zn(2+) is therefore a higher affinity activator of RyR2 than Ca(2+). Millimolar levels of free Zn(2+) were found to inhibit channel openings. In cardiomyocytes, consistent with our single channel results, we show that Zn(2+) modulates both the frequency and amplitude of Ca(2+) waves in a concentration-dependent manner and that physiological levels of Zn(2+) elicit Ca(2+) release in the absence of activating levels of cytosolic Ca(2+). This highlights a new role for intracellular Zn(2+) in shaping Ca(2+) dynamics in cardiomyocytes through modulation of RyR2 gating. PMID:26041778

  11. Intracellular Zinc Modulates Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor-mediated Calcium Release*

    PubMed Central

    Woodier, Jason; Rainbow, Richard D.; Stewart, Alan J.; Pitt, Samantha J.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant Zn2+ homeostasis is a hallmark of certain cardiomyopathies associated with altered contractile force. In this study, we addressed whether Zn2+ modulates cardiac ryanodine receptor gating and Ca2+ dynamics in isolated cardiomyocytes. We reveal that Zn2+ is a high affinity regulator of RyR2 displaying three modes of operation. Picomolar free Zn2+ concentrations potentiate RyR2 responses, but channel activation is still dependent on the presence of cytosolic Ca2+. At concentrations of free Zn2+ >1 nm, Zn2+ is the main activating ligand, and the dependence on Ca2+ is removed. Zn2+ is therefore a higher affinity activator of RyR2 than Ca2+. Millimolar levels of free Zn2+ were found to inhibit channel openings. In cardiomyocytes, consistent with our single channel results, we show that Zn2+ modulates both the frequency and amplitude of Ca2+ waves in a concentration-dependent manner and that physiological levels of Zn2+ elicit Ca2+ release in the absence of activating levels of cytosolic Ca2+. This highlights a new role for intracellular Zn2+ in shaping Ca2+ dynamics in cardiomyocytes through modulation of RyR2 gating. PMID:26041778

  12. Drosophila Ryanodine Receptors Mediate General Anesthesia by Halothane

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shuying; Sandstrom, David J.; Smith, Harold E.; High, Brigit; Marsh, Jon W.; Nash, Howard A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although in vitro studies have identified numerous possible targets, the molecules that mediate the in vivo effects of volatile anesthetics remain largely unknown. The mammalian ryanodine receptor (Ryr) is a known halothane target, and we hypothesized that it has a central role in anesthesia. Methods Gene function of the Drosophila Ryr (dRyr) was manipulated in the whole body or in specific tissues using a collection of mutants and transgenes, and responses to halothane were measured with a reactive climbing assay. Cellular responses to halothane were studied using Ca2+ imaging and patch clamp electrophysiology. Results Halothane potency strongly correlates with dRyr gene copy number, and missense mutations in regions known to be functionally important in mammalian Ryrs gene cause dominant hypersensitivity. Tissue-specific manipulation of dRyr shows that expression in neurons and glia, but not muscle, mediates halothane sensitivity. In cultured cells, halothane-induced Ca2+ efflux is strictly dRyr-dependent, suggesting a close interaction between halothane and dRyr. Ca2+ imaging and electrophysiology of Drosophila central neurons reveal halothane-induced Ca2+ flux that is altered in dRyr mutants and correlates with strong hyperpolarization. Conclusions In Drosophila, neurally-expressed dRyr mediates a substantial proportion of halothane's anesthetic effects in vivo, is potently activated by halothane in vitro, and activates an inhibitory conductance. Our results provide support for Ryr as an important mediator of immobilization by volatile anesthetics. PMID:23254148

  13. Fluorescent probes for insect ryanodine receptors: candidate anthranilic diamides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Guo, Lei; Qi, Suzhen; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Kechang; Liu, Ruiquan; Liang, Pei; Casida, John E; Liu, Shangzhong

    2014-01-01

    Diamide insecticides with high efficacy against pests and good environmental safety are broadly applied in crop protection. They act at a poorly-defined site in the very complex ryanodine (Ry) receptor (RyR) potentially accessible to a fluorescent probe. Two N-propynyl analogs of the major anthranilic diamide insecticides chlorantraniliprole (Chlo) and cyantraniliprole (Cyan) were accordingly synthesized and converted into two fluorescent ligands by click reaction coupling with 3-azido-7-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one. The new diamide analogs and fluorescent ligands were shown to be nearly as potent as Chlo and Cyan in inhibition of [3H]Chlo binding and stimulation of [3H]Ry binding in house fly thoracic muscle RyR. Although the newly synthesized compounds had only moderate activity in insect larvicidal activity assays, their high in vitro potency in a validated insect RyR binding assay encourages further development of fluorescent probes for insect RyRs. PMID:24699151

  14. Insect Ryanodine Receptor: Distinct But Coupled Insecticide Binding Sites for [N-C3H3]Chlorantraniliprole, Flubendiamide, and [3H]Ryanodine

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, André K.; Qi, Suzhen; Sarpong, Richmond; Casida, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Radiolabeled anthranilic diamide insecticide [N-C3H3]chlorantraniliprole was synthesized at high specific activity and compared with phthalic diamide insecticide flubendiamide and [3H]ryanodine in radioligand binding studies with house fly muscle membranes to provide the first direct evidence with a native insect ryanodine receptor that the major anthranilic and phthalic diamide insecticides bind at different allosterically coupled sites, i.e. there are three distinct Ca2+-release channel targets for insecticide action. PMID:22856329

  15. Marked Sexual Dimorphism in the Role of the Ryanodine Receptor in a Model of Pain Chronification in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Luiz F; Khomula, Eugen V; Araldi, Dionéia; Levine, Jon D

    2016-01-01

    Hyperalgesic priming, an estrogen dependent model of the transition to chronic pain, produced by agonists at receptors that activate protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε), occurs in male but not in female rats. However, activation of second messengers downstream of PKCε, such as the ryanodine receptor, induces priming in both sexes. Since estrogen regulates intracellular calcium, we investigated the interaction between estrogen and ryanodine in the susceptibility to develop priming in females. The lowest dose of ryanodine able to induce priming in females (1 pg) is 1/100,000(th) that needed in males (100 ng), an effect dependent on the activation of ryanodine receptors. Treatment of female rats with antisense to estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), but not beta (ERβ), mRNA, prevented the induction of priming by low dose ryanodine, and the ERα agonist, PPT, induced ryanodine receptor-dependent priming. In vitro application of ryanodine in low concentration (2 nM) to small DRG neurons cultured from females, significantly potentiated calcium release via ryanodine receptors induced by caffeine. This effect was only observed in IB4+ neurons, cultured in the presence of β-estradiol or PPT. Our results demonstrate a profound regulatory role of ERα in ryanodine receptor-dependent transition to chronic pain. PMID:27499186

  16. Marked Sexual Dimorphism in the Role of the Ryanodine Receptor in a Model of Pain Chronification in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Luiz F.; Khomula, Eugen V.; Araldi, Dionéia; Levine, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperalgesic priming, an estrogen dependent model of the transition to chronic pain, produced by agonists at receptors that activate protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε), occurs in male but not in female rats. However, activation of second messengers downstream of PKCε, such as the ryanodine receptor, induces priming in both sexes. Since estrogen regulates intracellular calcium, we investigated the interaction between estrogen and ryanodine in the susceptibility to develop priming in females. The lowest dose of ryanodine able to induce priming in females (1 pg) is 1/100,000th that needed in males (100 ng), an effect dependent on the activation of ryanodine receptors. Treatment of female rats with antisense to estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), but not beta (ERβ), mRNA, prevented the induction of priming by low dose ryanodine, and the ERα agonist, PPT, induced ryanodine receptor-dependent priming. In vitro application of ryanodine in low concentration (2 nM) to small DRG neurons cultured from females, significantly potentiated calcium release via ryanodine receptors induced by caffeine. This effect was only observed in IB4+ neurons, cultured in the presence of β-estradiol or PPT. Our results demonstrate a profound regulatory role of ERα in ryanodine receptor-dependent transition to chronic pain. PMID:27499186

  17. Modulation of Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor Channels by Alkaline Earth Cations

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Sylvester, Paula L.; Porta, Maura; Copello, Julio A.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) function is modulated by Ca2+ and Mg2+. To better characterize Ca2+ and Mg2+ binding sites involved in RyR2 regulation, the effects of cytosolic and luminal earth alkaline divalent cations (M2+: Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+) were studied on RyR2 from pig ventricle reconstituted in bilayers. RyR2 were activated by M2+ binding to high affinity activating sites at the cytosolic channel surface, specific for Ca2+ or Sr2+. This activation was interfered by Mg2+ and Ba2+ acting at low affinity M2+-unspecific binding sites. When testing the effects of luminal M2+ as current carriers, all M2+ increased maximal RyR2 open probability (compared to Cs+), suggesting the existence of low affinity activating M2+-unspecific sites at the luminal surface. Responses to M2+ vary from channel to channel (heterogeneity). However, with luminal Ba2+or Mg2+, RyR2 were less sensitive to cytosolic Ca2+ and caffeine-mediated activation, openings were shorter and voltage-dependence was more marked (compared to RyR2 with luminal Ca2+or Sr2+). Kinetics of RyR2 with mixtures of luminal Ba2+/Ca2+ and additive action of luminal plus cytosolic Ba2+ or Mg2+ suggest luminal M2+ differentially act on luminal sites rather than accessing cytosolic sites through the pore. This suggests the presence of additional luminal activating Ca2+/Sr2+-specific sites, which stabilize high Po mode (less voltage-dependent) and increase RyR2 sensitivity to cytosolic Ca2+ activation. In summary, RyR2 luminal and cytosolic surfaces have at least two sets of M2+ binding sites (specific for Ca2+ and unspecific for Ca2+/Mg2+) that dynamically modulate channel activity and gating status, depending on SR voltage. PMID:22039534

  18. Cardiomyocyte ryanodine receptor degradation by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Pedrozo, Zully; Torrealba, Natalia; Fernández, Carolina; Gatica, Damian; Toro, Barbra; Quiroga, Clara; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Sanchez, Gina; Gillette, Thomas G.; Hill, Joseph A.; Donoso, Paulina; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Time for primary review: 15 days Aims Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is a selective mechanism for the degradation of soluble cytosolic proteins bearing the sequence KFERQ. These proteins are targeted by chaperones and delivered to lysosomes where they are translocated into the lysosomal lumen and degraded via the lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2A (LAMP-2A). Mutations in LAMP2 that inhibit autophagy result in Danon disease characterized by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) plays a key role in cardiomyocyte excitation–contraction and its dysfunction can lead to cardiac failure. Whether RyR2 is degraded by CMA is unknown. Methods and results To induce CMA, cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were treated with geldanamycin (GA) to promote protein degradation through this pathway. GA increased LAMP-2A levels together with its redistribution and colocalization with Hsc70 in the perinuclear region, changes indicative of CMA activation. The inhibition of lysosomes but not proteasomes prevented the loss of RyR2. The recovery of RyR2 content after incubation with GA by siRNA targeting LAMP-2A suggests that RyR2 is degraded via CMA. In silico analysis also revealed that the RyR2 sequence harbours six KFERQ motifs which are required for the recognition Hsc70 and its degradation via CMA. Our data suggest that presenilins are involved in RyR2 degradation by CMA. Conclusion These findings are consistent with a model in which oxidative damage of the RyR2 targets it for turnover by presenilins and CMA, which could lead to removal of damaged or leaky RyR2 channels. PMID:23404999

  19. Presence and functional significance of presynaptic ryanodine receptors.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Ron; Pattarini, Roberto; Geiger, Jonathan D

    2003-04-01

    Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR) mediated by sarcoplasmic reticulum resident ryanodine receptors (RyRs) has been well described in cardiac, skeletal and smooth muscle. In brain, RyRs are localised primarily to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and have been demonstrated in postsynaptic entities, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes where they regulate intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), membrane potential and the activity of a variety of second messenger systems. Recently, the contribution of presynaptic RyRs and CICR to functions of central and peripheral presynaptic terminals, including neurotransmitter release, has received increased attention. However, there is no general agreement that RyRs are localised to presynaptic terminals, nor is it clear that RyRs regulate a large enough pool of intracellular Ca(2+) to be physiologically significant. Here, we review direct and indirect evidence that on balance favours the notion that ER and RyRs are found in presynaptic terminals and are physiologically significant. In so doing, it became obvious that some of the controversy originates from issues related to (i) the ability to demonstrate conclusively the physical presence of ER and RyRs, (ii) whether the biophysical properties of RyRs are such that they can contribute physiologically to regulation of presynaptic [Ca(2+)](i), (iii) how ER Ca(2+) load and feedback gain of CICR contributes to the ability to detect functionally relevant RyRs, (iv) the distance that Ca(2+) diffuses from plasma membranes to RyRs to trigger CICR and from RyRs to the Active Zone to enhance vesicle release, and (v) the experimental conditions used. The recognition that ER Ca(2+) stores are able to modulate local Ca(2+) levels and neurotransmitter release in presynaptic terminals will aid in the understanding of the cellular mechanisms controlling neuronal function. PMID:12880633

  20. Ryanodine receptor dysfunction and triggered activity in the heart.

    PubMed

    Katra, Rodolphe P; Oya, Toshiyuki; Hoeker, Gregory S; Laurita, Kenneth R

    2007-05-01

    Arrhythmogenesis has been increasingly linked to cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR) dysfunction. However, the mechanistic relationship between abnormal RyR function and arrhythmogenesis in the heart is not clear. We hypothesize that, under abnormal RyR conditions, triggered activity will be caused by spontaneous calcium release (SCR) events that depend on transmural heterogeneities of calcium handling. We performed high-resolution optical mapping of intracellular calcium and transmembrane potential in the canine left ventricular wedge preparation (n = 28). Rapid pacing was used to initiate triggered activity under normal and abnormal RyR conditions induced by FKBP12.6 dissociation and beta-adrenergic stimulation (20-150 microM rapamycin, 0.2 microM isoproterenol). Under abnormal RyR conditions, almost all preparations experienced SCRs and triggered activity, in contrast to control, rapamycin, or isoproterenol conditions alone. Furthermore, under abnormal RyR conditions, complex arrhythmias (monomorphic and polymorphic tachycardia) were commonly observed. After washout of rapamycin and isoproterenol, no triggered activity was observed. Surprisingly, triggered activity and SCRs occurred preferentially near the epicardium but not the endocardium (P < 0.01). Interestingly, the occurrence of triggered activity and SCR events could not be explained by cytoplasmic calcium levels, but rather by fast calcium reuptake kinetics. These data suggest that, under abnormal RyR conditions, triggered activity is caused by multiple SCR events that depend on the faster calcium reuptake kinetics near the epicardium. Furthermore, multiple regions of SCR may be a mechanism for multifocal arrhythmias associated with RyR dysfunction. PMID:17189349

  1. Modulation of cardiac ryanodine receptor channels by alkaline earth cations.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Sylvester, Paula L; Porta, Maura; Copello, Julio A

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) function is modulated by Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). To better characterize Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) binding sites involved in RyR2 regulation, the effects of cytosolic and luminal earth alkaline divalent cations (M(2+): Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+)) were studied on RyR2 from pig ventricle reconstituted in bilayers. RyR2 were activated by M(2+) binding to high affinity activating sites at the cytosolic channel surface, specific for Ca(2+) or Sr(2+). This activation was interfered by Mg(2+) and Ba(2+) acting at low affinity M(2+)-unspecific binding sites. When testing the effects of luminal M(2+) as current carriers, all M(2+) increased maximal RyR2 open probability (compared to Cs(+)), suggesting the existence of low affinity activating M(2+)-unspecific sites at the luminal surface. Responses to M(2+) vary from channel to channel (heterogeneity). However, with luminal Ba(2+)or Mg(2+), RyR2 were less sensitive to cytosolic Ca(2+) and caffeine-mediated activation, openings were shorter and voltage-dependence was more marked (compared to RyR2 with luminal Ca(2+)or Sr(2+)). Kinetics of RyR2 with mixtures of luminal Ba(2+)/Ca(2+) and additive action of luminal plus cytosolic Ba(2+) or Mg(2+) suggest luminal M(2+) differentially act on luminal sites rather than accessing cytosolic sites through the pore. This suggests the presence of additional luminal activating Ca(2+)/Sr(2+)-specific sites, which stabilize high P(o) mode (less voltage-dependent) and increase RyR2 sensitivity to cytosolic Ca(2+) activation. In summary, RyR2 luminal and cytosolic surfaces have at least two sets of M(2+) binding sites (specific for Ca(2+) and unspecific for Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)) that dynamically modulate channel activity and gating status, depending on SR voltage. PMID:22039534

  2. Ryanodine and inositol trisphosphate receptors are differentially distributed and expressed in rat parotid gland.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Wen, J; Bidasee, K R; Besch, H R; Wojcikiewicz, R J; Lee, B; Rubin, R P

    1999-01-01

    The present study examines the cellular distribution of the ryanodine receptor/channel (RyR) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R) subtypes in parotid acini. Using fluorescently labelled 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-propionic acid glycyl-ryanodine (BODIPYtrade mark-ryanodine) and confocal microscopy, RyRs were localized primarily to the perinuclear region (basal pole) of the acinar cell. Ryanodine, Ruthenium Red, cAMP and cADP ribose (cADPR) competed with BODIPY-ryanodine, resulting in a reduction in the fluorescence signal. However, inositol 1,4, 5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] did not alter the binding of BODIPY-ryanodine. Using receptor-subtype-specific antisera, InsP3Rs (types I, II and III) were located predominantly in the apical pole of the parotid cell. The presence of these three subtypes was confirmed using reverse transcriptase PCR with RNA-specific oligonucleotide probes. Binding studies using a parotid cell-membrane fraction identified and characterized RyRs and InsP3Rs in terms of binding affinity (Kd) and maximum binding capacity (Bmax) and confirmed that cADPR displaces ryanodine from its binding sites. Ruthenium Red and 8-Br-cADP-ribose blocked Ca2+ release in permeabilized acinar cells in response to cADPR and cAMP or forskolin, whereas Ins(1,4,5)P3-induced Ca2+ release was unaffected. The localization of the RyRs and InsP3Rs in discrete regions endow broad areas of the parotid cell with ligand-activated Ca2+ channels. The consequences of the dual activation of the RyRs and InsP3Rs by physiologically relevant stimuli such as noradrenaline (norepinephrine) are considered in relation to Ca2+ signalling in the parotid gland. PMID:10333498

  3. Disease Mutations in the Ryanodine Receptor Central Region: Crystal Structures of a Phosphorylation Hot Spot Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Yuchi, Zhiguang; Lau, Kelvin; Van Petegem, Filip

    2015-02-09

    Ryanodine Receptors (RyRs) are huge Ca{sup 2+} release channels in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and form targets for phosphorylation and disease mutations. We present crystal structures of a domain in three RyR isoforms, containing the Ser2843 (RyR1) and Ser2808/Ser2814 (RyR2) phosphorylation sites. The RyR1 domain is the target for 11 disease mutations. Several of these are clustered near the phosphorylation sites, suggesting that phosphorylation and disease mutations may affect the same interface. The L2867G mutation causes a drastic thermal destabilization and aggregation at room temperature. Crystal structures for other disease mutants show that they affect surface properties and intradomain salt bridges. In vitro phosphorylation experiments show that up to five residues in one long loop of RyR2 can be phosphorylated by PKA or CaMKII. Docking into cryo-electron microscopy maps suggests a putative location in the clamp region, implying that mutations and phosphorylation may affect the allosteric motions within this area.

  4. Molecular characterization of a ryanodine receptor gene from Spodoptera exigua and its upregulation by chlorantraniliprole.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lina; Qiu, Guisheng; Cui, Li; Ma, Chunsen; Yuan, Huizhu

    2015-09-01

    Chlorantraniliprole is a novel diamide insecticide that targets the insect ryanodine receptor, a Ca(2+) release channel. Spodoptera exigua is a significant insect pest, and chlorantraniliprole is the most popular diamide insecticide used against this pest. To better understand the effects of diamides on RyR expression and [Ca(2+)], we isolated the SeRyR cDNA and investigated changes in SeRyR expression as a result of the application of chlorantraniliprole. The full-length cDNAs of SeRyR contain an open reading frame (ORF) of 15,357 bp with a predicted protein consisting of 5118 amino acids. SeRyR shares 77-92% identity with other insect RyR isoforms and 45-47% identity with vertebrate RyR isoforms. Furthermore, the relative expression abundances of RyR mRNA extracted from S. exigua fat body cells after 24 h of culture in 0.1, 1, 10, 100 nM, 1 µM and 100 µM of chlorantraniliprole changed 1.04-, 0.89-, 1.83-, 2.58-, 4.03- and 3.12-fold compared to blank control, respectively. The regression equation for the relative expression levels of SeRyR after 24 h as a function of the chlorantraniliprole concentration was Y = 0.6455 + 0.8188LgX, R(2) = 0.97093 for the cell line IOZCAS-Spex-II. These results outline the effects of chlorantraniliprole on the expression of SeRyR and provide a basis for the discovery of a compound that may exhibit selective insect activity. PMID:26267053

  5. Highly cooperative and hysteretic response of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor to changes in proton concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, J; Zhao, J

    1994-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors are key molecules in excitation-contraction coupling of skeletal muscle. They form the pore of the calcium release channel, which is regulated by Ca and ATP. Multiple proton titration sites are involved in controlling the different open states of the channel, as indicated by the following: i) the channel had a biphasic response to changes in proton concentrations around neutral pH; ii) the activities of the channel were inhibited by acidic pHs in a highly cooperative manner; and iii) the channel exhibited pronounced hysteresis to changes in pH. Four distinct conductance states can be identified in the single ryanodine-activated calcium release channel. The distribution of the multiple conductance states depends on the level of [Ca], ATP, and pH in the recording solution. The data are consistent with the multimeric structure of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:7948677

  6. Spaceflight regulates ryanodine receptor subtype 1 in portal vein myocytes in the opposite way of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dabertrand, Fabrice; Porte, Yves; Macrez, Nathalie; Morel, Jean-Luc

    2012-02-01

    Gravity has a structural role for living systems. Tissue development, architecture, and organization are modified when the gravity vector is changed. In particular, microgravity induces a redistribution of blood volume and thus pressure in the astronaut body, abolishing an upright blood pressure gradient, inducing orthostatic hypotension. The present study was designed to investigate whether isolated vascular smooth muscle cells are directly sensitive to altered gravitational forces and, second, whether sustained blood pressure changes act on the same molecular target. Exposure to microgravity during 8 days in the International Space Station induced the decrease of ryanodine receptor subtype 1 expression in primary cultured myocytes from rat hepatic portal vein. Identical results were found in portal vein from mice exposed to microgravity during an 8-day shuttle spaceflight. To evaluate the functional consequences of this physiological adaptation, we have compared evoked calcium signals obtained in myocytes from hindlimb unloaded rats, in which the shift of blood pressure mimics the one produced by the microgravity, with those obtained in myocytes from rats injected with antisense oligonucleotide directed against ryanodine receptor subtype 1. In both conditions, calcium signals implicating calcium-induced calcium release were significantly decreased. In contrast, in spontaneous hypertensive rat, an increase in ryanodine receptor subtype 1 expression was observed as well as the calcium-induced calcium release mechanism. Taken together, our results shown that myocytes were directly sensitive to gravity level and that they adapt their calcium signaling pathways to pressure by the regulation of the ryanodine receptor subtype 1 expression. PMID:22096120

  7. Nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate activates the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Hohenegger, Martin; Suko, Josef; Gscheidlinger, Regina; Drobny, Helmut; Zidar, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    Calcium is a universal second messenger. The temporal and spatial information that is encoded in Ca(2+)-transients drives processes as diverse as neurotransmitter secretion, axonal outgrowth, immune responses and muscle contraction. Ca(2+)-release from intracellular Ca(2+) stores can be triggered by diffusible second messengers like Ins P (3), cyclic ADP-ribose or nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). A target has not yet been identified for the latter messenger. In the present study we show that nanomolar concentrations of NAADP trigger Ca(2+)-release from skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. This was due to a direct action on the Ca(2+)-release channel/ryanodine receptor type-1, since in single channel recordings, NAADP increased the open probability of the purified channel protein. The effects of NAADP on Ca(2+)-release and open probability of the ryanodine receptor occurred over a similar concentration range (EC(50) approximately 30 nM) and were specific because (i) they were blocked by Ruthenium Red and ryanodine, (ii) the precursor of NAADP, NADP, was ineffective at equimolar concentrations, (iii) NAADP did not affect the conductance and reversal potential of the ryanodine receptor. Finally, we also detected an ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity in the sarcoplasmic reticulum fraction of skeletal muscle. This enzyme was not only capable of synthesizing cyclic GDP-ribose but also NAADP, with an activity of 0.25 nmol/mg/min. Thus, we conclude that NAADP is generated in the vicinity of type 1 ryanodine receptor and leads to activation of this ion channel. PMID:12102654

  8. Rectification of muscle and nerve deficits in paralyzed ryanodine receptor type 1 mutant embryos

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, M. Gartz; Niswander, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    Locomotion and respiration require motor axon connectivity and activation of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Through a forward genetic screen for muscle weakness, we recently reported an allele of ryanodine receptor type 1 (Ryr1AG). Here we reveal a role for functional RyR1 during acetylcholine receptor (AChR) cluster formation and embryonic synaptic transmission. Ryr1AG homozygous embryos are non-motile. Motor axons extend past AChR clusters and enlarged AChR clusters are found under fasciculated nerves. Using physiological and pharmacological methods, we show that contractility can be resumed through the masking of a potassium leak, and evoked vesicular release can be resumed via bypassing the defect in RyR1 induced calcium release. Moreover, we show the involvement of ryanodine receptors in presynaptic release at the NMJ. This data provides evidence of a role for RyR1 on both the pre- and postsynaptic sides of the NMJ. PMID:26025922

  9. Ryanodine receptors are involved in nuclear calcium oscillation in primary pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ji; Chen, Zheng; Yin, Wenxuan; Miao, Lin; Zhou, Zhansong; Ji, Guangju

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that the pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results demonstrate that ryanodine-sensitive Ca{sup 2+} stores exist and have function in the pancreatic {beta}-cell nucleus. -- Abstract: Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are mainly located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and play an important role in regulating glucose-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in pancreatic {beta}-cells. However, subcellular locations and functions of RyRs on other cell organelles such as nuclear envelope are not well understood. In order to investigate the role of RyRs in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation we designed and conducted experiments in intact primary pancreatic {beta}-cells. Immunocytochemistry was used to examine the expression of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate the function of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Laser scanning confocal microscopy studies indicated that application of glucose to the cells co-incubated with Ca{sup 2+} indicator Fluo-4 AM and cell-permeable nuclear indicator Hoechst 33342 resulted in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation. The pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. The reduction of Ca{sup 2+} oscillation amplitude by ryanodine was much greater in the nucleus though both the cytosol and the nucleus Ca{sup 2+} amplitude decreased by ryanodine. Our results suggest that functional ryanodine receptors not only exist in endoplasmic reticulum but are also expressed in nuclear envelope of pancreatic {beta}-cells.

  10. Function and expression of ryanodine receptors and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors in smooth muscle cells of murine feed arteries and arterioles.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Erika B; Goodwin, Erica L; Segal, Steven S; Jackson, William F

    2012-04-15

    We tested the hypothesis that vasomotor control is differentially regulated between feed arteries and downstream arterioles from the cremaster muscle of C57BL/6 mice. In isolated pressurized arteries, confocal Ca(2+) imaging of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) revealed Ca(2+) sparks and Ca(2+) waves. Ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonists (ryanodine and tetracaine) inhibited both sparks and waves but increased global Ca(2+) and myogenic tone. In arterioles, SMCs exhibited only Ca(2+) waves that were insensitive to ryanodine or tetracaine. Pharmacological interventions indicated that RyRs are functionally coupled to large-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK(Ca)) in SMCs of arteries, whereas BK(Ca) appear functionally coupled to voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in SMCs of arterioles. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) antagonists (xestospongin D or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate) or a phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122) attenuated Ca(2+) waves, global Ca(2+) and myogenic tone in arteries and arterioles but had no effect on arterial sparks. Real-time PCR of isolated SMCs revealed RyR2 as the most abundant isoform transcript; arteries expressed twice the RyR2 but only 65% the RyR3 of arterioles and neither vessel expressed RyR1. Immunofluorescent localisation of RyR protein indicated bright, clustered staining of arterial SMCs in contrast to diffuse staining in arteriolar SMCs. Expression of IP(3)R transcripts and protein immunofluorescence were similar in SMCs of both vessels with IP(3)R1>IP(3)R2>IP(3)R3. Despite similar expression of IP(3)Rs and dependence of Ca(2+) waves on IP(3)Rs, these data illustrate pronounced regional heterogeneity in function and expression of RyRs between SMCs of the same vascular resistance network. We conclude that vasomotor control is differentially regulated in feed arteries vs. downstream arterioles. PMID:22331418

  11. The effects of compensated cardiac hypertrophy on dihydropyridine and ryanodine receptors in rat, ferret and guinea-pig hearts.

    PubMed

    Rannou, F; Sainte-Beuve, C; Oliviero, P; Do, E; Trouvé, P; Charlemagne, D

    1995-05-01

    The number of dihydropyridine and ryanodine receptors (DHP-R and RyR) has been measured in control and hypertrophied ventricles from rats, guinea pigs and ferrets to determine whether these two channels contribute to the alterations in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), and in Ca2+ transient during compensated cardiac hypertrophy. We found that ventricular hypertrophy did not change the density of DHP-R. Mild hypertrophy did not alter the density of RyR in the rat but decreased it in the guinea-pig and in the ferret (30% and 36%, respectively). Severe hypertrophy decreased the density of RyR by 20% in the rat and by 34% in the guinea-pig. Therefore, the decrease is greater in ferret and guinea-pig hearts than in rat heart. We conclude that the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channels but not the L-type Ca2+ channels could contribute to the slowing of intracellular Ca2+ movements and to the reduced velocity of shortening of the hypertrophied hearts. We suggest that, in the guinea pig and ferret hearts which express only the beta myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform, the reduced velocity of shortening during hypertrophy is related to the decrease in RyR density, whereas in the rat, it is regulated primarily via a shift in the MHC isoform, except in severe hypertrophy in which the moderate decrease in RyR would also be involved. PMID:7473781

  12. Glucose-Dependent Insulin Secretion in Pancreatic β-Cell Islets from Male Rats Requires Ca2+ Release via ROS-Stimulated Ryanodine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Paola; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Barrientos, Genaro; Valencia, Marco; Mears, David; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells requires an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]). Glucose uptake into β-cells promotes Ca2+ influx and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. In other cell types, Ca2+ and ROS jointly induce Ca2+ release mediated by ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels. Therefore, we explored here if RyR-mediated Ca2+ release contributes to GSIS in β-cell islets isolated from male rats. Stimulatory glucose increased islet insulin secretion, and promoted ROS generation in islets and dissociated β-cells. Conventional PCR assays and immunostaining confirmed that β-cells express RyR2, the cardiac RyR isoform. Extended incubation of β-cell islets with inhibitory ryanodine suppressed GSIS; so did the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), which also decreased insulin secretion induced by glucose plus caffeine. Inhibitory ryanodine or NAC did not affect insulin secretion induced by glucose plus carbachol, which engages inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors. Incubation of islets with H2O2 in basal glucose increased insulin secretion 2-fold. Inhibitory ryanodine significantly decreased H2O2-stimulated insulin secretion and prevented the 4.5-fold increase of cytoplasmic [Ca2+] produced by incubation of dissociated β-cells with H2O2. Addition of stimulatory glucose or H2O2 (in basal glucose) to β-cells disaggregated from islets increased RyR2 S-glutathionylation to similar levels, measured by a proximity ligation assay; in contrast, NAC significantly reduced the RyR2 S-glutathionylation increase produced by stimulatory glucose. We propose that RyR2-mediated Ca2+ release, induced by the concomitant increases in [Ca2+] and ROS produced by stimulatory glucose, is an essential step in GSIS. PMID:26046640

  13. Evidence for the transport of glutathione through ryanodine receptor channel type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Bánhegyi, Gábor; Csala, Miklós; Nagy, Gábor; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Fulceri, Rosella; Benedetti, Angelo

    2003-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the role of RyR1 (ryanodine receptor calcium channel type 1) in glutathione (GSH) transport through the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane of skeletal muscles. Lanthanum chloride, a prototypic blocker of cation channels, inhibited the influx and efflux of GSH in SR vesicles. Using a rapid-filtration-based assay and lanthanum chloride as a transport blocker, an uptake of radiolabelled GSH into SR vesicles was observed. Pretreatment of SR vesicles with the RyR1 antagonists Ruthenium Red and ryanodine as well as with lanthanum chloride blocked the GSH uptake. An SR-like GSH uptake appeared in microsomes obtained from an HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney 293) cell line after transfection of RyR1. These observations strongly suggest that RyR1 mediates GSH transport through the SR membranes of skeletal muscles. PMID:14519101

  14. Dust from hog confinement facilities impairs Ca2+ mobilization from sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum by inhibiting ryanodine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Chengju; Moore, Caronda J.; Dodmane, Puttappa; Shao, Chun Hong; Romberger, Debra J.; Toews, Myron L.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals working in commercial hog confinement facilities have elevated incidences of headaches, depression, nausea, skeletal muscle weakness, fatigue, gastrointestinal disorders, and cardiovascular diseases, and the molecular mechanisms for these nonrespiratory ailments remain incompletely undefined. A common element underlying these diverse pathophysiologies is perturbation of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. This study assessed whether the dust generated inside hog confinement facilities contains compounds that alter Ca2+ mobilization via ryanodine receptors (RyRs), key intracellular channels responsible for mobilizing Ca2+ from internal stores to elicit an array of physiologic functions. Hog barn dust (HBD) was extracted with phosphate-buffered saline, sterile-filtered (0.22 μm), and size-separated using Sephadex G-100 resin. Fractions (F) 1 through 9 (Mw >10,000 Da) had no measurable effects on RyR isoforms. However, F10 through F17, which contained compounds of Mw ≤2,000 Da, modulated the [3H]ryanodine binding to RyR1, RyR2, and RyR3 in a biphasic (Gaussian) manner. The Ki values for F13, the most potent fraction, were 3.8 ± 0.2 μg/ml for RyR1, 0.2 ± 0.01 μg/ml and 19.1 ± 2.8 μg/ml for RyR2 (two binding sites), and 44.9 ± 2.8 μg/ml and 501.6 ± 9.2 μg/ml for RyR3 (two binding sites). In lipid bilayer assays, F13 dose-dependently decreased the open probabilities of RyR1, RyR2, and RyR3. Pretreating differentiated mouse skeletal myotubes (C2C12 cells) with F13 blunted the amplitudes of ryanodine- and K+-induced Ca2+ transients. Because RyRs are present in many cell types, impairment in Ca2+ mobilization from internal stores via these channels is a possible mechanism by which HBD may trigger these seemingly unrelated pathophysiologies. PMID:23288552

  15. Structure-activity relationship of non-coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls toward skeletal muscle ryanodine receptors in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Erika B.; Pessah, Isaac N.

    2013-01-01

    Research addressing the health impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has primarily focused on the effects of coplanar, or dioxin-like (DL), congeners, which is especially true for research assessing impacts in fish species. Ortho substituted non-coplanar, termed non-dioxin-like (NDL), PCBs have received less attention. In mammals, NDL PCBs enhance the activity of ryanodine receptors (RyR), calcium release channels necessary for engaging excitation-contraction (EC) coupling in striated muscle. We utilized in vitro receptor binding analysis to determine whether NDL PCB congeners detected in aquatic environments alter the activity of RyR isoform 1 (RyR1) found in the skeletal muscle of rainbow trout. Congeners 52, 95, 136, and 149 were the most efficacious leading to an increase in receptor activity that was approximately 250% greater than that found under solvent control conditions. Other environmentally relevant congeners, namely PCB 153, 151 and 101, which all contain two or more chlorines in the ortho-position, enhanced receptor activity by greater than 160% of baseline. The mono-ortho congeners or the non-ortho PCB 77 had negligible impact on the RyR1. When combined, in binary or environmentally relevant mixtures, congeners shown to enhance receptor activity appeared to display additivity and when the active PCB 95 was present with the non-active congener PCB 77 the impact on receptor activity was reduced from 250% to 230%. The important role of the RyR and the demonstrated additive nature of NDL congeners towards altering channel function calls for further investigation into the ecological implications of altered RyR function in fish with high PCB burdens. PMID:23827775

  16. Carbonylation Induces Heterogeneity in Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor Function in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chun Hong; Tian, Chengju; Ouyang, Shouqiang; Moore, Caronda J.; Alomar, Fadhel; Nemet, Ina; D'Souza, Alicia; Nagai, Ryoji; Kutty, Shelby; Rozanski, George J.; Ramanadham, Sasanka; Singh, Jaipaul

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure and arrhythmias occur at 3 to 5 times higher rates among individuals with diabetes mellitus, compared with age-matched, healthy individuals. Studies attribute these defects in part to alterations in the function of cardiac type 2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2s), the principal Ca2+-release channels on the internal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). To date, mechanisms underlying RyR2 dysregulation in diabetes remain poorly defined. A rat model of type 1 diabetes, in combination with echocardiography, in vivo and ex vivo hemodynamic studies, confocal microscopy, Western blotting, mass spectrometry, site-directed mutagenesis, and [3H]ryanodine binding, lipid bilayer, and transfection assays, was used to determine whether post-translational modification by reactive carbonyl species (RCS) represented a contributing cause. After 8 weeks of diabetes, spontaneous Ca2+ release in ventricular myocytes increased ∼5-fold. Evoked Ca2+ release from the SR was nonuniform (dyssynchronous). Total RyR2 protein levels remained unchanged, but the ability to bind the Ca2+-dependent ligand [3H]ryanodine was significantly reduced. Western blotting and mass spectrometry revealed RCS adducts on select basic residues. Mutation of residues to delineate the physiochemical impact of carbonylation yielded channels with enhanced or reduced cytoplasmic Ca2+ responsiveness. The prototype RCS methylglyoxal increased and then decreased the RyR2 open probability. Methylglyoxal also increased spontaneous Ca2+ release and induced Ca2+ waves in healthy myocytes. Treatment of diabetic rats with RCS scavengers normalized spontaneous and evoked Ca2+ release from the SR, reduced carbonylation of RyR2s, and increased binding of [3H]ryanodine to RyR2s. From these data, we conclude that post-translational modification by RCS contributes to the heterogeneity in RyR2 activity that is seen in experimental diabetes. PMID:22648972

  17. The role of ryanodine receptor type 3 in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Supnet, Charlene; Sun, Suya; Zhang, Hua; Good, Levi; Popugaeva, Elena; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium (Ca2+) signaling is reported to play an important role in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis. The role of ER Ca2+ release channels, the ryanodine receptors (RyanRs), has been extensively studied in AD models and RyanR expression and activity are upregulated in the brains of various familial AD (FAD) models. The objective of this study was to utilize a genetic approach to evaluate the importance of RyanR type 3 (RyanR3) in the context of AD pathology. PMID:24476841

  18. FKBP12.6 binding of ryanodine receptors carrying mutations associated with arrhythmogenic cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Zissimopoulos, Spyros; Thomas, N Lowri; Jamaluddin, Wan W; Lai, F Anthony

    2009-04-15

    In the present paper we show that distinct human RyR2 (ryanodine receptor type 2) inherited mutations expressed in mammalian cells exhibit either unaltered or increased FKBP12.6 (12.6 kDa FK506-binding protein) binding compared with the wild-type. Oxidizing conditions result in decreased FKBP12.6 binding, but to the same extent as for the wild-type. Our findings suggest that FKBP12.6 regulation of RyR2 is unlikely to be the primary defect in inherited arrhythmogenic cardiac disease. PMID:19226252

  19. A rare genetic variant of the ryanodine receptor in a suspected malignant hyperthermia susceptible patient.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Emily Jane; Wilkerson, Carlos; Kraeva, Natalia; Rosenberg, Henry; Kennedy, Tara

    2016-09-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) remains a diagnostic challenge. This case report describes the anesthetic management of a suspected intraoperative MH episode and the subsequent, genetic sequence analysis of 3 genes associated with MH. The results of the molecular genetic testing revealed heterozygosity for a rare variant, c.12553G>A (p.Ala4185Thr), in the RYR1 gene encoding the ryanodine receptor. Although the RYR1 gene has previously been implicated in the pathogenesis of MH, (1) this particular variant has only been reported in one other case of MH; (2) the role for diagnostic genetic testing in the diagnosis of MH will be examined. PMID:27555149

  20. Disease mutations in the ryanodine receptor N-terminal region couple to a mobile intersubunit interface

    PubMed Central

    Kimlicka, Lynn; Lau, Kelvin; Tung, Ching-Chieh; Van Petegem, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors are large channels that release Ca2+ from the endoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticulum. Hundreds of RyR mutations can cause cardiac and skeletal muscle disorders, yet detailed mechanisms explaining their effects have been lacking. Here we compare pseudo-atomic models and propose that channel opening coincides with widening of a cytoplasmic vestibule formed by the N-terminal region, thus altering an interface targeted by 20 disease mutations. We solve crystal structures of several disease mutants that affect intrasubunit domain–domain interfaces. Mutations affecting intrasubunit ionic pairs alter relative domain orientations, and thus couple to surrounding interfaces. Buried disease mutations cause structural changes that also connect to the intersubunit contact area. These results suggest that the intersubunit contact region between N-terminal domains is a prime target for disease mutations, direct or indirect, and we present a model whereby ryanodine receptors and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors are activated by altering domain arrangements in the N-terminal region. PMID:23422674

  1. Ryanodine receptors selectively contribute to the formation of taste-evoked calcium signals in mouse taste cells

    PubMed Central

    Rebello, Michelle R.; Medler, Kathryn F.

    2010-01-01

    The peripheral taste system uses multiple signaling pathways to transduce a stimulus into an output signal that activates afferent neurons. All of these signaling pathways depend on transient increases in intracellular calcium but the current understanding of these calcium signals is not well-developed. Using molecular and physiological techniques, this study establishes that ryanodine receptors (RyRs), specifically isoform 1, are expressed in taste cells and that their physiological function differs among cell types employing different signaling pathways. RyR1 contributes to some taste-evoked signals that rely on calcium release from internal stores but can also supplement the calcium signal that is initiated by opening VGCCs. In taste cells expressing both signaling pathways, RyR1 contributes to the depolarization-induced calcium signal but not to the calcium signal that depends on calcium release from stores. These data suggest that RyR1 is an important regulator of calcium signaling and that its physiological role in taste cells is dictated by the nature of the calcium signaling mechanisms expressed. PMID:20955474

  2. Heterogeneous function of ryanodine receptors, but not IP3 receptors, in hamster cremaster muscle feed arteries and arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Westcott, Erika B.

    2011-01-01

    The roles played by ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) in vascular smooth muscle in the microcirculation remain unclear. Therefore, the function of both RyRs and IP3Rs in Ca2+ signals and myogenic tone in hamster cremaster muscle feed arteries and downstream arterioles were assessed using confocal imaging and pressure myography. Feed artery vascular smooth muscle displayed Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ waves, which were inhibited by the RyR antagonists ryanodine (10 μM) or tetracaine (100 μM). Despite the inhibition of sparks and waves, ryanodine or tetracaine increased global intracellular Ca2+ and constricted the arteries. The blockade of IP3Rs with xestospongin D (5 μM) or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (100 μM) or the inhibition of phospholipase C using U-73122 (10 μM) also attenuated Ca2+ waves without affecting Ca2+ sparks. Importantly, the IP3Rs and phospholipase C antagonists decreased global intracellular Ca2+ and dilated the arteries. In contrast, cremaster arterioles displayed only Ca2+ waves: Ca2+ sparks were not observed, and neither ryanodine (10–50 μM) nor tetracaine (100 μM) affected either Ca2+ signals or arteriolar tone despite the presence of functional RyRs as assessed by responses to the RyR agonist caffeine (10 mM). As in feed arteries, arteriolar Ca2+ waves were attenuated by xestospongin D (5 μM), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (100 μM), and U-73122 (10 μM), accompanied by decreased global intracellular Ca2+ and vasodilation. These findings highlight the contrasting roles played by RyRs and IP3Rs in Ca2+ signals and myogenic tone in feed arteries and demonstrate important differences in the function of RyRs between feed arteries and downstream arterioles. PMID:21357503

  3. S100A1 and Calmodulin Compete for the Same Binding Site on Ryanodine Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nathan T.; Prosser, Benjamin L.; Varney, Kristen M.; Zimmer, Danna B.; Schneider, Martin F.; Weber, David J.

    2008-01-01

    In heart and skeletal muscle an S100 protein family member, S100A1, binds to the ryanodine receptor (RyR) and promotes Ca2+ release. Using competition binding assays, we further characterized this system in skeletal muscle and showed that Ca2+-S100A1 competes with Ca2+-calmodulin (CaM) for the same binding site on RyR1. In addition, the NMR structure was determined for Ca2+-S100A1 bound to a peptide derived from this CaM/S100A1 binding domain, a region conserved in RyR1 and RyR2 and termed RyRP12 (residues 3616-3627 in human RyR1). Examination of the S100A1-RyRP12 complex revealed residues of the helical RyRP12 peptide (Lys-3616, Trp-3620, Lys-3622, Leu-3623, Leu-3624, and Lys-3626) that are involved in favorable hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions with Ca2+-S100A1. These same residues were shown previously to be important for RyR1 binding to Ca2+-CaM. A model for regulating muscle contraction is presented in which Ca2+-S100A1 and Ca2+-CaM compete directly for the same binding site on the ryanodine receptor. PMID:18650434

  4. Ca(2+) microdomains, NAADP and type 1 ryanodine receptor in cell activation.

    PubMed

    Guse, Andreas H; Wolf, Insa M A

    2016-06-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a Ca(2+) mobilizing second messenger that belongs to the superfamily of regulatory adenine nucleotides. Though NAADP has been known since 20years, several aspects of its metabolism and molecular mode of action are still under discussion. Though the importance of the type 1 ryanodine receptor was discovered and published already in 2002 Hohenegger et al. (2002 Oct 15) , recent data re-emphasize these original findings in pancreatic acinar cells and in T-lymphocytes. Here we review recent developments in NAADP formation and metabolism, putative target Ca(2+) channels for NAADP with special emphasis on the type 1 ryanodine receptor, and NAADP binding proteins. The latter are basis for a unifying hypothesis for NAADP action. Finally, the role of NAADP in T cell Ca(2+) signaling and activation is discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate . Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26804481

  5. Structure-function relationships of peptides forming the calcin family of ryanodine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Liang; Gurrola, Georgina B; Zhang, Jing; Valdivia, Carmen R; SanMartin, Mario; Zamudio, Fernando Z; Zhang, Liming; Possani, Lourival D; Valdivia, Héctor H

    2016-05-01

    Calcins are a novel family of scorpion peptides that bind with high affinity to ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and increase their activity by inducing subconductance states. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the structure-function relationships of the eight calcins known to date, based on their primary sequence, three-dimensional modeling, and functional effects on skeletal RyRs (RyR1). Primary sequence alignment and evolutionary analysis show high similarity among all calcins (≥78.8% identity). Other common characteristics include an inhibitor cysteine knot (ICK) motif stabilized by three pairs of disulfide bridges and a dipole moment (DM) formed by positively charged residues clustering on one side of the molecule and neutral and negatively charged residues segregating on the opposite side. [(3)H]Ryanodine binding assays, used as an index of the open probability of RyRs, reveal that all eight calcins activate RyR1 dose-dependently with Kd values spanning approximately three orders of magnitude and in the following rank order: opicalcin1 > opicalcin2 > vejocalcin > hemicalcin > imperacalcin > hadrucalcin > maurocalcin > urocalcin. All calcins significantly augment the bell-shaped [Ca(2+)]-[(3)H]ryanodine binding curve with variable effects on the affinity constants for Ca(2+) activation and inactivation. In single channel recordings, calcins induce the appearance of a subconductance state in RyR1 that has a unique fractional value (∼20% to ∼60% of the full conductance state) but bears no relationship to binding affinity, DM, or capacity to stimulate Ca(2+) release. Except for urocalcin, all calcins at 100 nM concentration stimulate Ca(2+) release and deplete Ca(2+) load from skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum. The natural variation within the calcin family of peptides offers a diversified set of high-affinity ligands with the capacity to modulate RyRs with high dynamic range and potency. PMID:27114612

  6. Channel Gating Dependence on Pore Lining Helix Glycine Residues in Skeletal Muscle Ryanodine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yingwu; Xu, Le; Mowrey, David D; Mendez Giraldez, Raul; Wang, Ying; Pasek, Daniel A; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Meissner, Gerhard

    2015-07-10

    Type 1 ryanodine receptors (RyR1s) release Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to initiate skeletal muscle contraction. The role of RyR1-G4934 and -G4941 in the pore-lining helix in channel gating and ion permeation was probed by replacing them with amino acid residues of increasing side chain volume. RyR1-G4934A, -G4941A, and -G4941V mutant channels exhibited a caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release response in HEK293 cells and bound the RyR-specific ligand [(3)H]ryanodine. In single channel recordings, significant differences in the number of channel events and mean open and close times were observed between WT and RyR1-G4934A and -G4941A. RyR1-G4934A had reduced K(+) conductance and ion selectivity compared with WT. Mutations further increasing the side chain volume at these positions (G4934V and G4941I) resulted in reduced caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release in HEK293 cells, low [(3)H]ryanodine binding levels, and channels that were not regulated by Ca(2+) and did not conduct Ca(2+) in single channel measurements. Computational predictions of the thermodynamic impact of mutations on protein stability indicated that although the G4934A mutation was tolerated, the G4934V mutation decreased protein stability by introducing clashes with neighboring amino acid residues. In similar fashion, the G4941A mutation did not introduce clashes, whereas the G4941I mutation resulted in intersubunit clashes among the mutated isoleucines. Co-expression of RyR1-WT with RyR1-G4934V or -G4941I partially restored the WT phenotype, which suggested lessening of amino acid clashes in heterotetrameric channel complexes. The results indicate that both glycines are important for RyR1 channel function by providing flexibility and minimizing amino acid clashes. PMID:25998124

  7. The mitochondrial ryanodine receptor in rat heart: a pharmaco-kinetic profile.

    PubMed

    Altschafl, Beth A; Beutner, Gisela; Sharma, Virendra K; Sheu, Shey-Shing; Valdivia, Héctor H

    2007-07-01

    A protein discovered within inner mitochondrial membranes (IMM), designated as the mitochondrial ryanodine receptor (mRyR), has been recognized recently as a modulator of Ca(2+) fluxes in mitochondria. The present study provides fundamental pharmacological and electrophysiological properties of this mRyR. Rat cardiac IMM fused to lipid bilayers revealed the presence of a mitochondrial channel with gating characteristics similar to those of classical sarcoplasmic reticulum RyR (SR-RyR), but a variety of other mitochondrial channels obstructed clean recordings. Mitochondrial vesicles were thus solubilized and subjected to sucrose sedimentation to obtain mRyR-enriched fractions. Reconstitution of sucrose-purified fractions into lipid bilayers yielded Cs(+)-conducting, Ca(2+)-sensitive, large conductance (500-800 pS) channels with signature properties of SR-RyRs. Cytosolic Ca(2+) increased the bursting frequency and mean open time of the channel. Micromolar concentrations of ryanodine induced the appearance of subconductance states or inhibited channel activity altogether, while Imperatoxin A (IpTx(a)), a specific activator of RyRs, reversibly induced the appearance of distinct subconductance states. Remarkably, the cardiac mRyR displayed a Ca(2+) dependence of [(3)H]ryanodine binding curve similar to skeletal RyR (RyR1), not cardiac RyR (RyR2). Overall, the mRyR displayed elemental attributes that are present in single channel lipid bilayer recordings of SR-RyRs, although some exquisite differences were also noted. These results therefore provide the first direct evidence that a unique RyR occurs in mitochondrial membranes. PMID:17499575

  8. Involvement of nitric oxide in iodine deficiency-induced microvascular remodeling in the thyroid gland: role of nitric oxide synthase 3 and ryanodine receptors.

    PubMed

    Craps, J; Wilvers, C; Joris, V; De Jongh, B; Vanderstraeten, J; Lobysheva, I; Balligand, J-L; Sonveaux, P; Gilon, P; Many, M-C; Gérard, A-C; Colin, I M

    2015-02-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID) induces microvascular changes in the thyroid gland via a TSH-independent reactive oxygen species-hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway. The involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in this pathway and the role of calcium (Ca(2+)) and of ryanodine receptors (RYRs) in NO synthase 3 (NOS3) activation were investigated in a murine model of goitrogenesis and in 3 in vitro models of ID, including primary cultures of human thyrocytes. ID activated NOS3 and the production of NO in thyrocytes in vitro and increased the thyroid blood flow in vivo. Using bevacizumab (a blocking antibody against VEGF-A) in mice, it appeared that NOS3 is activated upstream of VEGF-A. L-nitroarginine methyl ester (a NOS inhibitor) blocked the ID-induced increase in thyroid blood flow in vivo and NO production in vitro, as well as ID-induced VEGF-A mRNA and HIF-1α expression in vitro, whereas S-nitroso-acetyl-penicillamine (a NO donor) did the opposite. Ca(2+) is involved in this pathway as intracellular Ca(2+) flux increased after ID, and thapsigargin activated NOS3 and increased VEGF-A mRNA expression. Two of the 3 known mammalian RYR isoforms (RYR1 and RYR2) were shown to be expressed in thyrocytes. RYR inhibition using ryanodine at 10μM decreased ID-induced NOS3 activation, HIF-1α, and VEGF-A expression, whereas RYR activation with ryanodine at 1nM increased NOS3 activation and VEGF-A mRNA expression. In conclusion, during the early phase of TSH-independent ID-induced microvascular activation, ID sequentially activates RYRs and NOS3, thereby supporting ID-induced activation of the NO/HIF-1α/VEGF-A pathway in thyrocytes. PMID:25406019

  9. Expression of Dihydropyridine and Ryanodine Receptors in Type IIA Fibers of Rat Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Anttila, Katja; Mänttäri, Satu; Järvilehto, Matti

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the fiber type specificity of dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in different rat limb muscles was investigated. Western blot and histochemical analyses provided for the first time evidence that the expression of both receptors correlates to a specific myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition. We observed a significant (p=0.01) correlation between DHP as well as Ry receptor density and the expression of MHC IIa (correlation factor r=0.674 and r=0.645, respectively) in one slow-twitch, postural muscle (m. soleus), one mixed, fast-twitch muscle (m. gastrocnemius) and two fast-twitch muscles (m. rectus femoris, m. extensor digitorum longus). The highest DHP and Ry receptor density was found in the white part of m. rectus femoris (0.058±0.0060 and 0.057±0.0158 ODu, respectively). As expected, the highest relative percentage of MHC IIa was also found in the white part of m. rectus femoris (70.0±7.77%). Furthermore, histochemical experiments revealed that the IIA fibers stained most strongly for the fluorophore-conjugated receptor blockers. Our data clearly suggest that the expression of DHPRs and RyRs follows a fiber type-specific pattern, indicating an important role for these proteins in the maintenance of an effective Ca2+ cycle in the fast contracting fiber type IIA. PMID:17576431

  10. Selecting Ions by Size in a Calcium Channel: The Ryanodine Receptor Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Dirk; Xu, Le; Meissner, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Many calcium channels can distinguish between ions of the same charge but different size. For example, when cations are in direct competition with each other, the ryanodine receptor (RyR) calcium channel preferentially conducts smaller cations such as Li+ and Na+ over larger ones such as K+ and Cs+. Here, we analyze the physical basis for this preference using a previously established model of RyR permeation and selectivity. Like other calcium channels, RyR has four aspartate residues in its GGGIGDE selectivity filter. These aspartates have their terminal carboxyl group in the pore lumen, which take up much of the available space for permeating ions. We find that small ions are preferred by RyR because they can fit into this crowded environment more easily. PMID:25418295

  11. Reactive oxygen species-mediated neurodegeneration is independent of the ryanodine receptor in Caernorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Young, Lyndsay EA; Williams, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the significant impacts on human health caused by neurodegeneration, our understanding of the degeneration process is incomplete. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is emerging as a genetic model organism well suited for identification of conserved cellular mechanisms and molecular pathways of neurodegeneration. Studies in the worm have identified factors that contribute to neurodegeneration, including excitotoxicity and stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Disruption of the gene unc-68, which encodes the ryanodine receptor, abolishes excitotoxic cell death, indicating a role for calcium (Ca2+) signaling in neurodegeneration. We tested the requirement for unc-68 in ROS-mediated neurodegeneration using the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed. Upon illumination of KillerRed expressing animals to produce ROS, we observed similar levels of degeneration in wild-type and unc-68 mutant strains. Our results indicate that ROS-mediated cell death is independent of unc-68 and suggest multiple molecular pathways of neurodegeneration.

  12. Heterogeneous function of ryanodine receptors, but not IP3 receptors, in hamster cremaster muscle feed arteries and arterioles.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Erika B; Jackson, William F

    2011-05-01

    The roles played by ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP₃Rs) in vascular smooth muscle in the microcirculation remain unclear. Therefore, the function of both RyRs and IP₃Rs in Ca(²+) signals and myogenic tone in hamster cremaster muscle feed arteries and downstream arterioles were assessed using confocal imaging and pressure myography. Feed artery vascular smooth muscle displayed Ca(²+) sparks and Ca(²+) waves, which were inhibited by the RyR antagonists ryanodine (10 μM) or tetracaine (100 μM). Despite the inhibition of sparks and waves, ryanodine or tetracaine increased global intracellular Ca(²+) and constricted the arteries. The blockade of IP₃Rs with xestospongin D (5 μM) or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (100 μM) or the inhibition of phospholipase C using U-73122 (10 μM) also attenuated Ca(2+) waves without affecting Ca(²+) sparks. Importantly, the IP₃Rs and phospholipase C antagonists decreased global intracellular Ca(2+) and dilated the arteries. In contrast, cremaster arterioles displayed only Ca(²+) waves: Ca(²+) sparks were not observed, and neither ryanodine (10-50 μM) nor tetracaine (100 μM) affected either Ca(²+) signals or arteriolar tone despite the presence of functional RyRs as assessed by responses to the RyR agonist caffeine (10 mM). As in feed arteries, arteriolar Ca(²+) waves were attenuated by xestospongin D (5 μM), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (100 μM), and U-73122 (10 μM), accompanied by decreased global intracellular Ca(²+) and vasodilation. These findings highlight the contrasting roles played by RyRs and IP₃Rs in Ca(²+) signals and myogenic tone in feed arteries and demonstrate important differences in the function of RyRs between feed arteries and downstream arterioles. PMID:21357503

  13. Novel Anthranilic Diamide Scaffolds Containing N-Substituted Phenylpyrazole as Potential Ryanodine Receptor Activators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Bo; Li, Yu-Xin; Zhang, Xiu-Lan; Hua, Xue-Wen; Wu, Chang-Chun; Wei, Wei; Wan, Ying-Ying; Cheng, Dan-Dan; Xiong, Li-Xia; Yang, Na; Song, Hai-Bin; Li, Zheng-Ming

    2016-05-11

    To discover potent insecticides targeting ryanodine receptors (RyRs), a series of novel anthranilic diamides analogues (12a-12u) containing N-substituted phenylpyrazole were designed and synthesized. These compounds were characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and HRMS, and the structure of compound 12u was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Their insecticidal activities indicated that these compounds displayed moderate to excellent activities. In particular, 12i showed 100 and 37% larvicidal activities against oriental armyworm (Mythimna separata) at 0.25 and 0.05 mg L(-1), equivalent to that of chlorantraniliprole (100%, 0.25 mg L(-1); and 33%, 0.05 mg L(-1)). The activity of 12i against diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) was 95% at 0.05 mg L(-1), whereas the control was 100% at 0.05 mg L(-1). The calcium-imaging technique experiment results showed that the effects of 12i on the intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in neurons were concentration-dependent. After the central neurons of Helicoverpa armigera were dyed by loading with fluo-5N and treated with 12i, the free calcium released in endoplasmic reticulum indicated the target of compound 12i is RyRs or IP3Rs. The activation of RyRs by natural ryanodine completely blocked the calcium release induced by 12i, which indicated that RyRs in the central neurons of H. armigera third-instar larvae is the possible target of compound 12i. PMID:27109555

  14. Functional calcium release channel formed by the carboxyl-terminal portion of ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, M B; Zhao, J; Takeshima, H; Ma, J

    1997-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR) is one of the key proteins involved in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in skeletal muscle, where it functions as a Ca2+ release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane. RyR consists of a single polypeptide of approximately 560 kDa normally arranged in a homotetrameric structure, which contains a carboxyl (C)-terminal transmembrane domain and a large amino (N)-terminal cytoplasmic domain. To test whether the carboxyl-terminal portion of RyR is sufficient to form a Ca2+ release channel, we expressed the full-length (RyR-wt) and C-terminal (RyR-C, approximately 130 kDa) RyR proteins in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, and measured their Ca2+ release channel functions in planar lipid bilayer membranes. The single-channel properties of RyR-wt were found to be similar to those of RyR from skeletal muscle SR. The RyR-C protein forms a cation-selective channel that shares some of the channel properties with RyR-wt, including activation by cytoplasmic Ca2+ and regulation by ryanodine. Unlike RyR-wt, which exhibits a linear current-voltage relationship and inactivates at millimolar Ca2+, the channels formed by RyR-C display significant inward rectification and fail to close at high cytoplasmic Ca2+. Our results show that the C-terminal portion of RyR contains structures sufficient to form a functional Ca2+ release channel, but the N-terminal portion of RyR also affects the ion-conduction and calcium-dependent regulation of the Ca2+ release channel. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:9284301

  15. Antibody probe study of Ca2+ channel regulation by interdomain interaction within the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Parness, Jerome; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2004-01-01

    N-terminal and central domains of ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1), where many reported malignant hyperthermia (MH) mutations are localized, represent putative channel regulatory domains. Recent domain peptide (DP) probe studies led us to the hypothesis that these domains interact to stabilize the closed state of channel (zipping), while weakening of domain-domain interactions (unzipping) by mutation de-stabilizes the channel, making it leaky to Ca2+ or sensitive to the agonists of RyR1. As shown previously, DP1 (N-terminal domain peptide) and DP4 (central domain peptide) produced MH-like channel activation/sensitization effects, presumably by peptide binding to sites critical to stabilizing domain-domain interactions and resultant loss of conformational constraints. Here we report that polyclonal anti-DP1 and anti-DP4 antibodies also produce MH-like channel activation and sensitization effects as evidenced by about 4-fold enhancement of high affinity [3H]ryanodine binding to RyR1 and by a significant left-shift of the concentration-dependence of activation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release by polylysine. Fluorescence quenching experiments demonstrate that the accessibility of a DP4-directed, conformationally sensitive fluorescence probe linked to the RyR1 N-terminal domain is increased in the presence of domain-specific antibodies, consistent with the view that these antibodies produce unzipping of interacting domains that are of hindered accessibility to the surrounding aqueous environment. Our results suggest that domain-specific antibody binding induces a conformational change resulting in channel activation, and are consistent with the hypothesis that interacting N-terminal and central domains are intimately involved in the regulation of RyR1 channel function. PMID:15027895

  16. Single-channel properties of the recombinant skeletal muscle Ca2+ release channel (ryanodine receptor).

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S R; Leong, P; Imredy, J P; Bartlett, C; Zhang, L; MacLennan, D H

    1997-01-01

    We report transient expression of a full-length cDNA encoding the Ca2+ release channel of rabbit skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum (ryanodine receptor) in HEK-293 cells. The single-channel properties of the 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulfonate-solubilized and sucrose gradient-purified recombinant Ca2+ release channels were investigated by using single-channel recordings in planar lipid bilayers. The recombinant Ca2+ release channel exhibited a K+ conductance of 780 pS when symmetrical 250 mM KCl was used as the conducting ion and a Ca2+ conductance of 116 pS in 50 mM luminal Ca2+. Opening events of the recombinant channels were brief, with an open time constant of approximately 0.22 ms. The recombinant Ca2+ release channel was more permeable to Ca2+ than to K+, with a pCa2+/pK+ ratio of 6.8. The response of the recombinant Ca2+ release channel to various concentrations of Ca2+ was biphasic, with the channel being activated by micromolar Ca2+ and inhibited by millimolar Ca2+. The recombinant channels were activated by ATP and caffeine, inhibited by Mg2+ and ruthenium red, and modified by ryanodine. Most recombinant channels were asymmetrically blocked, conducting current unidirectionally from the luminal to the cytoplasmic side of the channel. These data demonstrate that the properties of recombinant Ca2+ release channel expressed in HEK-293 cells are very similar, if not identical, to those of the native channel. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9336186

  17. Complex formation between calsequestrin and the ryanodine receptor in fast- and slow-twitch rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Murray, B E; Ohlendieck, K

    1998-06-16

    Linkage between the high-capacity Ca2+-binding protein calsequestrin and the ryanodine receptor is proposed to be essential for proper Ca2+-release during skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling. However, no direct biochemical evidence exists showing a connection between these high-molecular-mass complexes in native skeletal muscle membranes. Here, using immunoblot analysis of chemically crosslinked membrane vesicles enriched in triad junctions, we have demonstrated that a very close neighborhood relationship exists between calsequestrin and the ryanodine receptor in both main fiber types. Hence, the luminal Ca2+-reservoir complex appears to be directly coupled to the membrane Ca2+-release complex and oligomerization seems to be of functional importance. PMID:9662440

  18. Minding the Calcium Store: Ryanodine Receptor Activation as a Convergent Mechanism of PCB Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Pessah, Isaac N.; Cherednichenko, Gennady; Lein, Pamela J.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic low level polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) exposures remain a significant public health concern since results from epidemiological studies indicate PCB burden is associated with immune system dysfunction, cardiovascular disease, and impairment of the developing nervous system. Of these various adverse health effects, developmental neurotoxicity has emerged as a particularly vulnerable endpoint in PCB toxicity. Arguably the most pervasive biological effects of PCBs could be mediated by their ability to alter the spatial and temporal fidelity of Ca2+ signals through one or more receptor mediated processes. This review will focus on our current knowledge of the structure and function of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in muscle and nerve cells and how PCBs and related non-coplanar structures alter these functions. The molecular and cellular mechanisms by which non-coplanar PCBs and related structures alter local and global Ca2+ signaling properties and the possible short and long-term consequences of these perturbations on neurodevelopment and neurodegeneration are reviewed. PMID:19931307

  19. Effect of ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist in experimental diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated dementia in rats.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for vascular dementia. In the past, we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the efficacy of a ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes (PaD) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. PaD rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with an increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of ruthenium red and pioglitazone has significantly attenuated PaD induced impairment of learning, memory, blood brain barrier permeability, endothelial function and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist may be considered as potent pharmacological agent for the management of PaD induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. Ryanodine receptor may be explored further for their possible benefits in vascular dementia. PMID:27262216

  20. IL-6/STAT3 signaling in mice with dysfunctional type-2 ryanodine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tai-Qin; Willis, Monte S; Meissner, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mice with genetically modified cardiac ryanodine receptor (Ryr2ADA/ADA mice) are impaired in regulation by calmodulin, develop severe cardiac hypertrophy and die about 2 weeks after birth. We hypothesized that the interleukin 6 (IL-6)/signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) signaling pathway has a role in the development of the Ryr2ADA/ADA cardiac hypertrophy phenotype, and determined cardiac function and protein levels of IL-6, phosphorylation levels of STAT3, and downstream targets c-Fos and c-Myc in wild-type and RyR2ADA/ADA mice, mice with a disrupted IL-6 gene, and mice treated with STAT3 inhibitor NSC74859. IL-6 protein levels were increased at postnatal day 1 but not day 10, whereas pSTAT3-Tyr705/STAT3 ratio and c-Fos and c-Myc protein levels increased in hearts of 10-day but not 1-day old Ryr2ADA/ADA mice compared with wild type. Both STAT3 and pSTAT3-Tyr705 accumulated in the nuclear fraction of 10-day old Ryr2ADA/ADA mice compared with wild type. Ryr2ADA /ADA /IL-6−/− mice lived 1.5 times longer, had decreased heart to body weight ratio, and reduced c-Fos and c-Myc protein levels. The STAT3 inhibitor NSC74859 prolonged life span by 1.3-fold, decreased heart to body weight ratio, increased cardiac performance, and decreased pSTAT-Tyr705/STAT3 ratio and IL-6, c-Fos and c-Myc protein levels of Ryr2ADA /ADA mice. The results suggest that upregulation of IL-6 and STAT3 signaling contributes to cardiac hypertrophy and early death of mice with a dysfunctional ryanodine receptor. They further suggest that STAT3 inhibitors may be clinically useful agents in patients with altered Ca2+ handling in the heart. PMID:27217982

  1. FKBP12 modulation of the binding of the skeletal ryanodine receptor onto the II-III loop of the dihydropyridine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, Fiona M; Robert, Mylène; Jona, Istvan; Szegedi, Csaba; Albrieux, Mireille; Geib, Sandrine; De Waard, Michel; Villaz, Michel; Ronjat, Michel

    2002-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, excitation-contraction coupling involves a functional interaction between the ryanodine receptor (RyR) and the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR). The domain corresponding to Thr(671)-Leu(690) of the II-III loop of the skeletal DHPR alpha(1)-subunit is able to regulate RyR properties and calcium release from sarcoplasmic reticulum, whereas the domain corresponding to Glu(724)-Pro(760) antagonizes this effect. Two peptides, covering these sequences (peptide A(Sk) and C(Sk), respectively) were immobilized on polystyrene beads. We demonstrate that peptide A(Sk) binds to the skeletal isoform of RyR (RyR1) whereas peptide C(Sk) does not. Using surface plasmon resonance detection, we show that 1) domain Thr(671)-Leu(690) is the only sequence of the II-III loop binding with RyR1 and 2) the interaction of peptide A(Sk) with RyR1 is not modulated by Ca(2+) (pCa 9-2) nor by Mg(2+) (up to 10 mM). In contrast, this interaction is strongly potentiated by the immunophilin FKBP12 (EC(50) = 10 nM) and inhibited by both rapamycin (IC(50) = 5 nM) and FK506. Peptide A(Sk) induces a 300% increase of the opening probability of the RyR1 incorporated in lipid bilayer. Removal of FKBP12 from RyR1 completely abolishes this effect of domain A(Sk) on RyR1 channel behavior. These results demonstrate a direct interaction of the RyR1 with the discrete domain of skeletal DHPR alpha(1)-subunit corresponding to Thr(671)-Leu(690) and show that the association of FKBP12 with RyR1 specifically modulates this interaction. PMID:11751303

  2. Posttranslational modifications of cardiac ryanodine receptors: Ca2+ signaling and EC-coupling

    PubMed Central

    Niggli, Ernst; Ullrich, Nina D.; Gutierrez, D.; Kyrychenko, Sergii; Poláková, Eva; Shirokova, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    In cardiac muscle, a number of posttranslational protein modifications can alter the function of the Ca2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), also known as the ryanodine receptor (RyR). During every heartbeat RyRs are activated by the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism and contribute a large fraction of the Ca2+ required for contraction. Some of the posttranslational modifications of the RyR are known to affect its gating and Ca2+ sensitivity. Presently, research in a number of laboratories is focussed on RyR phosphorylation, both by PKA and CaMKII, or on RyR modifications caused by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS / RNS). Both classes of posttranslational modifications are thought to play important roles in the physiological regulation of channel activity, but are also known to provoke abnormal alterations during various diseases. Only recently it was realized that several types of posttranslational modifications are tightly connected and form synergistic (or antagonistic) feed-back loops resulting in additive and potentially detrimental downstream effects. This review summarizes recent findings on such posttranslational modifications, attempts to bridge molecular with cellular findings, and opens a perspective for future work trying to understand the ramifications of crosstalk in these multiple signaling pathways. Clarifying these complex interactions will be important in the development of novel therapeutic approaches, since this may form the foundation for the implementation of multi-pronged treatment regimes in the future. PMID:22960642

  3. Gene profiling of embryonic skeletal muscle lacking type I ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release channel

    PubMed Central

    Filipova, Dilyana; Walter, Anna M.; Gaspar, John A.; Brunn, Anna; Linde, Nina F.; Ardestani, Mostafa A.; Deckert, Martina; Hescheler, Jürgen; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Sachinidis, Agapios; Papadopoulos, Symeon

    2016-01-01

    In mature skeletal muscle, the intracellular Ca2+ concentration rises dramatically upon membrane depolarization, constituting the link between excitation and contraction. This process requires Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum via the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RYR1). However, RYR1’s potential roles in muscle development remain obscure. We used an established RyR1- null mouse model, dyspedic, to investigate the effects of the absence of a functional RYR1 and, consequently, the lack of RyR1-mediated Ca2+ signaling, during embryogenesis. Homozygous dyspedic mice die after birth and display small limbs and abnormal skeletal muscle organization. Skeletal muscles from front and hind limbs of dyspedic fetuses (day E18.5) were subjected to microarray analyses, revealing 318 differentially expressed genes. We observed altered expression of multiple transcription factors and members of key signaling pathways. Differential regulation was also observed for genes encoding contractile as well as muscle-specific structural proteins. Additional qRT-PCR analysis revealed altered mRNA levels of the canonical muscle regulatory factors Six1, Six4, Pax7, MyoD, MyoG and MRF4 in mutant muscle, which is in line with the severe developmental retardation seen in dyspedic muscle histology analyses. Taken together, these findings suggest an important non-contractile role of RyR1 or RYR1-mediated Ca2+ signaling during muscle organ development. PMID:26831464

  4. A Model of the Putative Pore Region of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor Channel

    PubMed Central

    Welch, William; Rheault, Shana; West, Duncan J.; Williams, Alan J.

    2004-01-01

    Using the bacterial K+ channel KcsA as a template, we constructed models of the pore region of the cardiac ryanodine receptor channel (RyR2) monomer and tetramer. Physicochemical characteristics of the RyR2 model monomer were compared with the template, including homology, predicted secondary structure, surface area, hydrophobicity, and electrostatic potential. Values were comparable with those of KcsA. Monomers of the RyR2 model were minimized and assembled into a tetramer that was, in turn, minimized. The assembled tetramer adopts a structure equivalent to that of KcsA with a central pore. Characteristics of the RyR2 model tetramer were compared with the KcsA template, including average empirical energy, strain energy, solvation free energy, solvent accessibility, and hydrophobic, polar, acid, and base moments. Again, values for the model and template were comparable. The pores of KcsA and RyR2 have a common motif with a hydrophobic channel that becomes polar at both entrances. Quantitative comparisons indicate that the assembled structure provides a plausible model for the pore of RyR2. Movement of Ca2+, K+, and tetraethylammonium (TEA+) through the model RyR2 pore were simulated with explicit solvation. These simulations suggest that the model RyR2 pore is permeable to Ca2+ and K+ with rates of translocation greater for K+. In contrast, simulations indicate that tetraethylammonium blocks movement of metal cations. PMID:15454434

  5. Structure of the rabbit ryanodine receptor RyR1 at near-atomic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianping; Li, Zhangqiang; Xie, Tian; Peng, Wei; Yin, Changcheng; Li, Xueming; Scheres, Sjors H.W.; Shi, Yigong; Yan, Nieng

    2014-01-01

    The ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are high-conductance intracellular Ca2+ channels that play a pivotal role in the excitation-contraction coupling of skeletal and cardiac muscles. RyRs are the largest known ion channels, with a homotetrameric organization and approximately 5000 residues in each protomer. Here we report the structure of the rabbit RyR1 in complex with its modulator FKBP12 at an overall resolution of 3.8 Å, determined by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy. Three previously uncharacterized domains, named Central, Handle, and Helical domains, display the armadillo repeat fold. These domains, together with the amino-terminal domain, constitute a network of superhelical scaffold for binding and propagation of conformational changes. The channel domain exhibits the voltage-gated ion channel superfamily fold with distinct features. A negative charge-enriched hairpin loop connecting S5 and the pore helix is positioned above the entrance to the selectivity filter vestibule. The four elongated S6 segments form a right-handed helical bundle that closes the pore at the cytoplasmic border of the membrane. Allosteric regulation of the pore by the cytoplasmic domains is mediated through extensive interactions between the Central domains and the channel domain. These structural features explain high ion conductance by RyRs and the long-range allosteric regulation of channel activities. PMID:25517095

  6. Gene profiling of embryonic skeletal muscle lacking type I ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) release channel.

    PubMed

    Filipova, Dilyana; Walter, Anna M; Gaspar, John A; Brunn, Anna; Linde, Nina F; Ardestani, Mostafa A; Deckert, Martina; Hescheler, Jürgen; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Sachinidis, Agapios; Papadopoulos, Symeon

    2016-01-01

    In mature skeletal muscle, the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration rises dramatically upon membrane depolarization, constituting the link between excitation and contraction. This process requires Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum via the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RYR1). However, RYR1's potential roles in muscle development remain obscure. We used an established RyR1- null mouse model, dyspedic, to investigate the effects of the absence of a functional RYR1 and, consequently, the lack of RyR1-mediated Ca(2+) signaling, during embryogenesis. Homozygous dyspedic mice die after birth and display small limbs and abnormal skeletal muscle organization. Skeletal muscles from front and hind limbs of dyspedic fetuses (day E18.5) were subjected to microarray analyses, revealing 318 differentially expressed genes. We observed altered expression of multiple transcription factors and members of key signaling pathways. Differential regulation was also observed for genes encoding contractile as well as muscle-specific structural proteins. Additional qRT-PCR analysis revealed altered mRNA levels of the canonical muscle regulatory factors Six1, Six4, Pax7, MyoD, MyoG and MRF4 in mutant muscle, which is in line with the severe developmental retardation seen in dyspedic muscle histology analyses. Taken together, these findings suggest an important non-contractile role of RyR1 or RYR1-mediated Ca(2+) signaling during muscle organ development. PMID:26831464

  7. Depletion of FKBP does not affect the interaction between isolated ryanodine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Xiaofang; Liang Xin; Chen Keying; Zhu Peihong; Hu Jun; E-mail: jhu@sjtu.edu.cn

    2005-10-14

    The ryanodine receptors/calcium release channels (RyRs) usually form two dimensional regular lattices in the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes. The native RyR is associated with many auxiliary proteins, including FKBP. It has been indicated that FKBP may play a role in the intermolecular interaction and coupled gating of neighboring RyRs. However, a more recent study shows that FKBP12 is not involved in the physical linkage between neighboring RyR1s. In the present work, the effect of FKBP12 on the interaction between RyR1s isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle was investigated in an aqueous medium with photon correlation spectroscopy. We found that the depletion of FKBP12 did not affect the oligomerization of RyR1s in the medium containing different [KCl] or under different channel functional states. No evidence is obtained for the involvement of FKBP12 in the intermolecular interaction between RyR1s.

  8. Temperature acclimation has no effect on ryanodine receptor expression or subcellular localization in rainbow trout heart.

    PubMed

    Birkedal, Rikke; Christopher, Jennifer; Thistlethwaite, Angela; Shiels, Holly A

    2009-11-01

    In cardiomyocytes, ryanodine receptors (RYRs) mediate Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release (CICR) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) during excitation-contraction (e-c) coupling. In rainbow trout heart, the relative importance of CICR increases with cold-acclimation. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature acclimation (4, 11 and 18 degrees C) on RYR intracellular localization and expression density. We used immunocytochemistry to assess intracellular localization in ventricular myocytes and Western blotting to assess RYR expression in both atrial and ventricular tissue. In ventricular myocytes, RYRs were localized peripherally in transverse bands aligning with sarcomeric m-lines and centrally around mitochondria and the nucleus. Localization did not change with temperature acclimation. RYR expression was also unaffected by temperature acclimation. The localization of RYRs at the m-line is similar to neonatal mammalian cardiomyocytes. We suggest this positioning is indicative of myocytes which rely predominantly on transsarcolemmal Ca(2+)-influx, rather than CICR, during e-c coupling. PMID:19544062

  9. Imaging Single Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor Ca2+ Fluxes in Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Peng, S.; Publicover, N. G.; Kargacin, G. J.; Duan, D.; Airey, J. A.; Sutko, John L.

    2004-01-01

    In this and an accompanying report we describe two steps, single-channel imaging and channel immobilization, necessary for using optical imaging to analyze the function of ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels reconstituted in lipid bilayers. An optical bilayer system capable of laser scanning confocal imaging of fluo-3 fluorescence due to Ca2+ flux through single RyR2 channels and simultaneous recording of single channel currents was developed. A voltage command protocol was devised in which the amplitude, time course, shape, and hence the quantity of Ca2+ flux through a single RyR2 channel is controlled solely by the voltage imposed across the bilayer. Using this system, the voltage command protocol, and concentrations of Ca2+ (25–50 mM) that result in saturating RyR2 Ca2+ currents, proportional fluo-3 fluorescence was recorded simultaneously with Ca2+ currents having amplitudes of 0.25–14 pA. Ca2+ sparks, similar to those obtained with conventional microscope-based laser scanning confocal systems, were imaged in mouse ventricular cardiomyocytes using the optical bilayer system. The utility of the optical bilayer for systematic investigation of how cellular factors extrinsic to the RyR2 channel, such as Ca2+ buffers and diffusion, alter fluo-3 fluorescent responses to RyR2 Ca2+ currents, and for addressing other current research questions is discussed. PMID:14695257

  10. Nitric oxide-induced calcium release via ryanodine receptors regulates neuronal function

    PubMed Central

    Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Chen, Yili; Ito, Akihiro; Murayama, Takashi; Oyamada, Hideto; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Sato, Osamu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Mori, Nozomu; Oguchi, Katsuji; Sakurai, Takashi; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito; Iino, Masamitsu

    2012-01-01

    Mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ stores regulates a multitude of cellular functions, but the role of intracellular Ca2+ release via the ryanodine receptor (RyR) in the brain remains incompletely understood. We found that nitric oxide (NO) directly activates RyRs, which induce Ca2+ release from intracellular stores of central neurons, and thereby promote prolonged Ca2+ signalling in the brain. Reversible S-nitrosylation of type 1 RyR (RyR1) triggers this Ca2+ release. NO-induced Ca2+ release (NICR) is evoked by type 1 NO synthase-dependent NO production during neural firing, and is essential for cerebellar synaptic plasticity. NO production has also been implicated in pathological conditions including ischaemic brain injury, and our results suggest that NICR is involved in NO-induced neuronal cell death. These findings suggest that NICR via RyR1 plays a regulatory role in the physiological and pathophysiological functions of the brain. PMID:22036948

  11. Voltage-gated Ca2+ entry and ryanodine receptor Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in preglomerular arterioles.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Susan K; Arendshorst, William J

    2007-05-01

    We have previously shown that in afferent arterioles, angiotensin II (ANG II) involves activation of the inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R), activation of adenine diphosphoribose (ADPR) cyclase, and amplification of the initial IP(3)R-stimulated release of cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) (Fellner SK, Arendshorst WJ. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 288: F785-F791, 2004). The response of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) to local increases in [Ca(2+)](i) is defined as calcium-induced calcium release (CICR). To investigate whether Ca(2+) entry via voltage-gated channels (VGCC) can stimulate CICR, we treated fura 2-loaded, freshly isolated afferent arterioles with KCl (40 mM; high KCl). In control arterioles, peak [Ca(2+)](i) increased by 165 +/- 10 nM. Locking the RyR in the closed position with ryanodine (100 microM) inhibited the [Ca(2+)](i) response by 59% (P < 0.01). 8-Br cADPR, a specific blocker of the ability of cyclic ADPR (cADPR) to sensitize the RyR to Ca(2+), caused a 43% inhibition. We suggest that the lower inhibition by 8-Br cADPR (P = 0.02, ryanodine vs. 8-Br cADPR) represents endogenously active ADPR cyclase. Depletion of SR Ca(2+) stores by inhibiting the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase with cyclopiazonic acid or thapsigargin blocked the [Ca(2+)](i) responses to KCl by 51% (P not significant vs. ryanodine or 8-Br cADPR). These data suggest that about half of the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) induced by high KCl is accomplished by activation of CICR through the ability of entered Ca(2+) to expose the RyR to high local concentrations of Ca(2+) and that endogenous cADPR contributes to the process. PMID:17190906

  12. S100A1 DNA-based Inotropic Therapy Protects Against Proarrhythmogenic Ryanodine Receptor 2 Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ritterhoff, Julia; Völkers, Mirko; Seitz, Andreas; Spaich, Kristin; Gao, Erhe; Peppel, Karsten; Pleger, Sven T; Zimmermann, Wolfram H; Friedrich, Oliver; Fink, Rainer H A; Koch, Walter J; Katus, Hugo A; Most, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Restoring expression levels of the EF-hand calcium (Ca2+) sensor protein S100A1 has emerged as a key factor in reconstituting normal Ca2+ handling in failing myocardium. Improved sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function with enhanced Ca2+ resequestration appears critical for S100A1's cyclic adenosine monophosphate-independent inotropic effects but raises concerns about potential diastolic SR Ca2+ leakage that might trigger fatal arrhythmias. This study shows for the first time a diminished interaction between S100A1 and ryanodine receptors (RyR2s) in experimental HF. Restoring this link in failing cardiomyocytes, engineered heart tissue and mouse hearts, respectively, by means of adenoviral and adeno-associated viral S100A1 cDNA delivery normalizes diastolic RyR2 function and protects against Ca2+- and β-adrenergic receptor-triggered proarrhythmogenic SR Ca2+ leakage in vitro and in vivo. S100A1 inhibits diastolic SR Ca2+ leakage despite aberrant RyR2 phosphorylation via protein kinase A and calmodulin-dependent kinase II and stoichiometry with accessory modulators such as calmodulin, FKBP12.6 or sorcin. Our findings demonstrate that S100A1 is a regulator of diastolic RyR2 activity and beneficially modulates diastolic RyR2 dysfunction. S100A1 interaction with the RyR2 is sufficient to protect against basal and catecholamine-triggered arrhythmic SR Ca2+ leak in HF, combining antiarrhythmic potency with chronic inotropic actions. PMID:26005840

  13. Ryanodine receptors/calcium release channels in heart failure and sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Marks, A R

    2001-04-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) ions are second messengers in signaling pathways in all types of cells. They regulate muscle contraction, electrical signals which determine the cardiac rhythm and cell growth pathways in the heart. In the past decade cDNA cloning has provided clues as to the molecular structure of the intracellular Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors, RyR, and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, IP3R) on the sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) and an understanding of how these molecules regulate Ca2+ homeostasis in the heart is beginning to emerge. The intracellular Ca2+ release channels form a distinct class of ion channels distinguished by their structure, size, and function. Both RyRs and IP3Rs have gigantic cytoplasmic domains that serve as scaffolds for modulatory proteins that regulate the channel pore located in the carboxy terminal 10% of the channel sequence. The channels are tetramers comprised of four RyR or IP3R subunits. RyR2 is required for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling in the heart. Using co-sedimentation and co-immunoprecipitation we have defined a macromolecular complex comprised of RyR2, FKBP12.6, PKA, the protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A, and an anchoring protein mAKAP. We have shown that protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation of RyR2 dissociates FKBP12.6 and regulates the channel open probability (P(o)). In failing human hearts RyR2 is PKA hyperphosphorylated resulting in defective channel function due to increased sensitivity to Ca2+-induced activation. PMID:11273716

  14. Species differences in chlorantraniliprole and flubendiamide insecticide binding sites in the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Qi, Suzhen; Casida, John E

    2013-11-01

    Anthranilic and phthalic diamides exemplified by chlorantraniliprole (Chlo) or cyantraniliprole (Cyan) and flubendiamide (Flu), respectively, are the newest major chemotype of insecticides with outstanding potency, little or no cross resistance with other classes and low mammalian toxicity. They are activators of the ryanodine (Ry) receptor (RyR)-Ca(2+) channel, based on Ca(2+) flux and electrophysiology investigations. The goal of this study is to define species differences in the degree and mechanisms of diamide selective action by radioligand specific binding studies at the [(3)H]Ry, [(3)H]Chlo and [(3)H]Flu sites. The [(3)H]Ry site is observed in muscle of lobster, rabbit and four insect species (Musca domestica, Apis mellifera, Heliothis virescens and Agrotis ipsilon) whereas the [(3)H]Chlo site is evident in the four insects and the [(3)H]Flu site in only the two lepidoptera (Agrotis and Heliothis). [(3)H]Ry binding is significantly stimulated by Chlo, Cyan and Flu with the insects (except Flu with Musca) but not the lobster and rabbit. [(3)H]Chlo binding is stimulated by Ry and Flu in Musca and Apis but not in the lepidoptera, while Flu and Cyan are inhibitory. [(3)H]Flu binding is strongly inhibited by Chlo and Cyan in Agrotis and Heliothis. [(3)H]Chlo and [(3)H]Flu binding are not dependent on added Ca(2+) or ATP in Heliothis and Agrotis whereas the other radioligand-receptor combinations are usually enhanced by Ca(2+) and ATP. More generally, there are species differences in the Ry, Chlo and Flu binding sites of the RyR that may confer selective toxicity and determine target site cross resistance mechanisms. PMID:24267693

  15. Structural and functional conservation of key domains in InsP[subscript 3] and ryanodine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Min-Duk; Velamakanni, Saroj; Ishiyama, Noboru; Stathopulos, Peter B.; Rossi, Ana M.; Khan, Samir A.; Dale, Philippa; Li, Congmin; Ames, James B.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Taylor, Colin W.

    2012-07-11

    Inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP{sub 3}Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are tetrameric intracellular Ca{sup 2+} channels. In each of these receptor families, the pore, which is formed by carboxy-terminal transmembrane domains, is regulated by signals that are detected by large cytosolic structures. InsP{sub 3}R gating is initiated by InsP{sub 3} binding to the InsP{sub 3}-binding core (IBC, residues 224-604 of InsP{sub 3}R1) and it requires the suppressor domain (SD, residues 1-223 of InsP{sub 3}R1). Here we present structures of the amino-terminal region (NT, residues 1-604) of rat InsP{sub 3}R1 with (3.6 {angstrom}) and without (3.0 {angstrom}) InsP{sub 3} bound. The arrangement of the three NT domains, SD, IBC-{beta} and IBC-{alpha}, identifies two discrete interfaces ({alpha} and {beta}) between the IBC and SD. Similar interfaces occur between equivalent domains (A, B and C) in RyR1 (ref. 9). The orientations of the three domains when docked into a tetrameric structure of InsP{sub 3}R and of the ABC domains docked into RyR are remarkably similar. The importance of the {alpha}-interface for activation of InsP{sub 3}R and RyR is confirmed by mutagenesis and, for RyR, by disease-causing mutations. Binding of InsP{sub 3} causes partial closure of the clam-like IBC, disrupting the {beta}-interface and pulling the SD towards the IBC. This reorients an exposed SD loop ('hotspot' (HS) loop) that is essential for InsP{sub 3}R activation. The loop is conserved in RyR and includes mutations that are associated with malignant hyperthermia and central core disease. The HS loop interacts with an adjacent NT, suggesting that activation re-arranges inter-subunit interactions. The A domain of RyR functionally replaced the SD in full-length InsP{sub 3}R, and an InsP{sub 3}R in which its C-terminal transmembrane region was replaced by that from RyR1 was gated by InsP{sub 3} and blocked by ryanodine. Activation mechanisms are conserved between InsP{sub 3}R and Ry

  16. Subconductance states in single-channel activity of skeletal muscle ryanodine receptors after removal of FKBP12.

    PubMed Central

    Ahern, G P; Junankar, P R; Dulhunty, A F

    1997-01-01

    FKBP12 was removed from ryanodine receptors (RyRs) by incubation of rabbit skeletal muscle terminal cisternae membranes with rapamycin. The extent of FKBP12 removal was estimated by immunostaining Western blots of terminal cisternae proteins. Single FKBP12-depleted RyR channels, incorporated into planar lipid bilayers, were modulated by Ca2+, ATP, ryanodine, and ruthenium red in the cis chamber and opened frequently to the normal maximum conductance of approximately 230 pS and to substate levels of approximately 0.25, approximately 0.5, and approximately 0.75 of the maximum conductance. Substate activity was rarely seen in native RyRs. Ryanodine did not after the number of conductance levels in FKBP12-depleted channels, but, at a membrane potential of +40 mV, reduced both the maximum and the substate conductances by approximately 50%. FKBP12-stripped channels were activated by a 10-fold-lower [Ca2+] and inhibited by a 10-fold-higher [Ca2+], than RyRs from control-incubated and native terminal cisternae vesicles. The open probability (Po) of these FKBP12-deficient channels was greater than that of control channels at 0.1 microM and 1 mM cis Ca2+ but no different at 10 microM cis Ca2+, where channels showed maximal Ca2+ activation. The approximately 0.25 substate was less sensitive than the maximum conductance to inhibition by Ca2+ and was the dominant level in channels inhibited by 1 mM cis Ca2+. The results show that FKBP12 coordinates the gating of channel activity in control and ryanodine-modified RyRs. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8994600

  17. Chiral dicarboxamide scaffolds containing a sulfiliminyl moiety as potential ryanodine receptor activators.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Sha; Jia, Zhehui; Xiong, Lixia; Yan, Tao; Yang, Na; Wu, Guiping; Song, Haibin; Li, Zhengming

    2014-07-01

    To search for new environmentally benign insecticides with high activity, low toxicity, and low residue, novel chiral configurations introduced into dicarboxamide scaffolds containing N-cyano sulfiliminyl moieties were first studied. Four series of phthalamides with sulfur-containing side chains were designed, synthesized, and evaluated against oriental armyworm (Pseudaletia separata Walker) and diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella (L.)) for their insecticidal activities. All structures were characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and HRMS (or elemental analysis), and their configurations were confirmed by optical polarimetry. The biological assessment indicated that some title compounds exhibited significant insecticidal activities. For oriental armyworm, these stereoisomers exerted different impacts on biological activity following the sequence (Sc, Ss) ≥ (Sc, Rs) ≫ (Rc, Ss) > (Rc, Rs), and carbon chirality influenced the activities more strongly than sulfur. Compounds Ia and IIa reached as high an activity as commercial flubendiamide, with LC50 values of 0.0504 and 0.0699 mg L(-1), respectively, lower than that of flubendiamide (0.1230 mg L(-1)). For diamondback moth, the sequence of activity was (Sc, Ss) > (Sc, Rs), and the sulfur chirality influenced the activities more greatly than carbon. Compound IIe exhibited even higher activity than flubendiamide, whereas Ie and Ic,d reached the activity of the latter. The results indicated that the improvement of insecticidal activity probably required a coordination of both carbon and sulfur chirality. Comparative molecular field analysis calculation indicated that stereoisomers with Sc configurations containing strong electron-withdrawing groups such as as CN are important in maintaining the high activity. The chiral scaffolds containing the N-cyano sulfiliminyl moiety are also essential for high larvicidal activity. Some title compounds could be considered as potential candidates for ryanodine receptor activators

  18. Calpains and proteasomes mediate degradation of ryanodine receptors in a model of cardiac ischemic reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Pedrozo, Zully; Sánchez, Gina; Torrealba, Natalia; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Fernández, Carolina; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Lavandero, Sergio; Donoso, Paulina

    2010-03-01

    Type-2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2)--the calcium release channels of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum--have a central role in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. In the heart, ischemia/reperfusion causes a rapid and significant decrease in RyR2 content but the mechanisms responsible for this effect are not fully understood. We have studied the involvement of three proteolytic systems--calpains, the proteasome and autophagy--on the degradation of RyR2 in rat neonatal cardiomyocyte cultures subjected to simulated ischemia/reperfusion (sI/R). We found that 8h of ischemia followed by 16h of reperfusion decreased RyR2 content by 50% without any changes in RyR2 mRNA. Specific inhibitors of calpains and the proteasome prevented the decrease of RyR2 caused by sI/R, implicating both pathways in its degradation. Proteasome inhibitors also prevented the degradation of calpastatin, the endogenous calpain inhibitor, hindering the activation of calpain induced by calpastatin degradation. Autophagy was activated during sI/R as evidenced by the increase in LC3-II and beclin-1, two proteins involved in autophagosome generation, and in the emergence of GFP-LC3 containing vacuoles in adenovirus GFP-LC3 transduced cardiomyocytes. Selective autophagy inhibition, however, induced even further RyR2 degradation, making unlikely the participation of autophagy in sI/R-induced RyR2 degradation. Our results suggest that calpain activation as a result of proteasome-induced degradation of calpastatin initiates RyR2 proteolysis, which is followed by proteasome-dependent degradation of the resulting RyR2 fragments. The decrease in RyR2 content during ischemia/reperfusion may be relevant to the decrease of heart contractility after ischemia. PMID:20026269

  19. Ryanodine receptors, a family of intracellular calcium ion channels, are expressed throughout early vertebrate development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Calcium signals ([Ca2+]i) direct many aspects of embryo development but their regulation is not well characterised. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a family of intracellular Ca2+ release channels that control the flux of Ca2+ from internal stores into the cytosol. RyRs are primarily known for their role in excitation-contraction coupling in adult striated muscle and ryr gene mutations are implicated in several human diseases. Current evidence suggests that RyRs do not have a major role to play prior to organogenesis but regulate tissue differentiation. Findings The sequences of the five zebrafish ryr genes were confirmed, their evolutionary relationship established and the primary sequences compared to other vertebrates, including humans. RyRs are differentially expressed in slow (ryr1a), fast (ryr3) and both types (ryr1b) of developing skeletal muscle. There are two ryr2 genes (ryr2a and ryr2b) which are expressed exclusively in developing CNS and cardiac tissue, respectively. In addition, ryr3 and ryr2a mRNA is detectable in the initial stages of development, prior to embryonic axis formation. Conclusions Our work reveals that zebrafish ryr genes are differentially expressed throughout the developing embryo from cleavage onwards. The data suggests that RyR-regulated Ca2+ signals are associated with several aspects of embryonic development, from organogenesis through to the differentiation of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and nervous system. These studies will facilitate further work to explore the developmental function of RyRs in each of these tissue types. PMID:22168922

  20. Three-Dimensional Distribution of Ryanodine Receptor Clusters in Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Izu, Ye; McCulle, Stacey L.; Ward, Chris W.; Soeller, Christian; Allen, Bryan M.; Rabang, Cal; Cannell, Mark B.; Balke, C. William; Izu, Leighton T.

    2006-01-01

    The clustering of ryanodine receptors (RyR2) into functional Ca2+ release units is central to current models for cardiac excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. Using immunolabeling and confocal microscopy, we have analyzed the distribution of RyR2 clusters in rat and ventricular atrial myocytes. The resolution of the three-dimensional structure was improved by a novel transverse sectioning method as well as digital deconvolution. In contrast to earlier reports, the mean RyR2 cluster transverse spacing was measured 1.05 μm in ventricular myocytes and estimated 0.97 μm in atrial myocytes. Intercalated RyR2 clusters were found interspersed between the Z-disks on the cell periphery but absent in the interior, forming double rows flanking the local Z-disks on the surface. The longitudinal spacing between the adjacent rows of RyR2 clusters on the Z-disks was measured to have a mean value of 1.87 μm in ventricular and 1.69 μm in atrial myocytes. The measured RyR2 cluster distribution is compatible with models of Ca2+ wave generation. The size of the typical RyR2 cluster was close to 250 nm, and this suggests that ∼100 RyR2s might be present in a cluster. The importance of cluster size and three-dimensional spacing for current E-C coupling models is discussed. PMID:16603500

  1. Blockage of the Ryanodine Receptor via Azumolene Does Not Prevent Mechanical Ventilation-Induced Diaphragm Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Talbert, Erin E.; Smuder, Ashley J.; Kwon, Oh Sung; Sollanek, Kurt J.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Powers, Scott K.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving intervention for patients in respiratory failure. However, prolonged MV causes the rapid development of diaphragm muscle atrophy, and diaphragmatic weakness may contribute to difficult weaning from MV. Therefore, developing a therapeutic countermeasure to protect against MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy is important. MV-induced diaphragm atrophy is due, at least in part, to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from diaphragm mitochondria and the activation of key muscle proteases (i.e., calpain and caspase-3). In this regard, leakage of calcium through the ryanodine receptor (RyR1) in diaphragm muscle fibers during MV could result in increased mitochondrial ROS emission, protease activation, and diaphragm atrophy. Therefore, these experiments tested the hypothesis that a pharmacological blockade of the RyR1 in diaphragm fibers with azumolene (AZ) would prevent MV-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS production, protease activation, and diaphragmatic atrophy. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 12 hours of full-support MV while receiving either AZ or vehicle. At the end of the experiment, mitochondrial ROS emission, protease activation, and fiber cross-sectional area were determined in diaphragm muscle fibers. Decreases in muscle force production following MV indicate that the diaphragm took up a sufficient quantity of AZ to block calcium release through the RyR1. However, our findings reveal that AZ treatment did not prevent the MV-induced increase in mitochondrial ROS emission or protease activation in the diaphragm. Importantly, AZ treatment did not prevent MV-induced diaphragm fiber atrophy. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of the RyR1 in diaphragm muscle fibers is not sufficient to prevent MV-induced diaphragm atrophy. PMID:26849371

  2. Aldolase potentiates DIDS activation of the ryanodine receptor in rabbit skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Seo, In-Ra; Moh, Sang Hyun; Lee, Eun Hui; Meissner, Gerhard; Kim, Do Han

    2006-10-15

    DIDS (4,4'-di-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate), an anion channel blocker, triggers Ca2+ release from skeletal muscle SR (sarcoplasmic reticulum). The present study characterized the effects of DIDS on rabbit skeletal single Ca2+-release channel/RyR1 (ryanodine receptor type 1) incorporated into a planar lipid bilayer. When junctional SR vesicles were used for channel incorporation (native RyR1), DIDS increased the mean P(o) (open probability) of RyR1 without affecting unitary conductance when Cs+ was used as the charge carrier. Lifetime analysis of single RyR1 activities showed that 10 microM DIDS induced reversible long-lived open events (P(o)=0.451+/-0.038) in the presence of 10 microM Ca2+, due mainly to a new third component for both open and closed time constants. However, when purified RyR1 was examined in the same condition, 10 microM DIDS became considerably less potent (P(o)=0.206+/-0.025), although the caffeine response was similar between native and purified RyR1. Hence we postulated that a DIDS-binding protein, essential for the DIDS sensitivity of RyR1, was lost during RyR1 purification. DIDS-affinity column chromatography of solubilized junctional SR, and MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight) MS analysis of the affinity-column-associated proteins, identified four major DIDS-binding proteins in the SR fraction. Among them, aldolase was the only protein that greatly potentiated DIDS sensitivity. The association between RyR1 and aldolase was further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and aldolase-affinity batch-column chromatography. Taken together, we conclude that aldolase is physically associated with RyR1 and could confer a considerable potentiation of the DIDS effect on RyR1. PMID:16817780

  3. Ryanodine Receptor Activation Induces Long-Term Plasticity of Spine Calcium Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Johenning, Friedrich W; Theis, Anne-Kathrin; Pannasch, Ulrike; Rückl, Martin; Rüdiger, Sten; Schmitz, Dietmar

    2015-06-01

    A key feature of signalling in dendritic spines is the synapse-specific transduction of short electrical signals into biochemical responses. Ca2+ is a major upstream effector in this transduction cascade, serving both as a depolarising electrical charge carrier at the membrane and an intracellular second messenger. Upon action potential firing, the majority of spines are subject to global back-propagating action potential (bAP) Ca2+ transients. These transients translate neuronal suprathreshold activation into intracellular biochemical events. Using a combination of electrophysiology, two-photon Ca2+ imaging, and modelling, we demonstrate that bAPs are electrochemically coupled to Ca2+ release from intracellular stores via ryanodine receptors (RyRs). We describe a new function mediated by spine RyRs: the activity-dependent long-term enhancement of the bAP-Ca2+ transient. Spines regulate bAP Ca2+ influx independent of each other, as bAP-Ca2+ transient enhancement is compartmentalized and independent of the dendritic Ca2+ transient. Furthermore, this functional state change depends exclusively on bAPs travelling antidromically into dendrites and spines. Induction, but not expression, of bAP-Ca2+ transient enhancement is a spine-specific function of the RyR. We demonstrate that RyRs can form specific Ca2+ signalling nanodomains within single spines. Functionally, RyR mediated Ca2+ release in these nanodomains induces a new form of Ca2+ transient plasticity that constitutes a spine specific storage mechanism of neuronal suprathreshold activity patterns. PMID:26098891

  4. Reversible redox modifications of ryanodine receptor ameliorate ventricular arrhythmias in the ischemic-reperfused heart.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Romina; Román, Bárbara; Di Carlo, Mariano N; Mariangelo, Juan Ignacio; Salas, Margarita; Sanchez, Gina; Donoso, Paulina; Schinella, Guillermo R; Vittone, Leticia; Wehrens, Xander H; Mundiña-Weilenmann, Cecilia; Said, Matilde

    2016-09-01

    Previous results from our laboratory showed that phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) by Ca(2+) calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) was a critical but not the unique event responsible for the production of reperfusion-induced arrhythmogenesis, suggesting the existence of other mechanisms cooperating in an additive way to produce these rhythm alterations. Oxidative stress is a prominent feature of ischemia/reperfusion injury. Both CaMKII and RyR2 are proteins susceptible to alteration by redox modifications. This study was designed to elucidate whether CaMKII and RyR2 redox changes occur during reperfusion and whether these changes are involved in the genesis of arrhythmias. Langendorff-perfused hearts from rats or transgenic mice with genetic ablation of CaMKII phosphorylation site on RyR2 (S2814A) were subjected to ischemia-reperfusion in the presence or absence of a free radical scavenger (mercaptopropionylglycine, MPG) or inhibitors of NADPH oxidase and nitric oxide synthase. Left ventricular contractile parameters and monophasic action potentials were recorded. Oxidation and phosphorylation of CaMKII and RyR2 were assessed. Increased oxidation of CaMKII during reperfusion had no consequences on the level of RyR2 phosphorylation. Avoiding the reperfusion-induced thiol oxidation of RyR2 with MPG produced a reduction in the number of arrhythmias and did not modify the contractile recovery. Conversely, selective prevention of S-nitrosylation and S-glutathionylation of RyR2 was associated with higher numbers of arrhythmias and impaired contractility. In S2814A mice, treatment with MPG further reduced the incidence of arrhythmias. Taken together, the results suggest that redox modification of RyR2 synergistically with CaMKII phosphorylation modulates reperfusion arrhythmias. PMID:27422983

  5. Ryanodine receptor cluster fragmentation and redistribution in persistent atrial fibrillation enhance calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Macquaide, Niall; Tuan, Hoang-Trong Minh; Hotta, Jun-ichi; Sempels, Wouter; Lenaerts, Ilse; Holemans, Patricia; Hofkens, Johan; Jafri, M. Saleet; Willems, Rik; Sipido, Karin R.

    2015-01-01

    Aims In atrial fibrillation (AF), abnormalities in Ca2+ release contribute to arrhythmia generation and contractile dysfunction. We explore whether ryanodine receptor (RyR) cluster ultrastructure is altered and is associated with functional abnormalities in AF. Methods and results Using high-resolution confocal microscopy (STED), we examined RyR cluster morphology in fixed atrial myocytes from sheep with persistent AF (N = 6) and control (Ctrl; N = 6) animals. RyR clusters on average contained 15 contiguous RyRs; this did not differ between AF and Ctrl. However, the distance between clusters was significantly reduced in AF (288 ± 12 vs. 376 ± 17 nm). When RyR clusters were grouped into Ca2+ release units (CRUs), i.e. clusters separated by <150 nm, CRUs in AF had more clusters (3.43 ± 0.10 vs. 2.95 ± 0.02 in Ctrl), which were more dispersed. Furthermore, in AF cells, more RyR clusters were found between Z lines. In parallel experiments, Ca2+ sparks were monitored in live permeabilized myocytes. In AF, myocytes had >50% higher spark frequency with increased spark time to peak (TTP) and duration, and a higher incidence of macrosparks. A computational model of the CRU was used to simulate the morphological alterations observed in AF cells. Increasing cluster fragmentation to the level observed in AF cells caused the observed changes, i.e. higher spark frequency, increased TTP and duration; RyR clusters dispersed between Z-lines increased the occurrence of macrosparks. Conclusion In persistent AF, ultrastructural reorganization of RyR clusters within CRUs is associated with overactive Ca2+ release, increasing the likelihood of propagating Ca2+ release. PMID:26490742

  6. The role of ryanodine receptor type 3 in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Supnet, Charlene; Sun, Suya; Zhang, Hua; Good, Levi; Popugaeva, Elena; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling is reported to play an important role in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis. The role of ER Ca(2+) release channels, the ryanodine receptors (RyanRs), has been extensivelys tudied in AD models and RyanR expression and activity are upregulated in the brains of various familial AD (FAD) models.The objective of this study was to utilize a genetic approach to evaluate the importance of RyanR type 3 (RyanR3) in the context of AD pathology.The expression of RyanR3 was also elevated in hippocampus of APPPS1 mice (Thy1-APPKM670/671NL, Thy1-PS1L166P).In young (≤ 3 mo) APPPS1 mice, the deletion of RyanR3 increased hippocampal neuronal network excitability and accelerated AD pathology, leading to mushroom spine loss and increased amyloid accumulation. In contrast, deletion of RyanR3 in older APPPS1 mice (≥ 6 mo) rescued network excitability and mushroom spine loss, reduced amyloid plaque load and reduced spontaneous seizure occurrence.Our data suggests a dual role for RyanR3 in AD pathology. In young AD neurons, RyanR3 protects AD neurons from synaptic and network dysfunction. In older AD neurons, increased RyanR3 activity contributes to pathology. These results imply that blockade of RyanR3 may be beneficial for those in the later stages of the disease, but RyanR activators may be beneficial when used prior to disease onset or in its initial stages. Caffeine is an activator of RyanRs and our results may help to explain a complex epidemiological connection between coffee consumption in mid-life and risk of AD development in old age. PMID:24476841

  7. Bioinformatic mapping and production of recombinant N-terminal domains of human cardiac ryanodine receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Bauerová-Hlinková, Vladena; Hostinová, Eva; Gašperík, Juraj; Beck, Konrad; Borko, Ľubomír; Lai, F. Anthony; Zahradníková, Alexandra; Ševčík, Jozef

    2010-01-01

    We report the domain analysis of the N-terminal region (residues 1–759) of the human cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) that encompasses one of the discrete RyR2 mutation clusters associated with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT1) and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD2). Our strategy utilizes a bioinformatics approach complemented by protein expression, solubility analysis and limited proteolytic digestion. Based on the bioinformatics analysis, we designed a series of specific RyR2 N-terminal fragments for cloning and overexpression in Escherichia coli. High yields of soluble proteins were achieved for fragments RyR21–606·His6, RyR2391–606·His6, RyR2409–606·His6, Trx·RyR2384–606·His6, Trx·RyR2391-606·His6 and Trx·RyR2409–606·His6. The folding of RyR21–606·His6 was analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy resulting in α-helix and β-sheet content of ∼23% and ∼29%, respectively, at temperatures up to 35 °C, which is in agreement with sequence based secondary structure predictions. Tryptic digestion of the largest recombinant protein, RyR21–606·His6, resulted in the appearance of two specific subfragments of ∼40 and 25 kDa. The 25 kDa fragment exhibited greater stability. Hybridization with anti-His6·Tag antibody indicated that RyR21–606·His6 is cleaved from the N-terminus and amino acid sequencing of the proteolytic fragments revealed that digestion occurred after residues 259 and 384, respectively. PMID:20045464

  8. Cardiomyocytes hypertrophic status after myocardial infarction determines distinct types of arrhythmia: role of the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Fauconnier, Jérémy; Pasquié, Jean-Luc; Bideaux, Patrice; Lacampagne, Alain; Richard, Sylvain

    2010-09-01

    The mechanisms responsible for sudden cardiac death in heart failure (HF) are unclear. We investigated early and delayed afterdepolarizations (EADs, DADs) in HF. Cardiomyocytes were enzymatically isolated from the right ventricle (RV) and the septum of rats 8 weeks after myocardial infarction (MI) and sham-operated animals. Membrane capacitance, action potentials (AP) and ionic currents were measured by whole-cell patch-clamp. The [Ca(2+)](i) transients and Ca(2+) sparks were recorded with Fluo-4 during fluorescence measurements. Arrhythmia was triggered in 40% of MI cells (not in sham) using trains of 5 stimulations at 2.0 Hz. EADs and DADs occurred in distinct cell populations both in the RV and the septum. EADs occurred in normal-sized PMI cells (<230 pF), whereas DADs occurred in hypertrophic PMI cells (>230 pF). All cells exhibited prolonged APs due to reduced I(to) current. However, additional modifications in Ca(2+)-dependent ionic currents occurred in hypertrophic cells: a decrease in the inward rectifier K(+) current I(K1), and a slowing of L-type Ca(2+) current inactivation which was responsible for the lack of adaptation of APs to abrupt changes in the pacing rate. The occurrence of spontaneous Ca(2+) sparks, reflecting ryanodine receptor (RyR2) diastolic activity, increased with hypertrophy. The [Ca(2+)](i) transient amplitude, sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) load and Ca(2+) sparks amplitude were all inversely correlated with cell size. We conclude that the trophic status of cardiomyocytes determines the type of cellular arrhythmia in MI rats, based on differential electrophysiological remodeling which may reflect early-mild and late-severe or differential modifications in the RyR2 function. PMID:20109482

  9. Chronic diabetes increases advanced glycation end products on cardiac ryanodine receptors/calcium-release channels.

    PubMed

    Bidasee, Keshore R; Nallani, Karuna; Yu, Yongqi; Cocklin, Ross R; Zhang, Yinong; Wang, Mu; Dincer, U Deniz; Besch, Henry R

    2003-07-01

    Decrease in cardiac contractility is a hallmark of chronic diabetes. Previously we showed that this defect results, at least in part, from a dysfunction of the type 2 ryanodine receptor calcium-release channel (RyR2). The mechanism(s) underlying RyR2 dysfunction is not fully understood. The present study was designed to determine whether non-cross-linking advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on RyR2 increase with chronic diabetes and if formation of these post-translational complexes could be attenuated with insulin treatment. Overnight digestion of RyR2 from 8-week control animals (8C) with trypsin afforded 298 peptides with monoisotopic mass (M+H(+)) >or=500. Digestion of RyR2 from 8-week streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals (8D) afforded 21% fewer peptides, whereas RyR2 from 6-week diabetic/2-week insulin-treated animals generated 304 peptides. Using an in-house PERLscript algorithm, search of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass data files identified several M+H(+) peaks corresponding to theoretical RyR2 peptides with single N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)-lysine, imidazolone A, imidazone B, pyrraline, or 1-alkyl-2-formyl-3,4-glycosyl pyrrole modification that were present in 8D but not 8C. Insulin treatment minimized production of some of these nonenzymatic glycation products. These data show for the first time that AGEs are formed on intracellular RyR2 during diabetes. Because AGE complexes are known to compromise protein activity, these data suggest a potential mechanism for diabetes-induced RyR2 dysfunction. PMID:12829653

  10. Ryanodine Receptor Activation Induces Long-Term Plasticity of Spine Calcium Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pannasch, Ulrike; Rückl, Martin; Rüdiger, Sten; Schmitz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    A key feature of signalling in dendritic spines is the synapse-specific transduction of short electrical signals into biochemical responses. Ca2+ is a major upstream effector in this transduction cascade, serving both as a depolarising electrical charge carrier at the membrane and an intracellular second messenger. Upon action potential firing, the majority of spines are subject to global back-propagating action potential (bAP) Ca2+ transients. These transients translate neuronal suprathreshold activation into intracellular biochemical events. Using a combination of electrophysiology, two-photon Ca2+ imaging, and modelling, we demonstrate that bAPs are electrochemically coupled to Ca2+ release from intracellular stores via ryanodine receptors (RyRs). We describe a new function mediated by spine RyRs: the activity-dependent long-term enhancement of the bAP-Ca2+ transient. Spines regulate bAP Ca2+ influx independent of each other, as bAP-Ca2+ transient enhancement is compartmentalized and independent of the dendritic Ca2+ transient. Furthermore, this functional state change depends exclusively on bAPs travelling antidromically into dendrites and spines. Induction, but not expression, of bAP-Ca2+ transient enhancement is a spine-specific function of the RyR. We demonstrate that RyRs can form specific Ca2+ signalling nanodomains within single spines. Functionally, RyR mediated Ca2+ release in these nanodomains induces a new form of Ca2+ transient plasticity that constitutes a spine specific storage mechanism of neuronal suprathreshold activity patterns. PMID:26098891

  11. Peptide fragments of the dihydropyridine receptor can modulate cardiac ryanodine receptor channel activity and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release.

    PubMed Central

    Dulhunty, Angela F; Curtis, Suzanne M; Cengia, Louise; Sakowska, Magdalena; Casarotto, Marco G

    2004-01-01

    We show that peptide fragments of the dihydropyridine receptor II-III loop alter cardiac RyR (ryanodine receptor) channel activity in a cytoplasmic Ca2+-dependent manner. The peptides were AC (Thr-793-Ala-812 of the cardiac dihydropyridine receptor), AS (Thr-671-Leu-690 of the skeletal dihydropyridine receptor), and a modified AS peptide [AS(D-R18)], with an extended helical structure. The peptides added to the cytoplasmic side of channels in lipid bilayers at > or = 10 nM activated channels when the cytoplasmic [Ca2+] was 100 nM, but either inhibited or did not affect channel activity when the cytoplasmic [Ca2+] was 10 or 100 microM. Both activation and inhibition were independent of bilayer potential. Activation by AS, but not by AC or AS(D-R18), was reduced at peptide concentrations >1 mM in a voltage-dependent manner (at +40 mV). In control experiments, channels were not activated by the scrambled AS sequence (ASS) or skeletal II-III loop peptide (NB). Resting Ca2+ release from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum was not altered by peptide AC, but Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release was depressed. Resting and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release were enhanced by both the native and modified AS peptides. NMR revealed (i) that the structure of peptide AS(D-R18) is not influenced by [Ca2+] and (ii) that peptide AC adopts a helical structure, particularly in the region containing positively charged residues. This is the first report of specific functional interactions between dihydropyridine receptor A region peptides and cardiac RyR ion channels in lipid bilayers. PMID:14678014

  12. A novel mutation (Arg169Gln) of the cardiac ryanodine receptor gene causing exercise-induced bidirectional ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Chia-Hsiang; Weng, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chao-Yu; Lin, Tin-Kwang; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lai, Ling-Ping; Lin, Jiunn-Lee

    2006-04-01

    An 18-year-old woman presented with exercise induced sudden collapse. Series of cardiac work up revealed no structural cardiac abnormalities. Bidirectional ventricular tachycardia occurred during a treadmill exercise test. Under the impression of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, we screened the cardiac ryanodine receptor gene for mutation. We identified a novel heterozygous mutation at the 169th amino acid (Arg169Gln). This amino acid is highly conserved among many species and this mutation was not present in 50 normal control subjects. This patient was treated with a beta-block with good response. PMID:16517285

  13. One Dimensional Finite Element Method Approach to Study Effect of Ryanodine Receptor and Serca Pump on Calcium Distribution in Oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Parvaiz Ahmad; Pardasani, Kamal Raj

    2013-11-01

    Oocyte is a female gametocyte or germ cell involved in reproduction. Calcium ions (Ca2+) impact nearly all aspects of cellular life as they play an important role in a variety of cellular functions. Calcium ions contributes to egg activation upon fertilization. Since it is the internal stores which provide most of the calcium signal, much attention has been focused on the intracellular channels. There are mainly two types of calcium channels which release calcium from the internal stores to the cytoplasm in many cell types. These channels are IP3-Receptor and Ryanodine Receptor (RyR). Further it is essential to maintain low cytosolic calcium concentration, the cell engages the Serco/Endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPases (SERCA) present on the ER or SR membrane for the re-uptake of cytosolic calcium at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. In view of above an attempt has been made to study the effect of the Ryanodine receptor (RyR) and the SERCA pump on the calcium distribution in oocytes. The main aim of this paper is to study the calcium concentration in absence and presence of these parameters. The FEM is used to solve the proposed Mathematical model under appreciate initial and boundary conditions. The program has been developed in MATLAB 7.10 for the entire problem to get numerical results.

  14. Apolipoprotein E isoform-specific effects on lipoprotein receptor processing

    PubMed Central

    Bachmeier, Corbin; Shackleton, Ben; Ojo, Joseph; Paris, Daniel; Mullan, Michael; Crawford, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings indicate an isoform-specific role for apolipoprotein E (apoE) in the elimination of beta-amyloid (Aβ) from the brain. ApoE is closely associated with various lipoprotein receptors, which contribute to Aβ brain removal via metabolic clearance or transit across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). These receptors are subject to ectodomain shedding at the cell surface, which alters endocytic transport and mitigates Aβ elimination. To further understand the manner in which apoE influences Aβ brain clearance, these studies investigated the effect of apoE on lipoprotein receptor shedding. Consistent with prior reports, we observed an increased shedding of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and the LDLR-related protein 1 (LRP1) following Aβ exposure in human brain endothelial cells. When Aβ was co-treated with each apoE isoform, there was a reduction in Aβ-induced shedding with apoE2 and apoE3, while lipoprotein receptor shedding in the presence of apoE4 remained elevated. Likewise, intracranial administration of Aβ to apoE targeted replacement mice (expressing the human apoE isoforms) resulted in an isoform-dependent effect on lipoprotein receptor shedding in the brain (apoE4>apoE3>apoE2). Moreover, these results show a strong inverse correlation with our prior work in apoE transgenic mice in which apoE4 animals showed reduced Aβ clearance across the BBB compared to apoE3 animals. Based on these results, apoE4 appears less efficient than other apoE isoforms in regulating lipoprotein receptor shedding, which may explain the differential effects of these isoforms in removing Aβ from the brain. PMID:25015123

  15. NAADP-mediated Ca2+ signaling via type 1 ryanodine receptor in T cells revealed by a synthetic NAADP antagonist.

    PubMed

    Dammermann, Werner; Zhang, Bo; Nebel, Merle; Cordiglieri, Chiara; Odoardi, Francesca; Kirchberger, Tanja; Kawakami, Naoto; Dowden, James; Schmid, Frederike; Dornmair, Klaus; Hohenegger, Martin; Flügel, Alexander; Guse, Andreas H; Potter, Barry V L

    2009-06-30

    The nucleotide NAADP was recently discovered as a second messenger involved in the initiation and propagation of Ca(2+) signaling in lymphoma T cells, but its impact on primary T cell function is still unknown. An optimized, synthetic, small molecule inhibitor of NAADP action, termed BZ194, was designed and synthesized. BZ194 neither interfered with Ca(2+) mobilization by d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate or cyclic ADP-ribose nor with capacitative Ca(2+) entry. BZ194 specifically and effectively blocked NAADP-stimulated [(3)H]ryanodine binding to the purified type 1 ryanodine receptor. Further, in intact T cells, Ca(2+) mobilization evoked by NAADP or by formation of the immunological synapse between primary effector T cells and astrocytes was inhibited by BZ194. Downstream events of Ca(2+) mobilization, such as nuclear translocation of "nuclear factor of activated T cells" (NFAT), T cell receptor-driven interleukin-2 production, and proliferation in antigen-experienced CD4(+) effector T cells, were attenuated by the NAADP antagonist. Taken together, specific inhibition of the NAADP signaling pathway constitutes a way to specifically and effectively modulate T-cell activation and has potential in the therapy of autoimmune diseases. PMID:19541638

  16. Hierarchical clustering of ryanodine receptors enables emergence of a calcium clock in sinoatrial node cells

    PubMed Central

    Maltseva, Larissa A.; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Sollott, Steven J.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Maltsev, Victor A.

    2014-01-01

    The sinoatrial node, whose cells (sinoatrial node cells [SANCs]) generate rhythmic action potentials, is the primary pacemaker of the heart. During diastole, calcium released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) via ryanodine receptors (RyRs) interacts with membrane currents to control the rate of the heartbeat. This “calcium clock” takes the form of stochastic, partially periodic, localized calcium release (LCR) events that propagate, wave-like, for limited distances. The detailed mechanisms controlling the calcium clock are not understood. We constructed a computational model of SANCs, including three-dimensional diffusion and buffering of calcium in the cytosol and SR; explicit, stochastic gating of individual RyRs and L-type calcium channels; and a full complement of voltage- and calcium-dependent membrane currents. We did not include an anatomical submembrane space or inactivation of RyRs, the two heuristic components that have been used in prior models but are not observed experimentally. When RyRs were distributed in discrete clusters separated by >1 µm, only isolated sparks were produced in this model and LCR events did not form. However, immunofluorescent staining of SANCs for RyR revealed the presence of bridging RyR groups between large clusters, forming an irregular network. Incorporation of this architecture into the model led to the generation of propagating LCR events. Partial periodicity emerged from the interaction of LCR events, as observed experimentally. This calcium clock becomes entrained with membrane currents to accelerate the beating rate, which therefore was controlled by the activity of the SERCA pump, RyR sensitivity, and L-type current amplitude, all of which are targets of β-adrenergic–mediated phosphorylation. Unexpectedly, simulations revealed the existence of a pathological mode at high RyR sensitivity to calcium, in which the calcium clock loses synchronization with the membrane, resulting in a paradoxical decrease in

  17. Hierarchical clustering of ryanodine receptors enables emergence of a calcium clock in sinoatrial node cells.

    PubMed

    Stern, Michael D; Maltseva, Larissa A; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Sollott, Steven J; Lakatta, Edward G; Maltsev, Victor A

    2014-05-01

    The sinoatrial node, whose cells (sinoatrial node cells [SANCs]) generate rhythmic action potentials, is the primary pacemaker of the heart. During diastole, calcium released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) via ryanodine receptors (RyRs) interacts with membrane currents to control the rate of the heartbeat. This "calcium clock" takes the form of stochastic, partially periodic, localized calcium release (LCR) events that propagate, wave-like, for limited distances. The detailed mechanisms controlling the calcium clock are not understood. We constructed a computational model of SANCs, including three-dimensional diffusion and buffering of calcium in the cytosol and SR; explicit, stochastic gating of individual RyRs and L-type calcium channels; and a full complement of voltage- and calcium-dependent membrane currents. We did not include an anatomical submembrane space or inactivation of RyRs, the two heuristic components that have been used in prior models but are not observed experimentally. When RyRs were distributed in discrete clusters separated by >1 µm, only isolated sparks were produced in this model and LCR events did not form. However, immunofluorescent staining of SANCs for RyR revealed the presence of bridging RyR groups between large clusters, forming an irregular network. Incorporation of this architecture into the model led to the generation of propagating LCR events. Partial periodicity emerged from the interaction of LCR events, as observed experimentally. This calcium clock becomes entrained with membrane currents to accelerate the beating rate, which therefore was controlled by the activity of the SERCA pump, RyR sensitivity, and L-type current amplitude, all of which are targets of β-adrenergic-mediated phosphorylation. Unexpectedly, simulations revealed the existence of a pathological mode at high RyR sensitivity to calcium, in which the calcium clock loses synchronization with the membrane, resulting in a paradoxical decrease in beating

  18. Unbalanced upregulation of ryanodine receptor 2 plays a particular role in early development of daunorubicin cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kucerova, Dana; Doka, Gabriel; Kruzliak, Peter; Turcekova, Katarina; Kmecova, Jana; Brnoliakova, Zuzana; Kyselovic, Jan; Kirchhefer, Uwe; Müller, Frank U; Krenek, Peter; Boknik, Peter; Klimas, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Calcium release channel on the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes (ryanodine receptor type 2, RyR2) plays a critical role in the regulation of calcium and was identified as a crucial factor for development of chronic anthracycline cardiomyopathy. Its early stages are less well described although these determine the later development. Hence, we tested the effect of repeated, short-term anthracycline (daunorubicin) administration on cardiac performance, cardiomyocyte function and accompanied changes in calcium regulating proteins expression. Ten-twelve weeks old male Wistar rats were administered with 6 doses of daunorubicin (DAU, 3 mg/kg, i.p., every 48 h), controls (CON) received vehicle. Left ventricular function (left ventricular pressure, LVP; rate of pressure development, +dP/dt and decline, -dP/dt) was measured using left ventricular catheterization under tribromethanol anaesthesia (15 ml/kg b.w.). Cell shortening was measured in enzymatically isolated cardiomyocytes. The expressions of RyR2 and associated intracellular calcium regulating proteins, cytoskeletal proteins (alpha-actinin, alpha-tubul in) as well as oxidative stress regulating enzymes (gp91phox, MnSOD) were detected in ventricular tissue samples using immunoblotting. mRNA expressions of cardiac damage markers (Nppa and Nppb, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides; Myh6, Myh7 and Myh7b, myosin heavy chain alpha and beta) were detected using RT-PCR. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances concentration was measured to estimate oxidative stress. DAU rats exhibited significantly depressed left ventricular features (LVP by 14%, +dP/dt by 36% and -dP/dt by 30%; for all P<0.05), in line with concomitant increase in Nppa and Nppb gene expressions (3.23- and 2.18-fold, for both P<0.05), and a 4.34-fold increase in Myh7 (P<0.05). Controversially, we observed increased cell shortening of isolated cardiac cells by 31% (p<0.05). DAU administration was associated with a twofold upregulation of RyR2 (P<0

  19. Regulation of Ca2+ Signaling in Rat Bile Duct Epithelia by Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Keiji; Dufour, Jean-François; Shibao, Kazunori; Knickelbein, Roy; O'Neill, Allison F.; Bode, Hans-Peter; Cassio, Doris; St-Pierre, Marie V.; LaRusso, Nicholas F.; Leite, M. Fatima; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ (Cai2+) regulates secretion of bicarbonate and other ions in the cholangiocyte. In other cell types, this second messenger acts through Ca2+ waves, Ca2+ oscillations, and other subcellular Ca2+ signaling patterns, but little is known about the subcellular organization of Ca2+ signaling in cholangiocytes. Therefore, we examined Ca2+ signaling and the subcellular distribution of Ca2+ release channels in cholangiocytes and in a model cholangiocyte cell line. The expression and subcellular distribution of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptor (InsP3R) isoforms and the ryanodine receptor (RyR) were determined in cholangiocytes from normal rat liver and in the normal rat cholangiocyte (NRC) polarized bile duct cell line. Subcellular Ca2+ signaling in cholangiocytes was examined by confocal microscopy. All 3 InsP3R isoforms were expressed in cholangiocytes, whereas RyR was not expressed. The type III InsP3R was the most heavily expressed isoform at the protein level and was concentrated apically, whereas the type I and type II isoforms were expressed more uniformly. The type III InsP3R was expressed even more heavily in NRC cells but was concentrated apically in these cells as well. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which increases Ca2+ via InsP3 in cholangiocytes, induced Ca2+ oscillations in both cholangiocytes and NRC cells. Acetylcholine (ACh) induced apical-to-basal Ca2+ waves. In conclusion, Ca2+ signaling in cholangiocytes occurs as polarized Ca2+ waves that begin in the region of the type III InsP3R. Differential subcellular localization of InsP3R isoforms may be an important molecular mechanism for the formation of Ca2+ waves and oscillations in cholangiocytes. Because Cai2+ is in part responsible for regulating ductular secretion, these findings also may have implications for the molecular basis of cholestatic disorders. PMID:12143036

  20. Discovery of cyantraniliprole, a potent and selective anthranilic diamide ryanodine receptor activator with cross-spectrum insecticidal activity.

    PubMed

    Selby, Thomas P; Lahm, George P; Stevenson, Thomas M; Hughes, Kenneth A; Cordova, Daniel; Annan, I Billy; Barry, James D; Benner, Eric A; Currie, Martin J; Pahutski, Thomas F

    2013-12-01

    Anthranilic diamides are an exceptionally active class of insect control chemistry that selectively activates insect ryanodine receptors causing mortality from uncontrolled release of calcium ion stores in muscle cells. Work in this area led to the successful commercialization of chlorantraniliprole for control of Lepidoptera and other insect pests at very low application rates. In search of lower logP analogs with improved plant systemic properties, exploration of cyano-substituted anthranilic diamides culminated in the discovery of a second product candidate, cyantraniliprole, having excellent activity against a wide range of pests from multiple insect orders. Here we report on the chemistry, biology and structure-activity trends for a series of cyanoanthranilic diamides from which cyantraniliprole was selected for commercial development. PMID:24135728

  1. RNAi suppression of the ryanodine receptor gene results in decreased susceptibility to chlorantraniliprole in Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata.

    PubMed

    Wan, Pin-Jun; Guo, Wei-Yan; Yang, Yao; Lü, Feng-Gong; Lu, Wei-Ping; Li, Guo-Qing

    2014-04-01

    Leptinotarsadecemlineata is the most important pest in potato and causes serious yield loss each year. Chlorantraniliprole acts on insect ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and is among the most active compounds against L. decemlineata. Here we cloned and characterized a 15,792-bp full-length LdRyR cDNA that encoded a 5128-amino acid protein. LdRyR shares 85-92% amino acid similarities with other insect RyR homologues, and 59-61% similarities with those from Caenorhabditis elegans and Homo sapiens. All hallmarks of the RyR proteins are conserved in LdRyR. LdRyR has a MIR domain, two RIH domains, three SPRY domains, four copies of RyR domain and a RIH-associated domain in the N-terminus, and it possesses two consensus calcium ion-binding EF-hand motifs and six predicted transmembrane helices in the C-terminus. Temporal, spatial and tissue-specific expression patterns of LdRyR were evaluated. LdRyR expression level was increased constantly from egg to wandering stages, dropped in pupal stage and was increased again in the adult stage. It was widely expressed in the head, thorax and abdomen of day 3 fourth-instar larvae. Moreover, it was ubiquitously expressed in all inspected tissues including epidermis, foregut, midgut, ileum, rectum, fat body, ventral ganglia and Malpighian tubules in day 3 fourth-instar larvae. Dietary introduction of double-stranded RNA of LdRyR significantly reduced the mRNA levels of the target gene in the larvae and adults, respectively, and significantly decreased chlorantraniliprole-induced mortalities. Thus, our results suggested that LdRyR encoded a functional ryanodine receptor in L. decemlineata. PMID:24607641

  2. Rapid cooling-induced contractures in rat skinned skeletal muscle fibres originate from sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release through ryanodine and inositol trisphosphate receptors.

    PubMed

    Talon, S; Huchet-Cadiou, C; Léoty, C

    2000-11-01

    Previous reports have shown that cooling striated muscles induces contractile responses that are related to Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. However, the effect of cooling has generally been studied in the presence of pharmacological agents that potentiate rapid cooling-induced contractures. The present study shows that in saponin-skinned rat skeletal muscle preparations, a drop in temperature from 22 degrees C to 2 degrees C per se induces a contracture which relaxes on return to 22 degrees C. In fast-twitch fibres, rapid cooling-induced contractures are fully blocked by ryanodine, an inhibitor of ryanodine receptors. By contrast, in slow-twitch fibres, ryanodine partially inhibits the rapid cooling-induced contractile response, leaving a residual tension that dissipates after application of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3). At low concentrations, heparin, an inhibitor of InsP3 receptors, decreases rapid cooling-induced contractures in both types of muscle. The present results suggest that in skeletal muscle, rapid cooling-induced contractures are due to both ryanodine-sensitive and InsP3-sensitive Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. PMID:11205048

  3. Overexpression of ryanodine receptor type 1 enhances mitochondrial fragmentation and Ca2+-induced ATP production in cardiac H9c2 myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    O-Uchi, Jin; Jhun, Bong Sook; Hurst, Stephen; Bisetto, Sara; Gross, Polina; Chen, Ming; Kettlewell, Sarah; Park, Jongsun; Oyamada, Hideto; Smith, Godfrey L.; Murayama, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Ca+ influx to mitochondria is an important trigger for both mitochondrial dynamics and ATP generation in various cell types, including cardiac cells. Mitochondrial Ca2+ influx is mainly mediated by the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU). Growing evidence also indicates that mitochondrial Ca2+ influx mechanisms are regulated not solely by MCU but also by multiple channels/transporters. We have previously reported that skeletal muscle-type ryanodine receptor (RyR) type 1 (RyR1), which expressed at the mitochondrial inner membrane, serves as an additional Ca2+ uptake pathway in cardiomyocytes. However, it is still unclear which mitochondrial Ca2+ influx mechanism is the dominant regulator of mitochondrial morphology/dynamics and energetics in cardiomyocytes. To investigate the role of mitochondrial RyR1 in the regulation of mitochondrial morphology/function in cardiac cells, RyR1 was transiently or stably overexpressed in cardiac H9c2 myoblasts. We found that overexpressed RyR1 was partially localized in mitochondria as observed using both immunoblots of mitochondrial fractionation and confocal microscopy, whereas RyR2, the main RyR isoform in the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum, did not show any expression at mitochondria. Interestingly, overexpression of RyR1 but not MCU or RyR2 resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation. These fragmented mitochondria showed bigger and sustained mitochondrial Ca2+ transients compared with basal tubular mitochondria. In addition, RyR1-overexpressing cells had a higher mitochondrial ATP concentration under basal conditions and showed more ATP production in response to cytosolic Ca2+ elevation compared with nontransfected cells as observed by a matrix-targeted ATP biosensor. These results indicate that RyR1 possesses a mitochondrial targeting/retention signal and modulates mitochondrial morphology and Ca2+-induced ATP production in cardiac H9c2 myoblasts. PMID:24124188

  4. GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate stress resilience.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Olivia F; Felice, Daniela; Galimberti, Stefano; Savignac, Hélène M; Bravo, Javier A; Crowley, Tadhg; El Yacoubi, Malika; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2014-10-21

    Stressful life events increase the susceptibility to developing psychiatric disorders such as depression; however, many individuals are resilient to such negative effects of stress. Determining the neurobiology underlying this resilience is instrumental to the development of novel and more effective treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders. GABAB receptors are emerging therapeutic targets for the treatment of stress-related disorders such as depression. These receptors are predominantly expressed as heterodimers of a GABAB(2) subunit with either a GABAB(1a) or a GABAB(1b) subunit. Here we show that mice lacking the GABAB(1b) receptor isoform are more resilient to both early-life stress and chronic psychosocial stress in adulthood, whereas mice lacking GABAB(1a) receptors are more susceptible to stress-induced anhedonia and social avoidance compared with wild-type mice. In addition, increased hippocampal expression of the GABAB(1b) receptor subunit is associated with a depression-like phenotype in the helpless H/Rouen genetic mouse model of depression. Stress resilience in GABAB(1b)(-/-) mice is coupled with increased proliferation and survival of newly born cells in the adult ventral hippocampus and increased stress-induced c-Fos activation in the hippocampus following early-life stress. Taken together, the data suggest that GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate the deleterious effects of stress and, thus, may be important therapeutic targets for the treatment of depression. PMID:25288769

  5. Specific roles of GABAB(1) receptor isoforms in cognition

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Laura H.; Kelly, Peter H.; Bettler, Bernhard; Kaupmann, Klemens; Cryan, John F.

    2010-01-01

    The GABAB receptor is a heterodimer of GABAB(1) and GABAB(2) subunits. There are two isoforms of the GABAB(1) subunit: GABAB(1a) and GABAB(1b). Recent studies with mutant mice suggest a differential role for the two GABAB(1) isoforms in behavioural processes. As pharmacological and genetic studies have implicated GABAB receptors in cognition we investigated the behaviour of GABAB(1a) −/− and GABAB(1b) −/− mice in different types of cognitive paradigms. GABAB(1a) −/− and GABAB(1b) −/− mice were both impaired relative to wildtype controls in a continuous spontaneous alternation behaviour test of working spatial memory. In contrast to the reported phenotype of GABAB(1) −/− mice, however, neither GABAB(1a) −/− nor GABAB(1b) −/− mice were deficient in a passive avoidance task. On the other hand, GABAB(1a) −/− mice were impaired in familiar and novel object recognition. We conclude that GABAB(1) isoforms contribute differentially to GABAB receptor-mediated cognitive processes. PMID:17498817

  6. Pre-Slaughter Stress Affects Ryanodine Receptor Protein Gene Expression and the Water-Holding Capacity in Fillets of the Nile Tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Jorge A. F.; Gasparino, Eliane; Del Vesco, Ana P.; Goes, Marcio D.; Alexandre Filho, Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Current study evaluated the effect of pre-slaughter stress on serum cortisol levels, pH, colorimetry, water-holding capacity (WHC) and gene expression of ryanodine receptors (RyR1 and RyR3) in the Nile tilapia. A 3x4 factorial scheme experiment was conducted comprising three densities (100, 200, 400 kg/m³) with four transportation times (60, 120, 180, and 240 minutes).Transportation times alone reduced cortisol levels up to 180 minutes, followed by increased WHC and mRNA expression, RyR1 and RyR3 (200 kg/m³ density). No effect of density x transportation time interacted on the evaluated parameters. Results provided the first evidence that pre-slaughter stress affected ryanodine gene expression receptors and, consequently, the water-holding capacity in tilapia fillets. PMID:26053858

  7. Mediation of Autophagic Cell Death by Type 3 Ryanodine Receptor (RyR3) in Adult Hippocampal Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyung Min; Jeong, Eun-Ji; Park, Hyunhee; An, Hyun-Kyu; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic Ca2+ actively engages in diverse intracellular processes from protein synthesis, folding and trafficking to cell survival and death. Dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels is observed in various neuropathological states including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs), the main Ca2+ release channels located in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, are known to direct various cellular events such as autophagy and apoptosis. Here we investigated the intracellular Ca2+-mediated regulation of survival and death of adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN) cells utilizing an insulin withdrawal model of autophagic cell death (ACD). Despite comparable expression levels of RyR and IP3R transcripts in HCN cells at normal state, the expression levels of RyRs—especially RyR3—were markedly upregulated upon insulin withdrawal. While treatment with the RyR agonist caffeine significantly promoted the autophagic death of insulin-deficient HCN cells, treatment with its inhibitor dantrolene prevented the induction of autophagy following insulin withdrawal. Furthermore, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of the RyR3 gene abolished ACD of HCN cells. This study delineates a distinct, RyR3-mediated ER Ca2+ regulation of autophagy and programmed cell death in neural stem cells. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical, yet understudied mechanisms underlying the regulatory function of ER Ca2+ in neural stem cell biology. PMID:27199668

  8. Electron-conformational transformations govern the temperature dependence of the cardiac ryanodine receptor gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvin, A. S.; Iaparov, B. I.; Ryvkin, A. M.; Solovyova, O. E.; Markhasin, V. S.

    2015-07-01

    Temperature influences many aspects of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, in particular, hypothermia increases the open probability ( P open) of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-release channels (ryanodine-sensitive RyR channels) rising the SR Ca2+ load in mammalian myocytes. However, to the best of our knowledge, no theoretical models are available for that effect. Traditional Markov chain models do not provide a reasonable molecular mechanistic insight on the origin of the temperature effects. Here in the paper we address a simple physically clear electron-conformational model to describe the RyR gating and argue that a synergetic effect of external thermal fluctuation forces (Gaussian-Markovian noise) and internal friction via the temperature stimulation/suppression of the open-close RyR tunneling probability can be considered as a main contributor to temperature effects on the RyR gating. Results of the computer modeling allowed us to successfully reproduce all the temperature effects observed for an isolated RyR gating in vitro under reducing the temperature: increase in P open and mean open time without any significant effect on mean closed

  9. Knockout of the BK β4-subunit promotes a functional coupling of BK channels and ryanodine receptors that mediate a fAHP-induced increase in excitability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Bugay, Vladislav; Ling, Ling; Chuang, Hui-Hsui; Jaffe, David B; Brenner, Robert

    2016-08-01

    BK channels are large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels with diverse properties. Knockout of the accessory BK β4-subunit in hippocampus dentate gyrus granule neurons causes BK channels to change properties from slow-gated type II channels to fast-gated type I channels that sharpen the action potential, increase the fast afterhyperpolarization (fAHP) amplitude, and increase spike frequency. Here we studied the calcium channels that contribute to fast-gated BK channel activation and increased excitability of β4 knockout neurons. By using pharmacological blockers during current-clamp recording, we find that BK channel activation during the fAHP is dependent on ryanodine receptor activation. In contrast, L-type calcium channel blocker (nifedipine) affects the BK channel-dependent repolarization phase of the action potential but has no effect on the fAHP. Reducing BK channel activation during the repolarization phase with nifedipine, or during the fAHP with ryanodine, indicated that it is the BK-mediated increase of the fAHP that confers proexcitatory effects. The proexcitatory role of the fAHP was corroborated using dynamic current clamp. Increase or decrease of the fAHP amplitude during spiking revealed an inverse relationship between fAHP amplitude and interspike interval. Finally, we show that the seizure-prone ryanodine receptor gain-of-function (R2474S) knockin mice have an unaltered repolarization phase but larger fAHP and increased AP frequency compared with their control littermates. In summary, these results indicate that an important role of the β4-subunit is to reduce ryanodine receptor-BK channel functional coupling during the fAHP component of the action potential, thereby decreasing excitability of dentate gyrus neurons. PMID:27146987

  10. Up-regulation of ryanodine receptor expression increases the calcium-induced calcium release and spontaneous calcium signals in cerebral arteries from hindlimb unloaded rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, Jean-Luc; Dabertrand, Fabrice; Porte, Yves; Prevot, Anne; Macrez, Nathalie

    2014-08-01

    Microgravity induces a redistribution of blood volume. Consequently, astronauts' body pressure is modified so that the upright blood pressure gradient is abolished, thereby inducing a modification in cerebral blood pressure. This effect is mimicked in the hindlimb unloaded rat model. After a duration of 8 days of unloading, Ca2+ signals activated by depolarization and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate intracellular release were increased in cerebral arteries. In the presence of ryanodine and thapsigargin, the depolarization-induced Ca2+ signals remained increased in hindlimb suspended animals, indicating that Ca2+ influx and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism were both increased. Spontaneous Ca2+ waves and localized Ca2+ events were also investigated. Increases in both amplitude and frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ waves were measured in hindlimb suspension conditions. After pharmacological segregation of Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ sparklets, their kinetic parameters were characterized. Hindlimb suspension induced an increase in the frequencies of both Ca2+ localized events, suggesting an increase of excitability. Labeling with bodipy compounds suggested that voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptor expressions were increased. Finally, the expression of the ryanodine receptor subtype 1 (RyR1) was increased in hindlimb unloading conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that RyR1 expression and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels activity are the focal points of the regulation of Ca2+ signals activated by vasoconstriction in rat cerebral arteries with an increase of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx. PMID:24233561

  11. Genetic and Biochemical Approaches for In Vivo and In Vitro Assessment of Protein Oligomerization: The Ryanodine Receptor Case Study.

    PubMed

    Stanczyk, Paulina J; Lai, F Anthony; Zissimopoulos, Spyros

    2016-01-01

    Oligomerization is often a structural requirement for proteins to accomplish their specific cellular function. For instance, tetramerization of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) is necessary for the formation of a functional Ca(2+) release channel pore. Here, we describe detailed protocols for the assessment of protein self-association, including yeast two-hybrid (Y2H), co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) and chemical cross-linking assays. In the Y2H system, protein self-interaction is detected by β-galactosidase assay in yeast co-expressing GAL4 bait and target fusions of the test protein. Protein self-interaction is further assessed by co-IP using HA- and cMyc-tagged fusions of the test protein co-expressed in mammalian HEK293 cells. The precise stoichiometry of the protein homo-oligomer is examined by cross-linking and SDS-PAGE analysis following expression in HEK293 cells. Using these different but complementary techniques, we have consistently observed the self-association of the RyR N-terminal domain and demonstrated its intrinsic ability to form tetramers. These methods can be applied to protein-protein interaction and homo-oligomerization studies of other mammalian integral membrane proteins. PMID:27500320

  12. miRNAs regulated overexpression of ryanodine receptor is involved in chlorantraniliprole resistance in Plutella xylostella (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuxia; Guo, Lei; Zhou, Xuguo; Gao, Xiwu; Liang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid mutations in ryanodine receptor (RyR) and elevated activity of detoxification enzymes have been associated with the diamide insecticide resistance in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). The up-regulation of P. xylostella RyR mRNA (PxRyR) expression has also been reported in field populations of different graphical origin. However, whether the up-regulation of PxRyR is involved in diamide resistance remains unknown. In this paper, 2.28- to 4.14-fold higher expression of PxRyR was detected in five field collected resistant populations, compared to that in a susceptible population. The expression of PxRyR was up-regulated 5.0- and 7.2-fold, respectively, after P. xylostella was treated with LC50 and LC75 of chlorantraniliprole for 12 h. Suppression of PxRyR using RNA interference restored the toxicity of chlorantraniliprole against the fourth instar larvae from the resistant population. More importantly, the expression of PxRyR is regulated by two miRNAs, miR-7a and miR-8519. These findings provide an empirical evidence of the involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of insecticide resistance, and shed light on the novel targets for the sustainable management of this devastating insect pest. PMID:26370154

  13. Molecular cloning, characterisation and mRNA expression of the ryanodine receptor from the peach-potato aphid, Myzus persicae.

    PubMed

    Troczka, B J; Williams, A J; Bass, C; Williamson, M S; Field, L M; Davies, T G E

    2015-02-10

    The peach potato aphid, Myzus persicae, is one of the most important agricultural pests of temperate climates. It is mainly controlled through the judicious application of insecticides; however, over time, aphids have developed resistance to many insecticidal classes. The recent introduction of synthetic diamide insecticides, with a novel mode of action, potentially offers new tools to control aphid populations. These diamides act on the ryanodine receptor (RyR), a large endoplasmic calcium release channel. In this study we have cloned cDNAs encoding the complete open reading frame of the RyR from M. persicae. The open reading frame is 15,306 base pairs long and encodes a protein of 5101 amino acids. The aphid RyR shares many of the features of other insect and vertebrate RyRs, including a highly conserved transmembrane region. However, unlike the other RyRs characterised to date, the M. persicae channel does not display alternative splicing at any stage of its developmental cycle, so it cannot generate functional variants of the channel. PMID:25447916

  14. Ryanodine receptor antagonists adapt NPC1 proteostasis to ameliorate lipid storage in Niemann-Pick type C disease fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting; Chung, Chan; Shen, Dongbiao; Xu, Haoxing; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2012-07-15

    Niemann-Pick type C disease is a lysosomal storage disorder most often caused by loss-of-function mutations in the NPC1 gene. The encoded multipass transmembrane protein is required for cholesterol efflux from late endosomes and lysosomes. Numerous missense mutations in the NPC1 gene cause disease, including the prevalent I1061T mutation that leads to protein misfolding and degradation. Here, we sought to modulate the cellular proteostasis machinery to achieve functional recovery in primary patient fibroblasts. We demonstrate that targeting endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium levels using ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonists increased steady-state levels of the NPC1 I1061T protein. These compounds also promoted trafficking of mutant NPC1 to late endosomes and lysosomes and rescued the aberrant storage of cholesterol and sphingolipids that is characteristic of disease. Similar rescue was obtained using three distinct RyR antagonists in cells with missense alleles, but not with null alleles, or by over-expressing calnexin, a calcium-dependent ER chaperone. Our work highlights the utility of proteostasis regulators to remodel the protein-folding environment in the ER to recover function in the setting of disease-causing missense alleles. PMID:22505584

  15. Crystal structures of Ryanodine Receptor SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains reveal a critical FKBP12 binding determinant

    PubMed Central

    Yuchi, Zhiguang; Wong King Yuen, Siobhan M.; Lau, Kelvin; Underhill, Ainsley Q.; Cornea, Razvan L.; Fessenden, James D.; Van Petegem, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) form calcium release channels located in the membranes of the sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum. RyRs play a major role in excitation-contraction coupling and other Ca2+-dependent signaling events, and consist of several globular domains that together form a large assembly. Here we describe the crystal structures of the SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains at 1.2 – 1.5Å resolution, which reveal several structural elements not detected in recent cryo-EM reconstructions of RyRs. The cryo-EM studies disagree on the position of SPRY domains, which had been proposed based on homology modeling. Computational docking of the crystal structures, combined with FRET studies, show that the SPRY1 domain is located next to FK506-Binding Protein (FKBP). Molecular dynamics flexible fitting and mutagenesis experiments suggest a hydrophobic cluster within SPRY1 that is crucial for FKBP binding. A RyR1 disease mutation, N760D, appears to directly impact FKBP binding through interfering with SPRY1 folding. PMID:26245150

  16. Crystal structures of ryanodine receptor SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains reveal a critical FKBP12 binding determinant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuchi, Zhiguang; Yuen, Siobhan M. Wong King; Lau, Kelvin; Underhill, Ainsley Q.; Cornea, Razvan L.; Fessenden, James D.; van Petegem, Filip

    2015-08-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) form calcium release channels located in the membranes of the sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum. RyRs play a major role in excitation-contraction coupling and other Ca2+-dependent signalling events, and consist of several globular domains that together form a large assembly. Here we describe the crystal structures of the SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains at 1.2-1.5 Å resolution, which reveal several structural elements not detected in recent cryo-EM reconstructions of RyRs. The cryo-EM studies disagree on the position of SPRY domains, which had been proposed based on homology modelling. Computational docking of the crystal structures, combined with FRET studies, show that the SPRY1 domain is located next to FK506-binding protein (FKBP). Molecular dynamics flexible fitting and mutagenesis experiments suggest a hydrophobic cluster within SPRY1 that is crucial for FKBP binding. A RyR1 disease mutation, N760D, appears to directly impact FKBP binding through interfering with SPRY1 folding.

  17. Ryanodine receptors blockade reduces Amyloid-beta load and memory impairments in Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Oulès, Bénédicte; Del Prete, Dolores; Greco, Barbara; Zhang, Xuexin; Lauritzen, Inger; Sevalle, Jean; Moreno, Sebastien; Paterlini-Bréchot, Patrizia; Trebak, Mohamed; Checler, Frédéric; Benfenati, Fabio; Chami, Mounia

    2012-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease (AD), the perturbation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis has been linked to presenilins (PS), the catalytic core in γ-secretase complexes cleaving the amyloid precursor protein (APP) thereby generating amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Here we investigate whether APP contributes to ER Ca2+ homeostasis and whether ER Ca2+ could in turn influence Aβ production. We show that overexpression of wild-type human APP (APP695), or APP harboring the Swedish double mutation (APPswe) triggers increased Ryanodine receptors (RyR) expression and enhances RyR-mediated ER Ca2+ release in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and in APPswe-expressing (Tg2576) mice. Interestingly, dantrolene-induced lowering of RyR-mediated Ca2+ release leads to the reduction of both intracellular and extracellular Aβ load in neuroblastoma cells as well as in primary cultured neurons derived from Tg2576 mice. This Aβ reduction can be accounted for by decreased Thr-668-dependent APP phosphorylation and β- and γ-secretases activities. Importantly, dantrolene diminishes Aβ load, reduces Aβ-related histological lesions and slows down learning and memory deficits in Tg2576 mice. Overall, our data document a key role of RyR in Aβ production and learning and memory performances, and delineate RyR-mediated control of Ca2+ homeostasis as a physiological paradigm that could be targeted for innovative therapeutic approaches. PMID:22915123

  18. Cardiac ryanodine receptor: Selectivity for alkaline earth metal cations points to the EF-hand nature of luminal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Gaburjakova, Jana; Gaburjakova, Marta

    2016-06-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the regulation of cardiac ryanodine receptor (RYR2) by luminal Ca(2+) is mediated by luminal binding sites located on the RYR2 channel itself and/or its auxiliary protein, calsequestrin. The localization and structure of RYR2-resident binding sites are not known because of the lack of a high-resolution structure of RYR2 luminal regions. To obtain the first structural insight, we probed the RYR2 luminal face stripped of calsequestrin by alkaline earth metal divalents (M(2+): Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+) or Ba(2+)). We show that the RYR2 response to caffeine at the single-channel level is significantly modified by the nature of luminal M(2+). Moreover, we performed competition experiments by varying the concentration of luminal M(2+) (Mg(2+), Sr(2+) or Ba(2+)) from 8mM to 53mM and investigated its ability to compete with 1mM luminal Ca(2+). We demonstrate that all tested M(2+) bind to exactly the same RYR2 luminal binding sites. Their affinities decrease in the order: Ca(2+)>Sr(2+)>Mg(2+)~Ba(2+), showing a strong correlation with the M(2+) affinity of the EF-hand motif. This indicates that the RYR2 luminal binding regions and the EF-hand motif likely share some structural similarities because the structure ties directly to the function. PMID:26849106

  19. Molecular cloning, characterisation and mRNA expression of the ryanodine receptor from the peach-potato aphid, Myzus persicae

    PubMed Central

    Troczka, B.J.; Williams, A.J.; Bass, C.; Williamson, M.S.; Field, L.M.; Davies, T.G.E.

    2015-01-01

    The peach potato aphid, Myzus persicae, is one of the most important agricultural pests of temperate climates. It is mainly controlled through the judicious application of insecticides; however, over time, aphids have developed resistance to many insecticidal classes. The recent introduction of synthetic diamide insecticides, with a novel mode of action, potentially offers new tools to control aphid populations. These diamides act on the ryanodine receptor (RyR), a large endoplasmic calcium release channel. In this study we have cloned cDNAs encoding the complete open reading frame of the RyR from M. persicae. The open reading frame is 15,306 base pairs long and encodes a protein of 5101 amino acids. The aphid RyR shares many of the features of other insect and vertebrate RyRs, including a highly conserved transmembrane region. However, unlike the other RyRs characterised to date, the M. persicae channel does not display alternative splicing at any stage of its developmental cycle, so it cannot generate functional variants of the channel. PMID:25447916

  20. The H29D Mutation Does Not Enhance Cytosolic Ca2+ Activation of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhichao; Guo, Wenting; Yuen, Siobhan M. Wong King; Wang, Ruiwu; Zhang, Lin; Van Petegem, Filip; Chen, S. R. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) harbors a large number of naturally occurring mutations that are associated with stress-induced ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden death. Nearly all these disease-associated N-terminal mutations are located at domain interfaces or buried within domains. Mutations at these locations would alter domain-domain interactions or the stability/folding of domains. Recently, a novel RyR2 mutation H29D associated with ventricular arrhythmia at rest was found to enhance the activation of single RyR2 channels by diastolic levels of cytosolic Ca2+. Unlike other N-terminal disease-associated mutations, the H29D mutation is located on the surface of the N-terminal domain. It is unclear how this surface-exposed H29D mutation that does not appear to interact with other parts of the RyR2 structure could alter the intrinsic properties of the channel. Here we carried out detailed functional characterization of the RyR2-H29D mutant at the molecular and cellular levels. We found that the H29D mutation has no effect on the basal level or the Ca2+ dependent activation of [3H]ryanodine binding to RyR2, the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of single RyR2 channels, or the cytosolic Ca2+- or caffeine-induced Ca2+ release in HEK293 cells. In addition, the H29D mutation does not alter the propensity for spontaneous Ca2+ release or the thresholds for Ca2+ release activation or termination. Furthermore, the H29D mutation does not have significant impact on the thermal stability of the N-terminal region (residues 1–547) of RyR2. Collectively, our data show that the H29D mutation exerts little or no effect on the function of RyR2 or on the folding stability of the N-terminal region. Thus, our results provide no evidence that the H29D mutation enhances the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of RyR2. PMID:26405799

  1. The H29D Mutation Does Not Enhance Cytosolic Ca2+ Activation of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhichao; Guo, Wenting; Yuen, Siobhan M Wong King; Wang, Ruiwu; Zhang, Lin; Van Petegem, Filip; Chen, S R Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) harbors a large number of naturally occurring mutations that are associated with stress-induced ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden death. Nearly all these disease-associated N-terminal mutations are located at domain interfaces or buried within domains. Mutations at these locations would alter domain-domain interactions or the stability/folding of domains. Recently, a novel RyR2 mutation H29D associated with ventricular arrhythmia at rest was found to enhance the activation of single RyR2 channels by diastolic levels of cytosolic Ca2+. Unlike other N-terminal disease-associated mutations, the H29D mutation is located on the surface of the N-terminal domain. It is unclear how this surface-exposed H29D mutation that does not appear to interact with other parts of the RyR2 structure could alter the intrinsic properties of the channel. Here we carried out detailed functional characterization of the RyR2-H29D mutant at the molecular and cellular levels. We found that the H29D mutation has no effect on the basal level or the Ca2+ dependent activation of [3H]ryanodine binding to RyR2, the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of single RyR2 channels, or the cytosolic Ca2+- or caffeine-induced Ca2+ release in HEK293 cells. In addition, the H29D mutation does not alter the propensity for spontaneous Ca2+ release or the thresholds for Ca2+ release activation or termination. Furthermore, the H29D mutation does not have significant impact on the thermal stability of the N-terminal region (residues 1-547) of RyR2. Collectively, our data show that the H29D mutation exerts little or no effect on the function of RyR2 or on the folding stability of the N-terminal region. Thus, our results provide no evidence that the H29D mutation enhances the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of RyR2. PMID:26405799

  2. Cardiac calcium release channel (ryanodine receptor) in control and cardiomyopathic human hearts: mRNA and protein contents are differentially regulated.

    PubMed

    Sainte Beuve, C; Allen, P D; Dambrin, G; Rannou, F; Marty, I; Trouvé, P; Bors, V; Pavie, A; Gandgjbakch, I; Charlemagne, D

    1997-04-01

    Abnormal intracellular calcium handling in cardiomyopathic human hearts has been associated with an impaired function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, but previous reports on the gene expression of the ryanodine receptors (Ry2) are contradictory. We measured the mRNA levels, the protein levels and the number of high affinity [3H]ryanodine binding sites in the left ventricle of non-failing (n = 9) and failing human hearts [idiopathic dilated (IDCM n = 16), ischemic (ICM n = 7) or mixed (MCM n = 8) cardiomyopathies]. Ry2 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in IDCM (-30%) and unchanged in MCM and ICM and Ry2 protein levels were similar. In contrast, we observed a two-fold increase in the number of high affinity Ry2 (B(max) = 0.43 +/- 0.11 v 0.22 +/- 0.13 pmol/mg protein, respectively; P<0.01) and an unchanged K(d). Furthermore, levels of myosin heavy chain mRNA and protein per g of tissue were similar in failing and non-failing hearts, suggesting that the observed differences in Ry2 are not caused by the increase in fibrosis in failing heart. Therefore, the dissociation between the two-fold increase in the number of high affinity ryanodine receptors observed in all failing hearts and the slightly decreased mRNA level or unchanged protein level suggests that the ryanodine binding properties are affected in failing myocardium and that such modifications rather than a change in gene expression alter the channel activity and could contribute to abnormalities in intracellular Ca2+ handling. PMID:9160875

  3. Homeostatic and stimulus-induced coupling of the L-type Ca2+ channel to the ryanodine receptor in the hippocampal neuron in slices

    PubMed Central

    Berrout, Jonathan; Isokawa, Masako

    2009-01-01

    Activity-dependent increase in cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) is a prerequisite for many neuronal functions. We previously reported a strong direct depolarization, independent of glutamate receptors, effectively caused a release of Ca2+ from ryanodine sensitive stores and induced the synthesis of endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs) and eCB-mediated responses. However, the cellular mechanism that initiated the depolarization-induced Ca2+ release is not completely understood. In the present study, we optically recorded [Ca2+]i from CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal slice and directly monitored miniature Ca2+ activities and depolarization-induced Ca2+ signals in order to determine the source(s) and properties of [Ca2+]i-dynamics that could lead to a release of Ca2+ from the ryanodine receptor. In the absence of depolarizing stimuli, spontaneously-occurring miniature Ca2+ events were detected from a group of hippocampal neurons. This miniature Ca2+ event persisted in the nominal Ca2+-containing artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF), and increased in frequency in response to the bath-application of caffeine and KCl. In contrast, nimodipine, the antagonist of the L-type Ca2+ channel (LTCC), a high concentration of ryanodine, the antagonist of the ryanodine receptor (RyR), and thapsigargin (TG) reduced the occurrence of the miniature Ca2+ events. When a brief puff-application of KCl was given locally to the soma of individual neurons in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists, these neurons generated a transient increase in the [Ca2+]i in the dendrosomal region. This [Ca2+]i-transient was sensitive to nimodipine, TG, and ryanodine suggesting that the [Ca2+]i-transient was caused primarily by the LTCC-mediated Ca2+-influx and a release of Ca2+ from RyR. We observed little contribution from N-or P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. The coupling between LTCC and RyR was direct and independent of synaptic activities. Immunohistochemical study revealed a cellular localization of LTCC

  4. Molecular Characteristics, mRNA Expression, and Alternative Splicing of a Ryanodine Receptor Gene in the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guo-Rui; Shi, Wen-Zhi; Yang, Wen-Jia; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a distinct class of ligand-gated channels controlling the release of calcium from intracellular stores. The emergence of diamide insecticides, which selectively target insect RyRs, has promoted the study of insect RyRs. In the present study, the full-length RyR cDNA (BdRyR) was cloned and characterized from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), a serious pest of fruits and vegetables throughout East Asia and the Pacific Rim. The cDNA of BdRyR contains a 15,420-bp open reading frame encoding 5,140 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 582.4 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.38. BdRyR shows a high level of amino acid sequence identity (78 to 97%) to other insect RyR isoforms. All common structural features of the RyRs are present in the BdRyR, including a well-conserved C-terminal domain containing consensus calcium-binding EF-hands and six transmembrane domains, and a large N-terminal domain. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that BdRyR was expressed at the lowest and highest levels in egg and adult, respectively, and that the BdRyR expression levels in the third instar larva, pupa and adult were 166.99-, 157.56- and 808.56-fold higher, respectively, than that in the egg. Among different adult body parts, the highest expression level was observed in the thorax compared with the head and abdomen. In addition, four alternative splice sites were identified in the BdRyR gene, with the first, ASI, being located in the central part of the predicted second spore lysis A/RyR domain. Diagnostic PCR analyses revealed that alternative splice variants were generated not only in a tissue-specific manner but also in a developmentally regulated manner. These results lay the foundation for further understanding the structural and functional properties of BdRyR, and the molecular mechanisms for target site resistance in B. dorsalis. PMID:24740254

  5. Targeted Proteomics Enables Simultaneous Quantification of Folate Receptor Isoforms and Potential Isoform-based Diagnosis in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ting; Xu, Feifei; Fang, Danjun; Chen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The distinct roles of protein isoforms in cancer are becoming increasingly evident. FRα and FRβ, two major isoforms of the folate receptor family, generally have different cellular distribution and tissue specificity. However, the presence of FRβ in breast tumors, where FRα is normally expressed, complicates this situation. Prior to applying any FR isoform-based diagnosis and therapeutics, it is essential to monitor the expression profile of FR isoforms in a more accurate manner. An LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics assay was developed and validated in this study because of the lack of suitable methodology for the simultaneous and specific measurement of highly homologous isoforms occurring at low concentrations. FRα and FRβ monitoring was achieved by measuring their surrogate isoform-specific peptides. Five human breast cell lines, isolated macrophages and 60 matched pairs of breast tissue samples were subjected to the analysis. The results indicated that FRβ was overexpressed in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) but not epithelial cells, in addition to an enhanced level of FRα in breast cancer cells and tissue samples. Moreover, the levels of the FR isoforms were evaluated according to the histology, histopathological features and molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Several positive associations with PR/ER and HER2 status and metastasis were revealed. PMID:26573433

  6. Exome Sequencing Reveals Novel Rare Variants in the Ryanodine Receptor and Calcium Channel Genes in Malignant Hyperthermia Families

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jerry H.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Browning, Brian L.; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Gordon, Adam S.; Rieder, Mark J.; Robertson, Peggy D.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Fisher, Nickla A.; Hopkins, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    Background About half of malignant hyperthermia (MH) cases are associated with skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR1) and calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L type, α1S subunit (CACNA1S) gene mutations, leaving many with an unknown cause. We chose to apply a sequencing approach to uncover causal variants in unknown cases. Sequencing the exome, the protein-coding region of the genome, has power at low sample sizes and identified the cause of over a dozen Mendelian disorders. Methods We considered four families with multiple MH cases but in whom no mutations in RYR1 and CACNA1S had been identified by Sanger sequencing of complementary DNA. Exome sequencing of two affecteds per family, chosen for maximum genetic distance, were compared. Variants were ranked by allele frequency, protein change, and measures of conservation among mammals to assess likelihood of causation. Finally, putative pathogenic mutations were genotyped in other family members to verify cosegregation with MH. Results Exome sequencing revealed 1 rare RYR1 nonsynonymous variant in each of 3 families (Asp1056His, Val2627Met, Val4234Leu), and 1 CACNA1S variant (Thr1009Lys) in a 4th family. These were not seen in variant databases or in our control population sample of 5379 exomes. Follow-up sequencing in other family members verified cosegregation of alleles with MH. Conclusions Using both exome sequencing and allele frequency data from large sequencing efforts may aid genetic diagnosis of MH. In our sample, it was more sensitive for variant detection in known genes than Sanger sequencing of complementary DNA, and allows for the possibility of novel gene discovery. PMID:24013571

  7. FKBP12 activates the cardiac ryanodine receptor Ca2+-release channel and is antagonised by FKBP12.6.

    PubMed

    Galfré, Elena; Pitt, Samantha J; Venturi, Elisa; Sitsapesan, Mano; Zaccai, Nathan R; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; O'Neill, Stephen; Sitsapesan, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Changes in FKBP12.6 binding to cardiac ryanodine receptors (RyR2) are implicated in mediating disturbances in Ca(2+)-homeostasis in heart failure but there is controversy over the functional effects of FKBP12.6 on RyR2 channel gating. We have therefore investigated the effects of FKBP12.6 and another structurally similar molecule, FKBP12, which is far more abundant in heart, on the gating of single sheep RyR2 channels incorporated into planar phospholipid bilayers and on spontaneous waves of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release in rat isolated permeabilised cardiac cells. We demonstrate that FKBP12 is a high affinity activator of RyR2, sensitising the channel to cytosolic Ca(2+), whereas FKBP12.6 has very low efficacy, but can antagonise the effects of FKBP12. Mathematical modelling of the data shows the importance of the relative concentrations of FKBP12 and FKBP12.6 in determining RyR2 activity. Consistent with the single-channel results, physiological concentrations of FKBP12 (3 µM) increased Ca(2+)-wave frequency and decreased the SR Ca(2+)-content in cardiac cells. FKBP12.6, itself, had no effect on wave frequency but antagonised the effects of FKBP12.We provide a biophysical analysis of the mechanisms by which FK-binding proteins can regulate RyR2 single-channel gating. Our data indicate that FKBP12, in addition to FKBP12.6, may be important in regulating RyR2 function in the heart. In heart failure, it is possible that an alteration in the dual regulation of RyR2 by FKBP12 and FKBP12.6 may occur. This could contribute towards a higher RyR2 open probability, 'leaky' RyR2 channels and Ca(2+)-dependent arrhythmias. PMID:22363773

  8. Cardiac ryanodine receptor activation by a high Ca2+ store load is reversed in a reducing cytoplasmic redox environment

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Amy D.; Lam, Alex; Thekkedam, Chris; Gallant, Esther M.; Beard, Nicole A.; Dulhunty, Angela F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the impact of redox potential on isolated cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) channel activity and its response to physiological changes in luminal [Ca2+]. Basal leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum is required for normal Ca2+ handling, but excess diastolic Ca2+ leak attributed to oxidative stress is thought to lower the threshold of RyR2 for spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release, thus inducing arrhythmia in pathological situations. Therefore, we examined the RyR2 response to luminal [Ca2+] under reducing or oxidising cytoplasmic redox conditions. Unexpectedly, as luminal [Ca2+] increased from 0.1 to 1.5 mM, RyR2 activity declined when pretreated with cytoplasmic 1 mM DTT or buffered with GSH∶GSSG to a normal reduced cytoplasmic redox potential (−220 mV). Conversely, with 20 µM cytoplasmic 4,4′-DTDP or buffering of the redox potential to an oxidising value (−180 mV), RyR2 activity increased with increasing luminal [Ca2+]. The luminal redox potential was constant at −180 mV in each case. These responses to luminal [Ca2+] were maintained with cytoplasmic 2 mM Na2ATP or 5 mM MgATP (1 mM free Mg2+). Overall, the results suggest that the redox potential in the RyR2 junctional microdomain is normally more oxidised than that of the bulk cytoplasm. PMID:25146393

  9. Abnormal interactions of calsequestrin with the ryanodine receptor calcium release channel complex linked to exercise-induced sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Nori, Alessandra; Santoro, Massimo; Viatchenko-Karpinski, Serge; Kubalova, Zuzana; Gyorke, Inna; Terentyeva, Radmila; Vedamoorthyrao, Srikanth; Blom, Nico A; Valle, Giorgia; Napolitano, Carlo; Williams, Simon C; Volpe, Pompeo; Priori, Silvia G; Gyorke, Sandor

    2006-05-12

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a familial arrhythmogenic disorder associated with mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and cardiac calsequestrin (CASQ2) genes. Previous in vitro studies suggested that RyR2 and CASQ2 interact as parts of a multimolecular Ca(2+)-signaling complex; however, direct evidence for such interactions and their potential significance to myocardial function remain to be determined. We identified a novel CASQ2 mutation in a young female with a structurally normal heart and unexplained syncopal episodes. This mutation results in the nonconservative substitution of glutamine for arginine at amino acid 33 of CASQ2 (R33Q). Adenoviral-mediated expression of CASQ2(R33Q) in adult rat myocytes led to an increase in excitation-contraction coupling gain and to more frequent occurrences of spontaneous propagating (Ca2+ waves) and local Ca2+ signals (sparks) with respect to control cells expressing wild-type CASQ2 (CASQ2WT). As revealed by a Ca2+ indicator entrapped inside the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of permeabilized myocytes, the increased occurrence of spontaneous Ca2+ sparks and waves was associated with a dramatic decrease in intra-SR [Ca2+]. Recombinant CASQ2WT and CASQ2R33Q exhibited similar Ca(2+)-binding capacities in vitro; however, the mutant protein lacked the ability of its WT counterpart to inhibit RyR2 activity at low luminal [Ca2+] in planar lipid bilayers. We conclude that the R33Q mutation disrupts interactions of CASQ2 with the RyR2 channel complex and impairs regulation of RyR2 by luminal Ca2+. These results show that intracellular Ca2+ cycling in normal heart relies on an intricate interplay of CASQ2 with the proteins of the RyR2 channel complex and that disruption of these interactions can lead to cardiac arrhythmia. PMID:16601229

  10. Simulation of the effect of rogue ryanodine receptors on a calcium wave in ventricular myocytes with heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Luyao; Xia, Ling; Ye, Xuesong; Cheng, Heping

    2010-06-01

    Calcium homeostasis is considered to be one of the most important factors for the contraction and relaxation of the heart muscle. However, under some pathological conditions, such as heart failure (HF), calcium homeostasis is disordered, and spontaneous waves may occur. In this study, we developed a mathematical model of formation and propagation of a calcium wave based upon a governing system of diffusion-reaction equations presented by Izu et al (2001 Biophys. J. 80 103-20) and integrated non-clustered or 'rogue' ryanodine receptors (rogue RyRs) into a two-dimensional (2D) model of ventricular myocytes isolated from failing hearts in which sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ pools are partially unloaded. The model was then used to simulate the effect of rogue RyRs on initiation and propagation of the calcium wave in ventricular myocytes with HF. Our simulation results show that rogue RyRs can amplify the diastolic SR Ca2+ leak in the form of Ca2+ quarks, increase the probability of occurrence of spontaneous Ca2+ waves even with smaller SR Ca2+ stores, accelerate Ca2+ wave propagation, and hence lead to delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs) and cardiac arrhythmia in the diseased heart. This investigation suggests that incorporating rogue RyRs in the Ca2+ wave model under HF conditions provides a new view of Ca2+ dynamics that could not be mimicked by adjusting traditional parameters involved in Ca2+ release units and other ion channels, and contributes to understanding the underlying mechanism of HF.

  11. Ryanodine receptor fragmentation and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak after one session of high-intensity interval exercise.

    PubMed

    Place, Nicolas; Ivarsson, Niklas; Venckunas, Tomas; Neyroud, Daria; Brazaitis, Marius; Cheng, Arthur J; Ochala, Julien; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Girard, Sebastien; Volungevičius, Gintautas; Paužas, Henrikas; Mekideche, Abdelhafid; Kayser, Bengt; Martinez-Redondo, Vicente; Ruas, Jorge L; Bruton, Joseph; Truffert, Andre; Lanner, Johanna T; Skurvydas, Albertas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2015-12-15

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient way of improving physical performance in healthy subjects and in patients with common chronic diseases, but less so in elite endurance athletes. The mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of HIIT are uncertain. Here, recreationally active human subjects performed highly demanding HIIT consisting of 30-s bouts of all-out cycling with 4-min rest in between bouts (≤3 min total exercise time). Skeletal muscle biopsies taken 24 h after the HIIT exercise showed an extensive fragmentation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release channel, the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1). The HIIT exercise also caused a prolonged force depression and triggered major changes in the expression of genes related to endurance exercise. Subsequent experiments on elite endurance athletes performing the same HIIT exercise showed no RyR1 fragmentation or prolonged changes in the expression of endurance-related genes. Finally, mechanistic experiments performed on isolated mouse muscles exposed to HIIT-mimicking stimulation showed reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS)-dependent RyR1 fragmentation, calpain activation, increased SR Ca(2+) leak at rest, and depressed force production due to impaired SR Ca(2+) release upon stimulation. In conclusion, HIIT exercise induces a ROS-dependent RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of recreationally active subjects, and the resulting changes in muscle fiber Ca(2+)-handling trigger muscular adaptations. However, the same HIIT exercise does not cause RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of elite endurance athletes, which may explain why HIIT is less effective in this group. PMID:26575622

  12. Ryanodine receptor fragmentation and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak after one session of high-intensity interval exercise

    PubMed Central

    Place, Nicolas; Ivarsson, Niklas; Venckunas, Tomas; Neyroud, Daria; Brazaitis, Marius; Cheng, Arthur J.; Ochala, Julien; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Girard, Sebastien; Volungevičius, Gintautas; Paužas, Henrikas; Mekideche, Abdelhafid; Kayser, Bengt; Martinez-Redondo, Vicente; Bruton, Joseph; Truffert, Andre; Lanner, Johanna T.; Skurvydas, Albertas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient way of improving physical performance in healthy subjects and in patients with common chronic diseases, but less so in elite endurance athletes. The mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of HIIT are uncertain. Here, recreationally active human subjects performed highly demanding HIIT consisting of 30-s bouts of all-out cycling with 4-min rest in between bouts (≤3 min total exercise time). Skeletal muscle biopsies taken 24 h after the HIIT exercise showed an extensive fragmentation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channel, the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1). The HIIT exercise also caused a prolonged force depression and triggered major changes in the expression of genes related to endurance exercise. Subsequent experiments on elite endurance athletes performing the same HIIT exercise showed no RyR1 fragmentation or prolonged changes in the expression of endurance-related genes. Finally, mechanistic experiments performed on isolated mouse muscles exposed to HIIT-mimicking stimulation showed reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS)-dependent RyR1 fragmentation, calpain activation, increased SR Ca2+ leak at rest, and depressed force production due to impaired SR Ca2+ release upon stimulation. In conclusion, HIIT exercise induces a ROS-dependent RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of recreationally active subjects, and the resulting changes in muscle fiber Ca2+-handling trigger muscular adaptations. However, the same HIIT exercise does not cause RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of elite endurance athletes, which may explain why HIIT is less effective in this group. PMID:26575622

  13. Molecular characterization of human thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 4.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Kenji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Futawaka, Kumi; Atake, Asami; Kasahara, Masato; Tagami, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone exerts a pleiotropic effect on development, differentiation, and metabolism through thyroid hormone receptor (TR). A novel thyroid hormone receptor β isoform (TRβ4) was cloned using PCR from a human pituitary cDNA library as a template. We report here the characterization of TRβ4 from a molecular basis. Temporal expression of TRβ4 during the fetal period is abundant in the brain and kidney, comparable with the adult pattern. Western blot analysis revealed that TRs are ubiquitination labile proteins, while TRβ1 is potentially stable. TRβ1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), and vitamin D receptor (VDR), which belong to class II transcription factors that function via the formation of heterodimeric complexes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), were suppressed by TRβ4 in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, TRβ4 exhibits ligand-independent transcriptional silencing, possibly as a substitute for dimerized RXR. In this study, TRβ1 and TRβ4 transcripts were detected in several cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR assay showed that the expression of TRβ4 in human embryonic carcinoma cells of the testis was suppressed by sex hormone in a reciprocal manner to TRβ1. In contrast, TRβ4 was expressed under a high dose of triiodothyronine (T3) in a reciprocal manner to TRβ1. Finally, in transiently transfected NIH-3T3 cells, green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged TRβ4 was mostly nuclear in both the absence and the presence of T3. By mutating defined regions of both TRβs, we found that both TRβ1 and TRβ4 had altered nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution as compared with wild-type, and different to T3 and the nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR). Thus, site-specific DNA binding is not essential for maintaining TRβs within the nucleus. PMID:26513165

  14. Splice isoform estrogen receptors as integral transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Toomre, Derek; Bender, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    In addition to enhancing or repressing transcription, steroid hormone receptors rapidly transduce kinase activation signals. On ligand engagement, an N-terminus–truncated splice isoform of estrogen receptor (ER) α, ER46, triggers membrane-initiated signals, resulting in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and endothelial NO production. The orientation of ER46 at the plasma membrane is incompletely defined. With the use of ecliptic pHluorin-fused ER46, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy in live human endothelial cells illustrates that ER46 can topologically conform to a type I transmembrane protein structure. Mutation of isoleucine-386 at the center of ER46's transmembrane hydrophobic core prevents membrane spanning, obscures the N-terminal ectodomain, and effects a marked reduction in membrane-impermeant estrogen binding with diminished rapid eNOS activation and NO production, despite maintained genomic induction of an estrogen response element–luciferase reporter. Thus there exist pools of transmembrane steroid hormone receptors that are efficient signaling molecules and potential novel therapeutic targets. PMID:21937726

  15. Role of nuclear progesterone receptor isoforms in uterine pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Bansari; Elguero, Sonia; Thakore, Suruchi; Dahoud, Wissam; Bedaiwy, Mohamed; Mesiano, Sam

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Progesterone is a key hormonal regulator of the female reproductive system. It plays a major role to prepare the uterus for implantation and in the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Actions of progesterone on the uterine tissues (endometrium, myometrium and cervix) are mediated by the combined effects of two progesterone receptor (PR) isoforms, designated PR-A and PR-B. Both receptors function primarily as ligand-activated transcription factors. Progesterone action on the uterine tissues is qualitatively and quantitatively determined by the relative levels and transcriptional activities of PR-A and PR-B. The transcriptional activity of the PR isoforms is affected by specific transcriptional coregulators and by PR post-translational modifications that affect gene promoter targeting. In this context, appropriate temporal and cell-specific expression and function of PR-A and PR-B are critical for normal uterine function. METHODS Relevant studies describing the role of PRs in uterine physiology and pathology (endometriosis, uterine leiomyoma, endometrial cancer, cervical cancer and recurrent pregnancy loss) were comprehensively searched using PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Google Scholar and critically reviewed. RESULTS Progesterone, acting through PR-A and PR-B, regulates the development and function of the endometrium and induces changes in cells essential for implantation and the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. During pregnancy, progesterone via the PRs promotes myometrial relaxation and cervical closure. Withdrawal of PR-mediated progesterone signaling triggers menstruation and parturition. PR-mediated progesterone signaling is anti-mitogenic in endometrial epithelial cells, and as such, mitigates the tropic effects of estrogen on eutopic normal endometrium, and on ectopic implants in endometriosis. Similarly, ligand-activated PRs function as tumor suppressors in endometrial cancer cells through inhibition of key

  16. Participation of inositol trisphosphate and ryanodine receptors in Bufo arenarum oocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Ajmat, M T; Bonilla, F; Zelarayán, L; Bühler, M I

    2011-05-01

    Calcium is considered the most important second messenger at fertilization. Transient release from intracellular stores is modulated through both agonist-gated channels, IP₃Rs and RyRs, which can be found individually or together depending on the oocyte species. Using the four commonly used compounds (thimerosal, caffeine, heparin and ruthenium red), we investigated the existence and interdependence of both IP₃Rs and RyRs in mature Bufo arenarum oocytes. We found that caffeine, a well known specific RyRs agonist, was able to trigger oocyte activation in a dose-dependent manner. Microinjection of 10 mM caffeine showed 100% of oocytes exhibiting characteristic morphological criteria of egg activation. Ruthenium red, the specific RyR blocker, was able to inhibit oocyte activation induced either by sperm or caffeine. Our present findings provide the first reported evidence of the existence of RyR in frogs. We further explored the relationship between IP₃Rs and RyRs in B. arenarum oocytes by exposing them to the agonists of one class after injecting a blocker of the other class of receptor. We found that thimerosal overcame the inhibitory effect of RyR on oocyte activation, indicating that IP₃Rs function as independent receptors. In contrast, previous injection of heparin delayed caffeine-induced calcium release, revealing a relative dependence of RyRs on functional IP₃Rs, probably through a CICR mechanism. Both receptors play a role in Ca²+ release mechanisms although their relative contribution to the activation process is unclear. PMID:20880424

  17. Reversal in Cognition Impairments, Cholinergic Dysfunction, and Cerebral Oxidative Stress Through the Modulation of Ryanodine Receptors (RyRs) and Cysteinyl Leukotriene-1 (CysLT1) Receptors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prabhat; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) is a general pathophysiological condition occurring in vascular dementia (VaD) associated with negative impact on cognitive functions. Ryanodine as well as cysteinyl leukotriene-1 receptors (RyRs and CysLT1Rs) are extensively present in the central nervous system, where they participate in regulation of cognition, motivation, inflammation and neurodegeneration. The purpose of this study is to examine the role of ruthenium red; a selective RyR blocker as well as montelukast; a specific CysLT1 antagonist in CCH induced VaD in mice. Two vessel occlusion (2VO) or permanent ligation of bilateral common carotid arteries technique was used to induce CCH in mice. Animals with bilateral carotid arteries occlusion have revealed impaired learning and memory (Morris water maze), cholinergic dysfunction (increased acetylcholinesterase activity) as well as increased brain oxidative stress (reduction in brain superoxide dismutase, glutathione and catalase with an increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance level), with increased brain infarct size (2,3,5-triphenylterazolium chloride staining). While, administration of ruthenium red and montelukast considerably attenuated CCH induced cognitive impairments, cholinergic dysfunction, brain oxidative stress as well as brain damage. The results suggest that bilateral carotid arteries occlusion induced CCH has brought out VaD, which was attenuated by treatment with ruthenium red and montelukast. Therefore, modulation of RyRs as well as CysLT1 receptors may provide help in conditions involving CCH such as cognitive impairment and VaD. PMID:26500103

  18. Involvement of plasma membrane Ca2+ channels, IP3 receptors, and ryanodine receptors in the generation of spontaneous rhythmic contractions of the cricket lateral oviduct.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, Hirotake; Yoshino, Masami

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, the isolated cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus) lateral oviduct exhibited spontaneous rhythmic contractions (SRCs) with a frequency of 0.29±0.009 Hz (n=43) and an amplitude of 14.6±1.25 mg (n=29). SRCs completely disappeared following removal of extracellular Ca2+ using a solution containing 5mM EGTA. Application of the non-specific Ca2+ channel blockers Co2+, Ni2+, and Cd2+ also decreased both the frequency and amplitude of SRCs in dose-dependent manners, suggesting that Ca2+ entry through plasma membrane Ca2+ channels is essential for the generation of SRCs. Application of ryanodine (30 μM), which depletes intracellular Ca2+ by locking ryanodine receptor (RyR)-Ca2+ channels in an open state, gradually reduced the frequency and amplitude of SRCs. A RyR antagonist, tetracaine, reduced both the frequency and amplitude of SRCs, whereas a RyR activator, caffeine, increased the frequency of SRCs with a subsequent increase in basal tonus, indicating that RyRs are essential for generating SRCs. To further investigate the involvement of phospholipase C (PLC) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) in SRCs, we examined the effect of a PLC inhibitor, U73122, and an IP3R antagonist, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), on SRCs. Separately, U73122 (10 μM) and 2-APB (30-50 μM) both significantly reduced the amplitude of SRCs with little effect on their frequency, further indicating that the PLC/IP3R signaling pathway is fundamental to the modulation of the amplitude of SRCs. A hypotonic-induced increase in the frequency and amplitude of SRCs and a hypertonic-induced decrease in the frequency and amplitude of SRCs indicated that mechanical stretch of the lateral oviduct is involved in the generation of SRCs. The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-pump ATPase inhibitors thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid impaired or suppressed the relaxation phase of SRCs. Taken together, the present results indicate that Ca2+ influx through plasma membrane Ca2

  19. Molecular characterization of a ryanodine receptor gene in the rice leaffolder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianjun; Li, Yanqing; Han, Zhaojun; Zhu, Youli; Xie, Zhijuan; Wang, Jian; Liu, Yaping; Li, Xianchun

    2012-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are the targets of two novel classes of synthetic insecticidal chemicals, phthalic acid diamides and anthranilic diamides. Isolation of full-length RyR cDNAs is a critical step towards the structural and functional characterization of insect RyRs and an understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the species selective toxicity of diamide insecticides. However, there has been little research on the insect RyR genes due to the high molecular weight of the RyR proteins. In this study, we isolated a full-length RyR cDNA (named as CmRyR) from Cnaphalocrocis medinalis, an important rice pest throughout Southeast Asia. The composite CmRyR gene contains an ORF of 15264 bp encoding a protein of 5087 amino acid residues, which shares 79% overall identity with its Drosophila melanogaster homologue. All hallmarks of the RyR proteins are conserved in the CmRyR protein, suggesting that CmRyR is a structural and functional analogue of known RyRs. A multiple sequence alignment illustrates that the insect RyRs share high levels of amino acid sequence identity at the the COOH-terminal region. However, the amino acid residues analogous to the CmRyR residues N(4922), N(4924), N(4935), L(4950), L(4981), N(5013) and T(5064) are unique to lepidopteran RyRs compared with non-lepidopteran insect RyRs. This finding suggests that these residues may be involved in the differences in channel properties between lepidopteran and non-lepidopteran insect RyRs and in the species selective toxicity of diamide insecticides. Furthermore, two alternative splicing sites were identified in the CmRyR gene, one of which was located in the central part of the predicted second SPRY domain. Diagnostic PCR showed that the inclusion frequencies of two mutually exclusive exons (a/b) and one optional exon (c) differed between developmental stages or adult anatomical regions. Our results imply that alternative splicing may be a major means of generating functional diversity in C

  20. Ryanodine receptor sensitivity governs the stability and synchrony of local calcium release during cardiac excitation-contraction coupling.

    PubMed

    Wescott, Andrew P; Jafri, M Saleet; Lederer, W J; Williams, George S B

    2016-03-01

    Calcium-induced calcium release is the principal mechanism that triggers the cell-wide [Ca(2+)]i transient that activates muscle contraction during cardiac excitation-contraction coupling (ECC). Here, we characterize this process in mouse cardiac myocytes with a novel mathematical action potential (AP) model that incorporates realistic stochastic gating of voltage-dependent L-type calcium (Ca(2+)) channels (LCCs) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release channels (the ryanodine receptors, RyR2s). Depolarization of the sarcolemma during an AP stochastically activates the LCCs elevating subspace [Ca(2+)] within each of the cell's 20,000 independent calcium release units (CRUs) to trigger local RyR2 opening and initiate Ca(2+) sparks, the fundamental unit of triggered Ca(2+) release. Synchronization of Ca(2+) sparks during systole depends on the nearly uniform cellular activation of LCCs and the likelihood of local LCC openings triggering local Ca(2+) sparks (ECC fidelity). The detailed design and true SR Ca(2+) pump/leak balance displayed by our model permits investigation of ECC fidelity and Ca(2+) spark fidelity, the balance between visible (Ca(2+) spark) and invisible (Ca(2+) quark/sub-spark) SR Ca(2+) release events. Excess SR Ca(2+) leak is examined as a disease mechanism in the context of "catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT)", a Ca(2+)-dependent arrhythmia. We find that that RyR2s (and therefore Ca(2+) sparks) are relatively insensitive to LCC openings across a wide range of membrane potentials; and that key differences exist between Ca(2+) sparks evoked during quiescence, diastole, and systole. The enhanced RyR2 [Ca(2+)]i sensitivity during CPVT leads to increased Ca(2+) spark fidelity resulting in asynchronous systolic Ca(2+) spark activity. It also produces increased diastolic SR Ca(2+) leak with some prolonged Ca(2+) sparks that at times become "metastable" and fail to efficiently terminate. There is a huge margin of safety for

  1. 5-HT2B receptor-mediated calcium release from ryanodine-sensitive intracellular stores in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ullmer, C.; Boddeke, H. G.; Schmuck, K.; Lübbert, H.

    1996-01-01

    1. We have characterized the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced calcium signalling in endothelial cells from the human pulmonary artery. Using RT-PCR we show, that of all cloned G-protein coupled 5-HT receptors, these cells express only 5-HT1D beta, 5-HT2B and little 5-HT4 receptor mRNA. 2. In endothelial cells 5-HT inhibits the formation of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) via 5-HT1D beta receptors but fails to activate phosphoinositide (PI) turnover. However, the latter pathway is strongly activated by histamine. 3. Despite the lack of detectable inositol phosphate (IP) formation in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells, 5-HT (pD2 = 5.82 +/- 0.06, n = 6) or the selective 5-HT2 agonist, 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) (pD2 = 5.66 +/- 0.03, n = 7) elicited transient calcium signals comparable to those evoked by histamine (pD2 = 6.44 +/- 0.01, n = 7). Since 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor mRNAs are not detectable in pulmonary artery endothelial cells, activation of 5-HT2B receptors is responsible for the transient calcium release. The calcium transients are independent of the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, since DOI does not stimulate 5-HT1D beta receptors. 4. Both, the 5-HT- and histamine-stimulated calcium signals were also observed when the cells were placed in calcium-free medium. This indicates that 5-HT triggers calcium release from intracellular stores. 5. Heparin is an inhibitor of the IP3-activated calcium release channels on the endoplasmic reticulum. Intracellular infusion of heparin through patch pipettes in voltage clamp experiments failed to block 5-HT-induced calcium signals, whereas it abolished the histamine response. This supports the conclusion that the 5-HT-induced calcium release is independent of IP3 formation. 6. Unlike the histamine response, the 5-HT response was sensitive to micromolar concentrations of ryanodine and, to a lesser extent, ruthenium red. This implies that 5-HT2B receptors trigger calcium

  2. Ca2+ responses of pulmonary arterial myocytes to acute hypoxia require release from ryanodine and inositol trisphosphate receptors in sarcoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Shimoda, Larissa A.

    2012-01-01

    In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC), acute hypoxia increases intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) by inducing Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and Ca2+ influx through store- and voltage-operated Ca2+ channels in sarcolemma. To evaluate the mechanisms of hypoxic Ca2+ release, we measured [Ca2+]i with fluorescent microscopy in primary cultures of rat distal PASMC. In cells perfused with Ca2+-free Krebs Ringer bicarbonate solution (KRBS), brief exposures to caffeine (30 mM) and norepinephrine (300 μM), which activate SR ryanodine and inositol trisphosphate receptors (RyR, IP3R), respectively, or 4% O2 caused rapid transient increases in [Ca2+]i, indicating intracellular Ca2+ release. Preexposure of these cells to caffeine, norepinephrine, or the SR Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor cyclopiazonic acid (CPA; 10 μM) blocked subsequent Ca2+ release to caffeine, norepinephrine, and hypoxia. The RyR antagonist ryanodine (10 μM) blocked Ca2+ release to caffeine and hypoxia but not norepinephrine. The IP3R antagonist xestospongin C (XeC, 0.1 μM) blocked Ca2+ release to norepinephrine and hypoxia but not caffeine. In PASMC perfused with normal KRBS, acute hypoxia caused a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i that was abolished by ryanodine or XeC. These results suggest that in rat distal PASMC 1) the initial increase in [Ca2+]i induced by hypoxia, as well as the subsequent Ca2+ influx that sustained this increase, required release of Ca2+ from both RyR and IP3R, and 2) the SR Ca2+ stores accessed by RyR, IP3R, and hypoxia functioned as a common store, which was replenished by a CPA-inhibitable Ca2+-ATPase. PMID:22582116

  3. Distinct roles for protein kinase C isoforms in regulating platelet purinergic receptor function.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart J; Jones, Matthew L; Hardy, Adam R; Barton, Johanna F; Beaucourt, Stephanie M; Conley, Pamela B; Poole, Alastair W

    2006-09-01

    ADP is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), P2Y1 and P2Y12. We have shown previously that the receptors are functionally desensitized, in a homologous manner, by distinct kinase-dependent mechanisms in which P2Y1 is regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) and P2Y12 by G protein-coupled receptor kinases. In this study, we addressed whether different PKC isoforms play different roles in regulating the trafficking and activity of these two GPCRs. Expression of PKCalpha and PKCdelta dominant-negative mutants in 1321N1 cells revealed that both isoforms regulated P2Y1 receptor signaling and trafficking, although only PKCdelta was capable of regulating P2Y12, in experiments in which PKC was directly activated by the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). These results were paralleled in human platelets, in which PMA reduced subsequent ADP-induced P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptor signaling. PKC isoform-selective inhibitors revealed that novel, but not conventional, isoforms of PKC regulate P2Y12 function, whereas both novel and classic isoforms regulate P2Y1 activity. It is also noteworthy that we studied receptor internalization in platelets by a radioligand binding approach showing that both receptors internalize rapidly in these cells. ADP-induced P2Y1 receptor internalization is attenuated by PKC inhibitors, whereas that of the P2Y12 receptor is unaffected. Both P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors can also undergo PMA-stimulated internalization, and here again, novel but not classic PKCs regulate P2Y12, whereas both novel and classic isoforms regulate P2Y1 internalization. This study therefore is the first to reveal distinct roles for PKC isoforms in the regulation of platelet P2Y receptor function and trafficking. PMID:16804093

  4. Membrane depolarization increases ryanodine sensitivity to Ca2+ release to the cytosol in L6 skeletal muscle cells: Implications for excitation-contraction coupling.

    PubMed

    Pitake, Saumitra; Ochs, Raymond S

    2016-04-01

    The dihydropyridine receptor in the plasma membrane and the ryanodine receptor in the sarcoplasmic reticulum are known to physically interact in the process of excitation-contraction coupling. However, the mechanism for subsequent Ca(2+) release through the ryanodine receptor is unknown. Our lab has previously presented evidence that the dihydropyridine receptor and ryanodine receptor combine as a channel for the entry of Ca(2+) under resting conditions, known as store operated calcium entry. Here, we provide evidence that depolarization during excitation-contraction coupling causes the dihydropyridine receptor to disengage from the ryanodine receptor. The newly freed ryanodine receptor can then transport Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol. Experimentally, this should more greatly expose the ryanodine receptor to exogenous ryanodine. To examine this hypothesis, we titrated L6 skeletal muscle cells with ryanodine in resting and excited (depolarized) states. When L6 muscle cells were depolarized with high potassium or exposed to the dihydropyridine receptor agonist BAYK-8644, known to induce dihydropyridine receptor movement within the membrane, ryanodine sensitivity was enhanced. However, ryanodine sensitivity was unaffected when Ca(2+) was elevated without depolarization by the ryanodine receptor agonist chloromethylcresol, or by increasing Ca(2+) concentration in the media. Ca(2+) entry currents (from the extracellular space) during excitation were strongly inhibited by ryanodine, but Ca(2+) entry currents in the resting state were not. We conclude that excitation releases the ryanodine receptor from occlusion by the dihydropyridine receptor, enabling Ca(2+) release from the ryanodine receptor to the cytosol. PMID:26643865

  5. Selective glucocorticoid receptor translational isoforms reveal glucocorticoid-induced apoptotic transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, I; Shin, S C; Cao, Y; Bender, I K; Jafari, N; Feng, G; Lin, S; Cidlowski, J A; Schleimer, R P; Lu, N Z

    2013-01-01

    Induction of T-cell apoptosis contributes to the anti-inflammatory and antineoplastic benefits of glucocorticoids. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) translational isoforms have distinct proapoptotic activities in osteosarcoma cells. Here we determined whether GR isoforms selectively induce apoptosis in Jurkat T lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Jurkat cells stably expressing individual GR isoforms were generated and treated with vehicle or dexamethasone (DEX). DEX induced apoptosis in cells expressing the GR-A, -B, or -C, but not the GR-D, isoform. cDNA microarray analyses of cells sensitive (GR-C3) and insensitive (GR-D3) to DEX revealed glucocorticoid-induced proapoptotic transcriptomes. Genes that were regulated by the proapoptotic GR-C3, but not by the GR-D3, isoform likely contributed to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. The identified genes include those that are directly involved in apoptosis and those that facilitate cell killing. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that distinct chromatin modification abilities may underlie the distinct functions of GR isoforms. Interestingly, all GR isoforms, including the GR-D3 isoform, suppressed mitogen-stimulated cytokines. Furthermore, the GR-C isoforms were selectively upregulated in mitogen-activated primary T cells and DEX treatment induced GR-C target genes in activated T cells. Cell-specific expressions and functions of GR isoforms may help to explain the tissue- and individual-selective actions of glucocorticoids and may provide a basis for developing improved glucocorticoids. PMID:23303127

  6. Selective glucocorticoid receptor translational isoforms reveal glucocorticoid-induced apoptotic transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, I; Shin, S C; Cao, Y; Bender, I K; Jafari, N; Feng, G; Lin, S; Cidlowski, J A; Schleimer, R P; Lu, N Z

    2013-01-01

    Induction of T-cell apoptosis contributes to the anti-inflammatory and antineoplastic benefits of glucocorticoids. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) translational isoforms have distinct proapoptotic activities in osteosarcoma cells. Here we determined whether GR isoforms selectively induce apoptosis in Jurkat T lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Jurkat cells stably expressing individual GR isoforms were generated and treated with vehicle or dexamethasone (DEX). DEX induced apoptosis in cells expressing the GR-A, -B, or -C, but not the GR-D, isoform. cDNA microarray analyses of cells sensitive (GR-C3) and insensitive (GR-D3) to DEX revealed glucocorticoid-induced proapoptotic transcriptomes. Genes that were regulated by the proapoptotic GR-C3, but not by the GR-D3, isoform likely contributed to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. The identified genes include those that are directly involved in apoptosis and those that facilitate cell killing. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that distinct chromatin modification abilities may underlie the distinct functions of GR isoforms. Interestingly, all GR isoforms, including the GR-D3 isoform, suppressed mitogen-stimulated cytokines. Furthermore, the GR-C isoforms were selectively upregulated in mitogen-activated primary T cells and DEX treatment induced GR-C target genes in activated T cells. Cell-specific expressions and functions of GR isoforms may help to explain the tissue- and individual-selective actions of glucocorticoids and may provide a basis for developing improved glucocorticoids. PMID:23303127

  7. Crystal structure of type I ryanodine receptor amino-terminal [beta]-trefoil domain reveals a disease-associated mutation 'hot spot' loop

    SciTech Connect

    Amador, Fernando J.; Liu, Shuang; Ishiyama, Noboru; Plevin, Michael J.; Wilson, Aaron; MacLennan, David H.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2009-12-01

    Muscle contraction and relaxation is regulated by transient elevations of myoplasmic Ca{sup 2+}. Ca{sup 2+} is released from stores in the lumen of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (SER) to initiate formation of the Ca{sup 2+} transient by activation of a class of Ca{sup 2+} release channels referred to as ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and is pumped back into the SER lumen by Ca{sup 2+}-ATPases (SERCAs) to terminate the Ca{sup 2+} transient. Mutations in the type 1 ryanodine receptor gene, RYR1, are associated with 2 skeletal muscle disorders, malignant hyperthermia (MH), and central core disease (CCD). The evaluation of proposed mechanisms by which RyR1 mutations cause MH and CCD is hindered by the lack of high-resolution structural information. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal 210 residues of RyR1 (RyR{sub NTD}) at 2.5 {angstrom}. The RyR{sub NTD} structure is similar to that of the suppressor domain of type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3Rsup), but lacks most of the long helix-turn-helix segment of the 'arm' domain in IP3Rsup. The N-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold, found in both RyR and IP{sub 3}R, is likely to play a critical role in regulatory mechanisms in this channel family. A disease-associated mutation 'hot spot' loop was identified between strands 8 and 9 in a highly basic region of RyR1. Biophysical studies showed that 3 MH-associated mutations (C36R, R164C, and R178C) do not adversely affect the global stability or fold of RyRNTD, supporting previously described mechanisms whereby mutations perturb protein-protein interactions.

  8. Crystal structure of type I ryanodine receptor amino-terminal beta-trefoil domain reveals a disease-associated mutation "hot spot" loop.

    PubMed

    Amador, Fernando J; Liu, Shuang; Ishiyama, Noboru; Plevin, Michael J; Wilson, Aaron; MacLennan, David H; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2009-07-01

    Muscle contraction and relaxation is regulated by transient elevations of myoplasmic Ca(2+). Ca(2+) is released from stores in the lumen of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (SER) to initiate formation of the Ca(2+) transient by activation of a class of Ca(2+) release channels referred to as ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and is pumped back into the SER lumen by Ca(2+)-ATPases (SERCAs) to terminate the Ca(2+) transient. Mutations in the type 1 ryanodine receptor gene, RYR1, are associated with 2 skeletal muscle disorders, malignant hyperthermia (MH), and central core disease (CCD). The evaluation of proposed mechanisms by which RyR1 mutations cause MH and CCD is hindered by the lack of high-resolution structural information. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal 210 residues of RyR1 (RyR(NTD)) at 2.5 A. The RyR(NTD) structure is similar to that of the suppressor domain of type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)Rsup), but lacks most of the long helix-turn-helix segment of the "arm" domain in IP(3)Rsup. The N-terminal beta-trefoil fold, found in both RyR and IP(3)R, is likely to play a critical role in regulatory mechanisms in this channel family. A disease-associated mutation "hot spot" loop was identified between strands 8 and 9 in a highly basic region of RyR1. Biophysical studies showed that 3 MH-associated mutations (C36R, R164C, and R178C) do not adversely affect the global stability or fold of RyR(NTD), supporting previously described mechanisms whereby mutations perturb protein-protein interactions. PMID:19541610

  9. Molecular Characterization, mRNA Expression and Alternative Splicing of Ryanodine Receptor Gene in the Brown Citrus Aphid, Toxoptera citricida (Kirkaldy)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke-Yi; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Yuan, Guo-Rui; Shang, Feng; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) play a critical role in regulating the release of intracellular calcium, which enables them to be effectively targeted by the two novel classes of insecticides, phthalic acid diamides and anthranilic diamides. However, less information is available about this target site in insects, although the sequence and structure information of target molecules are essential for designing new control agents of high selectivity and efficiency, as well as low non-target toxicity. Here, we provided sufficient information about the coding sequence and molecular structures of RyR in T. citricida (TciRyR), an economically important pest. The full-length TciRyR cDNA was characterized with an open reading frame of 15,306 nucleotides, encoding 5101 amino acid residues. TciRyR was predicted to embrace all the hallmarks of ryanodine receptor, typically as the conserved C-terminal domain with consensus calcium-biding EF-hands (calcium-binding motif) and six transmembrane domains, as well as a large N-terminal domain. qPCR analysis revealed that the highest mRNA expression levels of TciRyR were observed in the adults, especially in the heads. Alternative splicing in TciRyR was evidenced by an alternatively spliced exon, resulting from intron retention, which was different from the case of RyR in Myzus persicae characterized with no alternative splicing events. Diagnostic PCR analysis indicated that the splicing of this exon was not only regulated in a body-specific manner but also in a stage-dependent manner. Taken together, these results provide useful information for new insecticide design and further insights into the molecular basis of insecticide action. PMID:26154764

  10. Molecular Characterization, mRNA Expression and Alternative Splicing of Ryanodine Receptor Gene in the Brown Citrus Aphid, Toxoptera citricida (Kirkaldy).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Yi; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Yuan, Guo-Rui; Shang, Feng; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) play a critical role in regulating the release of intracellular calcium, which enables them to be effectively targeted by the two novel classes of insecticides, phthalic acid diamides and anthranilic diamides. However, less information is available about this target site in insects, although the sequence and structure information of target molecules are essential for designing new control agents of high selectivity and efficiency, as well as low non-target toxicity. Here, we provided sufficient information about the coding sequence and molecular structures of RyR in T. citricida (TciRyR), an economically important pest. The full-length TciRyR cDNA was characterized with an open reading frame of 15,306 nucleotides, encoding 5101 amino acid residues. TciRyR was predicted to embrace all the hallmarks of ryanodine receptor, typically as the conserved C-terminal domain with consensus calcium-biding EF-hands (calcium-binding motif) and six transmembrane domains, as well as a large N-terminal domain. qPCR analysis revealed that the highest mRNA expression levels of TciRyR were observed in the adults, especially in the heads. Alternative splicing in TciRyR was evidenced by an alternatively spliced exon, resulting from intron retention, which was different from the case of RyR in Myzus persicae characterized with no alternative splicing events. Diagnostic PCR analysis indicated that the splicing of this exon was not only regulated in a body-specific manner but also in a stage-dependent manner. Taken together, these results provide useful information for new insecticide design and further insights into the molecular basis of insecticide action. PMID:26154764

  11. Immunohistochemical localization of progesterone receptor isoforms and estrogen receptor alpha in the chicken oviduct magnum during development.

    PubMed

    González-Morán, María Genoveva

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the immunohistochemical expression of progesterone receptor (PR) isoforms and estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α), as well as the histomorphometric changes of the magnum region of the left oviduct from 8-day-old chicken embryos to one-month-old chickens were evaluated. Results indicate evident histological changes in the oviduct magnum during development mainly in the magnum's mucosa. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the oviduct magnum from 8-day-old chicken embryos to one-day-old chickens did not present any PR isoform, but the oviduct magnum of one-week and one-month-old chickens expressed PR in the nuclei of all cell types. In epithelial cells, PR-B was the only isoform expressed; in muscle and serosa cells, PR-A isoform was the only isoform expressed; and stromal cells expressed both isoforms. The results also demonstrate positive ER-α immunostaining in the nuclei of different cells from embryonic life to later developmental stages of the oviduct magnum. Data indicate that the variations of ER-α or PR expression or dominance of either PR expression is differentially regulated depending on the cell type, the development of the oviduct, and in an age-specific manner. These variations in sex steroids hormone receptors are related with histological changes of the oviduct magnum through development. PMID:26519127

  12. Cryptocephal, the Drosophila melanogaster ATF4, Is a Specific Coactivator for Ecdysone Receptor Isoform B2

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Sebastien A.; VanHaaften, Eric; Cherbas, Lucy; Cherbas, Peter; Hewes, Randall S.

    2012-01-01

    The ecdysone receptor is a heterodimer of two nuclear receptors, the Ecdysone receptor (EcR) and Ultraspiracle (USP). In Drosophila melanogaster, three EcR isoforms share common DNA and ligand-binding domains, but these proteins differ in their most N-terminal regions and, consequently, in the activation domains (AF1s) contained therein. The transcriptional coactivators for these domains, which impart unique transcriptional regulatory properties to the EcR isoforms, are unknown. Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a basic-leucine zipper transcription factor that plays a central role in the stress response of mammals. Here we show that Cryptocephal (CRC), the Drosophila homolog of ATF4, is an ecdysone receptor coactivator that is specific for isoform B2. CRC interacts with EcR-B2 to promote ecdysone-dependent expression of ecdysis-triggering hormone (ETH), an essential regulator of insect molting behavior. We propose that this interaction explains some of the differences in transcriptional properties that are displayed by the EcR isoforms, and similar interactions may underlie the differential activities of other nuclear receptors with distinct AF1-coactivators. PMID:22912598

  13. Expression of leptin and leptin receptor isoforms in the rat and human carotid body.

    PubMed

    Porzionato, Andrea; Rucinski, Marcin; Macchi, Veronica; Stecco, Carla; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Malendowicz, Ludwik K; De Caro, Raffaele

    2011-04-18

    Leptin is known to play a role in the modulation of metabolism and control of breathing acting mainly on central nervous structures, although additional actions on peripheral arterial chemoreceptors have also been suggested in the literature. We therefore examined by means of immunohistochemistry the expression of leptin and leptin receptors in the carotid bodies of rats and humans. Leptin expression and relative expression of leptin receptor isoforms were also studied in rats by real-time PCR. No leptin or leptin receptor immunoreactivities were visible in the type II cells of either series. In rat carotid bodies, diffuse positive stainings for leptin and leptin receptors (both with antibody recognizing all receptor isoforms and antibody specific for Ob-Rb) were observed in type I cells. In human carotid bodies, the mean percentage (±standard error) of leptin immunoreactive type I cells was 39.4%±5.1% and the percentages of leptin receptor immunoreactive type I cells were 57.3%±3.9% with antibody recognizing all receptor isoforms and 33.3%±4.2% with antibody specific for isoform Ob-Rb. Double immunofluorescences with anti-tyrosine hydroxylase (type I cell marker) and anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (type II cell markers) confirmed the selective location of leptin and Ob-Rb in type I cells. Real-time PCR showed the expression of leptin and Ob-Ra, Ob-Rb, Ob-Rc and Ob-Rf isoform mRNA in the rat carotid body, levels of expression being Ob-Rf>Ob-Rc>Ob-Ra>Ob-Rb. Ob-Re mRNA was not detected. The above findings suggest a role of circulating or locally produced leptin in the regulation of chemoreceptor discharge and/or metabolic sensing function, by means of direct action on type I cells. PMID:21334312

  14. Multiple actions of φ-LITX-Lw1a on ryanodine receptors reveal a functional link between scorpion DDH and ICK toxins

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jennifer J.; Vetter, Irina; Lewis, Richard J.; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Lam, Alexander; Gallant, Esther M.; Beard, Nicole A.; Alewood, Paul F.; Dulhunty, Angela F.

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported the isolation of a scorpion toxin named U1-liotoxin-Lw1a (U1-LITX-Lw1a) that adopts an unusual 3D fold termed the disulfide-directed hairpin (DDH) motif, which is the proposed evolutionary structural precursor of the three-disulfide-containing inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) motif found widely in animals and plants. Here we reveal that U1-LITX-Lw1a targets and activates the mammalian ryanodine receptor intracellular calcium release channel (RyR) with high (fM) potency and provides a functional link between DDH and ICK scorpion toxins. Moreover, U1-LITX-Lw1a, now described as φ-liotoxin-Lw1a (φ-LITX-Lw1a), has a similar mode of action on RyRs as scorpion calcines, although with significantly greater potency, inducing full channel openings at lower (fM) toxin concentrations whereas at higher pM concentrations increasing the frequency and duration of channel openings to a submaximal state. In addition, we show that the C-terminal residue of φ-LITX-Lw1a is crucial for the increase in full receptor openings but not for the increase in receptor subconductance opening, thereby supporting the two-binding-site hypothesis of scorpion toxins on RyRs. φ-LITX-Lw1a has potential both as a pharmacological tool and as a lead molecule for the treatment of human diseases that involve RyRs, such as malignant hyperthermia and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. PMID:23671114

  15. Nitric Oxide-Induced Calcium Release: Activation of Type 1 Ryanodine Receptor, a Calcium Release Channel, through Non-Enzymatic Post-Translational Modification by Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Kakizawa, Sho

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a typical gaseous messenger involved in a wide range of biological processes. In our classical knowledge, effects of NO are largely achieved by activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase to form cyclic guanosine-3′, 5′-monophosphate. However, emerging evidences have suggested another signaling mechanism mediated by NO: “S-nitrosylation” of target proteins. S-nitrosylation is a covalent addition of an NO group to a cysteine thiol/sulfhydryl (RSH), and categorized into non-enzymatic post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins, contrasted to enzymatic PTM of proteins, such as phosphorylation mediated by various protein kinases. Very recently, we found novel intracellular calcium (Ca2+) mobilizing mechanism, NO-induced Ca2+ release (NICR) in cerebellar Purkinje cells. NICR is mediated by type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), a Ca2+ release channel expressed in endoplasmic-reticular membrane. Furthermore, NICR is indicated to be dependent on S-nitrosylation of RyR1, and involved in synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum. In this review, molecular mechanisms and functional significance of NICR, as well as non-enzymatic PTM of proteins by gaseous signals, are described. PMID:24130553

  16. Maternal high-altitude hypoxia and suppression of ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca2+ sparks in fetal sheep pulmonary arterial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Scott R; Blood, Quintin; Rubalcava, Monica; Waskel, Edith; Lumbard, Britney; Le, Petersen; Longo, Lawrence D; Buchholz, John N; Wilson, Sean M

    2012-11-01

    Ca(2+) sparks are fundamental Ca(2+) signaling events arising from ryanodine receptor (RyR) activation, events that relate to contractile and dilatory events in the pulmonary vasculature. Recent studies demonstrate that long-term hypoxia (LTH) can affect pulmonary arterial reactivity in fetal, newborn, and adult animals. Because RyRs are important to pulmonary vascular reactivity and reactivity changes with ontogeny and LTH we tested the hypothesis that RyR-generated Ca(2+) signals are more active before birth and that LTH suppresses these responses. We examined these hypotheses by performing confocal imaging of myocytes in living arteries and by performing wire myography studies. Pulmonary arteries (PA) were isolated from fetal, newborn, or adult sheep that lived at low altitude or from those that were acclimatized to 3,801 m for > 100 days. Confocal imaging demonstrated preservation of the distance between the sarcoplasmic reticulum, nucleus, and plasma membrane in PA myocytes. Maturation increased global Ca(2+) waves and Ca(2+) spark activity, with sparks becoming larger, wider, and slower. LTH preferentially depressed Ca(2+) spark activity in immature pulmonary arterial myocytes, and these sparks were smaller, wider, and slower. LTH also suppressed caffeine-elicited contraction in fetal PA but augmented contraction in the newborn and adult. The influence of both ontogeny and LTH on RyR-dependent cell excitability shed new light on the therapeutic potential of these channels for the treatment of pulmonary vascular disease in newborns as well as adults. PMID:22962012

  17. Estrogen receptor isoforms and progestin hormone dependence in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    PubMed

    Actis, A M; Caruso, S P; Levin, E

    1994-09-01

    The close interaction between receptors and other transcription factors suggests that their corresponding transducing signals can trigger functional and structural changes in other related molecules. The effect of a progestinic agent, medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), on some of the estrogen-receptor (ER) parameters was studied in 2 murine mammary tumor sublines with different progestin hormone dependence for their respective growth. The relative binding affinity of estradiol and tamoxifen for the ER, the receptor content and the ER isoforms studied by HPLC were determined in the hormone-autonomous (HA) and the hormone-dependent (HD) tumor sublines. In the HA subline administration of MPA did not modify the tumor growth rate, whereas this was accelerated in the HD subline. The ER content was clearly increased in the HD tumor subline, but not in the HA subline, compared with the untreated controls. In contrast, the E2 and tamoxifen relative binding affinity for the ER and the isoform profiles were affected by MPA treatment in the HA, but not in the HD tumor subline. The functional change (decrease in relative binding affinity) can be attributed to the appearance of a lower-molecular-size ER isoform under the progestinic treatment. Modifications in one receptor molecule by the action of ligands corresponding to another type of receptor show the interconection between transcription factors and the necessity of broadening conventional concepts regarding hormone dependence in mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:8077051

  18. Ryanodine receptors are targeted by anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL involving its BH4 domain and Lys87 from its BH3 domain

    PubMed Central

    Vervliet, Tim; Lemmens, Irma; Vandermarliere, Elien; Decrock, Elke; Ivanova, Hristina; Monaco, Giovanni; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Kasri, Nael Nadif; Missiaen, Ludwig; Martens, Lennart; De Smedt, Humbert; Leybaert, Luc; Parys, Jan B.; Tavernier, Jan; Bultynck, Geert

    2015-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family members target several intracellular Ca2+-transport systems. Bcl-2, via its N-terminal Bcl-2 homology (BH) 4 domain, inhibits both inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs), while Bcl-XL, likely independently of its BH4 domain, sensitizes IP3Rs. It remains elusive whether Bcl-XL can also target and modulate RyRs. Here, Bcl-XL co-immunoprecipitated with RyR3 expressed in HEK293 cells. Mammalian protein-protein interaction trap (MAPPIT) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) showed that Bcl-XL bound to the central domain of RyR3 via its BH4 domain, although to a lesser extent compared to the BH4 domain of Bcl-2. Consistent with the ability of the BH4 domain of Bcl-XL to bind to RyRs, loading the BH4-Bcl-XL peptide into RyR3-overexpressing HEK293 cells or in rat hippocampal neurons suppressed RyR-mediated Ca2+ release. In silico superposition of the 3D-structures of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL indicated that Lys87 of the BH3 domain of Bcl-XL could be important for interacting with RyRs. In contrast to Bcl-XL, the Bcl-XLK87D mutant displayed lower binding affinity for RyR3 and a reduced inhibition of RyR-mediated Ca2+ release. These data suggest that Bcl-XL binds to RyR channels via its BH4 domain, but also its BH3 domain, more specific Lys87, contributes to the interaction. PMID:25872771

  19. Expression and function of ryanodine receptor related pathways in PCB tolerant Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from New Bedford Harbor, MA, USA

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Erika B.; Stegeman, John J.; Goldstone, Jared V.; Nacci, Diane E.; Champlin, Denise; Jayaraman, Saro; Connon, Richard E.; Pessah, Isaac N.

    2015-01-01

    Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) thrive in New Bedford Harbor (NBH), MA, highly contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Resident killifish have evolved tolerance to dioxin-like (DL) PCBs, whose toxic effects through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) are well studied. In NBH, non-dioxin like PCBs (NDL PCBs), which lack activity toward the AhR, vastly exceed levels of DL congeners yet how killifish counter NDL toxic effects has not been explored. In mammals and fish, NDL PCBs are potent activators of ryanodine receptors (RyR), Ca2+ release channels necessary for a vast array of physiological processes. In the current study we compared the expression and function of RyR related pathways in NBH killifish with killifish from the reference site at Scorton Creek (SC, MA). Relative to the SC fish, adults from NBH displayed increased levels of skeletal muscle RyR1 protein, and increased levels of FK506-binding protein 12 kDa (FKBP12), an accessory protein essential for NDL PCB-triggered changes in RyR channel function. In accordance with increased RyR1 levels, NBH killifish displayed increased maximal ligand binding, increased maximal response to Ca2+ activation and increased maximal response to activation by the NDL PCB congener PCB 95. Compared to SC, NBH embryos and larvae had increased levels of mtor and ryr2 transcripts at multiple stages of development, and generations, while levels of serca2 were decreased at 9 days post-fertilization in the F1 and F2 generations. These findings suggest that there are compensatory and heritable changes in RyR mediated Ca2+ signaling proteins or potential signaling partners in NBH killifish. PMID:25546006

  20. BDE-47 and 6-OH-BDE-47 modulate calcium homeostasis in primary fetal human neural progenitor cells via ryanodine receptor-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Kathrin; Schreiber, Timm; Dingemans, Milou M L; Krause, Guido; Roderigo, Claudia; Giersiefer, Susanne; Schuwald, Janette; Moors, Michaela; Unfried, Klaus; Bergman, Åke; Westerink, Remco H S; Rose, Christine R; Fritsche, Ellen

    2014-08-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are bioaccumulating flame retardants found in rising concentrations in human tissue. Epidemiological and animal studies have raised concern for their potential to induce developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). Considering the essential role of calcium homeostasis in neurodevelopment, PBDE-induced disturbance of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) may underlie PBDE-induced DNT. To test this hypothesis, we investigated acute effects of BDE-47 and 6-OH-BDE-47 on [Ca(2+)]i in human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) and unraveled involved signaling pathways. Short-time differentiated hNPCs were exposed to BDE-47, 6-OH-BDE-47, and multiple inhibitors/stimulators of presumably involved signaling pathways to determine possible effects on [Ca(2+)]i by single-cell microscopy with the fluorescent dye Fura-2. Initial characterization of calcium signaling pathways confirmed the early developmental stage of hNPCs. In these cells, BDE-47 (2 μM) and 6-OH-BDE-47 (0.2 μM) induce [Ca(2+)]i transients. This increase in [Ca(2+)]i is due to extracellular Ca(2+) influx and intracellular release of Ca(2+), mainly from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). While extracellular Ca(2+) seems to enter the cytoplasm upon 6-OH-BDE-47 by interfering with the cell membrane and independent of Ca(2+) ion channels, ER-derived Ca(2+) is released following activation of protein lipase C and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, but independently of ryanodine receptors. These findings illustrate that immature developing hNPCs respond to low concentrations of 6-OH-BDE-47 by an increase in [Ca(2+)]i and provide new mechanistic explanations for such BDE-induced calcium disruption. Thus, these data support the possibility of a critical window of PBDE exposure, i.e., early human brain development, which has to be acknowledged in risk assessment. PMID:24599297

  1. Insulin receptor isoforms: an integrated view focused on gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Westermeier, F; Sáez, T; Arroyo, P; Toledo, F; Gutiérrez, J; Sanhueza, C; Pardo, F; Leiva, A; Sobrevia, L

    2016-05-01

    The human insulin receptor (IR) exists in two isoforms that differ by the absence (IR-A) or the presence (IR-B) of a 12-amino acid segment encoded by exon 11. Both isoforms are functionally distinct regarding their binding affinities and intracellular signalling. However, the underlying mechanisms related to their cellular functions in several tissues are only partially understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge in this field regarding the alternative splicing of IR isoform, tissue-specific distribution and signalling both in physiology and disease, with an emphasis on the human placenta in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Furthermore, we discuss the clinical relevance of IR isoforms highlighted by findings that show altered insulin signalling due to differential IR-A and IR-B expression in human placental endothelium in GDM pregnancies. Future research and clinical studies focused on the role of IR isoform signalling might provide novel therapeutic targets for treating GDM to improve the adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26431063

  2. A novel protein isoform of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor transforms human pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chakedis, Jeffery; French, Randall; Babicky, Michele; Jaquish, Dawn; Howard, Haleigh; Mose, Evangeline; Lam, Raymond; Holman, Patrick; Miyamoto, Jaclyn; Walterscheid, Zakk; Lowy, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    The MST1R gene is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer producing elevated levels of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor protein. While mutations in MST1R are rare, alternative splice variants have been previously reported in epithelial cancers. We report the discovery of a novel RON isoform discovered in human pancreatic cancer. Partial splicing of exons 5 and 6 (P5P6) produces a RON isoform that lacks the first extracellular immunoglobulin-plexin-transcription (IPT) domain. The splice variant is detected in 73% of pancreatic adenocarcinoma patient derived xenografts and 71% of pancreatic cancer cell lines. Peptides specific to RON P5P6 detected in human pancreatic cancer specimens by mass spectrometry confirms translation of the protein isoform. The P5P6 isoform is found to be constitutively phosphorylated, present in the cytoplasm, and it traffics to the plasma membrane. Expression of P5P6 in immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cells activates downstream AKT, and in human pancreatic epithelial nestin-expressing (HPNE) cells activates both the AKT and MAPK pathways. Inhibiting RON P5P6 in HPDE cells using a small molecule inhibitor BMS-777607 blocked constitutive activation and decreased AKT signaling. P5P6 transforms NIH3T3 cells and induces tumorigenicity in HPDE cells. Resultant HPDE-P5P6 tumors develop a dense stromal compartment similar to that seen in pancreatic cancer. In summary, we have identified a novel and constitutively active isoform of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor that has transforming activity and is expressed in human pancreatic cancer. These findings provide additional insight into the biology of the RON receptor in pancreatic cancer and are clinically relevant to the study of RON as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26477314

  3. A novel protein isoform of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor transforms human pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chakedis, J; French, R; Babicky, M; Jaquish, D; Howard, H; Mose, E; Lam, R; Holman, P; Miyamoto, J; Walterscheid, Z; Lowy, A M

    2016-06-23

    The MST1R gene is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer producing elevated levels of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor protein. While mutations in MST1R are rare, alternative splice variants have been previously reported in epithelial cancers. We report the discovery of a novel RON isoform discovered in human pancreatic cancer. Partial splicing of exons 5 and 6 (P5P6) produces a RON isoform that lacks the first extracellular immunoglobulin-plexin-transcription domain. The splice variant is detected in 73% of xenografts derived from pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients and 71% of pancreatic cancer cell lines. Peptides specific to RON P5P6 detected in human pancreatic cancer specimens by mass spectrometry confirm translation of the protein isoform. The P5P6 isoform is found to be constitutively phosphorylated, present in the cytoplasm, and it traffics to the plasma membrane. Expression of P5P6 in immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cells activates downstream AKT, and in human pancreatic epithelial nestin-expressing cells, activates both the AKT and MAPK pathways. Inhibiting RON P5P6 in HPDE cells using a small molecule inhibitor BMS-777607 blocked constitutive activation and decreased AKT signaling. P5P6 transforms NIH3T3 cells and induces tumorigenicity in HPDE cells. Resultant HPDE-P5P6 tumors develop a dense stromal compartment similar to that seen in pancreatic cancer. In summary, we have identified a novel and constitutively active isoform of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor that has transforming activity and is expressed in human pancreatic cancer. These findings provide additional insight into the biology of the RON receptor in pancreatic cancer and are clinically relevant to the study of RON as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26477314

  4. Studying isoform-specific inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor function and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Betzenhauser, Matthew J.; Wagner, Larry E.; Won, Jong-Hak; Yule, David I.

    2011-01-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP3R) are a family of ubiquitously expressed intracellular Ca2+ channels. Isoform-specific properties of the three family members may play a prominent role in defining the rich diversity of the spatial and temporal characteristics of intracellular Ca2+ signals. Studying the properties of the particular family members is complicated because individual receptor isoforms are typically never expressed in isolation. In this article, we discuss strategies for studying Ca2+ release through individual InsP3R family members with particular reference to methods applicable following expression of recombinant InsP3R and mutant constructs in the DT40-3KO cell line, an unambiguously null InsP3R expression system. PMID:18929664

  5. Differential neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of L-type voltage dependent calcium channel and ryanodine receptor antagonists in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Sarah C; Royer, Sarah E; D'Angelo, Heather M; Kaercher, Roxanne M; Fisher, David A; Wenk, Gary L

    2015-03-01

    Neuroinflammation and degeneration of catecholaminergic brainstem nuclei occur early in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Neuroinflammation increases levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species which can alter neuronal calcium (Ca(+2)) homoeostasis via L-type voltage dependent calcium channels (L-VDCCs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Alterations in Ca(+2) channel activity in the SN and LC can lead to disruption of normal pacemaking activity in these areas, contributing to behavioral deficits. Here, we utilized an in vivo model of chronic neuroinflammation: rats were infused intraventricularly with a continuous small dose (0.25 μg/h) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) for 28 days. Rats were treated with either the L-VDCC antagonist nimodipine or the RyR antagonist dantrolene. LPS-infused rats had significant motor deficits in the accelerating rotarod task as well as abnormal behavioral agitation in the forced swim task and open field. Corresponding with these behavioral deficits, LPS-infused rats also had significant increases in microglia activation and loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and locus coeruleus (LC). Treatment with nimodipine or dantrolene normalized LPS-induced abnormalities in the rotarod and forced swim, restored the number of TH-immunoreactive cells in the LC, and significantly reduced microglia activation in the SNpc. Only nimodipine significantly reduced microglia activation in the LC, and neither drug increased TH immunoreactivity in the SNpc. These findings demonstrate that the Ca(+2) dysregulation in the LC and SN brainstem nuclei is differentially altered by chronic neuroinflammation. Overall, targeting Ca + 2 dysregulation may be an important target for ameliorating neurodegeneration in the SNpc and LC. PMID:25318607

  6. The effects of ryanodine receptor (RYR1) mutation on natural killer cell cytotoxicity, plasma cytokines and stress hormones during acute intermittent exercise in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ciepielewski, Z M; Stojek, W; Borman, A; Myślińska, D; Pałczyńska, P; Kamyczek, M

    2016-04-01

    Stress susceptibility has been mapped to a single recessive gene, the ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR1) gene or halothane (Hal) gene. Homozygous (Hal(nn)), mutated pigs are sensitive to halothane and susceptible to Porcine Stress Syndrome (PSS). Previous studies have shown that stress-susceptible RYR1 gene mutated homozygotes in response to restraint stress showed an increase in natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) accompanied by more pronounced stress-related hormone and anti-inflammatory cytokine changes. In order to determine the relationship of a RYR1 gene mutation with NKCC, plasma cytokines and stress-related hormones following a different stress model - exercise - 36 male pigs (representing different genotypes according to RYR1 gene mutation: NN, homozygous dominant; Nn, heterozygous; nn, homozygous recessive) were submitted to an intermittent treadmill walking. During the entire experiment the greatest level of NKCC and the greatest concentrations of interleukin (IL-) 6, IL-10, IL-12, interferon (IFN-)γ and tumor necrosis factor-α and stress-related hormones (adrenaline, prolactin, beta-endorphin) were observed in nn pigs, and the greatest concentration of IL-1 and growth hormone in NN pigs. Immunostimulatory effects of intermittent exercise on NKCC in nn pigs were concomitant with increases in IL-2, IL-12 and IFN-γ, the potent NKCC activators. Our findings suggest that stress-susceptible pigs RYR1 gene mutated pigs develop a greater level of NKCC and cytokine production in response to exercise stress. These results suggest that the heterogeneity of immunological and neuroendocrine response to exercise stress in pigs could be influenced by RYR1 gene mutation. PMID:27033913

  7. Channel Activity of Cardiac Ryanodine Receptors (RyR2) Determines Potency and Efficacy of Flecainide and R-Propafenone against Arrhythmogenic Calcium Waves in Ventricular Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Knollmann, Björn C.

    2015-01-01

    Flecainide blocks ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) channels in the open state, suppresses arrhythmogenic Ca2+ waves and prevents catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) in mice and humans. We hypothesized that differences in RyR2 activity induced by CPVT mutations determines the potency of open-state RyR2 blockers like flecainide (FLEC) and R-propafenone (RPROP) against Ca2+ waves in cardiomyocytes. Using confocal microscopy, we studied Ca2+ sparks and waves in isolated saponin-permeabilized ventricular myocytes from two CPVT mouse models (Casq2-/-, RyR2-R4496C+/-), wild-type (c57bl/6, WT) mice, and WT rabbits (New Zealand white rabbits). Consistent with increased RyR2 activity, Ca2+ spark and wave frequencies were significantly higher in CPVT compared to WT mouse myocytes. We next obtained concentration-response curves of Ca2+ wave inhibition for FLEC, RPROP (another open-state RyR2 blocker), and tetracaine (TET) (a state-independent RyR2 blocker). Both FLEC and RPROP inhibited Ca2+ waves with significantly higher potency (lower IC50) and efficacy in CPVT compared to WT. In contrast, TET had similar potency in all groups studied. Increasing RyR2 activity of permeabilized WT myocytes by exposure to caffeine (150 µM) increased the potency of FLEC and RPROP but not of TET. RPROP and FLEC were also significantly more potent in rabbit ventricular myocytes that intrinsically exhibit higher Ca2+ spark rates than WT mouse ventricular myocytes. In conclusion, RyR2 activity determines the potency of open-state blockers FLEC and RPROP for suppressing arrhythmogenic Ca2+ waves in cardiomyocytes, a mechanism likely relevant to antiarrhythmic drug efficacy in CPVT. PMID:26121139

  8. Channel Activity of Cardiac Ryanodine Receptors (RyR2) Determines Potency and Efficacy of Flecainide and R-Propafenone against Arrhythmogenic Calcium Waves in Ventricular Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Knollmann, Björn C

    2015-01-01

    Flecainide blocks ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) channels in the open state, suppresses arrhythmogenic Ca2+ waves and prevents catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) in mice and humans. We hypothesized that differences in RyR2 activity induced by CPVT mutations determines the potency of open-state RyR2 blockers like flecainide (FLEC) and R-propafenone (RPROP) against Ca2+ waves in cardiomyocytes. Using confocal microscopy, we studied Ca2+ sparks and waves in isolated saponin-permeabilized ventricular myocytes from two CPVT mouse models (Casq2-/-, RyR2-R4496C+/-), wild-type (c57bl/6, WT) mice, and WT rabbits (New Zealand white rabbits). Consistent with increased RyR2 activity, Ca2+ spark and wave frequencies were significantly higher in CPVT compared to WT mouse myocytes. We next obtained concentration-response curves of Ca2+ wave inhibition for FLEC, RPROP (another open-state RyR2 blocker), and tetracaine (TET) (a state-independent RyR2 blocker). Both FLEC and RPROP inhibited Ca2+ waves with significantly higher potency (lower IC50) and efficacy in CPVT compared to WT. In contrast, TET had similar potency in all groups studied. Increasing RyR2 activity of permeabilized WT myocytes by exposure to caffeine (150 µM) increased the potency of FLEC and RPROP but not of TET. RPROP and FLEC were also significantly more potent in rabbit ventricular myocytes that intrinsically exhibit higher Ca2+ spark rates than WT mouse ventricular myocytes. In conclusion, RyR2 activity determines the potency of open-state blockers FLEC and RPROP for suppressing arrhythmogenic Ca2+ waves in cardiomyocytes, a mechanism likely relevant to antiarrhythmic drug efficacy in CPVT. PMID:26121139

  9. Identification of Novel Ryanodine Receptor 1 (RyR1) Protein Interaction with Calcium Homeostasis Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein (CHERP)*♦

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Timothy; Sharma, Parveen; Ignatchenko, Alex; MacLennan, David H.; Kislinger, Thomas; Gramolini, Anthony O.

    2011-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) is a homotetrameric Ca2+ release channel located in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle where it plays a role in the initiation of skeletal muscle contraction. A soluble, 6×-histidine affinity-tagged cytosolic fragment of RyR1 (amino acids 1–4243) was expressed in HEK-293 cells, and metal affinity chromatography under native conditions was used to purify the peptide together with interacting proteins. When analyzed by gel-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), 703 proteins were identified under all conditions. This group of proteins was filtered to identify putative RyR interacting proteins by removing those proteins found in only 1 RyR purification and proteins for which average spectral counts were enriched by less than 4-fold over control values. This resulted in 49 potential RyR1 interacting proteins, and 4 were selected for additional interaction studies: calcium homeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein (CHERP), endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi intermediate compartment 53-kDa protein (LMAN1), T-complex protein, and phosphorylase kinase. Western blotting showed that only CHERP co-purified with affinity-tagged RyR1 and was eluted with imidazole. Immunofluorescence showed that endogenous CHERP co-localizes with endogenous RyR1 in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of rat soleus muscle. A combination of overexpression of RyR1 in HEK-293 cells with siRNA-mediated suppression of CHERP showed that CHERP affects Ca2+ release from the ER via RyR1. Thus, we propose that CHERP is an RyR1 interacting protein that may be involved in the regulation of excitation-contraction coupling. PMID:21454501

  10. Reduced aerobic capacity causes leaky ryanodine receptors that trigger arrhythmia in a rat strain artificially selected and bred for low aerobic running capacity

    PubMed Central

    Høydal, MA; Stølen, TO; Johnsen, AB; Alvez, M; Catalucci, D; Condorelli, G; Koch, LG; Britton, SL; Smith, GL; Wisløff, U

    2014-01-01

    Aim Rats selectively bred for inborn Low Capacity of Running (LCR) display a series of poor health indices where as rats selected for High Capacity of Running (HCR) display a healthy profile. We hypothesized that selection of low aerobic capacity over generations leads to a phenotype with increased diastolic Ca2+ leak that trigger arrhythmia. Methods We used rats selected for HCR (N=10) or LCR (N=10) to determine the effect of inborn aerobic capacity on Ca2+ leak and susceptibility of ventricular arrhythmia. We studied isolated FURA2/AM loaded cardiomyocytes to detect Ca2+-handling and function on an inverted epi-fluorescence microscope. To determine arrhythmogenicity we did a final experiment with electrical burst pacing in Langendorff perfused hearts. Results Ca2+-handling was impaired by reduced Ca2+ amplitude, prolonged time to 50% Ca2+ decay, and reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-content. Impaired Ca2+ removal was influenced by reduced SR Ca2+ ATP-ase 2a (SERCA2a) function and increased sodium/Ca2+-exchanger (NCX) in LCR rats. Diastolic Ca2 leak was 87% higher in LCR rats. The leak was reduced by CaMKII inhibition. Expression levels of phosphorylated theorine-286 CaMKII levels and increased RyR2 phosphorylation at the Serine-2814 site mechanistically support our findings of increased leak in LCR. LCR rats had significantly higher incidence of ventricular fibrillation. Conclusion Selection of inborn low aerobic capacity over generations leads to a phenotype with increased risk of ventricular fibrillation. Increased phosphorylation of CaMKII at serine-2814 at the cardiac ryanodine receptor appears as an important mechanism of impaired Ca2+ handling and diastolic Ca2+ leak that results in increased susceptibility to ventricular fibrillation. PMID:24444142

  11. Synchrony of Cardiomyocyte Ca2+ Release is Controlled by t-tubule Organization, SR Ca2+ Content, and Ryanodine Receptor Ca2+ Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Øyehaug, Leiv; Loose, Kristian Ø.; Jølle, Guro F.; Røe, Åsmund T.; Sjaastad, Ivar; Christensen, Geir; Sejersted, Ole M.; Louch, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that cardiomyocyte Ca2+release is desynchronized in several pathological conditions. Loss of Ca2+ release synchrony has been attributed to t-tubule disruption, but it is unknown if other factors also contribute. We investigated this issue in normal and failing myocytes by integrating experimental data with a mathematical model describing spatiotemporal dynamics of Ca2+ in the cytosol and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Heart failure development in postinfarction mice was associated with progressive t-tubule disorganization, as quantified by fast-Fourier transforms. Data from fast-Fourier transforms were then incorporated in the model as a dyadic organization index, reflecting the proportion of ryanodine receptors located in dyads. With decreasing dyadic-organization index, the model predicted greater dyssynchrony of Ca2+ release, which exceeded that observed in experimental line-scan images. Model and experiment were reconciled by reducing the threshold for Ca2+ release in the model, suggesting that increased RyR sensitivity partially offsets the desynchronizing effects of t-tubule disruption in heart failure. Reducing the magnitude of SR Ca2+ content and release, whether experimentally by thapsigargin treatment, or in the model, desynchronized the Ca2+ transient. However, in cardiomyocytes isolated from SERCA2 knockout mice, RyR sensitization offset such effects. A similar interplay between RyR sensitivity and SR content was observed during treatment of myocytes with low-dose caffeine. Initial synchronization of Ca2+ release during caffeine was reversed as SR content declined due to enhanced RyR leak. Thus, synchrony of cardiomyocyte Ca2+ release is not only determined by t-tubule organization but also by the interplay between RyR sensitivity and SR Ca2+ content. PMID:23601316

  12. Contribution of impaired myofibril and ryanodine receptor function to prolonged low-frequency force depression after in situ stimulation in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daiki; Kanzaki, Keita; Kuratani, Mai; Matsunaga, Satoshi; Yanaka, Noriyuki; Wada, Masanobu

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether prolonged low-frequency force depression (PLFFD) that occurs in situ is the result of decreased myofibrillar Ca(2+) sensitivity and/or reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release. Intact rat gastrocnemius muscles were electrically stimulated via the sciatic nerve until force was reduced to ~50% of the initial and dissected 30 min following the cessation of stimulation. Skinned fibre and whole muscle analyses were performed in the superficial region composed exclusively of type IIB fibres. Fatiguing stimulation significantly reduced the ratio of force at low frequency to that at high frequency to 65% in skinned fibres (1 vs. 50 Hz) and 73% in whole muscles (20 vs. 100 Hz). In order to evaluate changes in myofibrillar Ca(2+) sensitivity and ryanodine receptor caffeine sensitivity, skinned fibres were activated in Ca(2+)- and caffeine-containing solutions, respectively. Skinned fibres from fatigued muscles displayed decreased caffeine sensitivity together with increased myofibrillar Ca(2+) sensitivity. Treatment with 2,2'-dithiodipyridine and reduced glutathione induced a smaller increase in myofibrillar Ca(2+)sensitivity in fatigued than in rested fibres. In fatigued muscles, S-glutathionylation of troponin I was increased and submaximal SR Ca(2+) release, induced by 4-chloro-m-cresol, was decreased. These findings suggest that in the early stage of PLFFD that occurs in fast-twitch muscles of exercising animals and humans, S-glutathionylation of troponin I may attenuate PLFFD by increasing myofibrillar Ca(2+) sensitivity and that under such a circumstance, PLFFD may be ascribable to failure of SR Ca(2+) release. PMID:25697123

  13. Topographies and isoforms of the progesterone receptor in female human, rat and mouse bladder.

    PubMed

    Gevaert, Thomas; Rietjens, Roma; Voets, Thomas; Everaerts, Wouter; De Ridder, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Steroid hormones such as progesterone are known to influence bladder function. Progesterone effects are mediated by the progesterone receptor (PR) but no detailed studies of PR in bladder exist. We have investigated the presence, topography and subtypes of PR in mouse, rat and human bladder. Fresh tissue samples were obtained from cystectomies in female humans, rats and mice (n = 7 per group). Tissue samples were processed for immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunofluorescence (IF) and western blot (WB) and, for each species, a panel of specific PR antibody clones was used. Interpretation of IHC/IF was carried out by light/fluorescent microscopy and of WB via standard WB software. IHC/IF in female human bladder showed PR on the interstitial cells in the lamina propria and between detrusor smooth muscle cells, whereas in female rat and mouse bladder, PR was only found on the urothelium. WB in human bladder showed a 78-kD and a 60-kDa band, respectively, corresponding to a modified PR isoform A and PR isoform C. WB in rat and mice bladder showed a 60 kDa band and a 37 kDa band, respectively corresponding with PR isoform C and an unknown isoform. This is the first detailed investigation of the precise location and presence of several isoforms of PR in bladder, together with a comparison of these data between human, rat and mouse. Our study has revealed complex PR families in bladders from the various species studied and demonstrates obvious inter-species differences in PR topography and isoforms. PMID:26650465

  14. Expression of fibronectin, fibronectin isoforms and integrin receptors in melanocytic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Natali, P. G.; Nicotra, M. R.; Di Filippo, F.; Bigotti, A.

    1995-01-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that fibronectin (FN) can deliver a mitogenic signal to quiescent human melanoma cells and that the alpha 5/beta 1-integrin receptor mediates this stimulus. In view of this finding we have analysed the in vivo expression of FN, and of ED-A and ED-B FN isoforms, in benign and malignant lesions of melanocyte origin. In the same specimens the expression of fibronectin integrin receptors was evaluated. The results demonstrate that, while detection of FN does not correlate with transformation and tumour progression, the expression of the two isoforms is associated with transformation and that only the ED-A variant is found in metastases. Integrin phenotyping disclosed that alpha 3/beta 1 expression is associated with tumour progression, alpha v/beta 3 is a marker of transformation, alpha 4 is rarely expressed and alpha 5 is expressed by about 50% and 30% of the primary and metastatic lesions respectively. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrate that transformation and tumour progression of the melanocyte lineage are associated with modulation of expression of FN isoforms and FN integrin receptors. Furthermore, the expression of alpha 5-integrin in a considerable percentage of primary and metastatic lesions indicates that FN may deliver a proliferative stimulus to melanoma cells in vivo. Images Figure 1 PMID:7779718

  15. The Splice Isoforms of the Drosophila Ecdysis Triggering Hormone Receptor Have Developmentally Distinct Roles.

    PubMed

    Diao, Feici; Mena, Wilson; Shi, Jonathan; Park, Dongkook; Diao, Fengqiu; Taghert, Paul; Ewer, John; White, Benjamin H

    2016-01-01

    To grow, insects must periodically shed their exoskeletons. This process, called ecdysis, is initiated by the endocrine release of Ecdysis Trigger Hormone (ETH) and has been extensively studied as a model for understanding the hormonal control of behavior. Understanding how ETH regulates ecdysis behavior, however, has been impeded by limited knowledge of the hormone's neuronal targets. An alternatively spliced gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (ETHR) that is activated by ETH has been identified, and several lines of evidence support a role in ecdysis for its A-isoform. The function of a second ETHR isoform (ETHRB) remains unknown. Here we use the recently introduced "Trojan exon" technique to simultaneously mutate the ETHR gene and gain genetic access to the neurons that express its two isoforms. We show that ETHRA and ETHRB are expressed in largely distinct subsets of neurons and that ETHRA- but not ETHRB-expressing neurons are required for ecdysis at all developmental stages. However, both genetic and neuronal manipulations indicate an essential role for ETHRB at pupal and adult, but not larval, ecdysis. We also identify several functionally important subsets of ETHR-expressing neurons including one that coexpresses the peptide Leucokinin and regulates fluid balance to facilitate ecdysis at the pupal stage. The general strategy presented here of using a receptor gene as an entry point for genetic and neuronal manipulations should be useful in establishing patterns of functional connectivity in other hormonally regulated networks. PMID:26534952

  16. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) isoforms control lymphoid cancer cell proliferation through differentially regulating tumor suppressor p53 activity

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Gloria; Sarkar, Krishnakali; Mendez, Omayra; Wright, Casey W.

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) is involved in xenobiotic and hypoxic responses, and we previously showed that ARNT also regulates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling by altering the DNA binding activity of the RelB subunit. However, our initial study of ARNT-mediated RelB modulation was based on simultaneous suppression of the two ARNT isoforms, isoform 1 and 3, and precluded the examination of their individual functions. We find here that while normal lymphocytes harbor equal levels of isoform 1 and 3, lymphoid malignancies exhibit a shift to higher levels of ARNT isoform 1. These elevated levels of ARNT isoform 1 are critical to the proliferation of these cancerous cells, as suppression of isoform 1 in a human multiple myeloma (MM) cell line, and an anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) cell line, triggered S-phase cell cycle arrest, spontaneous apoptosis, and sensitized cells to doxorubicin treatment. Furthermore, co-suppression of RelB or p53 with ARNT isoform 1 prevented cell cycle arrest and blocked doxorubicin induced apoptosis. Together our findings reveal that certain blood cancers rely on ARNT isoform 1 to potentiate proliferation by antagonizing RelB and p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Significantly, our results identify ARNT isoform 1 as a potential target for anticancer therapies. PMID:26909609

  17. Two farnesoid X receptor alpha isoforms in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) are differentially activated in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, Deanna L.; Hagey, Lee R.; Law, Sheran H.W.; Ai, Ni; Krasowski, Matthew D.; Ekins, Sean; Moore, John T.; Kollitz, Erin M.; Hinton, David E.; Kullman, Seth W.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor alpha (FXRα, NR1H4) is activated by bile acids in multiple species including mouse, rat, and human and in this study we have identified two isoforms of Fxrα in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), a small freshwater teleost. Both isoforms share a high amino acid sequence identity to mammalian FXRα (~70% in the ligand-binding domain). Fxrα1 and Fxrα2 differ within the AF1 domain due to alternative splicing at the fourth intron-exon boundary. This process results in Fxrα1 having an extended N-terminus compared to Fxrα2. A Gal4DBD-FxrαLBD fusion construct was activated by chenodeoxycholic, cholic, deoxycholic and lithocholic acids, and the synthetic agonist GW4064 in transient transactivation assays. Activation of the Gal4DBD-FxrαLBD fusion construct was enhanced by addition of PGC-1α, as demonstrated through titration assays. Surprisingly, when the full-length versions of the two Fxrα isoforms were compared in transient transfection assays, Fxrα2 was activated by C24 bile acids and GW4064, while Fxrα1 was not significantly activated by any of the compounds tested. Since the only significant difference between the full-length constructs was sequence in the AF1 domain, these experiments highlight a key functional region in the Fxrα AF1 domain. Furthermore, mammalian two-hybrid studies demonstrated the ability of Fxrα2, but not Fxrα1, to interact with PGC-1α and SRC-1, and supported our results from the transient transfection reporter gene activation assays. These data demonstrate that both mammalian and teleost FXR (Fxrα2 isoform) are activated by primary and secondary bile acids. PMID:20430454

  18. Rank-based genome-wide analysis reveals the association of Ryanodine receptor-2 gene variants with childhood asthma among human populations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The standard approach to determine unique or shared genetic factors across populations is to identify risk alleles in one population and investigate replication in others. However, since populations differ in DNA sequence information, allele frequencies, effect sizes, and linkage disequilibrium patterns, SNP association using a uniform stringent threshold on p values may not be reproducible across populations. Here, we developed rank-based methods to investigate shared or population-specific loci and pathways for childhood asthma across individuals of diverse ancestry. We performed genome-wide association studies on 859,790 SNPs genotyped in 527 affected offspring trios of European, African, and Hispanic ancestry using publically available asthma database in the Genotypes and Phenotypes database. Results Rank-based analyses showed that there are shared genetic factors for asthma across populations, more at the gene and pathway levels than at the SNP level. Although the top 1,000 SNPs were not shared, 11 genes (RYR2, PDE4D, CSMD1, CDH13, ROBO2, RBFOX1, PTPRD, NPAS3, PDE1C, SEMA5A, and CTNNA2) mapped by these SNPs were shared across populations. Ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2, a statin response-related gene) showed the strongest association in European (p value = 2.55 × 10−7) and was replicated in African (2.57 × 10−4) and Hispanic (1.18 × 10−3) Americans. Imputation analyses based on the 1000 Genomes Project uncovered additional RYR2 variants associated with asthma. Network and functional ontology analyses revealed that RYR2 is an integral part of dermatological or allergic disorder biological networks, specifically in the functional classes involving inflammatory, eosinophilic, and respiratory diseases. Conclusion Our rank-based genome-wide analysis revealed for the first time an association of RYR2 variants with asthma and replicated previously discovered PDE4D asthma gene across human populations. The replication of top

  19. Calcium-Dependent Energetics of Calmodulin Domain Interactions with Regulatory Regions of the Ryanodine Receptor Type 1 (RyR1)

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Rhonda A.; Sorensen, Brenda R.; Kilpatrick, Adina M.; Shea, Madeline A.

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) plays a vital role in calcium homeostasis by allosterically modulating intracellular calcium channels including the homo-tetrameric human Ryanodine Receptor Type 1 (hRyR1). Apo (calcium-free) CaM activates hRyR1 while calcium-saturated CaM inhibits it. Two CaM-binding regions (residues 1975–1999 and 3614–3643) identified in each RyR1 monomer were proposed to allow CaM to bridge adjacent RyR1 subunits. We explored the distinct roles of CaM domains by using fluorescence anisotropy to determine the affinity of CaM1–148 (full-length), CaM1–80 (N-domain) and CaM76–148 (C-domain) for peptides encompassing hRyR1 residues 1975–1999 or 3614–3643. Both CaM1–148 and CaM76–148 associated in a calcium-independent manner with similar affinities for hRyR1(3614–3643)p while CaM1–80 required calcium and bound ~250-fold more weakly. Association of CaM1–148, CaM1–80 and CaM76–148 with hRyR1(1975–1999)p was much less favorable than with hRyR1(3614–3643)p; differences between the two CaM domains were smaller. Equilibrium calcium titrations monitored by steady-state fluorescence demonstrated that both hRyR1 peptides increased the calcium-binding affinity of both CaM domains. These thermodynamic properties support a prior model in which the CaM C-domain associates with RyR1(3614–3643) at low levels of calcium, positioning CaM to rapidly respond to calcium efflux. However, the affinity of the N-domain of CaM for hRyR1(1975–1999)p is insufficient to explain a model in which CaM bridges adjacent RyR1 subunits within the tetramer. This indicates that other protein factors or properties of the tertiary or quaternary structure of hRyR1 contribute to the energetics of CaM-mediated regulation. PMID:25145833

  20. Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility arising from altered resting coupling between the skeletal muscle L-type Ca2+ channel and the type 1 ryanodine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Eltit, Jose Miguel; Bannister, Roger A.; Moua, Ong; Altamirano, Francisco; Hopkins, Philip M.; Pessah, Isaac N.; Molinski, Tadeusz F.; López, Jose R.; Beam, Kurt G.; Allen, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) susceptibility is a dominantly inherited disorder in which volatile anesthetics trigger aberrant Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle and a potentially fatal rise in perioperative body temperature. Mutations causing MH susceptibility have been identified in two proteins critical for excitation–contraction (EC) coupling, the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) and CaV1.1, the principal subunit of the L-type Ca2+ channel. All of the mutations that have been characterized previously augment EC coupling and/or increase the rate of L-type Ca2+ entry. The CaV1.1 mutation R174W associated with MH susceptibility occurs at the innermost basic residue of the IS4 voltage-sensing helix, a residue conserved among all CaV channels [Carpenter D, et al. (2009) BMC Med Genet 10:104–115.]. To define the functional consequences of this mutation, we expressed it in dysgenic (CaV1.1 null) myotubes. Unlike previously described MH-linked mutations in CaV1.1, R174W ablated the L-type current and had no effect on EC coupling. Nonetheless, R174W increased sensitivity of Ca2+ release to caffeine (used for MH diagnostic in vitro testing) and to volatile anesthetics. Moreover, in CaV1.1 R174W-expressing myotubes, resting myoplasmic Ca2+ levels were elevated, and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) stores were partially depleted, compared with myotubes expressing wild-type CaV1.1. Our results indicate that CaV1.1 functions not only to activate RyR1 during EC coupling, but also to suppress resting RyR1-mediated Ca2+ leak from the SR, and that perturbation of CaV1.1 negative regulation of RyR1 leak identifies a unique mechanism that can sensitize muscle cells to MH triggers. PMID:22547813

  1. Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility arising from altered resting coupling between the skeletal muscle L-type Ca2+ channel and the type 1 ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Eltit, Jose Miguel; Bannister, Roger A; Moua, Ong; Altamirano, Francisco; Hopkins, Philip M; Pessah, Isaac N; Molinski, Tadeusz F; López, Jose R; Beam, Kurt G; Allen, Paul D

    2012-05-15

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) susceptibility is a dominantly inherited disorder in which volatile anesthetics trigger aberrant Ca(2+) release in skeletal muscle and a potentially fatal rise in perioperative body temperature. Mutations causing MH susceptibility have been identified in two proteins critical for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) and Ca(V)1.1, the principal subunit of the L-type Ca(2+) channel. All of the mutations that have been characterized previously augment EC coupling and/or increase the rate of L-type Ca(2+) entry. The Ca(V)1.1 mutation R174W associated with MH susceptibility occurs at the innermost basic residue of the IS4 voltage-sensing helix, a residue conserved among all Ca(V) channels [Carpenter D, et al. (2009) BMC Med Genet 10:104-115.]. To define the functional consequences of this mutation, we expressed it in dysgenic (Ca(V)1.1 null) myotubes. Unlike previously described MH-linked mutations in Ca(V)1.1, R174W ablated the L-type current and had no effect on EC coupling. Nonetheless, R174W increased sensitivity of Ca(2+) release to caffeine (used for MH diagnostic in vitro testing) and to volatile anesthetics. Moreover, in Ca(V)1.1 R174W-expressing myotubes, resting myoplasmic Ca(2+) levels were elevated, and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) stores were partially depleted, compared with myotubes expressing wild-type Ca(V)1.1. Our results indicate that Ca(V)1.1 functions not only to activate RyR1 during EC coupling, but also to suppress resting RyR1-mediated Ca(2+) leak from the SR, and that perturbation of Ca(V)1.1 negative regulation of RyR1 leak identifies a unique mechanism that can sensitize muscle cells to MH triggers. PMID:22547813

  2. Overexpression of FK506-binding protein FKBP12.6 in cardiomyocytes reduces ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca(2+) leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and increases contractility.

    PubMed

    Prestle, J; Janssen, P M; Janssen, A P; Zeitz, O; Lehnart, S E; Bruce, L; Smith, G L; Hasenfuss, G

    2001-02-01

    The FK506-binding protein FKBP12.6 is tightly associated with the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-release channel (ryanodine receptor type 2 [RyR2]), but the physiological function of FKBP12.6 is unclear. We used adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene transfer to overexpress FKBP12.6 in adult rabbit cardiomyocytes. Western immunoblot and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed specific overexpression of FKBP12.6, with unchanged expression of endogenous FKBP12. FKBP12.6-transfected myocytes displayed a significantly higher (21%) fractional shortening (FS) at 48 hours after transfection compared with Ad-GFP-infected control cells (4.8+/-0.2% FS versus 4+/-0.2% FS, respectively; n=79 each; P:=0.001). SR-Ca(2+) uptake rates were monitored in beta-escin-permeabilized myocytes using Fura-2. Ad-FKBP12.6-infected cells showed a statistically significant higher rate of Ca(2+) uptake of 0.8+/-0.09 nmol/s(-)(1)/10(6) cells (n=8, P:<0.05) compared with 0.52+/-0.1 nmol/s(-)(1)/10(6) cells in sham-infected cells (n=8) at a [Ca(2+)] of 1 micromol/L. In the presence of 5 micromol/L ruthenium red to block Ca(2+) efflux via RyR2, SR-Ca(2+) uptake rates were not significantly different between groups. From these measurements, we calculate that SR-Ca(2+) leak through RyR2 is reduced by 53% in FKBP12.6-overexpressing cells. Caffeine-induced contractures were significantly larger in Ad-FKBP12.6-infected myocytes compared with Ad-GFP-infected control cells, indicating a higher SR-Ca(2+) load. Taken together, these data suggest that FKBP12.6 stabilizes the closed conformation state of RyR2. This may reduce diastolic SR-Ca(2+) leak and consequently increase SR-Ca(2+) release and myocyte shortening. PMID:11157671

  3. Redox modification of ryanodine receptors by mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species contributes to aberrant Ca2+ handling in ageing rabbit hearts.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Leroy L; Li, Weiyan; Lu, Yichun; Centracchio, Jason; Terentyeva, Radmila; Koren, Gideon; Terentyev, Dmitry

    2013-12-01

    Ageing is associated with a blunted response to sympathetic stimulation and an increased risk of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. Aberrant calcium (Ca(2+)) handling is an important contributor to the electrical and contractile dysfunction associated with ageing. Yet, the specific molecular mechanisms underlying abnormal Ca(2+) handling in ageing heart remain poorly understood. In this study, we used ventricular myocytes isolated from young (5-9 months) and old (4-6 years) rabbit hearts to test the hypothesis that changes in Ca(2+) homeostasis are caused by post-translational modification of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) by mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in the ageing heart. Changes in parameters of Ca(2+) handling were determined by measuring cytosolic and intra-sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) dynamics in intact and permeabilized ventricular myocytes using confocal microscopy. We also measured age-related changes in ROS production and mitochondria membrane potential using a ROS-sensitive dye and a mitochondrial voltage-sensitive fluorescent indicator, respectively. In permeablized myocytes, ageing did not change SERCA activity and spark frequency but decreased spark amplitude and SR Ca(2+) load suggesting increased RyR activity. Treatment with the antioxidant dithiothreitol reduced RyR-mediated SR Ca(2+) leak in permeabilized myocytes from old rabbit hearts to the level comparable to young. Moreover, myocytes from old rabbits had more depolarized mitochondria membrane potential and increased rate of ROS production. Under β-adrenergic stimulation, Ca(2+) transient amplitude, SR Ca(2+) load, and latency of pro-arrhythmic spontaneous Ca(2+) waves (SCWs) were decreased while RyR-mediated SR Ca(2+) leak was increased in cardiomyocytes from old rabbits. Additionally, with β-adrenergic stimulation, scavenging of mitochondrial ROS in myocytes from old rabbit hearts restored redox status of RyRs, which reduced SR Ca(2+) leak, ablated most

  4. K201 (JTV519) is a Ca2+-Dependent Blocker of SERCA and a Partial Agonist of Ryanodine Receptors in Striated Muscle.

    PubMed

    Darcy, Yuanzhao L; Diaz-Sylvester, Paula L; Copello, Julio A

    2016-08-01

    K201 (JTV-519) may prevent abnormal Ca(2+) leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in the ischemic heart and skeletal muscle (SkM) by stabilizing the ryanodine receptors (RyRs; RyR1 and RyR2, respectively). We tested direct modulation of the SR Ca(2+)-stimulated ATPase (SERCA) and RyRs by K201. In isolated cardiac and SkM SR microsomes, K201 slowed the rate of SR Ca(2+) loading, suggesting potential SERCA block and/or RyR agonism. K201 displayed Ca(2+)-dependent inhibition of SERCA-dependent ATPase activity, which was measured in microsomes incubated with 200, 2, and 0.25 µM Ca(2+) and with the half-maximal K201 inhibitory doses (IC50) estimated at 130, 19, and 9 µM (cardiac muscle) and 104, 13, and 5 µM (SkM SR). K201 (≥5 µM) increased RyR1-mediated Ca(2+) release from SkM microsomes. Maximal K201 doses at 80 µM produced ∼37% of the increase in SkM SR Ca(2+) release observed with the RyR agonist caffeine. K201 (≥5 µM) increased the open probability (Po) of very active ("high-activity") RyR1 of SkM reconstituted into bilayers, but it had no effect on "low-activity" channels. Likewise, K201 activated cardiac RyR2 under systolic Ca(2+) conditions (∼5 µM; channels at Po ∼0.3) but not under diastolic Ca(2+) conditions (∼100 nM; Po < 0.01). Thus, K201-induced the inhibition of SR Ca(2+) leak found in cell-system studies may relate to potentially potent SERCA block under resting Ca(2+) conditions. SERCA block likely produces mild SR depletion in normal conditions but could prevent SR Ca(2+) overload under pathologic conditions, thus precluding abnormal RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release. PMID:27235390

  5. Increased Ca2+ sensitivity of the ryanodine receptor mutant RyR2R4496C underlies catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Velasco, María; Rueda, Angélica; Rizzi, Nicoletta; Benitah, Jean-Pierre; Colombi, Barbara; Napolitano, Carlo; Priori, Silvia G; Richard, Sylvain; Gómez, Ana María

    2009-01-30

    Cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) mutations are associated with autosomal dominant catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, suggesting that alterations in Ca(2+) handling underlie this disease. Here we analyze the underlying Ca(2+) release defect that leads to arrhythmia in cardiomyocytes isolated from heterozygous knock-in mice carrying the RyR2(R4496C) mutation. RyR2(R4496C-/-) littermates (wild type) were used as controls. [Ca(2+)](i) transients were obtained by field stimulation in fluo-3-loaded cardiomyocytes and viewed using confocal microscopy. In our basal recording conditions (2-Hz stimulation rate), [Ca(2+)](i) transients and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) load were similar in wild-type and RyR2(R4496C) cells. However, paced RyR2(R4496C) ventricular myocytes presented abnormal Ca(2+) release during the diastolic period, viewed as Ca(2+) waves, consistent with the occurrence of delayed afterdepolarizations. The occurrence of this abnormal Ca(2+) release was enhanced at faster stimulation rates and by beta-adrenergic stimulation, which also induced triggered activity. Spontaneous Ca(2+) sparks were more frequent in RyR2(R4496C) myocytes, indicating increased RyR2(R4496C) activity. When permeabilized cells were exposed to different cytosolic [Ca(2+)](i), RyR2(R4496C) showed a dramatic increase in Ca(2+) sensitivity. Isoproterenol increased [Ca(2+)](i) transient amplitude and Ca(2+) spark frequency to the same extent in wild-type and RyR2(R4496C) cells, indicating that the beta-adrenergic sensitivity of RyR2(R4496C) cells remained unaltered. This effect was independent of protein expression variations because no difference was found in the total or phosphorylated RyR2 expression levels. In conclusion, the arrhythmogenic potential of the RyR2(R4496C) mutation is attributable to the increased Ca(2+) sensitivity of RyR2(R4496C), which induces diastolic Ca(2+) release and lowers the threshold for triggered activity. PMID:19096022

  6. Glucocorticoid receptor translational isoforms underlie maturational stage-specific glucocorticoid sensitivities of dendritic cells in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yun; Bender, Ingrid K; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K; Shin, Soon Cheon; Jewell, Christine M; Cidlowski, John A; Schleimer, Robert P; Lu, Nick Z

    2013-02-28

    Although glucocorticoids are a profoundly important class of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents, their actions in dendritic cells (DCs) are not well understood. We found that dexamethasone, a potent glucocorticoid, selectively induced apoptosis in mature, but not in immature, DCs in healthy mice, in mice with experimental airway inflammation, and in vitro in bone marrow–derived DCs. Distinct glucocorticoid receptor (GR) translational isoforms expressed in immature and mature DCs probably contribute to the DC maturational stage-specific glucocorticoid sensitivity. The GR-D isoforms were the predominant isoforms in immature DCs, whereas the proapoptotic GR-A isoform was the main isoform in mature DCs. Ectopic expression of the GR-A isoform in immature DCs increased glucocorticoid sensitivity and RU486, a selective GR antagonist, inhibited the glucocorticoid sensitivity of mature DCs. Furthermore, the distinct expression pattern of GR isoforms in immature and mature murine DCs was also observed in human monocyte–derived DCs. These studies suggest that glucocorticoids may spare immature DCs and suppress mature DCs and inflammation via differential expression of GR translational isoforms. PMID:23297131

  7. Glucocorticoid receptor translational isoforms underlie maturational stage-specific glucocorticoid sensitivities of dendritic cells in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yun; Bender, Ingrid K.; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K.; Shin, Soon Cheon; Jewell, Christine M.; Cidlowski, John A.; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Although glucocorticoids are a profoundly important class of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents, their actions in dendritic cells (DCs) are not well understood. We found that dexamethasone, a potent glucocorticoid, selectively induced apoptosis in mature, but not in immature, DCs in healthy mice, in mice with experimental airway inflammation, and in vitro in bone marrow–derived DCs. Distinct glucocorticoid receptor (GR) translational isoforms expressed in immature and mature DCs probably contribute to the DC maturational stage-specific glucocorticoid sensitivity. The GR-D isoforms were the predominant isoforms in immature DCs, whereas the proapoptotic GR-A isoform was the main isoform in mature DCs. Ectopic expression of the GR-A isoform in immature DCs increased glucocorticoid sensitivity and RU486, a selective GR antagonist, inhibited the glucocorticoid sensitivity of mature DCs. Furthermore, the distinct expression pattern of GR isoforms in immature and mature murine DCs was also observed in human monocyte–derived DCs. These studies suggest that glucocorticoids may spare immature DCs and suppress mature DCs and inflammation via differential expression of GR translational isoforms. PMID:23297131

  8. Alternative splicing in the fiddler crab cognate ecdysteroid receptor: variation in receptor isoform expression and DNA binding properties in response to hormone.

    PubMed

    Durica, David S; Das, Sunetra; Najar, Fares; Roe, Bruce; Phillips, Barret; Kappalli, Sudha; Anilkumar, Gopinathan

    2014-09-15

    RXR cDNA cloning from three Uca species led to the identification of 4 conserved isoforms, indicative of alternative splicing in the hinge and ligand binding domains (LBD). Sequencing of overlapping clones from a Ucapugilator genomic library identified EcR isoforms matching previously identified cDNA variants; in addition, a cryptic exon in the LBD was detected and evidence for expression of this new isoform was obtained from next-generation sequencing. RNA-seq analysis also identified a new amino terminal EcR variant. EcR and RXR transcript abundance increases throughout ovarian maturation in U. pugilator, while cognate receptor transcript abundance remains constant in a related Indo-Pacific species with a different reproductive strategy. To examine if crab RXR LBD isoforms have different physical properties in vitro, electromobility shift assays were performed with different EcR isoforms. The cognate crab and fruit fly receptors differ in their responses to hormone. Ecdysteroids did not increase DNA binding for the crab heterodimers, while ecdysteroids stimulate binding for Drosophilamelanogaster EcR/USP heterodimers. In swapping experiments, UpEcR/USP heterodimers did not show ligand-responsive differences in DNA binding; both crab RXR LBD isoforms, however, conferred ligand-responsive increases in DNA binding with DmEcRs. These data indicate that both UpRXR LBD isoforms can heterodimerize with the heterologous DmEcR receptors and promote ligand and DNA binding. Unresponsiveness of the cognate receptors to ecdysteroid, however, suggest additional factors may be required to mediate endogenous, perhaps isoform-specific, differences in EcR conformation, consistent with previously reported effects of UpRXR isoforms on UpEcR ligand-binding affinities. PMID:25025945

  9. Altered expression of progesterone receptor isoforms A and B in human eutopic endometrium in endometriosis patients.

    PubMed

    Wölfler, Monika Martina; Küppers, Mareike; Rath, Werner; Buck, Volker Uwe; Meinhold-Heerlein, Ivo; Classen-Linke, Irmgard

    2016-07-01

    Recent data implicate an altered expression of progesterone receptor isoform A (PR-A) and B (PR-B) in the endometrium of endometriosis patients. This prospective exploratory study aimed to precisely determine the PR-A and PR-B expression using immunohistochemical techniques in eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis compared with disease-free women throughout the menstrual cycle. All symptomatic patients underwent laparoscopy for the diagnosis of endometriosis and histological confirmation of the disease (EO) whereas controls were proven disease-free (CO). In CO samples (n=10) an increased expression of PR-A and PR-B during the proliferative to early secretory phase and a decreased expression of both receptor isoforms during the mid to late secretory phase was ascertained in accordance with previous studies. In patients with endometriosis (n=16) no cycle dependent pattern of PR-A and PR-B expression was identified in contrast to patients without endometriosis. Moreover, in EO samples a huge variety of inter- and intra-individual differences in PR-A and PR-B expression were detected. These data provide further evidence that dysregulation of the PR-A and PR-B expression might contribute to the pathophysiology of endometriosis. PMID:27050108

  10. Steroid Receptor Isoform Expression in Drosophila Nociceptor Neurons Is Required for Normal Dendritic Arbor and Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    McParland, Aidan L.; Follansbee, Taylor L.; Vesenka, Gwendolyn D.; Panaitiu, Alexandra E.; Ganter, Geoffrey K.

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormones organize many aspects of development, including that of the nervous system. Steroids also play neuromodulatory and other activational roles, including regulation of sensitivity to painful stimuli in mammals. In Drosophila, ecdysteroids are the only steroid hormones, and therefore the fly represents a simplified model system in which to explore mechanisms of steroid neuromodulation of nociception. In this report, we present evidence that ecdysteroids, acting through two isoforms of their nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR), modulate sensitivity to noxious thermal and mechanical stimuli in the fly larva. We show that EcRA and EcRB1 are expressed by third instar larvae in the primary nociceptor neurons, known as the class IV multidendritic neurons. Suppression of EcRA by RNA interference in these cells leads to hyposensitivity to noxious stimulation. Suppression of EcRB1 leads to reduction of dendritic branching and length of nociceptor neurons. We show that specific isoforms of the ecdysone receptor play critical cell autonomous roles in modulating the sensitivity of nociceptor neurons and may indicate human orthologs that represent targets for novel analgesic drugs. PMID:26495837

  11. Pinpointing retrovirus entry sites in cells expressing alternatively spliced receptor isoforms by single virus imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of viruses enter host cells via endocytosis. Current knowledge of viral entry pathways is largely based upon infectivity measurements following genetic and/or pharmacological interventions that disrupt vesicular trafficking and maturation. Imaging of single virus entry in living cells provides a powerful means to delineate viral trafficking pathways and entry sites under physiological conditions. Results Here, we visualized single avian retrovirus co-trafficking with markers for early (Rab5) and late (Rab7) endosomes, acidification of endosomal lumen and the resulting viral fusion measured by the viral content release into the cytoplasm. Virus-carrying vesicles either merged with the existing Rab5-positive early endosomes or slowly accumulated Rab5. The Rab5 recruitment to virus-carrying endosomes correlated with acidification of their lumen. Viral fusion occurred either in early (Rab5-positive) or intermediate (Rab5- and Rab7-positive) compartments. Interestingly, different isoforms of the cognate receptor directed virus entry from distinct endosomes. In cells expressing the transmembrane receptor, viruses preferentially entered and fused with slowly maturing early endosomes prior to accumulation of Rab7. By comparison, in cells expressing the GPI-anchored receptor, viruses entered both slowly and quickly maturing endosomes and fused with early (Rab5-positive) and intermediate (Rab5- and Rab7-positive) compartments. Conclusions Since the rate of low pH-triggered fusion was independent of the receptor isoform, we concluded that the sites of virus entry are determined by the kinetic competition between endosome maturation and viral fusion. Our findings demonstrate the ability of this retrovirus to enter cells via alternative endocytic pathways and establish infection by releasing its content from distinct endosomal compartments. PMID:24935247

  12. Cell-free protein synthesis and purification of human dopamine D2 receptor long isoform.

    PubMed

    Basu, Dipannita; Castellano, Jessica M; Thomas, Nancy; Mishra, Ram K

    2013-01-01

    The human dopamine D2 receptor long isoform (D2L) has significant implications in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders such as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia. Detailed structural knowledge of this receptor is limited owing to its highly hydrophobic nature, which leads to protein aggregation and host toxicity when expressed in cellular systems. The newly emerging field of cell-free protein expression presents numerous advantages to overcome these challenges. This system utilizes protein synthesis machinery and exogenous DNA to synthesize functional proteins outside of intact cells. This study utilizes two different cell-free systems for the synthesis of human dopamine D2L receptor. These include the Escherichia coli lysate-based system and the wheat-germ lysate-based system. The bacterial cell-free method used pET 100/D-TOPO vector to synthesize hexa-histidine-tagged D2L receptor using a dialysis bag system; the resulting protein was purified using nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity resin. The wheat germ system used pEU-glutathione-S-transferase (GST) vector to synthesize GST-tagged D2L receptor using a bilayer translation method; the resulting protein was purified using a GST affinity resin. The presence and binding capacity of the synthesized D2L receptor was confirmed by immunoblotting and radioligand competition assays, respectively. Additionally, in-gel protein sequencing via Nano LC-MS/MS was used to confirm protein synthesis via the wheat germ system. The results showed both systems to synthesize microgram quantities of the receptor. Improved expression of this highly challenging protein can improve research and understanding of the human dopamine D2L receptor. PMID:23424095

  13. [Isoforms of the human histamine H3 receptor: Generation, expression in the central nervous system and functional implications].

    PubMed

    García-Gálvez, Ana Maricela; Arias-Montaño, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Histamine plays a significant role as a neuromodulator in the human central nervous system. Histamine-releasing neurons are exclusively located in the tuberomammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus, project to all major areas of the brain, and participate in functions such as the regulation of sleep/wakefulness, locomotor activity, feeding and drinking, analgesia, learning, and memory. The functional effects of histamine are exerted through the activation of four G protein-coupled receptors (H1, H2, H3 and H4), and in the central nervous system the first three receptors are widely expressed. The H3 receptor (H3R) is found exclusively in neuronal cells, where it functions as auto- and hetero-receptor. One remarkable characteristic of the H3R is the existence of isoforms, generated by alternative splicing of the messenger RNA. For the human H3R, 20 isoforms have been reported; although a significant number lack those regions required for agonist binding or receptor signaling, at least five isoforms appear functional upon heterologous expression. In this work we review the evidence for the generation of human H3R isoforms, their expression, and the available information regarding the functionality of such receptors. PMID:26927649

  14. Purification and characterization of ryanotoxin, a peptide with actions similar to those of ryanodine.

    PubMed Central

    Morrissette, J; Beurg, M; Sukhareva, M; Coronado, R

    1996-01-01

    We purified and characterized ryanotoxin, an approximately 11.4-kDa peptide from the venom of the scorpion Buthotus judiacus that induces changes in ryanodine receptors of rabbit skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum analogous to those induced by the alkaloid ryanodine. Ryanotoxin stimulated Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles and induced a state of reduce unit conductance with a mean duration longer than that of unmodified ryanodine receptor channels. With Cs+ as the current carrier, the slope conductance of the state induced by 1 microM ryanotoxin was 163 +/- 12 pS, that of the state induced by 1 microM ryanodine was 173 +/- 26 pS, and that of control channels was 2.3-fold larger (396 +/- 25 pS). The distribution of substate events induced by 1 microM RyTx was biexponential and was fitted with time constants approximately 10 times shorter than those fitted to the distribution of substates induced by 1 microM ryanodine. Bath-applied 5 microM ryanotoxin had no effect on the excitability of mouse myotubes in culture. When 5 microM ryanotoxin was dialyzed into the cell through the patch pipette in the whole-cell configuration, there was a voltage-dependent increase in the amplitude of intracellular Ca2+ transients elicited by depolarizing potentials in the range of -30 to +50 mV. Ryanotoxin increased the binding affinity of [3H]ryanodine in a reversible manner with a 50% effective dose (ED50) of 0.16 microM without altering the maximum number (Bmax) of [3H]ryanodine-binding sites. This result suggested that binding sites for ryanotoxin and ryanodine were different. Ryanotoxin should prove useful in identifying domains coupling the ryanodine receptor to the voltage sensor, or domains affecting the gating and conductance of the ryanodine receptor channel. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 11 PMID:8842209

  15. Aberrant Liver Insulin Receptor Isoform A Expression Normalises with Remission of Type 2 Diabetes after Gastric Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Besic, Vinko; Shi, Hongjun; Stubbs, Richard S.; Hayes, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) results from a combination of progressive insulin resistance and loss of pancreatic beta cell function and/or mass. Insulin signalling occurs through the insulin receptor, (INSR) which is alternatively spliced into two isoforms: INSRA (-exon 11) and INSRB (+exon 11). Because the INSR isoforms have different functional characteristics, their relative expression ratio has been implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and T2DM. We studied levels of INSR isoform mRNA in liver samples taken from 46 individuals with or without T2DM at Roux-en-Y (RYGB) surgery, and on average 17 (± 5.6) months later in 16 of the same individuals (8 diabetic and non-diabetic patients). INSRA or INSRB was also overexpressed in HepG2 cells to ascertain their effect on AKT phosphorylation and PCK1 expression as markers of insulin-mediated metabolic signalling. We found the INSRB:A isoform ratio was reduced in individuals with T2DM in comparison to those with normal glucose tolerance and normalised with remission of diabetes. The INSRB:A ratio increased due to a reduction in the alternatively spliced INSRA isoform following remission of diabetes. Overexpressing INSRA isoform in HepG2 hepatoma cells reduced inhibition of PCK1 transcription and did not increase AKT phosphorylation in response to insulin load compared to the effect of overexpressing the B isoform. Data presented here revitalizes the role of the INSR isoforms in the pathogenesis of T2DM, and suggests that an abrogated INSRB:A ratio that favours the INSRA isoform may negatively impact insulin-mediated metabolic signalling. PMID:25742416

  16. Identification of novel chicken estrogen receptor-alpha messenger ribonucleic acid isoforms generated by alternative splicing and promoter usage.

    PubMed

    Griffin, C; Flouriot, G; Sonntag-Buck, V; Nestor, P; Gannon, F

    1998-11-01

    Using the rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends (RACE) methodology we have identified three new chicken estrogen receptor-alpha (cER alpha) messenger RNA (mRNA) variants in addition to the previously described form (isoform A). Whereas one of the new variants (isoform B) presents a 5'-extremity contiguous to the 5'-end of isoform A, the two other forms (isoforms C and D) are generated by alternative splicing of upstream exons (C and D) to a common site situated 70 nucleotides upstream of the translation start site in the previously assigned exon 1 (A). The 3'-end of exon 1C has been located at position -1334 upstream of the transcription start site of the A isoform (+1). Whereas the genomic location of exon 1D is unknown, 700 bp 5' to this exon were isolated by genomic walking, and their sequence was determined. The transcription start sites of the cER alpha mRNA isoforms were defined. In transfection experiments, the regions immediately upstream of the A-D cER alpha mRNA isoforms were shown to possess cell-specific promoter activities. Three of these promoters were down-regulated in the presence of estradiol and ER alpha protein. It is concluded, therefore, that the expression of the four different cER alpha mRNA isoforms is under the control of four different promoters. Finally, RT-PCR, S1 nuclease mapping, and primer extension analysis of these different cER alpha mRNA isoforms revealed a differential pattern of expression of the cER alpha gene in chicken tissues. Together, the results suggest that alternative 5'-splicing and promoter usage may be mechanisms used to modulate the levels of expression of the chicken ER alpha gene in a tissue-specific and/or developmental stage-specific manner. PMID:9794473

  17. Distinct Transcript Isoforms of the Atypical Chemokine Receptor 1 (ACKR1) / Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) Gene Are Expressed in Lymphoblasts and Altered Isoform Levels Are Associated with Genetic Ancestry and the Duffy-Null Allele

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Melissa B.; Walens, Andrea; Hire, Rupali; Mumin, Kauthar; Brown, Andrea M.; Ford, DeJuana; Howerth, Elizabeth W.; Monteil, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The Atypical ChemoKine Receptor 1 (ACKR1) gene, better known as Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC or Duffy), is responsible for the Duffy Blood Group and plays a major role in regulating the circulating homeostatic levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines. Previous studies have shown that one common variant, the Duffy Null (Fy-) allele that is specific to African Ancestry groups, completely removes expression of the gene on erythrocytes; however, these individuals retain endothelial expression. Additional alleles are associated with a myriad of clinical outcomes related to immune responses and inflammation. In addition to allele variants, there are two distinct transcript isoforms of DARC which are expressed from separate promoters, and very little is known about the distinct transcriptional regulation or the distinct functionality of these protein isoforms. Our objective was to determine if the African specific Fy- allele alters the expression pattern of DARC isoforms and therefore could potentially result in a unique signature of the gene products, commonly referred to as antigens. Our work is the first to establish that there is expression of DARC on lymphoblasts. Our data indicates that people of African ancestry have distinct relative levels of DARC isoforms expressed in these cells. We conclude that the expression of both isoforms in combination with alternate alleles yields multiple Duffy antigens in ancestry groups, depending upon the haplotypes across the gene. Importantly, we hypothesize that DARC isoform expression patterns will translate into ancestry-specific inflammatory responses that are correlated with the axis of pro-inflammatory chemokine levels and distinct isoform-specific interactions with these chemokines. Ultimately, this work will increase knowledge of biological mechanisms underlying disparate clinical outcomes of inflammatory-related diseases among ethnic and geographic ancestry groups. PMID:26473357

  18. Differential function and regulation of orphan nuclear receptor TR3 isoforms in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; Cui, Pengfei; Zhao, Shengqiang; Ye, Taiyang; Li, Yan; Peng, Jin; Niu, Gengming; Zhao, Dezheng

    2016-01-01

    TR3 has been reported to be an excellent target for angiogenesis therapies. We reported three TR3 transcript variant messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and are differentially regulated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). TR3 transcript variant 1 (TR3-TV1) and variant 2 (TR3-TV2) encoding the same TR3 isoform 1 protein (TR3-iso1) that was named TR3 has been extensively studied. However, the function of TR3 isoform 2 protein (TR3-iso2) encoded by TR3 transcript variant 3 (TR3-TV3) is still not known. Here, we clone and express the novel TR3-iso2 protein and find that expression of TR3-iso2, in contrast to TR3-iso1, inhibits en-dothelial cell proliferation induced by VEGF-A, histamine, and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). The differential function of TR3-iso2 correlates with the down-regulation of cyclin D1. However, TR3-iso2 plays similar roles in endothelial cell migration and monolayer permeability as TR3-iso1. We further demonstrate that several intracellular signaling pathways are involved in histamine-induced TR3 transcript variants, including histamine receptor H1-mediated phospholipase C (PLC)/calcium/calcineurin/protein kinase C (PKC)/ protein kinase D (PKD) pathway and ERK pathway, as well as histamine receptor H3-mediated PKC-ERK pathway. Further, expressions of TR3-TV1, TR3-TV2, and TR3-TV3 by VEGF and histamine are regulated by different promoters, but not by their mRNA stability. PMID:26440050

  19. INTERACTION OF PAH-RELATED COMPOUNDS WITH THE ALPHA AND BETA ISOFORMS OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR. (R826192)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of several 4- and 5-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic PAHs, and their monohydroxy derivatives to interact with the estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta isoforms was examined. Only compounds possessing a hydroxyl group were able to compete wit...

  20. Epimorphin is a novel regulator of the progesterone receptor isoform-a.

    PubMed

    Bascom, Jamie L; Radisky, Derek C; Koh, Eileen; Fata, Jimmie E; Lo, Alvin; Mori, Hidetoshi; Roosta, Neda; Hirai, Yohei; Bissell, Mina J

    2013-09-15

    Epimorphin/syntaxin-2 is a membrane-tethered protein localized extracellularly (Epim) and intracellularly (Stx-2). The extracellular form Epim stimulates morphogenic processes in a range of tissues, including in murine mammary glands where its overexpression in luminal epithelial cells is sufficient to drive hyperplasia and neoplasia. We analyzed WAP-Epim transgenic mice to gain insight into how Epim promotes malignancy. Ectopic overexpression of Epim during postnatal mammary gland development led to early side-branching onset, precocious bud formation, and increased proliferation of mammary epithelial cells. Conversely, peptide-based inhibition of Epim function reduced side branching. Because increased side branching and hyperplasia occurs similarly in mice upon overexpression of the progesterone receptor isoform-a (Pgr-a), we investigated whether Epim exhibits these phenotypes through Pgr modulation. Epim overexpression indeed led to a steep upregulation of both total Pgr mRNA and Pgr-a protein levels. Notably, the Pgr antagonist RU486 abrogated Epim-induced ductal side branching, mammary epithelial cell proliferation, and bud formation. Evaluation of Epim signaling in a three-dimensional ex vivo culture system showed that its action was dependent on binding to its extracellular receptor, integrin-αV, and on matrix metalloproteinase 3 activity downstream of Pgr-a. These findings elucidate a hitherto unknown transcriptional regulator of Pgr-a, and shed light on how overexpression of Epim leads to malignancy. PMID:23867473

  1. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Alternatively Spliced Isoform Negatively Regulates TLR9 Signaling in Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nai-Yu; Nagarajan, Govindarajulu; Chiou, Pinwen Peter

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes and binds unmethylated CpG motifs in DNA, which are found in the genomes of bacteria and DNA viruses. In fish, Tlr9 is highly diverse, with the number of introns ranging from 0 to 4. A fish Tlr9 gene containing two introns has been reported to express two alternatively spliced isoforms, namely gTLR9A (full-length) and gTLR9B (with a truncated Cʹ-terminal signal transducing domain), whose regulation and function remain unclear. Here, we report a unique regulatory mechanism of gTLR9 signaling in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides), whose gTlr9 sequence also contains two introns. We demonstrated that the grouper gTlr9 gene indeed has the capacity to produce two gTLR9 isoforms via alternative RNA splicing. We found that gTLR9B could function as a negative regulator to suppress gTLR9 signaling as demonstrated by the suppression of downstream gene expression. Following stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), gTLR9A and gTLR9B were observed to translocate into endosomes and co-localize with ODN and the adaptor protein gMyD88. Both gTLR9A and gTLR9B could interact with gMyD88; however, gTLR9B could not interact with downstream IRAK4 and TRAF6. Further analysis of the expression profile of gTlr9A and gTlr9B upon immune-stimulation revealed that the two isoforms were differentially regulated in a time-dependent manner. Overall, these data suggest that fish TLR9B functions as a negative regulator, and that its temporal expression is mediated by alternative RNA splicing. This has not been observed in mammalian TLR9s and might have been acquired relatively recently in the evolution of fish. PMID:25955250

  2. B cell receptor-mediated apoptosis of human lymphocytes is associated with a new regulatory pathway of Bim isoform expression.

    PubMed

    Mouhamad, Shahul; Besnault, Laurence; Auffredou, Marie Thérèse; Leprince, Corinne; Bourgeade, Marie Françoise; Leca, Gérald; Vazquez, Aimé

    2004-02-15

    Studies in Bim-deficient mice have shown that the proapoptotic molecule Bim plays a key role in the control of B cell homeostasis and activation. However, the role of Bim in human B lymphocyte apoptosis is unknown. We show in this study that, depending on the degree of cross-linking, B cell receptors can mediate both Bim-dependent and apparent Bim-independent apoptotic pathways. Cross-linked anti-mu Ab-mediated activation induces an original pathway governing the expression of the various Bim isoforms. This new pathway involves the following three sequential steps: 1) extracellular signal-regulated kinase-dependent phosphorylation of the BimEL isoform, which is produced in large amounts in healthy B cells; 2) proteasome-mediated degradation of phosphorylated BimEL; and 3) increased expression of the shorter apoptotic isoforms BimL and BimS. PMID:14764673

  3. Expression of the alpha 1, alpha 2 and alpha 3 isoforms of the GABAA receptor in human alcoholic brain.

    PubMed

    Lewohl, J M; Crane, D I; Dodd, P R

    1997-03-14

    The expression of the alpha 1, alpha 2 and alpha 3 isoforms of the GABAA receptor was studied in the superior frontal and motor cortices of 10 control, 10 uncomplicated alcoholic and 7 cirrhotic alcoholic cases matched for age and post-mortem delay. The assay was based on competitive RT/PCR using a single set of primers specific to the alpha class of isoform mRNA species, and was normalized against a synthetic cRNA internal standard. The assay was shown to be quantitative for all three isoform mRNA species. Neither the patient's age nor the post-mortem interval significantly affected the expression of any isoform in either cortical area. The profile of expression was shown to be significantly different between the case groups, particularly because alpha 1 expression was raised in both groups of alcoholics of controls. The two groups of alcoholics could be differentiated on the basis of regional variations in alpha 1 expression. In frontal cortex, alpha 1 mRNA expression was significantly increased when uncomplicated alcoholics were compared with control cases whereas alcoholic-cirrhotic cases were not significantly different from either controls or uncomplicated alcoholic cases. In the motor cortex, alpha 1 expression was elevated only when alcoholic-cirrhotic cases were compared with control cases. There was no significant difference between case groups or areas for any other isoform. PMID:9098573

  4. Cigarette Smoke and the Induction of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor In Vivo: Selective Contribution of Isoforms to Bronchial Epithelial Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Portelli, Michael A; Stewart, Ceri E; Hall, Ian P; Brightling, Christopher E; Sayers, Ian

    2015-08-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) gene (PLAUR) has been identified as an asthma susceptibility gene, with polymorphisms within that gene being associated with baseline lung function, lung function decline, and lung function in a smoking population. Soluble cleaved uPAR (scuPAR), a molecule identified as a marker of increased morbidity and mortality in a number of diseases, has been shown to be elevated in the airways of patients with asthma and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the functionality of soluble receptor isoforms and their relationship with an important initiator for obstructive lung disease, cigarette smoke, remains undefined. In this study, we set out to determine the effect of cigarette smoke on soluble uPAR isoforms, its regulatory pathway and the resultant effect on bronchial epithelial cell function. We identified a positive association between cigarette pack-years and uPAR expression in the airway bronchial epithelium of biopsies from patients with asthma (n = 27; P = 0.0485). In vitro, cigarette smoke promoted cleavage of uPAR from the surface of bronchial epithelial cells (1.5× induction; P < 0.0001) and induced the soluble spliced isoform through changes in messenger RNA expression (∼2× change; P < 0.001), driven by loss of endogenous 3' untranslated region suppression. Elevated expression of the soluble isoforms resulted in a proremodeling cell phenotype, characterized by increased proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in primary bronchial epithelial cells. This suggests that cigarette smoke elevates soluble receptor isoforms in bronchial epithelial cells through direct (cleavage) and indirect (messenger RNA expression) means. These findings provide further insight into how cigarette smoke may influence changes in the airways of importance to airway remodeling and obstructive lung disease progression. PMID:25490122

  5. Ulipristal Acetate Inhibits Progesterone Receptor Isoform A-Mediated Human Breast Cancer Proliferation and BCl2-L1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Esber, Nathalie; Le Billan, Florian; Resche-Rigon, Michèle; Loosfelt, Hugues; Lombès, Marc; Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The progesterone receptor (PR) with its isoforms and ligands are involved in breast tumorigenesis and prognosis. We aimed at analyzing the respective contribution of PR isoforms, PRA and PRB, in breast cancer cell proliferation in a new estrogen-independent cell based-model, allowing independent PR isoforms analysis. We used the bi-inducible human breast cancer cell system MDA-iPRAB. We studied the effects and molecular mechanisms of action of progesterone (P4) and ulipristal acetate (UPA), a new selective progesterone receptor modulator, alone or in combination. P4 significantly stimulated MDA-iPRA expressing cells proliferation. This was associated with P4-stimulated expression of the anti-apoptotic factor BCL2-L1 and enhanced recruitment of PRA, SRC-1 and RNA Pol II onto the +58 kb PR binding motif of the BCL2-L1 gene. UPA decreased cell proliferation and repressed BCL2-L1 expression in the presence of PRA, correlating with PRA and SRC1 but not RNA Pol II recruitment. These results bring new information on the mechanism of action of PR ligands in controlling breast cancer cell proliferation through PRA in an estrogen independent model. Evaluation of PR isoforms ratio, as well as molecular signature studies based on PRA target genes could be proposed to facilitate personalized breast cancer therapy. In this context, UPA could be of interest in endocrine therapy. Further confirmation in the clinical setting is required. PMID:26474308

  6. Ulipristal Acetate Inhibits Progesterone Receptor Isoform A-Mediated Human Breast Cancer Proliferation and BCl2-L1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Esber, Nathalie; Le Billan, Florian; Resche-Rigon, Michèle; Loosfelt, Hugues; Lombès, Marc; Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The progesterone receptor (PR) with its isoforms and ligands are involved in breast tumorigenesis and prognosis. We aimed at analyzing the respective contribution of PR isoforms, PRA and PRB, in breast cancer cell proliferation in a new estrogen-independent cell based-model, allowing independent PR isoforms analysis. We used the bi-inducible human breast cancer cell system MDA-iPRAB. We studied the effects and molecular mechanisms of action of progesterone (P4) and ulipristal acetate (UPA), a new selective progesterone receptor modulator, alone or in combination. P4 significantly stimulated MDA-iPRA expressing cells proliferation. This was associated with P4-stimulated expression of the anti-apoptotic factor BCL2-L1 and enhanced recruitment of PRA, SRC-1 and RNA Pol II onto the +58 kb PR binding motif of the BCL2-L1 gene. UPA decreased cell proliferation and repressed BCL2-L1 expression in the presence of PRA, correlating with PRA and SRC1 but not RNA Pol II recruitment. These results bring new information on the mechanism of action of PR ligands in controlling breast cancer cell proliferation through PRA in an estrogen independent model. Evaluation of PR isoforms ratio, as well as molecular signature studies based on PRA target genes could be proposed to facilitate personalized breast cancer therapy. In this context, UPA could be of interest in endocrine therapy. Further confirmation in the clinical setting is required. PMID:26474308

  7. Expression and reconstitution of the bioluminescent Ca(2+) reporter aequorin in human embryonic stem cells, and exploration of the presence of functional IP3 and ryanodine receptors during the early stages of their differentiation into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Harvey Y S; Cheung, Man Chun; Gao, Yi; Miller, Andrew L; Webb, Sarah E

    2016-08-01

    In order to develop a novel method of visualizing possible Ca(2+) signaling during the early differentiation of hESCs into cardiomyocytes and avoid some of the inherent problems associated with using fluorescent reporters, we expressed the bioluminescent Ca(2+) reporter, apo-aequorin, in HES2 cells and then reconstituted active holo-aequorin by incubation with f-coelenterazine. The temporal nature of the Ca(2+) signals generated by the holo-f-aequorin-expressing HES2 cells during the earliest stages of differentiation into cardiomyocytes was then investigated. Our data show that no endogenous Ca(2+) transients (generated by release from intracellular stores) were detected in 1-12-day-old cardiospheres but transients were generated in cardiospheres following stimulation with KCl or CaCl2, indicating that holo-f-aequorin was functional in these cells. Furthermore, following the addition of exogenous ATP, an inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) agonist, small Ca(2+) transients were generated from day 1 onward. That ATP was inducing Ca(2+) release from functional IP3Rs was demonstrated by treatment with 2-APB, a known IP3R antagonist. In contrast, following treatment with caffeine, a ryanodine receptor (RyR) agonist, a minimal Ca(2+) response was observed at day 8 of differentiation only. Thus, our data indicate that unlike RyRs, IP3Rs are present and continually functional at these early stages of cardiomyocyte differentiation. PMID:27430888

  8. Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer cell migration through interaction with focal adhesion kinase complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bellance, Catherine; Khan, Junaid A.; Meduri, Geri; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Lombès, Marc; Loosfelt, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) and progestins affect mammary tumorigenesis; however, the relative contributions of PR isoforms A and B (PRA and PRB, respectively) in cancer cell migration remains elusive. By using a bi-inducible MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing PRA and/or PRB, we analyzed the effect of conditional PR isoform expression. Surprisingly, unliganded PRB but not PRA strongly enhanced cell migration as compared with PR(–) cells. 17,21-Dimethyl-19-norpregna-4,9-dien-3,20-dione (R5020) progestin limited this effect and was counteracted by the antagonist 11β-(4-dimethyl­amino)­phenyl-17β-hydroxy-17-(1-propynyl)­estra-4,9-dien-3-one (RU486). Of importance, PRA coexpression potentiated PRB-mediated migration, whereas PRA alone was ineffective. PR isoforms differentially regulated expressions of major players of cell migration, such as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, uPA receptor (uPAR), and β1-integrin, which affect focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Moreover, unliganded PRB but not PRA enhanced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and colocalized with activated FAK in cell protrusions. Because PRB, as well as PRA, coimmunoprecipitated with FAK, both isoforms can interact with FAK complexes, depending on their respective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In addition, FAK degradation was coupled to R5020-dependent turnovers of PRA and PRB. Such an effect of PRB/PRA expression on FAK signaling might thus affect adhesion/motility, underscoring the implication of PR isoforms in breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic evolution with underlying therapeutic outcomes. PMID:23485561

  9. Estradiol differentially induces progesterone receptor isoforms expression through alternative promoter regulation in a mouse embryonic hypothalamic cell line.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Martínez, Edgar Ricardo; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Zarain-Herzberg, Angel; Rodríguez, María Carmen; Mendoza-Garcés, Luciano; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Cerbón, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) presents two main isoforms (PR-A and PR-B) that are regulated by two specific promoters and transcribed from alternative transcriptional start sites. The molecular regulation of PR isoforms expression in embryonic hypothalamus is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to assess estradiol regulation of PR isoforms in a mouse embryonic hypothalamic cell line (mHypoE-N42), as well as the transcriptional status of their promoters. MHypoE-N42 cells were treated with estradiol for 6 and 12 h. Then, Western blot, real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and chromatin and DNA immunoprecipitation experiments were performed. PR-B expression was transiently induced by estradiol after 6 h of treatment in an estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-dependent manner. This induction was associated with an increase in ERα phosphorylation (serine 118) and its recruitment to PR-B promoter. After 12 h of estradiol exposure, a downregulation of this PR isoform was associated with a decrease of specific protein 1, histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation, and RNA polymerase II occupancy on PR-B promoter, without changes in DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation. In contrast, there were no estradiol-dependent changes in PR-A expression that could be related with the epigenetic marks or the transcription factors evaluated. We demonstrate that PR isoforms are differentially regulated by estradiol and that the induction of PR-B expression is associated to specific transcription factors interactions and epigenetic changes in its promoter in embryonic hypothalamic cells. PMID:26676302

  10. Positioning of the α-subunit isoforms confers a functional signature to γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors

    PubMed Central

    Minier, Frédéric; Sigel, Erwin

    2004-01-01

    Fast synaptic inhibitory transmission in the CNS is mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors. They belong to the ligand-gated ion channel receptor superfamily, and are constituted of five subunits surrounding a chloride channel. Their clinical interest is highlighted by the number of therapeutic drugs that act on them. It is well established that the subunit composition of a receptor subtype determines its pharmacological properties. We have investigated positional effects of two different α-subunit isoforms, α1 and α6, in a single pentamer. For this purpose, we used concatenated subunit receptors in which subunit arrangement is predefined. The resulting receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and analyzed by using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Thus, we have characterized γ2β2α1β2α1, γ2β2α6β2α6, γ2β2α1β2α6, and γ2β2α6β2α1 GABAA receptors. We investigated their response to the agonist GABA, to the partial agonist piperidine-4-sulfonic acid, to the noncompetitive inhibitor furosemide and to the positive allosteric modulator diazepam. Each receptor isoform is characterized by a specific set of properties. In this case, subunit positioning provides a functional signature to the receptor. We furthermore show that a single α6-subunit is sufficient to confer high furosemide sensitivity, and that the diazepam efficacy is determined exclusively by the α-subunit neighboring the γ2-subunit. By using this diagnostic tool, it should become possible to determine the subunit arrangement of receptors expressed in vivo that contain α1- and α6-subunits. This method may also be applied to the study of other ion channels. PMID:15136735

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of progesterone receptor-promoter interactions reveals a molecular model for isoform-specific function.

    PubMed

    Connaghan-Jones, Keith D; Heneghan, Aaron F; Miura, Michael T; Bain, David L

    2007-02-13

    Human progesterone receptors (PR) exist as two functionally distinct isoforms, PR-A and PR-B. The proteins are identical except for an additional 164 residues located at the N terminus of PR-B. To determine the mechanisms responsible for isoform-specific functional differences, we present here a thermodynamic dissection of PR-A-promoter interactions and compare the results to our previous work on PR-B. This analysis has generated a number of results inconsistent with the traditional, biochemically based model of receptor function. Specifically, statistical models invoking preformed PR-A dimers as the active binding species demonstrate that intrinsic binding energetics are over an order of magnitude greater than is apparent. High-affinity binding is opposed, however, by a large energetic penalty. The consequences of this penalty are 2-fold: Successive monomer binding to a palindromic response element is thermodynamically favored over preformed dimer binding, and DNA-induced dimerization of the monomers is largely abolished. Furthermore, PR-A binding to multiple PREs is only weakly cooperative, as judged by a 5-fold increase in overall stability. Comparison of these results to our work on PR-B demonstrates that whereas both isoforms appear to have similar DNA binding affinities, PR-B in fact has a greatly increased intrinsic binding affinity and cooperative binding ability relative to PR-A. These differences thus suggest that residues unique to PR-B allosterically regulate the energetics of cooperative promoter assembly. From a functional perspective, the differences in microscopic affinities predict receptor-promoter occupancies that accurately correlate with the transcriptional activation profiles seen for each isoform. PMID:17277083

  12. Hypertrophy of lymphoid organs is a possible phenotypic characteristic of R420W mutation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor gene: a study using a knock-in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Hajime; Okudaira, Noriyuki; Matsushita, Kazufumi; Yoshimoto, Tomohiro; Sato, Takako; Suzuki, Koichi

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac ryanodine receptor gene (RyR2) mutations sometimes result in sudden cardiac death due to fatal arrhythmias. N-terminal R420W mutation of RyR2 is known to show similar phenotypes to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and to cause juvenile sudden death. We previously reported two sudden death cases with the same R420W mutation. Interestingly, the cases showed hypertrophy of lymphoid organs such as the thymus and mesenteric lymph nodes. The present study examined whether R420W mutation of RYR2 causes hypertrophy of lymphoid organs by generating a mouse model carrying the mutation. Homozygous (RyR2(R420W/R420W)) mice showed significant increases in thymus and spleen weights but not in kidney, heart, and brain weights compared with wild-type mice. The mice also showed remarkable hypertrophy of mesenteric lymph nodes. Immunohistochemical study revealed that RyR2 protein was prominently expressed in epithelial cells of the thymic medulla in the thymus. These findings show that mice with R420W mutation of RyR2 exhibit hypertrophy of lymphoid organs. Sudden unexplained death cases with the mutation may display such findings at autopsy. PMID:25087098

  13. Immunohistochemical analysis of aldehyde dehydrogenase isoforms and their association with estrogen-receptor status and disease progression in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Opdenaker, Lynn M; Arnold, Kimberly M; Pohlig, Ryan T; Padmanabhan, Jayasree S; Flynn, Daniel C; Sims-Mourtada, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    In many types of tumors, especially breast tumors, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity has been used to identify cancer stem-like cells within the tumor. The presence and quantity of these cells are believed to predict the response of tumors to chemotherapy. Therefore, identification and eradication of these cells would be necessary to cure the patient. However, there are 19 different ALDH isoforms that could contribute to the enzyme activity. ALDH1A1 and ALDH1A3 are among the isoforms mostly responsible for the increased ALDH activity observed in these stem-like cells, although the main isoforms vary in different tissues and tumor types. In the study reported here, we attempted to determine if ALDH1A1 or ALDH1A3, specifically, correlate with tumor stage, grade, and hormone-receptor status in breast-cancer patients. While there was no significant correlation between ALDH1A1 and any of the parameters tested, we were able to identify a positive correlation between ALDH1A3 and tumor stage in triple-negative cancers. In addition, ALDH1A3 was negatively correlated with estrogen-receptor status. Our data suggest that ALDH1A3 could be utilized as a marker to identify stem-like cells within triple-negative tumors. PMID:25540596

  14. Cellular localization and changes in expression of prolactin receptor isoforms in sheep ovary throughout the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Picazo, R A; García Ruiz, J P; Santiago Moreno, J; González de Bulnes, A; Muñoz, J; Silván, G; Lorenzo, P L; Illera, J C

    2004-11-01

    The actions of prolactin (PRL) on target cells depend on the type of prolactin receptor (PRLr) predominantly expressed, particularly whether the long PRLr isoform is expressed. The aims of this study were to determine the cellular localization and the changes in expression of long and short PRLr isoforms in sheep ovary throughout the estrous cycle. Long and short PRLrs were localized mostly in the same ovarian cells. Maximum signal intensity, particularly for long PRLrs, was found in stromal cells surrounding primordial and primary follicles, and, for both PRLrs, in granulosa cells of preantral follicles and in luteal cells. Moderate signal intensity for PRLrs was found in theca cells of preantral to ovulatory follicles, and in granulosa cells of antral follicles up to the gonadotropin-dependent stage. Decreasing immunoreactivity to PRLrs was found in granulosa cells of gonadotropin-dependent to ovulatory follicles. For long PRLrs in particular, no signal was found in mural granulosa cells of gonadotropin-dependent follicles; for both isoforms, no signal was found in most granulosa cells of ovulatory follicles. In primordial to gonadotropin-dependent follicles, cellular localization of PRLr was similar on days 0, 10 and 15 of the cycle. Oocytes consistently showed positive immunostaining for PRLrs. Comparative RT-PCR analysis of long and short PRLr expression showed that the short isoform is evenly expressed throughout the estrous cycle, whereas the expression of the long form increases at the time of estrus and decreases at mid-luteal phase and at the onset of the follicular phase. Expression of long PRLrs was greater than that of short PRLrs on day 0 of cycle; expression of both isoforms was similar on day 10 and on day 15, long PRLrs expression was lower than that of short PRLrs. Our results indicate that in sheep ovary, the maximum responsiveness to PRL might occur during the preovulatory phase of the estrous cycle. PMID:15509700

  15. Progesterone receptor isoform analysis by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded canine mammary dysplasias and tumors.

    PubMed

    Guil-Luna, S; Stenvang, J; Brünner, N; Sánchez-Céspedes, R; Millán, Y; Gómez-Laguna, J; de las Mulas, J Martín

    2014-09-01

    Cloning and sequencing of the progesterone receptor gene in dogs have revealed 2 isoforms, A and B, transcribed from a single gene. Distribution of isoforms A and B in canine mammary lesions has hitherto been investigated only by Western blot analysis. This study analyzed progesterone receptor and its isoforms in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples from canine mammary lesions (4 dysplasias, 10 benign tumors, and 46 carcinomas) using 1-step SYBR Green quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Progesterone receptor was expressed in 75% of dysplasias, all benign tumors, and 59% of carcinomas. Carcinomas, and particularly simple epithelial-type carcinomas, displayed the lowest levels of expression. A high rate of agreement was recorded between RT-qPCR and immunohistochemical labeling. Isoforms A and B were successfully amplified, with correlation coefficients of 0.99 and amplification efficiencies close to 2, and were expressed in all lesion types analyzed. Predominance of A over B expression was observed in carcinomas and complex adenomas. Low-grade tumors exhibited higher progesterone receptor messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, but no difference was observed in the expression of isoform A versus B. Analysis of progesterone receptor mRNA isoforms by RT-qPCR was successful in routinely formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples and enabled the distribution of isoforms A and B to be identified for the first time in dysplasias, benign tumors, and malignant tumors of the canine mammary gland. These findings will facilitate future research into the role of progesterone receptor isoforms in the progression of canine mammary tumors. PMID:24249219

  16. Rational Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (RQSAR) Screen for PXR and CAR Isoform-Specific Nuclear Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Dring, Ann M.; Anderson, Linnea E.; Qamar, Saima; Stoner, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are closely related orphan nuclear receptor proteins that share several ligands and target overlapping sets of genes involved in homeostasis and all phases of drug metabolism. CAR and PXR are involved in the development of certain diseases, including diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity. Ligand screens for these receptors so far have typically focused on steroid hormone analogs with pharmacophore-based approaches, only to find relatively few new hits. Multiple CAR isoforms have been detected in human liver, with the most abundant being the constitutively active reference, CAR1, and the ligand-dependent isoform CAR3. It has been assumed that any compound that binds CAR1 should also activate CAR3, and so CAR3 can be used as a ligand-activated surrogate for CAR1 studies. The possibility of CAR3-specific ligands has not, so far, been addressed. To investigate the differences between CAR1, CAR3 and PXR, and to look for more CAR ligands that may be of use in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies, we performed a luciferase transactivation assay screen of 60 mostly non-steroid compounds. Known active compounds with different core chemistries were chosen as starting points and structural variants were rationally selected for screening. Distinct differences in agonist versus inverse agonist/antagonist effects were seen in 49 compounds that had some ligand effect on at least one receptor and 18 that had effects on all three receptors; eight were CAR1 ligands only, three were CAR3 only ligands and four affected PXR only. This work provides evidence for new CAR ligands, some of which have CAR3-specific effects, and provides observational data on CAR and PXR ligands with which to inform in silico strategies. Compounds that demonstrated unique activity on any one receptor are potentially valuable diagnostic tools for the investigation of in vivo molecular targets. PMID:20869355

  17. Immunoreactivity of progesterone receptor isoform B, nuclear factor kappaB, and IkappaBalpha in adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jichan; Lu, Yuan; Liu, Xishi; Guo, Sun-Wei

    2009-09-01

    Compared with normal endometrium, progesterone receptor isoform B (PR-B) and IkappaBalpha immunoreactivity were statistically significantly reduced in ectopic as well as eutopic endometrium from women with adenomyosis while nuclear p65, p50, and p52 immunoreactivity were statistically significantly increased in ectopic and eutopic endometrium. Nuclear p65 immunoreactivity was positively associated with heavier menses, and decreased PR-B and increased nuclear p65 immunoreactivity in ectopic endometrium were statistically significantly associated with the severity of dysmenorrhea in women with adenomyosis. PMID:19296948

  18. Isoforms of the CD79 signal transduction component of the macropod B-cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Suthers, Amy N; Young, Lauren J

    2014-12-01

    B cell responses and their concomitant signal transduction pathways are not well understood in marsupial mammals, despite the availability of gene expression data for key immunoglobulin genes and for elements of the CD79a/CD79b heterodimer signalling complex for two model marsupials. Broader studies of factors that influence B cell responses are still hampered by a lack of species-specific reagents and there are few reports of other factors that influence gene expression such as the potential for splice variants in BCR components, which may influence immune signalling pathways. In this study, we characterise CD79a and CD79b genes in the endangered macropod marsupial, Onychogalea fraenata (the bridled nailtail wallaby) and show that domains and residues important for the structural and functional integrity of both monomers are conserved in this species, consistent with results previously reported for the closely-related macropod, Macropus eugenii (the tammar wallaby). We extend this work to report the detection of splice variants for CD79a and CD79b in wallaby species; three CD79a isoforms and one CD79b isoform. Of these, two CD79a isoforms and the CD79b isoform have not been reported in any other mammalian species. PMID:25064685

  19. MALONDIALDEHYDE AND 4-HYDROXYNONENAL ADDUCTS ARE NOT FORMED ON CARDIAC RYANODINE RECEPTOR (RyR2) AND SARCO(ENDO)PLASMIC RETICULUM Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA2) IN DIABETES

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Caronda J.; Shao, Chun Hong; Nagai, Ryoji; Kutty, Shelby; Singh, Jaipaul; Bidasee, Keshore R.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we reported an elevated level of glucose-derived carbonyl adducts on cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2) in hearts of streptozotocin(STZ)-induced diabetic rats. We also showed these adduct impaired RyR2 and SERCA2 activities, and altered evoked Ca2+ transients. What is less clear is if lipid-derived malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) also chemically react with and impair RyR2 and SERCA2 activities in diabetes. This study used Western blot assays with adduct-specific antibodies and confocal microscopy to assess levels of MDA, 4-HNE, Nε-carboxy(methyl)lysine (CML), pentosidine and pyrraline adducts on RyR2 and SERCA2 and evoked intracellular transient Ca2+ kinetics in myocytes from control, diabetic and treated-diabetic rats. MDA and 4-HNE adducts were not detected on RyR2 and SERCA2 from control or 8 weeks diabetic rats with altered evoked Ca2+ transients. However, CML, pentosidine, and pyrraline adducts were elevated 3–5 fold (p<0.05). Treating diabetic rats with pyridoxamine (a scavenger of reactive carbonyl species, RCS) or aminoguanidine (a mixed reactive oxygen species-reactive carbonyl species scavenger) reduced CML, pentosidine and pyrraline adducts on RyR2 and SERCA2 and blunted SR Ca2+ cycling changes. Treating diabetic rats with the superoxide dismutase mimetic tempol had no impact on MDA and 4-HNE adducts on RyR2 and SERCA2, and on SR Ca2+ cycling. From these data we conclude that lipid-derived MDA and 4-HNE adducts are not formed on RyR2 and SERCA2 in this model of diabetes, and are therefore unlikely to be directly contributing to the SR Ca2+ dysregulation. PMID:23354458

  20. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) leukocytes express estrogen receptor isoforms ERα and ERβ2 and are functionally modulated by estrogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Stafford, James L.; Patiño, Reynaldo; Bengten, Eva; Miller, Norman W.; Blazer, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens are recognized as modulators of immune responses in mammals and teleosts. While it is known that the effects of estrogens are mediated via leukocyte-specific estrogen receptors (ERs) in humans and mice, leucocyte-specific estrogen receptor expression and the effects of estrogens on this cell population is less explored and poorly understood in teleosts. Here in, we verify that channel catfish (Ictalurus punctaus) leukocytes express ERα and ERβ2. Transcripts of these isoforms were detected in tissue-associated leukocyte populations by PCR, but ERβ2 was rarely detected in PBLs. Expression of these receptors was temporally regulated in PBLs following polyclonal activation by concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide or alloantigen based on evaluation by quantitative and end-point PCR. Examination of long-term leukocyte cell lines demonstrated that these receptors are differentially expressed depending on leukocyte lineage and phenotype. Expression of ERs was also temporally dynamic in some leukocyte lineages and may reflect stage of cell maturity. Estrogens affect the responsiveness of channel catfish peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) to mitogens in vitro. Similarly, bactericidal activity and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate induced respiratory burst was modulated by 17β-estradiol. These actions were blocked by the pure ER antagonist ICI 182780 indicating that response is, in part, mediated via ERα. In summary, estrogen receptors are expressed in channel catfish leukocytes and participate in the regulation of the immune response. This is the first time leukocyte lineage expression has been reported in teleost cell lines.

  1. Mechanisms of Transient Signaling via Short and Long Prolactin Receptor Isoforms in Female and Male Sensory Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Belugin, Sergei; Diogenes, Anibal R.; Patil, Mayur J.; Ginsburg, Erika; Henry, Michael A.; Akopian, Armen N.

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) regulates activity of nociceptors and causes hyperalgesia in pain conditions. PRL enhances nociceptive responses by rapidly modulating channels in nociceptors. The molecular mechanisms underlying PRL-induced transient signaling in neurons are not well understood. Here we use a variety of cell biology and pharmacological approaches to show that PRL transiently enhanced capsaicin-evoked responses involve protein kinase C ϵ (PKCϵ) or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways in female rat trigeminal (TG) neurons. We next reconstituted PRL-induced signaling in a heterologous expression system and TG neurons from PRL receptor (PRLR)-null mutant mice by expressing rat PRLR-long isoform (PRLR-L), PRLR-short isoform (PRLR-S), or a mix of both. Results show that PRLR-S, but not PRLR-L, is capable of mediating PRL-induced transient enhancement of capsaicin responses in both male and female TG neurons. However, co-expression of PRLR-L with PRLR-S (1:1 ratio) leads to the inhibition of the transient PRL actions. Co-expression of PRLR-L deletion mutants with PRLR-S indicated that the cytoplasmic site adjacent to the trans-membrane domain of PRLR-L was responsible for inhibitory effects of PRLR-L. Furthermore, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry data indicate that in normal conditions, PRLR-L is expressed mainly in glia with little expression in rat sensory neurons (3–5%) and human nerves. The predominant PRLR form in TG neurons/nerves from rats and humans is PRLR-S. Altogether, PRL-induced transient signaling in sensory neurons is governed by PI3K or PKCϵ, mediated via the PRLR-S isoform, and transient effects mediated by PRLR-S are inhibited by presence of PRLR-L in these cells. PMID:24142695

  2. Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ Coactivator-1 α Isoforms Selectively Regulate Multiple Splicing Events on Target Genes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Redondo, Vicente; Jannig, Paulo R; Correia, Jorge C; Ferreira, Duarte M S; Cervenka, Igor; Lindvall, Jessica M; Sinha, Indranil; Izadi, Manizheh; Pettersson-Klein, Amanda T; Agudelo, Leandro Z; Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo; Brum, Patricia C; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Ruas, Jorge L

    2016-07-15

    Endurance and resistance exercise training induces specific and profound changes in the skeletal muscle transcriptome. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1 α (PGC-1α) coactivators are not only among the genes differentially induced by distinct training methods, but they also participate in the ensuing signaling cascades that allow skeletal muscle to adapt to each type of exercise. Although endurance training preferentially induces PGC-1α1 expression, resistance exercise activates the expression of PGC-1α2, -α3, and -α4. These three alternative PGC-1α isoforms lack the arginine/serine-rich (RS) and RNA recognition motifs characteristic of PGC-1α1. Discrete functions for PGC-1α1 and -α4 have been described, but the biological role of PGC-1α2 and -α3 remains elusive. Here we show that different PGC-1α variants can affect target gene splicing through diverse mechanisms, including alternative promoter usage. By analyzing the exon structure of the target transcripts for each PGC-1α isoform, we were able to identify a large number of previously unknown PGC-1α2 and -α3 target genes and pathways in skeletal muscle. In particular, PGC-1α2 seems to mediate a decrease in the levels of cholesterol synthesis genes. Our results suggest that the conservation of the N-terminal activation and repression domains (and not the RS/RNA recognition motif) is what determines the gene programs and splicing options modulated by each PGC-1α isoform. By using skeletal muscle-specific transgenic mice for PGC-1α1 and -α4, we could validate, in vivo, splicing events observed in in vitro studies. These results show that alternative PGC-1α variants can affect target gene expression both quantitatively and qualitatively and identify novel biological pathways under the control of this system of coactivators. PMID:27231350

  3. Role for the thromboxane A2 receptor β-isoform in the pathogenesis of intrauterine growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Katie L.; Stevens, Veronica; Upton, Dannielle H.; McCracken, Sharon A.; Simpson, Ann M.; Cheng, Yan; Tasevski, Vitomir; Morris, Jonathan M.; Ashton, Anthony W.

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a pathology of pregnancy that results in failure of the fetus to reach its genetically determined growth potential. In developed nations the most common cause of IUGR is impaired placentation resulting from poor trophoblast function, which reduces blood flow to the fetoplacental unit, promotes hypoxia and enhances production of bioactive lipids (TXA2 and isoprostanes) which act through the thromboxane receptor (TP). TP activation has been implicated as a pathogenic factor in pregnancy complications, including IUGR; however, the role of TP isoforms during pregnancy is poorly defined. We have determined that expression of the human-specific isoform of TP (TPβ) is increased in placentae from IUGR pregnancies, compared to healthy pregnancies. Overexpression of TPα enhanced trophoblast proliferation and syncytialisation. Conversely, TPβ attenuated these functions and inhibited migration. Expression of the TPβ transgene in mice resulted in growth restricted pups and placentae with poor syncytialisation and diminished growth characteristics. Together our data indicate that expression of TPα mediates normal placentation; however, TPβ impairs placentation, and promotes the development of IUGR, and represents an underappreciated pathogenic factor in humans. PMID:27363493

  4. Carboxyl-Terminal Receptor Domains Control the Differential Dephosphorylation of Somatostatin Receptors by Protein Phosphatase 1 Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Märtens, Jan Carlo; Nagel, Falko; Schulz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We have recently identified protein phosphatase 1β (PP1β) as G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) phosphatase for the sst2 somatostatin receptor using siRNA knockdown screening. By contrast, for the sst5 somatostatin receptor we identified protein phosphatase 1γ (PP1γ) as GPCR phosphatase using the same approach. We have also shown that sst2 and sst5 receptors differ substantially in the temporal dynamics of their dephosphorylation and trafficking patterns. Whereas dephosphorylation and recycling of the sst2 receptor requires extended time periods of ∼30 min, dephosphorylation and recycling of the sst5 receptor is completed in less than 10 min. Here, we examined which receptor domains determine the selection of phosphatases for receptor dephosphorylation. We found that generation of tail-swap mutants between sst2 and sst5 was required and sufficient to reverse the patterns of dephosphorylation and trafficking of these two receptors. In fact, siRNA knockdown confirmed that the sst5 receptor carrying the sst2 tail is predominantly dephosphorylated by PP1β, whereas the sst2 receptor carrying the sst5 tail is predominantly dephosphorylated by PP1γ. Thus, the GPCR phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of individual somatostatin receptor subtypes is primarily determined by their different carboxyl-terminal receptor domains. This phosphatase specificity has in turn profound consequences for the dephosphorylation dynamics and trafficking patterns of GPCRs. PMID:24637622

  5. SMRT isoforms mediate repression and anti-repression of nuclear receptor heterodimers.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J D; Umesono, K; Evans, R M

    1996-01-01

    Transcriptional repression represents an important component in the regulation of cell differentiation and oncogenesis mediated by nuclear hormone receptors. Hormones act to relieve repression, thus allowing receptors to function as transcriptional activators. The transcriptional corepressor SMRT was identified as a silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors. SMRT is highly related to another corepressor, N-CoR, suggesting the existence of a new family of receptor-interacting proteins. We demonstrate that SMRT is a ubiquitous nuclear protein that interacts with unliganded receptor heterodimers in mammalian cells. Furthermore, expression of the receptor-interacting domain of SMRT acts as an antirepressor, suggesting the potential importance of splicing variants as modulators of thyroid hormone and retinoic acid signaling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8755515

  6. Alternative mRNA splicing of SMRT creates functional diversity by generating corepressor isoforms with different affinities for different nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Michael L; Jonas, Brian A; Privalsky, Martin L

    2005-03-01

    Many eukaryotic transcription factors are bimodal in their regulatory properties and can both repress and activate expression of their target genes. These divergent transcriptional properties are conferred through recruitment of auxiliary proteins, denoted coactivators and corepressors. Repression plays a particularly critical role in the functions of the nuclear receptors, a large family of ligand-regulated transcription factors involved in metazoan development, differentiation, reproduction, and homeostasis. The SMRT corepressor interacts directly with nuclear receptors and serves, in turn, as a platform for the assembly of a larger corepressor complex. We report here that SMRT is expressed in cells by alternative mRNA splicing to yield two distinct variants or isoforms. We designate these isoforms SMRTalpha and SMRTtau and demonstrate that these isoforms have significantly different affinities for different nuclear receptors. These isoforms are evolutionarily conserved and are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Our results suggest that differential mRNA splicing serves to customize corepressor function in different cells, allowing the transcriptional properties of nuclear receptors to be adapted to different contexts. PMID:15632172

  7. Insulin receptor isoform A and insulin-like growth factor II as additional treatment targets in human osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Avnet, Sofia; Sciacca, Laura; Salerno, Manuela; Gancitano, Giovanni; Cassarino, Maria Francesca; Longhi, Alessandra; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Carboni, Joan M; Gottardis, Marco; Giunti, Armando; Pollak, Michael; Vigneri, Riccardo; Baldini, Nicola

    2009-03-15

    Despite the frequent presence of an insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGFIR)-mediated autocrine loop in osteosarcoma (OS), interfering with this target was only moderately effective in preclinical studies. Here, we considered other members of the IGF system that might be involved in the molecular pathology of OS. We found that, among 45 patients with OS, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 serum levels were significantly lower, and IGF-II serum levels significantly higher, than healthy controls. Increased IGF-II values were associated with a decreased disease-free survival. After tumor removal, both IGF-I and IGF-II levels returned to normal values. In 23 of 45 patients, we obtained tissue specimens and found that all expressed high mRNA level of IGF-II and >IGF-I. Also, isoform A of the insulin receptor (IR-A) was expressed at high level in addition to IGFIR and IR-A/IGFIR hybrids receptors (HR(A)). These receptors were also expressed in OS cell lines, and simultaneous impairment of IGFIR, IR, and Hybrid-Rs by monoclonal antibodies, siRNA, or the tyrosine kinase inhibitor BMS-536924, which blocks both IGFIR and IR, was more effective than selective anti-IGFIR strategies. Also, anti-IGF-II-siRNA treatment in low-serum conditions significantly inhibited MG-63 OS cells that have an autocrine circuit for IGF-II. In summary, IGF-II rather than IGF-I is the predominant growth factor produced by OS cells, and three different receptors (IR-A, HR(A), and IGFIR) act complementarily for an IGF-II-mediated constitutive autocrine loop, in addition to the previously shown IGFIR/IGF-I circuit. Cotargeting IGFIR and IR-A is more effective than targeting IGF-IR alone in inhibiting OS growth. PMID:19258511

  8. Development of a Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Human Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor and Insulin Receptor Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Clare A; Rowzee, Anne M; Choe, Gina H; Saleh, Farrah L; Radford, Caitlin C; Taylor, Hugh S; Wood, Teresa L

    2016-04-01

    The biological activity of insulin and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) ligands, IGF-I and IGF-II, is based in part on the relative abundance and distribution of their target receptors: the insulin receptor (IR) splice variants A (IR-A) and B (IR-B) and IGF 1 receptor (IGF-1R). However, the relative quantity of all three receptors in human tissues has never been measured together on the same scale. Due to the high homology between insulin receptor (IR)-A and IR-B proteins and lack of antibodies that discern the two IR splice variants, their mRNA sequence is the most reliable means of distinguishing between the receptors. Hence, highly specific primers for IR-A, IR-B, and IGF-1R mRNA were designed to accurately detect all three receptors by quantitative RT-PCR and enable direct quantification of relative receptor expression levels. A standard concentration curve of cDNA from each receptor was performed. Assay specificity was tested using competition assays and postamplification analysis by gel electrophoresis and cloning. Forward and reverse primer concentrations were optimized to ensure equal efficiencies across primer pairs. This assay enables a specific molecular signature of IGF/insulin signaling receptors to be assayed in different tissues, cell types, or cancers. PMID:26862994

  9. Sex-Steroid Regulation of Relaxin Receptor Isoforms (RXFP1 & RXFP2) Expression in the Patellar Tendon and Lateral Collateral Ligament of Female WKY Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Firouzeh; Muniandy, Sekaran; Yusof, Ashril; Salleh, Naguib

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of non-contact knee injury was found higher in female than in male and is related to the phases of the menstrual cycle. This raised the possibility that female sex-steroids are involved in the mechanism underlying this injury via affecting the expression of the receptors for relaxin, a peptide hormone known to modulate ligament laxity. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the effect of sex-steroids on relaxin receptor isoforms (RXFP1 & RXFP2) expression in the ligaments and tendons of the knee. Methods: Ovariectomized adult female WKY rats were treated with different doses of estrogen (0.2, 2, 20 μg/kg), progesterone (4mg) and testosterone (125 & 250μg/kg) for three consecutive days. At the end of the treatment, the animals were sacrificed and the patellar tendon and lateral collateral ligament were harvested for mRNA and protein expression analyses by Real Time PCR and Western blotting respectively. Results: RXFP1, the main isoform expressed in these knee structures and RXFP2 showed a dose-dependent increase in expression with estrogen. Progesterone treatment resulted in an increase while testosterone caused a dose-dependent decrease in the mRNA and protein expression of both relaxin receptor isoforms. Discussion: Progesterone and high dose estrogen up-regulate while testosterone down-regulates RXFP1 and RXFP2 expression in the patellar tendon and lateral collateral ligament of rat's knee. Conclusion: Relaxin receptor isoforms up-regulation by progesterone and high dose estrogen could provide the basis for the reported increase in knee laxity while down-regulation of these receptor isoforms by testosterone could explain low incidence of non-contact knee injury in male. PMID:24465164

  10. Ryanodine-mediated conversion of STP to LTP is lacking in synaptopodin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Grigoryan, Gayane; Segal, Menahem

    2016-05-01

    In previous studies we and others have found that activation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) facilitate expression of long-term potentiation (LTP) of reactivity to afferent stimulation in hippocampal slices, with a more pronounced action in the ventral hippocampus. We have also been able to link the involvement of synaptopodin (SP), an actin-binding protein, with neuronal plasticity via its interaction with RyRs. To test this link more directly, we have now compared the ability of ryanodine to convert short-term to LTP in hippocampal slices taken from normal and SP-knockout (SPKO) mice. Indeed, SPKO hippocampus expresses lower concentrations of RyRs and in slices of these mice ryanodine is unable to facilitate conversion of short-term to LTP. These observations link functionally SP with calcium stores. PMID:25772508