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Sample records for sabin live poliovirus

  1. The Sabin live poliovirus vaccination trials in the USSR, 1959.

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Widespread use of the Sabin live attenuated poliovirus vaccine has had tremendous impact on the disease worldwide, virtually eliminating it from a number of countries, including the United States. Early proof of its safety and effectiveness was presented in 1959 by Russian investigators, who had staged massive trials in the USSR, involving millions of children. Their positive results were at first viewed in the United States and elsewhere with some skepticism, but the World Health Organization favored proceeding with large-scale trials, and responded to the claims made by Russian scientists by sending a representative to the USSR to review in detail the design and execution of the vaccine programs and the reliability of their results. The report that followed was a positive endorsement of the findings and contributed to the acceptance of the Sabin vaccine in the United States, where it has been the polio vaccine of choice since the mid-1960s. PMID:1814062

  2. Sabin Vaccine Reversion in the Field: a Comprehensive Analysis of Sabin-Like Poliovirus Isolates in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Stewart; Iber, Jane; Zhao, Kun; Adeniji, Johnson A.; Bukbuk, David; Baba, Marycelin; Behrend, Matthew; Burns, Cara C.; Oberste, M. Steven

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To assess the dynamics of genetic reversion of live poliovirus vaccine in humans, we studied molecular evolution in Sabin-like poliovirus isolates from Nigerian acute flaccid paralysis cases obtained from routine surveillance. We employed a novel modeling approach to infer substitution and recombination rates from whole-genome sequences and information about poliovirus infection dynamics and the individual vaccination history. We confirmed observations from a recent vaccine trial that VP1 substitution rates are increased for Sabin-like isolates relative to the rate for the wild type due to increased nonsynonymous substitution rates. We also inferred substitution rates for attenuating nucleotides and confirmed that reversion can occur in days to weeks after vaccination. We combine our observations for Sabin-like virus evolution with the molecular clock for VP1 of circulating wild-type strains to infer that the mean time from the initiating vaccine dose to the earliest detection of circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV) is 300 days for Sabin-like virus type 1, 210 days for Sabin-like virus type 2, and 390 days for Sabin-like virus type 3. Phylogenetic relationships indicated transient local transmission of Sabin-like virus type 3 and, possibly, Sabin-like virus type 1 during periods of low wild polio incidence. Comparison of Sabin-like virus recombinants with known Nigerian vaccine-derived poliovirus recombinants shows that while recombination with non-Sabin enteroviruses is associated with cVDPV, the recombination rates are similar for Sabin isolate-Sabin isolate and Sabin isolate–non-Sabin enterovirus recombination after accounting for the time from dosing to the time of detection. Our study provides a comprehensive picture of the evolutionary dynamics of the oral polio vaccine in the field. IMPORTANCE The global polio eradication effort has completed its 26th year. Despite success in eliminating wild poliovirus from most of the world, polio

  3. Development and introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccines derived from Sabin strains in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    During the endgame of global polio eradication, the universal introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccines is urgently required to reduce the risk of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis and polio outbreaks due to wild and vaccine-derived polioviruses. In particular, the development of inactivated poliovirus vaccines (IPVs) derived from the attenuated Sabin strains is considered to be a highly favorable option for the production of novel IPV that reduce the risk of facility-acquired transmission of poliovirus to the communities. In Japan, Sabin-derived IPVs (sIPVs) have been developed and introduced for routine immunization in November 2012. They are the first licensed sIPVs in the world. Consequently, trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine was used for polio control in Japan for more than half a century but has now been removed from the list of vaccines licensed for routine immunization. This paper reviews the development, introduction, characterization, and global status of IPV derived from attenuated Sabin strains. PMID:25448090

  4. Hematopoietic Cancer Cell Lines Can Support Replication of Sabin Poliovirus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    van Eikenhorst, Gerco; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; van der Pol, Leo A.; Bakker, Wilfried A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Viral vaccines can be produced in adherent or in suspension cells. The objective of this work was to screen human suspension cell lines for the capacity to support viral replication. As the first step, it was investigated whether poliovirus can replicate in such cell lines. Sabin poliovirus type 1 was serially passaged on five human cell lines, HL60, K562, KG1, THP-1, and U937. Sabin type 1 was capable of efficiently replicating in three cell lines (K562, KG1, and U937), yielding high viral titers after replication. Expression of CD155, the poliovirus receptor, did not explain susceptibility to replication, since all cell lines expressed CD155. Furthermore, we showed that passaged virus replicated more efficiently than parental virus in KG1 cells, yielding higher virus titers in the supernatant early after infection. Infection of cell lines at an MOI of 0.01 resulted in high viral titers in the supernatant at day 4. Infection of K562 with passaged Sabin type 1 in a bioreactor system yielded high viral titers in the supernatant. Altogether, these data suggest that K562, KG1, and U937 cell lines are useful for propagation of poliovirus. PMID:25815312

  5. Innovative IPV from attenuated Sabin poliovirus or newly designed alternative seed strains.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Ahd; Bakker, Wilfried A M

    2012-11-01

    This article gives an overview of the patent literature related to innovative inactivated polio vaccine (i-IPV) based on using Sabin poliovirus strains and newly developed alternative recombinant poliovirus strains. This innovative approach for IPV manufacturing is considered to attribute to the requirement for affordable IPV in the post-polio-eradication era, which is on the horizon. Although IPV is a well-established vaccine, the number of patent applications in this field was seen to have significantly increased in the past decade. Currently, regular IPV appears to be too expensive for universal use. Future affordability may be achieved by using alternative cell lines, alternative virus seed strains, improved and optimized processes, dose sparing, or the use of adjuvants. A relatively short-term option to achieve cost-price reduction is to work on regular IPV, using wild-type poliovirus strains, or on Sabin-IPV, based on using attenuated poliovirus strains. This price reduction can be achieved by introducing efficiency in processing. There are also multiple opportunities to work on dose sparing, for example, by using adjuvants or fractional doses. Renewed interest in this field was clearly reflected in the number and diversity of patent applications. In a later stage, several innovative approaches may become even more attractive, for example the use of recombinant virus strains or even a totally synthetic vaccine. Currently, such work is mainly carried out by research institutes and universities and therefore clinical data are not available. PMID:24236927

  6. Stool screening of Syrian refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, 2013/2014: Identification of Sabin like polioviruses.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Sindy; Neubauer, Katrin; Baillot, Armin; Rieder, Gabriele; Adam, Maja; Diedrich, Sabine

    2015-10-01

    Germany is a partner of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. Assurance of polio free status is based on enterovirus surveillance, which focuses on patients with signs of acute flaccid paralysis or aseptic meningitis/encephalitis, representing the key symptoms of poliovirus infection. In response to the wild poliovirus outbreak in Syria 2013 and high number of refugees coming from Syria to Germany, stool samples from 629 Syrian refugees/asylum seekers aged <3 years were screened for wild poliovirus between November 2013 and April 2014. Ninety-three samples (14.8%) were positive in an enterovirus specific PCR. Of these, 12 contained Sabin-like polioviruses. The remaining 81 samples were characterized as non-polio enteroviruses representing several members of groups A-C as well as rhinovirus. Wild-type poliovirus was not detected via stool screening involving molecular and virological methods, indicating a very low risk for the importation by Syrian refugees and asylum seekers at that time. PMID:26321005

  7. Sporadic Isolation of Sabin-Like Polioviruses and High-Level Detection of Non-Polio Enteroviruses during Sewage Surveillance in Seven Italian Cities, after Several Years of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Battistone, A.; Buttinelli, G.; Fiore, S.; Amato, C.; Bonomo, P.; Patti, A. M.; Vulcano, A.; Barbi, M.; Binda, S.; Pellegrinelli, L.; Tanzi, M. L.; Affanni, P.; Castiglia, P.; Germinario, C.; Mercurio, P.; Cicala, A.; Triassi, M.; Pennino, F.

    2014-01-01

    Sewage surveillance in seven Italian cities between 2005 and 2008, after the introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccination (IPV) in 2002, showed rare polioviruses, none that were wild-type or circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV), and many other enteroviruses among 1,392 samples analyzed. Two of five polioviruses (PV) detected were Sabin-like PV2 and three PV3, based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and PCR results. Neurovirulence-related mutations were found in the 5′ noncoding region (5′NCR) of all strains and, for a PV2, also in VP1 region 143 (Ile > Thr). Intertypic recombination in the 3D region was detected in a second PV2 (Sabin 2/Sabin 1) and a PV3 (Sabin 3/Sabin 2). The low mutation rate in VP1 for all PVs suggests limited interhuman virus passages, consistent with efficient polio immunization in Italy. Nonetheless, these findings highlight the risk of wild or Sabin poliovirus reintroduction from abroad. Non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs) were detected, 448 of which were coxsackievirus B (CVB) and 294 of which were echoviruses (Echo). Fifty-six NPEVs failing serological typing were characterized by sequencing the VP1 region (nucleotides [nt] 2628 to 2976). A total of 448 CVB and 294 Echo strains were identified; among those strains, CVB2, CVB5, and Echo 11 predominated. Environmental CVB5 and CVB2 strains from this study showed high sequence identity with GenBank global strains. The high similarity between environmental NPEVs and clinical strains from the same areas of Italy and the same periods indicates that environmental strains reflect the viruses circulating in the population and highlights the potential risk of inefficient wastewater treatments. This study confirmed that sewage surveillance can be more sensitive than acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance in monitoring silent poliovirus circulation in the population as well as the suitability of molecular approaches to enterovirus typing. PMID:24814793

  8. Sporadic isolation of sabin-like polioviruses and high-level detection of non-polio enteroviruses during sewage surveillance in seven Italian cities, after several years of inactivated poliovirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Battistone, A; Buttinelli, G; Fiore, S; Amato, C; Bonomo, P; Patti, A M; Vulcano, A; Barbi, M; Binda, S; Pellegrinelli, L; Tanzi, M L; Affanni, P; Castiglia, P; Germinario, C; Mercurio, P; Cicala, A; Triassi, M; Pennino, F; Fiore, L

    2014-08-01

    Sewage surveillance in seven Italian cities between 2005 and 2008, after the introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccination (IPV) in 2002, showed rare polioviruses, none that were wild-type or circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV), and many other enteroviruses among 1,392 samples analyzed. Two of five polioviruses (PV) detected were Sabin-like PV2 and three PV3, based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and PCR results. Neurovirulence-related mutations were found in the 5'noncoding region (5'NCR) of all strains and, for a PV2, also in VP1 region 143 (Ile>Thr). Intertypic recombination in the 3D region was detected in a second PV2 (Sabin 2/Sabin 1) and a PV3 (Sabin 3/Sabin 2). The low mutation rate in VP1 for all PVs suggests limited interhuman virus passages, consistent with efficient polio immunization in Italy. Nonetheless, these findings highlight the risk of wild or Sabin poliovirus reintroduction from abroad. Non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs) were detected, 448 of which were coxsackievirus B (CVB) and 294 of which were echoviruses (Echo). Fifty-six NPEVs failing serological typing were characterized by sequencing the VP1 region (nucleotides [nt] 2628 to 2976). A total of 448 CVB and 294 Echo strains were identified; among those strains, CVB2, CVB5, and Echo 11 predominated. Environmental CVB5 and CVB2 strains from this study showed high sequence identity with GenBank global strains. The high similarity between environmental NPEVs and clinical strains from the same areas of Italy and the same periods indicates that environmental strains reflect the viruses circulating in the population and highlights the potential risk of inefficient wastewater treatments. This study confirmed that sewage surveillance can be more sensitive than acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance in monitoring silent poliovirus circulation in the population as well as the suitability of molecular approaches to enterovirus typing. PMID:24814793

  9. Comparative in vivo efficiencies of hand-washing agents against hepatitis A virus (HM-175) and poliovirus type 1 (Sabin).

    PubMed Central

    Mbithi, J N; Springthorpe, V S; Sattar, S A

    1993-01-01

    The abilities of 10 hygienic hand-washing agents and tap water (containing approximately 0.5 ppm of free chlorine) to eliminate strain HM-175 of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and poliovirus (PV) type 1 (Sabin) were compared by using finger pad and whole-hand protocols with three adult volunteers. A mixture of the two viruses was prepared in a 10% suspension of feces, and 10 microliters of the mixture was placed on each finger pad. The inoculum was allowed to dry for 20 min, and the contaminated area was exposed to a hand-washing agent for 10 s, rinsed in tap water, and dried with a paper towel. In the whole-hand protocol, the hands were contaminated with 0.5 ml of the virus mixture, exposed for 10 s to a hand-washing agent, washed, and dried as described above. Tryptose phosphate broth was used to elute any virus remaining on the finger pads or hands. One part of the eluate was assayed directly for PV with FRhK-4 cells, while the other part was first treated with a PV-neutralizing serum and then assayed for HAV with the same cell line. The results are reported as mean percentages of reduction in PFU compared with the amount of infectious virus detectable after initial drying.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8250567

  10. Modeling population immunity to support efforts to end the transmission of live polioviruses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Pallansch, Mark A; Tebbens, Radboud J Duintjer; Wassilak, Steve G; Cochi, Stephen L

    2013-04-01

    Eradication of wild poliovirus (WPV) types 1 and 3, prevention and cessation of circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses, and achievement and maintenance of a world free of paralytic polio cases requires active risk management by focusing on population immunity and coordinated cessation of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). We suggest the need for a complementary and different conceptual approach to achieve eradication compared to the current case-based approach using surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) to identify symptomatic poliovirus infections. Specifically, we describe a modeling approach to characterize overall population immunity to poliovirus transmission. The approach deals with the realities that exposure to live polioviruses (e.g., WPV, OPV) and/or vaccination with inactivated poliovirus vaccine provides protection from paralytic polio (i.e., disease), but does not eliminate the potential for reinfection or asymptomatic participation in poliovirus transmission, which may increase with time because of waning immunity. The AFP surveillance system provides evidence of symptomatic poliovirus infections detected, which indicate immunity gaps after outbreaks occur, and this system represents an appropriate focus for controlling disease outbreaks. We describe a conceptual dynamic model to characterize population immunity to poliovirus transmission that helps identify risks created by immunity gaps before outbreaks occur, which provides an opportunity for national and global policymakers to manage the risk of poliovirus and prevent outbreaks before they occur. We suggest that dynamically modeling risk represents an essential tool as the number of cases approaches zero. PMID:22985171

  11. Pioneering figures in medicine: Albert Bruce Sabin--inventor of the oral polio vaccine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek R; Leggat, Peter A

    2005-01-01

    Over ten years after his death, the Sabin oral vaccine continues its profound influence on public health throughout the world. The annual incidence of polio has fallen dramatically since its introduction, with more than 300,000 lives being spared each year and an annual global saving in excess of 1 billion US dollars. In many ways, the development of an effective oral vaccine and its subsequent regulation by the World Health Organization can serve as a model for medical researchers. Our review describes the contribution of Albert Sabin as a medical researcher, and how his vaccine had a profound impact on the global reduction of polio infections. As many different factors influenced health-care last century, we describe Sabin's involvement with respect to prevailing scientific paradigms and public health issues of the time. Our paper also outlines the basic epidemiology of poliovirus and the historical development of an effective vaccine, both with and without Albert Sabin. PMID:16422178

  12. Current status of poliovirus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, J L

    1996-01-01

    Two scientists who played leading roles in the conquest of poliomyelitis died recently. In 1954, Jonas Salk provided the first licensed polio vaccine, the formalin (and heat)-inactivated virus. Albert Sabin gave us the attenuated live virus vaccine, which was licensed in 1962. This paper takes the reader through the history of the disease, including its pathogenesis, epidemiology, vaccines, and future directions. The emphasis is on vaccines, for it seems that with proper vaccination the number of new cases is falling dramatically. It is hoped that by the year 2000, we will accomplish the goal of the World Health Organization of "a world without polio." Then, because there is no animal reservoir, we can seriously discuss when and how to eliminate the need for vaccination and ultimately destroy our stocks of poliovirus. PMID:8809461

  13. Current status of poliovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Melnick, J L

    1996-07-01

    Two scientists who played leading roles in the conquest of poliomyelitis died recently. In 1954, Jonas Salk provided the first licensed polio vaccine, the formalin (and heat)-inactivated virus. Albert Sabin gave us the attenuated live virus vaccine, which was licensed in 1962. This paper takes the reader through the history of the disease, including its pathogenesis, epidemiology, vaccines, and future directions. The emphasis is on vaccines, for it seems that with proper vaccination the number of new cases is falling dramatically. It is hoped that by the year 2000, we will accomplish the goal of the World Health Organization of "a world without polio." Then, because there is no animal reservoir, we can seriously discuss when and how to eliminate the need for vaccination and ultimately destroy our stocks of poliovirus. PMID:8809461

  14. Nucleobase but not Sugar Fidelity is Maintained in the Sabin I RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinran; Musser, Derek M.; Lee, Cheri A.; Yang, Xiaorong; Arnold, Jamie J.; Cameron, Craig E.; Boehr, David D.

    2015-01-01

    The Sabin I poliovirus live, attenuated vaccine strain encodes for four amino acid changes (i.e., D53N, Y73H, K250E, and T362I) in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). We have previously shown that the T362I substitution leads to a lower fidelity RdRp, and viruses encoding this variant are attenuated in a mouse model of poliovirus. Given these results, it was surprising that the nucleotide incorporation rate and nucleobase fidelity of the Sabin I RdRp is similar to that of wild-type enzyme, although the Sabin I RdRp is less selective against nucleotides with modified sugar groups. We suggest that the other Sabin amino acid changes (i.e., D53N, Y73H, K250E) help to re-establish nucleotide incorporation rates and nucleotide discrimination near wild-type levels, which may be a requirement for the propagation of the virus and its efficacy as a vaccine strain. These results also suggest that the nucleobase fidelity of the Sabin I RdRp likely does not contribute to viral attenuation. PMID:26516899

  15. Nucleobase but not Sugar Fidelity is Maintained in the Sabin I RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinran; Musser, Derek M; Lee, Cheri A; Yang, Xiaorong; Arnold, Jamie J; Cameron, Craig E; Boehr, David D

    2015-10-01

    The Sabin I poliovirus live, attenuated vaccine strain encodes for four amino acid changes (i.e., D53N, Y73H, K250E, and T362I) in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). We have previously shown that the T362I substitution leads to a lower fidelity RdRp, and viruses encoding this variant are attenuated in a mouse model of poliovirus. Given these results, it was surprising that the nucleotide incorporation rate and nucleobase fidelity of the Sabin I RdRp is similar to that of wild-type enzyme, although the Sabin I RdRp is less selective against nucleotides with modified sugar groups. We suggest that the other Sabin amino acid changes (i.e., D53N, Y73H, K250E) help to re-establish nucleotide incorporation rates and nucleotide discrimination near wild-type levels, which may be a requirement for the propagation of the virus and its efficacy as a vaccine strain. These results also suggest that the nucleobase fidelity of the Sabin I RdRp likely does not contribute to viral attenuation. PMID:26516899

  16. Sabin-to-Mahoney Transition Model of Quasispecies Replication

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-31

    Qspp is an agent-based stochastic simulation model of the Poliovirus Sabin-to-Mahoney transition. This code simulates a cell-to-cell model of Poliovirus replication. The model tracks genotypes (virus genomes) as they are replicated in cells, and as the cells burst and release particles into the medium of a culture dish. An inoculum is then taken from the pool of virions and is used to inoculate cells on a new dish. This process repeats. The Sabin genotype comprises the initial inoculum. Nucleotide positions that match the Sabin1 (vaccine strain) and Mahoney (wild type) genotypes, as well as the neurovirulent phenotype (from the literature) are enumerated as constants.

  17. Multiplex PCR Method for Identifying Recombinant Vaccine-Related Polioviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, David R.; Ching, Karen; Iber, Jane; Campagnoli, Ray; Freeman, Christopher J.; Mishrik, Nada; Liu, Hong-Mei; Pallansch, Mark A.; Kew, Olen M.

    2004-01-01

    The recent discovery of recombinant circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (recombinant cVDPV) has highlighted the need for enhanced global poliovirus surveillance to assure timely detection of any future cVDPV outbreaks. Six pairs of Sabin strain-specific recombinant primers were designed to permit rapid screening for VDPV recombinants by PCR. PMID:15365031

  18. PER.C6(®) cells as a serum-free suspension cell platform for the production of high titer poliovirus: a potential low cost of goods option for world supply of inactivated poliovirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Barbara P; Edo-Matas, Diana; Custers, Jerome H H V; Koldijk, Martin H; Klaren, Vincent; Turk, Marije; Luitjens, Alfred; Bakker, Wilfried A M; Uytdehaag, Fons; Goudsmit, Jaap; Lewis, John A; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2013-01-21

    There are two highly efficacious poliovirus vaccines: Sabin's live-attenuated oral polio vaccine (OPV) and Salk's inactivated polio vaccine (IPV). OPV can be made at low costs per dose and is easily administrated. However, the major drawback is the frequent reversion of the OPV vaccine strains to virulent poliovirus strains which can result in Vaccine Associated Paralytic Poliomyelitis (VAPP) in vaccinees. Furthermore, some OPV revertants with high transmissibility can circulate in the population as circulating Vaccine Derived Polioviruses (cVDPVs). IPV does not convey VAPP and cVDPVs but the high costs per dose and insufficient supply have rendered IPV an unfavorable option for low and middle-income countries. Here, we explored whether the human PER.C6(®) cell-line, which has the unique capability to grow at high density in suspension, under serum-free conditions, could be used as a platform for high yield production of poliovirus. PER.C6(®) cells supported replication of all three poliovirus serotypes with virus titers ranging from 9.4 log(10) to 11.1 log(10)TCID(50)/ml irrespective of the volume scale (10 ml in shaker flasks to 2 L in bioreactors). This production yield was 10-30 fold higher than in Vero cell cultures performed here, and even 100-fold higher than what has been reported for Vero cell cultures in literature [38]. In agreement, the D-antigen content per volume PER.C6(®)-derived poliovirus was on average 30-fold higher than Vero-derived poliovirus. Interestingly, PER.C6(®) cells produced on average 2.5-fold more D-antigen units per cell than Vero cells. Based on our findings, we are exploring PER.C6(®) as an interesting platform for large-scale production of poliovirus at low costs, potentially providing the basis for global supply of an affordable IPV. PMID:23123018

  19. Development of a multiplex RT-PCR assay for the identification of recombination types at different genomic regions of vaccine-derived polioviruses.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, T G; Kyriakopoulou, Z; Tsakogiannis, D; Fikatas, A; Gartzonika, C; Levidiotou-Stefanou, S; Markoulatos, P

    2016-08-01

    Polioviruses (PVs) are the causal agents of acute paralytic poliomyelitis. Since the 1960s, poliomyelitis has been effectively controlled by the use of two vaccines containing all three serotypes of PVs, the inactivated poliovirus vaccine and the live attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). Despite the success of OPV in polio eradication programme, a significant disadvantage was revealed: the emergence of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP). VAPP is the result of accumulated mutations and putative recombination events located at the genome of attenuated vaccine Sabin strains. In the present study, ten Sabin isolates derived from OPV vaccinees and environmental samples were studied in order to identify recombination types located from VP1 to 3D genomic regions of virus genome. The experimental procedure that was followed was virus RNA extraction, reverse transcription to convert the virus genome into cDNA, PCR and multiplex-PCR using specific designed primers able to localize and identify each recombination following agarose gel electrophoresis. This multiplex RT-PCR assay allows for the immediate detection and identification of multiple recombination types located at the viral genome of OPV derivatives. After the eradication of wild PVs, the remaining sources of poliovirus infection worldwide would be the OPV derivatives. As a consequence, the immediate detection and molecular characterization of recombinant derivatives are important to avoid epidemics due to the circulation of neurovirulent viral strains. PMID:27098645

  20. Sabin-to-Mahoney Transition Model of Quasispecies Replication

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-05-31

    Qspp is an agent-based stochastic simulation model of the Poliovirus Sabin-to-Mahoney transition. This code simulates a cell-to-cell model of Poliovirus replication. The model tracks genotypes (virus genomes) as they are replicated in cells, and as the cells burst and release particles into the medium of a culture dish. An inoculum is then taken from the pool of virions and is used to inoculate cells on a new dish. This process repeats. The Sabin genotype comprisesmore » the initial inoculum. Nucleotide positions that match the Sabin1 (vaccine strain) and Mahoney (wild type) genotypes, as well as the neurovirulent phenotype (from the literature) are enumerated as constants.« less

  1. Inactivated poliovirus type 2 vaccine delivered to rat skin via high density microprojection array elicits potent neutralising antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Muller, David A; Pearson, Frances E; Fernando, Germain J P; Agyei-Yeboah, Christiana; Owens, Nick S; Corrie, Simon R; Crichton, Michael L; Wei, Jonathan C J; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Young, Paul R; Kendall, Mark A F

    2016-01-01

    Polio eradication is progressing rapidly, and the live attenuated Sabin strains in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) are being removed sequentially, starting with type 2 in April 2016. For risk mitigation, countries are introducing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into routine vaccination programs. After April 2016, monovalent type 2 OPV will be available for type 2 outbreak control. Because the current IPV is not suitable for house-to-house vaccination campaigns (the intramuscular injections require health professionals), we developed a high-density microprojection array, the Nanopatch, delivered monovalent type 2 IPV (IPV2) vaccine to the skin. To assess the immunogenicity of the Nanopatch, we performed a dose-matched study in rats, comparing the immunogenicity of IPV2 delivered by intramuscular injection or Nanopatch immunisation. A single dose of 0.2 D-antigen units of IPV2 elicited protective levels of poliovirus antibodies in 100% of animals. However, animals receiving IPV2 by IM required at least 3 immunisations to reach the same neutralising antibody titres. This level of dose reduction (1/40th of a full dose) is unprecedented for poliovirus vaccine delivery. The ease of administration coupled with the dose reduction observed in this study points to the Nanopatch as a potential tool for facilitating inexpensive IPV for mass vaccination campaigns. PMID:26911254

  2. Inactivated poliovirus type 2 vaccine delivered to rat skin via high density microprojection array elicits potent neutralising antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    Muller, David A.; Pearson, Frances E.; Fernando, Germain J.P.; Agyei-Yeboah, Christiana; Owens, Nick S.; Corrie, Simon R.; Crichton, Michael L.; Wei, Jonathan C.J.; Weldon, William C.; Oberste, M. Steven; Young, Paul R.; Kendall, Mark A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Polio eradication is progressing rapidly, and the live attenuated Sabin strains in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) are being removed sequentially, starting with type 2 in April 2016. For risk mitigation, countries are introducing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into routine vaccination programs. After April 2016, monovalent type 2 OPV will be available for type 2 outbreak control. Because the current IPV is not suitable for house-to-house vaccination campaigns (the intramuscular injections require health professionals), we developed a high-density microprojection array, the Nanopatch, delivered monovalent type 2 IPV (IPV2) vaccine to the skin. To assess the immunogenicity of the Nanopatch, we performed a dose-matched study in rats, comparing the immunogenicity of IPV2 delivered by intramuscular injection or Nanopatch immunisation. A single dose of 0.2 D-antigen units of IPV2 elicited protective levels of poliovirus antibodies in 100% of animals. However, animals receiving IPV2 by IM required at least 3 immunisations to reach the same neutralising antibody titres. This level of dose reduction (1/40th of a full dose) is unprecedented for poliovirus vaccine delivery. The ease of administration coupled with the dose reduction observed in this study points to the Nanopatch as a potential tool for facilitating inexpensive IPV for mass vaccination campaigns. PMID:26911254

  3. Molecular Properties of Poliovirus Isolates: Nucleotide Sequence Analysis, Typing by PCR and Real-Time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Burns, Cara C; Kilpatrick, David R; Iber, Jane C; Chen, Qi; Kew, Olen M

    2016-01-01

    Virologic surveillance is essential to the success of the World Health Organization initiative to eradicate poliomyelitis. Molecular methods have been used to detect polioviruses in tissue culture isolates derived from stool samples obtained through surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis. This chapter describes the use of realtime PCR assays to identify and serotype polioviruses. In particular, a degenerate, inosine-containing, panpoliovirus (panPV) PCR primer set is used to distinguish polioviruses from NPEVs. The high degree of nucleotide sequence diversity among polioviruses presents a challenge to the systematic design of nucleic acid-based reagents. To accommodate the wide variability and rapid evolution of poliovirus genomes, degenerate codon positions on the template were matched to mixed-base or deoxyinosine residues on both the primers and the TaqMan™ probes. Additional assays distinguish between Sabin vaccine strains and non-Sabin strains. This chapter also describes the use of generic poliovirus specific primers, along with degenerate and inosine-containing primers, for routine VP1 sequencing of poliovirus isolates. These primers, along with nondegenerate serotype-specific Sabin primers, can also be used to sequence individual polioviruses in mixtures. PMID:26983735

  4. Notes from the Field: Circulating Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Outbreaks - Five Countries, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Morales, Michelle; Nnadi, Chimeremma D; Tangermann, Rudolf H; Wassilak, Steven G F

    2016-02-12

    In 2015, wild poliovirus (WPV) transmission was identified in only Afghanistan and Pakistan (1). The widespread use of live, attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) has been key in polio eradication efforts. However, OPV use, particularly in areas with low vaccination coverage, is associated with the low risk for emergence of vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPV), which can cause paralysis (2). VDPVs vary genetically from vaccine viruses and can cause outbreaks in areas with low vaccination coverage. Circulating VDPVs (cVDPVs) are VDPVs in confirmed outbreaks. Single VDPVs for which the origin cannot be determined are classified as ambiguous (aVDPVs), which can also cause paralysis. Among the three types of WPV, type 2 has been declared to be eradicated. More than 90% of cVDPV cases have been caused by type 2 cVDPVs (cVDPV2). Therefore, in April 2016, all OPV-using countries of the world are discontinuing use of type 2 Sabin vaccine by simultaneously switching from trivalent OPV (types 1, 2, and 3) to bivalent OPV (types 1 and 3) for routine and supplementary immunization. The World Health Organization recently broadened the definition of cVDPVs to include any VDPV with genetic evidence of prolonged transmission (i.e., >1.5 years) and indicated that any single VDPV2 event (a case of paralysis caused by a VDPV or isolation of a VDPV from an environmental specimen) should elicit a detailed outbreak investigation and local immunization response. A confirmed cVDPV2 detection should elicit a full poliovirus outbreak response that includes multiple supplemental immunization activities (SIAs); an aVDPV designation should be made only after investigation and response (3). Since 2005, there have been 1-8 cVDPV outbreaks and 3-12 aVDPV events per year. There are currently five active cVDPV outbreaks in Guinea, Laos, Madagascar, Myanmar, and Ukraine, and four other active VDPV events. PMID:26866942

  5. Transgenic mice carrying the human poliovirus receptor: new animal models for study of poliovirus neurovirulence.

    PubMed Central

    Horie, H; Koike, S; Kurata, T; Sato-Yoshida, Y; Ise, I; Ota, Y; Abe, S; Hioki, K; Kato, H; Taya, C

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant viruses between the virulent Mahoney and attenuated Sabin 1 strains of poliovirus type 1 were subjected to neurovirulence tests using a transgenic (Tg) mouse line, ICR-PVRTg1, that carried the human poliovirus receptor gene. The Tg mice were inoculated intracerebrally with these recombinant viruses and observed for clinical signs, histopathological lesions, and viral antigens as parameters of neurovirulence of the viruses. These parameters observed in the Tg mice were different for different inoculated viruses. Dose-dependent incidences of paralysis and of death were observed in the Tg mice inoculated with any viruses used. This indicates that values of 50% lethal dose are useful to score a wide range of neurovirulence of poliovirus. The neurovirulence of individual viruses estimated by the Tg mouse model had a strong correlation with those estimated by monkey model. Consequently, the mouse tests identified the neurovirulence determinants on the genome of poliovirus that had been identified by monkey tests. In addition, the mouse tests revealed new neurovirulence determinants, that is, different nucleotides between the two strains at positions 189 and 21 and/or 935 in the 5'-proximal 1,122 nucleotides. The Tg mice used in this study may be suitable for replacing monkeys for investigating poliovirus neurovirulence. Images PMID:8289371

  6. Annual report of the Australian National Poliovirus Reference Laboratory, 2009.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jason A; Hobday, Linda; Polychronopoulos, Sophie; Ibrahim, Aishah; Thorley, Bruce R

    2010-09-01

    The Australian National Poliovirus Reference Laboratory (NPRL) is accredited by the World Health Organization (WHO) for the testing of faecal specimens from acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases and operates as a regional poliovirus reference laboratory for the Western Pacific Region. The NPRL, in collaboration with the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit, co-ordinates surveillance for cases of AFP in children in Australia, according to criteria recommended by the WHO. Specimens are referred from AFP cases in children and suspected cases of poliomyelitis in persons of any age. The WHO AFP surveillance performance indicator is 1 non-polio AFP case per 100,000 children less than 15 years of age. In 2009, the Polio Expert Committee classified 48 cases as non-polio AFP, a rate of 1.17 cases per 100,000 children less than 15 years of age. An additional WHO AFP surveillance performance indicator is that more than 80% of notified AFP cases have 2 faecal samples collected 24 hours apart and within 14 days of onset of paralysis. Adequate faecal samples were received from 16 (33.3%) of the 48 classified cases. A poliovirus was referred via the Enterovirus Reference Laboratory Network of Australia from a non-AFP case and was determined to be Sabin-like. This case most likely represents an importation event, the source of which was not identified, as Australia ceased using Sabin oral polio vaccine in 2005. The last report of a wild poliovirus importation in Australia was from Pakistan in 2007. In 2009, 1,604 wild poliovirus cases were reported in 23 countries with Afghanistan, India, Nigeria and Pakistan remaining endemic for poliomyelitis. PMID:21090182

  7. Impaired binding of standard initiation factors eIF3b, eIF4G and eIF4B to domain V of the live-attenuated coxsackievirus B3 Sabin3-like IRES - alternatives for 5′UTR-related cardiovirulence mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements fold into highly organized conserved secondary and probably tertiary structures that guide the ribosome to an internal site of the RNA at the IRES 3′end. The composition of the cellular proteome is under the control of multiple processes, one of the most important being translation initiation. In each poliovirus Sabin vaccine strain, a single point mutation in the IRES secondary-structure domain V is a major determinant of neurovirulence and translation attenuation. Here we are extrapolating poliovirus findings to a genomic related virus named coxsackievirus B3 CVB3); a causative agent of viral myocarditis. We have previously reported that Sabin3-like mutation (U473 → C) introduced in the domain V sequence of the CVB3 IRES led to a defective mutant with a serious reduction in translation efficiency and ribosomal initiation complex assembly, besides an impaired RNA-protein binding pattern. With the aim to identify proteins interacting with both CVB3 wild-type and Sabin3-like domain V RNAs and to assess the effect of the Sabin3-like mutation on these potential interactions, we have used a proteomic approach. This procedure allowed the identification of three RNA-binding proteins interacting with the domain V: eIF4G (p220), eIF3b (p116) and eIF4B (p80). Moreover, we report that this single-nucleotide exchange impairs the interaction pattern and the binding affinity of these standard translation initiation factors within the IRES domain V of the mutant strain. Taken together, these data indicate how this decisive Sabin3-like mutation mediates viral translation attenuation; playing a key role in the understanding of the cardiovirulence attenuation within this construct. Hence, these data provide further evidence for the crucial role of RNA structure for the IRES activity, and reinforce the idea of a distribution of function between the different IRES structural domains. Virtual slide The virtual slide(s) for

  8. Environmental Surveillance of Polioviruses in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in Support to the Activities of Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Pereira, Joseane Simone; da Silva, Lidiane Rodrigues; de Meireles Nunes, Amanda; de Souza Oliveira, Silas; da Costa, Eliane Veiga; da Silva, Edson Elias

    2016-03-01

    Wild polioviruses still remain endemic in three countries (Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Nigeria) and re-emergency of wild polio has been reported in previously polio-free countries. Environmental surveillance has been used as a supplementary tool in monitoring the circulation of wild poliovirus (PVs) and/or vaccine-derived PVs even in the absence of acute flaccid paralysis cases. This study aimed to monitor the presence of polioviruses in wastewater samples collected at one wastewater treatment plant located in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. From December 2011 to June 2012 and from September to December 2012, 31 samples were collected and processed. RD and L20B cell cultures were able to isolate PVs and non-polio enteroviruses in 27/31 samples. Polioviruses were isolated in eight samples (type 1 Sabin = 1, type 2 Sabin = 5, and type 3 Sabin = 2). Vaccine-derived polioviruses were not detected nor evidence of recombination with other PVs or non-polio enterovirus serotypes were observed among the isolates. The Sabin-related serotypes 2 and 3 presented nucleotide substitutions in positions associated with the neurovirulent phenotype at the 5'-UTR. Changes in important Amino acid residues at VP1 were also observed in the serotypes 2 and 3. Environmental surveillance has been used successfully in monitoring the circulation of PVs and non-polio enteroviruses and it is of crucial importance in the final stages of the WHO global polio eradication initiative. Our results show the continuous circulation of Sabin-like PVs and non-polio enteroviruses in the analyzed area during the study period. PMID:26538420

  9. Immunity status of adults and children against poliomyelitis virus type 1 strains CHAT and Sabin (LSc-2ab) in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In October 2007, the working group CEN/TC 216 of the European Committee for standardisation suggested that the Sabin oral poliovirus vaccine type 1 strain (LSc-2ab) presently used for virucidal tests should be replaced by another attenuated vaccine poliovirus type 1 strain, CHAT. Both strains were historically used as oral vaccines, but the Sabin type 1 strain was acknowledged to be more attenuated. In Germany, vaccination against poliomyelitis was introduced in 1962 using the oral polio vaccine (OPV) containing Sabin strain LSc-2ab. The vaccination schedule was changed from OPV to an inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) containing wild polio virus type 1 strain Mahoney in 1998. In the present study, we assessed potential differences in neutralising antibody titres to Sabin and CHAT in persons with a history of either OPV, IPV, or OPV with IPV booster. Methods Neutralisation poliovirus antibodies against CHAT and Sabin 1 were measured in sera of 41 adults vaccinated with OPV. Additionally, sera from 28 children less than 10 years of age and immunised with IPV only were analysed. The neutralisation assay against poliovirus was performed according to WHO guidelines. Results The neutralisation activity against CHAT in adults with OPV vaccination history was significantly lower than against Sabin poliovirus type 1 strains (Wilcoxon signed-rank test P < 0.025). In eight sera, the antibody titres measured against CHAT were less than 8, although the titre against Sabin 1 varied between 8 and 64. Following IPV booster, anti-CHAT antibodies increased rapidly in sera of CHAT-negative adults with OPV history. Sera from children with IPV history neutralised CHAT and Sabin 1 strains equally. Conclusion The lack of neutralising antibodies against the CHAT strain in persons vaccinated with OPV might be associated with an increased risk of reinfection with the CHAT polio virus type 1, and this implies a putative risk of transmission of the virus to polio-free communities. We

  10. Registration of 'Sabine' Dallisgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Sabine' dallisgrass (Paspalum dilatatum Poir.) (Reg. No. CV-2; PI 655527) was released by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, and Texas AgriLife Research on 2 September 2008. This cultivar is phenotypically and cytologically different from common...

  11. An Introduction to Poliovirus: Pathogenesis, Vaccination, and the Endgame for Global Eradication.

    PubMed

    Minor, Philip D

    2016-01-01

    Poliomyelitis is caused by poliovirus, which is a positive strand non-enveloped virus that occurs in three distinct serotypes (1, 2, and 3). Infection is mainly by the fecal-oral route and can be confined to the gut by antibodies induced either by vaccine, previous infection or maternally acquired. Vaccines include the live attenuated strains developed by Sabin and the inactivated vaccines developed by Salk; the live attenuated vaccine (Oral Polio Vaccine or OPV) has been the main tool in the Global Program of Polio eradication of the World Health Organisation. Wild type 2 virus has not caused a case since 1999 and type 3 since 2012 and eradication seems near. However most infections are entirely silent so that sophisticated environmental surveillance may be needed to ensure that the virus has been eradicated, and the live vaccine can sometimes revert to virulent circulating forms under conditions that are not wholly understood. Cessation of vaccination is therefore an increasingly important issue and inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) is playing a larger part in the end game. PMID:26983727

  12. High resolution identity testing of inactivated poliovirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Mee, Edward T.; Minor, Philip D.; Martin, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background Definitive identification of poliovirus strains in vaccines is essential for quality control, particularly where multiple wild-type and Sabin strains are produced in the same facility. Sequence-based identification provides the ultimate in identity testing and would offer several advantages over serological methods. Methods We employed random RT-PCR and high throughput sequencing to recover full-length genome sequences from monovalent and trivalent poliovirus vaccine products at various stages of the manufacturing process. Results All expected strains were detected in previously characterised products and the method permitted identification of strains comprising as little as 0.1% of sequence reads. Highly similar Mahoney and Sabin 1 strains were readily discriminated on the basis of specific variant positions. Analysis of a product known to contain incorrect strains demonstrated that the method correctly identified the contaminants. Conclusion Random RT-PCR and shotgun sequencing provided high resolution identification of vaccine components. In addition to the recovery of full-length genome sequences, the method could also be easily adapted to the characterisation of minor variant frequencies and distinction of closely related products on the basis of distinguishing consensus and low frequency polymorphisms. PMID:26049003

  13. 75 FR 29695 - Security Zones; Sabine Bank Channel, Sabine Pass Channel and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting At this time, we do not plan to hold a public meeting, but... and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ] ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... waters through Sabine Bank Channel, Sabine Pass Channel and the Sabine-Neches Waterway, extending...

  14. Fractional-Dose Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine Immunization Campaign - Telangana State, India, June 2016.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Sunil; Verma, Harish; Bhatnagar, Pankaj; Haldar, Pradeep; Satapathy, Asish; Kumar, K N Arun; Horton, Jennifer; Estivariz, Concepcion F; Anand, Abhijeet; Sutter, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Wild poliovirus type 2 was declared eradicated in September 2015 (1). In April 2016, India, switched from use of trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (tOPV; containing types 1, 2, and 3 polio vaccine viruses), to bivalent OPV (bOPV; containing types 1 and 3), as part of a globally synchronized initiative to withdraw Sabin poliovirus type 2 vaccine. Concurrently, inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) was introduced into India's routine immunization program to maintain an immunity base that would mitigate the number of paralytic cases in the event of epidemic transmission of poliovirus type 2 (2,3). After cessation of use of type 2 Sabin vaccine, any reported isolation of vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (VDPV2) would be treated as a public health emergency and might need outbreak response with monovalent type 2 oral vaccine, IPV, or both (4). In response to identification of a VDPV2 isolate from a sewage sample collected in the southern state of Telangana in May 2016, India conducted a mass vaccination campaign in June 2016 using an intradermal fractional dose (0.1 ml) of IPV (fIPV). Because of a global IPV supply shortage, fIPV, which uses one fifth of regular intramuscular (IM) dose administered intradermally, has been recommended as a response strategy for VDPV2 (5). Clinical trials have demonstrated that fIPV is highly immunogenic (6,7). During the 6-day campaign, 311,064 children aged 6 weeks-3 years were vaccinated, achieving an estimated coverage of 94%. With appropriate preparation, an emergency fIPV response can be promptly and successfully implemented. Lessons learned from this campaign can be applied to successful implementation of future outbreak responses using fIPV. PMID:27559683

  15. Vaccine-derived polioviruses.

    PubMed

    Burns, Cara C; Diop, Ousmane M; Sutter, Roland W; Kew, Olen M

    2014-11-01

    The attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) has many properties favoring its use in polio eradication: ease of administration, efficient induction of intestinal immunity, induction of durable humoral immunity, and low cost. Despite these advantages, OPV has the disadvantage of genetic instability, resulting in rare and sporadic cases of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) and the emergence of genetically divergent vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs). Whereas VAPP is an adverse event following exposure to OPV, VDPVs are polioviruses whose genetic properties indicate prolonged replication or transmission. Three categories of VDPVs are recognized: (1) circulating VDPVs (cVDPVs) from outbreaks in settings of low OPV coverage, (2) immunodeficiency-associated VDPVs (iVDPVs) from individuals with primary immunodeficiencies, and (3) ambiguous VDPVs (aVDPVs), which cannot be definitively assigned to either of the first 2 categories. Because most VDPVs are type 2, the World Health Organization's plans call for coordinated worldwide replacement of trivalent OPV with bivalent OPV containing poliovirus types 1 and 3. PMID:25316847

  16. Transgenic mice as an alternative to monkeys for neurovirulence testing of live oral poliovirus vaccine: validation by a WHO collaborative study.

    PubMed Central

    Dragunsky, Eugenia; Nomura, Tatsuji; Karpinski, Kazimir; Furesz, John; Wood, David J.; Pervikov, Yuri; Abe, Shinobu; Kurata, Takeshi; Vanloocke, Olivier; Karganova, Galina; Taffs, Rolf; Heath, Alan; Ivshina, Anna; Levenbook, Inessa

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Extensive WHO collaborative studies were performed to evaluate the suitability of transgenic mice susceptible to poliovirus (TgPVR mice, strain 21, bred and provided by the Central Institute for Experimental Animals, Japan) as an alternative to monkeys in the neurovirulence test (NVT) of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). METHODS: Nine laboratories participated in the collaborative study on testing neurovirulence of 94 preparations of OPV and vaccine derivatives of all three serotypes in TgPVR21 mice. FINDINGS: Statistical analysis of the data demonstrated that the TgPVR21 mouse NVT was of comparable sensitivity and reproducibility to the conventional WHO NVT in simians. A statistical model for acceptance/rejection of OPV lots in the mouse test was developed, validated, and shown to be suitable for all three vaccine types. The assessment of the transgenic mouse NVT is based on clinical evaluation of paralysed mice. Unlike the monkey NVT, histological examination of central nervous system tissue of each mouse offered no advantage over careful and detailed clinical observation. CONCLUSIONS: Based on data from the collaborative studies the WHO Expert Committee for Biological Standardization approved the mouse NVT as an alternative to the monkey test for all three OPV types and defined a standard implementation process for laboratories that wish to use the test. This represents the first successful introduction of transgenic animals into control of biologicals. PMID:12764491

  17. Cessation of Trivalent Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and Introduction of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine - Worldwide, 2016.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Lee M; Farrell, Margaret; Ramirez-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Menning, Lisa; Shendale, Stephanie; Lewis, Ian; Rubin, Jennifer; Garon, Julie; Harris, Jennifer; Hyde, Terri; Wassilak, Steven; Patel, Manish; Nandy, Robin; Chang-Blanc, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1988 World Health Assembly resolution to eradicate poliomyelitis, transmission of the three types of wild poliovirus (WPV) has been sharply reduced (1). WPV type 2 (WPV2) has not been detected since 1999 and was declared eradicated in September 2015. Because WPV type 3 has not been detected since November 2012, WPV type 1 (WPV1) is likely the only WPV that remains in circulation (1). This marked progress has been achieved through widespread use of oral poliovirus vaccines (OPVs), most commonly trivalent OPV (tOPV), which contains types 1, 2, and 3 live, attenuated polioviruses and has been a mainstay of efforts to prevent polio since the early 1960s. However, attenuated polioviruses in OPV can undergo genetic changes during replication, and in communities with low vaccination coverage, can result in vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) that can cause paralytic polio indistinguishable from the disease caused by WPVs (2). Among the 721 polio cases caused by circulating VDPVs (cVDPVs*) detected during January 2006-May 2016, type 2 cVDPVs (cVDPV2s) accounted for >94% (2). Eliminating the risk for polio caused by VDPVs will require stopping all OPV use. The first stage of OPV withdrawal involved a global, synchronized replacement of tOPV with bivalent OPV (bOPV) containing only types 1 and 3 attenuated polioviruses, planned for April 18-May 1, 2016, thereby withdrawing OPV type 2 from all immunization activities (3). Complementing the switch from tOPV to bOPV, introduction of at least 1 dose of injectable, trivalent inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into childhood immunization schedules reduces risks from and facilitates responses to cVDPV2 outbreaks. All 155 countries and territories that were still using OPV in immunization schedules in 2015 have reported that they had ceased use of tOPV by mid-May 2016.(†) As of August 31, 2016, 173 (89%) of 194 World Health Organization (WHO) countries included IPV in their immunization schedules.(§) The cessation of

  18. Importation and circulation of poliovirus in Bulgaria in 2001.

    PubMed Central

    Kojouharova, Mira; Zuber, Patrick L. F.; Gyurova, Snejana; Fiore, Lucia; Buttinelli, Gabriele; Kunchev, Angel; Vladimirova, Nadejda; Korsun, Neli; Filipova, Radosveta; Boneva, Roumiana; Gavrilin, Eugene; Deshpande, Jagadish M.; Oblapenko, George; Wassilak, Steven G.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the circumstances in which poliomyelitis occurred among three children in Bulgaria during 2001 and to describe the public health response. METHODS: Bulgarian authorities investigated the three cases of polio and their contacts, conducted faecal and serological screening of children from high-risk groups, implemented enhanced surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis, and conducted supplemental immunization activities. FINDINGS: The three cases of polio studied had not been vaccinated and lived in socioeconomically deprived areas of two cities. Four Roma children from the Bourgas district had antibody titres to serotype 1 poliovirus only, and wild type 1 virus was isolated from the faeces of two asymptomatic Roma children in the Bourgas and Sofia districts. Poliovirus isolates were related genetically and represented a single evolutionary lineage; genomic sequences were less than 90% identical to poliovirus strains isolated previously in Europe, but 98.3% similar to a strain isolated in India in 2000. No cases or wild virus isolates were found after supplemental immunization activities were launched in May 2001. CONCLUSIONS: In Bulgaria, an imported poliovirus was able to circulate for two to five months among minority populations. Surveillance data strongly suggest that wild poliovirus circulation ceased shortly after supplemental immunization activities with oral poliovirus vaccine were conducted. PMID:12973639

  19. 33 CFR 165.819 - Security Zone; Sabine Bank Channel, Sabine Pass Channel and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX. (a) Location. (1) The following LNG facility mooring basins are designated as fixed security zones whenever LNG carriers are moored within them: (i) Golden Pass LNG, Sabine TX: All...°45′50″ N, 093°55′17″ W. (ii) Sabine Pass LNG, Cameron Parish, LA: All mooring basin waters north of...

  20. 77 FR 45329 - Sabine Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Sabine Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Sabine Resource Advisory Committee will meet in ] Hemphill, Texas. The committee...

  1. 33 CFR 117.981 - Sabine River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sabine River. 117.981 Section 117.981 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.981 Sabine River. See § 117.493, Sabine...

  2. 33 CFR 117.981 - Sabine River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sabine River. 117.981 Section 117.981 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.981 Sabine River. See § 117.493, Sabine...

  3. 33 CFR 117.981 - Sabine River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sabine River. 117.981 Section 117.981 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.981 Sabine River. See § 117.493, Sabine...

  4. 33 CFR 117.981 - Sabine River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sabine River. 117.981 Section 117.981 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.981 Sabine River. See § 117.493, Sabine...

  5. 33 CFR 117.981 - Sabine River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sabine River. 117.981 Section 117.981 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.981 Sabine River. See § 117.493, Sabine...

  6. Serial Recombination during Circulation of Type 1 Wild-Vaccine Recombinant Polioviruses in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Mei; Zheng, Du-Ping; Zhang, Li-Bi; Oberste, M. Steven; Kew, Olen M.; Pallansch, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    Type 1 wild-vaccine recombinant polioviruses sharing a 367-nucleotide (nt) block of Sabin 1-derived sequence spanning the VP1 and 2A genes circulated widely in China from 1991 to 1993. We surveyed the sequence relationships among 34 wild-vaccine recombinants by comparing six genomic intervals: the conserved 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) (nt 186 to 639), the hypervariable portion of the 5′-UTR (nt 640 to 742), the VP4 and partial VP2 genes (nt 743 to 1176), the VP1 gene (nt 2480 to 3385), the 2A gene (nt 3386 to 3832), and the partial 3D gene (nt 6011 to 6544). The 5′-UTR, capsid (VP4-VP2 and VP1), and 2A sequence intervals had similar phylogenies. By contrast, the partial 3D sequences could be distributed into five divergent genetic classes. Most (25 of 34) of the wild-vaccine recombinant isolates showed no evidence of additional recombination beyond the initial wild-Sabin recombination event. Eight isolates from 1992 to 1993, however, appear to be derived from three independent additional recombination events, and one 1993 isolate was derived from two consecutive events. Complete genomic sequences of a representative isolate for each 3D sequence class demonstrated that these exchanges had occurred in the 2B, 2C, and 3D genes. The 3D gene sequences were not closely related to those of the Sabin strains or 53 diverse contemporary wild poliovirus isolates from China, but all were related to the 3D genes of species C enteroviruses. The appearance within approximately 2.5 years of five recombinant classes derived from a single ancestral infection illustrates the rapid emergence of new recombinants among circulating wild polioviruses. PMID:14512548

  7. Limited and localized outbreak of newly emergent type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus in Sichuan, China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dongmei; Zhang, Yong; Zhu, Shuangli; Chen, Na; Li, Xiaolei; Wang, Dongyan; Ma, Xiaozhen; Zhu, Hui; Tong, Wenbin; Xu, Wenbo

    2014-07-01

    From August 2011 to February 2012, an outbreak caused by type 2 circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV) occurred in Aba County, Sichuan, China. During the outbreak, four type 2 VDPVs (≥0.6% nucleotide divergence in the VP1 region relative to the Sabin 2 strain) were isolated from 3 patients with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) and one close contact. In addition, a type 2 pre-VDPV (0.3% to 0.5% divergence from Sabin 2) that was genetically related to these type 2 VDPVs was isolated from another AFP patient. These 4 patients were all unimmunized children 0.7 to 1.1 years old. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that the 4 VDPV isolates differed from Sabin 2 by 0.7% to 1.2% in nucleotides in the VP1 region and shared 5 nucleotide substitutions with the pre-VDPV. All 5 isolates were closely related, and all were S2/S3/S2/S3 recombinants sharing common recombination crossover sites. Although the two major determinants of attenuation and temperature sensitivity phenotype of Sabin 2 (A481 in the 5' untranslated region and Ile143 in the VP1 protein) had reverted in all 5 isolates, one VDPV (strain CHN16017) still retained the temperature sensitivity phenotype. Phylogenetic analysis of the third coding position of the complete P1 coding region suggested that the cVDPVs circulated locally for about 7 months following the initiating oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) dose. Our findings reinforce the point that cVDPVs can emerge and spread in isolated communities with immunity gaps and highlight the emergence risks of type 2 cVDPVs accompanying the trivalent OPV used. To solve this issue, it is recommended that type 2 OPV be removed from the trivalent OPV or that inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) be used instead. PMID:24850620

  8. 78 FR 66909 - Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Sabine Pass LNG, L.P.; Notice of Application to Amend...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Sabine Pass LNG, L.P.; Notice of Application... Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P. (collectively, Sabine Pass), 700 Milam Street... authorizations granted on April 16, 2012 in Docket No. CP11-72-000 (Liquefaction Project), as amended in...

  9. Managing population immunity to reduce or eliminate the risks of circulation following the importation of polioviruses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Kalkowska, Dominika A; Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J

    2015-03-24

    Poliovirus importations into polio-free countries represent a major concern during the final phases of global eradication of wild polioviruses (WPVs). We extend dynamic transmission models to demonstrate the dynamics of population immunity out through 2020 for three countries that only used inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) for routine immunization: the US, Israel, and The Netherlands. For each country, we explore the vulnerability to re-established transmission following an importation for each poliovirus serotype, including the impact of immunization choices following the serotype 1 WPV importation that occurred in 2013 in Israel. As population immunity declines below the threshold required to prevent transmission, countries become at risk for re-established transmission. Although importations represent stochastic events that countries cannot fully control because people cross borders and polioviruses mainly cause asymptomatic infections, countries can ensure that any importations die out. Our results suggest that the general US population will remain above the threshold for transmission through 2020. In contrast, Israel became vulnerable to re-established transmission of importations of live polioviruses by the late 2000s. In Israel, the recent WPV importation and outbreak response use of bivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (bOPV) eliminated the vulnerability to an importation of poliovirus serotypes 1 and 3 for several years, but not serotype 2. The Netherlands experienced a serotype 1 WPV outbreak in 1992-1993 and became vulnerable to re-established transmission in religious communities with low vaccine acceptance around the year 2000, although the general population remains well-protected from widespread transmission. All countries should invest in active management of population immunity to avoid the potential circulation of imported live polioviruses. IPV-using countries may wish to consider prevention opportunities and/or ensure preparedness for response

  10. 76 FR 14647 - Sabine National Forest Resource Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Sabine National Forest Resource Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting, Sabine National Forest Resource Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: In.... Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Sabine National Forest Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)...

  11. S2M: A Stochastic Simulation Model of Poliovirus Genetic State Transition

    PubMed Central

    Ecale Zhou, Carol L.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling the molecular mechanisms that govern genetic variation can be useful in understanding the dynamics that drive genetic state transition in quasispecies viruses. For example, there is considerable interest in understanding how the relatively benign vaccine strains of poliovirus eventually revert to forms that confer neurovirulence and cause disease (ie, vaccine-derived poliovirus). This report describes a stochastic simulation model, S2M, which can be used to generate hypothetical outcomes based on known mechanisms of genetic diversity. S2M begins with predefined genotypes based on the Sabin-1 and Mahoney wild-type sequences, constructs a set of independent cell-based populations, and performs in-cell replication and cell-to-cell infection cycles while quantifying genetic changes that track the transition from Sabin-1 toward Mahoney. Realism is incorporated into the model by assigning defaults for variables that constrain mechanisms of genetic variability based roughly on metrics reported in the literature, yet these values can be modified at the command line in order to generate hypothetical outcomes driven by these parameters. To demonstrate the utility of S2M, simulations were performed to examine the effects of the rates of replication error and recombination and the presence or absence of defective interfering particles, upon reaching the end states of Mahoney resemblance (semblance of a vaccine-derived state), neurovirulence, genome fitness, and cloud diversity. Simulations provide insight into how modeled biological features may drive hypothetical outcomes, independently or in combination, in ways that are not always intuitively obvious. PMID:27385911

  12. Phylogenetic Analysis of Poliovirus Sequences.

    PubMed

    Jorba, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Comparative genomic sequencing is a major surveillance tool in the Polio Laboratory Network. Due to the rapid evolution of polioviruses (~1 % per year), pathways of virus transmission can be reconstructed from the pathways of genomic evolution. Here, we describe three main phylogenetic methods; estimation of genetic distances, reconstruction of a maximum-likelihood (ML) tree, and estimation of substitution rates using Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). The data set used consists of complete capsid sequences from a survey of poliovirus sequences available in GenBank. PMID:26983737

  13. 76 FR 62342 - Sabine Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Sabine Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Sabine Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Hemphill, Texas. The committee is...

  14. 76 FR 44574 - Sabine Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... etaylor@fs.fed.us or via facsimile to 409-625-1953. Dated: July 20, 2011.FR William E. Taylor, Jr... Forest Service Sabine Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Sabine Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Hemphill, Texas. The committee is...

  15. 76 FR 34962 - Sabine Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Sabine Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Sabine Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Hemphill, Texas. The committee is...

  16. 76 FR 28950 - Sabine Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Sabine Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Sabine Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Hemphill, Texas. The committee is authorized under...

  17. 77 FR 53842 - Sabine Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Sabine Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Sabine Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Hemphill, Texas. The committee is...

  18. 76 FR 66033 - Sabine Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Sabine Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting cancellation. SUMMARY: The Sabine-Angelina Resource Advisory Committee was scheduled to meet October 20,...

  19. 33 CFR 117.979 - Sabine Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sabine Lake. 117.979 Section 117.979 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.979 Sabine Lake. The draw of the S82 bridge, mile...

  20. 33 CFR 117.979 - Sabine Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sabine Lake. 117.979 Section 117.979 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.979 Sabine Lake. The draw of the S82 bridge, mile...

  1. 33 CFR 117.979 - Sabine Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sabine Lake. 117.979 Section 117.979 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.979 Sabine Lake. The draw of the S82 bridge, mile...

  2. 33 CFR 117.979 - Sabine Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sabine Lake. 117.979 Section 117.979 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.979 Sabine Lake. The draw of the S82 bridge, mile...

  3. 33 CFR 117.979 - Sabine Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sabine Lake. 117.979 Section 117.979 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.979 Sabine Lake. The draw of the S82 bridge, mile...

  4. 33 CFR 117.493 - Sabine River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sabine River. 117.493 Section 117.493 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.493 Sabine River. (a) The draw of the...

  5. 33 CFR 117.493 - Sabine River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sabine River. 117.493 Section 117.493 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.493 Sabine River. (a) The draw of the...

  6. 33 CFR 117.493 - Sabine River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sabine River. 117.493 Section 117.493 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.493 Sabine River. (a) The draw of the...

  7. 33 CFR 117.493 - Sabine River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sabine River. 117.493 Section 117.493 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.493 Sabine River. (a) The draw of the...

  8. 33 CFR 117.493 - Sabine River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sabine River. 117.493 Section 117.493 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.493 Sabine River. (a) The draw of the...

  9. 77 FR 65546 - Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Sabine Pass LNG, L.P.; Notice of Petition To Amend Authorizations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Sabine Pass LNG, L.P.; Notice of Petition To... Pass Liquefaction, LLC and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P. (collectively, Sabine Pass), 700 Milam Street, Suite... authorizations granted on April 16, 2012 in Docket No. CP11-72-000 (Liquefaction Project) in order to...

  10. 78 FR 25432 - Sabine Pass LNG, L.P., Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Sabine Pass LNG, L.P., Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project Modification The... assessment (EA) for the Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project Modification (Modification Project), proposed...

  11. 76 FR 9573 - Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P.; Notice of Application Take notice that on January 31, 2011, Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P... the Commission's Regulations, to site, construct, and operate liquefaction and export...

  12. Multiple Independent Emergences of Type 2 Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses during a Large Outbreak in Northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jing; Jorba, Jaume; Bukbuk, David; Adu, Festus; Gumede, Nicksy; Pate, Muhammed Ali; Abanida, Emmanuel Ade; Gasasira, Alex; Iber, Jane; Chen, Qi; Vincent, Annelet; Chenoweth, Paul; Henderson, Elizabeth; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Naeem, Asif; Umami, Rifqiyah Nur; Nishimura, Yorihiro; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Baba, Marycelin; Adeniji, Adekunle; Williams, A. J.; Kilpatrick, David R.; Oberste, M. Steven; Wassilak, Steven G.; Tomori, Oyewale; Pallansch, Mark A.; Kew, Olen

    2013-01-01

    Since 2005, a large poliomyelitis outbreak associated with type 2 circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV2) has occurred in northern Nigeria, where immunization coverage with trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (tOPV) has been low. Phylogenetic analysis of P1/capsid region sequences of isolates from each of the 403 cases reported in 2005 to 2011 resolved the outbreak into 23 independent type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV2) emergences, at least 7 of which established circulating lineage groups. Virus from one emergence (lineage group 2005-8; 361 isolates) was estimated to have circulated for over 6 years. The population of the major cVDPV2 lineage group expanded rapidly in early 2009, fell sharply after two tOPV rounds in mid-2009, and gradually expanded again through 2011. The two major determinants of attenuation of the Sabin 2 oral poliovirus vaccine strain (A481 in the 5′-untranslated region [5′-UTR] and VP1-Ile143) had been replaced in all VDPV2 isolates; most A481 5′-UTR replacements occurred by recombination with other enteroviruses. cVDPV2 isolates representing different lineage groups had biological properties indistinguishable from those of wild polioviruses, including efficient growth in neuron-derived HEK293 cells, the capacity to cause paralytic disease in both humans and PVR-Tg21 transgenic mice, loss of the temperature-sensitive phenotype, and the capacity for sustained person-to-person transmission. We estimate from the poliomyelitis case count and the paralytic case-to-infection ratio for type 2 wild poliovirus infections that ∼700,000 cVDPV2 infections have occurred during the outbreak. The detection of multiple concurrent cVDPV2 outbreaks in northern Nigeria highlights the risks of cVDPV emergence accompanying tOPV use at low rates of coverage in developing countries. PMID:23408630

  13. Rare natural type 3/type 2 intertypic capsid recombinant vaccine-related poliovirus isolated from a case of acute flaccid paralysis in Brazil, 2015.

    PubMed

    Cassemiro, Klécia M S M; Burlandy, Fernanda M; da Silva, Edson E

    2016-07-01

    A natural type 3/type 2 intertypic capsid recombinant vaccine-related poliovirus was isolated from an acute flaccid paralytic case in Brazil. Genome sequencing revealed the uncommon location of the crossover site in the VP1 coding region (nucleotides 3251-3258 of Sabin 3 genome). The Sabin 2 donor sequence replaced the last 118 nt of VP1, resulting in the substitution of the complete antigenic site IIIa by PV2-specific amino acids. The low overall number of nucleotide substitutions in P1 region indicated that the predicted replication time of the isolate was about 8-9 weeks. Two of the principal determinants of attenuation in Sabin 3 genomes were mutated (U472C and C2493U), but the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the isolate was preserved. Our results support the theory that there exists a PV3/PV2 recombination hotspot site in the tail region of the VP1 capsid protein and that the recombination may occur soon after oral poliovirus vaccine administration. PMID:27082658

  14. Molecular and Phenotypic Characterization of a Highly Evolved Type 2 Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Isolated from Seawater in Brazil, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Cassemiro, Klécia Marília S. de Melo; Burlandy, Fernanda M.; Barbosa, Mikaela R. F.; Chen, Qi; Jorba, Jaume; Hachich, Elayse M.; Sato, Maria I. Z.; Burns, Cara C.; da Silva, Edson E.

    2016-01-01

    A type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV), differing from the Sabin 2 strain at 8.6% (78/903) of VP1 nucleotide positions, was isolated from seawater collected from a seaport in São Paulo State, Brazil. The P1/capsid region is related to the Sabin 2 strain, but sequences within the 5'-untranslated region and downstream of the P1 region were derived from recombination with other members of Human Enterovirus Species C (HEV-C). The two known attenuating mutations had reverted to wild-type (A481G in the 5'-UTR and Ile143Thr in VP1). The VDPV isolate had lost the temperature sensitive phenotype and had accumulated amino acid substitutions in neutralizing antigenic (NAg) sites 3a and 3b. The date of the initiating OPV dose, estimated from the number of synonymous substitutions in the capsid region, was approximately 8.5 years before seawater sampling, a finding consistent with a long time of virus replication and possible transmission among several individuals. Although no closely related type 2 VDPVs were detected in Brazil or elsewhere, this VDPV was found in an area with a mobile population, where conditions may favor both viral infection and spread. Environmental surveillance serves as an important tool for sensitive and early detection of circulating poliovirus in the final stages of global polio eradication. PMID:27019095

  15. H1PVAT is a novel and potent early-stage inhibitor of poliovirus replication that targets VP1.

    PubMed

    Tijsma, Aloys; Thibaut, Hendrik Jan; Spieser, Stéphane A H; De Palma, Armando; Koukni, Mohamed; Rhoden, Eric; Oberste, Steve; Pürstinger, Gerhard; Volny-Luraghi, Antonia; Martin, Javier; Marchand, Arnaud; Chaltin, Patrick; Neyts, Johan; Leyssen, Pieter

    2014-10-01

    A novel small molecule, H1PVAT, was identified as a potent and selective inhibitor of the in vitro replication of all three poliovirus serotypes, whereas no activity was observed against other enteroviruses. Time-of-drug-addition studies revealed that the compound interfered with an early stage of virus replication. Four independently-selected H1PVAT-resistant virus variants uniformly carried the single amino acid substitution I194F in the VP1 capsid protein. Poliovirus type 1 strain Sabin, reverse-engineered to contain this substitution, proved to be completely insensitive to the antiviral effect of H1PVAT and was cross-resistant to the capsid-binding inhibitors V-073 and pirodavir. The VP1 I194F mutant had a smaller plaque phenotype than wild-type virus, and the amino acid substitution rendered the virus more susceptible to heat inactivation. Both for the wild-type and VP1 I194F mutant virus, the presence of H1PVAT increased the temperature at which the virus was inactivated, providing evidence that the compound interacts with the viral capsid, and that capsid stabilization and antiviral activity are not necessarily correlated. Molecular modeling suggested that H1PVAT binds with high affinity in the pocket underneath the floor of the canyon that is involved in receptor binding. Introduction of the I194F substitution in the model of VP1 induced a slight concerted rearrangement of the core β-barrel in this pocket, which disfavors binding of the compound. Taken together, the compound scaffold, to which H1PVAT belongs, may represent another promising class of poliovirus capsid-binding inhibitors next to V-073 and pirodavir. Potent antivirals against poliovirus will be essential in the poliovirus eradication end-game. PMID:25043639

  16. 76 FR 52563 - Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ...) entitled Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX in the Federal Register (76 FR 103). We... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX... temporary Special Local Regulation on the Sabine River within the Port Arthur, TX Captain of the Port...

  17. 77 FR 277 - Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P; Notice of Availability of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project The staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...

  18. [Genetic Characteristics of Type 2 Vaccine-derived Poliovirus in Shanxi Province (China) in 2014].

    PubMed

    Yan, Dongrei; Li, Xiaolei; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Jianfang; Zhu, Shuangli; Wang, Dongyan; Zhang, Chuangye; Zhu, Hui; Xu, Wenbo

    2015-03-01

    The World Health Organization redefined the type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) in 2010. To study the genetic characteristics and evolution of type 2 VDPV under this new definition, we conducted genome sequencing and analyses of type 2 VDPVs isolated from one patient with acute flaccid paralysis in Shanxi province (China) in 2014. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that the full-length of type 2 VDPV is 7439 bases encoding 2207 amino acids with no insertion or deletion of nucleotides compared with Sabin2. One nucleotide substitution identified as a key determinant of the attenuated phenotype of the Sabin 2 strain (A-G reversion at nucleotide nt 481 in the 5-end of the untranslated region) had reverted in the Shanxi type 2 VDPV. The other known key determinant of the attenuated phenotype of the Sabin 2 strain (U-->C reversion at nt2909 in the VP1 coding region that caused a Ile143Thr substitution in VP1) had not reverted in the Shanxi VDPV. The Shanxi type 2 VDPV was S2/S1 recombinant, the crossover site of which mapped to the 3-end of the 3D region (between nt 6247 and nt 6281). A phylogentic tree based on the VP1 coding region showed that evolution of the Shanxi type 2 VDPV was independent of other type 2 VDPVs detected worldwide. We estimated that the strain circulated for approximately = 11 months in the population according to the known evolution rate. The present study confirmed that the Chinese Polio Laboratory Network could discover the VDPV promptly and that it played an important part in maintenance of a polio-free China. PMID:26164941

  19. 78 FR 62344 - Sabine Pass Liquefaction Expansion, LLC, Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC, and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-18

    ... Sabine Pass LNG, L.P., Cheniere Creole Trail Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Application Take notice that on... Commission an application under section 3(a) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) for authorization to site...) filed, in the same application, a request under section 7(c) of the NGA, for authorization to...

  20. 76 FR 1519 - Security Zones; Sabine Bank Channel, Sabine Pass Channel and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ... and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX in the Federal Register (75 FR 29695). We received one comment on the... recommendation from that one comment and requesting further comments (75 FR 65232). No public meeting was... preamble, the Coast Guard adopts the interim rule amending 33 CFR part 165 that was published at 75...

  1. 75 FR 65232 - Security Zones; Sabine Bank Channel, Sabine Pass Channel and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ...-Neches Waterway, TX'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 29695). We received one comment on the proposed rule... public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do... and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Interim rule with request...

  2. New Generation of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccines for Universal Immunization After Eradication of Poliomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Chumakov, Konstantin; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2008-01-01

    Twenty years of global polio eradication efforts may soon eliminate wild-type poliovirus transmission. However, new information about poliovirus learned during this campaign, as well as the political realities of a modern world demand that universal immunity against poliomyelitis be maintained even after wild poliovirus is eradicated. Although two excellent vaccines have proven highly effective in the past, neither the live nor current inactivated products are optimal for use in the post-eradication setting. Therefore, concerted efforts are urgently needed to develop a new generation of vaccine that is risk-free and affordable and can be produced on a global scale. Here we discuss the desired properties and ways to create a new polio vaccine. PMID:18990066

  3. Inhibition of poliovirus RNA synthesis by brefeldin A.

    PubMed Central

    Maynell, L A; Kirkegaard, K; Klymkowsky, M W

    1992-01-01

    Brefeldin A (BFA), a fungal metabolite that blocks transport of newly synthesized proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum, was found to inhibit poliovirus replication 10(5)- to 10(6)-fold. BFA does not inhibit entry of poliovirus into the cell or translation of viral RNA. Poliovirus RNA synthesis, however, is completely inhibited by BFA. A specific class of membranous vesicles, with which the poliovirus replication complex is physically associated, is known to proliferate in poliovirus-infected cells. BFA may inhibit poliovirus replication by preventing the formation of these vesicles. Images PMID:1312615

  4. Examination of poliovirus vaccine preparations for SV40 sequences.

    PubMed

    Sangar, D; Pipkin, P A; Wood, D J; Minor, P D

    1999-03-01

    Oral poliovaccines derived from the strains developed by Sabin have been the basis of vaccination against poliomyelitis in the U.K. since 1962. Contamination of earlier materials with the monkey virus SV40, particularly inactivated Salk type poliovaccines, is well documented. Precautions have been in place for more than 30 years to prevent SV40 contamination of oral poliovaccines based on screening of donor animals and tests for SV40 infectivity. PCR was applied to examine all archived samples of oral poliovaccines available to us dating from 1966 to the present, including all vaccines used in the U.K. since 1980, for the presence of SV40 sequences. Of 132 materials examined, 118 were negative on initial testing and fourteen gave reactions which on further examination were attributed either to cross contamination during handling in the laboratory at National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC) or to non-specific amplification. It was concluded that none of the samples contained SV40 sequences. The materials included 69 separate monovalent bulks of poliovirus type 1, 2 or 3 grown on monkey kidney cells from four different manufacturers and 74 bulks grown on human diploid cells from two manufacturers. One additional seed material from 1962 contained low levels of unique and characteristic SV40 sequences. The seed had been treated by the manufacturer to inactivate DNA viruses and tests by the manufacturer and at NIBSC failed to demonstrate the presence of infectious SV40 virus. Monovalent bulks prepared by the manufacturer from this seed were negative for SV40 sequences by PCR. The PCR studies provide no evidence of contamination of oral poliovaccines used in the UK with infectious SV40 and suggest that the steps taken to ensure the absence of infectious SV40 are satisfactory. PMID:10441397

  5. Will containment of wild poliovirus in laboratories and inactivated poliovirus vaccine production sites be effective for global certification?

    PubMed Central

    Dowdle, Walter R.; Wolff, Christopher; Sanders, Raymond; Lambert, Scott; Best, Maureen

    2004-01-01

    The absolute laboratory containment of any virus cannot be guaranteed, but a wealth of experience indicates that effective containment of wild poliovirus materials for global certification is technically and operationally feasible. Effective containment is based on the principles of minimal wild poliovirus infectious and potentially infectious materials in laboratories; minimal risks of operations in laboratories and inactivated poliovirus vaccine production facilities; minimal susceptibility of workers to wild poliovirus infection and shedding; and minimal susceptibility of populations to wild poliovirus spread. Each principle alone is imperfect, but collectively they greatly minimize the risks of transmitting wild poliovirus from the laboratory to the community. PMID:15106302

  6. The late early Miocene Sabine River

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, E. )

    1990-09-01

    Work on a new late early Miocene vertebrate fossil site, in a paleochannel deposit of the upper Carnahan Bayou Member of the lower Fleming Formation, has revealed unexpected data on the course and nature of the Sabine River of that time. Screen washing for smaller vertebrate remains at the site, just west of the Sabine River in Newton County, central eastern Texas, has resulted in the recovery of early Permian, Early Cretaceous, Late Cretaceous (Maestrichtian), Paleocene/Eocene, late Eocene, and Oligocene/Miocene fossils, in addition to the main early Miocene fauna. The reworked fossils, as well as distinctive mineral grains, show that the late early Miocene Sabine River was connected to the Texas/Oklahoma/Arkansas boundary section of the Red River, as well as to rivers draining the southern Ouachita Mountains. These rivers must have joined the Texas/Louisiana boundary section of the Sabine River somewhere in northwest Louisiana at that time. This suggests that the Louisiana section of the present Red River pirated the Texas/Oklahoma/Arkansas boundary section of the river some time after the early Miocene. The preservation of recognizable fossils transported hundreds of miles in a large river itself requires explanation. It is speculated here that the late early Miocene Sabine River incorporated a large amount of the then recently deposited volcanic ash from the Trans-Pecos Volcanic Field. Montmorillonite clay from the altered volcanic ash would have made the river very turbid, which could have allowed coarse sand-sized particles to be carried in the suspended load of the river, rather than in its bed load (where they would have been destroyed by the rolling chert gravel). Additional evidence for such long-distance fossil transport in the late early Miocene rivers of the western Gulf Coastal Plain comes from the abundant Cretaceous fossils of the upper Oakville Formation of southeast Texas and the Siphonina davisi zone of the southeast Texas subsurface.

  7. Identification and Manipulation of the Molecular Determinants Influencing Poliovirus Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Runckel, Charles; Westesson, Oscar; Andino, Raul; DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    The control and prevention of communicable disease is directly impacted by the genetic mutability of the underlying etiological agents. In the case of RNA viruses, genetic recombination may impact public health by facilitating the generation of new viral strains with altered phenotypes and by compromising the genetic stability of live attenuated vaccines. The landscape of homologous recombination within a given RNA viral genome is thought to be influenced by several factors; however, a complete understanding of the genetic determinants of recombination is lacking. Here, we utilize gene synthesis and deep sequencing to create a detailed recombination map of the poliovirus 1 coding region. We identified over 50 thousand breakpoints throughout the genome, and we show the majority of breakpoints to be concentrated in a small number of specific “hotspots,” including those associated with known or predicted RNA secondary structures. Nucleotide base composition was also found to be associated with recombination frequency, suggesting that recombination is modulated across the genome by predictable and alterable motifs. We tested the predictive utility of the nucleotide base composition association by generating an artificial hotspot in the poliovirus genome. Our results imply that modification of these motifs could be extended to whole genome re-designs for the development of recombination-deficient, genetically stable live vaccine strains. PMID:23408891

  8. [Investigation of a Patient with Pre-vaccine-derived Poliovirus in Shandong Province, China].

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaojuan; Liu, Yao; Wang, Suting; Zhang Xiao; Song, Lizhi; Tao, Zexin; Ji, Feng; Xiong, Ping; Xu, Aiqiang

    2015-09-01

    To analyze the genetic characteristics of a polio-I highly variant vaccine recombinant virus in Shandong Province (China) in 2011 and to identify isolates from healthy contacts, two stool specimens from one patient with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) and 40 stool specimens from his contacts were collected for virus isolation. The complete genome of poliovirus and VP1 coding region of the non-polio enterovirus were sequenced. Homologous comparison and phylogenetic analyses based on VP1 sequences were undertaken among coxsackievirus (CV) B1, CV-B3 isolates, and those in GenBank. One poliovirus (P1/11186), CV-A4 and CV-A8 were isolated from the AFP patient; one CV-A2, Echovirus 3 (E-3), E-12 and E-14, ten CV-B1, and five CV-B3 strains were isolated from his contacts. These results led us to believe that there may be a human enterovirus epidemic in this area, and that surveillance must be enhanced. P1/11186 was a type-1 vaccine-related poliovirus; it combined with type-2 and type-3 polioviruses in 2A and 3A regions, respectively. There were 25 nucleotide mutations with 9 amino-acid alterations in the entire genome. There were 8 nucleotide mutations with 5 amino-acid alterations in the VP1 region compared with the corresponding Sabin strains. Homology analyses suggested that the ten CV-B1 isolates had 97.0%-100% nucleotide and 98.9%-100% amino-acid identities with each other, as well as 92.6%-100% nucleotide and 99.2%-100% amino-acid identities among the five CV-B3 isolates. Phylogenetic analyses on the complete sequences of VP1 among CV-B1 and CV-B3 isolates showed that Shandong strains, together with strains from other provinces in China, had a close relationship and belonged to the same group. PMID:26738293

  9. Poliovirus Adsorption by 34 Minerals and Soils

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Rebecca S.; Taylor, Dene H.; Sturman, Lawrence S.; Reddy, Michael M.; Fuhs, G. Wolfgang

    1981-01-01

    The adsorption of radiolabeled infectious poliovirus type 2 by 34 well-defined soils and mineral substrates was analyzed in a synthetic freshwater medium containing 1 mM CaCl2 and 1.25 mM NaHCO3 at pH 7. In a model system, adsorption of poliovirus by Ottawa sand was rapid and reached equilibrium within 1 h at 4°C. Near saturation, the adsorption could be described by the Langmuir equation; the apparent surface saturation was 2.5 × 106 plaque-forming units of poliovirus per mg of Ottawa sand. At low surface coverage, adsorption was described by the Freundlich equation. The soils and minerals used ranged from acidic to basic and from high in organic content to organic free. The available negative surface charge on each substrate was measured by the adsorption of a cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. Most of the substrates adsorbed more than 95% of the virus. In general, soils, in comparison with minerals, were weak adsorbents. Among the soils, muck and Genesee silt loam were the poorest adsorbents; among the minerals, montmorillonite, glauconite, and bituminous shale were the least effective. The most effective adsorbents were magnetite sand and hematite, which are predominantly oxides of iron. Correlation coefficients for substrate properties and virus adsorption revealed that the elemental composition of the adsorbents had little effect on poliovirus uptake. Substrate surface area and pH, by themselves, were not significantly correlated with poliovirus uptake. A strong negative correlation was found between poliovirus adsorption and both the contents of organic matter and the available negative surface charge on the substrates as determined by their capacities for adsorbing the cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. PMID:6274259

  10. Poliovirus: Generation and Characterization of Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Burrill, Cecily P.; Strings, Vanessa R.; Schulte, Michael B.; Andino, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) is the prototypical picornavirus. It is a non-enveloped RNA virus with a small (~7.5 kb) genome of positive polarity. cDNA clones of several strains are available, and infectious virus can be produced by the transfection of in vitro transcribed viral genomes into an appropriate host cell. The ease of genetic studies in poliovirus is a primary reason that it has long served as a model to study RNA virus biology, pathogenesis, and evolution. Protocols for the generation and characterization of PV mutants are presented. A separate unit concerning the production, propagation, quantification, and purification of PV will also be presented. PMID:23686829

  11. A severe case of co-infection with Enterovirus 71 and vaccine-derived Poliovirus type II.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shaohui; Du, Zengqing; Feng, Min; Che, Yanchun; Li, Qihan

    2015-11-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is often identified as the primary pathogen that directly leads to severe cases of HFMD, whereas the association between other enteroviruses and EV71 infection remains largely unclear. Here we report a rare case of a 5-year-old boy co-infected with EV71 and vaccine-derived Poliovirus (VDPV) type II, which were identified based on PCR and sequence analysis results and clinical symptoms and were characterized on CT. We determined that the EV71 strain belongs to the C4 subtype, and the VDPV II strain was closely genetically related to the reference Sabin type II strain. This report may improved our understanding of the clinical significance of the associations between clinical signs and the infectious properties of the involved pathogens. PMID:26361010

  12. 75 FR 55968 - Special Local Regulations, Sabine River; Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... (NPRM) entitled Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX in the Federal Register (75 FR 41119... published in 75 FR 41119. Regulatory Analyses We developed this rule after considering numerous statutes and... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations, Sabine River; Orange,...

  13. Update on Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses - Worldwide, January 2015-May 2016.

    PubMed

    Jorba, Jaume; Diop, Ousmane M; Iber, Jane; Sutter, Roland W; Wassilak, Steven G; Burns, Cara C

    2016-01-01

    In 1988, the World Health Assembly resolved to eradicate poliomyelitis worldwide (1). One of the main tools used in polio eradication efforts has been the live, attenuated, oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) (2), an inexpensive vaccine easily administered by trained volunteers. OPV might require several doses to induce immunity, but provides long-term protection against paralytic disease. Through effective use of OPV, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) has brought wild polioviruses to the threshold of eradication (1). However, OPV use, particularly in areas with low routine vaccination coverage, is associated with the emergence of genetically divergent vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) whose genetic drift from the parental OPV strains indicates prolonged replication or circulation (3). VDPVs can emerge among immunologically normal vaccine recipients and their contacts as well as among persons with primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). Immunodeficiency-associated VDPVs (iVDPVs) can replicate for years in some persons with PIDs. In addition, circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) (3) can emerge in areas with low OPV coverage and can cause outbreaks of paralytic polio. This report updates previous summaries regarding VDPVs (4). PMID:27491079

  14. Poliovirus Laboratory Based Surveillance: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Syed Sohail Zahoor; Asghar, Humayun; Sharif, Salmaan; Alam, Muhammad Masroor

    2016-01-01

    World Health Assembly (WHA) in 1988 encouraged the member states to launch Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) (resolution WHA41.28) against "the Crippler" called poliovirus, through strong routine immunization program and intensified surveillance systems. Since its launch, global incidence of poliomyelitis has been reduced by more than 99 % and the disease squeezed to only three endemic countries (Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Nigeria) out of 125. Today, poliomyelitis is on the verge of eradication, and their etiological agents, the three poliovirus serotypes, are on the brink of extinction from the natural environment. The last case of poliomyelitis due to wild type 2 strain occurred in 1999 in Uttar Pradesh, India whereas the last paralytic case due to wild poliovirus type 3 (WPV3) was seen in November, 2012 in Yobe, Nigeria. Despite this progress, undetected circulation cannot fully rule out the eradication as most of the poliovirus infections are entirely subclinical; hence sophisticated environmental surveillance is needed to ensure the complete eradication of virus. Moreover, the vaccine virus in under-immunized communities can sometimes revert and attain wild type characteristics posing a big challenge to the program. PMID:26983728

  15. 75 FR 74029 - Sabine Pass LNG, L.P.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Sabine Pass LNG, L.P.; Notice of Application November 22, 2010. Take notice that on November 12, 2010, Sabine Pass LNG, L.P. (Sabine Pass), 700 Milam Street, Suite 800, Houston... directed to Patricia Outtrim, Sabine Pass LNG, L.P., 700 Milam Street, Suite 800, Houston, Texas 77002,...

  16. 76 FR 63914 - Sabine River Authority of Texas and Sabine River Authority, State of Louisiana; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Sabine River Authority of Texas and Sabine River Authority, State of Louisiana; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and Establishing Procedural Schedule for Licensing and Deadline for...

  17. An Outbreak of Type Π Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus in Sichuan Province, China: Emergence and Circulation in an Under-Immunized Population

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chun-Xiang; Liu, Qing-Lian; Hao, Li-Xin; Liu, Yu; Zheng, Jing-Shan; Qin, Zhi-Ying; Xia, Wei; Zhang, Shi-Yue; Yin, Zun-Dong; Jing, Qiong; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Huang, Rong-Na; Yang, Ru-Pei; Tong, Wen-Bin; Qi, Qi; Guan, Xu-Jing; Jing, Yu-Lin; Ma, Qian-Li; Wang, Jin; Ma, Xiao-Zhen; Chen, Na; Zheng, Hong-Ru; Li, Yin-Qiao; Ma, Chao; Su, Qi-Ru; Reilly, Kathleen H.; Luo, Hui-Ming; Wu, Xian-Ping; Wen, Ning; Yang, Wei-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Background During August 2011–February 2012, an outbreak of type Π circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPVs) occurred in Sichuan Province, China. Methods A field investigation of the outbreak was conducted to characterize outbreak isolates and to guide emergency response. Sequence analysis of poliovirus capsid protein VP1 was performed to determine the viral propagation, and a coverage survey was carried out for risk assessment. Results One clinical compatible polio case and three VDPV cases were determined in Ngawa County, Ngawa Tibetan and Qiang Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan Province. Case patients were unimmunized children, 0.8–1 years old. Genetic sequencing showed that the isolates diverged from the VP1 region of the type Π Sabin strain by 5–12 nucleotides (nt) and shared the same 5 nt VP1 substitutions, which indicate single lineage of cVDPVs. Of the 7 acute flaccid paralysis cases (all>6 months) reported in Ngawa Prefecture in 2011, 4 (57.1%) cases (including 2 polio cases) did not receive oral attenuated poliovirus vaccine. Supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) were conducted in February–May, 2012, and the strain has not been isolated since. Conclusion High coverage of routine immunization should be maintained among children until WPV transmission is globally eradicated. Risk assessments should be conducted regularly to pinpoint high risk areas or subpopulations, with SIAs developed if necessary. PMID:25503964

  18. Update on vaccine-derived polioviruses - worldwide, July 2012-December 2013.

    PubMed

    Diop, Ousmane M; Burns, Cara C; Wassilak, Steven G; Kew, Olen M

    2014-03-21

    In 1988, the World Health Assembly resolved to eradicate poliomyelitis worldwide. One of the main tools used in polio eradication efforts has been live, attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), an inexpensive vaccine easily administered by trained volunteers. OPV might require several doses to induce immunity, but then it provides long-term protection against paralytic disease through durable humoral immunity. Rare cases of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis can occur among immunologically normal OPV recipients, their contacts, and persons who are immunodeficient. In addition, vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) can emerge in areas with low OPV coverage to cause polio outbreaks and can replicate for years in persons who have primary, B-cell immunodeficiencies. This report updates previous surveillance summaries and describes VDPVs detected worldwide during July 2012-December 2013. Those include a new circulating VDPV (cVDPV) outbreak identified in Pakistan in 2012, with spread to Afghanistan; an outbreak in Afghanistan previously identified in 2009 that continued into 2013; a new outbreak in Chad that spread to Cameroon, Niger, and northeastern Nigeria; and an outbreak that began in Somalia in 2008 that continued and spread to Kenya in 2013. A large outbreak in Nigeria that was identified in 2005 was nearly stopped by the end of 2013. Additionally, 10 newly identified persons in eight countries were found to excrete immunodeficiency-associated VDPVs (iVDPVs), and VDPVs were found among immunocompetent persons and environmental samples in 13 countries. Because the majority of VDPV isolates are type 2, the World Health Organization has developed a plan for coordinated worldwide replacement of trivalent OPV (tOPV) with bivalent OPV (bOPV; types 1 and 3) by 2016, preceded by introduction of at least 1 dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) containing all three poliovirus serotypes into routine immunization schedules worldwide to ensure high population

  19. Twenty-Eight Years of Poliovirus Replication in an Immunodeficient Individual: Impact on the Global Polio Eradication Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Glynis; Klapsa, Dimitra; Wilton, Thomas; Stone, Lindsay; Minor, Philip D.; Martin, Javier

    2015-01-01

    There are currently huge efforts by the World Health Organization and partners to complete global polio eradication. With the significant decline in poliomyelitis cases due to wild poliovirus in recent years, rare cases related to the use of live-attenuated oral polio vaccine assume greater importance. Poliovirus strains in the oral vaccine are known to quickly revert to neurovirulent phenotype following replication in humans after immunisation. These strains can transmit from person to person leading to poliomyelitis outbreaks and can replicate for long periods of time in immunodeficient individuals leading to paralysis or chronic infection, with currently no effective treatment to stop excretion from these patients. Here, we describe an individual who has been excreting type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus for twenty eight years as estimated by the molecular clock established with VP1 capsid gene nucleotide sequences of serial isolates. This represents by far the longest period of excretion described from such a patient who is the only identified individual known to be excreting highly evolved vaccine-derived poliovirus at present. Using a range of in vivo and in vitro assays we show that the viruses are very virulent, antigenically drifted and excreted at high titre suggesting that such chronic excreters pose an obvious risk to the eradication programme. Our results in virus neutralization assays with human sera and immunisation-challenge experiments using transgenic mice expressing the human poliovirus receptor indicate that while maintaining high immunisation coverage will likely confer protection against paralytic disease caused by these viruses, significant changes in immunisation strategies might be required to effectively stop their occurrence and potential widespread transmission. Eventually, new stable live-attenuated polio vaccines with no risk of reversion might be required to respond to any poliovirus isolation in the post-eradication era. PMID:26313548

  20. [Circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 outbreak in Democratic Republic of Congo 2011-2012].

    PubMed

    Bazira, L; Coulibaly, T; Mayenga, M; Ncharre, C; Yogolelo, R; Mbule, A; Moudzeo, H; Lwamba, P; Mulumba, A W; Cabore, J

    2015-10-01

    According to the WHO records of 2013, the incidence of poliomyelitis was reduced by more than 99%, the number of endemic countries decreased from 125 in 1988 to 3 in 2013 and over 10 million cases were prevented from poliomyelitis thanks to the intensive use of Oral polio vaccine (OPV). However, the emergence of circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus strains (cVDPV), causing serious epidemics like the wild poliovirus, is a major challenge on the final straight towards the goal of eradication and OPV cessation. This paper describes the cVDPVoutbreak that occurred in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) from November 2011 to April 2012. All children under 15 years of age with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) and confirmed presence of cVDPV in the stool samples were included. Thirty (30) children, all from the administrative territories of Bukama and Malemba Nkulu in the Katanga Province (south-east DRC), were reported. The virus responsible was the cVDPV type 2 (0.7% -3.5% divergent from the reference Sabin 2 strain) in 29 children (97%) and the ambiguous vaccine-derived poliovirus strain (0.7% divergent) was confirmed in one case (3%), a boy seventeen months old and already vaccinated four times with OPV. Twentyfive children (83%) were protected by any of the routine EPI vaccines and 3 children (10%) had never received any dose of OPV. In reaction, DRC has conducted five local campaigns over a period of 10 months (from January to October 2012) and the epidemic was stopped after the second round performed in March 2012. As elsewhere in similar conditions, low immunization coverage, poor sanitation conditions and the stop of the use of OPV2 have favoured the emergence of the third cVDPV epidemic in DRC. The implementation of the Strategic Plan for Polio eradication and endgame strategic plan 2013-2018 will prevent the emergence of cVDPV and set up the conditions for a coordinated OPV phase out. PMID:26288132

  1. WHO collaborative studies on poliovirus type 3 strains isolated during the 1968 poliomyelitis epidemic in Poland.

    PubMed

    Melnick, J L; Berencsi, G; Biberi-Moroeanu, S; Combiescu, A A; Furesz, J; Kantoch, M; Kostrzewski, J; Magrath, D I; Perkins, F T; Vonka, V; Cockburn, W C; Dömök, I; Assaad, F A

    1972-01-01

    In 1968 in Poland an extensive outbreak of poliomyelitis, caused by type 3 poliovirus, began about four months after small vaccine trials with the Leon 12a(1)b (Sabin) and USOL-D bac vaccine strains had been carried out. Because of the temporal association, and because the first cases appeared in the province in which the USOL-D vaccine trial was carried out, a detailed investigation of the strains isolated from cases in the epidemic was made in four laboratories in an attempt to determine whether they were related to the two vaccine strains or to a "wild" strain. All the studies were made under code. The rct marker was of no help in determining the relationship of the epidemic strains to the vaccine strains. The McBride test and the elution marker test clearly separated the Leon 12a(1)b strains from those from the cases, but were incapable of detecting whether the epidemic strains were related to the USOL-D bac strain or to wild type 3 strains. Thus the studies did not provide valid information on the origin of the epidemic. PMID:4346582

  2. Environmental Isolation of Circulating Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus After Interruption of Wild Poliovirus Transmission - Nigeria, 2016.

    PubMed

    Etsano, Andrew; Damisa, Eunice; Shuaib, Faisal; Nganda, Gatei Wa; Enemaku, Ogu; Usman, Samuel; Adeniji, Adekunle; Jorba, Jaume; Iber, Jane; Ohuabunwo, Chima; Nnadi, Chimeremma; Wiesen, Eric

    2016-01-01

    In September 2015, more than 1 year after reporting its last wild poliovirus (WPV) case in July 2014 (1), Nigeria was removed from the list of countries with endemic poliovirus transmission,* leaving Afghanistan and Pakistan as the only remaining countries with endemic WPV. However, on April 29, 2016, a laboratory-confirmed, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2) isolate was reported from an environmental sample collected in March from a sewage effluent site in Maiduguri Municipal Council, Borno State, a security-compromised area in northeastern Nigeria. VDPVs are genetic variants of the vaccine viruses with the potential to cause paralysis and can circulate in areas with low population immunity. The Nigeria National Polio Emergency Operations Center initiated emergency response activities, including administration of at least 2 doses of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) to all children aged <5 years through mass campaigns; retroactive searches for missed cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP), and enhanced environmental surveillance. Approximately 1 million children were vaccinated in the first OPV round. Thirteen previously unreported AFP cases were identified. Enhanced environmental surveillance has not resulted in detection of additional VDPV isolates. The detection of persistent circulation of VDPV2 in Borno State highlights the low population immunity, surveillance limitations, and risk for international spread of cVDPVs associated with insurgency-related insecurity. Increasing vaccination coverage with additional targeted supplemental immunization activities and reestablishment of effective routine immunization activities in newly secured and difficult-to-reach areas in Borno is urgently needed. PMID:27490081

  3. NCI’s Douglas R. Lowy and John T. Schiller awarded Sabin Medal

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists whose discovery provided the technology for commercially developed HPV vaccines were honored with the prestigious Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal Award at a ceremony held at the Sabin Vaccine Institute, May 18, 2011.

  4. Battle against poliovirus in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Kaneez; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2013-11-01

    On 22 Feb 2013, the Polio Monitoring Cell of Pakistan announced that the 2012-2013 polio campaign ended, and that 1.6 million children could not be vaccinated due to security concerns in several regions where polio workers had been killed. Those who could not be vaccinated included 50,000 children from the Federally Administrated Tribal Area (FATA), 150,000 form Khyber Pakhtoon Khao, 400,000 from a Quetta, 400,000 from Karachi, and a small number from the Rawalpindi District. These statistics are worrying, as several districts in the large metropolitan cities of Karachi and Quetta were also excluded. The fear of advanced medicine, ideas, or complex devices is a new phenomenon in many conservative and poor countries such as Pakistan, Afghanistan, Sudan, and Somalia. To safeguard the safety of the rest of the world, the failure in the implementation of WHO guidelines for vaccination must be regulated by the UN. There are a number of reasons for the phobias surrounding vaccination, but as technology continues to evolve at such a rapid rate, those with self-determined ideologies cannot cope with such advances. They become vocal to gain popularity and prevent the use of these technologies and medicine by creating and spreading rumors and propaganda of expediency. The struggle to vaccinate children is not easily understood by anyone living in the developed world. The irrational fear of vaccines and the lack of vaccination pose a serious global health risk and must be curbed through a wide variety of pro-vaccination media and religious campaigns. PMID:24240051

  5. 75 FR 33803 - Sabine Pipe Line LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Sabine Pipe Line LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization June 8, 2010. Take notice that on June 1, 2010, Sabine Pipe Line LLC (Sabine), 4800 Fournace Place, Bellaire... L. Kirk, Regulatory Specialist, Chevron Pipe Line Company, 4800 Fournace Place, Bellaire,...

  6. Circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses: current state of knowledge.

    PubMed Central

    Kew, Olen M.; Wright, Peter F.; Agol, Vadim I.; Delpeyroux, Francis; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Nathanson, Neal; Pallansch, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Within the past 4 years, poliomyelitis outbreaks associated with circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) have occurred in Hispaniola (2000-01), the Philippines (2001), and Madagascar (2001-02). Retrospective studies have also detected the circulation of endemic cVDPV in Egypt (1988-93) and the likely localized spread of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV)-derived virus in Belarus (1965-66). Gaps in OPV coverage and the previous eradication of the corresponding serotype of indigenous wild poliovirus were the critical risk factors for all cVDPV outbreaks. The cVDPV outbreaks were stopped by mass immunization campaigns using OPV. To increase sensitivity for detecting vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs), in 2001 the Global Polio Laboratory Network implemented additional testing requirements for all poliovirus isolates under investigation. This approach quickly led to the recognition of the Philippines and Madagascar cVDPV outbreaks, but of no other current outbreaks. The potential risk of cVDPV emergence has increased dramatically in recent years as wild poliovirus circulation has ceased in most of the world. The risk appears highest for the type 2 OPV strain because of its greater tendency to spread to contacts. The emergence of cVDPVs underscores the critical importance of eliminating the last pockets of wild poliovirus circulation, maintaining universally high levels of polio vaccine coverage, stopping OPV use as soon as it is safely possible to do so, and continuing sensitive poliovirus surveillance into the foreseeable future. Particular attention must be given to areas where the risks for wild poliovirus circulation have been highest, and where the highest rates of polio vaccine coverage must be maintained to suppress cVDPV emergence. PMID:15106296

  7. Seroimmunity to polioviruses in U.S. Army recruits.

    PubMed

    Burke, D S; Gaydos, J C; Hodder, R A; Bancroft, W H

    1979-02-01

    Titers of neutralizing antibody to poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3 were determined for serum specimens obtained from 268 U.S. Army recruits. Among those tested, 20.9% lacked neutralizing antibody to one or more types of poliovirus, and 1.1% lacked antibody to all three types. An analysis of demographic data showed that age of less than 18 years, schooling for less than 10 years, and residence in the northeastern United States were associated with higher percentages of recruits lacking neutralizing antibodies to polioviruses in serum. PMID:220335

  8. Concentration and purification of poliovirus by ultrafiltration and isopycnic centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Guskey, L E; Wolff, D A

    1972-07-01

    A method is described by which poliovirus can be rapidly and simply concentrated by the use of a Diaflo XM-50 ultrafilter membrane. Freon-extracted ultrafilter concentrates banded in CsCl provided a 1,724-fold volumetric concentration of poliovirus. During concentration, trypsin-digested cellular material can pass through the ultrafilter membrane, thus providing a versatile means of degrading and eliminating extraneous contaminating proteins. The ultrafilter concentration system is compared with the CsCl cushion system of poliovirus concentration, and both systems are further compared by banding virus and virus capsid material in CsCl by use of isopycnic centrifugation. PMID:4341520

  9. Kinetics of poliovirus shedding following oral vaccination as measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR versus culture.

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, Mami; Begum, Sharmin; Uddin, Md Jashim; Platts-Mills, James A; Liu, Jie; Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Chowdhury, Anwarul H; Jamil, Khondoker M; Haque, Rashidul; Petri, William A; Houpt, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    Amid polio eradication efforts, detection of oral polio vaccine (OPV) virus in stool samples can provide information about rates of mucosal immunity and allow estimation of the poliovirus reservoir. We developed a multiplex one-step quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) assay for detection of OPV Sabin strains 1, 2, and 3 directly in stool samples with an external control to normalize samples for viral quantity and compared its performance with that of viral culture. We applied the assay to samples from infants in Dhaka, Bangladesh, after the administration of trivalent OPV (tOPV) at weeks 14 and 52 of life (on days 0 [pre-OPV], +4, +11, +18, and +25 relative to vaccination). When 1,350 stool samples were tested, the sensitivity and specificity of the quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay were 89 and 91% compared with culture. A quantitative relationship between culture(+)/qPCR(+) and culture(-)/qPCR(+) stool samples was observed. The kinetics of shedding revealed by qPCR and culture were similar. qPCR quantitative cutoffs based on the day +11 or +18 stool samples could be used to identify the culture-positive shedders, as well as the long-duration or high-frequency shedders. Interestingly, qPCR revealed that a small minority (7%) of infants contributed the vast majority (93 to 100%) of the total estimated viral excretion across all subtypes at each time point. This qPCR assay for OPV can simply and quantitatively detect all three Sabin strains directly in stool samples to approximate shedding both qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:25378579

  10. Construction and characterization of poliovirus subgenomic replicons.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G; Racaniello, V R

    1988-05-01

    Poliovirus RNAs containing in-frame deletions within the capsid-coding region were produced by in vitro transcription of altered poliovirus type 1 cDNA by using bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Three RNAs were transcribed that contained deletions of 2,317 nucleotides (bases 747 to 3064), 1,781 nucleotides (bases 1,175 to 2,956), and 1,295 nucleotides (bases 1,175 to 2,470). All three subgenomic RNAs replicated after transfection into HeLa cells, demonstrating that sequences encoding the capsid polypeptides are not essential for viral RNA replication in vivo. Viral RNA containing the largest deletion (R1) replicated approximately three times better than full-length RNA produced in vitro. Northern blot (RNA blot) hybridization analysis of total cellular RNA from HeLa cells at different times after transfection with R1 demonstrated the presence of increasing amounts of the expected 5.1-kilobase subgenomic RNA. Analysis by immunoprecipitation of viral proteins induced after transfection of R1 RNA into HeLa cells revealed the presence of proteins 2Apro, 2C, and 3Dpol and its precursors, suggesting that the polyprotein cleavages are similar to those occurring in virus-infected cells. Replication of P2/Lansing virion RNA was inhibited by cotransfection with the R1 replicon, as demonstrated by hybridization analysis with a serotype-specific oligonucleotide probe. A higher level of inhibition of RNA replication was observed when P2/Lansing RNA was cotransfected into HeLa cells with truncated R1 transcripts (R1-PvuII) that were missing 395 3' nucleotides and a poly(A) tail. These internally and terminally deleted RNAs inhibited the replication of subgenomic replicons R1, R2, and R3 and caused a reduction in plaque size when cotransfected with P1/Mahoney or P2/Lansing viral RNA, suggesting that individual cells had received both RNAs. No inhibition of plaque size was observed when replicon RNAs were used that were missing 1,384 or 1,839 3' nucleotides or contained plasmid

  11. Exploring the fitness landscape of poliovirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Simone; Acevedo, Ashely; Andino, Raul; Tang, Chao

    2012-02-01

    RNA viruses are known to display extraordinary adaptation capabilities to different environments, due to high mutation rates. Their very dynamical evolution is captured by the quasispecies concept, according to which the viral population forms a swarm of genetic variants linked through mutation, which cooperatively interact at a functional level and collectively contribute to the characteristics of the population. The description of the viral fitness landscape becomes paramount towards a more thorough understanding of the virus evolution and spread. The high mutation rate, together with the cooperative nature of the quasispecies, makes it particularly challenging to explore its fitness landscape. I will present an investigation of the dynamical properties of poliovirus fitness landscape, through both the adoption of new experimental techniques and theoretical models.

  12. Preventing Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Emergence during the Polio Endgame.

    PubMed

    Pons-Salort, Margarita; Burns, Cara C; Lyons, Hil; Blake, Isobel M; Jafari, Hamid; Oberste, M Steven; Kew, Olen M; Grassly, Nicholas C

    2016-07-01

    Reversion and spread of vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) to cause outbreaks of poliomyelitis is a rare outcome resulting from immunisation with the live-attenuated oral poliovirus vaccines (OPVs). Global withdrawal of all three OPV serotypes is therefore a key objective of the polio endgame strategic plan, starting with serotype 2 (OPV2) in April 2016. Supplementary immunisation activities (SIAs) with trivalent OPV (tOPV) in advance of this date could mitigate the risks of OPV2 withdrawal by increasing serotype-2 immunity, but may also create new serotype-2 VDPV (VDPV2). Here, we examine the risk factors for VDPV2 emergence and implications for the strategy of tOPV SIAs prior to OPV2 withdrawal. We first developed mathematical models of VDPV2 emergence and spread. We found that in settings with low routine immunisation coverage, the implementation of a single SIA increases the risk of VDPV2 emergence. If routine coverage is 20%, at least 3 SIAs are needed to bring that risk close to zero, and if SIA coverage is low or there are persistently "missed" groups, the risk remains high despite the implementation of multiple SIAs. We then analysed data from Nigeria on the 29 VDPV2 emergences that occurred during 2004-2014. Districts reporting the first case of poliomyelitis associated with a VDPV2 emergence were compared to districts with no VDPV2 emergence in the same 6-month period using conditional logistic regression. In agreement with the model results, the odds of VDPV2 emergence decreased with higher routine immunisation coverage (odds ratio 0.67 for a 10% absolute increase in coverage [95% confidence interval 0.55-0.82]). We also found that the probability of a VDPV2 emergence resulting in poliomyelitis in >1 child was significantly higher in districts with low serotype-2 population immunity. Our results support a strategy of focused tOPV SIAs before OPV2 withdrawal in areas at risk of VDPV2 emergence and in sufficient number to raise population immunity above the

  13. Preventing Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Emergence during the Polio Endgame

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Cara C.; Lyons, Hil; Blake, Isobel M.; Oberste, M. Steven; Kew, Olen M.; Grassly, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Reversion and spread of vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) to cause outbreaks of poliomyelitis is a rare outcome resulting from immunisation with the live-attenuated oral poliovirus vaccines (OPVs). Global withdrawal of all three OPV serotypes is therefore a key objective of the polio endgame strategic plan, starting with serotype 2 (OPV2) in April 2016. Supplementary immunisation activities (SIAs) with trivalent OPV (tOPV) in advance of this date could mitigate the risks of OPV2 withdrawal by increasing serotype-2 immunity, but may also create new serotype-2 VDPV (VDPV2). Here, we examine the risk factors for VDPV2 emergence and implications for the strategy of tOPV SIAs prior to OPV2 withdrawal. We first developed mathematical models of VDPV2 emergence and spread. We found that in settings with low routine immunisation coverage, the implementation of a single SIA increases the risk of VDPV2 emergence. If routine coverage is 20%, at least 3 SIAs are needed to bring that risk close to zero, and if SIA coverage is low or there are persistently “missed” groups, the risk remains high despite the implementation of multiple SIAs. We then analysed data from Nigeria on the 29 VDPV2 emergences that occurred during 2004−2014. Districts reporting the first case of poliomyelitis associated with a VDPV2 emergence were compared to districts with no VDPV2 emergence in the same 6-month period using conditional logistic regression. In agreement with the model results, the odds of VDPV2 emergence decreased with higher routine immunisation coverage (odds ratio 0.67 for a 10% absolute increase in coverage [95% confidence interval 0.55−0.82]). We also found that the probability of a VDPV2 emergence resulting in poliomyelitis in >1 child was significantly higher in districts with low serotype-2 population immunity. Our results support a strategy of focused tOPV SIAs before OPV2 withdrawal in areas at risk of VDPV2 emergence and in sufficient number to raise population immunity

  14. 75 FR 41119 - Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX... River, Orange, Texas. This Special Local Regulation is intended to restrict vessels from portions of...

  15. 76 FR 30890 - Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX... River, Orange, Texas on September 24-25, 2011. This Special Local Regulation is intended to...

  16. 78 FR 1851 - Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P.; Notice of Intent To Prepare an...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... facility; condensate storage, metering and send-out facilities; four gas pipeline meter stations... HRU, condensate storage, and metering facilities would be located within the existing Sabine Pass LNG... wetlands; Cultural resources; Vegetation and wildlife; Air quality and noise; Endangered and...

  17. Development and consideration of global policies for managing the future risks of poliovirus outbreaks: insights and lessons learned through modeling.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J; Pallansch, Mark A; Kew, Olen M; Sutter, Roland W; Aylward, R Bruce; Watkins, Margaret; Gary, Howard; Alexander, James P; Venczel, Linda; Johnson, Denise; Cáceres, Victor M; Sangrujee, Nalinee; Jafari, Hamid; Cochi, Stephen L

    2006-12-01

    The success of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative promises to bring large benefits, including sustained improvements in quality of life (i.e., cases of paralytic disease and deaths avoided) and costs saved from cessation of vaccination. Obtaining and maintaining these benefits requires that policymakers manage the transition from the current massive use of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) to a world without OPV and free of the risks of potential future reintroductions of live polioviruses. This article describes the analytical journey that began in 2001 with a retrospective case study on polio risk management and led to development of dynamic integrated risk, economic, and decision analysis tools to inform global policies for managing the risks of polio. This analytical journey has provided several key insights and lessons learned that will be useful to future analysts involved in similar complex decision-making processes. PMID:17184398

  18. Seroepidemiology of Polioviruses among University Students in Northern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Vincenzo; Cocchio, Silvia; Lazzari, Roberta; Saracino, Elena; Bertoncello, Chiara; Buja, Alessandra; Trevisan, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of poliovirus vaccination schemes has led to a marked decline in the incidence of paralytic poliomyelitis worldwide, but wild poliovirus is still endemic in some developing countries, and in 2009 a total of 23 countries reported at least 1 case of poliomyelitis caused by wild-strain polio viruses. A serological survey was thus conducted on the immunological status against polioviruses of 318 young adults, classified by their country of origin. Immunity to poliomyelitis was assessed by neutralizing antibody titration in tissues cultured on microplates. The rate of seronegativity (≤1:8) in the study population was 26.7% for poliovirus type 1, 7.2% for type 2, and 22.6% for type 3. In our sample of 318 individuals, 219 (68.9%) were Italian and 99 (31.1%) were from outside the European Union (EU). The proportion of cases found seropositive to polioviruses 1 and 3 decreased significantly with older age; this age-related decrease was more evident in the Italian group than among the non-EU subjects. Any risk of the wild virus recurring and causing paralytic poliomyelitis must be prevented, keeping Europe polio free by means of appropriate immunological protection, until polio has been conclusively eradicated all over the world. Judging from our findings, it may be worth considering administering a fifth dose of polio vaccine to adolescents. PMID:22739695

  19. Seroepidemiology of polioviruses among university students in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Vincenzo; Baldovin, Tatjana; Cocchio, Silvia; Lazzari, Roberta; Saracino, Elena; Bertoncello, Chiara; Buja, Alessandra; Trevisan, Andrea

    2012-08-01

    The widespread use of poliovirus vaccination schemes has led to a marked decline in the incidence of paralytic poliomyelitis worldwide, but wild poliovirus is still endemic in some developing countries, and in 2009 a total of 23 countries reported at least 1 case of poliomyelitis caused by wild-strain polio viruses. A serological survey was thus conducted on the immunological status against polioviruses of 318 young adults, classified by their country of origin. Immunity to poliomyelitis was assessed by neutralizing antibody titration in tissues cultured on microplates. The rate of seronegativity (≤ 1:8) in the study population was 26.7% for poliovirus type 1, 7.2% for type 2, and 22.6% for type 3. In our sample of 318 individuals, 219 (68.9%) were Italian and 99 (31.1%) were from outside the European Union (EU). The proportion of cases found seropositive to polioviruses 1 and 3 decreased significantly with older age; this age-related decrease was more evident in the Italian group than among the non-EU subjects. Any risk of the wild virus recurring and causing paralytic poliomyelitis must be prevented, keeping Europe polio free by means of appropriate immunological protection, until polio has been conclusively eradicated all over the world. Judging from our findings, it may be worth considering administering a fifth dose of polio vaccine to adolescents. PMID:22739695

  20. Cellular origin and ultrastructure of membranes induced during poliovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, A; Giddings, T H; Ladinsky, M S; Kirkegaard, K

    1996-01-01

    Poliovirus RNA replicative complexes are associated with cytoplasmic membranous structures that accumulate during viral infection. These membranes were immunoisolated by using a monoclonal antibody against the viral nonstructural protein 2C. Biochemical analysis of the isolated membranes revealed that several organelles of the host cell (lysosomes, trans-Golgi stack and trans-Golgi network, and endoplasmic reticulum) contributed to the virus-induced membranous structures. Electron microscopy of infected cells preserved by high-pressure freezing revealed that the virus-induced membranes contain double lipid bilayers that surround apparently cytosolic material. Immunolabeling experiments showed that poliovirus proteins 2C and 3D were localized to the same membranes as the cellular markers tested. The morphological and biochemical data are consistent with the hypothesis that autophagy or a similar host process is involved in the formation of the poliovirus-induced membranes. PMID:8794292

  1. Poliovirus protein 2C has ATPase and GTPase activities.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, P L; Carrasco, L

    1993-04-15

    Poliovirus protein 2C belongs to an expanding group of proteins containing a nucleotide binding motif in their sequence. We present evidence that poliovirus 2C has nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) activity and binds to RNA. Poliovirus 2C was expressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion protein with the maltose binding protein (MBP). The fusion protein MBP-2C is efficiently cut by protease Xa within the 2C region. Thus, the fusion protein as such was used to assay for the putative activities of poliovirus 2C. Deletion mutants were constructed which lacked different portions of the 2C carboxyl terminus: mutant 2C delta 1 lacked the last 169 amino acids, whereas mutant 2C delta 2 had the last 74 amino acids deleted. The fusion proteins MBP-2C, MBP-2BC, and the mutant MBP-2C delta 2 that contained the first 255 amino acids of 2C had NTPase activity. Both ATPase and GTPase activities are inhibited by antibodies directed against the MBP-2C protein. Analysis of the ability of the different proteins to bind to labeled RNA indicates that MBP-2C and MBP-2BC form a complex, whereas none of the mutants interacted with RNA, indicating that the RNA binding domain lies beyond amino acid 255. None of the fusion proteins had detectable helicase activity. We suggest that poliovirus protein 2C shows similarities to the GTPases group involved in vesicular traffic and transports the viral RNA replication complexes. These results provide the first experimental evidence that poliovirus protein 2C is an NTPase and that this protein has affinity for nucleic acids. PMID:8385138

  2. Annual report of the Australian National Poliovirus Reference Laboratory, 2008.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jason A; Grant, Kristina A; Yoon, Yeon Kyung; Polychronopoulos, Sophie; Ibrahim, Aishah; Thorley, Bruce R

    2009-09-01

    The Australian National Poliovirus Reference Laboratory (NPRL) is accredited by the World Health Organization (WHO) for the testing of stool specimens from cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP), a major clinical presentation of poliovirus infection. The NPRL, in collaboration with the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit, co-ordinates surveillance for cases of AFP in children in Australia, according to criteria recommended by the WHO. Clinical specimens are referred from AFP cases in children and suspected case of poliomyelitis in persons of any age. The WHO AFP surveillance performance indicator for a polio-free country such as Australia, is 1 non-polio AFP case per 100,000 children less than 15 years of age. In 2008, the Polio Expert Committee (PEC) classified 62 cases as non-polio AFP, or 1.51 non-polio AFP cases per 100,000 children aged less than 15 years. Poliovirus infection is confirmed by virus culture of stool specimens from AFP cases as other conditions that present with acute paralysis can mimic polio. While no poliovirus was reported in Australia from any source in 2008, the non-polio enteroviruses echovirus 25, coxsackievirus B2 and echovirus 11 were isolated from stool specimens of AFP cases. The last report of a wild poliovirus in Australia was due to an importation from Pakistan in 2007. With 4 countries remaining endemic for poliomyelitis--Afghanistan, India, Nigeria and Pakistan--and more than 1,600 confirmed cases of wild poliovirus infection in 18 countries in 2008, Australia continues to be at risk of further importation events. PMID:20043599

  3. Defective Interfering Particles of Poliovirus I. Isolation and Physical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Charles N.; Smoler, Donna; Wimmer, Eckard; Baltimore, David

    1971-01-01

    A class of defective interfering (DI) poliovirus particles has been identified. The first was found as a contaminant of a viral stock; others have been isolated by serial passage at a high multiplicity of infection. The DI particles are less dense than standard virus and sediment more slowly. Their ribonucleic acid (RNA) sediments more slowly than standard RNA and has a higher electrophoretic mobility. Competition hybridization experiments with double-stranded viral RNA indicate that DI RNA is 80 to 90% of the length of standard RNA. The proteins of DI particles are indistinguishable from those of standard poliovirus. PMID:4329564

  4. Modification of RNA polymerase IIO subspecies after poliovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, L M; Fernandez-Tomas, C; Dahmus, M E; Gariglio, P

    1987-01-01

    Infection of HeLa cells with poliovirus results in a shutdown of host transcription. In an effort to understand the mechanism(s) that underlies this process, we analyzed the distribution of RNA polymerase IIO before and after viral infection. Analysis of free and chromatin-bound enzyme indicated that there is a significant reduction in RNA polymerase IIO following infection. This observation, together with increasing evidence that transcription is catalyzed by RNA polymerase IIO, supports the hypothesis that poliovirus-induced inhibition of host transcription occurs at the level of RNA chain initiation and involves the direct modification of RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:3029396

  5. Update on Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses - Worldwide, January 2014-March 2015.

    PubMed

    Diop, Ousmane M; Burns, Cara C; Sutter, Roland W; Wassilak, Steven G; Kew, Olen M

    2015-06-19

    Since the World Health Assembly's 1988 resolution to eradicate poliomyelitis, one of the main tools of the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) has been the live, attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). OPV might require several doses to induce immunity but provides long-term protection against paralytic disease. Through effective use of OPV, GPEI has brought polio to the threshold of eradication. Wild poliovirus type 2 (WPV2) was eliminated in 1999, WPV3 has not been detected since November 2012, and WPV1 circulation appears to be restricted to parts of Pakistan and Afghanistan. However, continued use of OPV carries two key risks. The first, vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) has been recognized since the early 1960s. VAPP is a very rare event that occurs sporadically when an administered dose of OPV reverts to neurovirulence and causes paralysis in the vaccine recipient or a nonimmune contact. VAPP can occur among immunologically normal vaccine recipients and their contacts as well as among persons who have primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) manifested by defects in antibody production; it is not associated with outbreaks. The second, the emergence of genetically divergent, neurovirulent vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) was recognized more recently. Circulating VDPVs (cVDPVs) resemble WPVs and, in areas with low OPV coverage, can cause polio outbreaks. Immunodeficiency-associated VDPVs (iVDPVs) can replicate and be excreted for years in some persons with PIDs; GPEI maintains a registry of iVDPV cases. Ambiguous VDPVs (aVDPVs) are isolates that cannot be classified definitively. This report updates previous surveillance summaries and describes VDPVs detected worldwide during January 2014-March 2015. Those include new cVDPV outbreaks in Madagascar and South Sudan, and sharply reduced type 2 cVDPV (cVDPV2) circulation in Nigeria and Pakistan during the latter half of 2014. Eight newly identified persons in

  6. Analysis of Sabine river flow data using semiparametric spline modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Soutir; Maity, Arnab

    2011-03-01

    SummaryIn this article, a modeling approach for the mean annual flow in different segments of Sabine river, as released in the NHDPlus data in 2007, as a function of five predictor variables is described. Modeling flow is extremely complex and the deterministic flow models are widely used for that purpose. The justification for using these deterministic models comes from the fact that the flow is governed by some explicitly stated physical laws. In contrast, in this article, this complex issue is addressed from a completely statistical point of view. A semiparametric model is proposed to analyze the spatial distribution of the mean annual flow of Sabine river. Semiparametric additive models allow explicit consideration of the linear and nonlinear relations with relevant explanatory variables. We use a conditionally specified Gaussian model for the estimation of the univariate conditional distributions of flow to incorporate auxiliary information and this formulation does not require the target variable to be independent.

  7. Multiple Poliovirus Proteins Repress Cytoplasmic RNA Granules

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Jonathan D.; Tsai, Wei-Chih; Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that poliovirus (PV) infection induces stress granule (SG) formation early in infection and then inhibits the formation of SG and disperses processing bodies (PBs) by the mid-phase of infection. Loss of SG was linked to cleavage of G3BP1 by viral 3C proteinase (3Cpro), however dispersal of PBs was not strongly linked to cleavage of specific factors by viral proteinases, suggesting other viral proteins may play roles in inhibition of SG or PB formation. Here we have screened all viral proteins for roles in inducing or inhibiting the formation of RNA granules by creating fusions with mCherry and expressing them individually in cells. Expression of viral proteins separately revealed that the capsid region P1, 2Apro, 3A, 3Cpro, the protease precursor 3CD and 3D polymerase all affect RNA granules to varying extents, whereas 2BC does not. 2Apro, which cleaves eIF4GI, induced SGs as expected, and entered novel foci containing the SG nucleating protein G3BP1. Of the two forms of G3BP, only G3BP1 is cleaved by a virus proteinase, 3Cpro, whereas G3BP2 is not cleaved by 3Cpro or 2Apro. Surprisingly, 3CD, which contains proteinase activity, differentially repressed PBs but not SGs. Further, both 2Apro and 3Cpro expression dispersed PBs, however molecular targets were different since PB dispersal due to 2Apro and heat shock protein (Hsp)90 inhibition but not 3Cpro, could be rescued by application of oxidative stress to cells. The data indicate that PV repression of SGs and PBs is multifactorial, though protease function is dominant. PMID:26610553

  8. Poliovirus receptor CD155–targeted oncolysis of glioma1

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Melinda K.; Bernhardt, Guenter; Sampson, John H.; Wikstrand, Carol J.; Bigner, Darell D.; Gromeier, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily are aberrantly expressed in malignant glioma. Amongst these, the human poliovirus receptor CD155 provides a molecular target for therapeutic intervention with oncolytic poliovirus recombinants. Poliovirus has been genetically modified through insertion of regulatory sequences derived from human rhinovirus type 2 to selectively replicate within and destroy cancerous cells. Efficacious oncolysis mediated by poliovirus derivatives depends on the presence of CD155 in targeted tumors. To prepare oncolytic polioviruses for clinical application, we have developed a series of assays in high-grade malignant glioma (HGL) to characterize CD155 expression levels and susceptibility to oncolytic poliovirus recombinants. Analysis of 6 HGL cases indicates that CD155 is expressed in these tumors and in primary cell lines derived from these tumors. Upregulation of the molecular target CD155 rendered explant cultures of all studied tumors highly susceptible to a prototype oncolytic poliovirus recombinant. Our observations support the clinical application of such agents against HGL. PMID:15279713

  9. Polio eradication. Efficacy of inactivated poliovirus vaccine in India.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Hamid; Deshpande, Jagadish M; Sutter, Roland W; Bahl, Sunil; Verma, Harish; Ahmad, Mohammad; Kunwar, Abhishek; Vishwakarma, Rakesh; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Jain, Shilpi; Estivariz, Concepcion; Sethi, Raman; Molodecky, Natalie A; Grassly, Nicholas C; Pallansch, Mark A; Chatterjee, Arani; Aylward, R Bruce

    2014-08-22

    Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) is efficacious against paralytic disease, but its effect on mucosal immunity is debated. We assessed the efficacy of IPV in boosting mucosal immunity. Participants received IPV, bivalent 1 and 3 oral poliovirus vaccine (bOPV), or no vaccine. A bOPV challenge was administered 4 weeks later, and excretion was assessed 3, 7, and 14 days later. Nine hundred and fifty-four participants completed the study. Any fecal shedding of poliovirus type 1 was 8.8, 9.1, and 13.5% in the IPV group and 14.4, 24.1, and 52.4% in the control group by 6- to 11-month, 5-year, and 10-year groups, respectively (IPV versus control: Fisher's exact test P < 0.001). IPV reduced excretion for poliovirus types 1 and 3 between 38.9 and 74.2% and 52.8 and 75.7%, respectively. Thus, IPV in OPV-vaccinated individuals boosts intestinal mucosal immunity. PMID:25146288

  10. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  15. POLIOVIRUS TYPE 1: NEUTRALIZATION BY PAPAIN-DIGESTED ANTIBODIES.

    PubMed

    VOGT, A; KOPP, R; MAASS, G; REICH, L

    1964-09-25

    Papain-digested rabbit antibody (Porter's fractions I and II) can neutralize poliovirus. Neutralizing capacity after digestion ranged from 35 to 45 percent of that of the undigested antibody. No definite dissociation of the antibody fragments from the virus was observed after the reaction mixture had been diluted in a neutral medium. PMID:14175107

  16. 33 CFR 165.806 - Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas... § 165.806 Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a regulated... thereto. (b) Unless otherwise authorized by the Captain of the Port, Port Arthur, Texas, tows on a...

  17. 33 CFR 165.806 - Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas... § 165.806 Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a regulated... thereto. (b) Unless otherwise authorized by the Captain of the Port, Port Arthur, Texas, tows on a...

  18. 33 CFR 165.806 - Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas... § 165.806 Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a regulated... thereto. (b) Unless otherwise authorized by the Captain of the Port, Port Arthur, Texas, tows on a...

  19. 33 CFR 165.806 - Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas... § 165.806 Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a regulated... thereto. (b) Unless otherwise authorized by the Captain of the Port, Port Arthur, Texas, tows on a...

  20. 33 CFR 80.840 - Sabine Pass, TX to Galveston, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sabine Pass, TX to Galveston, TX. 80.840 Section 80.840 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Eighth District § 80.840 Sabine Pass, TX to...

  1. Albert Sabin and the Coalition to Eliminate Polio From the Americas

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Albert B. Sabin, MD, developer of the oral polio vaccine, was also a major proponent of its use in annual vaccination campaigns aimed at the elimination of polio. Sabin argued that administering his vaccine simultaneously to every child in a country would break polio's chains of transmission. Although he was already promoting mass vaccination by the 1960s, Sabin's efforts expanded considerably when he became an adviser to groups fighting polio in the Americas in the 1980s. Sabin's experiences provide a window into both the formation of the coalition that eliminated poliomyelitis from the Western Hemisphere and what can happen when biomedical researchers become public health policy advisers. Although the polio elimination coalition succeeded in part because member groups often accommodated each other's priorities, Sabin was often limited by his indifference to the interests of those he was advising and to the shortcomings of his vaccine. PMID:19008524

  2. Interim CDC guidance for polio vaccination for travel to and from countries affected by wild poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Gregory S; Seward, Jane F; Pallansch, Mark A

    2014-07-11

    In the prevaccine era, infection with wild poliovirus (WPV) was common worldwide, with seasonal peaks and epidemics in the summer and fall in temperate areas. The incidence of poliomyelitis in the United States declined rapidly after the licensure of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) in 1955 and live oral polio vaccine (OPV) in the 1960s. The last cases of indigenously acquired WPV in the United States occurred in 1979, the last WPV case in a U.S. resident traveling abroad occurred in 1986, and the last WPV imported case was in 1993. Since 2000, the United States has exclusively used IPV, resulting in prevention of 8-10 vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis cases annually. In 2005, an unvaccinated U.S. adult traveling abroad acquired vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis after contact with an infant recently vaccinated with OPV. PMID:25006826

  3. National choices related to inactivated poliovirus vaccine, innovation and the endgame of global polio eradication.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J

    2014-02-01

    Achieving the goal of a world free of poliomyelitis still requires significant effort. Although polio immunization represents a mature area, the polio endgame will require new tools and strategies, particularly as national and global health leaders coordinate the cessation of all three serotypes of oral poliovirus vaccine and increasingly adopt inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV). Poliovirus epidemiology and the global options for managing polioviruses continue to evolve, along with our understanding and appreciation of the resources needed and the risks that require management. Based on insights from modeling, we offer some perspective on the current status of plans and opportunities to achieve and maintain a world free of wild polioviruses and to successfully implement oral poliovirus vaccine cessation. IPV costs and potential wastage will represent an important consideration for national policy makers. Innovations may reduce future IPV costs, but the world urgently needs lower-cost IPV options. PMID:24308581

  4. Chlorine resistance of poliovirus isolants recovered from drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, P T; Metcalf, T G; Sproul, O J

    1980-01-01

    Poliovirus 1 isolants were recovered from finished drinking water produced by a modern, well-operated water treatment plant. These waters contained free chlorine residuals in excess of 1 mg/liter. The chlorine inactivation of purified high-titer preparations of two such isolants was compared with the inactivation behavior of two stock strains of poliovirus 1, LSc and Mahoney. The surviving fraction of virus derived from the two natural isolants was shown to be orders of magnitude greater than that of the standard strains. These results raise the question whether indirect drinking water standards based on free chlorine residuals are adequate public health measures, or whether direct standards based on virus determinations might be necessary. Images PMID:6257162

  5. INFECTIVITY OF HISTONE-POLIOVIRUS RIBONUCLEIC ACID PREPARATIONS.

    PubMed

    LUDWIG, E H; SMULL, C E

    1963-06-01

    Ludwig, Ernest H. (The Pennsylvania State University, University Park) and Christine E. Smull. Infectivity of histone-poliovirus ribonucleic acid preparations. J. Bacteriol. 85:1334-1338. 1963.-Some properties of histone-poliovirus ribonucleic acid (RNA) preparations, as relate to infectivity for HeLa cell monolayers, were investigated. The histone-RNA preparations were found to lose their infectivity rapidly at room temperature. They were considerably more stable at ice-bath temperature. Dilution of a histone-RNA preparation in a diluent containing an appropriate amount of histone yielded a plaque count which was proportional to the dilution factor, and which regressed linearly through the point of origin. Dilution of a histone-RNA preparation in a diluent containing no histone resulted in a rapidly decreasing plaque count which was not proportional to the dilution factor. The ability of histone to enhance the infectivity of poliovirus RNA was found to be dependent upon the presence of a low concentration of a monovalent salt in the histone-RNA preparations. Histone-RNA preparations containing approximately isotonic levels of NaCl exhibited a high degree of infectivity. When concentrations of NaCl outside this range were used, a great loss in infectivity of the histone-RNA preparations occurred. The NaCl could be replaced by KCl but not by CaCl(2), MgCl(2), or MgSO(4). PMID:14047226

  6. Surface for Catalysis by Poliovirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Lyle, John M.; Bullitt, Esther

    2013-01-01

    The poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, 3Dpol, replicates the viral genomic RNA on the surface of virus-induced intracellular membranes. Macromolecular assemblies of 3Dpol form linear array of subunits that propagate along a strong protein-protein interaction called interface-I, as was observed in the crystal structure of wild-type poliovirus polymerase. These “filaments” recur with slight modifications in planar sheets and, with additional modifications that accommodate curvature, in helical tubes of the polymerase, by packing filaments together via a second set of interactions. Periodic variations of subunit orientations within 3Dpol tubes give rise to “ghost reflections” in diffraction patterns computed from electron cryomicrographs of helical arrays. The ghost reflections reveal that polymerase tubes are formed by bundles of 4–6 interface-I filaments, which are then connected to the next bundle of filaments with a perturbation of interface interactions between bundles. While enzymatically inactive polymerase is also capable of oligomerization, much thinner tubes are formed that lack interface-I interactions between adjacent subunits, suggesting that long-range allostery produces conformational changes that extend from the active site to the protein-protein interface. Macromolecular assemblies of poliovirus polymerase show repeated use of flexible interface interactions for polymerase lattice formation, suggesting that adaptability of polymerase-polymerase interactions facilitates RNA replication. In addition, the presence of a positively charged groove identified in polymerase arrays may help position and stabilize the RNA template during replication. PMID:23583774

  7. An Insight into Recombination with Enterovirus Species C and Nucleotide G-480 Reversion from the Viewpoint of Neurovirulence of Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Shuangli; Nishimura, Yorihiro; Ye, Xufang; Wang, Dongyan; Jorba, Jaume; Zhu, Hui; An, Hongqiu; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Kew, Olen; Xu, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    A poliomyelitis outbreak caused by type 1 circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) was identified in China in 2004. Six independent cVDPVs (eight isolates) could be grouped into a single cluster with pathways of divergence different from a single cVDPV progenitor, which circulated and evolved into both a highly neurovirulent lineage and a less neurovirulent lineage. They were as neurovirulent as the wild type 1 Mahoney strain, recombination was absent, and their nucleotide 480-G was identical to that of the Sabin strain. The Guizhou/China cVDPV strains shared 4 amino acid replacements in the NAg sites: 3 located at the BC loop, which may underlie the aberrant results of the ELISA intratypic differentiation (ITD) test. The complete ORF tree diverged into two main branches from a common ancestral infection estimated to have occurred in about mid-September 2003, nine months before the appearance of the VDPV case, which indicated recently evolved VDPV. Further, recombination with species C enteroviruses may indicate the presence and density of these enteroviruses in the population and prolonged virus circulation in the community. The aforementioned cVDPVs has important implications in the global initiative to eradicate polio: high quality surveillance permitted earliest detection and response. PMID:26603565

  8. Co-Circulation and Evolution of Polioviruses and Species C Enteroviruses in a District of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Rakoto-Andrianarivelo, Mala; Guillot, Sophie; Iber, Jane; Balanant, Jean; Blondel, Bruno; Riquet, Franck; Martin, Javier; Kew, Olen; Randriamanalina, Bakolalao; Razafinimpiasa, Lalatiana; Rousset, Dominique; Delpeyroux, Francis

    2007-01-01

    Between October 2001 and April 2002, five cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) associated with type 2 vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) were reported in the southern province of the Republic of Madagascar. To determine viral factors that favor the emergence of these pathogenic VDPVs, we analyzed in detail their genomic and phenotypic characteristics and compared them with co-circulating enteroviruses. These VDPVs appeared to belong to two independent recombinant lineages with sequences from the type 2 strain of the oral poliovaccine (OPV) in the 5′-half of the genome and sequences derived from unidentified species C enteroviruses (HEV-C) in the 3′-half. VDPV strains showed characteristics similar to those of wild neurovirulent viruses including neurovirulence in poliovirus-receptor transgenic mice. We looked for other VDPVs and for circulating enteroviruses in 316 stools collected from healthy children living in the small area where most of the AFP cases occurred. We found vaccine PVs, two VDPVs similar to those found in AFP cases, some echoviruses, and above all, many serotypes of coxsackie A viruses belonging to HEV-C, with substantial genetic diversity. Several coxsackie viruses A17 and A13 carried nucleotide sequences closely related to the 2C and the 3Dpol coding regions of the VDPVs, respectively. There was also evidence of multiple genetic recombination events among the HEV-C resulting in numerous recombinant genotypes. This indicates that co-circulation of HEV-C and OPV strains is associated with evolution by recombination, resulting in unexpectedly extensive viral diversity in small human populations in some tropical regions. This probably contributed to the emergence of recombinant VDPVs. These findings give further insight into viral ecosystems and the evolutionary processes that shape viral biodiversity. PMID:18085822

  9. 76 FR 14052 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Sabine River Authority of Texas, Quitman, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Sabine River Authority...

  10. Assessment of cell culture and polymerase chain reaction procedures for the detection of polioviruses in wastewater.

    PubMed Central

    Grabow, W. O.; Botma, K. L.; de Villiers, J. C.; Clay, C. G.; Erasmus, B.

    1999-01-01

    WHO considers that environmental surveillance for wild-type polioviruses is potentially important for surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis as a means of confirming eradication of poliomyelitis. The present study investigated methods for detecting polioviruses in a variety of water environments in South Africa. Most polioviruses were isolated on L20B mouse cells, which, however, were not selective: 16 reoviruses and 8 enteroviruses, apparently animal strains, were also isolated on these cells. Vaccine strains of polioviruses were isolated from surface waters during and shortly after two rounds of mass vaccination of children in an informal settlement where there was no sewerage. The results demonstrated the feasibility of poliovirus surveillance in such settlements. It was also evident that neither poliovirus vaccine strains nor other viruses were likely to interfere significantly with the detection of wild-type polioviruses. Optimal isolation of polioviruses was accomplished by parallel inoculation of L20B mouse cells and at least the PLC/PRF/5 human liver and buffalo green monkey (BGM) kidney cell lines. Analysis of cell cultures using the polymerase chain reaction revealed that 319 test samples contained at least 263 human enteroviruses that failed to produce a cytopathogenic effect. This type of analysis thus significantly increased the sensitivity of enterovirus detection. PMID:10680244

  11. Sit Down with Sabin: Henrik Scheller: Customizing plants for biofuels. (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Sabin, Russell; Scheller, Henrik

    2014-05-06

    Henrik Scheller from the JBEI appeared on August 3rd, 2011 for this installment of "Sit Down with Sabin," a conversation in which former reporter Sabin Russell chats with Lab staff about innovative science. They will discuss "Customizing plants for biofuels." During this series of conversations, Russell and Lab staff will explore the ups and downs of pioneering science, all without the aid of PowerPoints.

  12. Sit Down With Sabin: Merrian Fuller: Efficiency for sale. Who's buying? (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Merrian; Russell, Sabin

    2011-07-26

    Merrian Fuller from the Environmental Energy Technologies Division appeared on July 26th, 2011 for this installment of "Sit Down with Sabin," a conversation in which former reporter Sabin Russell chats with Lab staff about innovative science. They will discuss "Efficiency for Sale. Who's Buying?" During this series of conversations, Russell and Lab staff will explore the ups and downs of pioneering science, all without the aid of PowerPoints.

  13. Sit Down with Sabin: Venkat Srinivasan: The Future of Batteries (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Sabin; Srinivasan, Venkat

    2011-06-29

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory battery scientist Venkat Srinivasan appears June 29, 2011 on "Sit Down with Sabin," a weekly conversation in which former reporter Sabin Russell chats with Berkeley Lab staff about innovative science. Over the course of several conversations held at noon in the Building 50 auditorium, Russell and Lab staff will explore the ups and downs of pioneering science — all without the aid of PowerPoints. Brought to you by Berkeley Lab Public Affairs.

  14. Evidence of presence of poliovirus genomic sequences in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with postpolio syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leparc-Goffart, I; Julien, J; Fuchs, F; Janatova, I; Aymard, M; Kopecka, H

    1996-08-01

    The postpolio syndrome (PPS) is characterized by new neuromuscular symptoms occurring 30 to 40 years after the acute episode of poliomyelitis paralysis. The presence of the poliovirus RNA genome in the cerebrospinal fluid from 10 patients with PPS and from 23 control patients was sought by using reverse transcription and a PCR specific for polioviruses and/or other enteroviruses. Poliovirus-specific genomic sequences in the 5' untranslated region and in the capsid region (VP1) were detected by reverse transcription PCR in 5 of 10 patients with PPS but in none of the control patients. Sequencing confirmed the presence of mutated poliovirus sequences. This finding suggests persistent viral infection in the central nervous system related to the presence of poliovirus genomes. PMID:8818905

  15. Analysis of Sabine and Eyring equations and their application to concert hall audience and chair absorption.

    PubMed

    Beranek, Leo L

    2006-09-01

    Historically, two equations have been used for predicting reverberation times, Sabine and Eyring. A precise means is presented for determining Eyring absorption coefficients alpha(eyring) when the Sabine coefficients alpha(sabine) are known, and vice versa. Thus, either formula can be used provided the absorption coefficients for the Sabine formula are allowed to exceed 1.0. The Sabine formula is not an approximation to the Eyring equation and is not a shortcoming. Given low reverberation times, the ratio of alpha(sabine) to alpha(eyring) may become greater than 2.0. It is vital that, for correct prediction of reverberation times, the absorption coefficients used in either formula must have been determined in spaces similar in size and shape, with similar locations of high absorption (audience) areas, and with similar reverberation times. For concert halls, it is found that, when the audience area (fully occupied) and midfrequency reverberation time are postulated, the hall volume is directly proportional to the audience absorption coefficient. Approximately 6% greater room volumes are needed when choosing nonrectangular versus classical-rectangular shaped halls and approximately 10% greater volumes when choosing heavily upholstered versus medium upholstered chairs. Determinations of audience sound absorption coefficients are presented, based on published acoustical and architectural data for 20 halls. PMID:17004464

  16. Immunogenicity of poliovirus vaccines in chronically malnourished infants: A randomized controlled trial in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Ali Faisal; Mach, Ondrej; Quadri, Farheen; Khan, Asia; Bhatti, Zaid; Rehman, Najeeb ur; Zaidi, Sohail; Weldon, William C.; Oberste, Steven M.; Salama, Maha; Sutter, Roland W.; Zaidi, Anita K.M.

    2015-01-01

    Reaching high population immunity against polioviruses (PV) is essential to achieving global polio eradication. Efficacy of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) varies and is lower among children living in tropical areas with impoverished environments. Malnutrition found as a risk factor for lower serological protection against PV. We compared whether inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) can be used to rapidly close the immunity gap among chronically malnourished (stunted) infants in Pakistan who will not be eligible for the 14 week IPV dose in routine EPI schedule. A phase 3, multicenter 4-arm randomized controlled trial conducted at five Primary Health Care (PHC) centers in Karachi, Pakistan. Infants, 9–12 months were stratified by length for age Z score into chronically malnourished and normally nourished. Infants were randomized to receive one dose of either bivalent OPV (bOPV) alone or bOPV + IPV. Baseline seroprevalence of PV antibodies and serum immune response to study vaccine dose were assessed by neutralization assay. Vaccine PV shedding in stool was evaluated 7 days after a bOPV challenge dose. Sera and stool were analyzed from 852/928 (92%) enrolled children. At baseline, the seroprevalence was 85.6% (n = 386), 73.6% (n = 332), and 70.7% (n = 319) in malnourished children against PV types 1, 2 and 3 respectively; and 94.1% (n = 448), 87.0% (n = 441) and 83.6% (n = 397) in the normally nourished group (p < 0.05). Children had previously received 9–10 doses of bOPV (80%) or tOPV (20%). One dose of IPV + bOPV given to malnourished children increased their serological protection (PV1, n = 201, 97.6%; PV2, n = 198, 96.1% and PV3, n = 189, 91.7%) to parity with normally nourished children who had not received IPV (p = <0.001). Seroconversion and boosting for all three serotypes was significantly more frequent in children who received IPV + bOPV than in those with bOPV only (p < 0.001) in both strata. Shedding of polioviruses in stool did

  17. Cross-neutralizing human anti-poliovirus antibodies bind the recognition site for cellular receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhaochun; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Kouiavskaia, Diana; Hansen, Bryan T.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Bidzhieva, Bella; Makiya, Michelle; Agulto, Liane; Purcell, Robert H.; Chumakov, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    Most structural information about poliovirus interaction with neutralizing antibodies was obtained in the 1980s in studies of mouse monoclonal antibodies. Recently we have isolated a number of human/chimpanzee anti-poliovirus antibodies and demonstrated that one of them, MAb A12, could neutralize polioviruses of both serotypes 1 and 2. This communication presents data on isolation of an additional cross-neutralizing antibody (F12) and identification of a previously unknown epitope on the surface of poliovirus virions. Epitope mapping was performed by sequencing of antibody-resistant mutants and by cryo-EM of complexes of virions with Fab fragments. The results have demonstrated that both cross-neutralizing antibodies bind the site located at the bottom of the canyon surrounding the fivefold axis of symmetry that was previously shown to interact with cellular poliovirus receptor CD155. However, the same antibody binds to serotypes 1 and 2 through different specific interactions. It was also shown to interact with type 3 poliovirus, albeit with about 10-fold lower affinity, insufficient for effective neutralization. Antibody interaction with the binding site of the cellular receptor may explain its broad reactivity and suggest that further screening or antibody engineering could lead to a universal antibody capable of neutralizing all three serotypes of poliovirus. PMID:24277851

  18. Poliovirus Proteins Induce Membrane Association of GTPase ADP-Ribosylation Factor

    PubMed Central

    Belov, George A.; Fogg, Mark H.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2005-01-01

    Poliovirus infection results in the disintegration of intracellular membrane structures and formation of specific vesicles that serve as sites for replication of viral RNA. The mechanism of membrane rearrangement has not been clearly defined. Replication of poliovirus is sensitive to brefeldin A (BFA), a fungal metabolite known to prevent normal function of the ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) family of small GTPases. During normal membrane trafficking in uninfected cells, ARFs are involved in vesicle formation from different intracellular sites through interaction with numerous regulatory and coat proteins as well as in regulation of phospholipase D activity and cytoskeleton modifications. We demonstrate here that ARFs 3 and 5, but not ARF6, are translocated to membranes in HeLa cell extracts that are engaged in translation of poliovirus RNA. The accumulation of ARFs on membranes correlates with active replication of poliovirus RNA in vitro, whereas ARF translocation to membranes does not occur in the presence of BFA. ARF translocation can be induced independently by synthesis of poliovirus 3A or 3CD proteins, and we describe mutations that abolished this activity. In infected HeLa cells, an ARF1-enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion redistributes from Golgi stacks to the perinuclear region, where poliovirus RNA replication occurs. Taken together, the data suggest an involvement of ARF in poliovirus RNA replication. PMID:15890959

  19. Poliovirus concentration from tap water with electropositive adsorbent filters.

    PubMed

    Sobsey, M D; Glass, J S

    1980-08-01

    Simple, reliable, and efficient concentration of poliovirus from tap water was obtained with two types of electropositive filter media, one of which is available in the form of a pleated cartridge filter (Virozorb 1MDS). Virus adsorption from tap water between pH 3.5 and 7.5 was more efficient with electropositive filters than with Filterite filters. Elution of adsorbed viruses was more efficient with beef extract in glycine, pH 9.5, than with glycine-NaOH, pH 11.0. In paired comparative studies, electropositive filters, with adsorption at pH 7.5 and no added polyvalent cation salts, gave less variable virus concentration efficiencies than did Filterite filters with adsorption at pH 3.5 plus added MgCl2. Recovery of poliovirus from 1,000-liter tap water volumes was approximately 30% efficient with both Virozorb 1MDS and Filterite pleated cartridge filters, but the former were much simpler to use. The virus adsorption behavior of these filters appears to be related to their surface charge properties, with more electropositive filters giving more efficient virus adsorption from tap water at higher pH levels. PMID:6258472

  20. A transcriptionally active form of TFIIIC is modified in poliovirus-infected HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, M E; Dasgupta, A

    1990-01-01

    In HeLa cells, RNA polymerase III (pol III)-mediated transcription is severely inhibited by poliovirus infection. This inhibition is due primarily to the reduction in transcriptional activity of the pol III transcription factor TFIIIC in poliovirus-infected cells. However, the specific binding of TFIIIC to the VAI gene B-box sequence, as assayed by DNase I footprinting, is not altered by poliovirus infection. We have used gel retardation analysis to analyze TFIIIC-DNA complexes formed in nuclear extracts prepared from mock- and poliovirus-infected cells. In mock-infected cell extracts, two closely migrating TFIIIC-containing complexes, complexes I and II, were detected in the gel retardation assay. The slower migrating complex, complex I, was absent in poliovirus-infected cell extracts, and an increase occurred in the intensity of the faster-migrating complex (complex II). Also, in poliovirus-infected cell extracts, a new, rapidly migrating complex, complex III, was formed. Complex III may have been the result of limited proteolysis of complex I or II. These changes in TFIIIC-containing complexes in poliovirus-infected cell extracts correlated kinetically with the decrease in TFIIIC transcriptional activity. Complexes I, II, and III were chromatographically separated; only complex I was transcriptionally active and specifically restored pol III transcription when added to poliovirus-infected cell extracts. Acid phosphatase treatment partially converted complex I to complex II but did not affect the binding of complex II or III. Dephosphorylation and limited proteolysis of TFIIIC are discussed as possible mechanisms for the inhibition of pol III-mediated transcription by poliovirus. Images PMID:2204807

  1. Concentration and Purification of Poliovirus by Ultrafiltration and Isopycnic Centrifugation1

    PubMed Central

    Guskey, Louis E.; Wolff, David A.

    1972-01-01

    A method is described by which poliovirus can be rapidly and simply concentrated by the use of a Diaflo XM-50 ultrafilter membrane. Freon-extracted ultrafilter concentrates banded in CsCl provided a 1,724-fold volumetric concentration of poliovirus. During concentration, trypsin-digested cellular material can pass through the ultrafilter membrane, thus providing a versatile means of degrading and eliminating extraneous contaminating proteins. The ultrafilter concentration system is compared with the CsCl cushion system of poliovirus concentration, and both systems are further compared by banding virus and virus capsid material in CsCl by use of isopycnic centrifugation. Images PMID:4341520

  2. Human Circulating Antibody-Producing B Cell as a Predictive Measure of Mucosal Immunity to Poliovirus

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Harish; Sharma, Prashant; Yang, Jae Seung; Saletti, Giulietta; Ahmad, Mohammad; Bahl, Sunil K.; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Nandy, Ranjan K.; Deshpande, Jagadish M.; Sutter, Roland W.; Czerkinsky, Cecil

    2016-01-01

    Background The “gold standard” for assessing mucosal immunity after vaccination with poliovirus vaccines consists in measuring virus excretion in stool after challenge with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). This testing is time and resource intensive, and development of alternative methods is a priority for accelerating polio eradication. We therefore evaluated circulating antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) as a potential means to evaluate mucosal immunity to poliovirus vaccine. Methods 199 subjects, aged 10 years, and previously immunized repeatedly with OPV, were selected. Subjects were assigned to receive either a booster dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV), bivalent OPV (bOPV), or no vaccine. Using a micro-modified whole blood-based ELISPOT assay designed for field setting, circulating poliovirus type-specific IgA- and IgG-ASCs, including gut homing α4β7+ ASCs, were enumerated on days 0 and 7 after booster immunization. In addition, serum samples collected on days 0, 28 and 56 were tested for neutralizing antibody titers against poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3. Stool specimens were collected on day 28 (day of bOPV challenge), and on days 31, 35 and 42 and processed for poliovirus isolation. Results An IPV dose elicited blood IgA- and IgG-ASC responses in 84.8 to 94.9% of subjects, respectively. In comparison, a bOPV dose evoked corresponding blood ASC responses in 20.0 to 48.6% of subjects. A significant association was found between IgA- and IgG-ASC responses and serum neutralizing antibody titers for poliovirus type 1, 2, 3 (p<0.001). In the IPV group, α4β7+ ASCs accounted for a substantial proportion of IgA-ASCs and the proportion of subjects with a positive α4β7+ IgA-ASC response to poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 was 62.7%, 89.8% and 45.8%, respectively. A significant association was observed between virus excretion and α4β7+ IgA- and/or IgG-ASC responses to poliovirus type 3 among immunized children; however, only a weak association was found for

  3. Sit Down with Sabin: Margaret Torn: The Carbon Cycle Like You've Never Seen It (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Sabin; Torn, Margaret

    2011-07-06

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory soil scientist Margaret Torn appears July 6, 2011 on "Sit Down with Sabin," a weekly conversation in which former reporter Sabin Russell chats with Berkeley Lab staff about innovative science. Torn discusses how she travels the world to learn more about soil's huge role in the global carbon cycle. Brought to you by Berkeley Lab Public Affairs.

  4. Oral and Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccines in the Newborn: A review

    PubMed Central

    Mateen, Farrah J.; Shinohara, Russell T.; Sutter, Roland W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) remains the vaccine-of-choice for routine immunization and supplemental immunization activities (SIAs) to eradicate poliomyelitis globally. Recent data from India suggested lowerthanexpected immunogenicity of an OPV birth dose, prompting a review of the immunogenicity of OPV or inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) when administered at birth. Methods We evaluated the seroconversion and reported adverse events among infants given a single birth dose (given ≤7 days of life) of OPV or IPV through a systematic review of published articles and conference abstracts from 1959-2011 in any language found on PubMed, Google Scholar, or reference lists of selected articles. Results 25 articles from 13 countries published between1959 and 2011 documented seroconversion rates in newborns following an OPV dose given within the first seven days of life. There were 10 studies that measured seroconversion rates between 4 and 8 weeks of a single birth dose of TOPV, using an umbilical cord blood draw at the time of birth to establish baseline antibody levels. The percentage of newborns who seroconverted at 8 weeks range 6-42% for poliovirus type 1, 2-63% for type 2, and 1-35% for type 3). For mOPV type 1, seroconversion ranged from 10-76%; mOPV type 3, the range was 12-58%; and for the one study reporting bOPV, it was 20% for type 1 and 7% for type 3. There were four studies of IPV in newborns with a seroconversion rate of 8-100% for serotype 1, 15-100% for serotype 2, and 15-94% for serotype 3, measured at 4-6 weeks of life. No serious adverse events related to newborn OPV or IPV dosing were reported, including no cases of acute flaccid paralysis. Conclusions There is great variability of the immunogenicity of a birth dose of OPV for reasons largely unknown. Our review confirms the utility of a birth dose of OPV, particularly in countries where early induction of polio immunity is imperative. IPV has higher seroconversion rates in newborns and

  5. Postpolio syndrome: poliovirus persistence is involved in the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Julien, J; Leparc-Goffart, I; Lina, B; Fuchs, F; Foray, S; Janatova, I; Aymard, M; Kopecka, H

    1999-06-01

    The pathogenesis of the postpolio syndrome (PPS) remains unclear. In this study we looked for poliovirus (PV) persistence in the CSF of 20 patients with PPS, in a control group including 20 patients with unrelated neurological diseases, and in 7 patients with stable poliomyelitis sequelae. CSF samples and sera were examined using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the detection of PV or other enterovirus genomes; this assay allows the detection from as little as 1 fg viral RNA. Sequencing of amplified products from 5 patients was performed. PV genomic sequences were detected in the CSF of 11 of 20 patients with PPS and in none of the control group. Sequencing in the 5' untranslated region confirmed the presence of mutated PV sequences. These findings suggest that PPS is related to the persistence of PV in the central nervous system. PMID:10431774

  6. Cytotoxic and immunogenic mechanisms of recombinant oncolytic poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael C; Gromeier, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    An oncolytic virus (OV) based on poliovirus (PV), the highly attenuated polio/rhinovirus recombinant PVSRIPO, may deliver targeted inflammatory cancer cell killing; a principle that is showing promise in clinical trials for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). The two decisive factors in PVSRIPO anti-tumor efficacy are selective cytotoxicity and its in situ immunogenic imprint. While our work is focused on what constitutes PVSRIPO cancer cytotoxicity, we are also studying how this engenders host immune responses that are vital to tumor regression. We hypothesize that PVSRIPO cytotoxicity and immunogenicity are inextricably linked in essential, complimentary roles that define the anti-neoplastic response. Herein we delineate mechanisms we unraveled to decipher the basis for PVSRIPO cytotoxicity and its immunotherapeutic potential. PMID:26083317

  7. Survival of poliovirus within organic solids during chlorination.

    PubMed Central

    Hejkal, T W; Wellings, F M; LaRock, P A; Lewis, A L

    1979-01-01

    Poliovirus in fecal homogenates was used to determine the protection against inactivation by chlorination afforded virus that was occluded within particulates. Virus that was closely associated with or occluded within small fecal particulates was protected. A fourfold increase in combined residual chlorine was required to achieve the same degree of inactivation for occluded virus as for free or secondarily adsorbed virus. A combined chlorine residual of 6.6 mg/liter was necessary to achieve 50% inactivation in 15 min at pH 8.0 and 22 degrees C in a particulate suspension containing occluded virus compared to 1.4 mg/liter for free virus. These differences were found to be relatively small compared to differences due to the presence of dissolved organics or between free and combined chlorine residuals. The results suggest different mechanisms of protection due to adsorption and occlusion. PMID:225993

  8. A survey for neutralizing antibodies to the three types of poliovirus among children in Maiduguri, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Baba, M M; Haruna, B A; Ogunmola, O; Ambe, J P; Shidali, N N; Oderinde, B; Marcello, A; Talle, M

    2012-04-01

    The milestone in polio eradication program is to protect effectively children aged 0-5 years against the three serotypes of poliovirus. It became necessary to measure the level of neutralizing antibodies to the three poliovirus types in an endemic State in Nigeria. Neutralizing antibodies to the poliovirus types among children aged 0-5 years was estimated using micro neutralization assay. Of 129 children, 99 (76.8%), 95 (73.6%), and 95 (73.6%) had neutralizing antibodies with the geometric mean titer of 42.7, 31.3, and 33.2 for the poliovirus type 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Fifty-three percent of the children were protected against the three types of poliovirus. Combination of poliovirus types 1 and 2, 1 and 3, and 2 and 3 were neutralized by 62.8, 58.9, and 61.2% of the children studied, respectively. Only poliovirus type 1 induced antibody titres ≥1:1,024. The number of children with neutralizing antibodies after receiving three doses was significantly higher than those who received one or two doses of oral polio vaccine (P ≤ 0.05). However, those who received more than three doses of oral polio vaccine showed no significant difference in their antibody response. The existence of immunity gap poses a risk of re-emergence of the paralytic poliovirus. The existence of unimmunized and unprotected children along with high birth rate could impede the success of polio vaccination in Nigeria. Elimination of non-compliance to polio vaccine, promotion of health education and documented evidence of vaccination of each child with the parents may facilitate the success of polio eradication program in Nigeria. PMID:22337311

  9. Complex Dynamic Development of Poliovirus Membranous Replication Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Vinod; Hansen, Bryan T.; Hoyt, Forrest H.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2012-01-01

    Replication of all positive-strand RNA viruses is intimately associated with membranes. Here we utilize electron tomography and other methods to investigate the remodeling of membranes in poliovirus-infected cells. We found that the viral replication structures previously described as “vesicles” are in fact convoluted, branching chambers with complex and dynamic morphology. They are likely to originate from cis-Golgi membranes and are represented during the early stages of infection by single-walled connecting and branching tubular compartments. These early viral organelles gradually transform into double-membrane structures by extension of membranous walls and/or collapsing of the luminal cavity of the single-membrane structures. As the double-membrane regions develop, they enclose cytoplasmic material. At this stage, a continuous membranous structure may have double- and single-walled membrane morphology at adjacent cross-sections. In the late stages of the replication cycle, the structures are represented mostly by double-membrane vesicles. Viral replication proteins, double-stranded RNA species, and actively replicating RNA are associated with both double- and single-membrane structures. However, the exponential phase of viral RNA synthesis occurs when single-membrane formations are predominant in the cell. It has been shown previously that replication complexes of some other positive-strand RNA viruses form on membrane invaginations, which result from negative membrane curvature. Our data show that the remodeling of cellular membranes in poliovirus-infected cells produces structures with positive curvature of membranes. Thus, it is likely that there is a fundamental divergence in the requirements for the supporting cellular membrane-shaping machinery among different groups of positive-strand RNA viruses. PMID:22072780

  10. Analysis of mutations in oral poliovirus vaccine by hybridization with generic oligonucleotide microchips.

    SciTech Connect

    Proudnikov, D.; Kirillov, E.; Chumakov, K.; Donion, J.; Rezapkin, G.; Mirzabekov, A.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes use of a new technology of hybridization with a micro-array of immobilized oligonucleotides for detection and quantification of neurovirulent mutants in Oral Poliovirus Vaccine (OPV). We used a micro-array consisting of three-dimensional gel-elements containing all possible hexamers (total of 4096 probes). Hybridization of fluorescently labelled viral cDNA samples with such microchips resulted in a pattern of spots that was registered and quantified by a computer-linked CCD camera, so that the sequence of the original cDNA could be deduced. The method could reliably identify single point mutations, since each of them affected fluorescence intensity of 12 micro-array elements. Micro-array hybridization of DNA mixtures with varying contents of point mutants demonstrated that the method can detect as little as 10% of revertants in a population of vaccine virus. This new technology should be useful for quality control of live viral vaccines, as well as for other applications requiring identification and quantification of point mutations.

  11. Framework for evaluating the risks of paralytic poliomyelitis after global interruption of wild poliovirus transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, R. Bruce; Cochi, Stephen L.

    2004-01-01

    With the interruption of wild poliovirus transmission globally, the need for new policies to deal with the post-certification era will rapidly arise. New policies will be required in four areas: detection and notification of circulating polioviruses; biocontainment of wild, vaccine-derived and attenuated strains of poliovirus; vaccine stockpiles and response mechanisms; and routine immunization against polioviruses. A common understanding of the potential risks of paralytic poliomyelitis in the post-certification period is essential to the development of these policies. Since 2000, there has been increasing international consensus that the risks of paralytic poliomyelitis in the post-certification era fall into two categories: those due to the continued use of the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) and those due to future improper handling of wild polioviruses. The specific risks within both categories have now been defined, and an understanding of the frequency and potential burden of disease associated with each is rapidly improving. This knowledge and clarity have provided a framework that is already proving valuable for identifying research priorities and discussing potential policy options with national authorities. However, this framework must be regarded as a dynamic tool, requiring regular updating as additional information on these risks becomes available through further scientific research, programmatic work, and policy decisions. PMID:15106299

  12. Contribution of Environmental Surveillance Toward Interruption of Poliovirus Transmission in Nigeria, 2012–2015

    PubMed Central

    Johnson Muluh, Ticha; Hamisu, Abdullahi Walla; Craig, Kehinde; Mkanda, Pascal; Andrew, Etsano; Adeniji, Johnson; Akande, Adefunke; Musa, Audu; Ayodeji, Isiaka; Nicksy, Gumede; Banda, Richard; Tegegne, Sisay G.; Nsubuga, Peter; Oyetunji, Ajiboye; Diop, Ousmane; Vaz, Rui G.; Muhammad, Ado J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cases of paralysis caused by poliovirus have decreased by >99% since the 1988 World Health Assembly's resolution to eradicate polio. The World Health Organization identified environmental surveillance (ES) of poliovirus in the poliomyelitis eradication strategic plan as an activity that can complement acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance. This article summarizes key public health interventions that followed the isolation of polioviruses from ES between 2012 and 2015. Methods. The grap method was used to collect 1.75 L of raw flowing sewage every 2–4 weeks. Once collected, samples were shipped at 4°C to a polio laboratory for concentration. ES data were then used to guide program implementation. Results. From 2012 to 2015, ES reported 97 circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPV2) and 14 wild polioviruses. In 2014 alone, 54 cVDPV type 2 cases and 1 WPV type 1 case were reported. In Sokoto State, 58 cases of AFP were found from a search of 9426 households. A total of 2 252 059 inactivated polio vaccine and 2 460 124 oral polio vaccine doses were administered to children aged <5 year in Borno and Yobe states. Conclusions. This article is among the first from Africa that relates ES findings to key public health interventions (mass immunization campaigns, inactivated polio vaccine introduction, and strengthening of AFP surveillance) that have contributed to the interruption of poliovirus transmission in Nigeria. PMID:26908747

  13. Current polio global eradication and control policy options: perspectives from modeling and prerequisites for oral poliovirus vaccine cessation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Tebbens, Radboud J Duintjer

    2012-04-01

    As the Global Polio Eradication Initiative progresses toward the eradication of wild polioviruses, national and global health leaders must still actively consider options for managing poliovirus risks, including risks associated with using oral poliovirus vaccine. Oral poliovirus vaccine continues to represent a highly effective tool, but its use causes noticeable, rare cases of vaccine-associated paralytic polio and with low coverage it can evolve to become circulating vaccine-derived polioviruse that causes outbreaks. National leaders face a wide range of options, but their choices depend in part on global policies. This article explores the current set of global options for poliovirus eradication or control, discusses constraints and prerequisites for their implementation and offers some insights based on dynamic modeling to inform discussions and frame future economic analyses. PMID:22551030

  14. Sit Down with Sabin: David Schlegel: Hunting Dark Energy (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Sabin; Schlegel, David

    2011-06-22

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory physicist and dark energy hunter David Schlegel chats with Sabin Russell, former San Francisco Chronicle reporter turned Berkeley Lab science writer, June 22, 2011. Their conversation is the first installment of "Sit Down With Sabin," a weekly conversation hosted by Russell. Over the course of five conversations with Berkeley Lab staff this summer, Russell will explore the ups and downs of innovative science — all without the aid of PowerPoint slides. Brought to you by Berkeley Lab Public Affairs.

  15. Effect of Enzymes on the Interaction of Enteroviruses with Living HeLa Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Zajac, Ihor; Crowell, Richard L.

    1965-01-01

    Zajac, Ihor (Hahnemann Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa.), and Richard L. Crowell. Effect of enzymes on the interaction of enteroviruses with living HeLa cells. J. Bacteriol. 89:574–582. 1965.—Eight crude enzyme preparations and two crystalline enzymes were tested for ability to inactivate coxsackie group B and poliovirus receptors on living HeLa cells. Receptor-destroying enzyme, erepsin, lysozyme, collagenase, proteinase, and cobra venom did not alter attachment of coxsackie B3 or poliovirus T1 to cells, whereas elastase prevented attachment of both viruses tested. Treatment of live cells with pancreatin or chymotrypsin rendered cells unable to attach group B coxsackie viruses, whereas cells treated with trypsin failed to attach poliovirus T1. In addition, chymotrypsin was found to release coxsackie B3 and poliovirus T1 from cell surfaces, whereas trypsin was unable to dissociate virus-cell union. These results indicate that cellular receptors for polioviruses differ from those for group B coxsackie-viruses. The finding that 1% solutions of enzymes will inactivate differentially the enteroviral receptors of HeLa cells, without altering cell viability, provides a useful approach for study of enterovirus receptors of live host cells. PMID:14273631

  16. 77 FR 47519 - Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 Annual Marine Events in the Eighth Coast Guard District, Sabine River; Orange, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast..., call or email Mr. Scott Whalen. U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Port Arthur, TX; telephone...

  17. 78 FR 38672 - Ocean Dumping; Sabine-Neches Waterway (SNWW) Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ...The EPA is proposing to designate four new Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site(s) (ODMDS) located offshore of Texas for the disposal of dredged material from the Sabine-Neches Waterway (SNWW), pursuant to the Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act, as amended (MPRSA). The new sites are needed for the disposal of additional dredged material associated with the SNWW Channel Improvement......

  18. Time of travel of solutes in the Sabine River basin, Texas, August-November 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raines, Timothy H.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Sabine River Authority, did a time-of-travel study in the Sabine River Basin during low flow from August to November 1996. The study was done to provide accurate estimates of the time-of-travel and dispersion characteristics for solutes during low flow in a 1.8-mile (mi) reach of Grace Creek, a 23.9-mi reach of the mainstem Sabine River, a 3.4-mi reach of Hawkins Creek, and a 1.9-mi reach of Rocky Creek. This report explains the approach and documents the results of the study. The results of the study will be used by the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission in a water-quality model to determine waste-load allocation in Segment 0505 of the Sabine River Basin. The time-of-travel and dispersion characteristics also provide useful information on the probable behavior of soluble contaminants that might be introduced into the streams measured in this study.

  19. Synthetic virus seeds for improved vaccine safety: Genetic reconstruction of poliovirus seeds for a PER.C6 cell based inactivated poliovirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Barbara P; Edo-Matas, Diana; Papic, Natasa; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Custers, Jerome H H V

    2015-10-13

    Safety of vaccines can be compromised by contamination with adventitious agents. One potential source of adventitious agents is a vaccine seed, typically derived from historic clinical isolates with poorly defined origins. Here we generated synthetic poliovirus seeds derived from chemically synthesized DNA plasmids encoding the sequence of wild-type poliovirus strains used in marketed inactivated poliovirus vaccines. The synthetic strains were phenotypically identical to wild-type polioviruses as shown by equivalent infectious titers in culture supernatant and antigenic content, even when infection cultures are scaled up to 10-25L bioreactors. Moreover, the synthetic seeds were genetically stable upon extended passaging on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. Use of synthetic seeds produced on the serum-free PER.C6 cell platform ensures a perfectly documented seed history and maximum control over starting materials. It provides an opportunity to maximize vaccine safety which increases the prospect of a vaccine end product that is free from adventitious agents. PMID:26362098

  20. EFFECT OF ENDOTOXIN ON CELLS AND ON THEIR RESPONSE TO INFECTION BY POLIOVIRUSES1

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, William H.; Wisner, Carolyn

    1962-01-01

    Murphy, W. H. (The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) and C. Wisner. Effect of endotoxin on cells and on their response to infection by polioviruses. J. Bacteriol. 83:649–662. 1962.—The effect of lipopolysaccharide on HeLa-S3, HeLa-Gey, Chang-liver, Maben, and L strain mouse fibroblasts was studied. The liminal dose of endotoxin for the human epithelial cell strains was approximately 250 μg/ml, and their order of sensitivity to endotoxin was: Chang-liver, HeLa-Gey, HeLa-S3, and Maben, the latter being the most resistant. Endotoxin at concentrations exceeding 100 μg/ml was cytotoxic to the L strain of mouse fibroblasts and caused them to markedly agglutinate. Cytotoxic response of cells to endotoxin was not characterized by cell lysis, but by distinctive nuclear changes. In an attempt to demonstrate the metabolic induction of the latent infection of cell cultures by a noncytopathic variant of poliovirus, endotoxin was added at maximal subliminal concentration to cell cultures totally, partially, or fully susceptible to virus. Endotoxin caused a slight but consistent accelerative cytopathic response of cells to infection by cytopathic poliovirus, but failed to induce cytopathic response to infection by submoderate (noncytopathic) poliovirus. Although endotoxin slightly suppressed yields of poliovirus from cells, it did not affect the plating efficiency of virus on cell monolayers. Images PMID:14477444

  1. Poliovirus neutralization epitopes: analysis and localization with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Emini, E A; Jameson, B A; Lewis, A J; Larsen, G R; Wimmer, E

    1982-01-01

    Two hybridomas (H3 and D3) secreting monoclonal neutralizing antibody to intact poliovirus type 1 (Mahoney strain) were established. Each antibody bound to a site qualitatively different from that to which the other antibody bound. The H3 site was located on intact virions and, to a lesser extent, on 80S naturally occurring empty capsids and 14S precursor subunits. The D3 site was found only on virions and empty capsids. Neither site was expressed on 80S heat-treated virions. The antibodies did not react with free denatured or undenatured viral structural proteins. Viral variants which were no longer capable of being neutralized by either one or the other antibody were obtained. Such variants arose during normal cell culture passage of wild-type virus and were present in the progeny viral population on the order of 10(-4) variant per wild-type virus PFU. Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate, a heterobifunctional covalent cross-linking reagent, was used to irreversibly bind the F(ab) fragments of the two antibodies to their respective binding sites. In this way, VP1 was identified as the structural protein containing both sites. PMID:6183443

  2. Progress in the development of poliovirus antiviral agents and their essential role in reducing risks that threaten eradication.

    PubMed

    McKinlay, Mark A; Collett, Marc S; Hincks, Jeffrey R; Oberste, M Steven; Pallansch, Mark A; Okayasu, Hiromasa; Sutter, Roland W; Modlin, John F; Dowdle, Walter R

    2014-11-01

    Chronic prolonged excretion of vaccine-derived polioviruses by immunodeficient persons (iVDPV) presents a personal risk of poliomyelitis to the patient as well as a programmatic risk of delayed global eradication. Poliovirus antiviral drugs offer the only mitigation of these risks. Antiviral agents may also have a potential role in the management of accidental exposures and in certain outbreak scenarios. Efforts to discover and develop poliovirus antiviral agents have been ongoing in earnest since the formation in 2007 of the Poliovirus Antivirals Initiative. The most advanced antiviral, pocapavir (V-073), is a capsid inhibitor that has recently demonstrated activity in an oral poliovirus vaccine human challenge model. Additional antiviral candidates with differing mechanisms of action continue to be profiled and evaluated preclinically with the goal of having 2 antivirals available for use in combination to treat iVDPV excreters. PMID:25316866

  3. Development of a poliovirus neutralization test with poliovirus pseudovirus for measurement of neutralizing antibody titer in human serum.

    PubMed

    Arita, Minetaro; Iwai, Masae; Wakita, Takaji; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-01

    In the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, laboratory diagnosis plays a critical role by isolating and identifying poliovirus (PV) from the stool samples from acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases. In recent years, reestablishment of PV circulation in countries where PV was previously eliminated has occurred because of decreased herd immunity, possibly due to poor vaccination coverage. To monitor the vulnerability of countries to PV circulation, surveillance of neutralizing-antibody titers against PV in susceptible populations is essential in the end game of the polio eradication program. In this study, we have developed a PV neutralization test with type 1, 2, and 3 PV pseudoviruses to determine the neutralizing-antibody titer against PV in human serum samples. With this test, the neutralizing-antibody titer against PV could be determined within 2 days by automated interpretation of luciferase signals without using infectious PV strains. We validated the pseudovirus PV neutralization test with 131 human serum samples collected from a wide range of age groups (ages 1 to >60 years) by comparison with a conventional neutralization test. We found good correlation in the neutralizing-antibody titers determined by these tests. These results suggest that a pseudovirus PV neutralization test would serve as a safe and simple procedure for the measurement of the neutralizing-antibody titer against PV. PMID:21880850

  4. The recent outbreaks and reemergence of poliovirus in war and conflict-affected areas

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Luma; Ahmad, H. Anwar

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Poliomyelitis is a highly infectious disease caused by poliovirus, which becomes difficult to manage/eradicate in politically unstable areas. The objectives of this study were to determine the movement and management of such polio outbreaks in endemic countries and countries with reoccurring cases of polio and to determine the effect of political instability on polio eradication. Methods In this study, the extent of polio outbreaks was examined and modeled using statistical methodologies and mapped with GIS software. Data on polio cases and immunization were collected for countries with polio cases for the period 2011 to 2014. Weekly data from the Global Polio Eradication Initiative were collected for selected countries. The recent virus origin and current movement was mapped using GIS. Correlations between immunization rates, the Global Peace Index (GPI), and other indicators of a country’s political stability with polio outbreaks were determined. Data were analyzed using SAS 9.4 and ArcGIS 10. Results For several reasons, Pakistan remains highly vulnerable to new incidences of polio (306 cases in 2014). Overall immunization rates showed a steady decline over time in selected countries. Countries with polio cases were shown to have high rates of infant mortality, and their GPI ranked between 2.0 and 3.3; displaced populations, level of violent crime rating, and political instability also were ranked high for several countries. Conclusion Polio was shown to be high in areas with increased conflict and instability. Displaced populations living in hard-to-reach areas may lack access to proper vaccination and health care. Wars and conflict have also resulted in the reemergence of polio in otherwise polio-free countries. PMID:27237735

  5. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Barbara P; de Los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H H V; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-03-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4-9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  6. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Barbara P.; de los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G.; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E.; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H. H. V.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4–9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  7. Septage treatments to reduce the numbers of bacteria and polioviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Stramer, S L; Cliver, D O

    1984-01-01

    Disposal of the pumped contents of septic tanks (septage) represents a possible means of dissemination of enteric pathogens including viruses, since persistence of enteroviruses in septic tank sludge for greater than 100 days has been demonstrated. The risk of exposure to potentially infectious agents can be reduced by disinfecting septages before their disposal. Of the septage disinfectants examined (technical and analytical grade glutaraldehyde, hydrogen peroxide, heat treatments, and a combination of heat and hydrogen peroxide), the treatment including hydrogen peroxide (5 mg, plus 0.33 mg of trichloroacetic acid, per ml of septage) and 55 degrees C killed virtually all the bacteria in septage within 1 h, whereas 55 degrees C alone inactivated inoculated polioviruses within 30 min. Virus was the most sensitive to heat, whereas fecal coliforms appeared to be the most sensitive to all chemical treatments. The responses of fecal streptococci and virus to both grades of glutaraldehyde (each at 1 mg/ml) were similar. Virus was more resistant than either fecal streptococci or total bacteria to low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (1 to 5 mg/ml); however, virus and fecal streptococci were more labile than total bacteria to the highest peroxide concentration (10 mg/ml) examined. It is possible that the treatment combining heat and hydrogen peroxide was the most effective in reducing the concentrations of all bacteria, because catalase and peroxidases as well as other enzymes were heat inactivated, although catalase seems the most likely cause of damage. However, this most effective treatment does not appear to be practical for on-site use as performed, so further work on septage disinfection is recommended. PMID:6093691

  8. Mathematical model for simulating discharges on the Sabine River between Tatum and Ruliff, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neely, Braxtel L.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical model for simulating discharges on the Sabine River between Tatum and Ruliff, TX., was developed to evaluate the effects of release schedules on discharges from the Toledo Bend Reservoir compared to discharges under natural conditions. Using the discharge at Tatum, TX., the rainfall over the basin, and the discharge release schedule for the reservoir, discharge hydrographs for the natural and reservoir-controlled conditions can be computed. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. Synthesis of immunogenic, but non-infectious, poliovirus particles in insect cells by a baculovirus expression vector.

    PubMed

    Urakawa, T; Ferguson, M; Minor, P D; Cooper, J; Sullivan, M; Almond, J W; Bishop, D H

    1989-06-01

    A baculovirus expression vector (AcLeon) derived from Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) was prepared containing the complete 6.6 kb coding region of the P3/Leon/37 strain of poliovirus type 3 placed under the control of the AcNPV polyhedrin promoter. The recombinant virus was used to infect Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. As demonstrated by use of the appropriate antibodies, infected insect cells made poliovirus proteins that included the structural proteins VP0, VP1 and VP3. Poliovirus particles were recovered from extracts of the infected cells and demonstrated to be free from detectable levels of RNA and to be non-infectious in tissue culture. After particle purification by CsCl gradient centrifugation and immunization of outbred mice, antibodies to the structural proteins, including neutralizing antibodies, were obtained. Other recombinant baculoviruses, containing the majority of the capsid coding region of P3/Leon/37 (e.g. AcCAP21, nucleotide residues 742 to 3318), made an unprocessed precursor to the poliovirus structural proteins. These data suggested that processing of the poliovirus gene product by the AcLeon construct was catalysed by the poliovirus-encoded proteases. The results demonstrated that antigenic and immunogenic poliovirus proteins and empty particles can be made in insect cells by recombinant baculoviruses. PMID:2543785

  10. Differential depuration of poliovirus, Escherichia coli, and a coliphage by the common mussel, Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Power, U.F.; Collins, J.K. )

    1989-06-01

    The elimination of sewage effluent-associated poliovirus, Escherichia coli, and a 22-nm icosahedral coliphage by the common mussel, Mytilus edulis, was studied. Both laboratory-and commercial-scale recirculating, UV depuration systems were used in this study. In the laboratory system, the logarithms of the poliovirus, E. coli, and coliphage levels were reduced by 1.86, 2.9, and 2.16, respectively, within 52 h of depuration. The relative patterns and rates of elimination of the three organisms suggest that they are eliminated from mussels by different mechanisms during depuration under suitable conditions. Poliovirus was not included in experiments undertaken in the commercial-scale depuration system. The differences in the relative rates and patterns of elimination were maintained for E. coli and coliphage in this system, with the logarithm of the E. coli levels being reduced by 3.18 and the logarithm of the coliphage levels being reduced by 0.87. The results from both depuration systems suggest that E. coli is an inappropriate indicator of the efficiency of virus elimination during depuration. The coliphage used appears to be a more representative indicator. Depuration under stressful conditions appeared to have a negligible affect on poliovirus and coliphage elimination rates from mussels. However, the rate and pattern of E. coli elimination were dramatically affected by these conditions. Therefore, monitoring E. coli counts might prove useful in ensuring that mussels are functioning well during depuration.

  11. CONCENTRATION OF POLIOVIRUS FROM TAP WATER USING POSITIVELY CHARGED MICROPOROUS FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microporous filters that are more electropositive than the negatively charged filters currently used for virus concentration from water by filter adsorption-elution methods were evaluated for poliovirus recovery from tap water. Zeta Plus filters composed of diatomaceous earth-cel...

  12. Concentration of poliovirus from tap water using positively charged microporous filters.

    PubMed Central

    Sobsey, M D; Jones, B L

    1979-01-01

    Microporous filters that are more electropositive than the negatively charged filters currently used for virus concentrations from water by filter adsorption-elution methods were evaluated for poliovirus recovery from tap water. Zeta Plus filters composed of diatomaceous earth-cellulose-"charge-modified" resin mixtures and having a net positive charge of up to pH 5 to 6 efficiently adsorbed poliovirus from tap water at ambient pH levels 7.0 to 7.5 without added multivalent cation salts. The adsorbed virus were eluted with glycine-NaOH, pH 9.5 to 11.5. Electropositive asbestos-cellulose filters efficiently adsorbed poliovirus from tap water without added multivalent cation salts between pH 3.5 and 9.0, and the absorbed viruses could be eluted with 3% beef extract, pH 9, but not with pH 9.5 to 11.5 glycine-NaOH. Under water quality conditions in which poliovirus recoveries from large volumes of water were less than 5% with conventional negatively charged filters and standard methods, recoveries with Zeta Plus filters averaged 64 and 22.5% for one- and two-stage concentration procedures, respectively. Electropositive filters appear to offer distinct advantages over conventional negatively charged filters for concentrating enteric viruses from water, and their behavior tends to confirm the importance of electrostatic forces in virus recovery from water by microporous filter adsorption-elution methods. PMID:36844

  13. EFFECTS OF BENTONITE CLAY SOLIDS ON POLIOVIRUS CONCENTRATION FROM WATER BY MICROPOROUS FILTER METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to determine if suspended solids interfere with enteric virus recovery from water by microporous filter methods, the effects of bentonite clay solids at a concentration of 10 NTU on the recovery of poliovirus type 1 from seeded, activated carbon-treated, filtered tap wat...

  14. Alternative splicing, a new target to block cellular gene expression by poliovirus 2A protease

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Enrique; Castello, Alfredo; Carrasco, Luis; Izquierdo, Jose M.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Novel role for poliovirus 2A protease as splicing modulator. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease inhibits the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease blocks the second catalytic step of splicing. -- Abstract: Viruses have developed multiple strategies to interfere with the gene expression of host cells at different stages to ensure their own survival. Here we report a new role for poliovirus 2A{sup pro} modulating the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Expression of 2A{sup pro} potently inhibits splicing of reporter genes in HeLa cells. Low amounts of 2A{sup pro} abrogate Fas exon 6 skipping, whereas higher levels of protease fully abolish Fas and FGFR2 splicing. In vitro splicing of MINX mRNA using nuclear extracts is also strongly inhibited by 2A{sup pro}, leading to accumulation of the first exon and the lariat product containing the unspliced second exon. These findings reveal that the mechanism of action of 2A{sup pro} on splicing is to selectively block the second catalytic step.

  15. Capped mRNAs with reduced secondary structure can function in extracts from poliovirus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sonenberg, N.; Guertin, D.; Lee, K.A.W.

    1982-12-01

    Extracts form poliovirus-infected HeLa cells were used to study ribosome binding of native and denatured reovirus mRNAs and translation of capped mRNAs with different degrees of secondary structure. Here, the authors demonstrate that ribosomes in extracts from poliovirus-infected cells could form initiation complexes with denatured reovirus mRNA, in contrast to their inability to bind native reovirus mRNA. Furthermore, the capped alfalfa mosiac virus 4 RNA, which is most probable devoid of stable secondary structure at its 5' end, could be translated at much higher efficiency than could other capped mRNAs in extracts from poliovirus-infected cells.

  16. 33 CFR 334.790 - Sabine River at Orange, Tex.; restricted area in vicinity of the Naval and Marine Corps Reserve...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sabine River at Orange, Tex... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.790 Sabine River at Orange, Tex.; restricted area in vicinity of the Naval.... Government or those duly authorized by the Commanding Officer, Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Center,...

  17. 33 CFR 334.790 - Sabine River at Orange, Tex.; restricted area in vicinity of the Naval and Marine Corps Reserve...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sabine River at Orange, Tex... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.790 Sabine River at Orange, Tex.; restricted area in vicinity of the Naval.... Government or those duly authorized by the Commanding Officer, Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Center,...

  18. 33 CFR 334.790 - Sabine River at Orange, Tex.; restricted area in vicinity of the Naval and Marine Corps Reserve...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sabine River at Orange, Tex... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.790 Sabine River at Orange, Tex.; restricted area in vicinity of the Naval.... Government or those duly authorized by the Commanding Officer, Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Center,...

  19. 33 CFR 334.790 - Sabine River at Orange, Tex.; restricted area in vicinity of the Naval and Marine Corps Reserve...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sabine River at Orange, Tex... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.790 Sabine River at Orange, Tex.; restricted area in vicinity of the Naval.... Government or those duly authorized by the Commanding Officer, Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Center,...

  20. 33 CFR 334.790 - Sabine River at Orange, Tex.; restricted area in vicinity of the Naval and Marine Corps Reserve...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sabine River at Orange, Tex... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.790 Sabine River at Orange, Tex.; restricted area in vicinity of the Naval.... Government or those duly authorized by the Commanding Officer, Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Center,...

  1. Effects of hydrostatic pressure on the stability and thermostability of poliovirus: a new method for vaccine preservation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Evanilce; Mendes, Ygara S; Silva, Jerson L; Galler, Ricardo; Oliveira, Andréa C; Freire, Marcos S; Gaspar, Luciane P

    2009-08-27

    Viruses are a structurally diverse group of infectious agents that differ widely in their sensitivities to high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). Studies on picornaviruses have demonstrated that these viruses are extremely resistant to HHP treatments, with poliovirus appearing to be the most resistant. Here, the three attenuated poliovirus serotypes were compared with regard to pressure and thermal resistance. We found that HHP does not inactivate any of the three serotypes studied (1-3). Rather, HHP treatment was found to stabilize poliovirus by increasing viral thermal resistance at 37 degrees C. Identification of new methods that stabilize poliovirus against heat inactivation would aid in the design of a more heat-stable vaccine, circumventing the problems associated with refrigeration during storage and transport of the vaccine prior to use. PMID:19616496

  2. Nectin-Like Interactions between Poliovirus and Its Receptor Trigger Conformational Changes Associated with Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Filman, David J.; Belnap, David M.; Cheng, Naiqian; Noel, Roane T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poliovirus infection is initiated by attachment to a receptor on the cell surface called Pvr or CD155. At physiological temperatures, the receptor catalyzes an irreversible expansion of the virus to form an expanded form of the capsid called the 135S particle. This expansion results in the externalization of the myristoylated capsid protein VP4 and the N-terminal extension of the capsid protein VP1, both of which become inserted into the cell membrane. Structures of the expanded forms of poliovirus and of several related viruses have recently been reported. However, until now, it has been unclear how receptor binding triggers viral expansion at physiological temperature. Here, we report poliovirus in complex with an enzymatically partially deglycosylated form of the 3-domain ectodomain of Pvr at a 4-Å resolution, as determined by cryo-electron microscopy. The interaction of the receptor with the virus in this structure is reminiscent of the interactions of Pvr with its natural ligands. At a low temperature, the receptor induces very few changes in the structure of the virus, with the largest changes occurring within the footprint of the receptor, and in a loop of the internal protein VP4. Changes in the vicinity of the receptor include the displacement of a natural lipid ligand (called “pocket factor”), demonstrating that the loss of this ligand, alone, is not sufficient to induce particle expansion. Finally, analogies with naturally occurring ligand binding in the nectin family suggest which specific structural rearrangements in the virus-receptor complex could help to trigger the irreversible expansion of the capsid. IMPORTANCE The cell-surface receptor (Pvr) catalyzes a large structural change in the virus that exposes membrane-binding protein chains. We fitted known atomic models of the virus and Pvr into three-dimensional experimental maps of the receptor-virus complex. The molecular interactions we see between poliovirus and its receptor are

  3. Improved Genotyping Vaccine and Wild-Type Poliovirus Strains by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis: Clinical Diagnostic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulou, Amalia; Markoulatos, Panayotis; Spyrou, Niki; Vamvakopoulos, Nicholas C.

    2000-01-01

    The combination of preventive vaccination and diagnostic typing of viral isolates from patients with clinical poliomyelitis constitutes our main protective shield against polioviruses. The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) adaptation of the reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR methodology has advanced diagnostic genotyping of polioviruses, although further improvements are definitely needed. We report here on an improved RFLP procedure for the genotyping of polioviruses. A highly conserved segment within the 5′ noncoding region of polioviruses was selected for RT-PCR amplification by the UC53-UG52 primer pair with the hope that it would be most resistant to the inescapable genetic alteration-drift experienced by the other segments of the viral genome. Complete inter- and intratypic genotyping of polioviruses by the present RFLP method was accomplished with a minimum set of four restriction endonucleases (HaeIII, DdeI, NcoI, and AvaI). To compensate for potential genetic drift within the recognition sites of HaeIII, DdeI, or NcoI in atypical clinical samples, the RFLP patterns generated with HpaII and StyI as replacements were analyzed. The specificity of the method was also successfully assessed by RFLP analysis of 55 reference nonpoliovirus enterovirus controls. The concerted implementation of these conditional protocols for diagnostic inter- and intratypic genotyping of polioviruses was evaluated with 21 clinical samples with absolute success. PMID:11101561

  4. Improved genotyping vaccine and wild-type poliovirus strains by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis: clinical diagnostic implications.

    PubMed

    Georgopoulou, A; Markoulatos, P; Spyrou, N; Vamvakopoulos, N C

    2000-12-01

    The combination of preventive vaccination and diagnostic typing of viral isolates from patients with clinical poliomyelitis constitutes our main protective shield against polioviruses. The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) adaptation of the reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR methodology has advanced diagnostic genotyping of polioviruses, although further improvements are definitely needed. We report here on an improved RFLP procedure for the genotyping of polioviruses. A highly conserved segment within the 5' noncoding region of polioviruses was selected for RT-PCR amplification by the UC(53)-UG(52) primer pair with the hope that it would be most resistant to the inescapable genetic alteration-drift experienced by the other segments of the viral genome. Complete inter- and intratypic genotyping of polioviruses by the present RFLP method was accomplished with a minimum set of four restriction endonucleases (HaeIII, DdeI, NcoI, and AvaI). To compensate for potential genetic drift within the recognition sites of HaeIII, DdeI, or NcoI in atypical clinical samples, the RFLP patterns generated with HpaII and StyI as replacements were analyzed. The specificity of the method was also successfully assessed by RFLP analysis of 55 reference nonpoliovirus enterovirus controls. The concerted implementation of these conditional protocols for diagnostic inter- and intratypic genotyping of polioviruses was evaluated with 21 clinical samples with absolute success. PMID:11101561

  5. The poliovirus receptor protein is produced both as membrane-bound and secreted forms.

    PubMed Central

    Koike, S; Horie, H; Ise, I; Okitsu, A; Yoshida, M; Iizuka, N; Takeuchi, K; Takegami, T; Nomoto, A

    1990-01-01

    Both genomic and complementary DNA clones encoding poliovirus receptors were isolated from genomic and complementary DNA libraries prepared from HeLa S3 cells, respectively. Nucleotide sequence analysis of these cloned DNAs revealed that the poliovirus receptor gene is approximately 20 kb long and contains seven introns in the coding region, and that at least four mRNA isoforms referring to the coding sequence are generated by alternative splicing and appear to encode four different molecules, that is, PVR alpha, PVR beta, PVR gamma and PVR delta. The predicted amino acid sequences indicate that PVR alpha and PVR delta, corresponding to the previously described cDNA clones H20A and H20B, respectively, are integral membrane proteins while the other two molecules described here for the first time lack a putative transmembrane domain. Mouse cell transformants carrying PVR alpha were permissive for poliovirus infection, but those carrying PVR beta were hardly permissive. In contrast to PVR alpha, PVR beta was not detected on the surface of the mouse cell transformants but was detected in the culture fluid by an immunological method using a monoclonal antibody against poliovirus receptor. Three types of splicing products for PVR alpha, PVR beta and PVR gamma were detected by polymerase chain reactions using appropriate primers in poly(A)+ RNAs of the brain, leukocyte, liver, lung and placenta of humans; the choice of primers used did not permit detection of PVR delta. In situ hybridization using a cDNA fragment as a probe demonstrated that the PVR gene is located at the band q13.1----13.2 of human chromosome 19. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2170108

  6. Simian virus 40, poliovirus vaccines, and human cancer: research progress versus media and public interests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butel, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    From 1955 through early 1963, millions of people were inadvertently exposed to simian virus 40 (SV40) as a contaminant of poliovirus vaccines; the virus had been present in the monkey kidney cultures used to prepare the vaccines and had escaped detection. SV40 was discovered in 1960 and subsequently eliminated from poliovirus vaccines. This article reviews current knowledge about SV40 and considers public responses to reports in the media. SV40 is a potent tumour virus with broad tissue tropism that induces tumours in rodents and transforms cultured cells from many species. It is also an important laboratory model for basic studies of molecular processes in eukaryotic cells and mechanisms of neoplastic transformation. SV40 neutralizing antibodies have been detected in individuals not exposed to contaminated poliovirus vaccines. There have been many reports of detection of SV40 DNA in human tumours, especially mesotheliomas, brain tumours and osteosarcomas; and DNA sequence analyses have ruled out the possibility that the viral DNA in tumours was due to laboratory contamination or that the virus had been misidentified. However, additional studies are necessary to prove that SV40 is the cause of certain human cancers. A recently published review article evaluated the status of the field and received much media attention. The public response emphasized that there is great interest in the possibility of health risks today from vaccinations received in the past.

  7. Strand-specific attachment of avidin-spheres to double-stranded poliovirus RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, O C; Ehrenfeld, E; Manning, J

    1979-01-01

    Poliovirus-specific double-stranded RNA molecules containing covalently attached protein were coupled with a biotin ester through the protein moiety. Subsequent interaction of the RNA-biotin with avidin attached to electronopaque plastic spheres led to the formation of complexes that were easily visualized in the electron microscope. Avidinspheres were associated only with one end of the RNA-biotin molecules, as seen in the electron microscope. Avidin-sphere attachment to poliovirus double-stranded RNA is strand specific, as shown by molecular hybridization of strand-specific probes to the separated strands of denatured complexes. [3H]DNA complementary to polio virion RNA hybridized exclusively to the strands bearing associated spheres [(+) strands] whereas 125I-labeled virion RNA hybridized predominantly with strands without spheres [(-)strands]. This biotin-avidin labeling technique provides a means for the isolation of full-length poliovirus (-) strands and may provide a general means for isolation of double-stranded polynucleotides containing tightly attached protein. Images PMID:218216

  8. Identification of terminal adenylyl transferase activity of the poliovirus polymerase 3Dpol.

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, K L; Galarza, J M; Richards, O C; Summers, D F; Ehrenfeld, E

    1994-01-01

    A terminal adenylyl transferase (TATase) activity has been identified in preparations of purified poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (3Dpol). Highly purified 3Dpol is capable of adding [32P]AMP to the 3' ends of chemically synthesized 12-nucleotide (nt)-long RNAs. The purified 52-kDa polypeptide, isolated after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and renatured, retained the TATase activity. Two 3Dpol mutants, purified from Escherichia coli expression systems, displayed no detectable polymerase activity and were unable to catalyze TATase activity. Likewise, extracts from the parental E. coli strain that harbored no expression plasmid were unable to catalyze formation of the TATase products. With the RNA oligonucleotide 5'-CCUGCUUUUGCA-3' used as an acceptor, the products formed by wild-type 3Dpol were 9 and 18 nt longer than the 12-nt oligomer. GTP, CTP, and UTP did not serve as substrates for transfer to this RNA, either by themselves or when all deoxynucleoside triphosphates were present in the reaction. Results from kinetic and stoichiometric analyses suggest that the reaction is catalytic and shows substrate and enzyme dependence. The 3'-terminal 13 nt of poliovirus minus-strand RNA also served as an acceptor for TATase activity, raising the possibility that this activity functions in poliovirus RNA replication. The efficiency of utilization and the nature of the products formed during the reaction were dependent on the acceptor RNA. Images PMID:8057462

  9. Recovery of poliovirus from cut surface of stored fresh papaya fruit.

    PubMed

    Lee, A S; Yap, K L

    1999-06-01

    Poliovirus kept on the cut surfaces of fully ripe papaya cubes placed in an ice box showed a sharp and significant reduction in the recovery of infectious virus about 15 minutes after exposure. Thereafter, a very gradual decrease ensued and infectious residual virus was detected up to the end of the 6-hour exposure period. Papaya cubes washed or kept overnight before virus inoculation, and from less ripe fruits produced a similar survival pattern. A very small proportion of the inoculum was recovered from the mashed content of the inoculated papaya cubes thus suggesting that most of the non-recovered virus particles were inactivated. The results suggest that the importance of poliovirus-contaminated cut papayas as a transmission vehicle for the virus is greatly reduced by the rapid decline in the infectivity of a large proportion of the virus soon after contamination. Nevertheless, the potential to transmit remains as a small residual pool of infectious poliovirus is able to survive for a relatively long period. PMID:10774695

  10. Massive outbreak of poliomyelitis caused by type-3 wild poliovirus in Angola in 1999.

    PubMed Central

    Valente, F.; Otten, M.; Balbina, F.; Van de Weerdt, R.; Chezzi, C.; Eriki, P.; Van-Dúnnen, J.; Bele, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    The largest outbreak of poliomyelitis ever recorded in Africa (1093 cases) occurred from 1 March to 28 May 1999 in Luanda, Angola, and in surrounding areas. The outbreak was caused primarily by a type-3 wild poliovirus, although type-1 wild poliovirus was circulating in the outbreak area at the same time. Infected individuals ranged in age from 2 months to 22 years; 788 individuals (72%) were younger than 3 years. Of the 590 individuals whose vaccination status was known, 23% had received no vaccine and 54% had received fewer than three doses of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). The major factors that contributed to this outbreak were as follows: massive displacement of unvaccinated persons to urban settings; low routine OPV coverage; inaccessible populations during the previous three national immunization days (NIDs); and inadequate sanitation. This outbreak indicates the urgent need to improve accessibility to all children during NIDs and the dramatic impact that war can have by displacing persons and impeding access to routine immunizations. The period immediately after an outbreak provides an enhanced opportunity to eradicate poliomyelitis. If continuous access in all districts for acute flaccid paralysis surveillance and supplemental immunizations cannot be assured, the current war in Angola may threaten global poliomyelitis eradication. PMID:10812730

  11. Environmental surveillance of poliovirus and non-polio enterovirus in urban sewage in Dakar, Senegal (2007-2013)

    PubMed Central

    Ndiaye, Abdou Kader; Diop, Pape Amadou Mbathio; Diop, Ousmane Madiagne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Global poliomyelitis eradication initiative relies on (i) laboratory based surveillance of acute flaccid surveillance (AFP) to monitor the circulation of wild poliovirus in a population, and (ii) vaccination to prevent its diffusion. However, as poliovirus can survive in the environment namely in sewage, environmental surveillance (ES) is of growing importance as the eradication target is close. This study aimed to assess polioviruses and non polio enteroviruses circulation in sewage drains covering a significant population of Dakar. Methods From April 2007 to May 2013, 271 specimens of raw sewage were collected using the grab method in 6 neighborhoods of Dakar. Samples were processed to extract and concentrate viruses using polyethylene glycol and Dextran (two-phase separation method). Isolation of enteroviruses was attempted in RD, L20B and Hep2 cell lines. Polioviruses were identified by RT-PCR and Elisa. Non Polio Enteroviruses (NPEVs) were identified by RT-PCR and microneutralisation tests. Results Polioviruses and NPEVs were respectively detected in 34,3% and 42,8% sewage samples. No wild poliovirus neither circulating vaccine-derived Poliovirus (cVDPV) was detected. Neutralization assays have identified 49 non polio enteroviruses that were subsequently classified in 13 serotypes belonging to HEV-A (22, 4%), HEV-B (12, 24%), HEV-C (26, 53%) and HEV-D (6, 12%) species. Conclusion This study is the first documentation of enteroviruses environmental detection in Senegal. It shows the usefulness of environmental surveillance for indirect monitoring of the circulation and distribution of enteroviruses in the community. PMID:25848458

  12. Gain-loss study along two streams in the upper Sabine River basin, Texas; August-September 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, Dennis R.

    1983-01-01

    A gain-loss study was made August-September 1981 along the upper Sabine River from Lake Tawakoni to Farm Road 2517 near Carthage and along Lake Fork Creek from Lake Fork Reservoir to its junction (mouth) with the Sabine River. The hydrologic data collected during the gain-loss study indicated that during periods of low flow on the Sabine River, at least as much water as is released from Lake Tawakoni and from Lake Fork Reservoir will be available downstream at Farm Road 14 near Big Sandy and at Farm Road 2517 near Carthage. Gains from bank seepage and small tributary inflows compensate for losses due to evaporation, evapotranspiration, and loss of water into the alluvial aquifer. Dissolved solids concentrations in the Sabine River, estimated from specific conductance, increased from about 120 milligrams per liter near the upstream end of the reach to about 400 milligrams per liter near the downstream end of the reach. Water with these concentrations of dissolved solids generally is suitable for most uses.

  13. Predictive spatial risk model of poliovirus to aid prioritization and hasten eradication in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the challenges facing the Global Polio Eradication Initiative is efficiently directing limited resources, such as specially trained personnel, community outreach activities, and satellite vaccinator tracking, to the most at-risk areas to maximize the impact of interventions. A validated predictive model of wild poliovirus circulation would greatly inform prioritization efforts by accurately forecasting areas at greatest risk, thus enabling the greatest effect of program interventions. Methods Using Nigerian acute flaccid paralysis surveillance data from 2004-2013, we developed a spatial hierarchical Poisson hurdle model fitted within a Bayesian framework to study historical polio caseload patterns and forecast future circulation of type 1 and 3 wild poliovirus within districts in Nigeria. A Bayesian temporal smoothing model was applied to address data sparsity underlying estimates of covariates at the district level. Results We find that calculated vaccine-derived population immunity is significantly negatively associated with the probability and number of wild poliovirus case(s) within a district. Recent case information is significantly positively associated with probability of a case, but not the number of cases. We used lagged indicators and coefficients from the fitted models to forecast reported cases in the subsequent six-month periods. Over the past three years, the average predictive ability is 86 ± 2% and 85 ± 4% for wild poliovirus type 1 and 3, respectively. Interestingly, the predictive accuracy of historical transmission patterns alone is equivalent (86 ± 2% and 84 ± 4% for type 1 and 3, respectively). We calculate uncertainty in risk ranking to inform assessments of changes in rank between time periods. Conclusions The model developed in this study successfully predicts districts at risk for future wild poliovirus cases in Nigeria. The highest predicted district risk was 12.8 WPV1 cases in 2006, while the lowest district risk

  14. Isolation and characterization of HeLa cell lines blocked at different steps in the poliovirus life cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, G; Levy, A; Racaniello, V R

    1989-01-01

    Cotransfection of poliovirus RNA and R1, a poliovirus subgenomic RNA containing a deletion of nearly all of the capsid region, resulted in surviving cells, in contrast to the complete cell death observed after transfection with viral RNA. Cells that survived the cotransfection grew into colonies, produced infectious poliovirus, and underwent cycles of cell lysis (crisis periods) where less than 1% of the cells survived, followed by periods of growth. Poliovirus evolved during the persistent infection as judged by changes in plaque size. After passage for 6 months, a stable line called SOFIA emerged that no longer produced infectious virus and did not contain viral proteins or viral RNA. Cells frozen in liquid N2 while still in crisis and recultured 4 months later (named SOFIA N2) were also stabilized. After infection with poliovirus, SOFIA N2 cells showed a delay in the development of cytopathic effect, viral production, and cellular death when compared with HeLa cells. In contrast, SOFIA cells did not develop cytopathic effect and produced 10,000 times less virus than SOFIA N2 or HeLa cells. Viral production was delayed in SOFIA and SOFIA N2 cells transfected with poliovirus RNA when compared with HeLa cells, suggesting the presence of an intracellular block to poliovirus replication. Analysis of the cellular receptor for poliovirus by virus binding, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and in situ rosette assays with an antireceptor monoclonal antibody showed that receptors were expressed in SOFIA N2 cells but not in SOFIA cells. Echovirus 6, an enterovirus which uses a different cellular receptor, formed small plaques on SOFIA cells. Vesicular stomatitis virus formed plaques of similar size on SOFIA and HeLa cells, suggesting that the intracellular block was specific for enteroviruses. Cotransfection of the subgenomic replicon R1 with poliovirion RNA therefore resulted in the selection of HeLa cell variants containing blocks to poliovirus replication at the

  15. Isolation of a soluble and template-dependent poliovirus RNA polymerase that copies virion RNA in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Flanegan, J B; Van Dyke, T A

    1979-01-01

    A soluble RNA-dependent RNA polymerase was isolated from poliovirus-infected HeLa cells and was shown to copy poliovirus RNA in vitro. The enzyme was purified from a 200,000-X-g supernatant of a cytoplasmic extract of infected cells. The activity of the enzyme was measured throughout the purification by using a polyadenylic acid template and oligouridylic acid primer. The enzyme was partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, glycerol gradient centrifugation, and phosphocellulose chromatography. The polymerase precipitated in a 35% saturated solution of ammonium sulfate, sedimented at about 7S on a glycerol gradient, and eluted from phosphocellulose with 0.15 M KC1. The polymerase was purified about 40-fold and was shown to be totally dependent on exogenous RNA for activity and relatively free of contaminating nuclease. The partially purified polymerase was able to use purified polio virion RNA as well as a template. Under the reaction conditions used, the polymerase required an oligouridylic acid primer and all four ribonucleside triphosphates for activity. The optimum ratio of oligouridylic acid molecules to poliovirus RNA molecules for priming activity was about 16:1. A nearest-neighbor analysis of the in vitro RNA product shows it to be heteropolymeric. Annealing the in vitro product with poliovirus RNA product shows it to be heteropolymeric. Annealing the in vitro product with poliovirus RNA rendered it resistant to RNase digestion, thus suggesting that the product RNA was complementary to the virion RNA template. PMID:232168

  16. Attenuation of Neurovirulence, Biodistribution, and Shedding of a Poliovirus:Rhinovirus Chimera after Intrathalamic Inoculation in Macaca fascicularis

    PubMed Central

    Dobrikova, Elena Y.; Goetz, Christian; Walters, Robert W.; Lawson, Sarah K.; Peggins, James O.; Muszynski, Karen; Ruppel, Sheryl; Poole, Karyol; Giardina, Steven L.; Vela, Eric M.; Estep, James E.

    2012-01-01

    A dependence of poliovirus on an unorthodox translation initiation mode can be targeted selectively to drive viral protein synthesis and cytotoxicity in malignant cells. Transformed cells are naturally susceptible to poliovirus, due to widespread ectopic upregulation of the poliovirus receptor, Necl-5, in ectodermal/neuroectodermal cancers. Viral tumor cell killing and the host immunologic response it engenders produce potent, lasting antineoplastic effects in animal tumor models. Clinical application of this principle depends on unequivocal demonstration of safety in primate models for paralytic poliomyelitis. We conducted extensive dose-range-finding, toxicity, biodistribution, shedding, and neutralizing antibody studies of the prototype oncolytic poliovirus recombinant, PVS-RIPO, after intrathalamic inoculation in Macaca fascicularis. These studies suggest that intracerebral PVS-RIPO inoculation does not lead to viral propagation in the central nervous system (CNS), does not cause histopathological CNS lesions or neurological symptoms that can be attributed to the virus, is not associated with extraneural virus dissemination or replication and does not induce shedding of virus with stool. Intrathalamic PVS-RIPO inoculation induced neutralizing antibody responses against poliovirus serotype 1 in all animals studied. PMID:22171271

  17. A poliovirus hybrid expressing a neutralization epitope from the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia trachomatis is highly immunogenic.

    PubMed Central

    Murdin, A D; Su, H; Manning, D S; Klein, M H; Parnell, M J; Caldwell, H D

    1993-01-01

    Trachoma and sexually transmitted diseases caused by Chlamydia trachomatis are major health problems worldwide. Epitopes on the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of C. trachomatis have been identified as important targets for the development of vaccines. In order to examine the immunogenicity of a recombinant vector expressing a chlamydial epitope, a poliovirus hybrid was constructed in which part of neutralization antigenic site I of poliovirus type 1 Mahoney (PV1-M) was replaced by a sequence from variable domain I of the MOMP of C. trachomatis serovar A. The chlamydial sequence included the neutralization epitope VAGLEK. This hybrid was viable, grew very well compared with PV1-M, and expressed both poliovirus and chlamydial antigenic determinants. When inoculated into rabbits, this hybrid was highly immunogenic, inducing a strong response against both PV1-M and C. trachomatis serovar A. Antichlamydia titers were 10- to 100-fold higher than the titers induced by equimolar amounts of either purified MOMP or a synthetic peptide expressing the VAGLEK epitope. Furthermore, rabbit antisera raised against this hybrid neutralized chlamydial infectivity both in vitro, for hamster kidney cells, and passively in vivo, for conjunctival epithelia of cynomolgus monkeys. Because poliovirus infection induces a strong mucosal immune response in primates and humans, these results indicate that poliovirus-chlamydia hybrids could become powerful tools for the study of mucosal immunity to chlamydial infection and for the development of recombinant chlamydial vaccines. Images PMID:7691749

  18. Conditional poliovirus mutants made by random deletion mutagenesis of infectious cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkegaard, K; Nelsen, B

    1990-01-01

    Small deletions were introduced into DNA plasmids bearing cDNA copies of Mahoney type 1 poliovirus RNA. The procedure used was similar to that of P. Hearing and T. Shenk (J. Mol. Biol. 167:809-822, 1983), with modifications designed to introduce only one lesion randomly into each DNA molecule. Methods to map small deletions in either large DNA or RNA molecules were employed. Two poliovirus mutants, VP1-101 and VP1-102, were selected from mutagenized populations on the basis of their host range phenotype, showing a large reduction in the relative numbers of plaques on CV1 and HeLa cells compared with wild-type virus. The deletions borne by the mutant genomes were mapped to the region encoding the amino terminus of VP1. That these lesions were responsible for the mutant phenotypes was substantiated by reintroduction of the sequenced lesions into a wild-type poliovirus cDNA by deoxyoligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. The deletion of nucleotides encoding amino acids 8 and 9 of VP1 was responsible for the VP1-101 phenotype; the VP1-102 defect was caused by the deletion of the sequences encoding the first four amino acids of VP1. The peptide sequence at the VP1-VP3 proteolytic cleavage site was altered from glutamine-glycine to glutamine-methionine in VP1-102; this apparently did not alter the proteolytic cleavage pattern. The biochemical defects resulting from these mutations are discussed in the accompanying report. Images PMID:2152811

  19. The human poliovirus receptor. Receptor-virus interaction and parameters of disease specificity.

    PubMed

    Gromeier, M; Lu, H H; Bernhardt, G; Harber, J J; Bibb, J A; Wimmer, E

    1995-05-25

    The host range of poliovirus is determined by the expression of the hPVR, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. We characterized hPVR proteins biochemically and found them to be complex-type glycoproteins. The outermost V-like domain of three extracellular domains harbors the PVR function. A panel of single or multiple amino acid exchanges were introduced throughout this domain in order to localize regions involved in virus-receptor interactions. Putative contact amino acids were found to reside in the C'C"D and DE regions. Binding and uptake of poliovirus paralleled virus replication in all mutants tested suggesting that virus binding was affected without abrogating the ability to mediate subsequent events in the infection. Although the primate PVR is essential in conferring susceptibility to poliovirus infection, certain strains can induce neurological disease in rodents. Mouse neurovirulent PV isolates of divergent serotypical origin each provoked a distinctive, characteristic neurological syndrome upon intracerebral infection of wild-type mice. We analyzed clinical and histopathological features of diffuse encephalomyelitis caused by these PV strains and compared the condition with poliomyelitis in mice transgenic for the hPVR. Diffuse PV encephalomyelitis in wild-type mice could be distinguished clinically and histopathologically from hPVR-mediated poliomyelitis in trangenic mice. We localized the determinants of mouse neurovirulence of PV1(LS-a), a derivative of PV1 (Mahoney), in a portion of the viral genome encompassing parts of the capsid protein VP1 as well as the nonstructural protein 2A. Mouse neuropathogenicity could possibly be conferred by reduced particle stability of PV1(LS-a) inasmuch as we found particles to be thermolabile. PMID:7611627

  20. Efficiency of beef extract for the recovery of poliovirus from wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Landry, E F; Vaughn, J M; Thomas, M Z; Vicale, T J

    1978-10-01

    The efficiency of poliovirus elution from fiber glass cartridge filters (K27), epoxy-fiber glass-asbestos filters (M780), and pleated cartridge filters was assessed by using 3% beef extract (pH 9.0) or 0.1 M glycine (pH 11.5). Poliovirus type I, strain LSc, was seeded into 20- to 25-gallon (ca. 75.6- to 95.6-liter) samples of treated sewage effluent and concentrated by using a filter adsorption-elution technique. Virus elution was accomplished by using either two 600-ml portions of 3% beef extract (pH 9.0), or two 1-liter portions of 0.1 M glycine (pH 11.5). In all experiments, beef extract elution followed by organic flocculation was found to be superior, yielding a mean recovery efficiency of 85%, with recoveries ranging from 68 to 100%. Elution with 0.1 M glycine (pH 11.5) followed by inorganic flocculation resulted in a mean recovery efficiency of 36%. The variable range of recoveries with beef extract could not be significantly improved by varying the type of beef extract or by extending the elution time to 30 min. Second-step reconcentration of 1-liter seeded sewage effluent and renovated wastewater samples indicated that organic flocculation was a more efficient method for virus recovery than inorganic flocculation. Beef extract concentrations of less than 3% were found to be efficient in the recovery of poliovirus from renovated wastewater. PMID:30391

  1. North Sabine Lake field: complex deposition and reservoir morphology of lower Hackberry (Oligocene), southwest Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Eubanks, L.G.

    1987-10-01

    Gas and condensate production at the North Sabine Lake field is from sands of the Hackberry wedge of the Oligocene Frio Formation. These lower Hackberry sands were deposited in a preexisting submarine canyon. Multiple sand bodies are present, and five patterns of sand deposition are recognized from SP logs: (1) incised channel fill, (2) braided fan channel, (3) intermediate suprafan, (4) proximal suprafan, and (5) overbank. Although three faults surround the field, the primary trapping mechanism is stratigraphic. The development and production history of the field indicate that many small sand lenses have coalesced to form a single large reservoir; however, differences in permeability have caused variations in water influx and in the levels of gas-water contacts. Sand lenses that are not connected to the larger reservoir are of limited size and have produced small amounts of hydrocarbon. Development of the field has been complicated by casing damage probably caused by reservoir compaction. 11 figures, 2 tables.

  2. In Vitro Synthesis of Poliovirus Ribonucleic Acid: Role of the Replicative Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Marc

    1969-01-01

    Poliovirus ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase crude extracts could be stored frozen in liquid nitrogen without loss of activity or specificity. The major in vitro product of these extracts was viral single-stranded RNA. However, after short periods of incubation with radioactive nucleoside triphosphates, most of the incorporated label was found in replicative intermediate. When excess unlabeled nucleoside triphosphate was added, the label was displaced from the replicative intermediate and accumulated as viral RNA. It is concluded from this experiment that the replicative intermediate is the precursor to viral RNA. In addition, some of the label was chased into double-stranded RNA. The implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:4306193

  3. Calcium Flux between the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrion Contributes to Poliovirus-Induced Apoptosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Brisac, Cynthia; Téoulé, François; Autret, Arnaud; Pelletier, Isabelle; Colbère-Garapin, Florence; Brenner, Catherine; Lemaire, Christophe; Blondel, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    We show that poliovirus (PV) infection induces an increase in cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) concentration in neuroblastoma IMR5 cells, at least partly through Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum lumen via the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP3R) and ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels. This leads to Ca2+ accumulation in mitochondria through the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter and the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC). This increase in mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration in PV-infected cells leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. PMID:20861253

  4. Remodeling the Endoplasmic Reticulum by Poliovirus Infection and by Individual Viral Proteins: an Autophagy-Like Origin for Virus-Induced Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Suhy, David A.; Giddings, Thomas H.; Kirkegaard, Karla

    2000-01-01

    All positive-strand RNA viruses of eukaryotes studied assemble RNA replication complexes on the surfaces of cytoplasmic membranes. Infection of mammalian cells with poliovirus and other picornaviruses results in the accumulation of dramatically rearranged and vesiculated membranes. Poliovirus-induced membranes did not cofractionate with endoplasmic reticulum (ER), lysosomes, mitochondria, or the majority of Golgi-derived or endosomal membranes in buoyant density gradients, although changes in ionic strength affected ER and virus-induced vesicles, but not other cellular organelles, similarly. When expressed in isolation, two viral proteins of the poliovirus RNA replication complex, 3A and 2C, cofractionated with ER membranes. However, in cells that expressed 2BC, a proteolytic precursor of the 2B and 2C proteins, membranes identical in buoyant density to those observed during poliovirus infection were formed. When coexpressed with 2BC, viral protein 3A was quantitatively incorporated into these fractions, and the membranes formed were ultrastructurally similar to those in poliovirus-infected cells. These data argue that poliovirus-induced vesicles derive from the ER by the action of viral proteins 2BC and 3A by a mechanism that excludes resident host proteins. The double-membraned morphology, cytosolic content, and apparent ER origin of poliovirus-induced membranes are all consistent with an autophagic origin for these membranes. PMID:10982339

  5. A Critical Role of a Cellular Membrane Traffic Protein in Poliovirus RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Belov, George A.; Feng, Qian; Nikovics, Krisztina; Jackson, Catherine L.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2008-01-01

    Replication of many RNA viruses is accompanied by extensive remodeling of intracellular membranes. In poliovirus-infected cells, ER and Golgi stacks disappear, while new clusters of vesicle-like structures form sites for viral RNA synthesis. Virus replication is inhibited by brefeldin A (BFA), implicating some components(s) of the cellular secretory pathway in virus growth. Formation of characteristic vesicles induced by expression of viral proteins was not inhibited by BFA, but they were functionally deficient. GBF1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small cellular GTPases, Arf, is responsible for the sensitivity of virus infection to BFA, and is required for virus replication. Knockdown of GBF1 expression inhibited virus replication, which was rescued by catalytically active protein with an intact N-terminal sequence. We identified a mutation in GBF1 that allows growth of poliovirus in the presence of BFA. Interaction between GBF1 and viral protein 3A determined the outcome of infection in the presence of BFA. PMID:19023417

  6. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Okazaki, S.; Fujimoto, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.

    2014-10-28

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 10{sup 6} all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  7. Effect of Poliovirus on Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, W. W.; Cox, D. C.; Kurtz, H.; Powers, C. D.; Davies, S. J.

    1966-01-01

    Ackermann, W. W. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), D. C. Cox, H. Kurtz, C. D. Powers, and S. J. Davies. Effect of poliovirus on deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in HeLa cells. J. Bacteriol. 91:1943–1952. 1966.—Both poliovirus and arginine stimulated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis in cultures of HeLa cells which were preconditioned by incubation in a medium deficient in arginine. However, the number of cells producing DNA was unaffected. DNA synthesis in such preconditioned cells was 10 to 20% of the maximal value obtained with a full complement of amino acids. Inhibition of DNA synthesis was produced in these cultures either by increasing the multiplicity of exposure above 40 plaque-forming units of virus per cell or by increasing the concentration of the deficient amino acid at the time of virus addition. Inhibition of DNA synthesis resulted from a reduction in the fraction of cells producing DNA. The concentration of arginine required for viral inhibition of DNA synthesis is greater than that for viral multiplication. PMID:4287076

  8. Development of a novel bag-mediated filtration system for environmental recovery of poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Fagnant, Christine Susan; Beck, Nicola Koren; Yang, Ming-Fong; Barnes, Kilala Sayisha; Boyle, David S; Meschke, John Scott

    2014-12-01

    Poliovirus (PV) is on the verge of global eradication. Due to asymptomatic shedding, eradication certification requires environmental and clinical surveillance. Current environmental surveillance methods involve collection and processing of 400-mL to 1-L grab samples by a two-phase separation method, where sample volume limits detection sensitivity. Filtration of larger sample volumes facilitates increased detection sensitivity. This study describes development of a pumpless in-field filtration system for poliovirus recovery from environmental waters. Recovery of PV types 1, 2, and 3 were compared for glass wool, ViroCap, and NanoCeram (PV1 only) filters. Seeded experiments were performed using 10(5) plaque forming units of PV inoculated into 10-L volumes of secondary effluent, surface water, or a 50:50 mixture of each at pH 7.0. Filter eluates were plated onto buffalo green monkey kidney cells for virus enumeration by plaque assay. Across all water types, recovery from glass wool filters for PV1, PV2, and PV3 averaged 17%, 28%, and 6%, respectively. Recovery from ViroCaps for PV1, PV2, and PV3 averaged 44%, 70%, and 81%, respectively. 10-L samples of moderate turbidity water were processed through ViroCap filters in less than 30 minutes using a pumpless, bag-mediated filtration system. Bag-mediated filtration offers a simple, compact, and efficient method for enhanced environmental PV surveillance. PMID:25473984

  9. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Fujimoto, K.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.; Okazaki, S.

    2014-10-01

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 106 all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  10. Modification of an adenovirus major late promoter-binding factor during poliovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Lazard, D; Fernández-Tomás, C; Gariglio, P; Weinmann, R

    1989-01-01

    To further characterize the mechanism involved in poliovirus-induced inhibition of HeLa cells mRNA synthesis, in vitro formation of DNA-protein complexes between nuclear upstream stimulatory transcription factor (USF) and the adenovirus type 2 major late promoter upstream promoter element (UPE; located between -45 and -65 base pairs) was studied. Using the gel shift assay, we found differences between the UPE-protein complex formed with partially purified nuclear extracts from poliovirus-infected HeLa cells and that obtained in the presence of mock-infected extracts. Formation of the modified UPE-USF complex coincided with virus-induced inhibition of host cell RNA synthesis in vivo and with a less efficient in vitro transcriptional activity of the nuclear extracts from infected cells. Furthermore, using a cross-linking protocol, we found that the host 46-kilodalton UPE-binding USF factor was severely diminished and that a virus-induced or -modified 50-kilodalton polypeptide appeared to be specifically bound to the UPE template. Images PMID:2474675

  11. The Role of Electron Microscopy in Studying the Continuum of Changes in Membranous Structures during Poliovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Evan D.; Yang, Jie E.; Bullitt, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Replication of the poliovirus genome is localized to cytoplasmic replication factories that are fashioned out of a mixture of viral proteins, scavenged cellular components, and new components that are synthesized within the cell due to viral manipulation/up-regulation of protein and phospholipid synthesis. These membranous replication factories are quite complex, and include markers from multiple cytoplasmic cellular organelles. This review focuses on the role of electron microscopy in advancing our understanding of poliovirus RNA replication factories. Structural data from the literature provide the basis for interpreting a wide range of biochemical studies that have been published on virus-induced lipid biosynthesis. In combination, structural and biochemical experiments elucidate the dramatic membrane remodeling that is a hallmark of poliovirus infection. Temporal and spatial membrane modifications throughout the infection cycle are discussed. Early electron microscopy studies of morphological changes following viral infection are re-considered in light of more recent data on viral manipulation of lipid and protein biosynthesis. These data suggest the existence of distinct subcellular vesicle populations, each of which serves specialized roles in poliovirus replication processes. PMID:26473912

  12. Isolation and Characterization of a Type 2 Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus from Environmental Surveillance in China, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yao; Xu, Aiqiang; Lin, Xiaojuan; Yoshida, Hiromu; Xiong, Ping; Zhu, Shuangli; Wang, Suting; Yan, Dongmei; Song, Lizhi; Wang, Haiyan; Cui, Ning; Xu, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of poliovirus on sewage has been conducted in Shandong Province, China since 2008. A type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) with 7 mutations in VP1 coding region was isolated from the sewage collected in the city of Jinan in December 2012. The complete genome sequencing analysis of this isolate revealed 25 nucleotide substitutions, 7 of which resulted in amino acid alteration. No evidence of recombination with other poliovirus serotypes was observed. The virus did not lose temperature sensitive phenotype at 40°C. An estimation based on the evolution rate of the P1 coding region suggested that evolution time of this strain might be 160–176 days. VP1 sequence analysis revealed that this VDPV strain is of no close relationship with other local type 2 polioviruses (n = 66) from sewage collected between May 2012 and June 2013, suggesting the lack of its circulation in the local population. The person who excreted the virus was not known and no closely related virus was isolated in local population via acute flaccid paralysis surveillance. By far this is the first report of VDPV isolated from sewage in China, and these results underscore the value of environmental surveillance in the polio surveillance system even in countries with high rates of OPV coverage. PMID:24386319

  13. Viral precursor protein P3 and its processed products perform discrete and essential functions in the poliovirus RNA replication complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The differential use of protein precursors and their products is a key strategy used during poliovirus replication. To characterize the role of protein precursors during replication, we examined the complementation profiles of mutants that inhibited 3D polymerase or 3C-RNA binding activity. We showe...

  14. The compatibility of inactivated-Enterovirus 71 vaccination with Coxsackievirus A16 and Poliovirus immunizations in humans and animals

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Qunying; Wang, Yiping; Shao, Jie; Ying, Zhifang; Gao, Fan; Yao, Xin; Li, Changgui; Ye, Qiang; Xu, Miao; Li, Rongcheng; Zhu, Fengcai; Liang, Zhenglun

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the key pathogen for Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFMD) and can result in severe neurological complications and death among young children. Three inactivated-EV71 vaccines have gone through phase III clinical trials and have demonstrated good safety and efficacy. These vaccines will benefit young children under the threat of severe HFMD. However, the potential immunization-related compatibility for different enterovirus vaccines remains unclear, making it hard to include the EV71 vaccine in Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI). Here, we measured the neutralizing antibodies (NTAbs) against EV71, Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) and Poliovirus from infants enrolled in those EV71 vaccine clinical trials. The results indicated that the levels of NTAb GMTs for EV71 increased significantly in all 3 vaccine groups (high, middle and low dosages, respectively) post-vaccination. Seroconversion ratios and Geometric mean fold increase were significantly higher in the vaccine groups (≥7/9 and 8.9~228.1) than in the placebo group (≤1/10 and 0.8~1.7, P < 0.05). But no similar NTAb response trends were found in CA16 and 3 types of Poliovirus. The decrease of 3 types of Poliovirus NTAb GMTs and an increase of CA16 GMTs post-EV71-vaccination were found in vaccine and placebo groups. Further animal study on CA16 and poliovirus vaccine co-immunization or pre-immunization with EV71 vaccine in mice indicated that there was no NTAb cross-activity between EV71 and CA16/Poliovirus. Our research showed that inactivated-EV71 vaccine has good specific-neutralizing capacity and can be included in EPI. PMID:25715318

  15. Channel adjustments to historical disturbances along the lower Brazos and Sabine Rivers, south-central USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.

    2014-01-01

    Historical channel adjustments are documented and discussed in context with anthropogenic disturbances along two meandering, coastal plain rivers - the lower Brazos and Sabine Rivers in the south-central United States. Hard-copy streamflow-measurement notes of the U.S. Geological Survey were utilized to render historical cross sections (1925-2007) at nine gauging stations, which were complemented with repeat photographs and flood-frequency analysis to assess trajectories of channel change and interpret causative mechanisms. Downstream- and upstream-propagating disturbances caused episodes of channel-bed incision and aggradation at different locations for distinct time periods along both rivers. Incision associated with upstream dams is detected, but channels are compensated downstream with sediment inputs from lateral channel migration and tributaries. In one case, temporary aggradation along the Brazos River at Waco was likely caused by a combination of dam construction and regional soil erosion. Channel-bed incision on the lowermost Brazos River is unrelated to dams, but is associated with instream aggregate extraction, possibly in conjunction with downstream channelization. On the Sabine River, extensive aggradation during the 1930s might be associated with logging activities (1880s-1930s), but whether the cause is pervasive regional-scale hillslope erosion or local-scale mill-site activities is indeterminate. Following passage of this sediment, the river generally recovered to pre-disturbance conditions and has exhibited stability despite a mainstem reservoir. Translation of this sediment slug is attenuated by a transition to a flood-prone, distributary-dominated system downstream of the Holocene-Pleistocene terrace onlap position. Additional findings include cross-channel hingepoints separating thalweg incision from simultaneous point-bar or bank accretion at meander bends, which indicates channel adjustment occurs along non-cohesive beds in preference to

  16. Poliovirus Polyuridylic Acid Polymerase and RNA Replicase Have the Same Viral Polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Flanegan, James B.; Baltimore, David

    1979-01-01

    A poliovirus-specific polyuridylic acid [poly(U)] polymerase that copies a polyadenylic acid template complexed to an oligouridylic acid primer was isolated from the membrane fraction of infected HeLa cells and was found to sediment at 4 to 5S on a linear 5 to 20% glycerol gradient. When the poly(U) polymerase was isolated from cells labeled with [35S]methionine and was analyzed by glycerol gradient centrifugation and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the position of only one viral protein was found to correlate with the location of enzyme activity. This protein had an apparent molecular weight of 62,500 based on its electrophoretic mobility relative to that of several molecular weight standards and was designated p63. When the poly(U) polymerase was isolated from the soluble fraction of a cytoplasmic extract, the activity was found to sediment at about 7S. In this case, however, both p63 and NCVP2 (77,000-dalton precursor of p63) cosedimented with the 7S activity peak. When the 7S polymerase activity was purified by phosphocellulose chromatography, both p63 and NCVP2 were found to co-chromatograph with poly(U) polymerase activity. The poliovirus replicase complexed with its endogenous RNA template was isolated from infected cells labeled with [35S]methionine and was centrifuged through a linear 15 to 30% glycerol gradient. The major viral polypeptide component in a 26S peak of replicase activity was p63, but small amounts of other poliovirus proteins were also present. When the replicase-template complex was treated with RNase T1 before centrifugation, a single peak of activity was found that sedimented at 20S and contained only labeled p63. Thus, p63 was found to be the only viral polypeptide in the replicase bound to its endogenous RNA template, and appears to be active as a poly(U) polymerase either as a monomer protein or as a 7S complex. Images PMID:219230

  17. Cell-Specific Establishment of Poliovirus Resistance to an Inhibitor Targeting a Cellular Protein

    PubMed Central

    Viktorova, Ekaterina G.; Nchoutmboube, Jules; Ford-Siltz, Lauren A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is hypothesized that targeting stable cellular factors involved in viral replication instead of virus-specific proteins may raise the barrier for development of resistant mutants, which is especially important for highly adaptable small (+)RNA viruses. However, contrary to this assumption, the accumulated evidence shows that these viruses easily generate mutants resistant to the inhibitors of cellular proteins at least in some systems. We investigated here the development of poliovirus resistance to brefeldin A (BFA), an inhibitor of the cellular protein GBF1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small cellular GTPase Arf1. We found that while resistant viruses can be easily selected in HeLa cells, they do not emerge in Vero cells, in spite that in the absence of the drug both cultures support robust virus replication. Our data show that the viral replication is much more resilient to BFA than functioning of the cellular secretory pathway, suggesting that the role of GBF1 in the viral replication is independent of its Arf activating function. We demonstrate that the level of recruitment of GBF1 to the replication complexes limits the establishment and expression of a BFA resistance phenotype in both HeLa and Vero cells. Moreover, the BFA resistance phenotype of poliovirus mutants is also cell type dependent in different cells of human origin and results in a fitness loss in the form of reduced efficiency of RNA replication in the absence of the drug. Thus, a rational approach to the development of host-targeting antivirals may overcome the superior adaptability of (+)RNA viruses. IMPORTANCE Compared to the number of viral diseases, the number of available vaccines is miniscule. For some viruses vaccine development has not been successful after multiple attempts, and for many others vaccination is not a viable option. Antiviral drugs are needed for clinical practice and public health emergencies. However, viruses are highly adaptable and can

  18. Host range of poliovirus is restricted to simians because of a rapid sequence change of the poliovirus receptor gene during evolution.

    PubMed

    Ida-Hosonuma, M; Sasaki, Y; Toyoda, H; Nomoto, A; Gotoh, O; Yonekawa, H; Koike, S

    2003-01-01

    The host range of most poliovirus (PV) strains is restricted to simians. This host range specificity is believed to be determined by the interaction between PV and its receptor molecule. To elucidate the molecular basis of this species-specific infection of PV, we cloned orthologs of the PV receptor (PVR) gene ( pvr) as well as those of PV receptor-related genes 1 and 2 ( prr1 and prr2) from various mammalian species. These three genes are widely present in mammalian genomes including those of non-susceptible species. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of PVR orthologs revealed that the NH(2)-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain (domain 1), which is the virus binding site in the human PVR, is highly variable among species, whereas that of PRR1 is highly conserved. Domain 1 of the PVR orthologs for the ring-tailed lemur and rabbit, which are not susceptible to PV, show only 51 and 61% amino acid sequence identity to that of human PVR, respectively. Chimeric PVR proteins that have the domain 1 of the ring-tailed lemur and rabbit PVRs failed to serve as receptors for PV. These results suggest that rapid changes in the domain 1 sequence during mammalian evolution determined the host range restriction of PV. PMID:12536294

  19. Seroprevalence of poliovirus antibodies among 7-month-old infants after 4 doses of oral polio vaccine in Sistan-va-Baluchestan, Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Izadi, S; Shahmahmoodi, S; Zahraei, S M; Dorostkar, F; Majdzadeh, S-R

    2015-02-01

    Despite high coverage rates of polio vaccine in the Islamic Republic of Iran, the seroconversion rates of infants may be inadequate. This study measured seroprevalence of antibodies against poliovirus serotypes 1 to 3 (PV1, PV2 and PV3) in 7-month-old infants who had received at least 4 doses of trivalent oral polio vaccine. A serosurvey was conducted in 2010 in rural areas of Chabahar, Sistan-va-Baluchestan province. Using cluster sampling, 72 eligible infants were tested for antibody against the 3 poliovirus serotypes according to WHO guidelines. Antibody titres ≥ 1:10 were considered positive. The seropositive rates for antibody against PV1, PV2 and PV3 were 84.7%, 95.8% and 70.8% respectively. Only 63.9% of participants were seropositive for antibodies against all 3 poliovirus serotypes. Except for PV2, the seroprevalence of antibody against the other 2 poliovirus serotypes, especially PV3, was unsatisfactory. PMID:25876819

  20. Comparison of ozone inactivation, in flowing water, of hepatitis A virus, poliovirus 1, and indicator organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Herbold, K.; Flehmig, B.; Botzenhart, K. )

    1989-11-01

    In steadily flowing water at 20 degrees C and pH 7, five organisms had the following order of resistance to ozone (at constant levels of ozone): poliovirus 1 (PV1) less than Escherichia coli less than hepatitis A virus (HAV) less than Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6 less than Bacillus subtilis spores. The tests were repeated at 10 degrees C with HAV, PV1, and E. coli. Ozone inactivation of HAV and E. coli was faster at 10 degrees C than at 20 degrees C. At 20 degrees C, 0.25 to 0.38 mg of O3 per liter was required for complete inactivation of HAV but only 0.13 mg of O3 per liter was required for complete inactivation of PV1.

  1. Effects of actinomycin D on the cytopathology induced by poliovirus in HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Guskey, L E; Wolff, D A

    1974-11-01

    One possible mechanism of virus-induced cell damage is that the redistributed (released) lysosomal enzymes produce the cytopathic effect during cytolytic types of infections such as poliovirus in HEp-2 cells. To determine if the lysosomal enzyme redistribution and cell damage are host-cell directed, we studied sensitivity of these events to the action of actinomycin D. By the use of actinomycin D at concentrations producing the least toxicity but maximal effectiveness in shuting down cell RNA synthesis, it was shown that the cytopathic effect and enzyme redistribution were not inhibited and, therefore, not directly controlled and induced by the cell genome in response to the virus infection. Evaluation of cytopathic effect by a phase contrast microscopy method detected changes earlier than the erythrocin B uptake method. PMID:4372396

  2. Effects of Actinomycin D on the Cytopathology Induced by Poliovirus in HEp-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guskey, Louis E.; Wolff, David A.

    1974-01-01

    One possible mechanism of virus-induced cell damage is that the redistributed (released) lysosomal enzymes produce the cytopathic effect during cytolytic types of infections such as poliovirus in HEp-2 cells. To determine if the lysosomal enzyme redistribution and cell damage are host-cell directed, we studied sensitivity of these events to the action of actinomycin D. By the use of actinomycin D at concentrations producing the least toxicity but maximal effectiveness in shuting down cell RNA synthesis, it was shown that the cytopathic effect and enzyme redistribution were not inhibited and, therefore, not directly controlled and induced by the cell genome in response to the virus infection. Evaluation of cytopathic effect by a phase contrast microscopy method detected changes earlier than the erythrocin B uptake method. PMID:4372396

  3. Human-Mouse Hybrid Cell Lines and Susceptibility to Poliovirus 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Richard; Pollack, Robert; Kusano, Toshihisa; Green, Howard

    1970-01-01

    A number of human-mouse somatic hybrid cell lines have been prepared, containing from 3 to 12 human biarmed chromosomes. These lines were susceptible to poliovirus type 1, producing viral yields comparable to those of the human parental cells. A small proportion of the cells of these lines survived the polio infection, and their progeny were solidly resistant to reinfection with the virus. Both sensitive and resistant hybrids produced virus following infection with viral ribonucleic acid, indicating that the cytoplasm of the resistant hybrids was able to support viral multiplication. Viral adsorption studies carried out at 4 C showed that the resistant sublines had negligible ability to adsorb the virus. It was concluded that the hybrid cells became resistant to polio through loss of the human chromosome bearing the gene for the receptor substance. PMID:4317112

  4. Molecular Characterization and Phylogenetic Relationship of Wild Type 1 Poliovirus Strains Circulating across Pakistan and Afghanistan Bordering Areas during 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Shaukat, Shahzad; Angez, Mehar; Alam, Muhammad Masroor; Sharif, Salmaan; Khurshid, Adnan; Malik, Farzana; Rehman, Lubna; Zaidi, Syed Sohail Zahoor

    2014-01-01

    Pakistan and Afghanistan share a long uncontrolled border with extensive population movement on both sides. Wild poliovirus transmission has never been interrupted in this block due to war against terrorism, poor public health infrastructure, misconceptions about polio vaccines and inadequate immunization activities. All these issues complicate the eradication operations and reinforce the complexity of wiping out poliomyelitis from this region. This study illustrates the origins and routes of cross-border wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) transmission during 2010–2012 between Pakistan and Afghanistan. Sequence analyses were conducted based on complete VP1 capsid protein sequences for WPV1 study strains to determine the origin of poliovirus genetic lineages and their evolutionary relationships. Phylogenetic tree was constructed from VP1 gene sequences applying Maximum Likelihood method using Kimura 2- parameter model in MEGA program v 5.0. A total of 72 (14.3%) out of 502 wild-type 1 polioviruses were found circulating in border areas of both countries during 2010–2012. Molecular phylogenetic analysis classified these strains in to two sub-genotypes with four clusters and 18 lineages. Genetic data confirmed that the most of WPV1 lineages (12; 66.6%) were transmitted from Pakistan to Afghanistan. However, the genetic diversity was significantly reduced during 2012 as most of the lineages were completely eliminated. In conclusion, Pakistan-Afghanistan block has emerged as a single poliovirus reservoir sharing the multiple poliovirus lineages due to uncontrolled movement of people across the borders between two countries. If it is neglected, it can jeopardize the extensive global efforts done so-far to eradicate the poliovirus infection. Our data will be helpful to devise the preventive strategies for effective control of wild poliovirus transmission in this region. PMID:25229826

  5. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of essential oil and different plant extracts of Psidium cattleianum Sabine.

    PubMed

    Scur, M C; Pinto, F G S; Pandini, J A; Costa, W F; Leite, C W; Temponi, L G

    2016-02-01

    The goals of the study were to determinethe antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of essential oil and plant extracts aqueous and ethanolic of Psidium cattleianum Sabine; the chemical composition of the essential oil of P. cattleianum; and the phytochemical screening of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of the same plant. Regarding the antimicrobial activity, the ethanolic extract exhibited moderate antimicrobial activity with respect to bacteria K. pneumoniae and S. epidermidis, whereas, regarding other microorganisms, it showed activity considered weak. The aqueous extract and the essential oil showed activity considered weak, although they inhibited the growth of microorganisms. About the antioxidant potential, the ethanolic and aqueous extracts exhibited a scavenging index exceeding 90%, while the essential oil didn´t show significant antioxidant activity. Regarding the phytochemical composition, the largest class of volatile compounds identified in the essential oil of P. cattleianum included the following terpenic hydrocarbons: α-copaene (22%); eucalyptol (15%), δ-cadinene (9.63%) and α-selinene (6.5%). The phytochemical screening of extracts showed the presence of tannins, flavonoids, and triterpenoids for aqueous and ethanolic extracts. The extracts and essential oils inhibit the growth of microrganisms and plant extracts showed significant antioxidant activity. Also, the phytochemical characterization of the essential oil showed the presence of compounds interest commercial, as well as extracts showed the presence of important classes and compounds with biological activities. PMID:26871744

  6. Comparative analysis of aroma compounds and sensorial features of strawberry and lemon guavas (Psidium cattleianum Sabine).

    PubMed

    Egea, Mariana Buranelo; Pereira-Netto, Adaucto Bellarmino; Cacho, Juan; Ferreira, Vicente; Lopez, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    The aroma of strawberry and lemon guava fruits (Psidium cattleianum Sabine) was studied by sensory analysis, gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and quantitative analysis. Volatiles released from the pulps were collected in a trapping system consisting of LiChrolut EN resins and eluted with dichloromethane/methanol. In total, 23 odour zones were detected by GC-O, of which 16 were found in the extract from the strawberry guava pulp and 17 in the extract from the lemon guava pulp. Among the compounds identified, only 10 were common to both strawberry and lemon guavas. The descriptive sensorial analysis differentiated between the aroma profiles of the strawberry guava pulp with the descriptor "tomato" and the lemon guava pulp with the descriptor "tropical fruit". The typical aroma of the guava fruits was dominated by the presence of numerous aldehydes and ketones among which (Z)-3-hexenal was the most intense odorant, while 1,8-cineole and linalool were also revealed as important aroma constituents. PMID:24996334

  7. Associations between degraded benthic communities and contaminated sediments: Sabine Lake, Lake Pontchartrain, and Choctawhatchee Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, V.D.; Summers, J.K.; Macauley, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program for Estuaries (EMAP-E) in the Gulf of Mexico supplements its base sampling effort each year with localized, intensive spatial sampling in selected large estuarine systems. By selecting random locations within 70 km{sup 2} hexagonal areas, individual estuaries were sampled using EMAP methods but at four times the density as base sampling. In 1992, 19 sites were sampled in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana. In 1 993, 18 sites were sampled in Sabine Lake, Texas and 12 sites were sampled in Choctawhatchee Bay, Florida. At all sites, sediment grabs were taken and analyzed for benthic species composition and abundance, for toxicity to Ampelisca, and for organic and inorganic sediment contaminants. An indicator of biotic integrity, the benthic index, was calculated to represent the status of benthic communities. A series of statistical techniques, such as stepwise regression analysis, were employed to determine whether the variation in the benthic index could be associated with variation in sediment contaminants, sediment toxicity, or levels of dissolved oxygen. Spatial distributions of these parameters were examined to determine the geographical co-occurrence of degraded benthic communities and environmental stressors. In Lake Pontchartrain, for example, 85% of the variation in the benthic index was associated with decreased levels of dissolved oxygen, and increased concentrations of PCBs, alkanes, copper, tin, and zinc in the sediments.

  8. Detection and quantification of poliovirus infection using FTIR spectroscopy and cell culture

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a globalized word, prevention of infectious diseases is a major challenge. Rapid detection of viable virus particles in water and other environmental samples is essential to public health risk assessment, homeland security and environmental protection. Current virus detection methods, especially assessing viral infectivity, are complex and time-consuming, making point-of-care detection a challenge. Faster, more sensitive, highly specific methods are needed to quantify potentially hazardous viral pathogens and to determine if suspected materials contain viable viral particles. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy combined with cellular-based sensing, may offer a precise way to detect specific viruses. This approach utilizes infrared light to monitor changes in molecular components of cells by tracking changes in absorbance patterns produced following virus infection. In this work poliovirus (PV1) was used to evaluate the utility of FTIR spectroscopy with cell culture for rapid detection of infective virus particles. Results Buffalo green monkey kidney (BGMK) cells infected with different virus titers were studied at 1 - 12 hours post-infection (h.p.i.). A partial least squares (PLS) regression method was used to analyze and model cellular responses to different infection titers and times post-infection. The model performs best at 8 h.p.i., resulting in an estimated root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 17 plaque forming units (PFU)/ml when using low titers of infection of 10 and 100 PFU/ml. Higher titers, from 103 to 106 PFU/ml, could also be reliably detected. Conclusions This approach to poliovirus detection and quantification using FTIR spectroscopy and cell culture could potentially be extended to compare biochemical cell responses to infection with different viruses. This virus detection method could feasibly be adapted to an automated scheme for use in areas such as water safety monitoring and medical diagnostics. PMID

  9. Characterization of Poliovirus Neutralization Escape Mutants of Single-Domain Antibody Fragments (VHHs)

    PubMed Central

    Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Strauss, Mike; Filman, David J.; Rombaut, Bart

    2015-01-01

    To complete the eradication of poliovirus and to protect unvaccinated people subsequently, the development of one or more antiviral drugs will be necessary. A set of five single-domain antibody fragments (variable parts of the heavy chain of a heavy-chain antibody [VHHs]) with an in vitro neutralizing activity against poliovirus type 1 was developed previously (B. Thys, L. Schotte, S. Muyldermans, U. Wernery, G. Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, and B. Rombaut, Antiviral Res 87:257–264, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.antiviral.2010.05.012), and their mechanisms of action have been studied (L. Schotte, M. Strauss, B. Thys, H. Halewyck, D. J. Filman, M. Bostina, J. M. Hogle, and B. Rombaut, J Virol 88:4403–4413, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.03402-13). In this study, neutralization escape mutants were selected for each VHH. Sequencing of the P1 region of the genome showed that amino acid substitutions are found in the four viral proteins of the capsid and that they are located both in proximity to the binding sites of the VHHs and in regions further away from the canyon and hidden beneath the surface. Characterization of the mutants demonstrated that they have single-cycle replication kinetics that are similar to those of their parental strain and that they are all drug (VHH) independent. Their resistant phenotypes are stable, as they do not regain full susceptibility to the VHH after passage over HeLa cells in the absence of VHH. They are all at least as stable as the parental strain against heat inactivation at 44°C, and three of them are even significantly (P < 0.05) more resistant to heat inactivation. The resistant variants all still can be neutralized by at least two other VHHs and retain full susceptibility to pirodavir and 35-1F4. PMID:26014941

  10. Antiviral Activity of Trichilia catigua Bark Extracts for Herpesvirus and Poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Espada, Samantha F; Faccin-Galhardi, Ligia C; Rincao, Vinicius P; Bernardi, Ana L S; Lopes, Nayara; Longhini, Renata; de Mello, Joao C P; Linhares, Rosa E C; Nozawa, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Herpesvirus and poliovirus are responsible for important diseases in human and animal. Trichilia catigua a Brazilian native plant known as catiguá has several medicinal properties among them antimicrobial for bacteria and protozoa, however, no antiviral activity has been reported yet. This study evaluated the antiviral activity of the crude extract (CE) and aqueous and ethyl acetate fractions (AF, EAF) obtained from T. catigua in the replication of the Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), bovine herpesvirus (BoHV-1) and poliovirus (PV-1). The cytotoxicity was analyzed by MTT assay and the antiviral effect was determined by the addition of extracts (0.25 to 100.0 μg/ml), before (-2h and -1h), during (Oh) and after (1h and 2h) the viral infection, by plaque reduction assay, in HEp-2 cell culture. The virucidal activity and inhibition of viral adsorption were also evaluated. In addition, the combination index (CI) with Acyclovir (ACV - reference drug) was determined for HSV-1. CE, AF and EAF showed a low toxicity (CC(50) >400 µg/ml) and low inhibitory concentration (IC50), ranging from 2.44-34.25 µg/ml for herpesvirus and 0.67 to 1.8 µg/ml for PV-1, associated with high selectivity index. The tested compounds showed high virucidal effect and high ability to inhibit viral adsorption, for all virus. The CI demonstrated a synergic effect (CI<1) for AF and EAF comparatively to acyclovir (ACV). Our study demonstrated that the extract and fractions of T. catigua is promising for future antiviral drug design with economically feasible production. PMID:25941883

  11. Preliminary report on vaccination in Croatia against poliomyelitis with type 1 (CHAT) and type 3 (W-Fox) attenuated polioviruses of Koprowski

    PubMed Central

    Ikić, D.; Jančikić, B.; Lulić, V.; Ćuk, D.; Juzbašić, M.; Manhalter, T.; Sindik, A.

    1963-01-01

    The incidence of poliomyelitis in the People's Republic of Croatia has progressively increased since 1945, and in 1953 and 1960 there were serious epidemics. In order to protect the age-groups at greatest risk a mass vaccination campaign was carried out with Koprowski live-virus vaccine in the early spring of 1961, covering the entire population aged 3 months to 20 years. Altogether 1 339 244 persons were given type 1 (CHAT strain), and 1 287 909 received type 3 (W-Fox). Over 100 000 persons were estimated to possess no pre-existing antibody to any of the three types of poliovirus. Although no unvaccinated control group was set up, it is considered that the epidemiological and serological data indicate the safety and efficacy of the vaccination. The serological conversion rate was 91.5% for type 1 and 93.5% for type 3. No post-vaccinal reactions were observed. The usual summer peak in incidence did not occur in 1961, altogether 6 cases being recorded from June (when immunity is considered to have been established) to December. This is the lowest figure since 1945. PMID:20604139

  12. The vaccine origin of the 1968 epidemic of type 3 poliomyelitis in Poland.

    PubMed

    Martín, J; Ferguson, G L; Wood, D J; Minor, P D

    2000-12-01

    A clear association was demonstrated between the use of USOL-D-bac type 3 poliovirus live-attenuated vaccine and the 1968 poliomyelitis epidemic in Poland. The epidemic followed small-scale trials with Sabin and USOL-D-bac type 3 vaccine strains carried out in seven countries including Poland. Factors that might have contributed to the genesis and development of the epidemic were the pattern of virus excretion from vaccinees, mutations found in viruses from the epidemic, and the particular vaccination policies in Poland during the previous years. These findings may provide essential insights into the strategies for stopping polio immunisation once wild poliovirus has been eradicated. PMID:11112479

  13. Detrital thermochronology and sedimentology of the Sabine Bay and Assistance formations, Ellesmere Island: insights into the source of the Melvilian Disturbance event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Y.; Leier, A.; Guest, B.; Beauchamp, B.; Morris, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Melvillian Disturbance in the Sverdrup Basin of the Canadian Arctic occurred between early and middle Permian time and is characterized by angular unconfomities, basaltic flows, and is linked to a broader mid-Permian circum-Arctic tectonic event.We examined the lower-middle Permian Sabine Bay and Assistance formations exposed in northwestern Ellesmere Island in order to better understand the depositional and tectonic history of this region during the middle Permian time. Detailed sections of these units were measured at multiple locations and samples were collected for zircon/apatite thermochronology. The Sabine Bay Formation is present in limited locations where it consists of white, medium-grained, quartzose sediments. Beds contain trough cross-strata with drapes of mud-sized organic material, ripples, and rare bioturbation. Preliminary paleocurrent data indicate transport to the west. We interpret the Sabine Bay Formation to have been deposited in a fluvial environment, possibly with some tidal influence. The Assistance Formation unconformably overlies the Sabine Bay Formation and appears to be more regionally extensive than the Sabine Bay Formation. The Assistance Formation consists of fine-grained quartzose sandstone with abundant Zoophycos burrows, shell biota and other marine trace fossils. The character of the Assistance Formation varies between locations, but in some locations the formation contains hummocky and swaley cross-stratification bedding. Vertically, the Assistance Formation grades from sandstone beds into mudstone beds with deeper-water marine trace fossils. We interpret the Assistance Formation to have been deposited in a lower-shoreface, storm-influenced, shelf setting that was progressively transgressed during deposition. The isolated occurrences of the Sabine Bay Formation and large lateral thickness variations of the Assistance Formation suggest these units were deposited in fault-bounded sub-basins within the Sverdrup Basin. The larger

  14. Virus Replication, Cytopathology, and Lysosomal Enzyme Response of Mitotic and Interphase Hep-2 Cells Infected with Poliovirus

    PubMed Central

    Bienz, Kurt; Egger, Denise; Wolff, David A.

    1973-01-01

    Mitotic Hep-2 cells, selected by the PEL (colloidal silica) density gradient method and held in mitosis with Colcemid, are readily infected by poliovirus type I (Mahoney). They produce and release the same amount of virus as interphase, random-growing cells. In contrast to interphase cells, mitotic cells show no detectable virus-induced cytopathic effect at the light microscopy level and only slight alterations, consisting of small clusters of vacuoles, at the electron microscopy level. Mitotic cells contain the same total amount of lysosomal enzymes per cell as interphase cells, but they display no redistribution of lysosomal enzymes during the virus infection as interphase cells do. This supports the view that lysosomal enzyme redistribution is associated with the cytopathic effect in poliovirus infection but shows that virus synthesis and release is not dependent on either the cytopathic effect or lysosomal enzyme release. The possible reasons for the lack of cytopathic effect in mitotic cells are discussed. Images PMID:4121707

  15. Combined use of inactivated and oral poliovirus vaccines in refugee camps and surrounding communities - Kenya, December 2013.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Mohamed A; Makokha, Frederick; Hussein, Abdullahi M; Mohamed, Gedi; Mach, Ondrej; Humayun, Kabir; Okiror, Samuel; Abrar, Leila; Nasibov, Orkhan; Burton, John; Unshur, Ahmed; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Estivariz, Concepcion F

    2014-03-21

    Since the launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) in 1988, circulation of indigenous wild poliovirus (WPV) has continued without interruption in only three countries: Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan. During April-December 2013, a polio outbreak caused by WPV type 1 (WPV1) of Nigerian origin resulted in 217 cases in or near the Horn of Africa, including 194 cases in Somalia, 14 cases in Kenya, and nine cases in Ethiopia (all cases were reported as of March 10, 2014). During December 14-18, 2013, Kenya conducted the first-ever campaign providing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) together with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) as part of its outbreak response. The campaign targeted 126,000 children aged ≤59 months who resided in Somali refugee camps and surrounding communities near the Kenya-Somalia border, where most WPV1 cases had been reported, with the aim of increasing population immunity levels to ensure interruption of any residual WPV transmission and prevent spread from potential new importations. A campaign evaluation and vaccination coverage survey demonstrated that combined administration of IPV and OPV in a mass campaign is feasible and can achieve coverage >90%, although combined IPV and OPV campaigns come at a higher cost than OPV-only campaigns and require particular attention to vaccinator training and supervision. Future operational studies could assess the impact on population immunity and the cost-effectiveness of combined IPV and OPV campaigns to accelerate interruption of poliovirus transmission during polio outbreaks and in certain areas in which WPV circulation is endemic. PMID:24647400

  16. Poliovirus Replication Requires the N-terminus but not the Catalytic Sec7 Domain of ArfGEF GBF1

    PubMed Central

    Belov, George A.; Kovtunovych, Gennadiy; Jackson, Catherine L.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are intracellular parasites whose reproduction relies on factors provided by the host. The cellular protein GBF1 is critical for poliovirus replication. Here we show that the contribution of GBF1 to virus replication is different from its known activities in uninfected cells. Normally GBF1 activates the Arf GTPases necessary for formation of COPI transport vesicles. GBF1 function is modulated by p115 and Rab1b. However, in polio-infected cells, p115 is degraded and neither p115 nor Rab1b knock-down affects virus replication. Poliovirus infection is very sensitive to BFA, an inhibitor of Arf activation by GBF1. BFA targets the catalytic Sec7 domain of GBF1. Nevertheless the BFA block of polio replication is rescued by expression of only the N-terminal region of GBF1 lacking the Sec7 domain. Replication of BFA-resistant poliovirus in the presence of BFA is uncoupled from Arf activation but is dependent on GBF1. Thus the function(s) of this protein essential for viral replication can be separated from those required for cellular metabolism. PMID:20497182

  17. [Poliovirus uptake into and excretion from oysters: a model experiment for elimination of Norwalk-like viruses from oysters].

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Miwa; Kawada, Kazunobu; Yano, Takuya; Sugiyama, Akira; Nakayama, Osamu; Nishio, Osamu; Sekine, Hiromasa; Sakurai, Nakao

    2003-02-01

    Outbreaks of gastroenteritis caused by Norwalk-like viruses are often induced by the consumption of raw shellfish such as oysters. Incidences reach a peak during the cold season in Japan, when seawater temperatures fall below 10 degrees C. We investigated oysters' uptake and excretion of viruses, over varying lengths of exposure, monitoring the effects of changes in temperature and flow rate of seawater, and the presence of plankton. The study was performed using a poliovirus and an experimental circulatory system, which was framed on the same principle as a model practically used for the depuration of oysters. Polioviruses present in the seawater were taken rapidly into the midgut gland of oysters. However, virus levels detected in oysters at both 10 degrees C and 20 degrees C were decreased to approximately 1/1,000 to 1/10,000 within 6 hrs after the circulatory seawater was replaced by UV irradiated seawater. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the circulatory depuration system for the elimination of poliovirus from oysters, and indicate that controlling the temperature and flow rate of the circulatory system could decrease the risk of NLV infection. PMID:12661085

  18. Expression and subcellular localization of poliovirus VPg-precursor protein 3AB in eukaryotic cells: evidence for glycosylation in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Datta, U; Dasgupta, A

    1994-01-01

    The poliovirus-encoded, membrane-associated VPg-precursor polypeptide 3AB has been implicated in the initiation of viral RNA synthesis. We have expressed 3AB and 3A polypeptides in eukaryotic cells and examined their localization using indirect immunofluorescence and a direct in vitro membrane-binding assay. Results presented here demonstrate that both 3AB and 3A are capable of localizing in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus in transfected HeLa cells in the absence of any other poliovirus protein. We have also shown that the carboxy-terminal 18 amino acids of 3A that constitute an amphipathic domain are important in membrane binding of 3A and 3AB. Additionally, we demonstrate that a significant fraction of both 3A and 3AB can be glycosylated in a membrane-dependent fashion during in vitro translation in reticulocyte lysate. We demonstrate that 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine, an inhibitor of glycoprotein synthesis, significantly inhibits poliovirus RNA synthesis in vivo. The implications of glycosylation of 3AB (and 3A) in viral replication are discussed. Images PMID:8207820

  19. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Sabin, MN Final Performance Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from January 30, 2006 to April 29, 2007 at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Arsenic Removal Technology Demonstration site in Sabin, MN. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the eff...

  20. Crystal structure of CD155 and electron microscopic studies of its complexes with polioviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ping; Mueller, Steffen; Morais, Marc C.; Bator, Carol M.; Bowman, Valorie D.; Hafenstein, Susan; Wimmer, Eckard; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-11-02

    When poliovirus (PV) recognizes its receptor, CD155, the virus changes from a 160S to a 135S particle before releasing its genome into the cytoplasm. CD155 is a transmembrane protein with 3 Ig-like extracellular domains, D1-D3, where D1 is recognized by the virus. The crystal structure of D1D2 has been determined to 3.5-{angstrom} resolution and fitted into {approx}8.5-{angstrom} resolution cryoelectron microscopy reconstructions of the virus-receptor complexes for the 3 PV serotypes. These structures show that, compared with human rhinoviruses, the virus-receptor interactions for PVs have a greater dependence on hydrophobic interactions, as might be required for a virus that can inhabit environments of different pH. The pocket factor was shown to remain in the virus during the first recognition stage. The present structures, when combined with earlier mutational investigations, show that in the subsequent entry stage the receptor moves further into the canyon when at a physiological temperature, thereby expelling the pocket factor and separating the viral subunits to form 135S particles. These results provide a detailed analysis of how a nonenveloped virus can enter its host cell.

  1. Molecular tectonic model of virus structural transitions: the putative cell entry states of poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Belnap, D M; Filman, D J; Trus, B L; Cheng, N; Booy, F P; Conway, J F; Curry, S; Hiremath, C N; Tsang, S K; Steven, A C; Hogle, J M

    2000-02-01

    Upon interacting with its receptor, poliovirus undergoes conformational changes that are implicated in cell entry, including the externalization of the viral protein VP4 and the N terminus of VP1. We have determined the structures of native virions and of two putative cell entry intermediates, the 135S and 80S particles, at approximately 22-A resolution by cryo-electron microscopy. The 135S and 80S particles are both approximately 4% larger than the virion. Pseudoatomic models were constructed by adjusting the beta-barrel domains of the three capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 from their known positions in the virion to fit the 135S and 80S reconstructions. Domain movements of up to 9 A were detected, analogous to the shifting of tectonic plates. These movements create gaps between adjacent subunits. The gaps at the sites where VP1, VP2, and VP3 subunits meet are plausible candidates for the emergence of VP4 and the N terminus of VP1. The implications of these observations are discussed for models in which the externalized components form a transmembrane pore through which viral RNA enters the infected cell. PMID:10627545

  2. Poliovirus receptor (CD155) regulates a step in transendothelial migration between PECAM and CD99.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, David P; Seidman, Michael A; Muller, William A

    2013-03-01

    The movement of leukocytes across endothelium [referred to as diapedesis or transendothelial migration (TEM)] is a critical step in the inflammatory process. Recently, it was demonstrated that treatment of endothelial cells and monocytes with antibodies against poliovirus receptor (PVR; CD155) and DNAX-associated molecule-1 (DNAM-1; CD226) arrested monocytes over endothelial junctions and prevented TEM, suggesting that these molecules are involved in diapedesis. However, nothing was known about the mechanism by which PVR and DNAM-1 work in TEM. Herein, we show that, similar to endothelial PECAM interacting with leukocyte PECAM, activation of endothelial PVR with anti-PVR antibodies or interaction with its ligand, DNAM-1, results in recruitment of the tyrosine phosphatase Shp-2, and this process is dependent on Src kinases. Furthermore, differential and sequential treatment with blocking antibodies directed against PVR, DNAM-1, PECAM, and CD99 showed that endothelial PVR and monocyte DNAM-1 interact at and regulate a step between those regulated by PECAM and CD99. Further studies demonstrate that PVR resides in the recently identified lateral border recycling compartment, similar to PECAM and CD99. These findings suggest that the localization of adhesion/signaling molecules to the lateral border recycling compartment and the recruitment of Shp-2 may be common mechanisms for the regulation of TEM by endothelial cells. PMID:23333754

  3. Membrane Requirements for Uridylylation of the Poliovirus VPg Protein and Viral RNA Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Mark H.; Teterina, Natalya L.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2003-01-01

    Efficient translation of poliovirus (PV) RNA in uninfected HeLa cell extracts generates all of the viral proteins required to carry out viral RNA replication and encapsidation and to produce infectious virus in vitro. In infected cells, viral RNA replication occurs in ribonucleoprotein complexes associated with clusters of vesicles that are formed from preexisting intracellular organelles, which serve as a scaffold for the viral RNA replication complex. In this study, we have examined the role of membranes in viral RNA replication in vitro. Electron microscopic and biochemical examination of extracts actively engaged in viral RNA replication failed to reveal a significant increase in vesicular membrane structures or the protective aggregation of vesicles observed in PV-infected cells. Viral, nonstructural replication proteins, however, bind to heterogeneous membrane fragments in the extract. Treatment of the extracts with nonionic detergents, a membrane-altering inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis (cerulenin), or an inhibitor of intracellular membrane trafficking (brefeldin A) prevents the formation of active replication complexes in vitro, under conditions in which polyprotein synthesis and processing occur normally. Under all three of these conditions, synthesis of uridylylated VPg to form the primer for initiation of viral RNA synthesis, as well as subsequent viral RNA replication, was inhibited. Thus, although organized membranous structures morphologically similar to the vesicles observed in infected cells do not appear to form in vitro, intact membranes are required for viral RNA synthesis, including the first step of forming the uridylylated VPg primer for RNA chain elongation. PMID:14557626

  4. Cellular COPII Proteins Are Involved in Production of the Vesicles That Form the Poliovirus Replication Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rust, René C.; Landmann, Lukas; Gosert, Rainer; Tang, Bor Luen; Hong, Wanjin; Hauri, Hans-Peter; Egger, Denise; Bienz, Kurt

    2001-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) replicates its genome in association with membranous vesicles in the cytoplasm of infected cells. To elucidate the origin and mode of formation of PV vesicles, immunofluorescence labeling with antibodies against the viral vesicle marker proteins 2B and 2BC, as well as cellular markers of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), anterograde transport vesicles, and the Golgi complex, was performed in BT7-H cells. Optical sections obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy were subjected to a deconvolution process to enhance resolution and signal-to-noise ratio and to allow for a three-dimensional representation of labeled membrane structures. The mode of formation of the PV vesicles was, on morphological grounds, similar to the formation of anterograde membrane traffic vesicles in uninfected cells. ER-resident membrane markers were excluded from both types of vesicles, and the COPII components Sec13 and Sec31 were both found to be colocalized on the vesicular surface, indicating the presence of a functional COPII coat. PV vesicle formation during early time points of infection did not involve the Golgi complex. The expression of PV protein 2BC or the entire P2 and P3 genomic region led to the production of vesicles carrying a COPII coat and showing the same mode of formation as vesicles produced after PV infection. These results indicate that PV vesicles are formed at the ER by the cellular COPII budding mechanism and thus are homologous to the vesicles of the anterograde membrane transport pathway. PMID:11559814

  5. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase specifically binds to the poliovirus IRES to activate translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Dmitri E.; Hirnet, Juliane; Terenin, Ilya M.; Dmitriev, Sergey E.; Niepmann, Michael; Shatsky, Ivan N.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to the host cell environment to efficiently take-over the host cell's machinery is crucial in particular for small RNA viruses like picornaviruses that come with only small RNA genomes and replicate exclusively in the cytosol. Their Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) elements are specific RNA structures that facilitate the 5′ end-independent internal initiation of translation both under normal conditions and when the cap-dependent host protein synthesis is shut-down in infected cells. A longstanding issue is which host factors play a major role in this internal initiation. Here, we show that the functionally most important domain V of the poliovirus IRES uses tRNAGly anticodon stem–loop mimicry to recruit glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) to the apical part of domain V, adjacent to the binding site of the key initiation factor eIF4G. The binding of GARS promotes the accommodation of the initiation region of the IRES in the mRNA binding site of the ribosome, thereby greatly enhancing the activity of the IRES at the step of the 48S initiation complex formation. Moonlighting functions of GARS that may be additionally needed for other events of the virus–host cell interaction are discussed. PMID:22373920

  6. Inhibition of host cell protein synthesis by UV-inactivated poliovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Helentjaris, T; Ehrenfeld, E

    1977-01-01

    The ability of poliovirus that was irradiated with UV light at energies up to 2,160 ergs/mm2 to subsequently inhibit host cell protein synthesis was measured. The inactivation of the host cell shutoff function followed one-hit kinetics. Increasing irradiation did not affect the rate of inhibition until the multiplicity of infection after irradiation was reduced to approximately 1 PFU/cell. At higher functional multiplicities, the rate was unchanged, but an increasing lag before the onset of inhibition was observed with increasing irradiation. The energy levels required to inactivate virus-induced inhibition of host cell protein synthesis suggest that damage to virus RNA rather than to virus capsid proteins is responsible for the loss of function. When the inactivation of host cell shutoff was compared with the inactivation of other viral functions by UV irradiation, it correlated exactly with the loss of infectivity but not with other viral functions measured. Guanidine treatment, which prevents detectable viral RNA and protein synthesis, completely inhibited host cell shutoff by low multiplicities of unirradiated virus infection but not higher multiplicities. When a high multiplicity of virus was first reduced to a low titer by irradiation, host cell shutoff was still evident in the presence of guanidine. The results demonstrate that the complete inhibition of host cell protein synthesis can be accomplished by one infectious viral genome per cell. Images PMID:189067

  7. Molecular Tectonic Model of Virus Structural Transitions: the Putative Cell Entry States of Poliovirus

    PubMed Central

    Belnap, David M.; Filman, David J.; Trus, Benes L.; Cheng, Naiqian; Booy, Frank P.; Conway, James F.; Curry, Stephen; Hiremath, Chaitanya N.; Tsang, Simon K.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Hogle, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Upon interacting with its receptor, poliovirus undergoes conformational changes that are implicated in cell entry, including the externalization of the viral protein VP4 and the N terminus of VP1. We have determined the structures of native virions and of two putative cell entry intermediates, the 135S and 80S particles, at ∼22-Å resolution by cryo-electron microscopy. The 135S and 80S particles are both ∼4% larger than the virion. Pseudoatomic models were constructed by adjusting the beta-barrel domains of the three capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 from their known positions in the virion to fit the 135S and 80S reconstructions. Domain movements of up to 9 Å were detected, analogous to the shifting of tectonic plates. These movements create gaps between adjacent subunits. The gaps at the sites where VP1, VP2, and VP3 subunits meet are plausible candidates for the emergence of VP4 and the N terminus of VP1. The implications of these observations are discussed for models in which the externalized components form a transmembrane pore through which viral RNA enters the infected cell. PMID:10627545

  8. Antiviral Activity of Sulfated Polysaccharide of Adenanthera pavonina against Poliovirus in HEp-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Godoi, Ananda Marques; Faccin-Galhardi, Lígia Carla; Lopes, Nayara; de Almeida, Raimundo Rafael; Ricardo, Nágila Maria Pontes Silva; Nozawa, Carlos; Linhares, Rosa Elisa Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Adenanthera pavonina, popularly known as red-bead tree, carolina, pigeon's eye, and dragon's eye, is a plant traditionally used in Brazil for the treatment of several diseases. The present study aimed at evaluating the activity of sulfated polysaccharide from the Adenanthera pavonina (SPLSAp) seeds against poliovirus type 1 (PV-1) in HEp-2 cell cultures. The SPLSAp presented a cytotoxic concentration (CC50) of 500 μg/mL in HEp-2 cell cultures, evaluated by the dimethylthiazolyl-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method (MTT). The SPLSAp exhibited a significant antiviral activity, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.18 µg/mL, determined by plaque reduction assay and a high selectivity index (SI) of 423. The maximum inhibition (100%) of PV replication was found when the SPLSAp treatment was concomitant with viral infection (time 0 h), at all tested concentrations. The maximal inhibition was also found when the SPLSAp was used 1 h and 2 h postinfection, albeit at 50 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL. Therefore, we demonstrated that the SPLSAp inhibited PV growth. We also suggested that SPLSAp inhibited PV in more than one step of the replication, as the mechanism of antiviral action. We, therefore, selected the compound as a potential candidate for further development towards the control of the infection. PMID:25221609

  9. Poliovirus protease 3C (P3-7c) does not cleave P220 of the eucaryotic mRNA cap-binding protein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K A; Edery, I; Hanecak, R; Wimmer, E; Sonenberg, N

    1985-01-01

    Infection of HeLa cells by poliovirus results in proteolysis of the large subunit (P220) of the cap-binding protein complex. This is believed to cause the rapid shut-off of host protein synthesis during poliovirus infection. In this communication we examined the possible involvement of poliovirus proteins 3C (a proteinase) and 2C in cleavage of P220. Using antisera against these two viral polypeptides, we were unable to inhibit proteolysis of P220 in an in vitro assay. These results indicate that viral proteins 3C and 2C are not directly involved in cleaving P220 and hence do not cause shut-off of cellular protein synthesis. Images PMID:2991572

  10. Marked increases in concentrations of apolipoprotein in the cerebrospinal fluid of poliovirus-infected macaques: relations between apolipoprotein concentrations and severity of brain injury.

    PubMed Central

    Saito, K; Seishima, M; Heyes, M P; Song, H; Fujigaki, S; Maeda, S; Vickers, J H; Noma, A

    1997-01-01

    Apolipoproteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) might have important functional roles in the pathophysiology of brain and lipid metabolism in the vascular component. The present study examined apolipoprotein A-I (apo-A-I) and apolipoprotein E (apo-E) levels in CSF and serum from poliovirus-infected macaques. Poliovirus-infected macaques developed motor deficits and were classified into three groups: (1) muscle weakness in one or both legs; (2) partial paralysis in one or both legs; (3) complete paralysis in one or both legs. No motor deficits were evident in the control or sham-treated macaques. Apo-A-I concentrations in CSF were markedly elevated in poliovirus-infected macaques with weakness, partial or complete paralysis, in comparison with either control or sham-treated animals, and were proportional to the severity of motor impairment. Apo-E concentrations in CSF were also significantly elevated in poliovirus-infected macaques with complete paralysis. The magnitude of increase in CSF apo-A-I or apo-E concentrations was also closely associated with the degree of histologic neurological damage and inflammation (lesion scores). However, no changes in serum apo-A-I and apo-E concentrations were observed in the poliovirus-infected macaques compared with control macaques. Furthermore there were no significant correlations apo-A-I or apo-E concentrations between serum and CSF. We hypothesize that the elevation of apo-A-I and apo-E concentrations after poliovirus infection is caused by immune stimulation within the central nervous system (CNS). Measures of CSF apo-A-I and apo-E levels might serve as a useful marker for the severity and/or the range of CNS injury. PMID:9003413

  11. Inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi traffic by poliovirus protein 3A: genetic and ultrastructural analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Doedens, J R; Giddings, T H; Kirkegaard, K

    1997-01-01

    Poliovirus protein 3A, only 87 amino acids in length, is a potent inhibitor of protein secretion in mammalian cells, blocking anterograde protein traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi complex. The function of viral protein 3A in blocking protein secretion is extremely sensitive to mutations near the N terminus of the protein. Deletion of the first 10 amino acids or insertion of a single amino acid between amino acids 15 and 16, a mutation that causes a cold-sensitive defect in poliovirus RNA replication, abrogates the inhibition of protein secretion although wild-type amounts of the mutant proteins are expressed. Immunofluorescence light microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy demonstrate that 3A protein, expressed in the absence of other viral proteins, colocalizes with membranes derived from the ER. The precise topology of 3A with respect to ER membranes is not known, but it is likely to be associated with the cytosolic surface of the ER. Although the glycosylation of 3A in translation extracts has been reported, we show that tunicamycin, under conditions in which glycosylation of cellular proteins is inhibited, has no effect on poliovirus growth. Therefore, glycosylation of 3A plays no functional role in the viral replicative cycle. Electron microscopy reveals that the ER dilates dramatically in the presence of 3A protein. The absence of accumulated vesicles and the swelling of the ER-derived membranes argues that ER-to-Golgi traffic is inhibited at the step of vesicle formation or budding from the ER. PMID:9371562

  12. Degradation of the interferon-induced 68,000-M(r) protein kinase by poliovirus requires RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Black, T L; Barber, G N; Katze, M G

    1993-01-01

    Control of the interferon-induced double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) activated protein kinase (referred to as P68 because of its M(r) of 68,000 in human cells) by animal viruses is essential to avoid decreases in protein synthetic rates during infection. We have previously demonstrated that poliovirus establishes a unique way of regulating the protein kinase, namely by inducing the specific degradation of P68 during infection (T. L. Black, B. Safer, A. Hovanessian, and M. G. Katze, J. Virol. 63:2244-2251, 1989). In the present study we investigated the mechanisms by which P68 degradation occurred. To do this we used an in vitro degradation assay which faithfully reproduced the in vivo events. Although viral gene expression was required for P68 degradation, the major poliovirus proteases, 2A and 3C, were found not to be directly involved with P68 proteolysis. However, the protease responsible for P68 degradation required divalent cations for maximal activity and probably has both an RNA and a protein component since trypsin and ribonuclease abrogated the activity. Despite this requirement for divalent cations and RNA, activation of the kinase was not required for proteolysis since a catalytically inactive P68 was still degraded. Mapping of P68 protease-sensitive sites by using in vitro translated truncation and deletion mutants revealed that sites required for degradation resided in the amino terminus and colocalized to dsRNA-binding domains. Finally, we found that preincubation of cell extracts with the synthetic dsRNA poly(I-C) largely prevented P68 proteolysis, providing additional evidence for the critical role of RNA. On the basis of these data, we present a hypothetical model depicting possible mechanisms of P68 degradation in poliovirus-infected cells. Images PMID:7678306

  13. Influence of Enteric Infections on Response to Oral Poliovirus Vaccine: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Edward P. K.; Kampmann, Beate; Kang, Gagandeep; Grassly, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The impaired immunogenicity of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) in low-income countries has been apparent since the early field trials of this vaccine. Infection with enteropathogens at the time of vaccination may contribute to this phenomenon. However, the relative influence of these infections on OPV performance remains uncertain. Methods. We conducted a systematic review to examine the impact of concurrent enteric infections on OPV response. Using random-effects models, we assessed the effects of nonpolio enteroviruses (NPEVs) and diarrhea on the odds of seroconversion and/or vaccine virus shedding. Results. We identified 25 trials in which OPV outcomes were compared according to the presence or absence of enteric infections, the majority of which (n = 17) reported only on NPEVs. Concurrent NPEVs significantly reduced the odds of per-dose seroconversion for type 1 poliovirus (odds ratio [OR] 0.44, 95% confidence interval 0.23−0.84), but not type 2 (OR 0.53 [0.19−1.46]) or type 3 (OR 0.56 [0.27−1.12]). A similar reduction, significant for type 1 poliovirus (OR 0.50 [0.28−0.89]), was observed in the odds of vaccine virus shedding among NPEV-infected individuals. Concurrent diarrhea significantly inhibited per-dose seroconversion overall (OR 0.61 [0.38−0.87]). Conclusions. Our findings are consistent with an inhibitory effect of concurrent enteric infections on OPV response. PMID:24688069

  14. Stabilization of Poliovirus Polymerase by NTP Binding and Fingers-Thumb Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Aaron A.; Albertini, Rebecca A.; Peersen, Olve B.

    2007-01-01

    The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases show a conserved structure where the fingers domain interacts with the top of the thumb domain to create a tunnel through which nucleotide triphosphates reach the active site. We have solved the crystal structures of poliovirus polymerase (3Dpol) in complex with all four NTPs, showing that they all bind in a common preinsertion site where the phosphates are not yet positioned over the active site. The NTPs interact with both the fingers and palm domains, forming bridging interactions that explain the increased thermal stability of 3Dpol in the presence of NTPs. We have also examined the importance of the fingers-thumb domain interaction for the function and structural stability of 3Dpol. Results from thermal denaturation experiments using circular dichroism and 2-aniliino-6-napthaline-sulfonate (ANS) fluorescence show that 3Dpol has a melting temperature of only ∼40°C. NTP binding stabilizes the protein and increases the melting by 5-6 °C while mutations in the fingers-thumb domain interface destabilize the protein and reduce the melting point by as much as 6 °C. In particular, the burial of Phe30 and Phe34 from the tip of the index finger into a pocket at the top of the thumb and the presence of Trp403 on the thumb domain are key interactions required to maintain the structural integrity of the polymerase. The data suggest the fingers domain has significant conformational flexibility and exists in a highly dynamic molten globule state at physiological temperature. The role of the enclosed active site motif as a structural scaffold for constraining the fingers domain and accommodating conformational changes in 3Dpol and other viral polymerases during the catalytic cycle is discussed. PMID:17223130

  15. Influence of pH and electrolyte composition on adsorption of poliovirus by soils and minerals.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D H; Moore, R S; Sturman, L S

    1981-01-01

    The pH and the nature an concentration of simple electrolytes influenced the interaction of poliovirus type 2 with three soils, a sand, and a clay mineral. In electrolytes above pH 9 the virus was not adsorbed extensively to the substrates, but below pH 7 almost all virus was bound. For each adsorbent there was a characteristic pH region of transition from strong to weak uptake. Differences between the soils in virus uptake were shown to parallel their pH-dependent mineral. In electrolytes above pH 9 the virus was not adsorbed extensively to the substrates, but below pH 7 almost all virus was bound. For each adsorbent there was a characteristic pH region of transition from strong to weak uptake. Differences between the soils in virus uptake were shown to parallel their pH-dependent mineral. In electrolytes above pH 9 the virus was not adsorbed extensively to the substrates, but below pH 7 almost all virus was bound. For each adsorbent there was a characteristic pH region of transition from strong to weak uptake. Differences between the soils in virus uptake were shown to parallel their pH-dependent charge properties, as determined by whole-particle microelectrophoresis. Only when the pH was close to or above the critical region was uptake increased with electrolyte concentration. The transition region for all substrates was above pH 7.5 the isoelectric point of the virus. Thus, it appears that when both the virus and substrate are highly negative charged, repulsive electrostatic effects may exceed inherent attractive interactions, thereby inhibiting adsorption. PMID:6274260

  16. Transferrin Receptor 1 Facilitates Poliovirus Permeation of Mouse Brain Capillary Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Taketoshi; Ishizaka, Aya; Nihei, Coh-Ichi

    2016-02-01

    As a possible route for invasion of the CNS, circulating poliovirus (PV) in the blood is believed to traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB), resulting in paralytic poliomyelitis. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that mouse transferrin receptor 1 (mTfR1) is responsible for PV attachment to the cell surface, allowing invasion into the CNS via the BBB. PV interacts with the apical domain of mTfR1 on mouse brain capillary endothelial cells (MBEC4) in a dose-dependent manner via its capsid protein (VP1). We found that F-G, G-H, and H-I loops in VP1 are important for this binding. However, C-D, D-E, and E-F loops in VP1-fused Venus proteins efficiently penetrate MBEC4 cells. These results imply that the VP1 functional domain responsible for cell attachment is different from that involved in viral permeation of the brain capillary endothelium. We observed that co-treatment of MBEC4 cells with excess PV particles but not dextran resulted in blockage of transferrin transport into cells. Using the Transwell in vitro BBB model, transferrin co-treatment inhibited permeation of PV into MBEC4 cells and delayed further viral permeation via mTfR1 knockdown. With mTfR1 as a positive mediator of PV-host cell attachment and PV permeation of MBEC4 cells, our results indicate a novel role of TfR1 as a cellular receptor for human PV receptor/CD155-independent PV invasion of the CNS. PMID:26637351

  17. Antiviral effect of Guazuma ulmifolia and Stryphnodendron adstringens on poliovirus and bovine herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Felipe, Adriana Meri Mestrimer; Rincão, Vinicius Pires; Benati, Fabrício José; Linhares, Rosa Elisa Carvalho; Galina, Karen Janaina; de Toledo, Cleyton Eduardo Mendes; Lopes, Gisely Cristiny; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Nozawa, Carlos

    2006-06-01

    Crude extract (CE) and aqueous (AqF) and ethyl acetate (EtOAcF) fractions of Guazuma ulmifolia Lam., Sterculiaceae and the corresponding AqF, EtOAcF of Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mart.) Coville, Leguminosae were tested for their antiviral activity against poliovirus 1 (P-1) and bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) in HEp-2 cultured cells. The antiviral activity was monitored by plaque assay and immunofluorescence assay (IFA) under virucidal and therapeutic protocols. The therapeutic protocol demonstrated statistically significant positive results with both plants and for both virus strains. The highest percentages of viral inhibition were found for G. ulmifolia EtOAcF which inhibited BHV-1 and P-1 replication by 100% and 99%, respectively (p<0.05, Student's t-test). For S. adstringens, AqF was the most efficient, inhibiting BHV-1 and P-1 by 97% and 93%, respectively (p<0.05). In the virucidal protocol, G. ulmifolia CE inhibited the replication of BHV-1 and P-1 by 60% and 26%, respectively (p<0.05), while, for S. adstringens, inhibition of 62% (p<0.05) was demonstrated only with EtOAcF for P-1. IFA demonstrated that the greatest reduction in fluorescent cell number occurred with G. ulmifolia, under the therapeutic protocol for both virus strains. However, AqF and EtOAcF of S. adstringens were most efficient with the virucidal protocol for P-1. In conclusion, we demonstrated that G. ulmifolia and S. adstringens inhibited BHV-1 and P-1 replication, as well as, blocked the synthesis of viral antigens in infected cell cultures. PMID:16754999

  18. An overview of historical channel adjustment and selected hydraulic values in the Lower Sabine and Lower Brazos River Basins, Texas and Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Greene, Lauren E.; John D. Gordon, John D.

    2010-01-01

    The Sabine and Brazos are alluvial rivers; alluvial rivers are dynamic systems that adjust their geometry in response to changes in streamflow (discharge) and sediment load. In fluvial geomorphology, the term 'channel adjustment' refers to river channel changes in three geometric dimensions: (1) channel slope (profile); (2) the outline or shape, such as meandering or braided, projected on a horizontal plane (planform); and (3) cross-sectional form (shape). The primary objective of the study was to investigate how the channel morphology of these rivers has changed in response to reservoirs and other anthropogenic disturbances that have altered streamflow and sediment load. The results of this study are expected to aid ecological assessments in the lower Sabine River and lower Brazos River Basins for the Texas Instream Flow Program. Starting in the 1920s, several dams have been constructed on the Sabine and Brazos Rivers and their tributaries, and numerous bridges have been built and sometimes replaced multiple times, which have changed the natural flow regime and reduced or altered sediment loads downstream. Changes in channel geometry over time can reduce channel conveyance and thus streamflow, which can have adverse ecological effects. Channel attributes including cross-section form, channel slope, and planform change were evaluated to learn how each river's morphology changed over many years in response to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Climate has large influence on the hydrologic regimes of the lower Sabine and lower Brazos River Basins. Equally important as climate in controlling the hydrologic regime of the two river systems are numerous reservoirs that regulate downstream flow releases. The hydrologic regimes of the two rivers and their tributaries reflect the combined influences of climate, flow regulation, and drainage area. Historical and contemporary cross-sectional channel geometries at 15 streamflow-gaging stations in the lower Sabine and

  19. A coral-based reconstruction of sea surface salinity at Sabine Bank, Vanuatu from 1842 to 2007 CE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, Meaghan K.; Quinn, Terrence M.; Taylor, Frederick W.; Partin, Judson W.; Cabioch, Guy; Austin, James A., Jr.; Pelletier, Bernard; Ballu, Valérie; Maes, Christophe; Saustrup, Steffen

    2012-09-01

    Climate variability associated with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) results in large sea-surface temperature (SST) and sea-surface salinity (SSS) anomalies in many regions of the tropical Pacific Ocean. We investigate interannual changes in SSS driven by ENSO in the southwestern Pacific at Sabine Bank, Vanuatu (SBV, 166.04°E, 15.94°S) using monthly variations in coralδ18O from 1842 to 2007 CE. We develop and apply a coral δ18O-SSS transfer function, which is assessed using a calibration-verification exercise (1970-2007 CE). The 165-year reconstructed SSS record contains a prominent trend toward freshening from 1842 to 2007 CE; mean SSS for 1842-1872 CE is 35.46 ± 0.28 psu, which contrasts with a mean value of 34.85 ± 0.31 psu for 1977-2007 CE, with a freshening trend during the latter part of the 20th century that is not unprecedented with respect to the overall record. Variance in the record is concentrated in the interannual (42%) and interdecadal (29%) bands. The SBV-SSS record matches well with a similarly reconstructed SSS time series at Malo Channel, Vanuatu, which is located ˜120 km to the east of SBV. This regional signal is likely driven by ENSO-related changes in the SPCZ and interdecadal changes in surface water advection. The pattern of interdecadal variability at SBV agrees reasonably well with coral records of interdecadal variability from Fiji and Tonga, especially in the pre-1940 portions of the records, further evidence for the regional extent of the salinity signal at Sabine Bank, Vanuatu.

  20. Inhibition of host cell RNA polymerase III-mediated transcription by poliovirus: Inactivation of specific transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Fradkin, L.G.; Yoshinaga, S.K.; Berk, A.J.; Dasgupta, A.

    1987-11-01

    The inhibition of transcription by RNA polymerase III in poliovirus-infected cells was studied. Experiments utilizing two different cell lines showed that the initiation step of transcription by RNA polymerase III was impaired by infection of these cells with the virus. The observed inhibition of transcription was not due to shut-off of host cell protein synthesis by poliovirus. Among four distinct components required for accurate transcription in vitro from cloned DNA templates, activities of RNA polymerase III and transcription factor TFIIIA were not significantly affected by virus infection. The activity of transcription factor TFIIIC, the limiting component required for transcription of RNA polymerase III genes, was severely inhibited in infected cells, whereas that of transcription factor TFIIIB was inhibited to a lesser extent. The sequence-specific DNA-binding of TFIIIC to the adenovirus VA1 gene internal promoted, however, was not altered by infection of cells with the virus. The authors conclude that (i) at least two transcription factors, TFIIIB and TFIIIC, are inhibited by infection of cells with poliovirtus, (ii) inactivation of TFIIIC does not involve destruction of its DNA-binding domain, and (iii) sequence-specific DNA binding by TFIIIC may be necessary but is not sufficient for the formation of productive transcription complexes.

  1. Generation of Recombinant Polioviruses Harboring RNA Affinity Tags in the 5′ and 3′ Noncoding Regions of Genomic RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Flather, Dylan; Cathcart, Andrea L.; Cruz, Casey; Baggs, Eric; Ngo, Tuan; Gershon, Paul D.; Semler, Bert L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being intensely studied for more than 50 years, a complete understanding of the enterovirus replication cycle remains elusive. Specifically, only a handful of cellular proteins have been shown to be involved in the RNA replication cycle of these viruses. In an effort to isolate and identify additional cellular proteins that function in enteroviral RNA replication, we have generated multiple recombinant polioviruses containing RNA affinity tags within the 3′ or 5′ noncoding region of the genome. These recombinant viruses retained RNA affinity sequences within the genome while remaining viable and infectious over multiple passages in cell culture. Further characterization of these viruses demonstrated that viral protein production and growth kinetics were unchanged or only slightly altered relative to wild type poliovirus. However, attempts to isolate these genetically-tagged viral genomes from infected cells have been hindered by high levels of co-purification of nonspecific proteins and the limited matrix-binding efficiency of RNA affinity sequences. Regardless, these recombinant viruses represent a step toward more thorough characterization of enterovirus ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in RNA replication. PMID:26861382

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Tat-Activated Expression of Poliovirus Protein 2A Inhibits mRNA Translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Hong; Baltimore, David

    1989-04-01

    To study the effect of poliovirus protein 2A on cellular RNA translation, the tat control system of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was used. Protein 2A was expressed from a plasmid construct (pHIV/2A) incorporating the HIV long terminal repeat. Protein synthesis was measured by using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase as a reporter gene driven by the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat. When HIV/2A was contransfected with the reporter, addition of a tat-producing plasmid caused at least a 50-fold drop in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase synthesis. A HeLa cell line carrying HIV/2A was established. In it, tat expression caused more than a 10-fold drop in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase synthesis from the reporter plasmid. Furthermore, 2A induction by tat caused cleavage of the cellular translation factor P220, a part of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F. Thus protein 2A can, by itself, carry out the inhibition of cellular protein synthesis characteristic of a poliovirus infection. Also, the HIV tat activation provides a very effective method to control gene expression in mammalian cells.

  3. Structural organization of poliovirus RNA replication is mediated by viral proteins of the P2 genomic region.

    PubMed Central

    Bienz, K; Egger, D; Troxler, M; Pasamontes, L

    1990-01-01

    Transcriptionally active replication complexes bound to smooth membrane vesicles were isolated from poliovirus-infected cells. In electron microscopic, negatively stained preparations, the replication complex appeared as an irregularly shaped, oblong structure attached to several virus-induced vesicles of a rosettelike arrangement. Electron microscopic immunocytochemistry of such preparations demonstrated that the poliovirus replication complex contains the proteins coded by the P2 genomic region (P2 proteins) in a membrane-associated form. In addition, the P2 proteins are also associated with viral RNA, and they can be cross-linked to viral RNA by UV irradiation. Guanidine hydrochloride prevented the P2 proteins from becoming membrane bound but did not change their association with viral RNA. The findings allow the conclusion that the protein 2C or 2C-containing precursor(s) is responsible for the attachment of the viral RNA to the vesicular membrane and for the spatial organization of the replication complex necessary for its proper functioning in viral transcription. A model for the structure of the viral replication complex and for the function of the 2C-containing P2 protein(s) and the vesicular membranes is proposed. Images PMID:2154600

  4. Isolation of enteroviruses from water, suspended solids, and sediments from Galveston Bay: survival of poliovirus and rotavirus adsorbed to sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V C; Seidel, K M; Goyal, S M; Metcalf, T G; Melnick, J L

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and quantitation of enteroviruses among water, suspended solids, and compact sediments in a polluted estuary are described. Samples were collected sequentially from water, suspended solids, fluffy sediments (uppermost layer of bottom sediments), and compact sediment. A total of 103 samples were examined of which 27 (26%) were positive for virus. Polioviruses were recovered most often, followed by coxsackie B viruses and echoviruses 7 and 29. Virus was found most often attached to suspended solids: 72% of these samples were positive, whereas only 14% of water samples without solids yielded virus. Fluffy sediments yielded virus in 47% of the samples, whereas only 5% of compact bottom-sediment samples were positive. When associated with solids, poliovirus and rotavirus retained their infectious quality for 19 days. The same viruses remained infectious for only 9 days when freely suspended in seawater. Collection of suspended solids at ambient water pH appears to be very useful for the detection of virus; it has advantages over collecting and processing large volumes of water, with accompanying pH adjustment and salt addition for processing. PMID:6091548

  5. A Cysteine-Rich Motif in Poliovirus Protein 2CATPase Is Involved in RNA Replication and Binds Zinc In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Thomas; Jones, Keith W.; Wimmer, Eckard

    2000-01-01

    Protein 2CATPase of picornaviruses is involved in the rearrangement of host cell organelles, viral RNA replication, and encapsidation. However, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms by which 2CATPase engages in these processes are not known. To characterize functional domains of 2CATPase, we have focused on a cysteine-rich motif near the carboxy terminus of poliovirus 2CATPase. This region, which is well conserved among enteroviruses and rhinoviruses displaying an amino acid arrangement resembling zinc finger motifs, was studied by genetic and biochemical analyses. A mutation that replaced the first cysteine residue of the motif with a serine was lethal. A mutant virus which lacked the second of four potential coordination sites for zinc was temperature sensitive. At the restrictive temperature, RNA replication was inhibited whereas translation and polyprotein processing, assayed in vitro and in vivo, appeared to be normal. An intragenomic second-site revertant which reinserted the missing coordination site for zinc and recovered RNA replication at the restrictive temperature was isolated. The cysteine-rich motif was sufficient to bind zinc in vitro, as assessed in the presence of 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol by a colorimetric assay. Zinc binding, however, was not required for hydrolysis of ATP. 2CATPase as well as its precursors 2BC and P2 were found to exist in a reduced form in poliovirus-infected cells. PMID:10590122

  6. [Investigation of the seropositivity of Toxoplasma gondii (Nicolle and Manceaux, 1908) in layer hens by the Sabin-Feldman Dye Test in the region of Konya].

    PubMed

    Altinöz, Funda; Babür, Cahit; Kiliç, Selçuk

    2007-01-01

    This study was carried out on layer hens in the region of Konya between December 2004 and March 2005. During this period, blood samples were collected from a total of 287 layer hens and the sera were separated by centrifugation at 4000 rpm for 10 minutes. All the sera were investigated with the Sabin-Feldman Dye Test for Toxoplasma gondii specific antibodies. The rate of seropositivity for Toxoplasma gondii was found to be 0.34%. PMID:17471403

  7. Risk assessment, risk management and risk-based monitoring following a reported accidental release of poliovirus in Belgium, September to November 2014.

    PubMed

    Duizer, Erwin; Rutjes, Saskia; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria; Schijven, Jack

    2016-01-01

    On 6 September 2014, the accidental release of 10(13) infectious wild poliovirus type 3 (WPV3) particles by a vaccine production plant in Belgium was reported. WPV3 was released into the sewage system and discharged directly to a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and subsequently into rivers that flowed to the Western Scheldt and the North Sea. No poliovirus was detected in samples from the WWTP, surface waters, mussels or sewage from the Netherlands. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) showed that the infection risks resulting from swimming in Belgium waters were above 50% for several days and that the infection risk by consuming shellfish harvested in the eastern part of the Western Scheldt warranted a shellfish cooking advice. We conclude that the reported release of WPV3 has neither resulted in detectable levels of poliovirus in any of the samples nor in poliovirus circulation in the Netherlands. This QMRA showed that relevant data on water flows were not readily available and that prior assumptions on dilution factors were overestimated. A QMRA should have been performed by all vaccine production facilities before starting up large-scale culture of WPV to be able to implement effective interventions when an accident happens. PMID:27020766

  8. Elevations and discharges produced by a simulated flood wave on the lower Sabine River, Louisiana and Texas, caused by a theoretical dam failure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neely, Braxtel L.; Stiltner, Gloria J.

    1979-01-01

    The Toledo Bend Reservoir is located on the lower Sabine River between Louisiana and Texas. Two mathematical models were coupled to calculate the flood wave that would result from the theoretical failure of 25 percent of Toledo Bend Dam and route the wave downstream to Orange, Tex. Computations assumed failure (1) at the peak of the 100-year flood when discharge of the Sabine River is 102,000 cubic feet per second and (2) when the average discharge is 10,000 cubic feet per second. Two techniques were used in the dam-break model. The method of characteristics was used to propagate the shock wave following dam failure. The linear implicit finite-difference solution was used to route the flood wave following shock wave dissipation. The magnitude of the flow was determined for Burkeville, Bon Wier, Ruliff, and Orange, Tex., along the lower Sabine River. For these sites, respectively, the following peak elevations were calculated: 119, 82, 31, and 13 feet for the 100-year flood and 110, 75, 27, and 9 feet for the average discharge. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. Single-Cell Analysis Uncovers Extensive Biological Noise in Poliovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viral infections often begin with a very small number of initiating particles. Accordingly, the outcome of an infection is likely to be affected by variability in the initial molecular interactions between virus and host. In this study, we investigated the range of outcomes upon infection of single cells. We isolated individual cells infected with poliovirus at low or high multiplicities of infection (MOI) and measured viral genomic replication and infectious viral progeny in each cell. We first determined that at 7 h postinfection, the ratio of positive to negative strands in individual cells varies from 5:1 to more than 190:1, with and average of 20:1, suggesting a significant variability in RNA synthesis. We further found that while virus genome production is higher in cells infected at a high multiplicity, the production of infectious particles is largely independent of the number of viruses infecting each cell. Strikingly, by correlating RNA and particle production within individual infections, we uncovered a significant contribution of stochastic noise to the outcome of infection. At low MOI, stochastic influences appear as kinetic effects which are most critical at the initial steps in infection. At high MOI, stochastic influences appear to dictate the virus's ability to harness cellular resources. We conclude that biological noise is a critical determinant of the overall productivity of viral infections. The distinct nature of stochasticity in the outcome of infection by low and high numbers of viral particles may have important implications for our understanding of the determinants of successful viral infections. IMPORTANCE By correlating genome and particle production in single-cell infections, we elucidated sources of noise in viral infections. When a cell was infected by only a single infectious particle, variation in the kinetics of the initial steps of replication contributed significantly to the overall productivity of the infection

  10. Investigation et riposte à une épidémie de poliovirus sauvage à Kinshasa

    PubMed Central

    Nsambu, Muriel Nzazi; Bazira, Léodegal; Coulibaly, Tiekoura; Mbule, Albert; Wilmet, Michèle Dramaix; Likwela, Joris Losimba

    2013-01-01

    Introduction La République Démocratique du Congo a été considérée comme un pays à circulation rétablie de poliovirus sauvage (PVS). Cet article décrit l’épidémie de PVS qui a sévit dans la province de Kinshasa de 2010 à 2011. Méthodes Les analyses ont porté sur les cas de paralysie flasque aigüe (PFA) enregistrés de décembre 2010 à décembre 2011, les données de surveillance des PFA, les données de couverture vaccinale et celles du monitorage indépendant des activités de vaccination supplémentaires. Résultats Entre décembre 2010 à décembre 2011, 298 cas de PFA ont été enregistrés par les zones de santé parmi lesquels 34 cas de PVS confirmés. 58% des cas de PVS avaient plus de 15 ans avec plus d'hommes que de femmes. 10 passages d'activités de vaccination supplémentaires ont été mis en œuvre dont 4 avaient ciblé toute la population de Kinshasa. Il n'y a plus eu de cas de PVS après le 3e passage. Le monitorage des activités de vaccination a montré une proportion de sujets non vaccinés allant de 4 à 13%. La performance du système de surveillance était globalement bonne. Conclusion La prédominance des adultes parmi les cas notifiés traduit leur susceptibilité alors qu'ils ne sont généralement pas concernés lors des campagnes de vaccination supplémentaires. Ceci devrait engager les autorités sanitaires à envisager des activités vaccinales supplémentaires ciblant les adultes afin de casser plus rapidement la chaîne de transmission. Les faiblesses subsistant dans le système de surveillance pourraient être jugulées par le renforcement de la surveillance à base communautaire. PMID:24062866

  11. Rapid Actin-Dependent Viral Motility in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Joshua C.; Brandenburg, Boerries; Hogle, James M.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2009-01-01

    During the course of an infection, viruses take advantage of a variety of mechanisms to travel in cells, ranging from diffusion within the cytosol to active transport along cytoskeletal filaments. To study viral motility within the intrinsically heterogeneous environment of the cell, we have developed a motility assay that allows for the global and unbiased analysis of tens of thousands of virus trajectories in live cells. Using this assay, we discovered that poliovirus exhibits anomalously rapid intracellular movement that was independent of microtubules, a common track for fast and directed cargo transport. Such rapid motion, with speeds of up to 5 μm/s, allows the virus particles to quickly explore all regions of the cell with the exception of the nucleus. The rapid, microtubule-independent movement of poliovirus was observed in multiple human-derived cell lines, but appeared to be cargo-specific. Other cargo, including a closely related picornavirus, did not exhibit similar motility. Furthermore, the motility is energy-dependent and requires an intact actin cytoskeleton, suggesting an active transport mechanism. The speed of this microtubule-independent but actin-dependent movement is nearly an order of magnitude faster than the fastest speeds reported for actin-dependent transport in animal cells, either by actin polymerization or by myosin motor proteins. PMID:19751669

  12. Combined immunization of infants with oral and inactivated poliovirus vaccines: results of a randomized trial in The Gambia, Oman, and Thailand. WHO Collaborative Study Group on Oral and Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    To assess an immunization schedule combining oral (OPV) and inactivated poliovirus vaccines (IPV), we conducted a clinical trial in the Gambia, Oman, and Thailand. Children were randomized to receive one of the following schedules: OPV at birth, 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age; OPV at birth followed by both OPV and IPV at 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age: or placebo at birth followed by IPV at 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age. A total of 1685 infants were enrolled; 24-week serum specimens were available for 1291 infants (77%). Across the study sites at 24 weeks of age, the proportion of seropositive children in the combined schedule group was 95-99% for type 1, 99-100% for type 2, and 97-100% for type 3. In the Gambia and Oman, the combined schedule performed significantly better than OPV for type 1 (95-97% versus 88-90%) and type 3 (97-99% versus 72-73%). In the Gambia and Oman, seroprevalences in the IPV group were lower for type 1 (significantly lower in the Gambia); significantly lower for type 2; and significantly higher for type 3, compared with the OPV group. In Thailand, the IPV group had significantly lower proportions of children who were seropositive for each of the three types, compared with the OPV group. The responses to OPV in the Gambia, Oman, and Thailand were consistent with previous studies from these countries. IPV given at 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age provided inadequate serological protection against poliovirus, especially type 1. The combined schedule provided the highest levels of serum antibody response, with mucosal immunity equivalent to that produced by OPV alone. PMID:8789924

  13. Poliovirus infection of cyclophosphamide-treated mice results in persistence and late paralysis: I. Clinical, pathologic, and immunologic studies.

    PubMed

    Jubelt, B; Meagher, J B

    1984-04-01

    An attenuated human poliovirus infection of cyclophosphamide (CY)-treated mice was developed as a model of persistent CNS enterovirus infections and as an investigation of the interaction of virus with motor neurons during persistence. Ten percent of mice inoculated intracerebrally with undiluted virus developed clinical disease by day 90, but of those treated with CY, 80% developed disease. At higher virus dilutions plus CY there was a marked increase in the incubation period. The latest onset of clinical disease occurred on day 146. Only paralyzed animals had pathologic changes in the spinal cord and virus antigen in anterior horn cells. Neutralizing antibodies were suppressed by CY, as were humoral and cellular immune responses to other antigens. PMID:6322051

  14. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in Poliovirus Nonstructural Protein 2CATPase Causes Conditional Defects in Encapsidation and Uncoating

    PubMed Central

    Asare, Emmanuel; Mugavero, JoAnn; Jiang, Ping; Paul, Aniko V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The specificity of encapsidation of C-cluster enteroviruses depends on an interaction between capsid proteins and nonstructural protein 2CATPase. In particular, residue N252 of poliovirus 2CATPase interacts with VP3 of coxsackievirus A20, in the context of a chimeric virus. Poliovirus 2CATPase has important roles both in RNA replication and encapsidation. In this study, we searched for additional sites in 2CATPase, near N252, that are required for encapsidation. Accordingly, segments adjacent to N252 were analyzed by combining triple and single alanine mutations to identify residues required for function. Two triple alanine mutants exhibited defects in RNA replication. The remaining two mutations, located in secondary structures in a predicted three-dimensional model of 2CATPase, caused lethal growth phenotypes. Most single alanine mutants, derived from the lethal variants, were either quasi-infectious and yielded variants with wild-type (wt) or temperature-sensitive (ts) growth phenotypes or had a lethal growth phenotype due to defective RNA replication. The K259A mutation, mapping to an α helix in the predicted structure of 2CATPase, resulted in a cold-sensitive virus. In vivo protein synthesis and virus production were strikingly delayed at 33°C relative to the wt, suggesting a defect in uncoating. Studies with a reporter virus indicated that this mutant is also defective in encapsidation at 33°C. Cell imaging confirmed a much-reduced production of K259A mature virus at 33°C relative to the wt. In conclusion, we have for the first time linked a cold-sensitive encapsidation defect in 2CATPase (K259A) to a subsequent delay in uncoating of the virus particle at 33°C during the next cycle of infection. IMPORTANCE Enterovirus morphogenesis, which involves the encapsidation of newly made virion RNA, is a process still poorly understood. Elucidation of this process is important for future drug development for a large variety of diseases caused by these

  15. Progress toward Global Interruption of Wild Poliovirus Transmission, 2010–2013 and Tackling the Challenges to Complete Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Wassilak, Steven G.F.; Oberste, M. Steven; Tangermann, Rudolph H.; Diop, Ousmane M.; Jafari, Hamid S.; Armstrong, Gregory L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite substantial progress, global polio eradication has remained elusive. Indigenous wild poliovirus (WPV) transmission in four endemic countries (Afghanistan, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan) persisted into 2010 and outbreaks from imported WPV continued. By 2013, most outbreaks in the interim were promptly controlled. The number of polio-affected districts globally has declined by74% (from 481 in 2009 to 126 in 2013), including a 79% decrease in the number of affected districts in endemic countries (from 304 to 63). India is now polio-free. The challenges to success in the remaining polio-endemic countries include 1) threats to the security of vaccinators in each country and a ban on polio vaccination in areas of Afghanistan and Pakistan; 2) a risk of decreased government commitment; and 3) remaining surveillance gaps. Coordinated efforts under the International Health Regulations and efforts to mitigate the challenges provide a clear opportunity to soon secure global eradication. PMID:25316873

  16. Construction of a mutagenesis cartridge for poliovirus genome-linked viral protein: isolation and characterization of viable and nonviable mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, R.J.; Tada, H.; Ypma-Wong, M.F.; Dunn, J.J.; Semler, B.L.; Wimmer, E.

    1988-01-01

    By following a strategy of genetic analysis of poliovirus, the authors have constructed a synthetic mutagenesis cartridge spanning the genome-linked viral protein coding region and flanking cleavage sites in an infectious cDNA clone of the type I (Mahoney) genome. The insertion of new restriction sites within the infectious clone has allowed them to replace the wild-type sequences with short complementary pairs of synthetic oligonucleotides containing various mutations. A set of mutations have been made that create methionine codons within the genome-linked viral protein region. The resulting viruses have growth characteristics similar to wild type. Experiments that led to an alteration of the tyrosine residue responsible for the linkage to RNA have resulted in nonviable virus. In one mutant, proteolytic processing assayed in vitro appeared unimpaired by the mutation. They suggest that the position of the tyrosine residue is important for genome-linked viral protein function(s).

  17. Progress toward global interruption of wild poliovirus transmission, 2010-2013, and tackling the challenges to complete eradication.

    PubMed

    Wassilak, Steven G F; Oberste, M Steven; Tangermann, Rudolph H; Diop, Ousmane M; Jafari, Hamid S; Armstrong, Gregory L

    2014-11-01

    Despite substantial progress, global polio eradication has remained elusive. Indigenous wild poliovirus (WPV) transmission in 4 endemic countries (Afghanistan, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan) persisted into 2010 and outbreaks from imported WPV continued. By 2013, most outbreaks in the interim were promptly controlled. The number of polio-affected districts globally has declined by 74% (from 481 in 2009 to 126 in 2013), including a 79% decrease in the number of affected districts in endemic countries (from 304 to 63). India is now polio-free. The challenges to success in the remaining polio-endemic countries include (1) threats to the security of vaccinators in each country and a ban on polio vaccination in areas of Afghanistan and Pakistan; (2) a risk of decreased government commitment; and (3) remaining surveillance gaps. Coordinated efforts under the International Health Regulations and efforts to mitigate the challenges provide a clear opportunity to soon secure global eradication. PMID:25316873

  18. Modified procedure for extraction of poliovirus from naturally-infected oysters using Cat-Floc and beef extract

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, E.F.; Vaughn, J.M.; Vicale, T.J.

    1980-02-01

    Methods for recovery of poliovirus type 1 from naturally-infected oysters were examined. Extraction procedures analyzed included glycine-saline and polyelectrolyte (Cat-Floc) methods followed by concentration using modifications of an acid precipitation technique. Direct viral assay of shellfish homogenates, when compared to virus recovery following extraction, indicated that substantially fewer viruses were detected in initial homogenates. These data appeared to support the contention that input values based on homogenate assay were inappropriate in determining recovery efficiencies with naturally-infected shellfish. Since absolute efficiencies could not be determined, relative efficiencies using samples from pooled homogenates were used to determine the recovery efficiencies of various extraction procedures. Cat-Floc extraction followed by a beef extract-modified acid precipitation technique resulted in higher virus recoveries than a glycine-saline extraction procedure.

  19. Construction of recombinant DNA molecules by the use of a single stranded DNA generated by the polymerase chain reaction: its application to chimeric hepatitis A virus/poliovirus subgenomic cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wychowski, C; Emerson, S U; Silver, J; Feinstone, S M

    1990-01-01

    In order to study the importance of VP4 in picornavirus replication and translation, we replaced the hepatitis A virus (HAV) VP4 with the poliovirus (PV1) VP4. Using a modification of oligonucleotide site directed mutagenesis and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), we created a subgenomic cDNA chimera of hepatitis A virus in which the precise sequences coding for HAV VP4 capsid protein were replaced by the sequences coding for the poliovirus VP4 capsid protein. The method involved the use of PCR primers corresponding to the 3' and 5' ends of the poliovirus VP4 sequence and that had HAV VP4 3' and 5' flanking sequences on their 5'ends. Single stranded DNA of 240 and 242 nt containing the 204 nt coding for the complete poliovirus VP4 were produced by using a limiting amount of one of the primers in a PCR reaction. These single stranded PCR products were used like mutagenic oligonucleotides on a single stranded phagemid containing the first 2070 bases of the HAV genome. Using this technique, we precisely replaced the HAV VP4 gene by the poliovirus VP4 gene as determined by DNA sequencing. The cDNA was transcribed into RNA and translated in vitro. The resulting protein could be precipitated by antibody to poliovirus VP4 but not to HAV VP4. Images PMID:2156236

  20. Assisted Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... but they don't need full-time nursing care. Some assisted living facilities are part of retirement ... change. Assisted living costs less than nursing home care. It is still fairly expensive. Older people or ...

  1. Immunogenicity and Effectiveness of Routine Immunization With 1 or 2 Doses of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grassly, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The World Health Organization has recommended that all 124 countries currently using only oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) introduce at least 1 dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) before the global withdrawal of serotype 2 OPV in 2016. A 1- or 2-dose schedule, potentially administered intradermally with reduced antigen content, may make this affordable. Methods. A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies documenting seroconversion after 1 or 2, full or fractional (1/5) doses of enhanced-potency IPV was performed. Studies reporting the clinical efficacy of IPV were also reviewed. Results. Twenty study arms from 12 published articles were included in the analysis of seroconversion. One full dose of intramuscular IPV seroconverted 33%, 41%, and 47% of infants against serotypes 1, 2, and 3 on average, whereas 2 full doses seroconverted 79%, 80%, and 90%, respectively. Seroconversion increased with age at administration. Limited data from case-control studies indicate clinical efficacy equivalent to the proportion seroconverting. One fractional dose of intradermal IPV gave lower seroconversion (10%–40%), but after 2 doses seroconversion was comparable to that with full-dose IPV. Conclusions. Routine immunization with 2 full or fractional doses of IPV given after 10 weeks of age is likely to protect >80% of recipients against poliomyelitis if poliovirus reemerges after withdrawal of OPV serotypes. PMID:24634499

  2. Translation of poliovirus RNA: role of an essential cis-acting oligopyrimidine element within the 5' nontranslated region and involvement of a cellular 57-kilodalton protein.

    PubMed Central

    Pestova, T V; Hellen, C U; Wimmer, E

    1991-01-01

    Translation of poliovirus RNA is initiated by cap-independent internal entry of ribosomes into the 5' nontranslated region. This process is dependent on elements within the 5' nontranslated region (the internal ribosomal entry site) and may involve novel translation factors. Systematic mutation of a conserved oligopyrimidine tract has revealed a cis-acting element that is essential for translation in vitro. The function of this element is related to its position relative to other cis-acting domains. This element is part of a more complex structure that interacts with several cellular factors, but changes in protein binding after mutation of this element were not detected in a UV cross-linking assay. A 57-kDa protein from the ribosomal salt wash fraction of HeLa cells was identified that binds upstream of the oligopyrimidine tract. Translation of poliovirus mRNA in vitro was strongly and specifically inhibited by competition with the p57-binding domain (nucleotides 260 to 488) of the 5' nontranslated region of encephalomyocarditis virus, indicating a probable role for p57 in poliovirus translation. p57 is likely to be identical to the ribosome-associated factor that binds to and is necessary for the function of the internal ribosomal entry site of encephalomyocarditis virus RNA. Images PMID:1656091

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VLTS. OVz stars in 30 Dor (Sabin-Sanjulian+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin-Sanjulian, C.; Simon-Diaz, S.; Herrero, A.; Walborn, N. R.; Puls, J.; Maiz Apellaniz, J.; Evans, C. J.; Brott, I.; de Koter, A.; Garcia, M.; Markova, N.; Najarro, F.; Ramirez-Agudelo, O. H.; Sana, H.; Taylor, W. D.; Vink, J. S.

    2014-10-01

    OVz stars, a subclass of O-type dwarfs characterized by having HeIIλ4686 stronger in absorption than any other helium line in their blue-violet spectra, have been suggested to be on or near the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS). If their youth were confirmed, they would be key objects with which to advance our knowledge of the physical properties of massive stars in the early stages of their lives. We test the hypothesis of OVz stars being at a different (younger) evolutionary stage than are normal O-type dwarfs. We have performed the first comprehensive quantitative spectroscopic analysis of a statistically meaningful sample of OVz and OV stars in the same star-forming region, exploiting the large number of OVz stars identified by the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey in the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We obtained the stellar and wind parameters of 38 OVz stars (and a control sample of 46 OV stars) using the FASTWIND stellar atmosphere code and the IACOB-GBAT, a grid-based tool developed for automated quantitative analysis of optical spectra of O stars. In the framework of a differential study, we compared the physical and evolutionary properties of both samples, locating the stars in the logg vs. logTeff, logQ vs. logTeff, and logL/L⊙ vs. logTeff diagrams. We also investigated the predictions of the FASTWIND code regarding the OVz phenomenon. (3 data files).

  4. Contribution of Contact Sampling in Increasing Sensitivity of Poliovirus Detection During A Polio Outbreak-Somalia, 2013.

    PubMed

    Moturi, Edna; Mahmud, Abdirahman; Kamadjeu, Raoul; Mbaeyi, Chukwuma; Farag, Noha; Mulugeta, Abraham; Gary, Howard; Ehrhardt, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Background.  In May 2013, a wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) outbreak reported in Somalia provided an opportunity to examine the contribution of testing contacts to WPV detection. Methods.  We reviewed acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) case-patients and linked contacts reported in the Somalia Surveillance Database from May 9 to December 31, 2013. We restricted our analysis to AFP case-patients that had ≥3 contacts and calculated the contribution of each contact to case detection. Results.  Among 546 AFP cases identified, 328 AFP cases had ≥3 contacts. Among the 328 AFP cases with ≥3 contacts, 93 WPV1 cases were detected: 58 cases (62%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 52%-72%) were detected through testing stool specimens from AFP case-patients; and 35 cases (38%; 95% CI, 28%-48%) were detected through testing stool specimens from contacts, including 19 cases (20%; 95% CI, 14%-30%) from the first contact, 11 cases (12%; 95% CI, 7%-20%) from the second contact, and 5 cases (5%; 95% CI, 2%-12%) from the third contact. Among the 103 AFP cases with ≥4 contacts, 3 (6%; 95% CI, 2%-16%) of 52 WPV1 cases were detected by testing the fourth contact. No additional WPV1 cases were detected by testing >4 contacts. Conclusions.  Stool specimens from 3 to 4 contacts of persons with AFP during polio outbreaks are needed to maximize detection of WPV cases. PMID:27419182

  5. Sero-Survey of Polio Antibodies during Wild Poliovirus Outbreak in Southern Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Bo; Zhu, Shuang-Li; Zheng, Jing-Shan; Gou, Ai-Li; Cui, Hui; Zhang, Yong; Ning, Gui-Jun; Fan, Chun-Xiang; Chen, Yuan-Sheng; Li, Ke-Li; Yuan, Ping; Ma, Chao; Ma, Jing; Zheng, Hui; Fan, Xin-Chun; Li, Xin-Lan; Tang, Hai-Shu; Li, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Fan; Yan, Dong-Mei; Wang, Dong-Yan; Cui, Zhi-Qiang; Ren, Li-Ping; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Hui-Ling; Jiang, Xiao-Hong; An, Hong-Qiu; Liu, Yang; Li, Jing; Xu, Wen-Bo; Wen, Ning; Xu, Ai-Qiang; Luo, Hui-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background After being polio free for more than 10 years, an outbreak following importation of wild poliovirus (WPV) was confirmed in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China, in 2011. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted prior to supplementary immunization activities (SIAs), immediately after the confirmation of the WPV outbreak. In selected prefectures, participants aged ≤60 years old who visited hospitals at county-level or above to have their blood drawn for reasons not related to the study, were invited to participate in our study. Antibody titers ≥8 were considered positive. Results Among the 2,611 participants enrolled, 2,253 (86.3%), 2,283 (87.4%), and 1,989 (76.2%) were seropositive to P1, P2 and P3 respectively, and 1744 (66.8%) participants were seropositive to all the three serotypes. Lower antibody seropositivities and geometric mean titers were observed in children <1 year of age and in adults aged 15–39 years. Conclusion Serosurveys to estimate population immunity in districts at high risk of polio importation might be useful to gauge underlying population immunity gaps to polio and possibly to guide preparedness and response planning. Consideration should be given to older children and adults during polio risk assessment planning and outbreak response. PMID:24991811

  6. Contribution of Contact Sampling in Increasing Sensitivity of Poliovirus Detection During A Polio Outbreak—Somalia, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Moturi, Edna; Mahmud, Abdirahman; Kamadjeu, Raoul; Mbaeyi, Chukwuma; Farag, Noha; Mulugeta, Abraham; Gary, Howard; Ehrhardt, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Background. In May 2013, a wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) outbreak reported in Somalia provided an opportunity to examine the contribution of testing contacts to WPV detection. Methods. We reviewed acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) case-patients and linked contacts reported in the Somalia Surveillance Database from May 9 to December 31, 2013. We restricted our analysis to AFP case-patients that had ≥3 contacts and calculated the contribution of each contact to case detection. Results. Among 546 AFP cases identified, 328 AFP cases had ≥3 contacts. Among the 328 AFP cases with ≥3 contacts, 93 WPV1 cases were detected: 58 cases (62%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 52%–72%) were detected through testing stool specimens from AFP case-patients; and 35 cases (38%; 95% CI, 28%–48%) were detected through testing stool specimens from contacts, including 19 cases (20%; 95% CI, 14%–30%) from the first contact, 11 cases (12%; 95% CI, 7%–20%) from the second contact, and 5 cases (5%; 95% CI, 2%–12%) from the third contact. Among the 103 AFP cases with ≥4 contacts, 3 (6%; 95% CI, 2%–16%) of 52 WPV1 cases were detected by testing the fourth contact. No additional WPV1 cases were detected by testing >4 contacts. Conclusions. Stool specimens from 3 to 4 contacts of persons with AFP during polio outbreaks are needed to maximize detection of WPV cases. PMID:27419182

  7. Crystal Structure of Poliovirus 3CD Protein: Virally Encoded Protease and Precursor to the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte,L.; Wass, A.; Gohara, D.; Pathak, H.; Arnold, J.; Filman, D.; Cameron, C.; Hogle, J.

    2007-01-01

    Poliovirus 3CD is a multifunctional protein that serves as a precursor to the protease 3Cpro and the viral polymerase 3Dpol and also plays a role in the control of viral replication. Although 3CD is a fully functional protease, it lacks polymerase activity. We have solved the crystal structures of 3CD at a 3.4- Angstroms resolution and the G64S fidelity mutant of 3Dpol at a 3.0- Angstroms resolution. In the 3CD structure, the 3C and 3D domains are joined by a poorly ordered polypeptide linker, possibly to facilitate its cleavage, in an arrangement that precludes intramolecular proteolysis. The polymerase active site is intact in both the 3CD and the 3Dpol G64S structures, despite the disruption of a network proposed to position key residues in the active site. Therefore, changes in molecular flexibility may be responsible for the differences in fidelity and polymerase activities. Extensive packing contacts between symmetry-related 3CD molecules and the approach of the 3C domain's N terminus to the VPg binding site suggest how 3Dpol makes biologically relevant interactions with the 3C, 3CD, and 3BCD proteins that control the uridylylation of VPg during the initiation of viral replication. Indeed, mutations designed to disrupt these interfaces have pronounced effects on the uridylylation reaction in vitro.

  8. Modifications of both selectivity factor and upstream binding factor contribute to poliovirus-mediated inhibition of RNA polymerase I transcription.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rajeev; Weidman, Mary K; Navarro, Sonia; Comai, Lucio; Dasgupta, Asim

    2005-08-01

    Soon after infection, poliovirus (PV) shuts off host-cell transcription, which is catalysed by all three cellular RNA polymerases. rRNA constitutes more than 50 % of all cellular RNA and is transcribed from rDNA by RNA polymerase I (pol I). Here, evidence has been provided suggesting that both pol I transcription factors, SL-1 (selectivity factor) and UBF (upstream binding factor), are modified and inactivated in PV-infected cells. The viral protease 3C(pro) appeared to cleave the TATA-binding protein-associated factor 110 (TAF(110)), a subunit of the SL-1 complex, into four fragments in vitro. In vitro protease-cleavage assays using various mutants of TAF(110) and purified 3C(pro) indicated that the Q(265)G(266) and Q(805)G(806) sites were cleaved by 3C(pro). Both SL-1 and UBF were depleted in PV-infected cells and their disappearance correlated with pol I transcription inhibition. rRNA synthesis from a template containing a human pol I promoter demonstrated that both SL-1 and UBF were necessary to restore pol I transcription fully in PV-infected cell extracts. These results suggested that both SL-1 and UBF are transcriptionally inactivated in PV-infected HeLa cells. PMID:16033979

  9. Development of an efficient entire-capsid-coding-region amplification method for direct detection of poliovirus from stool extracts.

    PubMed

    Arita, Minetaro; Kilpatrick, David R; Nakamura, Tomofumi; Burns, Cara C; Bukbuk, David; Oderinde, Soji B; Oberste, M Steven; Kew, Olen M; Pallansch, Mark A; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory diagnosis has played a critical role in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative since 1988, by isolating and identifying poliovirus (PV) from stool specimens by using cell culture as a highly sensitive system to detect PV. In the present study, we aimed to develop a molecular method to detect PV directly from stool extracts, with a high efficiency comparable to that of cell culture. We developed a method to efficiently amplify the entire capsid coding region of human enteroviruses (EVs) including PV. cDNAs of the entire capsid coding region (3.9 kb) were obtained from as few as 50 copies of PV genomes. PV was detected from the cDNAs with an improved PV-specific real-time reverse transcription-PCR system and nucleotide sequence analysis of the VP1 coding region. For assay validation, we analyzed 84 stool extracts that were positive for PV in cell culture and detected PV genomes from 100% of the extracts (84/84 samples) with this method in combination with a PV-specific extraction method. PV could be detected in 2/4 stool extract samples that were negative for PV in cell culture. In PV-positive samples, EV species C viruses were also detected with high frequency (27% [23/86 samples]). This method would be useful for direct detection of PV from stool extracts without using cell culture. PMID:25339406

  10. Assisted Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... it, too. Back to top What is the Cost for Assisted Living? Although assisted living costs less than nursing home care, it is still ... of services an older person chooses, the price costs can range from less than $25,000 a ...

  11. Risks of reintroduction of polio after eradication: the vaccine origin of an outbreak of type 3 poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Ferguson, G L; Wood, D J; Minor, P D

    2001-01-01

    Sabin live-attenuated strains, which have proved to be the most effective tools for poliovirus eradication, could also be the source of reintroduction of polio epidemics after global eradication of wild poliomyelitis is achieved. There are still considerable gaps in our knowledge about the persistence of vaccine-derived viruses in the population and the mechanisms involved in poliovirus transmissibility, both of which are essential factors in assessing the risks posed by such strains and in designing effective strategies for the cessation of polio immunisation. In this report, we have examined virological and epidemiological aspects of an epidemic of poliomyelitis in 1968 in Poland that was shown to be associated with the use of the USOL-D-bac live-attenuated vaccine strain. Possible causes of the origin and progress of the outbreak included the pattern of virus excretion from vaccinees, mutations identified in epidemic viruses and the unique vaccination policies in Poland during the years preceding the epidemic. PMID:11763341

  12. Assisted Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... a resident's needs depends as much on the philosophy and services of the assisted living facility as ... the facility provide a written statement of its philosophy of care? Visit each facility more than once, ...

  13. Assisted Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... premises. Adult foster care has the advantages of maintaining frail older adults in a more home-like ... pay to live in these communities, though some facilities have beds for skilled care that are funded ...

  14. Living Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mules, B. R.

    1976-01-01

    Presented is a review of various methods of keeping live animals, including scorpions, spiders, crabs, crayfish, shrimp, ants, fish, mice, and birds, as well as plants as a school science project/display. (SL)

  15. Healthy Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... Environment Kids Health Kids Environment Kids Health Topics Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The Natural World Games Brainteasers Puzzles Riddles Songs Activities Be ...

  16. Assisted Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... are part of retirement communities. Others are near nursing homes, so a person can move easily if needs change. Assisted living costs less than nursing home care. It is still fairly expensive. Older people ...

  17. Assisted Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recreational activities Security Transportation How to Choose a Facility A good match between a facility and a resident's needs depends as much on the philosophy and services of the assisted living facility as it does on the quality of care. ...

  18. Poliovirus Internal Ribosome Entry Segment Structure Alterations That Specifically Affect Function in Neuronal Cells: Molecular Genetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Malnou, Cécile E.; Pöyry, Tuija A. A.; Jackson, Richard J.; Kean, Katherine M.

    2002-01-01

    Translation of poliovirus RNA is driven by an internal ribosome entry segment (IRES) present in the 5′ noncoding region of the genomic RNA. This IRES is structured into several domains, including domain V, which contains a large lateral bulge-loop whose predicted secondary structure is unclear. The primary sequence of this bulge-loop is strongly conserved within enteroviruses and rhinoviruses: it encompasses two GNAA motifs which could participate in intrabulge base pairing or (in one case) could be presented as a GNRA tetraloop. We have begun to address the question of the significance of the sequence conservation observed among enterovirus reference strains and field isolates by using a comprehensive site-directed mutagenesis program targeted to these two GNAA motifs. Mutants were analyzed functionally in terms of (i) viability and growth kinetics in both HeLa and neuronal cell lines, (ii) structural analyses by biochemical probing of the RNA, and (iii) translation initiation efficiencies in vitro in rabbit reticulocyte lysates supplemented with HeLa or neuronal cell extracts. Phenotypic analyses showed that only viruses with both GNAA motifs destroyed were significantly affected in their growth capacities, which correlated with in vitro translation defects. The phenotypic defects were strongly exacerbated in neuronal cells, where a temperature-sensitive phenotype could be revealed at between 37 and 39.5°C. Biochemical probing of mutated domain V, compared to the wild type, demonstrated that such mutations lead to significant structural perturbations. Interestingly, revertant viruses possessed compensatory mutations which were distant from the primary mutations in terms of sequence and secondary structure, suggesting that intradomain tertiary interactions could exist within domain V of the IRES. PMID:12368304

  19. Delineation of marsh types of the Texas coast from Corpus Christi Bay to the Sabine River in 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Enwright, Nicholas M.; Hartley, Stephen B.; Brasher, Michael G.; Visser, Jenneke M.; Mitchell, Michael K.; Ballard, Bart M.; Parr, Mark W.; Couvillion, Brady R.; Wilson, Barry C.

    2014-01-01

    Coastal zone managers and researchers often require detailed information regarding emergent marsh vegetation types for modeling habitat capacities and needs of marsh-reliant wildlife (such as waterfowl and alligator). Detailed information on the extent and distribution of marsh vegetation zones throughout the Texas coast has been historically unavailable. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation and collaboration with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via the Gulf Coast Joint Venture, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, the University of Louisiana-Lafayette, and Ducks Unlimited, Inc., has produced a classification of marsh vegetation types along the middle and upper Texas coast from Corpus Christi Bay to the Sabine River. This study incorporates approximately 1,000 ground reference locations collected via helicopter surveys in coastal marsh areas and about 2,000 supplemental locations from fresh marsh, water, and “other” (that is, nonmarsh) areas. About two-thirds of these data were used for training, and about one-third were used for assessing accuracy. Decision-tree analyses using Rulequest See5 were used to classify emergent marsh vegetation types by using these data, multitemporal satellite-based multispectral imagery from 2009 to 2011, a bare-earth digital elevation model (DEM) based on airborne light detection and ranging (lidar), alternative contemporary land cover classifications, and other spatially explicit variables believed to be important for delineating the extent and distribution of marsh vegetation communities. Image objects were generated from segmentation of high-resolution airborne imagery acquired in 2010 and were used to refine the classification. The classification is dated 2010 because the year is both the midpoint of the multitemporal satellite-based imagery (2009–11) classified and the date of the high-resolution airborne imagery that was used to develop image objects. Overall accuracy corrected for bias (accuracy

  20. Healthy Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... health. Some you cannot control, such as your genetic makeup or your age. But you can make changes to your lifestyle. By taking steps toward healthy living, you can help reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer, stroke and other serious diseases: Get ...

  1. Retiring Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnell, Eileen, Ed.; Lodge, Caroline, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Retiring Lives" presents fourteen personal real life stories from people at various stages of retiring. Each author recounts their own story about retiring, bringing together many aspects of the experiences: the social, psychological and practical. These inspirational and illustrated stories will encourage the reader to hold up these experiences…

  2. Learn & Live.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burness, Patty, Ed.; Snider, William, Ed.

    Along with a companion documentary video, "Learn & Live," this resource manual focuses on innovative schools around the country that are integrating technology and involving parents, business, and the community. Ten chapters are divided into four sections. In Section 1, "Students," two chapters look at learning and assessment. The two chapters in…

  3. Outdoor Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Kathy

    Course objectives and learning activities are contained in this curriculum guide for a 16-week home economics course which teaches cooking and sewing skills applicable to outdoor living. The course goals include increasing male enrollment in the home economics program, developing students' self-confidence and ability to work in groups, and…

  4. Conformational Ensemble of the Poliovirus 3CD Precursor Observed by MD Simulations and Confirmed by SAXS: A Strategy to Expand the Viral Proteome?

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Ibrahim M.; Gohara, David W.; Uchida, Akira; Yennawar, Neela; Cameron, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    The genomes of RNA viruses are relatively small. To overcome the small-size limitation, RNA viruses assign distinct functions to the processed viral proteins and their precursors. This is exemplified by poliovirus 3CD protein. 3C protein is a protease and RNA-binding protein. 3D protein is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). 3CD exhibits unique protease and RNA-binding activities relative to 3C and is devoid of RdRp activity. The origin of these differences is unclear, since crystal structure of 3CD revealed “beads-on-a-string” structure with no significant structural differences compared to the fully processed proteins. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on 3CD to investigate its conformational dynamics. A compact conformation of 3CD was observed that was substantially different from that shown crystallographically. This new conformation explained the unique properties of 3CD relative to the individual proteins. Interestingly, simulations of mutant 3CD showed altered interface. Additionally, accelerated MD simulations uncovered a conformational ensemble of 3CD. When we elucidated the 3CD conformations in solution using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments a range of conformations from extended to compact was revealed, validating the MD simulations. The existence of conformational ensemble of 3CD could be viewed as a way to expand the poliovirus proteome, an observation that may extend to other viruses. PMID:26610545

  5. Immune response to simultaneous administration of a combined measles, mumps and rubella vaccine with booster doses of diphtheria-tetanus and poliovirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, G; Li Volti, S; Salemi, I; Giammanco Bilancia, G; Mauro, L

    1993-03-01

    A combined vaccine against measles (Edmonston-Zagreb 19 strain), mumps (Rubini strain) and rubella (Wistar RA 27/3 strain) was administered to a group of 46 children aged 10-12 months simultaneously with booster doses of compulsory diphtheria-tetanus toxoid and oral poliovirus vaccine. A second group of 53 children aged 15-24 months who had received booster doses of the compulsory vaccines 5 to 12 months before was also vaccinated. The same seroconversion rates (100%) and similar antibody titers for rubella were observed in both groups. The same seroconversion rates for mumps (93%) and similar rates for measles (98 and 94%) were observed in the two groups. Significantly lower antibody titers for measles and mumps were found in the first group, but they were compensated by an earlier protection, a reduction of number of visits for immunization, costs for the community, and improvement in parental compliance. These results confirm that Edmonston-Zagreb 19 and Rubini strains are still immunogenic even when they are combined with Wistar RA 27/3 strain. Moreover, a long term follow-up in order to verify the persistence of protective antibody levels in both groups of children, could suggest that combined measles, mumps and rubella vaccine could be given earlier (at 10-12 months of age), simultaneously with booster doses of diphtheria and tetanus toxoid and of trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine. PMID:8519358

  6. Controlled trial of immune response of preterm infants to recombinant hepatitis B and inactivated poliovirus vaccines administered simultaneously shortly after birth

    PubMed Central

    Linder, N.; Handsher, R.; German, B.; Sirota, L.; Bachman, M.; Zinger, S.; Mendelson, E.; Barzilai, A.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—The study was conducted to evaluate the immunogenicity of an early, extra dose of enhanced inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) administered simultaneously with recombinant hepatitis B vaccine (HBV) to preterm infants shortly after birth.
METHODS—Three groups were studied. Fifty preterm infants received IPV intramuscularly within 24 hours of birth, in addition to routine recommended childhood immunisations. Fifty two preterm infants and 35 full term infants received routine immunisations only (routine vaccination timing: HBV at birth, 1 and 6 months of age; IPV at 2 and 4 months; oral polio vaccine (OPV) at 4 and 6 months; diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) at 2, 4, and 6 months; and Haemophilus influenzae B vaccine at 2 and 4 months). Blood samples were taken at birth, 3 and 7months of age from all infants, and at 1 month of age from preterm infants only.
RESULTS—At birth, a lower percentage of both study and control preterm infants had antipoliovirus type 3 titres ⩾ 1:8 than full term infants. At 1 and 3 months of age significantly more early IPV infants had antipoliovirus type 3 titres ⩾ 1:8 than routinely vaccinated preterm infants (p < 0.05). At 7 months of age there were no significant differences in percentage of antipoliovirus titres ⩾ 1:8 or geometric mean times (GMTs) between the early IPV group and the routinely vaccinated preterm group. At 3 and 7 months of age, the percentage of positive antihepatitis B titres (⩾ 1:10) and the GMT of the early IPV preterm group did not differ significantly from those of preterm controls. There was no significant difference in percentage of positive antihepatitis B titres between the early IPV group and full term controls at any time. GMTs for hepatitis B antibodies were significantly lower in the early IPV preterm group than in full term controls at 3 and 7 months of age.
CONCLUSIONS—Administration of an additional dose of IPV simultaneously with routine HBV to preterm infants shortly after

  7. Immunotherapy of metastatic melanoma by reversal of immune suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Biggs, M.W.; Eiselein, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    Beginning with the observation that the human enteorvirus, Poliovirus Sabin 1, will lyse human melanoma cells in culture, clinical trials involving two patients with advance melanoma were performed. Parenteral injection of the viable Poliovirus into cutaneous melanoma metastases followed in 24 hours by oral administration of cyclophosphamide. The results of these two trials are described.

  8. Wild Poliovirus Cases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Polio campaign monitoring reports Polio eradication targets Immunization coverage Reported estimates of polio immunization coverage The Global Polio Eradication Initiative © Copyright 2010 Site ...

  9. Quality of Life and Utility in Patients with Metastatic Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma: The Sarcoma Treatment and Burden of Illness in North America and Europe (SABINE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Reichardt, Peter; Leahy, Michael; Garcia del Muro, Xavier; Ferrari, Stefano; Martin, Javier; Gelderblom, Hans; Wang, Jingshu; Krishna, Arun; Eriksson, Jennifer; Staddon, Arthur; Blay, Jean-Yves

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among metastatic soft tissue (mSTS) or bone sarcoma (mBS) patients who had attained a favourable response to chemotherapy. We employed the EORTC QLQ-C30, the 3-item Cancer-Related Symptoms Questionnaire, and the EQ-5D instrument. HRQoL was evaluated overall and by health state in 120 mSTS/mBS patients enrolled in the SABINE study across nine countries in Europe and North America. Utility was estimated from responses to the EQ-5D instrument using UK population-based weights. The mean EQ-5D utility score was 0.69 for the pooled patient sample with little variation across health states. However, patients with progressive disease reported a clinically significant lower utility (0.56). Among disease symptoms, pain and respiratory symptoms are common. This study showed that mSTS/mBS is associated with reduced HRQoL and utility among patients with metastatic disease. PMID:22550425

  10. ISS Live!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Jennifer; Harris, Philip; Hochstetler, Bruce; Guerra, Mark; Mendez, Israel; Healy, Matthew; Khan, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    International Space Station Live! (ISSLive!) is a Web application that uses a proprietary commercial technology called Lightstreamer to push data across the Internet using the standard http port (port 80). ISSLive! uses the push technology to display real-time telemetry and mission timeline data from the space station in any common Web browser or Internet- enabled mobile device. ISSLive! is designed to fill a unique niche in the education and outreach areas by providing access to real-time space station data without a physical presence in the mission control center. The technology conforms to Internet standards, supports the throughput needed for real-time space station data, and is flexible enough to work on a large number of Internet-enabled devices. ISSLive! consists of two custom components: (1) a series of data adapters that resides server-side in the mission control center at Johnson Space Center, and (2) a set of public html that renders the data pushed from the data adapters. A third component, the Lightstreamer server, is commercially available from a third party and acts as an intermediary between custom components (1) and (2). Lightstreamer also provides proprietary software libraries that are required to use the custom components. At the time of this reporting, this is the first usage of Web-based, push streaming technology in the aerospace industry.

  11. Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index SMALLPOX FACT SHEET The Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine The vaccinia virus is the "live virus" used ... cannot cause smallpox. What is a "live virus" vaccine? A "live virus" vaccine is a vaccine that ...

  12. Living Nanomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlier, M.-F.; Helfer, E.; Wade, R.; Haraux, F.

    The living cell is a kind of factory on the microscopic scale, in which an assembly of modular machines carries out, in a spatially and temporally coordinated way, a whole range of activities internal to the cell, including the synthesis of substances essential to its survival, intracellular traffic, waste disposal, and cell division, but also activities related to intercellular communication and exchanges with the outside world, i.e., the ability of the cell to change shape, to move within a tissue, or to organise its own defence against attack by pathogens, injury, and so on. These nanomachines are made up of macromolecular assemblies with varying degrees of complexity, forged by evolution, within which work is done as a result of changes in interactions between proteins, or between proteins and nucleic acids, or between proteins and membrane components. All these cell components measure a few nanometers across, so the mechanical activity of these nanomachines all happens on the nanometric scale. The directional nature of the work carried out by biological nanomachines is associated with a dissipation of energy. As examples of protein assemblies, one could mention the proteasome, which is responsible for the degradation of proteins, and linear molecular motors such as actomyosin, responsible for muscle contraction, the dynein-microtubule system, responsible for flagellar motility, and the kinesin-microtubule system, responsible for transport of vesicles, which transform chemical energy into motion. Nucleic acid-protein assemblies include the ribosome, responsible for synthesising proteins, polymerases, helicases, elongation factors, and the machinery of DNA replication and repair; the mitotic spindle is an integrated system involving several of these activities which drive chromosome segregation. The machinery coupling membranes and proteins includes systems involved in the energy metabolism, such as the ATP synthase rotary motor, signalling cascades, endocytosis

  13. Poly(rC) binding protein 2 binds to stem-loop IV of the poliovirus RNA 5' noncoding region: identification by automated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Blyn, L B; Swiderek, K M; Richards, O; Stahl, D C; Semler, B L; Ehrenfeld, E

    1996-01-01

    The 5' noncoding region of poliovirus RNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) for cap-independent initiation of translation. Utilization of the IRES requires the participation of one or more cellular proteins that mediate events in the translation initiation reaction, but whose biochemical roles have not been defined. In this report, we identify a cellular RNA binding protein isolated from the ribosomal salt wash of uninfected HeLa cells that specifically binds to stem-loop IV, a domain located in the central part of the poliovirus IRES. The protein was isolated by specific RNA affinity chromatography, and 55% of its sequence was determined by automated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The sequence obtained matched that of poly(rC) binding protein 2 (PCBP2), previously identified as an RNA binding protein from human cells. PCBP2, as well as a related protein, PCBP1, was over-expressed in Escherichia coli after cloning the cDNAs into an expression plasmid to produce a histidine-tagged fusion protein. Specific interaction between recombinant PCBP2 and poliovirus stem-loop IV was demonstrated by RNA mobility shift analysis. The closely related PCBP1 showed no stable interaction with the RNA. Stem-loop IV RNA containing a three nucleotide insertion that abrogates translation activity and virus viability was unable to bind PCBP2. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8855318

  14. Living with endometriosis

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain - living with endometriosis; Endometrial implant - living with endometriosis; Endometrioma - living with endometriosis ... counter pain relievers can reduce the pain of endometriosis. These include: Ibuprofen (Advil) Naproxen (Aleve) Acetaminophen (Tylenol) ...

  15. Living with an Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With an Arrhythmia Many arrhythmias are harmless. It's common to have an occasional ... heartbeat or mild palpitations . People who have harmless arrhythmias can live healthy lives. They usually don't ...

  16. Living Gluten Free

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease Living Gluten Free Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of Contents Allowed ... to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten-Free Spring 2015 Issue: Volume 10 Number 1 Page ...

  17. Poliovirus and vesicular stomatitis virus replication in the presence of 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine or 2-deoxy-D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, G; Guskey, L E

    1984-01-01

    The effects of 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON), 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DOG), and tunicamycin (TM) on the replication of poliovirus (PV) and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) were examined. During a 48-hr replication period, TM, DON, and DOG inhibit VSV plaque formation in HEp-2 cells by 99.9%, 99.8%, and 99.9% respectively. Inhibition of VSV by DON is reversed with glutamine. Although all three agents are known to affect glycoprotein synthesis, DON and DOG also inhibit plaque formation of viruses devoid of structural glycoproteins. Thus, plaque formation of PV types 1 and 3 and Coxsackie B3 virus is delayed in HEp-2 and Buffalo green monkey kidney cells during exposure to these agents. Since these viruses do not contain glycoproteins and since concentrations up to 10 micrograms TM/ml cause no significant inhibition of PV, DON and DOG are affecting another viral or cellular process. Inhibition of PV replication by DON is reversed by addition of 25 mM glutamine or marginally by exposure to a combination of 5 mM concentrations of cytidine, uridine, adenosine monophosphate, and guanosine monophosphate. Inhibition of PV replication by DOG is reversed with 5 mM uridine alone. During DON exposure of HEp-2 cells infected with PV, the amount of 3H-uridine incorporation at 5.5 hr postinfection (pi) is reduced to 53% of untreated controls, an amount 11% greater than incorporation in cultures infected with PV but not treated with DON. These data indicate that the inhibition of PV replication by DON or DOG occurs at the level of viral RNA synthesis, while the primary target of these agents during VSV replication is probably glycosylation. PMID:6208320

  18. Interactions of Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, Vaccinal Poliovirus Type 1, and Bacteriophages φX174 and MS2 with a Drinking Water Biofilm and a Wastewater Biofilm▿

    PubMed Central

    Helmi, Karim; Skraber, Sylvain; Gantzer, Christophe; Willame, Raphaël; Hoffmann, Lucien; Cauchie, Henry-Michel

    2008-01-01

    Biofilms colonizing surfaces inside drinking water distribution networks may provide a habitat and shelter to pathogenic viruses and parasites. If released from biofilms, these pathogens may disseminate in the water distribution system and cause waterborne diseases. Our study aimed to investigate the interactions of protozoan parasites (Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia [oo]cysts) and viruses (vaccinal poliovirus type 1, φX174, and MS2) with two contrasting biofilms. First, attachment, persistence, and detachment of the protozoan parasites and the viruses were assessed with a drinking water biofilm. This biofilm was allowed to develop inside a rotating annular reactor fed with tap water for 7 months prior to the inoculation. Our results show that viable parasites and infectious viruses attached to the drinking water biofilm within 1 h and persisted within the biofilm. Indeed, infectious viruses were detected in the drinking water biofilm up to 6 days after the inoculation, while viral genome and viable parasites were still detected at day 34, corresponding to the last day of the monitoring period. Since viral genome was detected much longer than infectious particles, our results raise the question of the significance of detecting viral genomes in biofilms. A transfer of viable parasites and viruses from the biofilm to the water phase was observed after the flow velocity was increased but also with a constant laminar flow rate. Similar results regarding parasite and virus attachment and detachment were obtained using a treated wastewater biofilm, suggesting that our observations might be extrapolated to a wide range of environmental biofilms and confirming that biofilms can be considered a potential secondary source of contamination. PMID:18281435

  19. Inactivation of Poliovirus 1 and F-Specific RNA Phages and Degradation of Their Genomes by UV Irradiation at 254 Nanometers▿

    PubMed Central

    Simonet, Julien; Gantzer, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    Several models (animal caliciviruses, poliovirus 1 [PV1], and F-specific RNA bacteriophages) are usually used to predict inactivation of nonculturable viruses. For the same UV fluence, viral inactivation observed in the literature varies from 0 to 5 logs according to the models and the methods (infectivity versus molecular biology). The lack of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of inactivation due to UV prevents us from selecting the best model. In this context, determining if viral genome degradation may explain the loss of infectivity under UV radiation becomes essential. Thus, four virus models (PV1 and three F-specific RNA phages: MS2, GA, and Qβ) were exposed to UV radiation from 0 to 150 mJ · cm−2. PV1 is the least-resistant virus, while MS2 and GA phages are the most resistant, with phage Qβ having an intermediate sensitivity; respectively, 6-log, 2.3-log, 2.5-log, and 4-log decreases for 50 mJ · cm−2. In parallel, analysis of RNA degradation demonstrated that this phenomenon depends on the fragment size for PV1 as well as for MS2. Long fragments (above 2,000 bases) for PV1 and MS2 fell rapidly to the background level (>1.3-log decrease) for 20 mJ · cm−2 and 60 mJ · cm− 2, respectively. Nevertheless, the size of the viral RNA is not the only factor affecting UV-induced RNA degradation, since viral RNA was more rapidly degraded in PV1 than in the MS2 phage with a similar size. Finally, extrapolation of inactivation and UV-induced RNA degradation kinetics highlights that genome degradation could fully explain UV-induced viral inactivation. PMID:17041164

  20. Living with hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000360.htm Living with hearing loss To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. If you are living with hearing loss, you know that it takes extra effort to ...

  1. Living with Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Sarcoidosis Sarcoidosis has no cure, but you can take ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  2. Living with Spina Bifida

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Living With Spina Bifida Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... of the website provides information about living with spina bifida at different ages. Spina bifida affects the entire ...

  3. Living with Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics » Atrial Fibrillation » Living With Atrial Fibrillation Explore Atrial Fibrillation What Is... Types Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia ...

  4. Sabine, a new dallisgrass cultivar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common dallisgrass, Paspalum dilatatum, is an important forage grass in the southern United States because of its forage quality, palatability, and ability to grow in mixed species stands. However, the grass produces less forage than other perennial warm-season grasses which reduces its popularity ...

  5. Investigation of enteric adenovirus and poliovirus removal by coagulation processes and suitability of bacteriophages MS2 and φX174 as surrogates for those viruses.

    PubMed

    Shirasaki, N; Matsushita, T; Matsui, Y; Marubayashi, T; Murai, K

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the removal of enteric adenovirus (AdV) type 40 and poliovirus (PV) type 1 by coagulation, using water samples from 13 water sources for drinking water treatment plants in Japan. The behaviors of two widely accepted enteric virus surrogates, bacteriophages MS2 and φX174, were compared with the behaviors of AdV and PV. Coagulation with polyaluminum chloride (PACl, basicity 1.5) removed AdV and PV from virus-spiked source waters: the infectious AdV and PV removal ratios evaluated by means of a plaque-forming-unit method were 0.1-1.4-log10 and 0.5-2.4-log10, respectively. A nonsulfated high-basicity PACl (basicity 2.1) removed infectious AdV and PV more efficiently than did other commercially available PACls (basicity 1.5-2.1), alum, and ferric chloride. The MS2 removal ratios tended to be larger than those of AdV and PV, partly because of differences in the hydrophobicities of the virus particles and the sensitivity of the virus to the virucidal activity of PACl; the differences in removal ratios were not due to differences in the surface charges of the virus particles. MS2, which was more hydrophobic than the other viruses, was inactivated during coagulation with PACl. Therefore, MS2 does not appear to be an appropriate surrogate for AdV and PV during coagulation. In contrast, because φX174, like AdV and PV, was not inactivated during coagulation, and because the hydrophobicity of φX174 was similar to or somewhat lower than the hydrophobicities of AdV and PV, the φX174 removal ratios tended to be similar to or somewhat smaller than those of the enteric viruses. Therefore, φX174 is a potential conservative surrogate for AdV and PV during coagulation. In summary, the surface hydrophobicity of virus particles and the sensitivity of the virus to the virucidal activity of the coagulant are probably important determinants of the efficiency of virus removal during coagulation. PMID:27135564

  6. Discounting human lives

    SciTech Connect

    Cropper, M.L. ); Portney, P.R.

    1992-09-01

    The future costs of regulatory programs to protect human health are routinely discounted, but the lives they save in the future are not. To shed light on the public's attitude toward the discounting of human lives, researchers at Resources for the Future asked 2,600 individuals to choose between one hypothetical program that would save lives immediately and another that would save lives in 5, 10, 25, 50, or 100 years. From the responses, they inferred the number of lives that must be saved in the future to make people as content as saving one life today, compared this implicit discount rate to the respondents' discount rate for money, and identified several factors that affect discount rates for human lives.

  7. Living with Bowel Control Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Living with Bowel Control Problems Resources Bowel Control Awareness Campaign Home Resources for Health Care Providers ... Living with Bowel Control Problems Living with Bowel Control Problems Living with a bowel control problem can ...

  8. The difficulties of 'living while girl'.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Judith

    2016-01-01

    In this Viewpoint, Judith Bruce answers questions from Journal of Virus Eradication Editor, Sabine Kinloch-de Loës, on the importance of fulfilling the basic human rights of adolescent girls and their relationship with viral epidemics such as HIV. Judith Bruce is a graduate of Harvard University and a Senior Associate and Policy Analyst at the Population Council, New York, USA, whose work is aimed at building the health, social and cognitive assets of girls in the poorest communities in the developing world. PMID:27482459

  9. Booster vaccination of pre-school children with reduced-antigen-content diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-inactivated poliovirus vaccine co-administered with measles-mumps-rubella-varicella vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ferrera, Giuseppe; Cuccia, Mario; Mereu, Gabriele; Icardi, Giancarlo; Bona, Gianni; Esposito, Susanna; Marchetti, Federico; Messier, Marc; Kuriyakose, Sherine; Hardt, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pertussis occurs in older children, adolescents and adults due to waning immunity after primary vaccination. Booster vaccination for pre-school children has been recommended in Italy since 1999. In this study (NCT00871000), the immunogenicity, safety and reactogenicity of a booster dose of reduced-antigen content diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-inactivated poliovirus vaccine (dTpa-IPV; GSK Biologicals Boostrix™-Polio; 3-component pertussis) vs. full-strength DTPa-IPV vaccine (sanofi-pasteur—MSD Tetravac™; 2-component pertussis) was evaluated in pre-school Italian children.   Methods: Healthy children aged 5–6 y primed in a routine vaccination setting with three doses of DTPa-based vaccines were enrolled and randomized (1:1) in this phase IIIb, booster study to receive a single dose of dTpa-IPV or DTPa-IPV; the MMRV vaccine was co-administered. Antibody concentrations/titers against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and poliovirus 1–3 were measured before and one month post-booster. Reactogenicity and safety was assessed. Results: 305 subjects were enrolled of whom 303 (dTpa-IPV = 151; DTPa-IPV = 152) received booster vaccination. One month post-booster, all subjects were seroprotected/seropositive for anti-diphtheria, anti-tetanus, anti-PT, anti-FHA and anti-poliovirus 1–3; 99.3% of dTpa-IPV and 60.4% of DTPa-IPV subjects were seropositive for anti-PRN; 98–100% of subjects were seropositive against MMRV antigens post-booster. Pain at the injection site (dTpa-IPV: 63.6%; DTPa-IPV: 63.2%) and fatigue (dTpa-IPV: 26.5%; DTPa-IPV: 23.7%) were the most commonly reported solicited local and general symptoms, during the 4-d follow-up period. No SAEs or fatalities were reported. Conclusions: The reduced-antigen-content dTpa-IPV vaccine was non-inferior to full-strength DTPa-IPV vaccine with respect to immunogenicity. The vaccine was well-tolerated and can be confidently used as a booster dose in pre-school children. PMID:22327497

  10. Living Willow Huts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2007-01-01

    Living Willow Huts are inexpensive to make, fun to plant, easy to grow, and make beautiful spaces for children. They involve planting dormant willow shoots in the ground and weaving them into shapes that will sprout and grow over time. People have been creating similar living architecture throughout the world for centuries in the forms of living…

  11. Families and Assisted Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaugler, Joseph E.; Kane, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Despite growing research on assisted living (AL) as a residential care option for older adults, the social ramifications of residents' transitions to AL are relatively unexplored. This article examines family involvement in AL, including family structures of residents, types of involvement from family members living outside the AL…

  12. Is It Living?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2011-01-01

    The word "living" is commonly used throughout elementary science lessons that focus on the biological world. It is a word teachers often take for granted when teaching life science concepts. How similar the constructed meaning of a common word like "living" is to the meaning intended by the teacher or instructional materials depends on how a…

  13. Engineering Living Functional Materials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Natural materials, such as bone, integrate living cells composed of organic molecules together with inorganic components. This enables combinations of functionalities, such as mechanical strength and the ability to regenerate and remodel, which are not present in existing synthetic materials. Taking a cue from nature, we propose that engineered ‘living functional materials’ and ‘living materials synthesis platforms’ that incorporate both living systems and inorganic components could transform the performance and the manufacturing of materials. As a proof-of-concept, we recently demonstrated that synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli enabled biofilms to be both a functional material in its own right and a materials-synthesis platform. To demonstrate the former, we engineered E. coli biofilms into a chemical-inducer-responsive electrical switch. To demonstrate the latter, we engineered E. coli biofilms to dynamically organize biotic-abiotic materials across multiple length scales, template gold nanorods, gold nanowires, and metal/semiconductor heterostructures, and synthesize semiconductor nanoparticles (Chen, A. Y. et al. (2014) Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat. Mater.13, 515–523.). Thus, tools from synthetic biology, such as those for artificial gene regulation, can be used to engineer the spatiotemporal characteristics of living systems and to interface living systems with inorganic materials. Such hybrids can possess novel properties enabled by living cells while retaining desirable functionalities of inorganic systems. These systems, as living functional materials and as living materials foundries, would provide a radically different paradigm of materials performance and synthesis–materials possessing multifunctional, self-healing, adaptable, and evolvable properties that are created and organized in a distributed, bottom-up, autonomously assembled, and environmentally sustainable manner. PMID

  14. Engineering living functional materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Allen Y; Zhong, Chao; Lu, Timothy K

    2015-01-16

    Natural materials, such as bone, integrate living cells composed of organic molecules together with inorganic components. This enables combinations of functionalities, such as mechanical strength and the ability to regenerate and remodel, which are not present in existing synthetic materials. Taking a cue from nature, we propose that engineered 'living functional materials' and 'living materials synthesis platforms' that incorporate both living systems and inorganic components could transform the performance and the manufacturing of materials. As a proof-of-concept, we recently demonstrated that synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli enabled biofilms to be both a functional material in its own right and a materials-synthesis platform. To demonstrate the former, we engineered E. coli biofilms into a chemical-inducer-responsive electrical switch. To demonstrate the latter, we engineered E. coli biofilms to dynamically organize biotic-abiotic materials across multiple length scales, template gold nanorods, gold nanowires, and metal/semiconductor heterostructures, and synthesize semiconductor nanoparticles (Chen, A. Y. et al. (2014) Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat. Mater. 13, 515-523.). Thus, tools from synthetic biology, such as those for artificial gene regulation, can be used to engineer the spatiotemporal characteristics of living systems and to interface living systems with inorganic materials. Such hybrids can possess novel properties enabled by living cells while retaining desirable functionalities of inorganic systems. These systems, as living functional materials and as living materials foundries, would provide a radically different paradigm of materials performance and synthesis-materials possessing multifunctional, self-healing, adaptable, and evolvable properties that are created and organized in a distributed, bottom-up, autonomously assembled, and environmentally sustainable manner. PMID:25592034

  15. Living Phenomena and Living Information : Centered on Living Structure and Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizuno, Tomofumi

    The term ‘living’ has manifold meanings. The author interprets it in three reasonable ways : 1) sustaining one's life, 2) surviving under economic surroundings, 3) existing socially. Centered on ‘living structure’ which grasps static aspects of living and ‘living design’ which does dynamic aspects of living he investigates living phenomena and discusses their relationship to living information. The author also catches living phenomena from viewpoints as follows : 1) people, 2) corporation, 3) researcher, 4) administration, and investigates living information from the four viewpoints as above. The examples of classification for living itself as well as for living information are shown.

  16. Fluorescence Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio, and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities, and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate fluorescent protein constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. PMID:24974023

  17. Living with Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Living with Hearing Loss Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Fast Facts There are two main types of hearing loss. Permanent hearing loss (called sensorineural) usually involves damage ...

  18. Living with Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Oxygen Therapy Oxygen therapy helps many people function better and be ... chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) Although you may need oxygen therapy continuously or for long periods, it doesn' ...

  19. Living with Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Living with Hearing Loss Past Issues / Fall 2008 ... the United States suffer some form of disordered communication. The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication ...

  20. Living with Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... live longer and enjoy a good quality of life. Many people who have Marfan syndrome and are ... tears and leaks blood. Aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition. The main symptom of aortic dissection ...

  1. Living with Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Anemia Often, you can treat and control anemia. If ... by an inherited or chronic disease or trauma. Anemia and Children/Teens Infants and young children have ...

  2. Living with Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Support Living with PH may cause fear, anxiety, depression, and stress. You may worry about your ... and friends also can help relieve stress and anxiety. Let your loved ones know how you feel ...

  3. Assisted Living Community Profile

    MedlinePlus

    ... News & Media News Releases Media Resources AHCA/NCAL Gazette Publications Social Media Resources & Publications Currently selected Assisted ... News & Media News Releases Media Resources AHCA/NCAL Gazette Publications Social Media Resources & Publications Assisted Living Studies ...

  4. [Promoting Living Kidney Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2016-04-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best approach for treating patients with end stage renal disease, offering patients the best chance of returning to normal health. While the techniques used in kidney transplantation surgery are mature and highly successful, there is a severe shortage of donor organs. Statistics show a serious imbalance between organ donations and patients on the waiting list for organ transplantation. Moreover, evidence from empirical studies has shown a better transplantation outcome for patients who receive living donor transplantation than for those who receive organs from cadavers. Although using relatives as donors offers an effective way to reduce the problem of organ shortage, this strategy faces many challenges and many other factors affect the promotion of living donor transplantation. This article elaborates how cultural and psychological factors, kidney transplantation awareness, and ethics and laws impact upon living kidney donations and then proposes coping strategies for promoting living kidney transplantation. PMID:27026555

  5. The Living Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impey, Chris

    2011-06-01

    Preface; 1. The unfinished revolution; 2. Life's origins; 3. Extreme life; 4. Shaping evolution; 5. Living in the Solar System; 6. Distant worlds; 7. Are we alone?; Notes; Glossary; Reading list; Media resources; Illustration credits; Index.

  6. Living with VHL

    MedlinePlus

    ... Videos Contact Us Shop Community vhl alliance vhl alliance Patients What is VHL? Seeking Care Living with VHL Caregiver Center Stories Professionals Surveillance & Diagnosis Treatment Professional Meetings Research Genetic Research and VHL Progress Towards a ...

  7. Living with Alopecia Areata

    MedlinePlus

    ... you wear a wig Sadness and depression Hopelessness Anger Embarrassment Guilt or self-blame that you somehow ... For siblings and other family members, shame and anger because the disease has also affected their lives ...

  8. Live Your Life Well

    MedlinePlus

    ... about reasonable steps that if used consistently can increase your comfort and boost your ability to build a rewarding life. About the Live Your Life Well Campaign Mental Health America is the country's leading non-profit ...

  9. Living with Paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... are available to answer your questions. Call toll-free 1-800-539-7309 Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm ... are people living with or impacted by paralysis. Free services and downloads > Paralysis Resource Guide Our free ...

  10. Live biometric authenticity check

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold H.; Hsu, Charles C.; Szu, Clifford; Wang, Shoujue

    2003-04-01

    This research defined the underpinning concepts of a system that was highly secure, yet was efficient and non-invasive enough for everyday use. The live biometric authenticity check augmented invariant fingerprints with variable live features offered superior security by combining physical characteristics of the user"s with a passcode (numerical PIN) or passphrase (a string of words), and might also easily be augmented with other biometric video imaging devices for the utmost security.

  11. Laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Waleed A; Al-Akraa, Mahmoud M

    2005-07-01

    With the number of patients presently awaiting renal transplantation exceeding the number of cadaveric organs available, there is an increasing reliance on live renal donation. Of the 11,869 renal transplants performed in 2002 in the US, 52.6% were living donors from the United Network for Organ Sharing Registry. Renal allografts from living donors provide: superior immediate long-term function; require less waiting time and are more cost-effective than those from cadaveric donors. However, anticipation of postoperative pain and temporary occupational disability may dissuade many potential donors. Additionally, some recipients hesitate to accept a living donor kidney due to suffering that would be endured by the donor. It is a unique medical situation when a young, completely healthy donor undergoes a major surgical procedure to provide an organ for transplantation. It is mandatory to offer a surgical technique, which is safe and with minimal complications. It is also obvious for any organ transplantation, that the integrity of the organ remain intact, thus, enabling its successful transplantation into the recipient. An acceptably short ischemia time and adequate lengths of ureter and renal vasculature are favored. Many centers are performing laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy in an effort to ease convalescence of renal donors. This may encourage the consideration of live donation by recipients and potential donors. PMID:16047050

  12. Living-Cell Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Yarmush, Martin L.; King, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Living cells are remarkably complex. To unravel this complexity, living-cell assays have been developed that allow delivery of experimental stimuli and measurement of the resulting cellular responses. High-throughput adaptations of these assays, known as living-cell microarrays, which are based on microtiter plates, high-density spotting, microfabrication, and microfluidics technologies, are being developed for two general applications: (a) to screen large-scale chemical and genomic libraries and (b) to systematically investigate the local cellular microenvironment. These emerging experimental platforms offer exciting opportunities to rapidly identify genetic determinants of disease, to discover modulators of cellular function, and to probe the complex and dynamic relationships between cells and their local environment. PMID:19413510

  13. Living in the question.

    PubMed

    Flower, J

    1999-01-01

    We live in a fast moving-world. Business has accelerated to breathtaking speeds in the 1990s--and in the last few years the afterburner has really kicked in. The speed of change is overwhelming. Especially in health care, who has time to "live in the question?" We need to decide things quickly, get the decision out of the way, and move on, right? Maybe. Biology shows us that you can't plan ahead very far. New things come along that you don't even have a category for, and therefore you don't even see them. Things are going to happen that you literally have no notion are even possible. The key to succeeding in this environment? Don't plan ahead. Stay curious. Make small bets. Build organizational hothouses. Feed the seedlings that grow. The challenge is to remain curious, to live in the question, both personally and organizationally. PMID:10557490

  14. Living My Family's Story

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Meghan L.; Lally, Robin M.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.; Murekeyisoni, Christine; Dickerson, Suzanne S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Based on known or suggested genetic risk factors, a growing number of women now live with knowledge of a potential cancer diagnosis that may never occur. Given this, it is important to understand the meaning of living with high risk for hereditary breast cancer. Objective The objective of the study was to explore how women at high risk for hereditary breast cancer (1) form self-identity, (2) apply self-care strategies toward risk, and (3) describe the meaning of care through a high-risk breast program. Methods Interpretive hermeneutic phenomenology guided the qualitative research method. Women at high risk for hereditary breast cancer were recruited from a high-risk breast program. Open-ended interview questions focused on experiences living as women managing high risk for breast cancer. Consistent with hermeneutic methodology, the principal investigator led a team to analyze the interview transcripts. Results Twenty women participated in in-depth interviews. Analysis revealed that women describe their own identity based on their family story and grieve over actual and potential familial loss. This experience influences self-care strategies, including seeking care from hereditary breast cancer risk experts for early detection and prevention, as well as maintaining a connection for early treatment “when” diagnosis occurs. Conclusions Healthy women living with high risk for hereditary breast cancer are living within the context of their family cancer story, which influences how they define themselves and engage in self-care. Implications for Practice Findings present important practical, research, and policy information regarding health promotion, psychosocial assessment, and support for women living with this risk. PMID:22544165

  15. Intestinal transplantation: living related.

    PubMed

    Pollard, S G

    1997-01-01

    The use of live donors in intestinal transplantation could potentially both reduce the severity of rejection responses against this highly immunogenic organ by better tissue matching and also reduce cold ischaemia times. These two advantages over cadaveric grafts could preserve mucosal integrity and reduce the risk of systemic sepsis from bacterial translocation. The disadvantages of live donation are the inherent risk to the donor and the compromise of using a shorter graft. Although only a handful of such cases have been performed, the success rate has been high and this is a therapeutic modality which should be explored further. PMID:9536535

  16. Cryopreservation of Living Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanasawa, Ichiro; Nagata, Shinichi; Kimura, Naohiro

    Cryopreservation is considered to be the most promising way of preserving living organs or tissues for a long period of time without casuing any damage to their biological functions. However, cryopreservation has been succeeded only for simple and small-size tissues such as spermatozoon, ovum, erythrocyte, bone marrow and cornea. Cryopreservation of more complex and large-scale organs are not yet succssful. The authors have attempted to establish a technique for cryopreservation of larger living organs. An experiment was carried out using daphnia (water flea). The optimum rates of freezing and thawing were determined together with the optimum selection of cryoprotectant. High recovery rate was achieved under these conditions.

  17. Living with Stepparents

    MedlinePlus

    ... doesn't live with you and knows how families work can help figure out how you can all ... also understand how much you still love your mother, even if she died. Families are about love and understanding, not about competing ...

  18. Moab's Living Room

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Grand County Public Library (GCPL) which was awarded the 2007 Best Small Library in America, an award sponsored by "Library Journal" and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Some 4800 of Grand County, Utah's 8,826 people live in Moab and the rest in the adjacent Spanish Valley and environs. The locals are a sizable group…

  19. Living with Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Cystic Fibrosis If you or your child has cystic fibrosis (CF), you should learn as much as you ... about CF Care Centers, go to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's Care Center Network Web page. It's standard ...

  20. You Live, You Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesta, Gert

    2008-01-01

    The Learning Lives project, a four-year study into the learning biographies and trajectories of adults, was conducted by a team of researchers from the universities of Stirling, Exeter, Brighton and Leeds as part of the Teaching and Learning Research Programme (TLRP) of the Economic and Social Research Council, and has just been completed. Whereas…

  1. Living with Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia Deep Vein Thrombosis Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan Overweight and Obesity Send ... Once you've had PE (with or without deep vein thrombosis (DVT)), you're at higher risk of having ...

  2. Learning and Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adults Learning, 2004

    2004-01-01

    "Lifelong learning" is the latest educational mantra. Yet little is understood about the ways in which learning and living are interconnected. To find out more about the complexities of learning in the life course, Professor Gert Biesta, of the University of Exeter, is leading a team of researchers from four universities in the first large-scale…

  3. Loneliness and Living Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stancliffe, Roger J.; Lakin, K. Charlie; Doljanac, Robert; Byun, Soo-Yong; Taub, Sarah; Chiri, Giuseppina

    2007-01-01

    Adults with ID/DD live in increasingly small community settings, where the risk of loneliness may be greater. We examined self-reported loneliness among 1,002 individuals with ID/DD from 5 states in relation to community residence size, personal characteristics, social contact, and social climate. One third reported being lonely sometimes and one…

  4. Teachers Transform Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Delia

    2001-01-01

    Teachers transform lives, and the ripple effect goes on for years. Three pertinent questions are asked in this paper: Where does this power come from? What is its source? and What makes teachers so special? Two aspects of these questions are the multiplicity of identities that coexist within each teacher and the passion inside teachers that…

  5. Live-cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Richard

    2014-01-01

    It would be hard to argue that live-cell imaging has not changed our view of biology. The past 10 years have seen an explosion of interest in imaging cellular processes, down to the molecular level. There are now many advanced techniques being applied to live cell imaging. However, cellular health is often under appreciated. For many researchers, if the cell at the end of the experiment has not gone into apoptosis or is blebbed beyond recognition, than all is well. This is simply incorrect. There are many factors that need to be considered when performing live-cell imaging in order to maintain cellular health such as: imaging modality, media, temperature, humidity, PH, osmolality, and photon dose. The wavelength of illuminating light, and the total photon dose that the cells are exposed to, comprise two of the most important and controllable parameters of live-cell imaging. The lowest photon dose that achieves a measureable metric for the experimental question should be used, not the dose that produces cover photo quality images. This is paramount to ensure that the cellular processes being investigated are in their in vitro state and not shifted to an alternate pathway due to environmental stress. The timing of the mitosis is an ideal canary in the gold mine, in that any stress induced from the imaging will result in the increased length of mitosis, thus providing a control model for the current imagining conditions. PMID:25482523

  6. Design for Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblum, Todd

    2011-01-01

    Bringing a newborn home from the hospital can come with stress for any parent. Coming home with twins can be double the stress. This article shares the story of a couple faced with this situation 12 years ago with the birth of twins, one was born with complications. They lived in a Colonial until the twins were almost five years old, at which time…

  7. Microholography of Living Organisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solem, Johndale C.; Baldwin, George C.

    1982-01-01

    By using intense pulsed coherent x-ray sources it will be possible to obtain magnified three-dimensional images of living elementary biological structures at precisely defined instants. Discussed are sources/geometrics for x-ray holography, x-radiation interactions, factors affecting resolution, recording the hologram, high-intensity holography,…

  8. Family Living Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truitt, Debbie

    This family living supplement contains 125 supplemental ideas and strategies designed to help vocational home economics teachers increase student motivation and enrich the teaching process. Ideas and strategies are organized into seven sections. These are career planning, securing a job, and career success; managing financial resources, buying…

  9. Living with Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips from the Health Care Team Finding Resources Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want ... resources & more. Order Free Materials Today Living with Parkinson’s “Parkinson’s is a part of my life, but ...

  10. The Living Periodic Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahlik, Mary Schrodt

    2005-01-01

    To help make the abstract world of chemistry more concrete eighth-grade students, the author has them create a living periodic table that can be displayed in the classroom or hallway. This display includes information about the elements arranged in the traditional periodic table format, but also includes visual real-world representations of the…

  11. Learning from Live Theater

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Jay P.; Hitt, Collin; Kraybill, Anne; Bogulski, Cari A.

    2015-01-01

    Culturally enriching field trips matter. They produce significant benefits for students on a variety of educational outcomes that schools and communities care about. This experiment on the effects of field trips to see live theater demonstrates that seeing plays is an effective way to teach academic content; increases student tolerance by…

  12. Living or Nonliving?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legaspi, Britt; Straits, William

    2011-01-01

    Categorizing organisms as living or nonliving things may seem to be intuitive by nature. Yet, it is regulated by scientific criteria. Students come to school with rules already in place. Their categorizing criteria have already been influenced by their personal experiences, also known as observations and inferences. They believe that all things…

  13. New Lives of Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The work and lives of teachers have always been subject to external influence as those who are nearing the end of their careers will attest, but it is arguable that what is new over the last two decades is the pace, complexity, and intensity of change as governments have responded to the shrinking world of economic competitiveness and social…

  14. Dementia and Assisted Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Joan; Perez, Rosa; Forester, Brent

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This article presents an overview of what is known about dementia services in assisted living settings and suggests areas for future research. Design and Methods: We undertook a search of Medline, the "Journals of Gerontology," and "The Gerontologist." We then organized publications dealing with the target subject into 10 topic areas and…

  15. Living Systems Energy Module

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-26

    The Living Systems Energy Module, renamed Voyage from the Sun, is a twenty-lesson curriculum designed to introduce students to the major ways in which energy is important in living systems. Voyage from the Sun tells the story of energy, describing its solar origins, how it is incorporated into living terrestrial systems through photosynthesis, how it flows from plants to herbivorous animals, and from herbivores to carnivores. A significant part of the unit is devoted to examining how humans use energy, and how human impact on natural habitats affects ecosystems. As students proceed through the unit, they read chapters of Voyage from the Sun, a comic book that describes the flow of energy in story form (Appendix A). During the course of the unit, an ``Energy Pyramid`` is erected in the classroom. This three-dimensional structure serves as a classroom exhibit, reminding students daily of the importance of energy and of the fragile nature of our living planet. Interactive activities teach students about adaptations that allow plants and animals to acquire, to use and to conserve energy. A complete list of curricular materials and copies of all activity sheets appear in Appendix B.

  16. Happy orang-utans live longer lives

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Alexander; Adams, Mark J.; King, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Nonhuman primate ageing resembles its human counterpart. Moreover, ratings of subjective well-being traits in chimpanzees, orang-utans and rhesus macaques are similar to those of humans: they are intercorrelated, heritable, and phenotypically and genetically related to personality. We examined whether, as in humans, orang-utan subjective well-being was related to longer life. The sample included 184 zoo-housed orang-utans followed up for approximately 7 years. Age, sex, species and number of transfers were available for all subjects and 172 subjects were rated on at least one item of a subjective well-being scale. Of the 31 orang-utans that died, 25 died a mean of 3.4 years after being rated. Even in a model that included, and therefore, statistically adjusted for, sex, age, species and transfers, orang-utans rated as being “happier” lived longer. The risk differential between orang-utans that were one standard deviation above and one standard deviation below baseline in subjective well-being was comparable with approximately 11 years in age. This finding suggests that impressions of the subjective well-being of captive great apes are valid indicators of their welfare and longevity. PMID:21715398

  17. Happy orang-utans live longer lives.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Alexander; Adams, Mark J; King, James E

    2011-12-23

    Nonhuman primate ageing resembles its human counterpart. Moreover, ratings of subjective well-being traits in chimpanzees, orang-utans and rhesus macaques are similar to those of humans: they are intercorrelated, heritable, and phenotypically and genetically related to personality. We examined whether, as in humans, orang-utan subjective well-being was related to longer life. The sample included 184 zoo-housed orang-utans followed up for approximately 7 years. Age, sex, species and number of transfers were available for all subjects and 172 subjects were rated on at least one item of a subjective well-being scale. Of the 31 orang-utans that died, 25 died a mean of 3.4 years after being rated. Even in a model that included, and therefore, statistically adjusted for, sex, age, species and transfers, orang-utans rated as being "happier" lived longer. The risk differential between orang-utans that were one standard deviation above and one standard deviation below baseline in subjective well-being was comparable with approximately 11 years in age. This finding suggests that impressions of the subjective well-being of captive great apes are valid indicators of their welfare and longevity. PMID:21715398

  18. Living history biography

    SciTech Connect

    Puck, T.T.

    1994-11-15

    A living history biography is presented of Theodore T. Puck. This history is intimately involved with the progress towards mapping of the human genome through research at the forefront of molecular cytogenetics. A review of historical research aims such as human genetics studies based on somatic cells, isolation of mutants as genetic markers, complementation analysis, gene mapping and the measurement of mutation is presented. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Live-donor nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Juan P; Davis, Eric; Edye, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Six decades after its first implementation, kidney transplantation remains the optimal therapy for end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis. Despite the incontrovertible mortality reduction and cost-effectiveness of kidney transplantation, the greatest remaining barrier to treatment of end-stage renal disease is organ availability. Although the waiting list of patients who stand to benefit from kidney transplantation grows at a rate proportional to the overall population and proliferation of diabetes and hypertension, the pool of deceased-donor organs available for transplantation experiences minimal to no growth. Because the kidney is uniquely suited as a paired organ, the transplant community's answer to this shortage is living donation of a healthy volunteer's kidney to a recipient with end-stage renal disease. This review details the history and evolution of living-donor kidney transplantation in the United States as well as advances the next decade promises. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy has overcome many of the obstacles to living donation in terms of donor morbidity and volunteerism. Known donor risks in terms of surgical and medical morbidity are reviewed, as well as the ongoing efforts to delineate and mitigate donor risk in the context of accumulating recipient morbidity while on the waiting list. PMID:22678857

  20. Live from the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnick, W. K.; Haines-Stiles, G.; Warburton, J.; Sunwood, K.

    2003-12-01

    For reasons of geography and geophysics, the poles of our planet, the Arctic and Antarctica, are places where climate change appears first: they are global canaries in the mine shaft. But while Antarctica (its penguins and ozone hole, for example) has been relatively well-documented in recent books, TV programs and journalism, the far North has received somewhat less attention. This project builds on and advances what has been done to date to share the people, places, and stories of the North with all Americans through multiple media, over several years. In a collaborative project between the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) and PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, Live from the Arctic will bring the Arctic environment to the public through a series of primetime broadcasts, live and taped programming, interactive virtual field trips, and webcasts. The five-year project will culminate during the 2007-2008 International Polar Year (IPY). Live from the Arctic will: A. Promote global understanding about the value and world -wide significance of the Arctic, B. Bring cutting-edge research to both non-formal and formal education communities, C. Provide opportunities for collaboration between arctic scientists, arctic communities, and the general public. Content will focus on the following four themes. 1. Pan-Arctic Changes and Impacts on Land (i.e. snow cover; permafrost; glaciers; hydrology; species composition, distribution, and abundance; subsistence harvesting) 2. Pan-Arctic Changes and Impacts in the Sea (i.e. salinity, temperature, currents, nutrients, sea ice, marine ecosystems (including people, marine mammals and fisheries) 3. Pan-Arctic Changes and Impacts in the Atmosphere (i.e. precipitation and evaporation; effects on humans and their communities) 4. Global Perspectives (i.e. effects on humans and communities, impacts to rest of the world) In The Earth is Faster Now, a recent collection of comments by members of indigenous arctic peoples, arctic

  1. Living with a Brain Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mentor The ABTA's Online Support Community Understanding The Affordable Care Act Living with a Brain Tumor Understanding Emotions Talking ... Mentor The ABTA's Online Support Community Understanding The Affordable Care Act Living with a Brain Tumor Understanding Emotions Talking ...

  2. Consumer Coalition on Assisted Living

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to content Home Dementia Action Alliance Consumers Caregiving Info Consumer Empowerment Informed Consumer Contact Us Person-Centered Living Person-Centered Living Overview PCL Resources Home- and Community-Based Services Overview ...

  3. Living with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    MedlinePlus

    ... living and employment while others may deal with dating issues and reproductive concerns. Throughout their lives, those ... Overview Outreach Toolkit Government Action Team TS Alliance Online Support Community Facebook Twitter YouTube How to Make ...

  4. Living in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ray (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    In this educational video from the 'Liftoff to Learning' series, astronauts from the STS-56 Mission (Ken Cockrell, Mike Foale, Ellen Ochoa, Steve Oswald, and Ken Cameron) explain and show through demonstrations how microgravity affects the way astronauts live onboard the Space Shuttle, and how these same daily habits or processes differ on Earth. A tour of the Space Shuttle is given, including the sleeping compartments, the kitchen area, the storage compartments, and the Waste Collection System (or WCS, as they call it). Daily habits (brushing teeth, shampooing hair and bathing, eating,...) are explained and actively illustrated, along with reasons of how these applications differ from their employment on Earth.

  5. "Living versus Dead":

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Pratik

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Semple antirabies vaccine was developed by David Semple in India in 1911. Semple introduced a peculiarly British approach within the Pasteurian tradition by using carbolized dead virus. This article studies this unique phase of vaccine research between 1910 and 1935 to show that in the debates and laboratory experiments around the potency and safety of vaccines, categories like "living" and "dead" were often used as ideological and moral denominations. These abstract and ideological debates were crucial in defining the final configuration of the Semple vaccine, the most popular antirabies vaccine used globally, and also in shaping international vaccination policies. PMID:21037397

  6. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Bauman, Robert

    2006-11-14

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  7. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Baumann, Robert

    2003-08-26

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  8. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, R.R.; Baumann, R.

    1999-03-30

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  9. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Baumann, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  10. Living with lightning

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarre, L.

    1994-01-01

    As many as 100 lightning flashes occur around the world each second. Electric utilities know well the impact of lightning in terms of dollars, lost productivity, and lives. EPRI research, which began with a study of lightning`s natural characteristics, has resulted in tools utilities can use to better track and prepare for thunderstorms. Recently the institute completed a series of tests using small rockets to trigger and direct lightning strikes. Now EPRI-sponsored researchers are developing a laser-based technology they believe will be able to guide thunderbolts safely to the ground and ultimately even to discharge thunderclouds.

  11. Microencapsulation Of Living Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium; Kendall, James M.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1989-01-01

    In experimental technique, living cells and other biological materials encapsulated within submillimeter-diameter liquid-filled spheres. Sphere material biocompatible, tough, and compliant. Semipermeable, permitting relatively small molecules to move into and out of sphere core but preventing passage of large molecules. New technique promises to make such spherical capsules at high rates and in uniform, controllable sizes. Capsules injected into patient through ordinary hypodermic needle. Promising application for technique in treatment of diabetes. Also used to encapsulate pituitary cells and thyroid hormone adrenocortical cells for treatment of other hormonal disorders, to encapsulate other secreting cells for transplantation, and to package variety of pharmaceutical products and agricultural chemicals for controlled release.

  12. The worm that lived

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hwei-yen; Maklakov, Alexei A

    2013-01-01

    Organisms age because of the “selection shadow”—the decline of the force of natural selection with age. Seemingly straightforward corollary of this theory is the Medawar-Williams prediction, which maintains that increased extrinsic (non-aging) mortality will result in the evolution of accelerated aging and decreased longevity. Despite its centrality to modern thinking about the ultimate causes of aging, this prediction ignores the fact that mortality is often a non-random process depending on individual condition. Increased condition-dependent mortality inescapably results in increased selection for resistance against the agent of mortality. Provided that resistance to various stressors is commonly associated with increased longevity, the evolutionary outcome is no longer certain. We recently documented this experimentally by showing that populations of Caenorhabditis remanei evolved to live shorter under high extrinsic mortality, but only when mortality was applied haphazardly. On the contrary, when extrinsic mortality was caused by heat-shock, populations experiencing the same rate of increased mortality evolved greater longevities, notwithstanding increased “selection shadow.” Intriguingly, stress-resistant and long-lived worms were also more fecund. We discuss these results in the light of recent theoretical developments, such as condition-environment interactions and hyperfunction theory of aging. PMID:24778930

  13. Living liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuang; Sokolov, Andrey; Lavrentovich, Oleg D; Aranson, Igor S

    2014-01-28

    Collective motion of self-propelled organisms or synthetic particles, often termed "active fluid," has attracted enormous attention in the broad scientific community because of its fundamentally nonequilibrium nature. Energy input and interactions among the moving units and the medium lead to complex dynamics. Here, we introduce a class of active matter--living liquid crystals (LLCs)--that combines living swimming bacteria with a lyotropic liquid crystal. The physical properties of LLCs can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to bacteria, by concentration of ingredients, or by temperature. Our studies reveal a wealth of intriguing dynamic phenomena, caused by the coupling between the activity-triggered flow and long-range orientational order of the medium. Among these are (i) nonlinear trajectories of bacterial motion guided by nonuniform director, (ii) local melting of the liquid crystal caused by the bacteria-produced shear flows, (iii) activity-triggered transition from a nonflowing uniform state into a flowing one-dimensional periodic pattern and its evolution into a turbulent array of topological defects, and (iv) birefringence-enabled visualization of microflow generated by the nanometers-thick bacterial flagella. Unlike their isotropic counterpart, the LLCs show collective dynamic effects at very low volume fraction of bacteria, on the order of 0.2%. Our work suggests an unorthodox design concept to control and manipulate the dynamic behavior of soft active matter and opens the door for potential biosensing and biomedical applications. PMID:24474746

  14. RACE AS LIVED EXPERIENCE

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, John A.; Sanchez, Gabriel R.; Sanchez-Youngman, Shannon; Vargas, Edward D.; Ybarra, Vickie D.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of social science research has sought to conceptualize race as a multidimensional concept in which context, societal relations, and institutional dynamics are key components. Utilizing a specially designed survey, we develop and use multiple measures of race (skin color, ascribed race, and discrimination experiences) to capture race as “lived experience” and assess their impact on Latinos’ self-rated health status. We model these measures of race as a lived experience to test the explanatory power of race, both independently and as an integrated scale with categorical regression, scaling, and dimensional analyses. Our analyses show that our multiple measures of race have significant and negative effects on Latinos’ self-reported health. Skin color is a dominant factor that impacts self-reported health both directly and indirectly. We then advocate for the utilization of multiple measures of race, adding to those used in our analysis, and their application to other health and social outcomes. Our analysis provides important contributions across a wide range of health, illness, social, and political outcomes for communities of color. PMID:26681972

  15. Living liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuang; Sokolov, Andrey; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2014-01-01

    Collective motion of self-propelled organisms or synthetic particles, often termed “active fluid,” has attracted enormous attention in the broad scientific community because of its fundamentally nonequilibrium nature. Energy input and interactions among the moving units and the medium lead to complex dynamics. Here, we introduce a class of active matter––living liquid crystals (LLCs)––that combines living swimming bacteria with a lyotropic liquid crystal. The physical properties of LLCs can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to bacteria, by concentration of ingredients, or by temperature. Our studies reveal a wealth of intriguing dynamic phenomena, caused by the coupling between the activity-triggered flow and long-range orientational order of the medium. Among these are (i) nonlinear trajectories of bacterial motion guided by nonuniform director, (ii) local melting of the liquid crystal caused by the bacteria-produced shear flows, (iii) activity-triggered transition from a nonflowing uniform state into a flowing one-dimensional periodic pattern and its evolution into a turbulent array of topological defects, and (iv) birefringence-enabled visualization of microflow generated by the nanometers-thick bacterial flagella. Unlike their isotropic counterpart, the LLCs show collective dynamic effects at very low volume fraction of bacteria, on the order of 0.2%. Our work suggests an unorthodox design concept to control and manipulate the dynamic behavior of soft active matter and opens the door for potential biosensing and biomedical applications. PMID:24474746

  16. A Transgenic Mouse Model of Poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Koike, Satoshi; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice (tg mice) that express the human poliovirus receptor (PVR), CD155, are susceptible to poliovirus and develop a neurological disease that resembles human poliomyelitis. Assessment of the neurovirulence levels of poliovirus strains, including mutant viruses produced by reverse genetics, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus, and vaccine candidates, is useful for basic research of poliovirus pathogenicity, the surveillance of circulating polioviruses, and the quality control of oral live poliovirus vaccines, and does not require the use of monkeys. Furthermore, PVR-tg mice are useful for studying poliovirus tissue tropism and host immune responses. PVR-tg mice can be bred with mice deficient in the genes involved in viral pathogenicity. This report describes the methods used to analyze the pathogenicity and immune responses of poliovirus using the PVR-tg mouse model. PMID:26983733

  17. Women's lives, mothers' health.

    PubMed

    Chauliac, M; Masse-raimbault, A M

    1985-01-01

    This document dealing with women's lives and the health of mothers identifies factors conditioning the health and nutritional status of women and girls (life expectancy at birth, maternal mortality rate, and the birthrate); considers nutritional requirements of pregnant and lactating women, weight gain during preganncy, mothers' age and number of children and interbirth interval, maternal nutritional status and breastfeeding, anemia, work and women's health, pregnancy in adolescents, abortion, the growth of small girls and its effect on future pregnancies, and sexual mutilations; and reports on actions aimed at improving the health of women as well as health problems facing rural women. The 3 key concepts of this reflection on women's lives are: women's health should be taken into account as well as children's health; the development of the whole human being should be respected, implying ongoing surveillance of the health status of women and of their children; and the overall living conditions of women within the family and society must be analyzed at the different phases of their life, so as to encourage integrated actions rather than various uncoordinated efforts. Women's health status, like the health status of everyone, depends on a multitude of socioeconomic and sanitational factors. A figure illustrates several of the many interrelations between the various factors which influence the nutritional status of all individuals. Women of childbearing age are at greater risk than other population groups, due to their reproductive function and their ability to nurse children: pregnancy, like lactation, generates metabolic changes and increases nutritional needs. Delivery itself presents a series of risks for the woman's health, and only regular surveillance of pregnancy may prevent many of these. A woman's health status and, most of all her nutritional status during pregnancy and delivery, condition her future health and ability to assume her many tasks as well as

  18. Live From the Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, C. A.; Kent, J.; Lippsett, L.

    2006-12-01

    International Polar Year presents an extraordinary opportunity to educate students and the public about science at the icy ends of the Earth. The goal of our proposal is to apply collaborative multimedia approaches to bring the story of four polar research expeditions to the general public and the classroom. The four expeditions (measurement of ice sheet dynamics in Greenland, a study of the McMurdo ecosystem over austral winter, installation of a buoy array in the Beaufort Gyre, and exploration of the Gakkel Ridge) were chosen based on their broad range of disciplines and relevance to the three primary IPY research emphasis areas defined by NSF. A science writer and a professional photographer will join each expedition and file dispatches for a daily Webcast. The posting will feature science updates, logistical challenges, team member profiles, and life at sea (or on the ice). The writer will also coordinate real-time phone patches from PIs in the field to audiences at the Museum of Science, Boston, the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, The Field Museum, Chicago, the Houston Museum of Natural Science, the Birch Aquarium, San Diego, the Pacific Science Center, Seattle, National Public Radio "Talk of the Nation: Science Friday," CBS News, and to student "reporters" writing for Scholastic Online. At the museums, the "Live from the Ice" interactive phone calls will be preceded by a background presentation by a scientist, who will also moderate the live discussion between the public and researchers in the field. A 20-30 minute satellite phone call will allow the public to ask the researchers questions about their research while it's happening. In addition to building and promoting an online experience, a museum exhibit featuring models of Arctic instruments and informative kiosks will be developed at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Exhibit Center. Each of our partner museums will also provide a "leave-behind" component to continue to educate

  19. Freezing of living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.

    1985-01-01

    It can be calculated that a living cell will survive more than 5000 years at -196/sup 0/C. This ability to essentially stop biological time has important implications in medicine and agriculture, and in biological research. In medicine the chief implications are in the banking of transplantable tissues and organs and in in vitro fertilization. In agriculture the applications stem in part from the role of frozen embryos in amplifying the number of calves produced by high quanlity cows. The problem is how can cells survive both the cooling to such very low temperatures and the return to normal temperatures. The answers involve fundamental characteristics of cells such as the permeability of their surface membranes to water and solutes. These characteristics determine whether or not cells undergo lethal internal ice formation and other response during freezing and thawing. 27 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Living on the edge.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, D

    1989-01-01

    A brief update on the destruction of the environment is given. The concern is for the coastal waters and rivers which are polluted daily by raw sewage, industrial waste, and sedimentation, e.g., the Juru in Malaysia, the Pasig in the Philippines, and the Chao Phraya in Thailand are open sewers by the time the rivers reach the sea or bay. Metropolitan Manila's river is said to be biologically dead from pollution, and the bays of Manila and Jakarta suffer from oxygen depletion. Unfortunately, the coastal area maintains population as well as the wealth of marine life. In the US in 1990, 75% of the population will live within 50 miles of a shore including the Great Lakes. 30 southeast Asia's 50 largest cities are located on or near a coast. Over fishing, over population, over developing, and over exploitation are unacceptable; the alternative is for man to correct his mistakes. PMID:12285899

  1. Living with uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, N.; Fong, C.C.; Grigg, C.H.; Silverstein, B.

    1994-11-01

    In the electric utility industry, only one thing can be guaranteed with absolute certainty: one lives and works with many unknowns. Thus, the industry has embraced probability methods to varying degrees over the last 25 years. These techniques aid decision makers in planning, operations, and maintenance by quantifying uncertainty. Examples include power system reliability, production costing simulation, and assessment of environmental factors. A series of brainstorming sessions was conducted by the Application of Probability Methods (APM) Subcommittee of the IEEE Power Engineering Society to identify research and development needs and to ask the question, ''where should we go from here '' The subcommittee examined areas of need in data development, applications, and methods for decision making. The purpose of this article is to share the thoughts of APM members with a broader audience to the findings and to invite comments and participation.

  2. Living With Semantic Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Karen; Wilkinson, Ray; Keady, John

    2014-01-01

    Semantic dementia is a variant of frontotemporal dementia and is a recently recognized diagnostic condition. There has been some research quantitatively examining care partner stress and burden in frontotemporal dementia. There are, however, few studies exploring the subjective experiences of family members caring for those with frontotemporal dementia. Increased knowledge of such experiences would allow service providers to tailor intervention, support, and information better. We used a case study design, with thematic narrative analysis applied to interview data, to describe the experiences of a wife and son caring for a husband/father with semantic dementia. Using this approach, we identified four themes: (a) living with routines, (b) policing and protecting, (c) making connections, and (d) being adaptive and flexible. Each of these themes were shared and extended, with the importance of routines in everyday life highlighted. The implications for policy, practice, and research are discussed. PMID:24532121

  3. [Short-lived disorders].

    PubMed

    Artigas-Pallares, Josep

    2012-02-29

    Over the years, most of the mental disorders that are dealt with in everyday clinical practice have changed not only their names but also their conceptualisation. Furthermore, as some disorders disappear or are forgotten, others come into being. Seen from a historical perspective and unlike many of the diseases included within classical medicine, it can be stated that one of the basic characteristics of mental disorders is their short-lived presence in the scientific literature. In this study we analyse the causes underlying the transitory nature of mental disorders. The disappearance of a disorder or the modification of how it is conceptualised may be linked to several different motives. Sometimes they may be due to an evolution of the construct, as a result of new findings. On other occasions the disorder falls into disuse owing to the weakness of the theoretical construct or the clinical research upholding it. Lastly, because the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and the International Classification of Diseases require updates that incorporate new contributions and correct faults in the current model, they give rise to new denominations and definitions in mental disorders. This article analyses these three situations and offers an illustrative example in each case. PMID:22374762

  4. Lives Worth Living: Religious Education and Social Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayres, Jennifer R.

    2013-01-01

    When people of faith participate in movements for social change, how are their religious and moral identities formed, challenged, and transformed? Although they have explicit and tangible goals as they participate in advocacy, protest, and boycotts, religious social activists also, James Jasper argues, craft "lives worth living" (1997).…

  5. Probiotics: "living drugs".

    PubMed

    Elmer, G W

    2001-06-15

    The uses, mechanisms of action, and safety of probiotics are discussed. Probiotics are live microorganisms or microbial mixtures administered to improve the patient's microbial balance, particularly the environment of the gastrointestinal tract and the vagina. The yeast Saccharomyces boulardii and the bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus, strain GG, have shown efficacy in clinical trials for the prevention of antimicrobial-associated diarrhea. Other probiotics that have demonstrated at least some promise as prophylaxis for this type of diarrhea are Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium longum, and Enterococcus faecium. The use of S. boulardii as an adjunctive treatment to therapy with metronidazole or vancomycin has been found in controlled studies to decrease further recurrences of Clostridium difficile-associated disease. Other gastrointestinal disorders for which probiotics have been studied include traveler's diarrhea, acute infantile diarrhea, and acute diarrhea in adults. Several Lactobacillus species given in yogurt or in tablet or suppository form have shown clinical efficacy as a treatment for vaginal infections. Lactobacillus strains have also been examined as a treatment for urinary-tract infections. Putative mechanisms of action of probiotics include production of pathogen-inhibitory substances, inhibition of pathogen attachment, inhibition of the action of microbial toxins, stimulation of immunoglobulin A, and trophic effects on intestinal mucosa. The available probiotics are considered nonpathogenic, but even benign microorganisms can be infective when a patient is severely debilitated or immunosuppressed. Probiotics have demonstrated an ability to prevent and treat some infections. Effective use of probiotics could decrease patients' exposure to antimicrobials. Additional controlled studies are needed to clearly define the safety and efficacy of these agents. PMID:11449853

  6. The living publication

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2012-06-04

    Within the ICSTI Insights Series we offer three articles on the 'living publication' that is already available to practitioners in the important field of crystal structure determination and analysis. While the specific examples are drawn from this particular field, we invite readers to draw parallels in their own fields of interest. The first article describes the present state of the crystallographic living publication, already recognized by an ALPSP (Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers) Award for Publishing Innovation in 2006. The second article describes the potential impact on the record of science as greater post-publication analysis becomes more common within currently accepted data deposition practices, using processed diffraction data as the starting point. The third article outlines a vision for the further improvement of crystallographic structure reports within potentially achievable enhanced data deposition practices, based upon raw (unprocessed) diffraction data. The IUCr in its Commissions and Journals has for many years emphasized the importance of publications being accompanied by data and the interpretation of the data in terms of atomic models. This has been followed as policy by numerous other journals in the field and its cognate disciplines. This practice has been well served by databases and archiving institutions such as the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), and the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD). Normally the models that are archived are interpretations of the data, consisting of atomic coordinates with their displacement parameters, along with processed diffraction data from X-ray, neutron or electron diffraction studies. In our current online age, a reader can not only consult the printed word, but can display and explore the results with molecular graphics software of exceptional quality. Furthermore, the routine availability of processed diffraction data allows

  7. Living positively as HIV positive.

    PubMed

    Garraty, Sarah J

    2011-01-01

    A nursing student records a brief biography of a Zambian nurse and certified midwife living with HIV/AIDS while shadowing the nurse during an undergraduate cross-cultural course in Macha, Zambia in January 2009. The nurse strives to live positively, educating, encouraging, and empowering others. PMID:21294466

  8. Community Living Skills Guide: Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Kathy

    One of twenty course guides in the Community Living Skills Guide for the College for Living series, this document provides guidelines and workbook activities for the course, Sexuality. The series of courses for developmentally disabled adults is intended to supplement residential programs and to aid in orienting institutionalized persons to…

  9. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Disease » Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Explore Diabetic Heart Disease What Is... Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Cardiomyopathy Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Heart Failure Send ...

  10. Community Living Skills: Nutrition I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreps, Alice Roelofs; Dreith, Rita Vallero

    One of twenty course guides in the Community Living Skills Guide for the College for Living series, this document provides guidelines and workbook activities for the course, Nutrition I. The series of courses for developmentally disabled adults is intended to supplement residential programs and to aid in orienting institutionalized persons to…

  11. Learning Lives and Alumni Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Andrea; Leach, Camilla; Spencer, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Changes in governmental financial support are causing many would-be students to question the value of higher education or to consider attending a local university. Oral history testimonies provide a source for understanding the role that living, as well as working, within an academic community plays in the learning lives of its alumni. An…

  12. Engineering Knowledge for Assistive Living

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liming; Nugent, Chris

    This paper introduces a knowledge based approach to assistive living in smart homes. It proposes a system architecture that makes use of knowledge in the lifecycle of assistive living. The paper describes ontology based knowledge engineering practices and discusses mechanisms for exploiting knowledge for activity recognition and assistance. It presents system implementation and experiments, and discusses initial results.

  13. Community Living Skills Guide: Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobol, Sheila; Kreps, Alice Roelofs

    One of twenty course guides in the Community Living Skills Guide for the College for Living series, this document provides guidelines and workbook activities for the course, Art. The series of courses for developmentally disabled adults is intended to supplement residential programs and to aid in orienting institutionalized persons to eventual…

  14. 78 FR 35625 - Sabine Pass Liquefaction Expansion, LLC; Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Sabine Pass LNG, L.P...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ...-000, CP04-39-000, CP04- 40-000, CP05-396-000, CP04-47-001, CP-05-396-001, CP11-72-000, and CP13-02-000... toll free at (866) 208-3676, or for TTY, contact (202) 502-8659. The eLibrary link also provides access.... In addition, the Commission now offers a free service called eSubscription which allows you to...

  15. Living Donor Kidney Transplant Surgery

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... more than 100 caregiving sites, including seven acute care hospitals, four advanced imaging centers, seven nursing homes, ... screen and open the door to informed medical care. “OR-Live,” the vision of improving health. Good ...

  16. Living with Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Deep Vein Thrombosis NHLBI Resources Pulmonary Embolism (Health Topics) Non-NHLBI Resources Deep Vein Thrombosis (MedlinePlus) Pulmonary Embolism (MedlinePlus) Clinical Trials ...

  17. Living with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Support Living with IPF may cause fear, anxiety, depression, and stress. Talk about how you feel ... and friends also can help relieve stress and anxiety. Let your loved ones know how you feel ...

  18. Living With Thrombocythemia or Thrombocytosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Stroke Von Willebrand Disease Send a link ...

  19. Living with Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Carotid Artery Disease If you have carotid artery disease, you can take steps to manage the ... treatment plan, and getting ongoing care. Having carotid artery disease raises your risk of having a stroke . ...

  20. The fibers of our lives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Presentation will include information and discussion of plants and how they are important to our lives for food, fiber, and oxygen. The “Learn-By-Doing” project will involve each student making their own sheet of paper....

  1. Complete lives in the balance.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, Samuel J; Bognar, Greg

    2010-04-01

    The allocation of scarce health care resources such as flu treatment or organs for transplant presents stark problems of distributive justice. Persad, Wertheimer, and Emanuel have recently proposed a novel system for such allocation. Their "complete lives system" incorporates several principles, including ones that prescribe saving the most lives, preserving the most life-years, and giving priority to persons between 15 and 40 years old. This paper argues that the system lacks adequate moral foundations. Persad and colleagues' defense of giving priority to those between 15 and 40 leaves them open to the charge that they discriminate unfairly against children. Second, the paper contends that the complete lives system fails to provide meaningful practical guidance in central cases, since it contains no method for balancing its principles when they conflict. Finally, the paper proposes a new method for balancing principles of saving the most lives and maximizing life-years. PMID:20379920

  2. Content in Family Living Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagby, Beatrice H.

    1976-01-01

    Generalizations or principles which can be taught in a high school course on family living are presented for the following areas: personal development, interpersonal relationships, marriage, parent/child relationships, and family relationships. (EC)

  3. Choosing a Senior Living Community

    MedlinePlus

    ... choosing an assisted Living communities for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia, often referred to as Special ... loved one, such as in the case of Alzheimer's disease or dementia, the burden of responsibility can seem ...

  4. Technology for Independent Living: Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enders, Alexandra, Ed.

    This sourcebook provides information for the practical implementation of independent living technology in the everyday rehabilitation process. "Information Services and Resources" lists databases, clearinghouses, networks, research and development programs, toll-free telephone numbers, consumer protection caveats, selected publications, and…

  5. Being a Living Donor: Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgical risks and long term complications: Long-Term Organ Specific Donor Complications Kidney Hypertension Kidney failure Proteinuria Lung Intra- ... Vancouver Forum on the care of the live organ donor: lung, liver, pancreas, and intestine data and medical ...

  6. Molecular characterization of mouse-virulent poliovirus type 1 Mahoney mutants: involvement of residues of polypeptides VP1 and VP2 located on the inner surface of the capsid protein shell.

    PubMed Central

    Couderc, T; Hogle, J; Le Blay, H; Horaud, F; Blondel, B

    1993-01-01

    Most poliovirus (PV) strains, including PV PV-1/Mahoney, are unable to cause paralysis in mice. Determinants for restriction of PV-1/Mahoney in mice have been identified by manipulating PV-1 cDNA and located on the viral capsid protein VP1. These determinants consist of a highly exposed amino acid sequence on the capsid surface corresponding to the B-C loop (M. Murray, J. Bradley, X. Yang, E. Wimmer, E. Moss, and V. Racaniello, Science 241:213-215, 1988; A. Martin, C. Wychowski, T. Couderc, R. Crainic, J. Hogle, and M. Girard, EMBO J. 7:2839-2847, 1988) and of residues belonging to the N-terminal sequence located on the inner surface of the protein shell (E. Moss and V. Racaniello, EMBO J. 10:1067-1074, 1991). Using an in vivo approach, we isolated two mouse-neurovirulent PV-1 mutants in the mouse central nervous system after a single passage of PV-1/Mahoney inoculated by the intracerebral route. Both mutants were subjected to two additional passages in mice, plaque purified, and subsequently characterized. The two cloned mutants, Mah-NK13 and Mah-NL32, retained phenotypic characteristics of the parental PV-1/Mahoney, including epitope map, heat lability, and temperature sensitivity. Mah-NK13 exhibited slightly smaller plaques than did the parental virus. The nucleotide sequences of the mutant genomes were determined, and mutations were identified. Mutations were independently introduced into the parental PV-1/Mahoney genome by single-site mutagenesis. Mutated PV-1/Mahoney viruses were then tested for their neurovirulence in mice. A single amino acid substitution in the capsid proteins VP1 (Thr-22-->Ile) and VP2 (Ser-31-->Thr) identified in the Mah-NK13 and Mah-NL32 genomes, respectively, conferred the mouse-virulent phenotype to the mouse-avirulent PV-1/Mahoney. Ile-22 in VP1 was responsible for the small-plaque phenotype of Mah-NK13. Both mutations arose during the first passage in the mouse central nervous system. We thus identified a new mouse adaptation

  7. Sabine, Sir Edward (1788-1883)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Physicist, astronomer, soldier and explorer, born in Dublin. He was the astronomer on two expeditions to the Arctic regions. He carried out experiments with pendulum clocks to measure the force of gravity at Spitzbergen and in Africa, in order to determine the shape of the Earth and studied terrestrial magnetism. Inspired by the work of HEINRICH SCHWABE on the 11 year cycle of sunspots, as report...

  8. [Passive euthanasia and living will].

    PubMed

    Julesz, Máté

    2014-07-01

    This article deals with the intentional distinction between murder of first degree and passive euthanasia. In Hungary, active euthanasia is considered to be a murder of first degree, whilst the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg and Switzerland have legalized the active form of mercy killing in Europe. The palliative terminal care, when e.g. giving pain-killer morphine to the patient, might result in decreasing the patient's life-span, and thus causing indirect euthanasia. However, the legal institution of living will exists in several counter-euthanasia countries. The living will allows future patients to express their decision in advance to refuse a life-sustaining treatment, e.g. in case of irreversible coma. The institution of living will exists in Germany and in Hungary too. Nevertheless, the formal criteria of living will make it hardly applicable. The patient ought to express his/her will before a notary public in advance, and he/she should hand it over when being hospitalized. If the patient is not able to present his/her living will to his/her doctor in the hospital, then his/her only hope remains that he/she has given a copy of the living will to the family doctor previously, and the family doctor will notify the hospital. PMID:24974840

  9. Recoding of the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus L Gene by Computer-Aided Design Provides a Live, Attenuated Vaccine Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bingyin; Yang, Chen; Tekes, Gergely; Mueller, Steffen; Paul, Aniko; Whelan, Sean P. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Codon pair bias (CPB), which has been observed in all organisms, is a neglected genomic phenomenon that affects gene expression. CPB results from synonymous codons that are paired more or less frequently in ORFeomes regardless of codon bias. The effect of an individual codon pair change is usually small, but when it is amplified by large-scale genome recoding, strikingly altered biological phenotypes are observed. The utility of codon pair bias in the development of live attenuated vaccines was recently demonstrated by recodings of poliovirus (a positive-strand RNA virus) and influenza virus (a negative-strand segmented RNA virus). Here, the L gene of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a nonsegmented negative-sense RNA virus, was partially recoded based on codon pair bias. Totals of 858 and 623 silent mutations were introduced into a 5′-terminal segment of the viral L gene (designated L1) to create sequences containing either overrepresented or underrepresented codon pairs, designated L1sdmax and L1min, respectively. Analysis revealed that recombinant VSV containing the L1min sequence could not be recovered, whereas the virus with the sdmax sequence showed a modest level of attenuation in cell culture. More strikingly, in mice the L1sdmax virus was almost as immunogenic as the parental strain but highly attenuated. Taken together, these results open a new road to attain a balance between VSV virulence and immunogenicity, which could serve as an example for the attenuation of other negative-strand, nonsegmented RNA viruses. PMID:25827413

  10. Viral Aetiology of Acute Flaccid Paralysis Surveillance Cases, before and after Vaccine Policy Change from Oral Polio Vaccine to Inactivated Polio Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Saraswathy Subramaniam, T. S.; Apandi, Mohd Apandi; Jahis, Rohani; Samsudin, Mohd Samsul; Saat, Zainah

    2014-01-01

    Since 1992, surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases was introduced in Malaysia along with the establishment of the National Poliovirus Laboratory at the Institute for Medical Research. In 2008, the Ministry of Health, Malaysia, approved a vaccine policy change from oral polio vaccine to inactivated polio vaccine (IPV). Eight states started using IPV in the Expanded Immunization Programme, followed by the remaining states in January 2010. The objective of this study was to determine the viral aetiology of AFP cases below 15 years of age, before and after vaccine policy change from oral polio vaccine to inactivated polio vaccine. One hundred and seventy-nine enteroviruses were isolated from the 3394 stool specimens investigated between 1992 and December 2012. Fifty-six out of 107 virus isolates were polioviruses and the remaining were non-polio enteroviruses. Since 2009 after the sequential introduction of IPV in the childhood immunization programme, no Sabin polioviruses were isolated from AFP cases. In 2012, the laboratory AFP surveillance was supplemented with environmental surveillance with sewage sampling. Thirteen Sabin polioviruses were also isolated from sewage in the same year, but no vaccine-derived poliovirus was detected during this period. PMID:24772175

  11. Live imaging of the lung.

    PubMed

    Looney, Mark R; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-01-01

    Live lung imaging has spanned the discovery of capillaries in the frog lung by Malpighi to the current use of single and multiphoton imaging of intravital and isolated perfused lung preparations incorporating fluorescent molecular probes and transgenic reporter mice. Along the way, much has been learned about the unique microcirculation of the lung, including immune cell migration and the mechanisms by which cells at the alveolar-capillary interface communicate with each other. In this review, we highlight live lung imaging techniques as applied to the role of mitochondria in lung immunity, mechanisms of signal transduction in lung compartments, studies on the composition of alveolar wall liquid, and neutrophil and platelet trafficking in the lung under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. New applications of live lung imaging and the limitations of current techniques are discussed. PMID:24245941

  12. How to increase living donation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Connie L

    2011-04-01

    Living donation is the key to increasing access to successful solid organ transplantation worldwide. However, the means to expanding the number of living donors on a global scale are not known. Although there have been many suggestions for the best approach, cultural issues may limit the effectiveness of some strategies. Only a few ideas have been studied, and one in particular- outright payment to donors - may raise ethical issues that are difficult to surmount and might negatively alter altruistic behavior. With respect to the present environment, this article will describe some of the approaches that are being discussed to increase the number of living donors, with a particular focus on kidney transplantation. PMID:21210867

  13. Information use in colonial living.

    PubMed

    Evans, Julian C; Votier, Stephen C; Dall, Sasha R X

    2016-08-01

    Despite the fact that many animals live in groups, there is still no clear consensus about the ecological or evolutionary mechanisms underlying colonial living. Recently, research has suggested that colonies may be important as sources of social information. The ready availability of information from conspecifics allows animals to make better decisions about avoiding predators, reducing brood parasitism, migratory phenology, mate choice, habitat choice and foraging. These choices can play a large part in the development and maintenance of colonies. Here we review the types of information provided by colonial animals and examine the different ways in which decision-making in colonies can be enhanced by social information. We discuss what roles information might take in the evolution, formation and maintenance of colonies. In the process, we illustrate that information use permeates all aspects of colonial living. PMID:25882618

  14. Live Imaging of the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Looney, Mark R.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2015-01-01

    Live lung imaging has spanned the discovery of capillaries in the frog lung by Malpighi to the current use of single and multiphoton imaging of intravital and isolated perfused lung preparations incorporating fluorescent molecular probes and transgenic reporter mice. Along the way, much has been learned about the unique microcirculation of the lung, including immune cell migration and the mechanisms by which cells at the alveolar-capillary interface communicate with each other. In this review, we highlight live lung imaging techniques as applied to the role of mitochondria in lung immunity, mechanisms of signal transduction in lung compartments, studies on the composition of alveolar wall liquid, and neutrophil and platelet trafficking in the lung under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. New applications of live lung imaging and the limitations of current techniques are discussed. PMID:24245941

  15. RAPID COMMUNICATION-- POLIO VACCINE COVERAGE IN THE ACUTE FLACCID PARALYSIS (AFP) CASES IN ROMANIA.

    PubMed

    Băicuş, Anda

    2015-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV), a member of the Enterovirus genus, is the etiological agent of poliomyelitis. A study carried out between 2013-2014 on 30 serum samples from acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases, showed a protective antibody level of 90% against poliovirus Sabin strains type 1 and type 2 and of 88% against type 3. No PV strains were isolated from 2009 to 2015 in Romania. Maintaining a high vaccine coverage level against polio is mandatory until global polio eradication, especially as the risk of polio importation remains elevated in Romania. PMID:26727855

  16. Passive Immunization Against Poliomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldo, Charles R.

    2005-01-01

    Poliomyelitis has gone from being one of the worst scourges of the 20th century to nearing eradication in the 21st. This success is well known to be attributable to the Salk inactivated and Sabin attenuated poliovirus vaccines. However, before introduction of these vaccines, William McDowall Hammon of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health led the first major breakthrough in prevention of the disease by using passive immunization in one of the earliest double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials. This study provided the first evidence that antibodies to poliovirus could prevent the disease in humans. PMID:15855454

  17. Vaccine associated paralytic poliomyelitis cases from children presenting with acute flaccid paralysis in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nanteza, Mary B; Kisakye, Annet; Ota, Martin O; Gumede, Nicksy; Bwogi, Josephine

    2015-12-01

    A retrospective study to identify VAPP cases from the entire Uganda was conducted between January 2003 and December 2011. Eleven of the 106 AFP cases were VAPPs. The VAPP rate ranged from 0 to 3.39 cases per 1,000,000 birth cohorts and the peak was in 2009 when there was scaling up of OPV immunization activities following an importation of wild poliovirus in the country. All the subsequent polio suspect cases since then have been vaccine-associated polio cases. Our data support the strategy to withdraw OPV and introduce IPV progressively in order to mitigate against the paralysis arising from Sabin polioviruses. PMID:26058454

  18. Shakespeare Live! and Character Counts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookshire, Cathy A.

    This paper discusses a live production of Shakespeare's "Macbeth" (in full costume but with no sets) for all public middle school and high school students in Harrisonburg and Rockingham, Virginia. The paper states that the "Character Counts" issues that are covered in the play are: decision making, responsibility and citizenship, trustworthiness,…

  19. Senior to Senior: Living Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    Senior to Senior: Living Lessons is a program created to provide meaningful horticulture therapy activities for community minority elders (60 years of age and older) and senior college students (20 years of age and older) from an Historically Black University. The program's objectives were to promote positive intergenerational relationships and to…

  20. Living History: Clark M. Blatteis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quan, Ning

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the American Physiological Society (APS) initiated the Living History Project to recognize senior members who have made extraordinary contributions during their career to the advancement of the discipline and profession of physiology. During 2007, the APS Section of Environmental and Exercise Physiology selected Clark M. Blatteis to be…

  1. Living History: Elsworth R. Buskirk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the American Physiological Society (APS) initiated the Living History of Physiology Archival Program to recognize senior members who have made significant contributions during their career to the advancement of the discipline and the profession of physiology. Subsequently, the leadership of the APS Section of Environmental and Exercise…

  2. Assisted Living Services and Amenities

    MedlinePlus

    ... good Alzheimer’s care. Safety and Security Peace of mind drives many decisions to seek senior housing for yourself or a loved one. Having a secure building where you know you or your loved one is protected from wandering or emergencies is very important. Senior living residences ...

  3. College for Living Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templin, Robert G., Jr.; And Others

    This five-part manual was designed to help volunteer instructors in Northern Virginia Community College's College for Living Program to conduct survival and socialization courses for handicapped adults. After introductory material summarizing general principles and specific suggestions, Robert Templin provides information on the skills and…

  4. Finding a Place to Live.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Provides background information and student activities on bird habitats, how birds have adapted to living in these habitats, and bird migration. Each activity includes an objective, recommended age level(s), subject area(s), list of materials needed, and procedures. Ready-to-copy student materials (puzzles and worksheets) are included. (JN)

  5. Living Assessment Passes the Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suskind, Dorothy C.

    2015-01-01

    The author, a 5th-grade teacher at an independent boys' school, gives a first-person account of how her constant assessments and requirement that her students be active participants in their own learning gainsays the need for high-stakes, standardized testing. She posits a "living assessment" that is intertwined, interactive and…

  6. Living History: F. Eugene Yates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urquhart, John

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the American Physiological Society (APS) initiated the Living History of Physiology Archival Program to recognize senior members who have made significant contributions during their career to the advancement of the discipline and the profession of physiology. During 2008, the APS Cardiovascular Section selected Francis Eugene Yates to be…

  7. Teen Living. 7015. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education Services.

    This curriculum guide was developed as a resource for teachers to use in planning and implementing a competency-based instructional program on teenage living at the high school level. It contains materials for a 2-semester consumer home economics course, based on the North Carolina Program of Studies (revised 1992); it is designed to help students…

  8. Investigating Evolution with Living Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlessman, Mark A.

    1997-01-01

    Describes two investigative labs that use live plants to illustrate important biological principles, include quantitative analysis, and require very little equipment. Each lab is adaptable to a variety of class sizes, course contents, and student backgrounds. Topics include the evolution of flower size in Mimulus and pollination of Brassicas. (DDR)

  9. Supramolecular polymerization: Living it up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Würthner, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Protein fibril formation is involved in many human diseases and thus has been mechanistically elucidated in the context of understanding -- and in turn treating -- them. This biological phenomenon has now also inspired the design of a supramolecular system that undergoes living polymerization.

  10. Men's Role and Men's Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, James B.

    1978-01-01

    The growing literature on men is clearly a response to the cultural ferment generated by feminism. However, as in the discussion of women's lives since the first advent of feminism, centuries of assumptions do not give way readily to appropriate scientific skepticism. (Author/MC)

  11. Living with High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With High Blood Pressure If you have high blood pressure, the best thing to do is to talk ... help you track your blood pressure. Pregnancy Planning High blood pressure can cause problems for mother and baby. High ...

  12. Living kidney donors and ESRD.

    PubMed

    Ross, Lainie Friedman

    2015-07-01

    There are more than 325 living kidney donors who have developed end-stage renal disease and have been listed on the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN)/United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) deceased donor kidney wait list. The OPTN/UNOS database records where these kidney donors are listed and, if they donated after April 1994, where that donation occurred. These 2 locations are often not the same. In this commentary, I examine whether a national living donor registry should be created and whether transplantation centers should be notified when one of their living kidney donors develops end-stage renal disease. I consider and refute 5 potential objections to center notification. I explain that transplantation centers should look back at these cases and input data into a registry to attempt to identify patterns that could improve donor evaluation protocols. Creating a registry and mining the information it contains is, in my view, our moral and professional responsibility to future patients and the transplantation endeavor. As individuals and as a community, we need to acknowledge the many unknown risks of living kidney donation and take responsibility for identifying these risks. We then must share information about these risks, educate prospective donors about them, and attempt to minimize them. PMID:25936672

  13. The Living Library of NCTE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleman, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author offers an appreciation of the writers and their books that have shaped her teaching and thinking. Her face-to-face encounters with these books prompted her to question her own beliefs about literacy, about authority, about language, about writing, about literature. She was surrounded by the living animations of the…

  14. Learn & Live: Imagine the Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargent, Mark

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the George Lucas Educational Foundation (GLEF), which was founded to explore how computers, telecommunications, and multimedia technologies can be used to help revitalize education. Describes their documentary film, "Learn and Live," that shows how innovative teaching combined with effective uses of technology is creating dynamic public…

  15. Instructional Materials in Independent Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bradley C.; Fry, Ronald R.

    This annotated list of 103 instructional materials for use in an independent living program focused on personal, social, and community adjustment of those with special needs is cross referenced using a subject index that lists skill areas within a fourteen-category system. Document descriptions are arranged alphabetically by author and include…

  16. Advance directives and living wills.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, K.; Bowker, L.

    1998-01-01

    Under certain circumstances, living wills or advance directives may carry legal force in the UK. This paper traces the development of advance directives, clarifies their current legal position and discusses potential problems with their use. Case histories are used to illustrate some of the common dilemmas which doctors may face. PMID:9640440

  17. Educating Lives for Christian Wisdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Darin H.; Wadell, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores how educating lives for Christian wisdom might serve as an antidote to the vice of "acedia," a prominent feature of the culture of contemporary higher education. After suggesting that the capital vice of "acedia" seems to capture well various facets of our present age and how the pursuit of wisdom serves…

  18. Improving kidney and live donation rates in Asia: living donation.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, S A H; Naqvi, S A A; Hashmi, A; Akhtar, F; Hussain, M; Ahmed, E; Zafar, M N; Abbas, Z; Jawad, F; Sultan, S; Hasan, S M

    2004-09-01

    Organ transplantation started with organs donated by living subjects. Increasing demands brought cadaveric organ donation. The brain-death law, mandatory for this procedure, is prevalent in all countries involved in organ transplantation except Pakistan. Spain is the leading country in cadaveric organ donation (32.5 pmp). Despite the sources of living and cadaveric organs, both heart-beating and non-heart-beating, the gap between the demand and supply has widened. An example is the United States, where the numbers of patients on the waiting list for kidney transplantation have risen from 30,000 in 1988 to more than 116,000 in 2001. This has caused a resurgence in living donors all over the world. These can be related, unrelated, spousal, marginal, or ABO-incompatible donors. Family apprehensions, medical care costs, and nonexistent social security can be barriers to this form of organ donation. Unrelated organ donation can open the doors to commercialism. To make this process more successful, transplantation should be made reachable by all sectors of the population. This is possible when transplantation is taken to the public sector institutions and financed jointly by the government and community. To increase living organ donation especially in Asian countries, which face barriers of low literacy rates, ignorance, and cultural and religious beliefs, more efforts are needed. Public awareness and education play an important role. Appreciation and supporting the donors is necessary and justified. It is a noble act and should be recognized by offering job security, health insurance, and free education for the donor's children. PMID:15518688

  19. How long must humans live?

    PubMed

    Carnes, Bruce A; Witten, T M

    2014-08-01

    Species are defined by biological criteria. This characterization, however, misses the most unique aspect of our species; namely, an ability to invent technologies that reduce mortality risks. Old animals are rare in nature, but survival to old age has become commonplace in humans. Science now asks how long can humans live, but we suggest a more appropriate question is: How long must humans live? Three lines of evidence are used to identify the biological equivalent of a warranty period for humans and why it exists. The effective end of reproduction, the age when the sex ratio is unity, and the acceleration of mortality reveal that approximately 50-55 years is sufficient time for our species to achieve its biological mandate-Darwinian fitness. Identifying this boundary is biomedically important because it represents a transition from expected health and vigor to a period when health and vigor become progressively harder to maintain. PMID:24149427

  20. A Heart Set on Living.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life is a highly subjective element on which to base health care decision making. This narrative reflection after the death of a family member uses poetry as a prompt to explore themes related to quality of life-including symptom burden, interpersonal relationships in the face of illness, and the will to live. Through penetrating inquiry and reflection, physicians and other care providers can gain insight into the underlying motivations, loyalties, and abilities that lend meaning to patients' lives and shape attitudes toward death and dying. By better recognizing and appreciating these factors, clinicians can develop patient-centered quality-of-life constructs that empower them to honor patient goals and preferences at the end of life. Physicians are encouraged to explore poetry and other artistic media to help foster the reflective capacity required to deeply understand and faithfully serve patients in this regard. PMID:26384558

  1. [Living donor transplantation. Surgical complications].

    PubMed

    Karam, Georges

    2008-02-01

    Although nephrectomy by open surgery is the most used technique for the extraction of kidney transplants in the living donor, nephrectomy under laparaoscopy is increasingly practiced. Laparoscopic nephrectomy is less invasive and performed under videoscopy control, after insufflation of the peritoneal cavity. Three to four incisions are done in order to enter the surgical instruments. The kidney is extracted through a horizontal sus-pubic incision. The exposition is either exclusively transperitoneal, retroperitoneal or hand assisted. The advantages of laparoscopy are esthetical, financial due to a shorter hospitalisation and a quicker recovery, as well a confort for the donor. The disadvantages are a longer warm ischemia time and possibly a higher risk of delayed graft function. Randomised studies having compared laparoscopy and open surgery in the living donor have not find any significant difference regarding the per- and perioperative in the complications. PMID:18160357

  2. Focusing light through living tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vellekoop, I. M.; Aegerter, C. M.

    2010-02-01

    Tissues such as skin, fat or cuticle are non-transparent because inhomogeneities in the tissue scatter light. We demonstrate experimentally that light can be focused through turbid layers of living tissue, in spite of scattering. Our method is based on the fact that coherent light forms an interference pattern, even after hundreds of scattering events. By spatially shaping the wavefront of the incident laser beam, this interference pattern was modified to make the scattered light converge to a focus. In contrast to earlier experiments, where light was focused through solid objects, we focused light through living pupae of Drosophila melanogaster. We discuss a dynamic wavefront shaping algorithm that follows changes due to microscopic movements of scattering particles in real time. We relate the performance of the algorithm to the measured timescale of the changes in the speckle pattern and analyze our experiment in the light of Laser Doppler flowmetry. Applications in particle tracking, imaging, and optical manipulation are discussed.

  3. Imaging Transcription in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Darzacq, Xavier; Yao, Jie; Larson, Daniel R.; Causse, Sebastien Z.; Bosanac, Lana; de Turris, Valeria; Ruda, Vera M.; Lionnet, Timothee; Zenklusen, Daniel; Guglielmi, Benjamin; Tjian, Robert; Singer, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    The advent of new technologies for the imaging of living cells has made it possible to determine the properties of transcription, the kinetics of polymerase movement, the association of transcription factors, and the progression of the polymerase on the gene. We report here the current state of the field and the progress necessary to achieve a more complete understanding of the various steps in transcription. Our Consortium is dedicated to developing and implementing the technology to further this understanding. PMID:19416065

  4. Steps to Independent Living Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobb, Nancy

    This set of six activity books and a teacher's guide is designed to help students from eighth grade to adulthood with special needs to learn independent living skills. The activity books have a reading level of 2.5 and address: (1) "How to Get Well When You're Sick or Hurt," including how to take a temperature, see a doctor, and use medicines…

  5. Live a legacy or live a lie: a choice.

    PubMed

    Wesorick, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    This article is about the result of a choice to Live a Legacy or Live a Lie. The choice led to the development and implementation of a clinical practice model (CPM) designed to create a healthy, healing integrated practice culture. The focus is on the foundation of the model that is a unique ongoing process called the Core Belief Review. The purpose of the review is to uncover those things that matter most for both those who give and receive care. The ongoing open communication process provides insights and truths about reality and a sense of direction related to the nature of the work necessary to create and sustain the best places to give and receive care. The results of the review feedback from 2500 providers and recipients of care are correlated to the actions taken to address the complexities of the point-of-care reality and the clinical outcomes reached as a result of collaboration and lessons learned within an International Consortium. PMID:18360211

  6. [Liver transplants from living donors].

    PubMed

    Rogiers, X; Danninger, F; Malagó, M; Knoefel, W T; Gundlach, M; Bassas, A; Burdelski, M; Broelsch, C E

    1996-03-01

    In this article the authors discuss the advantages of Living Related Liver Transplantation (LRLT), criteria for the selection of donors and the standard operation technique. Among a total of 241 liver transplantation (LTx), 42 LRLT were performed at the University of Hamburg between October 1, 1991 and December 19, 1994. The body weight of recipients for LRLT ranged from 4,6 to 39 kg, with 64,2% having less than 10 kg. The volume of the donor left lateral liver lobe ranged from 100 cc to 350 cc. The average one year survival rate among electively operated patients-status 3-4 (UNOS 1995 classification) was 86.7%, two year survival rate 83.3%. The main advantages of LRLT are consired the following: 1. Absence of mortality on the waiting list, 2. Optimal timing of the transplantation (elective procedure, patient in a good condition), 3. Excellent organ (no primary non function), 4. A possible immunologic advantage, 5. Relief of the waiting list for cadaveric organs, 6. Psychological benefit for the family, 7. Cost effectiveness. Potential candidates for living donation with more than one cardiovascular risk factors were excluded. Social and psychological reasons leading to rejection of candidates were as follows: unstable family structure, expected professional or financial difficulties after living donation or withdrawal from consent. LRLT gives parents of a child with TLD a chance to avoid the risk of death on the waiting list or primary non function of the graft. LRLT has therefore established an important place in pediatric liver transplantation. PMID:8768973

  7. Short-Lived Climate Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrehumbert, R. T.

    2014-05-01

    Although carbon dioxide emissions are by far the most important mediator of anthropogenic climate disruption, a number of shorter-lived substances with atmospheric lifetimes of under a few decades also contribute significantly to the radiative forcing that drives climate change. In recent years, the argument that early and aggressive mitigation of the emission of these substances or their precursors forms an essential part of any climate protection strategy has gained a considerable following. There is often an implication that such control can in some way make up for the current inaction on carbon dioxide emissions. The prime targets for mitigation, known collectively as short-lived climate pollution (SLCP), are methane, hydrofluo-rocarbons, black carbon, and ozone. A re-examination of the issues shows that the benefits of early SLCP mitigation have been greatly exaggerated, largely because of inadequacies in the methodologies used to compare the climate effects of short-lived substances with those of CO2, which causes nearly irreversible climate change persisting millennia after emissions cease. Eventual mitigation of SLCP can make a useful contribution to climate protection, but there is little to be gained by implementing SLCP mitigation before stringent carbon dioxide controls are in place and have caused annual emissions to approach zero. Any earlier implementation of SLCP mitigation that substitutes to any significant extent for carbon dioxide mitigation will lead to a climate irreversibly warmer than will a strategy with delayed SLCP mitigation. SLCP mitigation does not buy time for implementation of stringent controls on CO2 emissions.

  8. Teasing Out Where the Tokers Live

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160089.html Teasing Out Where the Tokers Live Marijuana use more common in western U.S., report finds ... States you live in, a new survey suggests. Marijuana use by Americans is highest in the West ...

  9. Live a Full Life with Fibro

    MedlinePlus

    ... Live a Full Life with Fibro Page Content Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain condition that affects 10 ... family, you can live an active life with fibromyalgia. Talking with Your Physician Take the first step ...

  10. Senior Living: Staying Positive and Moving Forward

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Feature: Senior Living Staying Positive and Moving Forward Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table of Contents For ... Living / Long Distance Caregiving / Staying Positive and Moving Forward / Former WWII Fighter Pilot Finds New Home Near ...

  11. LIVE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM FOR OREGON VINEYARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Region 10 has funded the Oregon Winegrape Commission in a project that promotes the LIVE (Low Input Viticulture and Enology) certification program. LIVE is an integrated winegrape production system that promotes ecologically sensible production techniques. For example, cer...

  12. Senior Living: There's No Place Like Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Senior Living There's No Place Like Home Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table ... Parents, Staying Close to Family Is Key / There's No Place Like Home / Assisted Living / Long Distance Caregiving / ...

  13. 78 FR 62345 - Sabine River Authority of Texas; Sabine River Authority, State of Louisiana; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-18

    ..., 2013. Section 15(a)(1) of the FPA, 16 U.S.C. 808(a)(1), requires the Commission, at the expiration of a... provided in section 15 or any other applicable section of the FPA. If the project's prior license waived the applicability of section 15 of the FPA, then, based on section 9(b) of the...

  14. Living and Working in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Monserrate C.

    2000-01-01

    This document is a presentation about some of the challenges of living and working in space. The presentation shows slides of the Apollo 11 liftoff, Skylab in orbit, a Space Shuttle launch, and a slide of the International Space Station. It reviews the needs and effluents of the astronauts per day, and the Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) systems. It shows a flow diagram of the Space Station Regenerative ECLS, which shows the various systems, and how they interact to control the environment and recycle the air, and water. There are other slides some of which show astronauts eating, brushing teeth, shaving, and sipping from a sip bottle while exercising.

  15. Conductivity of living intracranial tissues.

    PubMed

    Latikka, J; Kuurne, T; Eskola, H

    2001-06-01

    Resistivity values were measured from living human brain tissue in nine patients. A monopolar needle electrode was used with a measurement frequency of 50 kHz. Mean values were 3.51 Ohms m for grey matter and 3.91 Ohms m for white matter. Cerebrospiral fluid had a mean value of 0.80 Ohms m. Values for tumour tissues were dependent on the type of tumour and ranged from 2.30 to 9.70 Ohms m. PMID:11419622

  16. Living productively with sensory loss.

    PubMed

    Kinderknecht, C H; Garner, J D

    1993-01-01

    As the avenues for fully perceiving and experiencing life, our sensory organs are the bridge between Self and the outside world. Of the many disorders affecting the senses of the older woman, those that affect vision and hearing have the greatest potential for disrupting her activities of daily living, and diminishing her quality of life and level of independence. While adapting to and coping successfully with sensory loss may require significant effort and adjustment on the part of the afflicted older woman, strategies designed to maximize the older woman's function, her sense of personal control, and her social support system can mediate the negative effects of the sensory loss. PMID:23077999

  17. Live from the Moon - Impact!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On March 24, 1965, a nationwide TV audience watched live video from Ranger 9 as it purposefully crashed into the Moon within the crater Alphonsus. Ranger's six cameras sent back more than 5800 video images during the last 18 minutes of its 3-day journey, the last of the Ranger Project. The last few images show the lunar surface in detail from a few hundred meters above.

    This sequence of images from Camera A was converted from video to film to laser disc to digital files.

  18. Blood Banking in Living Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Lei; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng; Song, YoungSeok; Keles, Hasan Onur; Matloff, Laura; Markel, Jordan; Demirci, Utkan

    2011-01-01

    Blood banking has a broad public health impact influencing millions of lives daily. It could potentially benefit from emerging biopreservation technologies. However, although vitrification has shown advantages over traditional cryopreservation techniques, it has not been incorporated into transfusion medicine mainly due to throughput challenges. Here, we present a scalable method that can vitrify red blood cells in microdroplets. This approach enables the vitrification of large volumes of blood in a short amount of time, and makes it a viable and scalable biotechnology tool for blood cryopreservation. PMID:21412411

  19. Lived Experience of University Continuing Education Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Janice

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on a study that explored the professional lives of eight leaders of continuing education in Canadian universities, with a focus on their administrative role, to provide a deeper understanding of how they live within their practice (lived experience). A practical listing of 56 horizons of experience was identified, useful as…

  20. Living Free: A Teacher Information Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mello, Robin

    This workbook helps adolescents learn how to take charge of their own lives and happiness. The underlying idea is to teach them how to live responsibly. By learning to live responsibly, adolescents have the best chance of avoiding drugs, alcohol, and other addictive behaviors such as overeating and overspending. The workbook explains the steps to…