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Sample records for saccharomyces cerevisiae determines

  1. Interorganelle signaling is a determinant of longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kirchman, P A; Kim, S; Lai, C Y; Jazwinski, S M

    1999-01-01

    Replicative capacity, which is the number of times an individual cell divides, is the measure of longevity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, a process that involves signaling from the mitochondrion to the nucleus, called retrograde regulation, is shown to determine yeast longevity, and its induction resulted in postponed senescence. Activation of retrograde regulation, by genetic and environmental means, correlated with increased replicative capacity in four different S. cerevisiae strains. Deletion of a gene required for the retrograde response, RTG2, eliminated the increased replicative capacity. RAS2, a gene previously shown to influence longevity in yeast, interacts with retrograde regulation in setting yeast longevity. The molecular mechanism of aging elucidated here parallels the results of genetic studies of aging in nematodes and fruit flies, as well as the caloric restriction paradigm in mammals, and it underscores the importance of metabolic regulation in aging, suggesting a general applicability. PMID:10224252

  2. Genetic determinants for enhanced glycerol growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Steve; Ho, Ping-Wei; Klein, Mathias; Nevoigt, Elke

    2016-07-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae generally shows a low natural capability to utilize glycerol as the sole source of carbon, particularly when synthetic medium is used and complex supplements are omitted. Nevertheless, wild type isolates have been identified that show a moderate growth under these conditions. In the current study we made use of intraspecies diversity to identify targets suitable for reverse metabolic engineering of the non-growing laboratory strain CEN.PK113-1A. A genome-wide genetic mapping experiment using pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis was conducted, and one major and several minor genetic loci were identified responsible for the superior glycerol growth phenotype of the previously selected S. cerevisiae strain CBS 6412-13A. Downscaling of the major locus by fine-mapping and reciprocal hemizygosity analysis allowed the parallel identification of two superior alleles (UBR2CBS 6412-13A and SSK1CBS 6412-13A). These alleles together with the previously identified GUT1CBS 6412-13A allele were used to replace the corresponding alleles in the strain CEN.PK113-1A. In this way, glycerol growth could be established reaching a maximum specific growth rate of 0.08h(-1). Further improvement to a maximum specific growth rate of 0.11h(-1) could be achieved by heterologous expression of the glycerol facilitator FPS1 from Cyberlindnera jadinii. PMID:26971668

  3. Determinants of Swe1p Degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, John N.; Theesfeld, Chandra L.; Harrison, Jacob C.; Bardes, Elaine S. G.; Lew, Daniel J.

    2002-01-01

    Swe1p, the sole Wee1-family kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is synthesized during late G1 and is then degraded as cells proceed through the cell cycle. However, Swe1p degradation is halted by the morphogenesis checkpoint, which responds to insults that perturb bud formation. The Swe1p stabilization promotes cell cycle arrest through Swe1p-mediated inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdc28p until the cells can recover from the perturbation and resume bud formation. Swe1p degradation involves the relocalization of Swe1p from the nucleus to the mother-bud neck, and neck targeting requires the Swe1p-interacting protein Hsl7p. In addition, Swe1p degradation is stimulated by its substrate, cyclin/Cdc28p, and Swe1p is thought to be a target of the ubiquitin ligase SCFMet30 acting with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34p. The basis for regulation of Swe1p degradation by the morphogenesis checkpoint remains unclear, and in order to elucidate that regulation we have dissected the Swe1p degradation pathway in more detail, yielding several novel findings. First, we show here that Met30p (and by implication SCFMet30) is not, in fact, required for Swe1p degradation. Second, cyclin/Cdc28p does not influence Swe1p neck targeting, but can directly phosphorylate Swe1p, suggesting that it acts downstream of neck targeting in the Swe1p degradation pathway. Third, a screen for functional but nondegradable mutants of SWE1 identified two small regions of Swe1p that are key to its degradation. One of these regions mediates interaction of Swe1p with Hsl7p, showing that the Swe1p-Hsl7p interaction is critical for Swe1p neck targeting and degradation. The other region did not appear to affect interactions with known Swe1p regulators, suggesting that other as-yet-unknown regulators exist. PMID:12388757

  4. Determination of biological activity from fluorescence-lifetime measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Hartmann, P.

    2015-03-01

    The importance of fluorescence lifetime measurement as an optical analysis tool is growing. Many applications already exist in order to determine the fluorescence lifetime, but the majority of these require the addition of fluorescence-active substances to enable measurements. Every usage of such foreign materials has an associated risk. This paper investigates the use of auto-fluorescing substances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) as a risk free alternative to fluorescence-active substance enabled measurements. The experimental setup uses a nitrogen laser with a pulse length of 350 ps and a wavelength of 337 nm. The excited sample emits light due to fluorescence of NADH/NADPH and collagen. A fast photodiode collects the light at the output of an appropriate high-pass edge-filter at 400 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes can be determined from the decay of the measurement signals, which in turn characterizes the individual materials and their surrounding environment. Information about the quantity of the fluorescence active substances can also be measured based on the received signal intensity. The correlation between the fluorescence lifetime and the metabolic state of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated and is presented here.

  5. Actin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Greer, C; Schekman, R

    1982-01-01

    Inhibition of DNase I activity has been used as an assay to purify actin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast actin). The final fraction, obtained after a 300-fold purification, is approximately 97% pure as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. Like rabbit skeletal muscle actin, yeast actin has a molecular weight of about 43,000, forms 7-nm-diameter filaments when polymerization is induced by KCl or Mg2+, and can be decorated with a proteolytic fragment of muscle myosin (heavy meromyosin). Although heavy meromyosin ATPase activity is stimulated by rabbit muscle and yeast actins to approximately the same Vmax (2 mmol of Pi per min per mumol of heavy meromyosin), half-maximal activation (Kapp) is obtained with 14 micro M muscle actin, but requires approximately 135 micro M yeast actin. This difference suggests a low affinity of yeast actin for muscle myosin. Yeast and muscle filamentous actin respond similarly to cytochalasin and phalloidin, although the drugs have no effect on S. cerevisiae cell growth. Images PMID:6217414

  6. PET genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Tzagoloff, A; Dieckmann, C L

    1990-01-01

    We describe a collection of nuclear respiratory-defective mutants (pet mutants) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae consisting of 215 complementation groups. This set of mutants probably represents a substantial fraction of the total genetic information of the nucleus required for the maintenance of functional mitochondria in S. cerevisiae. The biochemical lesions of mutants in approximately 50 complementation groups have been related to single enzymes or biosynthetic pathways, and the corresponding wild-type genes have been cloned and their structures have been determined. The genes defined by an additional 20 complementation groups were identified by allelism tests with mutants characterized in other laboratories. Mutants representative of the remaining complementation groups have been assigned to one of the following five phenotypic classes: (i) deficiency in cytochrome oxidase, (ii) deficiency in coenzyme QH2-cytochrome c reductase, (iii) deficiency in mitochondrial ATPase, (iv) absence of mitochondrial protein synthesis, and (v) normal composition of respiratory-chain complexes and of oligomycin-sensitive ATPase. In addition to the genes identified through biochemical and genetic analyses of the pet mutants, we have cataloged PET genes not matched to complementation groups in the mutant collection and other genes whose products function in the mitochondria but are not necessary for respiration. Together, this information provides an up-to-date list of the known genes coding for mitochondrial constituents and for proteins whose expression is vital for the respiratory competence of S. cerevisiae. PMID:2215420

  7. Sequential Logic of Polarity Determination during the Haploid-to-Diploid Transition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zapanta Rinonos, Serendipity; Rai, Urvashi; Vereb, Sydney; Wolf, Kyle; Yuen, Eric; Lin, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    In many organisms, the geometry of encounter of haploid germ cells is arbitrary. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the resulting zygotes have been seen to bud asymmetrically in several directions as they produce diploid progeny. What mechanisms account for the choice of direction, and do the mechanisms directing polarity change over time? Distinct subgroups of cortical “landmark” proteins guide budding by haploid versus diploid cells, both of which require the Bud1/Rsr1 GTPase to link landmarks to actin. We observed that as mating pairs of haploid cells form zygotes, bud site specification progresses through three phases. The first phase follows disassembly and limited scattering of proteins that concentrated at the zone of cell contact, followed by their reassembly to produce a large medial bud. Bud1 is not required for medial placement of the initial bud. The second phase produces a contiguous bud(s) and depends on axial landmarks. As the titer of the Axl1 landmark diminishes, the third phase ultimately redirects budding toward terminal sites and is promoted by bipolar landmarks. Thus, following the initial random encounter that specifies medial budding, sequential spatial choices are orchestrated by the titer of a single cortical determinant that determines whether successive buds will be contiguous to their predecessors. PMID:25172767

  8. Homozygous diploid deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that determine lag phase and dehydration tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Elia, Riccardo; Allen, Patricia L.; Johanson, Kelly; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2005-01-01

    This study identifies genes that determine length of lag phase, using the model eukaryotic organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report growth of a yeast deletion series following variations in the lag phase induced by variable storage times after drying-down yeast on filters. Using a homozygous diploid deletion pool, lag times ranging from 0 h to 90 h were associated with increased drop-out of mitochondrial genes and increased survival of nuclear genes. Simple linear regression (R2 analysis) shows that there are over 500 genes for which > 70% of the variation can be explained by lag alone. In the genes with a positive correlation, such that the gene abundance increases with lag and hence the deletion strain is suitable for survival during prolonged storage, there is a strong predominance of nucleonic genes. In the genes with a negative correlation, such that the gene abundance decreases with lag and hence the strain may be critical for getting yeast out of the lag phase, there is a strong predominance of glycoproteins and transmembrane proteins. This study identifies yeast deletion strains with survival advantage on prolonged storage and amplifies our understanding of the genes critical for getting out of the lag phase.

  9. Peptidase activities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, B; Becker, J M; Naider, F

    1979-01-01

    At least four distinct aminopeptidase activities and a single dipeptidase activity were found in cell extracts of a leucine-lysine auxotroph of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The assay for peptidase activity involved polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by an enzyme-coupled activity staining procedure. The aminopeptidases had largely overlapping specificities but could be distinguished from one another by their electrophoretic mobilities and activities toward different peptide substrates. Substrates tested included both free and blocked di- and tripeptides and amino acid derivatives. Images PMID:378955

  10. Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ostergaard, Simon; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge regarding Saccharomyces cerevisiae has accumulated over time, and today S. cerevisiae serves as a widley used biotechnological production organism as well as a eukaryotic model system. The high transformation efficiency, in addition to the availability of the complete yeast genome sequence, has facilitated genetic manipulation of this microorganism, and new approaches are constantly being taken to metabolicially engineer this organism in order to suit specific needs. In this paper, strategies and concepts for metabolic engineering are discussed and several examples based upon selected studies involving S. cerevisiae are reviewed. The many different studies of metabolic engineering using this organism illustrate all the categories of this multidisciplinary field: extension of substrate range, improvements of producitivity and yield, elimination of byproduct formation, improvement of process performance, improvements of cellular properties, and extension of product range including heterologous protein production. PMID:10704473

  11. The rate of metabolism as a factor determining longevity of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast.

    PubMed

    Molon, Mateusz; Szajwaj, Monika; Tchorzewski, Marek; Skoczowski, Andrzej; Niewiadomska, Ewa; Zadrag-Tecza, Renata

    2016-02-01

    Despite many controversies, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae continues to be used as a model organism for the study of aging. Numerous theories and hypotheses have been created for several decades, yet basic mechanisms of aging have remained unclear. Therefore, the principal aim of this work is to propose a possible mechanism leading to increased longevity in yeast. In this paper, we suggest for the first time that there is a link between decreased metabolic activity, fertility and longevity expressed as time of life in yeast. Determination of reproductive potential and total lifespan with the use of fob1Δ and sfp1Δ mutants allows us to compare the "longevity" presented as the number of produced daughters with the longevity expressed as the time of life. The results of analyses presented in this paper suggest the need for a change in the definition of longevity of yeast by taking into consideration the time parameter. The mutants that have been described as "long-lived" in the literature, such as the fob1Δ mutant, have an increased reproductive potential but live no longer than their standard counterparts. On the other hand, the sfp1Δ mutant and the wild-type strain produce a similar number of daughter cells, but the former lives much longer. Our results demonstrate a correlation between the decreased efficiency of the translational apparatus and the longevity of the sfp1Δ mutant. We suggest that a possible factor regulating the lifespan is the rate of cell metabolism. To measure the basic metabolism of the yeast cells, we used the isothermal microcalorimetry method. In the case of sfp1Δ, the flow of energy, ATP concentration, polysome profile and translational fitness are significantly lower in comparison with the wild-type strain and the fob1Δ mutant. PMID:26783001

  12. Determination of the core promoter regions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPS3 gene.

    PubMed

    Joo, Yoo Jin; Kim, Jin-Ha; Baek, Joung Hee; Seong, Ki Moon; Lee, Jae Yung; Kim, Joon

    2009-01-01

    Ribosomal protein genes (RPG), which are scattered throughout the genomes of all eukaryotes, are subjected to coordinated expression. In yeast, the expression of RPGs is highly regulated, mainly at the transcriptional level. Recent research has found that many ribosomal proteins (RPs) function in multiple processes in addition to protein synthesis. Therefore, detailed knowledge of promoter architecture as well as gene regulation is important in understanding the multiple cellular processes mediated by RPGs. In this study, we investigated the functional architecture of the yeast RPS3 promoter and identified many putative cis-elements. Using beta-galactosidase reporter analysis and EMSA, the core promoter of RPS3 containing UASrpg and T-rich regions was corroborated. Moreover, the promoter occupancy of RPS3 by three transcription factors was confirmed. Taken together, our results further the current understanding of the promoter architecture and trans-elements of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RPS3 gene. PMID:19853675

  13. Cadmium biosorption by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Volesky, B.; May, H.; Holan, Z.R. )

    1993-04-01

    Cadmium uptake by nonliving and resting cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae obtained from aerobic or anaerobic cultures from pure cadmium-bearing solutions was examined. The highest cadmium uptake exceeding 70 mg Cd/g was observed with aerobic baker's yeast biomass from the exponential growth phase. Nearly linear sorption isotherms featured by higher sorbing resting cells together with metal deposits localized exclusively in vacuoles indicate the possibility of a different metal-sequestering mechanism when compared to dry nonliving yeasts which did not usually accumulate more than 20 mg Cd/g. The uptake of cadmium was relatively fast, 75% of the sorption completed in less than 5 min.

  14. Degradation of Misfolded Endoplasmic Reticulum Glycoproteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Determined by a Specific Oligosaccharide Structure

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, Claude A.; Burda, Patricie; Roth, Jürgen; Aebi, Markus

    1998-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transfer of N-linked oligosaccharides is immediately followed by trimming of ER-localized glycosidases. We analyzed the influence of specific oligosaccharide structures for degradation of misfolded carboxypeptidase Y (CPY). By studying the trimming reactions in vivo, we found that removal of the terminal α1,2 glucose and the first α1,3 glucose by glucosidase I and glucosidase II respectively, occurred rapidly, whereas mannose cleavage by mannosidase I was slow. Transport and maturation of correctly folded CPY was not dependent on oligosaccharide structure. However, degradation of misfolded CPY was dependent on specific trimming steps. Degradation of misfolded CPY with N-linked oligosaccharides containing glucose residues was less efficient compared with misfolded CPY bearing the correctly trimmed Man8GlcNAc2 oligosaccharide. Reduced rate of degradation was mainly observed for mis- folded CPY bearing Man6GlcNAc2, Man7GlcNAc2 and Man9GlcNAc2 oligosaccharides, whereas Man8GlcNAc2 and, to a lesser extent, Man5GlcNAc2 oligosaccharides supported degradation. These results suggest a role for the Man8GlcNAc2 oligosaccharide in the degradation process. They may indicate the presence of a Man8GlcNAc2-binding lectin involved in targeting of misfolded glycoproteins to degradation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:9732283

  15. Comparison of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains of clinical and nonclinical origin by molecular typing and determination of putative virulence traits

    PubMed Central

    Klingberg, Trine Danø; Lesnik, Urska; Arneborg, Nils; Raspor, Peter; Jespersen, Lene

    2008-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains of clinical and nonclinical origin were compared by pulse field gel electrophoresis. Complete separation between strains of clinical origin and food strains by their chromosome length polymorphism was not obtained even though there was a tendency for the clinical and food strains to cluster separately. All the investigated strains, except for one food strain, were able to grow at temperatures ≥37 °C but not at 42 °C. Great strain variations were observed in pseudohyphal growth and invasiveness, but the characters were not linked to strains of clinical origin. The adhesion capacities of the yeast strains to a human intestinal epithelial cell line (Caco-2) in response to different nutritional availabilities were determined, as were the effects of the strains on the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) across polarized monolayers of Caco-2 cells. The yeast strains displayed very low adhesion capacities to Caco-2 cells (0.6–6.2%), and no significant difference was observed between the strains of clinical and nonclinical origin. Both S. cerevisiae strains of clinical and non-clinical origin increased the TER of polarized monolayers of Caco-2 cells. Based on the results obtained in this study, no specific virulence factor was found that clearly separated the strains of clinical origin from the strains of nonclinical origin. On the contrary, all investigated strains of S. cerevisiae were found to strengthen the epithelial barrier function. PMID:18355272

  16. Asymmetrical division of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Lord, P G; Wheals, A E

    1980-01-01

    The unequal division model proposed for budding yeast (L. H. Hartwell and M. W. Unger, J. Cell Biol. 75:422-435, 1977) was tested by bud scar analyses of steady-state exponential batch cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing at 30 degrees C at 19 different rates, which were obtained by altering the carbon source. The analyses involved counting the number of bud scars, determining the presence or absence of buds on at least 1,000 cells, and independently measuring the doubling times (gamma) by cell number increase. A number of assumptions in the model were tested and found to be in good agreement with the model. Maximum likelihood estimates of daughter cycle time (D), parent cycle time (P), and the budded phase (B) were obtained, and we concluded that asymmetrical division occurred at all growth rates tested (gamma, 75 to 250 min). D, P, and B are all linearly related to gamma, and D, P, and gamma converge to equality (symmetrical division) at gamma = 65 min. Expressions for the genealogical age distribution for asymmetrically dividing yeast cells were derived. The fraction of daughter cells in steady-state populations is e-alpha P, and the fraction of parent cells of age n (where n is the number of buds that a cell has produced) is (e-alpha P)n-1(1-e-alpha P)2, where alpha = IN2/gamma; thus, the distribution changes with growth rate. The frequency of cells with different numbers of bud scars (i.e., different genealogical ages) was determined for all growth rates, and the observed distribution changed with the growth rate in the manner predicted. In this haploid strain new buds formed adjacent to the previous buds in a regular pattern, but at slower growth rates the pattern was more irregular. The median volume of the cells and the volume at start in the cell cycle both increased at faster growth rates. The implications of these findings for the control of the cell cycle are discussed. PMID:6991494

  17. Methionine catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Perpète, Philippe; Duthoit, Olivier; De Maeyer, Simon; Imray, Louise; Lawton, Andrew I; Stavropoulos, Konstantinos E; Gitonga, Virginia W; Hewlins, Michael J E; Dickinson, J Richard

    2006-01-01

    The catabolism of methionine to methionol and methanethiol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied using (13)C NMR spectroscopy, GC-MS, enzyme assays and a number of mutants. Methionine is first transaminated to alpha-keto-gamma-(methylthio)butyrate. Methionol is formed by a decarboxylation reaction, which yields methional, followed by reduction. The decarboxylation is effected specifically by Ydr380wp. Methanethiol is formed from both methionine and alpha-keto-gamma-(methylthio)butyrate by a demethiolase activity. In all except one strain examined, demethiolase was induced by the presence of methionine in the growth medium. This pathway results in the production of alpha-ketobutyrate, a carbon skeleton, which can be re-utilized. Hence, methionine catabolism is more complex and economical than the other amino acid catabolic pathways in yeast, which use the Ehrlich pathway and result solely in the formation of a fusel alcohol. PMID:16423070

  18. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression. PMID:26205245

  19. Postreplication repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, M.A.; Boyce, J.; Cox, B.

    1981-04-01

    Postreplication events in logarithmically growing excision-defective mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were examined after low doses of ultraviolet light. Pulse-labeled deoxyribonucleic acid had interruptions, and when the cells were chased, the interruptions were no longer detected. Since the loss of interruptions was not associated with an exchange of pyrimidine dimers at a detection level of 10 to 20% of the induced dimers, it was concluded that postreplication repair in excision-defective mutants does not involve molecular recombination. Pyrimidine dimers were assayed by utilizing the ultraviolet-endonuclease activity in extracts of Micrococcus luteus and newly developed alkaline sucrose gradient techniques, which yielded chromosomal-size deoxyribonucleic acid after treatment of irradiated cells.

  20. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression. PMID:26205245

  1. Determination of maintenance coefficients of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures with cell recycle by cross-flow membrane filtration.

    PubMed

    Uribelarrea, J L; Winter, J; Goma, G; Pareilleux, A

    1990-01-20

    The fermentation of glucose by a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied in a continuous single-stage process with recycle of the cells via cross-flow micro-filtration membranes. Operating conditions were selected such that the culture was not carbon limited and inhibition by ethanol and cell death were minimized.Steady states were obtained for various biomass bleeding rates, i.e., various specific growth rates. From the experimental data, the stoichiometry of the simultaneous reactions, cell growth, ethanol production and maintenance were established using mass and degree of reduction balance relative to substrates (carbon source and oxygen) and products (biomass, ethanol, carbon dioxide etc.), and the growth parameters, yields, and maintenance cofficients were determined. It was shown that the oxygen consumption was not linked to the kinetics of the fermentation. The calculated growth constants were discussed and compared to the currently reported values. PMID:18592509

  2. Fatal Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Aortic Graft Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Smith, Davey; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast commonly used in baking and a frequent colonizer of human mucosal surfaces. It is considered relatively nonpathogenic in immunocompetent adults. We present a case of S. cerevisiae fungemia and aortic graft infection in an immunocompetent adult. This is the first reported case of S. cerevisiue fungemia where the identity of the pathogen was confirmed by rRNA sequencing.

  3. Saccharomyces cerevisiae osteomyelitis in an immunocompetent baker.

    PubMed

    Seng, Piseth; Cerlier, Alexandre; Cassagne, Carole; Coulange, Mathieu; Legré, Regis; Stein, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Invasive infection caused by Saccharomyces cerevisiae is rare. We report the first case of osteomyelitis caused by S. cerevisiae (baker's yeast) in a post-traumatic patient. The clinical outcome was favorable after surgical debridement, prolonged antifungal treatment and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. PMID:27347482

  4. Determination of carbohydrates present in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using mid-infrared spectroscopy and partial least squares regression.

    PubMed

    Plata, Maria R; Koch, Cosima; Wechselberger, Patrick; Herwig, Christoph; Lendl, Bernhard

    2013-10-01

    A fast and simple method to control variations in carbohydrate composition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, baker's yeast, during fermentation was developed using mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectroscopy. The method allows for precise and accurate determinations with minimal or no sample preparation and reagent consumption based on mid-IR spectra and partial least squares (PLS) regression. The PLS models were developed employing the results from reference analysis of the yeast cells. The reference analyses quantify the amount of trehalose, glucose, glycogen, and mannan in S. cerevisiae. The selection and optimization of pretreatment steps of samples such as the disruption of the yeast cells and the hydrolysis of mannan and glycogen to obtain monosaccharides were carried out. Trehalose, glucose, and mannose were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a refractive index detector and total carbohydrates were measured using the phenol-sulfuric method. Linear concentration range, accuracy, precision, LOD and LOQ were examined to check the reliability of the chromatographic method for each analyte. PMID:23963571

  5. Proteomics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Organelles*

    PubMed Central

    Wiederhold, Elena; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Poolman, Bert; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the subcellular localization of proteins is indispensable to understand their physiological roles. In the past decade, 18 studies have been performed to analyze the protein content of isolated organelles from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we integrate the data sets and compare them with other large scale studies on protein localization and abundance. We evaluate the completeness and reliability of the organelle proteomics studies. Reliability depends on the purity of the organelle preparations, which unavoidably contain (small) amounts of contaminants from different locations. Quantitative proteomics methods can be used to distinguish between true organellar constituents and contaminants. Completeness is compromised when loosely or dynamically associated proteins are lost during organelle preparation and also depends on the sensitivity of the analytical methods for protein detection. There is a clear trend in the data from the 18 organelle proteomics studies showing that proteins of low abundance frequently escape detection. Proteins with unknown function or cellular abundance are also infrequently detected, indicating that these proteins may not be expressed under the conditions used. We discuss that the yeast organelle proteomics studies provide powerful lead data for further detailed studies and that methodological advances in organelle preparation and in protein detection may help to improve the completeness and reliability of the data. PMID:19955081

  6. Sensitive determination of L-lysine with a new amperometric microbial biosensor based on Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Akyilmaz, Erol; Erdoğan, Ali; Oztürk, Ramazan; Yaşa, Ihsan

    2007-01-15

    A new amperometric microbial biosensor based on Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL-12632 cells, which had been induced for lysine oxidase enzyme and immobilized in gelatin by a cross-linking agent was developed for the sensitive determination of L-lysine amino acid. To construct the microbial biosensor S. cerevisiae cells were activated and cultured in a suitable culture medium. By using gelatine (8.43 mg cm(-2)) and glutaraldehyde (0.25%), cells obtained in the logarithmic phase of the growth curve at the end of a 14 h period were immobilized and fixed on a pretreated oxygen sensitive Teflon membrane of a dissolved oxygen probe. The assay procedure of the microbial biosensor is based on the determination of the differences of the respiration activity of the cells on the oxygenmeter in the absence and the presence of L-lysine. According to the end point measurement technique used in the experiments it was determined that the microbial biosensor response depended linearly on L-lysine concentrations between 1.0 and 10.0 microM with a 1 min response time. In optimization studies of the microbial biosensor, the most suitable microorganism quantities were found to be 0.97x10(5)CFU cm(-2). In addition phosphate buffer (pH 7.5; 50 mM) and 30 degrees C were obtained as the optimum working conditions. In characterization studies of the microbial biosensor some parameters such as substrate specificity, interference effects of some substances on the microbial biosensor responses, reproducibility of the biosensor and operational and storage stability were investigated. PMID:16759846

  7. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... techniques, antibodies to S. cerevisiae (baker's or brewer's yeast) in human serum or plasma. Detection of S... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... techniques, antibodies to S. cerevisiae (baker's or brewer's yeast) in human serum or plasma. Detection of S... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... techniques, antibodies to S. cerevisiae (baker's or brewer's yeast) in human serum or plasma. Detection of S... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... techniques, antibodies to S. cerevisiae (baker's or brewer's yeast) in human serum or plasma. Detection of S... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test...

  11. Determination of the Cytosolic NADPH/NADP Ratio in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using Shikimate Dehydrogenase as Sensor Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinrui; Pierick, Angela ten; van Rossum, Harmen M.; Maleki Seifar, Reza; Ras, Cor; Daran, Jean-Marc; Heijnen, Joseph J.; Aljoscha Wahl, S.

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic metabolism is organised in complex networks of enzyme catalysed reactions which are distributed over different organelles. To quantify the compartmentalised reactions, quantitative measurements of relevant physiological variables in different compartments are needed, especially of cofactors. NADP(H) are critical components in cellular redox metabolism. Currently, available metabolite measurement methods allow whole cell measurements. Here a metabolite sensor based on a fast equilibrium reaction is introduced to monitor the cytosolic NADPH/NADP ratio in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: . The cytosolic NADPH/NADP ratio was determined by measuring the shikimate and dehydroshikimate concentrations (by GC-MS/MS). The cytosolic NADPH/NADP ratio was determined under batch and chemostat (aerobic, glucose-limited, D = 0.1 h−1) conditions, to be 22.0 ± 2.6 and 15.6 ± 0.6, respectively. These ratios were much higher than the whole cell NADPH/NADP ratio (1.05 ± 0.08). In response to a glucose pulse, the cytosolic NADPH/NADP ratio first increased very rapidly and restored the steady state ratio after 3 minutes. In contrast to this dynamic observation, the whole cell NADPH/NADP ratio remained nearly constant. The novel cytosol NADPH/NADP measurements provide new insights into the thermodynamic driving forces for NADP(H)-dependent reactions, like amino acid synthesis, product pathways like fatty acid production or the mevalonate pathway. PMID:26243542

  12. Nile red fluorescence screening facilitating neutral lipid phenotype determination in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Rostron, Kerry A; Rolph, Carole E; Lawrence, Clare L

    2015-07-01

    Investigation of yeast neutral lipid accumulation is important for biotechnology and also for modelling aberrant lipid metabolism in human disease. The Nile red (NR) method has been extensively utilised to determine lipid phenotypes of yeast cells via microscopic means. NR assays have been used to differentiate lipid accumulation and relative amounts of lipid in oleaginous species but have not been thoroughly validated for phenotype determination arising from genetic modification. A modified NR assay, first described by Sitepu et al. (J Microbiol Methods 91:321-328, 2012), was able to detect neutral lipid changes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion mutants with sensitivity similar to more advanced methodology. We have also be able to, for the first time, successfully apply the NR assay to the well characterised fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, an increasingly important organism in biotechnology. The described NR fluorescence assay is suitable for increased throughput and rapid screening of genetically modified strains in both the biotechnology industry and for modelling ectopic lipid production for a variety of human diseases. This ultimately negates the need for labour intensive and time consuming lipid analyses of samples that may not yield a desirable lipid phenotype, whilst genetic modifications impacting significantly on the cellular lipid phenotype can be further promoted for more in depth analyses. PMID:25948336

  13. Transcriptional Regulatory Networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tong Ihn; Rinaldi, Nicola J.; Robert, François; Odom, Duncan T.; Bar-Joseph, Ziv; Gerber, Georg K.; Hannett, Nancy M.; Harbison, Christopher T.; Thompson, Craig M.; Simon, Itamar; Zeitlinger, Julia; Jennings, Ezra G.; Murray, Heather L.; Gordon, D. Benjamin; Ren, Bing; Wyrick, John J.; Tagne, Jean-Bosco; Volkert, Thomas L.; Fraenkel, Ernest; Gifford, David K.; Young, Richard A.

    2002-10-01

    We have determined how most of the transcriptional regulators encoded in the eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae associate with genes across the genome in living cells. Just as maps of metabolic networks describe the potential pathways that may be used by a cell to accomplish metabolic processes, this network of regulator-gene interactions describes potential pathways yeast cells can use to regulate global gene expression programs. We use this information to identify network motifs, the simplest units of network architecture, and demonstrate that an automated process can use motifs to assemble a transcriptional regulatory network structure. Our results reveal that eukaryotic cellular functions are highly connected through networks of transcriptional regulators that regulate other transcriptional regulators.

  14. Semi-quantitative colony immunoassay for determining and optimizing protein expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cridge, Andrew G; Visweswaraiah, Jyothsna; Ramesh, Rashmi; Sattlegger, Evelyn

    2014-02-15

    This work describes a quick semi-quantitative colony immunoassay (QSCI) method for immunoblot detection of intracellularly expressed proteins in both yeast and bacterial cells. After induction of protein expression, only 4.5 h is required for cell breakage, protein detection, and data analysis. This protocol was used to screen and unambiguously identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells efficiently overexpressing glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged Yih1 in addition to cells expressing the myc-tagged large 297-kDa Gcn1 protein. In addition, the method was used to identify Escherichia coli cells efficiently expressing His6-tagged Yih1 and a GST-tagged Gcn1 fragment, respectively. The protocol allows the use of both epitope-specific and protein-specific antibodies. The same colony immunoassay can also be used to determine the minimal concentration of inducing agent sufficient for induction of optimal protein expression (e.g., galactose for yeast, isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside [IPTG] for E. coli). To our knowledge, this is the first report on a rapid low-cost procedure that allows the calibration of inducing agent on solid medium. PMID:24176934

  15. The chemical nature of phenolic compounds determines their toxicity and induces distinct physiological responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in lignocellulose hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the severity of the inhibitory effects of 13 phenolic compounds usually found in spruce hydrolysates (4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamaldehyde, homovanilyl alcohol, vanillin, syringic acid, vanillic acid, gallic acid, dihydroferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, hydroquinone, ferulic acid, homovanillic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and vanillylidenacetone). The effects of the selected compounds on cell growth, biomass yield and ethanol yield were studied and the toxic concentration threshold was defined for each compound. Using Ethanol Red, the popular industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found the most toxic compound to be 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamaldehyde which inhibited growth at a concentration of 1.8 mM. We also observed that toxicity did not generally follow a trend based on the aldehyde, acid, ketone or alcohol classification of phenolic compounds, but rather that other structural properties such as additional functional groups attached to the compound may determine its toxicity. Three distinctive growth patterns that effectively clustered all the compounds involved in the screening into three categories. We suggest that the compounds have different cellular targets, and that. We suggest that the compounds have different cellular targets and inhibitory mechanisms in the cells, also compounds who share similar pattern on cell growth may have similar inhibitory effect and mechanisms of inhibition. PMID:24949277

  16. Mechanisms of Ethanol Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a superb ethanol producer, yet is also sensitive to higher ethanol concentrations especially under high gravity or very high gravity fermentation conditions. Ethanol tolerance is associated with interplay of complex networks at the genome level. Although significant eff...

  17. Tangential Ultrafiltration of Aqueous "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae" Suspensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Carlos M.; Neves, Patricia S.; Da Silva, Francisco A.; Xavier, Ana M. R. B.; Eusebio, M. F. J.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental work on ultrafiltration is presented to illustrate the practical and theoretical principles of this separation technique. The laboratory exercise comprises experiments with pure water and with aqueous "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" (from commercial Baker's yeast) suspensions. With this work students detect the characteristic phenomena…

  18. Analysis of the RNA Content of the Yeast "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutch, Charles E.; Marshall, Pamela A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an interconnected set of relatively simple laboratory experiments in which students determine the RNA content of yeast cells and use agarose gel electrophoresis to separate and analyze the major species of cellular RNA. This set of experiments focuses on RNAs from the yeast "Saccharomyces cerevisiae", a…

  19. Rad5 Template Switch Pathway of DNA Damage Tolerance Determines Synergism between Cisplatin and NSC109268 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Dilip; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    The success of cisplatin (CP) based therapy is often hindered by acquisition of CP resistance. We isolated NSC109268 as a compound altering cellular sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Previous investigation revealed an enhancement of CP sensitivity by NSC109268 in wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae and CP-sensitive and -resistant cancer cell lines that correlated with a slower S phase traversal. Here, we extended these studies to determine the target pathway(s) of NSC109268 in mediating CP sensitization, using yeast as a model. We reasoned that mutants defective in the relevant target of NSC109268 should be hypersensitive to CP and the sensitization effect by NSC109268 should be absent or strongly reduced. A survey of various yeast deletion mutants converged on the Rad5 pathway of DNA damage tolerance by template switching as the likely target pathway of NSC109268 in mediating cellular sensitization to CP. Additionally, cell cycle delays following CP treatment were not synergistically influenced by NSC109268 in the CP hypersensitive rad5Δ mutant. The involvement of the known inhibitory activities of NSC109268 on 20S proteasome and phosphatases 2Cα and 2A was tested. In the CP hypersensitive ptc2Δptc3Δpph3Δ yeast strain, deficient for 2C and 2A-type phosphatases, cellular sensitization to CP by NSC109268 was greatly reduced. It is therefore suggested that NSC109268 affects CP sensitivity by inhibiting the activity of unknown protein(s) whose dephosphorylation is required for the template switch pathway. PMID:24130896

  20. Preparation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae expression plasmids.

    PubMed

    Drew, David; Kim, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Expression plasmids for Saccharomyces cerevisiae offer a wide choice of vector copy number, promoters of varying strength and selection markers. These expression plasmids are usually shuttle vectors that can be propagated both in yeast and bacteria, making them useful in gene cloning. For heterologous production of membrane proteins, we used the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion technology which was previously developed in the Escherichia coli system. We designed an expression plasmid carrying an inducible GAL1 promoter, a gene encoding a membrane protein of interest and the GFP-octa-histidine sequence. Here we describe construction of multi-copy yeast expression plasmids by homologous recombination in S. cerevisiae. PMID:22454112

  1. [Urinary infection by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Emerging yeast?].

    PubMed

    Elkhihal, B; Elhalimi, M; Ghfir, B; Mostachi, A; Lyagoubi, M; Aoufi, S

    2015-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a commensal yeast of the digestive, respiratory and genito-urinary tract. It is widely used as a probiotic for the treatment of post-antibiotic diarrhea. It most often occurs in immunocompromised patients frequently causing fungemia. We report the case of an adult diabetic patient who had a urinary tract infection due to S. cerevisiae. The disease started with urination associated with urinary frequency burns without fever. The diagnosis was established by the presence of yeasts on direct examination and positivity of culture on Sabouraud-chloramphenicol three times. The auxanogramme gallery (Auxacolor BioRad(®)) allowed the identification of S. cerevisiae. The patient was put on fluconazole with good outcome. This observation points out that this is an opportunistic yeast in immunocompromised patients. PMID:26522963

  2. cis- and trans-Acting Localization Determinants of pH Response Regulator Rim13 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Shoba; Woolford, Carol A.; Desai, Jigar V.; Lanni, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    The Rim101/PacC pathway governs adaptation to alkaline pH in many fungi. Output of the pathway is mediated by transcription factors of the Rim101/PacC family, which are activated by proteolytic cleavage. The proteolytic complex includes scaffold protein Rim20 and endosome-associated subunits of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT). We provide here evidence that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rim13, the protease that is implicated in Rim101 cleavage, is associated with the Rim20-ESCRT complex, and we investigate its regulation. Rim13-GFP is dispersed in cells grown in acidic medium but forms punctate foci when cells encounter alkaline conditions. A vps4Δ mutant, which accumulates elevated levels of endosomal ESCRT, also accumulates elevated levels of Rim13-GFP foci, independently of external pH. In the vps4Δ background, mutation of ESCRT subunit Snf7 or of Rim20 blocks the formation of Rim13 foci, and we found that Rim13 and Rim20 are colocalized. The Rim13 ortholog PalB of Aspergillus nidulans has been shown to undergo ESCRT and membrane association through an N-terminal MIT domain, but Rim13 orthologs in the Saccharomyces clade lack homology to this N-terminal region. Instead, there is a clade-limited C-terminal region, and we show that point mutations in this region prevent punctate localization and impair Rim13 function. We suggest that RIM13 arose from its ancestral gene through two genome rearrangements. The ancestor lost the coding region for its MIT domain through a 5′ rearrangement and acquired the coding region for the Saccharomyces-specific functional equivalent through a 3′ rearrangement. PMID:22865500

  3. The reference genome sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: then and now.

    PubMed

    Engel, Stacia R; Dietrich, Fred S; Fisk, Dianna G; Binkley, Gail; Balakrishnan, Rama; Costanzo, Maria C; Dwight, Selina S; Hitz, Benjamin C; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith D; Lloyd, Paul; Skrzypek, Marek S; Miyasato, Stuart R; Simison, Matt; Cherry, J Michael

    2014-03-01

    The genome of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the first completely sequenced from a eukaryote. It was released in 1996 as the work of a worldwide effort of hundreds of researchers. In the time since, the yeast genome has been intensively studied by geneticists, molecular biologists, and computational scientists all over the world. Maintenance and annotation of the genome sequence have long been provided by the Saccharomyces Genome Database, one of the original model organism databases. To deepen our understanding of the eukaryotic genome, the S. cerevisiae strain S288C reference genome sequence was updated recently in its first major update since 1996. The new version, called "S288C 2010," was determined from a single yeast colony using modern sequencing technologies and serves as the anchor for further innovations in yeast genomic science. PMID:24374639

  4. The Reference Genome Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Then and Now

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Stacia R.; Dietrich, Fred S.; Fisk, Dianna G.; Binkley, Gail; Balakrishnan, Rama; Costanzo, Maria C.; Dwight, Selina S.; Hitz, Benjamin C.; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S.; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith D.; Lloyd, Paul; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Miyasato, Stuart R.; Simison, Matt; Cherry, J. Michael

    2014-01-01

    The genome of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the first completely sequenced from a eukaryote. It was released in 1996 as the work of a worldwide effort of hundreds of researchers. In the time since, the yeast genome has been intensively studied by geneticists, molecular biologists, and computational scientists all over the world. Maintenance and annotation of the genome sequence have long been provided by the Saccharomyces Genome Database, one of the original model organism databases. To deepen our understanding of the eukaryotic genome, the S. cerevisiae strain S288C reference genome sequence was updated recently in its first major update since 1996. The new version, called “S288C 2010,” was determined from a single yeast colony using modern sequencing technologies and serves as the anchor for further innovations in yeast genomic science. PMID:24374639

  5. Sporulation in the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Neiman, Aaron M.

    2011-01-01

    In response to nitrogen starvation in the presence of a poor carbon source, diploid cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo meiosis and package the haploid nuclei produced in meiosis into spores. The formation of spores requires an unusual cell division event in which daughter cells are formed within the cytoplasm of the mother cell. This process involves the de novo generation of two different cellular structures: novel membrane compartments within the cell cytoplasm that give rise to the spore plasma membrane and an extensive spore wall that protects the spore from environmental insults. This article summarizes what is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling spore assembly with particular attention to how constitutive cellular functions are modified to create novel behaviors during this developmental process. Key regulatory points on the sporulation pathway are also discussed as well as the possible role of sporulation in the natural ecology of S. cerevisiae. PMID:22084423

  6. Biosorption of heavy metals by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Volesky, B; May-Phillips, H A

    1995-01-01

    Abundant and common yeast biomass has been examined for its capacity to sequester heavy metals from dilute aqueous solutions. Live and non-living biomass of Saccharomyces cerevisiae differs in the uptake of uranium, zinc and copper at the optimum pH 4-5. Culture growth conditions can influence the biosorbent metal uptake capacity which normally was: living and non-living brewer's yeast: U > Zn > Cd > Cu; non-living baker's yeast: Zn > (Cd) > U > Cu; living baker's yeast: Zn > Cu approximately (Cd) > U. Non-living brewer's yeast biomass accumulated 0.58 mmol U/g. The best biosorbent of zinc was non-living baker's yeast (approximately 0.56 mmol Zn/g). Dead cells of S. cerevisiae removed approximately 40% more uranium or zinc than the corresponding live cultures. Biosorption of uranium by S. cerevisiae was a rapid process reaching 60% of the final uptake value within the first 15 min of contact. Its deposition differing from that of other heavy metals more associated with the cell wall, uranium was deposited as fine needle-like crystals both on the inside and outside of the S. cerevisiae cells. PMID:7765919

  7. Calcium control of Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Greer, C; Schekman, R

    1982-01-01

    Low levels of Ca2+ dramatically influence the polymerization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin in KCl. The apparent critical concentration for polymerization (C infinity) increases eightfold in the presence of 0.1 mM Ca2+. This effect is rapidly reversed by the addition of ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid or of 0.1 mM Mg2+. Furthermore, the addition of Ca2+ to polymerized actin causes a reversible increase in the apparent C infinity. In the presence of Ca2+, at actin concentrations below the apparent C infinity, particles of 15 to 50 nm in diameter are seen instead of filaments. These particles are separated from soluble actin when Ca2+-treated filamentous actin is sedimented at high speed; both the soluble and particulate fractions retain Ca2+-sensitive polymerization. The Ca2+ effect is S. cerevisiae actin-specific: the C infinity for rabbit muscle actin is not affected by the presence of Ca2+ and S. cerevisiae actin. Ca2+ may act directly on S. cerevisiae actin to control the assembly state in vivo. Images PMID:6757718

  8. Sequence determination of human papillomavirus type 6a and assembly of virus-like particles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, K J; Cook, J C; Joyce, J G; Brown, D R; Schultz, L D; George, H A; Rosolowsky, M; Fife, K H; Jansen, K U

    1995-06-01

    Human papillomavirus 6a (HPV6a), the most abundant HPV6 subtype, was detected in a vulvar condyloma acuminatum. The complete genome of HPV6a was cloned, and its DNA sequence was shown to be over 97% identical to the HPV6b sequence. Of the eight open reading frames (ORFs) of HPV6a, only the imputed amino acid sequence of the major capsid protein L1 was identical to the corresponding HPV6b sequence; all other HPV6a ORFs showed amino acid changes compared to the HPV6b ORFs. The HPV6a L1 or the L1 + L2 ORFs were expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Self-assembly of the L1 capsid protein into virus-like particles (VLPs) was demonstrated both in the L1 as well as L1 + L2 coexpressing yeast strains. Copurification of the L1 and L2 proteins showed complex formation of the L1 and L2 proteins in the yeast-derived VLPs of coexpressing strains. PMID:7778283

  9. Progress in Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Nevoigt, Elke

    2008-01-01

    Summary: The traditional use of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in alcoholic fermentation has, over time, resulted in substantial accumulated knowledge concerning genetics, physiology, and biochemistry as well as genetic engineering and fermentation technologies. S. cerevisiae has become a platform organism for developing metabolic engineering strategies, methods, and tools. The current review discusses the relevance of several engineering strategies, such as rational and inverse metabolic engineering, evolutionary engineering, and global transcription machinery engineering, in yeast strain improvement. It also summarizes existing tools for fine-tuning and regulating enzyme activities and thus metabolic pathways. Recent examples of yeast metabolic engineering for food, beverage, and industrial biotechnology (bioethanol and bulk and fine chemicals) follow. S. cerevisiae currently enjoys increasing popularity as a production organism in industrial (“white”) biotechnology due to its inherent tolerance of low pH values and high ethanol and inhibitor concentrations and its ability to grow anaerobically. Attention is paid to utilizing lignocellulosic biomass as a potential substrate. PMID:18772282

  10. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J J

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes. PMID:25905794

  11. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes. PMID:25905794

  12. Myo-inositol transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nikawa, J; Nagumo, T; Yamashita, S

    1982-05-01

    myo-Inositol uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was dependent on temperature, time, and substrate concentration. The transport obeyed saturation kinetics with an apparent Km for myo-inositol of 0.1 mM, myo-Inositol analogs, such as scyllo-inositol, 2-inosose, mannitol, and 1,2-cyclohexanediol, had no effect on myo-inositol uptake, myo-Inositol uptake required metabolic energy. Removal of D-glucose resulted in a loss of activity, and azide and cyanide ions were inhibitory. In the presence of D-glucose, myo-inositol was accumulated in the cells against a concentration gradient. A myo-inositol transport mutant was isolated from UV-mutagenized S. cerevisiae cells using the replica-printing technique. The defect in myo-inositol uptake was due to a single nuclear gene mutation. The activities of L-serine and D-glucose transport were not affected by the mutation. Thus it was shown that S. cerevisiae grown under the present culture conditions possessed a single and specific myo-inositol transport system. myo-Inositol transport activity was reduced by the addition of myo-inositol to the culture medium. The activity was reversibly restored by the removal of myo-inositol from the medium. This restoration of activity was completely abolished by cycloheximide. PMID:7040334

  13. Activity of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase is a key physiological determinant of thermotolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Coote, P J; Jones, M V; Seymour, I J; Rowe, D L; Ferdinando, D P; McArthur, A J; Cole, M B

    1994-08-01

    The role of membrane integrity and the membrane ATPase in the mechanism of thermotolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. The resistance to lethal heat of a mutant strain with reduced expression of the membrane ATPase was significantly less than that of the wild-type parent. However, prior exposure to sub-lethal temperatures resulted in the induction of similar levels of thermotolerance in the mutant compared to the parent strain, suggesting that the mechanism of sub-lethal heat-induced thermotolerance is independent of ATPase activity. Supporting this, exposure to sub-lethal heat stress did not result in increased levels of glucose-induced acid efflux at lethal temperatures and there was little correlation between levels of acid efflux and levels of heat resistance. ATPase activity in crude membrane preparations from sub-lethally heat-stressed cells was similar to that in preparations from unstressed cells. Study of net acid flux during heating revealed that pre-stressed cells were able to protect the proton gradient for longer. This may confer an 'advantage' to these cells that results in increased thermotolerance. This was supported by the observation that prior exposure to sub-lethal heat resulted in a transient protection against the large increase in membrane permeability that occurs at lethal temperatures. However, no protection against the large drop in intracellular pH was detected. Sub-lethal heat-induced protection of membrane integrity also occurred to the same extent in the reduced-expression membrane ATPase mutant, further implying that the mechanism of induced thermotolerance is independent of ATPase activity. To conclude, although the membrane ATPase is essential for basal heat resistance, thermotolerance induced by prior exposure to stress is largely conferred by a mechanism that is independent of the enzyme. PMID:7921241

  14. Synchronization of the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Foltman, Magdalena; Molist, Iago; Sanchez-Diaz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    A number of model organisms have provided the basis for our understanding of the eukaryotic cell cycle. These model organisms are generally much easier to manipulate than mammalian cells and as such provide amenable tools for extensive genetic and biochemical analysis. One of the most common model organisms used to study the cell cycle is the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This model provides the ability to synchronise cells efficiently at different stages of the cell cycle, which in turn opens up the possibility for extensive and detailed study of mechanisms regulating the eukaryotic cell cycle. Here, we describe methods in which budding yeast cells are arrested at a particular phase of the cell cycle and then released from the block, permitting the study of molecular mechanisms that drive the progression through the cell cycle. PMID:26519319

  15. Filamentation of Metabolic Enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing-Ji; Kassim, Hakimi; Huang, Yong; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Li, Guang; Wang, Peng-Ye; Yan, Jun; Ye, Fangfu; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-06-20

    Compartmentation via filamentation has recently emerged as a novel mechanism for metabolic regulation. In order to identify filament-forming metabolic enzymes systematically, we performed a genome-wide screening of all strains available from an open reading frame-GFP collection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We discovered nine novel filament-forming proteins and also confirmed those identified previously. From the 4159 strains, we found 23 proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, which are capable of forming filaments in vivo. In silico protein-protein interaction analysis suggests that these filament-forming proteins can be clustered into several groups, including translational initiation machinery and glucose and nitrogen metabolic pathways. Using glutamine-utilising enzymes as examples, we found that the culture conditions affect the occurrence and length of the metabolic filaments. Furthermore, we found that two CTP synthases (Ura7p and Ura8p) and two asparagine synthetases (Asn1p and Asn2p) form filaments both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Live imaging analyses suggest that metabolic filaments undergo sub-diffusion. Taken together, our genome-wide screening identifies additional filament-forming proteins in S. cerevisiae and suggests that filamentation of metabolic enzymes is more general than currently appreciated. PMID:27312010

  16. Killer systems of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterova, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    The killer systems of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are an unusual class of cytoplasmic symbionts of primitive eukaryotes. The genetic material of these symbionts is double-stranded RNA. They are characterized by the linearity of the genome, its fragmentation into a major and a minor fraction, which replicate separately, and their ability to control the synthesis of secretory mycocin proteins possessing a toxic action on closely related strains. The secretion of mycocins at the same time ensures acquiring of resistance to them. Strains containing killer symbionts are toxigenic and resistant to the action of their own toxin, but strains that are free of killer double-stranded RNAs are sensitive to the action of mycocins. The killer systems of S. cerevisiae have retained features relating them to viruses and are apparently the result of evolution of infectious viruses. The occurrences of such systems among monocellular eukaryotic organisms is an example of complication of the genome by means of its assembly from virus-like components. We discuss the unusual features of replication and the expression of killer systems and their utilization in the construction of vector molecules.

  17. Transfer RNA splicing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: defining the substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, R C; Lee, M C; Knapp, G

    1984-01-01

    The primary sequences of all the tRNA precursors which contain intervening sequences and which accumulate in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae rnal mutant are presented. A combination of DNA and RNA sequence analysis has led to elucidation of the primary sequence of four hitherto uncharacterized precursors. The location of the intervening sequence has in all cases been unambiguously determined by analysis of the intermediates in the splicing reaction. Secondary structures based upon the tRNA cloverleaf are shown for all the tRNA precursors and discussed with respect to common recognition by the yeast splicing endonuclease. Images PMID:6096826

  18. Differential repair of UV damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Terleth, C; van Sluis, C A; van de Putte, P

    1989-01-01

    Preferential repair of UV-induced damage is a phenomenon by which mammalian cells might enhance their survival. This paper presents the first evidence that preferential repair occurs in the lower eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover an unique approach is reported to compare identical sequences present on the same chromosome and only differing in expression. We determined the removal of pyrimidine dimers from two identical alpha-mating type loci and we were able to show that the active MAT alpha locus is repaired preferentially to the inactive HML alpha locus. In a sir-3 mutant, in which both loci are active this preference is not observed. Images PMID:2664708

  19. Force Sensitivity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Flocculins

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cho X. J.; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Joseph, Ivor G.; Jackson, Desmond N.; Ramsook, Caleen B.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many fungal adhesins have short, β-aggregation-prone sequences that play important functional roles, and in the Candida albicans adhesin Als5p, these sequences cluster the adhesins after exposure to shear force. Here, we report that Saccharomyces cerevisiae flocculins Flo11p and Flo1p have similar β-aggregation-prone sequences and are similarly stimulated by shear force, despite being nonhomologous. Shear from vortex mixing induced the formation of small flocs in cells expressing either adhesin. After the addition of Ca2+, yeast cells from vortex-sheared populations showed greatly enhanced flocculation and displayed more pronounced thioflavin-bright surface nanodomains. At high concentrations, amyloidophilic dyes inhibited Flo1p- and Flo11p-mediated agar invasion and the shear-induced increase in flocculation. Consistent with these results, atomic force microscopy of Flo11p showed successive force-distance peaks characteristic of sequentially unfolding tandem repeat domains, like Flo1p and Als5p. Flo11p-expressing cells bound together through homophilic interactions with adhesion forces of up to 700 pN and rupture lengths of up to 600 nm. These results are consistent with the potentiation of yeast flocculation by shear-induced formation of high-avidity domains of clustered adhesins at the cell surface, similar to the activation of Candida albicans adhesin Als5p. Thus, yeast adhesins from three independent gene families use similar force-dependent interactions to drive cell adhesion. IMPORTANCE The Saccharomyces cerevisiae flocculins mediate the formation of cellular aggregates and biofilm-like mats, useful in clearing yeast from fermentations. An important property of fungal adhesion proteins, including flocculins, is the ability to form catch bonds, i.e., bonds that strengthen under tension. This strengthening is based, at least in part, on increased avidity of binding due to clustering of adhesins in cell surface nanodomains. This clustering depends

  20. Force Sensitivity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Flocculins.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cho X J; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Joseph, Ivor G; Jackson, Desmond N; Ramsook, Caleen B; Dufrêne, Yves F; Lipke, Peter N

    2016-01-01

    Many fungal adhesins have short, β-aggregation-prone sequences that play important functional roles, and in the Candida albicans adhesin Als5p, these sequences cluster the adhesins after exposure to shear force. Here, we report that Saccharomyces cerevisiae flocculins Flo11p and Flo1p have similar β-aggregation-prone sequences and are similarly stimulated by shear force, despite being nonhomologous. Shear from vortex mixing induced the formation of small flocs in cells expressing either adhesin. After the addition of Ca(2+), yeast cells from vortex-sheared populations showed greatly enhanced flocculation and displayed more pronounced thioflavin-bright surface nanodomains. At high concentrations, amyloidophilic dyes inhibited Flo1p- and Flo11p-mediated agar invasion and the shear-induced increase in flocculation. Consistent with these results, atomic force microscopy of Flo11p showed successive force-distance peaks characteristic of sequentially unfolding tandem repeat domains, like Flo1p and Als5p. Flo11p-expressing cells bound together through homophilic interactions with adhesion forces of up to 700 pN and rupture lengths of up to 600 nm. These results are consistent with the potentiation of yeast flocculation by shear-induced formation of high-avidity domains of clustered adhesins at the cell surface, similar to the activation of Candida albicans adhesin Als5p. Thus, yeast adhesins from three independent gene families use similar force-dependent interactions to drive cell adhesion. IMPORTANCE The Saccharomyces cerevisiae flocculins mediate the formation of cellular aggregates and biofilm-like mats, useful in clearing yeast from fermentations. An important property of fungal adhesion proteins, including flocculins, is the ability to form catch bonds, i.e., bonds that strengthen under tension. This strengthening is based, at least in part, on increased avidity of binding due to clustering of adhesins in cell surface nanodomains. This clustering depends on

  1. Prediction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication origins

    PubMed Central

    Breier, Adam M; Chatterji, Sourav; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R

    2004-01-01

    Background Autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs) function as replication origins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ARSs contain the 17 bp ARS consensus sequence (ACS), which binds the origin recognition complex. The yeast genome contains more than 10,000 ACS matches, but there are only a few hundred origins, and little flanking sequence similarity has been found. Thus, identification of origins by sequence alone has not been possible. Results We developed an algorithm, Oriscan, to predict yeast origins using similarity to 26 characterized origins. Oriscan used 268 bp of sequence, including the T-rich ACS and a 3' A-rich region. The predictions identified the exact location of the ACS. A total of 84 of the top 100 Oriscan predictions, and 56% of the top 350, matched known ARSs or replication protein binding sites. The true accuracy was even higher because we tested 25 discrepancies, and 15 were in fact ARSs. Thus, 94% of the top 100 predictions and an estimated 70% of the top 350 were correct. We compared the predictions to corresponding sequences in related Saccharomyces species and found that the ACSs of experimentally supported predictions show significant conservation. Conclusions The high accuracy of the predictions indicates that we have defined near-sufficient conditions for ARS activity, the A-rich region is a recognizable feature of ARS elements with a probable role in replication initiation, and nucleotide sequence is a reliable predictor of yeast origins. Oriscan detected most origins in the genome, demonstrating previously unrecognized generality in yeast replication origins and significant discriminatory power in the algorithm. PMID:15059255

  2. Stationary phase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Werner-Washburne, M; Braun, E; Johnston, G C; Singer, R A

    1993-01-01

    Growth and proliferation of microorganisms such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are controlled in part by the availability of nutrients. When proliferating yeast cells exhaust available nutrients, they enter a stationary phase characterized by cell cycle arrest and specific physiological, biochemical, and morphological changes. These changes include thickening of the cell wall, accumulation of reserve carbohydrates, and acquisition of thermotolerance. Recent characterization of mutant cells that are conditionally defective only for the resumption of proliferation from stationary phase provides evidence that stationary phase is a unique developmental state. Strains with mutations affecting entry into and survival during stationary phase have also been isolated, and the mutations have been shown to affect at least seven different cellular processes: (i) signal transduction, (ii) protein synthesis, (iii) protein N-terminal acetylation, (iv) protein turnover, (v) protein secretion, (vi) membrane biosynthesis, and (vii) cell polarity. The exact nature of the relationship between these processes and survival during stationary phase remains to be elucidated. We propose that cell cycle arrest coordinated with the ability to remain viable in the absence of additional nutrients provides a good operational definition of starvation-induced stationary phase. PMID:8393130

  3. Regulation of Phosphatidylcholine Biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Waechter, Charles J.; Lester, Robert L.

    1971-01-01

    Evidence is presented which indicates that the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine by the methylation pathway in growing cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is repressed by the presence of choline in the growth medium. This result, obtained previously for glucose-grown cells, was also observed for lactate-grown cells, of which half of the phosphatidylcholine is mitochondrial. A respiration-deficient mutant of the parent wild-type strain has been studied, and its inability to form functional mitochondria cannot be due to an impaired methylation pathway, as it has been shown to incorporate 14C-CH3-methionine into all of the methylated glycerophosphatides. The incorporation rate is depressed by the inclusion of 1 mm choline in the growth medium, suggesting a regulatory effect similar to that demonstrated for the wild-type strain. The effects of choline on the glycerophospholipid composition of lactate and glucose-grown cells is presented. The repressive effects of the two related bases, mono- and dimethylethanolamine, were examined, and reduced levels of 14C-CH3-methionine incorporation were found for cells grown in the presence of these bases. The effect of choline on the methylation rates is reversible and glucosegrown cells regain the nonrepressed level of methylation activity in 60 to 80 min after removal of choline from the growth medium. Images PMID:5547992

  4. Inositol-Requiring Mutants of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Culbertson, Michael R.; Henry, Susan A.

    1975-01-01

    Fifty-two inositol-requiring mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated following mutagenesis with ethyl methanesulfonate. Complementation and tetrad analysis revealed ten major complementation classes, representing ten independently segregating loci (designated ino1 through ino10) which recombined freely with their respective centromeres. Members of any given complementation class segregated as alleles of a single locus. Thirteen complementation subclasses were identified among thirty-six mutants which behaved as alleles of the ino1 locus. The complementation map for these mutants was circular.—Dramatic cell viability losses indicative of unbalanced growth were observed in liquid cultures of representative mutants under conditions of inositol starvation. Investigation of the timing, kinetics, and extent of cell death revealed that losses in cell viability in the range of 2-4 log orders could be prevented by the addition of inositol to the medium or by disruption of protein synthesis with cycloheximide. Mutants defective in nine of the ten loci identified in this study displayed these unusual characteristics. The results suggest an important physiological role for inositol that may be related to its cellular localization and function in membrane phospholipids. The possibility is discussed that inositol deficiency initiates the process of unbalanced growth leading to cell death through the loss of normal assembly, function, or integrity of biomembranes.—Part of this work has been reported in preliminary form (Culbertson and Henry 1974). PMID:1093935

  5. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. 866.5785 Section 866.5785 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... controls). The special control is FDA's “Guidance for Industry and FDA Reviewers: Class II Special...

  6. Transformations of inorganic mercury by Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Yannai, S.; Berdicevsky, I.; Duek, L. )

    1991-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans were incubated with 0.25, 0.5, or 0.75 {mu}g of Hg (as HgCl{sub 2}) per ml of Nelson's medium in the presence of trace amounts of oxygen at 28{degree}C for 12 days. Two control media were used, one without added Hg and one without yeast inoculum. Yeast cell growth was estimated after 1, 2, 3, and 8 days of incubation. The contents of organomercury in the system and of elemental mercury released from the media and collected in traps were determined at the end of the experiments. The results were as follows: (1) C. albicans was the more mercury-resistant species, but both yeast species failed to grown in the media containing 0.75 {mu}g of Hg per ml.; (2) The amounts of organomercury produced by the two species were proportional to the amount of HgCl{sub 2} added to the medium. In all cases C. albicans produced considerably larger amounts of methylmercury than S. cerevisiae; (3) The amounts of elemental Hg produced were inversely proportional to the HgCl{sub 2} level added in the case of S. cerevisiae but were all similar in the case of C. albicans;and (4) Neither organomercury nor elemental Hg was produced in any of the control media.

  7. Selected non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts in controlled multistarter fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Comitini, Francesca; Gobbi, Mirko; Domizio, Paola; Romani, Cristina; Lencioni, Livio; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Ciani, Maurizio

    2011-08-01

    Non-Saccharomyces yeasts are metabolically active during spontaneous and inoculated must fermentations, and by producing a plethora of by-products, they can contribute to the definition of the wine aroma. Thus, use of Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts as mixed starter cultures for inoculation of wine fermentations is of increasing interest for quality enhancement and improved complexity of wines. We initially characterized 34 non-Saccharomyces yeasts of the genera Candida, Lachancea (Kluyveromyces), Metschnikowia and Torulaspora, and evaluated their enological potential. This confirmed that non-Saccharomyces yeasts from wine-related environments represent a rich sink of unexplored biodiversity for the winemaking industry. From these, we selected four non-Saccharomyces yeasts to combine with starter cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mixed fermentation trials. The kinetics of growth and fermentation, and the analytical profiles of the wines produced indicate that these non-Saccharomyces strains can be used with S. cerevisiae starter cultures to increase polysaccharide, glycerol and volatile compound production, to reduce volatile acidity, and to increase or reduce the total acidity of the final wines, depending on yeast species and inoculum ratio used. The overall effects of the non-Saccharomyces yeasts on fermentation and wine quality were strictly dependent on the Saccharomyces/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratio that mimicked the differences of fermentation conditions (natural or simultaneous inoculated fermentation). PMID:21569929

  8. Regulation of Cation Balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cyert, Martha S.; Philpott, Caroline C.

    2013-01-01

    All living organisms require nutrient minerals for growth and have developed mechanisms to acquire, utilize, and store nutrient minerals effectively. In the aqueous cellular environment, these elements exist as charged ions that, together with protons and hydroxide ions, facilitate biochemical reactions and establish the electrochemical gradients across membranes that drive cellular processes such as transport and ATP synthesis. Metal ions serve as essential enzyme cofactors and perform both structural and signaling roles within cells. However, because these ions can also be toxic, cells have developed sophisticated homeostatic mechanisms to regulate their levels and avoid toxicity. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have characterized many of the gene products and processes responsible for acquiring, utilizing, storing, and regulating levels of these ions. Findings in this model organism have often allowed the corresponding machinery in humans to be identified and have provided insights into diseases that result from defects in ion homeostasis. This review summarizes our current understanding of how cation balance is achieved and modulated in baker’s yeast. Control of intracellular pH is discussed, as well as uptake, storage, and efflux mechanisms for the alkali metal cations, Na+ and K+, the divalent cations, Ca2+ and Mg2+, and the trace metal ions, Fe2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Mn2+. Signal transduction pathways that are regulated by pH and Ca2+ are reviewed, as well as the mechanisms that allow cells to maintain appropriate intracellular cation concentrations when challenged by extreme conditions, i.e., either limited availability or toxic levels in the environment. PMID:23463800

  9. Effects of cyclohexane, an industrial solvent, on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and on isolated yeast mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Uribe, S.; Rangel, P.; Espinola, G.; Aguirre, G. )

    1990-07-01

    Little information on the effects of cyclohexane at the cellular or subcellular level is available. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cyclohexane inhibited respiration and diverse energy-dependent processes. In mitochondria isolated from S. cerevisiae, oxygen uptake and ATP synthesis were inhibited, although ATPase activity was not affected. Cyclohexane effects were similar to those reported for beta-pinene and limonene, suggesting that the cyclohexane ring in these monoterpenes may be a determinant for their biological activities.

  10. Analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome with PeptideAtlas

    PubMed Central

    King, Nichole L; Deutsch, Eric W; Ranish, Jeffrey A; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Eddes, James S; Mallick, Parag; Eng, Jimmy; Desiere, Frank; Flory, Mark; Martin, Daniel B; Kim, Bong; Lee, Hookeun; Raught, Brian; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2006-01-01

    We present the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PeptideAtlas composed from 47 diverse experiments and 4.9 million tandem mass spectra. The observed peptides align to 61% of Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) open reading frames (ORFs), 49% of the uncharacterized SGD ORFs, 54% of S. cerevisiae ORFs with a Gene Ontology annotation of 'molecular function unknown', and 76% of ORFs with Gene names. We highlight the use of this resource for data mining, construction of high quality lists for targeted proteomics, validation of proteins, and software development. PMID:17101051

  11. Invasive Saccharomyces cerevisiae infection: a friend turning foe?

    PubMed

    Pillai, Unnikrishnan; Devasahayam, Joe; Kurup, Aparna Narayana; Lacasse, Alexandre

    2014-11-01

    We report a very rare case of acute pyelonephritis in a 51-year-old female with a history of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes caused by a normally benign and a well-known human commensal organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is very often prescribed as a probiotic in modern medical practice. The causal role of S. cerevisiae was confirmed by its isolation in blood, urine, stool as well as vaginal swabs thus proving its virulent nature in suitable situations. PMID:25394448

  12. A global topology map of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae membrane proteome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun; Melén, Karin; Österberg, Marie; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2006-07-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is, arguably, the best understood eukaryotic model organism, yet comparatively little is known about its membrane proteome. Here, we report the cloning and expression of 617 S. cerevisiae membrane proteins as fusions to a C-terminal topology reporter and present experimentally constrained topology models for 546 proteins. By homology, the experimental topology information can be extended to 15,000 membrane proteins from 38 fully sequenced eukaryotic genomes. membrane proteins | membrane proteomics | yeast

  13. [Tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to monoterpenes--a review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jidong; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2013-06-01

    Tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to monoterpenes is important in both metabolic engineering of the yeast to produce these chemicals de novo and efficient use of biomass containing these chemicals. Understanding the mechanisms in the tolerance of S. cerevisiae to monoterpenes could facilitate the construction of yeast strains with enhanced monoterpenes resistance, and therefore improve related bioprocesses. Monoterpenes could disturb the redox balance in S. cerevisiae, therefore increase the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and result in cell death. S. cerevisiae has to systematically improve its antioxidative ability to deal with the ROS induced damage. The current review summarized the recent developments in demonstration of the tolerance of S. cerevisiae to different typical monoterpenes mainly from the aspect of the antioxidative mechanisms. Based on the analysis of the previous works, further attempts to demonstrate the mechanisms were proposed. PMID:24028054

  14. Synthesis of ribosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, J R

    1989-01-01

    The assembly of a eucaryotic ribosome requires the synthesis of four ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules and more than 75 ribosomal proteins. It utilizes all three RNA polymerases; it requires the cooperation of the nucleus and the cytoplasm, the processing of RNA, and the specific interaction of RNA and protein molecules. It is carried out efficiently and is exquisitely sensitive to the needs of the cell. Our current understanding of this process in the genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reviewed. The ribosomal RNA genes are arranged in a tandem array of 100 to 200 copies. This tandem array has led to unique ways of carrying out a number of functions. Replication is asymmetric and does not initiate from every autonomously replicating sequence. Recombination is suppressed. Transcription of the major ribosomal RNA appears to involve coupling between adjacent transcription units, which are separated by the 5S RNA transcription unit. Genes for many ribosomal proteins have been cloned and sequenced. Few are linked; most are duplicated; most have an intron. There is extensive homology between yeast ribosomal proteins and those of other species. Most, but not all, of the ribosomal protein genes have one or two sites that are essential for their transcription and that bind a common transcription factor. This factor binds also to many other places in the genome, including the telomeres. There is coordinated transcription of the ribosomal protein genes under a variety of conditions. However, the cell seems to possess no mechanism for regulating the transcription of individual ribosomal protein genes in response either to a deficiency or an excess of a particular ribosomal protein. A deficiency causes slow growth. Any excess ribosomal protein is degraded very rapidly, with a half-life of 1 to 5 min. Unlike most types of cells, yeast cells appear not to regulate the translation of ribosomal proteins. However, in the case of ribosomal protein L32

  15. Interaction between Hanseniaspora uvarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2015-08-01

    During wine fermentation, Saccharomyces clearly dominate over non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts, and several factors could be related to this dominance. However, the main factor causing the reduction of cultivable non-Saccharomyces populations has not yet been fully established. In the present study, various single and mixed fermentations were performed to evaluate some of the factors likely responsible for the interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Hanseniaspora uvarum. Alcoholic fermentation was performed in compartmented experimental set ups with ratios of 1:1 and 1:9 and the cultivable population of both species was followed. The cultivable H. uvarum population decreased sharply at late stages when S. cerevisiae was present in the other compartment, similarly to alcoholic fermentations in non-compartmented vessels. Thus, cell-to-cell contact did not seem to be the main cause for the lack of cultivability of H. uvarum. Other compounds related to fermentation performance (such as sugar and ethanol) and/or certain metabolites secreted by S. cerevisiae could be related to the sharp decrease in H. uvarum cultivability. When these factors were analyzed, it was confirmed that metabolites from S. cerevisiae induced lack of cultivability in H. uvarum, however ethanol and other possible compounds did not seem to induce this effect but played some role during the process. This study contributes to a new understanding of the lack of cultivability of H. uvarum populations during the late stages of wine fermentation. PMID:25956738

  16. Improving biomass sugar utilization by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficient utilization of all available sugars in lignocellulosic biomass, which is more abundant than available commodity crops and starch, represents one of the most difficult technological challenges for the production of bioethanol. The well-studied yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has played a...

  17. Molecular mechanisms of ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a superb ethanol producer, yet sensitive to ethanol at higher concentrations especially under high gravity or very high gravity fermentation conditions. Although significant efforts have been made to study ethanol-stress response in past decades, molecular mecha...

  18. Phosphate uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hansen wild type and phenotypes exposed to space flight irradiation.

    PubMed

    Berry, D; Volz, P A

    1979-10-01

    Rates of phosphate uptake were approximately twice as great for Saccharomyces cerevisiae single-cell phenotypic isolates exposed to space parameters as for the wild-type ground control. Quantitative determination of 32P was performed by liquid scintillation spectrometry utilizing Cerenkov radiation counting techniques. PMID:395899

  19. Modulation of the acute phase response in feedlot steers supplemented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of supplementing feedlot steers with Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-1079 (SC) on the acute phase response to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Steers (n = 18; 266 ± 4 kilograms body weight) were separated into three treatment groups (n = 6/treatm...

  20. Copper Tolerance and Biosorption of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during Alcoholic Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling-ling; Jia, Bo; Zhao, Fang; Huang, Wei-dong; Zhan, Ji-cheng

    2015-01-01

    At high levels, copper in grape mash can inhibit yeast activity and cause stuck fermentations. Wine yeast has limited tolerance of copper and can reduce copper levels in wine during fermentation. This study aimed to understand copper tolerance of wine yeast and establish the mechanism by which yeast decreases copper in the must during fermentation. Three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (lab selected strain BH8 and industrial strains AWRI R2 and Freddo) and a simple model fermentation system containing 0 to 1.50 mM Cu2+ were used. ICP-AES determined Cu ion concentration in the must decreasing differently by strains and initial copper levels during fermentation. Fermentation performance was heavily inhibited under copper stress, paralleled a decrease in viable cell numbers. Strain BH8 showed higher copper-tolerance than strain AWRI R2 and higher adsorption than Freddo. Yeast cell surface depression and intracellular structure deformation after copper treatment were observed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy; electronic differential system detected higher surface Cu and no intracellular Cu on 1.50 mM copper treated yeast cells. It is most probably that surface adsorption dominated the biosorption process of Cu2+ for strain BH8, with saturation being accomplished in 24 h. This study demonstrated that Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BH8 has good tolerance and adsorption of Cu, and reduces Cu2+ concentrations during fermentation in simple model system mainly through surface adsorption. The results indicate that the strain selected from China’s stress-tolerant wine grape is copper tolerant and can reduce copper in must when fermenting in a copper rich simple model system, and provided information for studies on mechanisms of heavy metal stress. PMID:26030864

  1. The HOG MAP kinase pathway is required for the induction of methylglyoxal-responsive genes and determines methylglyoxal resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Jaime; Rodríguez-Vargas, Sonia; Prieto, Jose A

    2005-04-01

    A sudden overaccumulation of methylglyoxal (MG) induces, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the expression of MG-protective genes, including GPD1, GLO1 and GRE3. The response is partially dependent on the transcriptional factors Msn2p/Msn4p, but unrelated with the general stress response mechanism. Here, we show that the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG)-pathway controls the genetic response to MG and determines the yeast growth capacity upon MG exposure. Strains lacking the MAPK Hog1p, the upstream component Ssk1p or the HOG-dependent nuclear factor Msn1p, showed a reduction in the mRNA accumulation of MG-responsive genes after MG addition. Moreover, hyperactivation of Hog1p by deletion of protein phosphatase PTP2 enhanced the response, while blocking the pathway by deletion of the MAPKK PBS2 had a negative effect. In addition, the activity of Hog1p affected the basal level of GPD1 mRNA under non-inducing conditions. These effects had a great influence on MG resistance, as hog1Delta and other HOG-pathway mutants with impaired MG-specific expression displayed MG sensitivity, whereas those with enhanced expression exhibited MG resistance as compared with the wild-type. However, MG does not trigger the overphosphorylation of Hog1p or its nuclear import in the parental strain. Moreover, dual phosphorylation of Hog1p appears to be dispensable in the triggering of the transcriptional response, although a phosphorylable form of Hog1p is fundamental for the transcriptional activity. Overall, our results suggest that the basal activity of the HOG-pathway serves to amplify the expression of MG-responsive genes under non-inducing and inducing conditions, ensuring cell protection against this toxic glycolytic by-product. PMID:15773992

  2. Complete nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome X.

    PubMed Central

    Galibert, F; Alexandraki, D; Baur, A; Boles, E; Chalwatzis, N; Chuat, J C; Coster, F; Cziepluch, C; De Haan, M; Domdey, H; Durand, P; Entian, K D; Gatius, M; Goffeau, A; Grivell, L A; Hennemann, A; Herbert, C J; Heumann, K; Hilger, F; Hollenberg, C P; Huang, M E; Jacq, C; Jauniaux, J C; Katsoulou, C; Karpfinger-Hartl, L

    1996-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome X (745 442 bp) reveals a total of 379 open reading frames (ORFs), the coding region covering approximately 75% of the entire sequence. One hundred and eighteen ORFs (31%) correspond to genes previously identified in S. cerevisiae. All other ORFs represent novel putative yeast genes, whose function will have to be determined experimentally. However, 57 of the latter subset (another 15% of the total) encode proteins that show significant analogy to proteins of known function from yeast or other organisms. The remaining ORFs, exhibiting no significant similarity to any known sequence, amount to 54% of the total. General features of chromosome X are also reported, with emphasis on the nucleotide frequency distribution in the environment of the ATG and stop codons, the possible coding capacity of at least some of the small ORFs (<100 codons) and the significance of 46 non-canonical or unpaired nucleotides in the stems of some of the 24 tRNA genes recognized on this chromosome. Images PMID:8641269

  3. Genomic Evolution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Chinese Rice Wine Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yudong; Zhang, Weiping; Zheng, Daoqiong; Zhou, Zhan; Yu, Wenwen; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Lifang; Liang, Xinle; Guan, Wenjun; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian; Lin, Zhenguo

    2014-01-01

    Rice wine fermentation represents a unique environment for the evolution of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To understand how the selection pressure shaped the yeast genome and gene regulation, we determined the genome sequence and transcriptome of a S. cerevisiae strain YHJ7 isolated from Chinese rice wine (Huangjiu), a popular traditional alcoholic beverage in China. By comparing the genome of YHJ7 to the lab strain S288c, a Japanese sake strain K7, and a Chinese industrial bioethanol strain YJSH1, we identified many genomic sequence and structural variations in YHJ7, which are mainly located in subtelomeric regions, suggesting that these regions play an important role in genomic evolution between strains. In addition, our comparative transcriptome analysis between YHJ7 and S288c revealed a set of differentially expressed genes, including those involved in glucose transport (e.g., HXT2, HXT7) and oxidoredutase activity (e.g., AAD10, ADH7). Interestingly, many of these genomic and transcriptional variations are directly or indirectly associated with the adaptation of YHJ7 strain to its specific niches. Our molecular evolution analysis suggested that Japanese sake strains (K7/UC5) were derived from Chinese rice wine strains (YHJ7) at least approximately 2,300 years ago, providing the first molecular evidence elucidating the origin of Japanese sake strains. Our results depict interesting insights regarding the evolution of yeast during rice wine fermentation, and provided a valuable resource for genetic engineering to improve industrial wine-making strains. PMID:25212861

  4. Potential immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae as heavy metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffar, Nur Izzati Abdul; Rahman, Nadhratul Nur Ain Abdul; Alrozi, Rasyidah; Senusi, Faraziehan; Chang, Siu Hua

    2015-05-01

    Biosorption of copper ion using treated and untreated immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae from aqueous solution was investigate in this study. S.cerevisiae has been choosing as biosorbent due to low cost, easy and continuously available from various industries. In this study, the ability of treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae in removing copper ion influence by the effect of pH solution, and initial concentration of copper ion with contact time. Besides, adsorption isotherm and kinetic model also studied. The result indicated that the copper ion uptake on treated and untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae was increased with increasing of contact time and initial concentration of copper ion. The optimum pH for copper ion uptake on untreated and treated immobilized S.cerevisiae at 4 and 6. From the data obtained of copper ion uptake, the adsorption isotherm was fitted well by Freundlich model for treated immobilized S.cerevisiae and Langmuir model for untreated immobilized S.cerevisiae according to high correlation coefficient. Meanwhile, the pseudo second order was described as suitable model present according to high correlation coefficient. Since the application of biosorption process has been received more attention from numerous researchers as a potential process to be applied in the industry, future study will be conducted to investigate the potential of immobilized S.cerevisiae in continuous process.

  5. Evolutionary engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient aerobic xylose consumption.

    PubMed

    Scalcinati, Gionata; Otero, José Manuel; Van Vleet, Jennifer R H; Jeffries, Thomas W; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-08-01

    Industrial biotechnology aims to develop robust microbial cell factories, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to produce an array of added value chemicals presently dominated by petrochemical processes. Xylose is the second most abundant monosaccharide after glucose and the most prevalent pentose sugar found in lignocelluloses. Significant research efforts have focused on the metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for fast and efficient xylose utilization. This study aims to metabolically engineer S. cerevisiae, such that it can consume xylose as the exclusive substrate while maximizing carbon flux to biomass production. Such a platform may then be enhanced with complementary metabolic engineering strategies that couple biomass production with high value-added chemical. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expressing xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulose kinase, from the native xylose-metabolizing yeast Pichia stipitis, was constructed, followed by a directed evolution strategy to improve xylose utilization rates. The resulting S. cerevisiae strain was capable of rapid growth and fast xylose consumption producing only biomass and negligible amount of byproducts. Transcriptional profiling of this strain was employed to further elucidate the observed physiology confirms a strongly up-regulated glyoxylate pathway enabling respiratory metabolism. The resulting strain is a desirable platform for the industrial production of biomass-related products using xylose as a sole carbon source. PMID:22487265

  6. Effects of spaceflight on polysaccharides of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Zhi; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Xiao-Yong; Tan, Sze-Sze

    2008-12-01

    Freeze-dried samples of four Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, namely, FL01, FL03, 2.0016, and 2.1424, were subjected to spaceflight. After the satellite's landing on Earth, the samples were recovered and changes in yeast cell wall were analyzed. Spaceflight strains of all S. cerevisiae strains showed significant changes in cell wall thickness (P < 0.05). One mutant of S. cerevisiae 2.0016 with increased biomass, cell wall thickness, and cell wall glucan was isolated (P < 0.05). The spaceflight mutant of S. cerevisiae 2.0016 showed 46.7%, 62.6%, and 146.0% increment in biomass, cell wall thickness and beta-glucan content, respectively, when compared to the ground strain. Moreover, growth curve analysis showed spaceflight S. cerevisiae 2.0016 had a faster growth rate, shorter lag phase periods, higher final biomass, and higher content of beta-glucan. Genetic stability analysis showed that prolonged subculturing of spaceflight strain S. cerevisiae 2.0016 did not lead to the appearance of variants, indicating that the genetic stability of S. cerevisiae 2.0016 mutant could be sufficient for its exploitation of beta-glucan production. PMID:18797865

  7. Mutagenesis protocols in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by in vivo overlap extension.

    PubMed

    Alcalde, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    A high recombination frequency and its ease of manipulation has made Saccharomyces cerevisiae a unique model eukaryotic organism to study homologous recombination. Indeed, the well-developed recombination machinery in S. cerevisiae facilitates the construction of mutant libraries for directed evolution experiments. In this context, in vivo overlap extension (IVOE) is a particularly attractive protocol that takes advantage of the eukaryotic apparatus to carry out combinatorial saturation mutagenesis, site-directed recombination or site-directed mutagenesis, avoiding ligation steps and additional PCR reactions that are common to standard in vitro protocols. PMID:20676972

  8. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a sexy yeast with a prion problem.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Amy C; Wickner, Reed B

    2013-01-01

    Yeast prions are infectious proteins that spread exclusively by mating. The frequency of prions in the wild therefore largely reflects the rate of spread by mating counterbalanced by prion growth slowing effects in the host. We recently showed that the frequency of outcross mating is about 1% of mitotic doublings with 23-46% of total matings being outcrosses. These findings imply that even the mildest forms of the [PSI+], [URE3] and [PIN+] prions impart > 1% growth/survival detriment on their hosts. Our estimate of outcrossing suggests that Saccharomyces cerevisiae is far more sexual than previously thought and would therefore be more responsive to the adaptive effects of natural selection compared with a strictly asexual yeast. Further, given its large effective population size, a growth/survival detriment of > 1% for yeast prions should strongly select against prion-infected strains in wild populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:23764836

  9. Expression of bacterial mercuric ion reductase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Rensing, C; Kües, U; Stahl, U; Nies, D H; Friedrich, B

    1992-01-01

    The gene merA coding for bacterial mercuric ion reductase was cloned under the control of the yeast promoter for alcohol dehydrogenase I in the yeast-Escherichia coli shuttle plasmid pADH040-2 and transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae AH22. The resulting transformant harbored stable copies of the merA-containing hybrid plasmid, displayed a fivefold increase in the MIC of mercuric chloride, and synthesized mercuric ion reductase activity. Images PMID:1735719

  10. The Interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeast during Alcoholic Fermentation Is Species and Strain Specific.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2016-01-01

    The present study analyzes the lack of culturability of different non-Saccharomyces strains due to interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. Interaction was followed in mixed fermentations with 1:1 inoculation of S. cerevisiae and ten non-Saccharomyces strains. Starmerella bacillaris, and Torulaspora delbrueckii indicated longer coexistence in mixed fermentations compared with Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Strain differences in culturability and nutrient consumption (glucose, alanine, ammonium, arginine, or glutamine) were found within each species in mixed fermentation with S. cerevisiae. The interaction was further analyzed using cell-free supernatant from S. cerevisiae and synthetic media mimicking both single fermentations with S. cerevisiae and using mixed fermentations with the corresponding non-Saccharomyces species. Cell-free S. cerevisiae supernatants induced faster culturability loss than synthetic media corresponding to the same fermentation stage. This demonstrated that some metabolites produced by S. cerevisiae played the main role in the decreased culturability of the other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. However, changes in the concentrations of main metabolites had also an effect. Culturability differences were observed among species and strains in culture assays and thus showed distinct tolerance to S. cerevisiae metabolites and fermentation environment. Viability kit and recovery analyses on non-culturable cells verified the existence of viable but not-culturable status. These findings are discussed in the context of interaction between non-Saccharomyces and S. cerevisiae. PMID:27148191

  11. The Interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeast during Alcoholic Fermentation Is Species and Strain Specific

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2016-01-01

    The present study analyzes the lack of culturability of different non-Saccharomyces strains due to interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. Interaction was followed in mixed fermentations with 1:1 inoculation of S. cerevisiae and ten non-Saccharomyces strains. Starmerella bacillaris, and Torulaspora delbrueckii indicated longer coexistence in mixed fermentations compared with Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Strain differences in culturability and nutrient consumption (glucose, alanine, ammonium, arginine, or glutamine) were found within each species in mixed fermentation with S. cerevisiae. The interaction was further analyzed using cell-free supernatant from S. cerevisiae and synthetic media mimicking both single fermentations with S. cerevisiae and using mixed fermentations with the corresponding non-Saccharomyces species. Cell-free S. cerevisiae supernatants induced faster culturability loss than synthetic media corresponding to the same fermentation stage. This demonstrated that some metabolites produced by S. cerevisiae played the main role in the decreased culturability of the other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. However, changes in the concentrations of main metabolites had also an effect. Culturability differences were observed among species and strains in culture assays and thus showed distinct tolerance to S. cerevisiae metabolites and fermentation environment. Viability kit and recovery analyses on non-culturable cells verified the existence of viable but not-culturable status. These findings are discussed in the context of interaction between non-Saccharomyces and S. cerevisiae. PMID:27148191

  12. Nutritional and environmental factors in ethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, H.; Wilke, C.R.; Blanch, H.W.

    1983-05-01

    Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, a basic study of the nutritional and environmental factors in ethanol fermentation was carried out to provide fundamental and practical bases for design of fermentation media and culture conditions. The requirements for all active medium components need to be determined in order to establish balanced media, which are important to reduce raw materials costs and to minimize inhibition from buildup of excess feed components in recycle processes with selective ethanol removal. Pulse injection of nutrients into continuous cultures was an effective method for screening active nutrients. In a systematic sensitivity analysis the effect of feed concentration of these individual nutrients was then determined and allowed formulation of media optimal with respect to the major fermentation parameters. Biotin, pantothenate, myo-inositol, potassium and phosphates appeared to stimulate growth preferentially to ethanol production. In contrast, thiamine and pyridoxine appeared to enhance specific ethanol productivity. The effect of ammonium sulfate depended on concentration. A conceptual model was proposed to relate the effects of these nutrients to biochemical pathways and functions. With these data and model the minimum cost combination of raw materials to achieve a medium of well defined components can be determined with a linear program. This computer program shows that many growth factors and minerals can be added to media more economically as pure components than as fractions of complex factors. 225 references, 61 figures, 54 tables.

  13. Nutritional and environmental factors in ethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, H.

    1983-01-01

    Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, a basic study of the nutritional and environmental factors in ethanol fermentation was carried out to provide fundamental and practical bases for design of fermentation media and culture conditions. The requirements for all active medium components need to be determined in order to establish balanced media, which are important to reduce raw materials costs and to minimize inhibition from build-up of excess feed components in recycle processes with selective ethanol removal. The effect of feed concentration of individual nutrients was determined and allowed formulation of media optimal with respect to the major fermentation parameters. Biotin, pantothenate, myoinositol, potassium, and phosphates appeared to stimulate growth preferentially to ethanol production. Thiamine and pyridoxine appeared to have the opposite effect. A conceptual model was proposed to relate the effects of these nutrients to biochemical pathways and functions. The minimum cost combination of raw materials to achieve a medium of well defined components can be determined with a linear program. The effect of dissolved oxygen was studied from essentially zero to 346 mm Hg oxygen tension, showing a continuous decline in specific ethanol productivity with increasing oxygen over this range. Long term continuous cultures resulted in decreased media requirements for growth factors and increased tolerance for ethanol inhibition, most probably through adaptation. An ethanol productivity of 5.6 g/l-hr in continuous culture was achieved with a completely synthetic medium with the improved culture.

  14. Isolation, identification and characterization of regional indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Šuranská, Hana; Vránová, Dana; Omelková, Jiřina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we isolated and identified various indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and screened them for the selected oenological properties. These S. cerevisiae strains were isolated from berries and spontaneously fermented musts. The grape berries (Sauvignon blanc and Pinot noir) were grown under the integrated and organic mode of farming in the South Moravia (Czech Republic) wine region. Modern genotyping techniques such as PCR-fingerprinting and interdelta PCR typing were employed to differentiate among indigenous S. cerevisiae strains. This combination of the methods provides a rapid and relatively simple approach for identification of yeast of S. cerevisiae at strain level. In total, 120 isolates were identified and grouped by molecular approaches and 45 of the representative strains were tested for selected important oenological properties including ethanol, sulfur dioxide and osmotic stress tolerance, intensity of flocculation and desirable enzymatic activities. Their ability to produce and utilize acetic/malic acid was examined as well; in addition, H2S production as an undesirable property was screened. The oenological characteristics of indigenous isolates were compared to a commercially available S. cerevisiae BS6 strain, which is commonly used as the starter culture. Finally, some indigenous strains coming from organically treated grape berries were chosen for their promising oenological properties and these strains will be used as the starter culture, because application of a selected indigenous S. cerevisiae strain can enhance the regional character of the wines. PMID:26887243

  15. Isolation, identification and characterization of regional indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    PubMed Central

    Šuranská, Hana; Vránová, Dana; Omelková, Jiřina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we isolated and identified various indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and screened them for the selected oenological properties. These S. cerevisiae strains were isolated from berries and spontaneously fermented musts. The grape berries (Sauvignon blanc and Pinot noir) were grown under the integrated and organic mode of farming in the South Moravia (Czech Republic) wine region. Modern genotyping techniques such as PCR-fingerprinting and interdelta PCR typing were employed to differentiate among indigenous S. cerevisiae strains. This combination of the methods provides a rapid and relatively simple approach for identification of yeast of S. cerevisiae at strain level. In total, 120 isolates were identified and grouped by molecular approaches and 45 of the representative strains were tested for selected important oenological properties including ethanol, sulfur dioxide and osmotic stress tolerance, intensity of flocculation and desirable enzymatic activities. Their ability to produce and utilize acetic/malic acid was examined as well; in addition, H2S production as an undesirable property was screened. The oenological characteristics of indigenous isolates were compared to a commercially available S. cerevisiae BS6 strain, which is commonly used as the starter culture. Finally, some indigenous strains coming from organically treated grape berries were chosen for their promising oenological properties and these strains will be used as the starter culture, because application of a selected indigenous S. cerevisiae strain can enhance the regional character of the wines. PMID:26887243

  16. Evaluation of Lactobacillus plantarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the Presence of Bifenthrin.

    PubMed

    Đorđević, Tijana M; Đurović-Pejčev, Rada D

    2016-06-01

    This work describes the effect of insecticide bifenthrin on Lactobacillus plantarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Growths of used microorganisms in growth media supplemented with pesticide were studied. Determination of bacterial and yeast fermentation efficiency in wheat supplemented with bifenthrin was conducted. Additionally, investigation of bifenthrin dissipation during microbiological activity was performed. Experiments applying bifenthrin in different concentrations highlighted a negligible impact of the pesticide on the growth of L. plantarum and S. cerevisiae. This insecticide overall negatively affected the yeast fermentation of wheat, while its presence in wheat had a slight negative impact on lactic acid fermentation. The results of bifenthrin dissipation during lactic acid and yeast fermentations of wheat showed that activities of L. plantarum and S. cerevisiae caused lower pesticide reductions. Average bifenthrin residue reduction within samples fermented with L. plantarum was 5.4 % (maximum ~16 %), while within samples fermented with S. cerevisiae, it was 11.6 % (maximum ~17 %). PMID:26868256

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomes recognize non-AUG initiation codons.

    PubMed Central

    Zitomer, R S; Walthall, D A; Rymond, B C; Hollenberg, C P

    1984-01-01

    A series of Saccharomyces cerevisiae plasmids and mutant derivatives containing fusions of the Escherichia coli galactokinase gene, galK, to the yeast iso-1-cytochrome c CYC1 transcription unit were used to study the sequences affecting the initiation of translation in S. cerevisiae. When the CYC1 AUG initiation codon preceded the galK AUG codon and coding sequence and either the two AUGs were out of frame with each other or a nonsense codon was located between them, the expression of the galK gene was extremely low. Deletion of the CYC1 AUG and its surrounding sequences resulted in a 100-fold increase in galK expression. This dependence of galK expression on the elimination of the CYC1 AUG codon was used to select mutations in that codon. Then the ability of these altered initiation codons to serve in translational initiation was determined by reconstruction of the CYC1 gene 3' to and in frame with them. Initiation was found to occur at the codons UUG and AUA, but not at the codons AAA and AUC. Furthermore the codon UUG, when preceded by an A three nucleotides upstream, served as a better initiation codon than when a U was substituted for the A. The efficiency of translation from these non-AUG codons was quantitated by using a CYC1/galK protein-coding fusion and measuring cellular galactokinase levels. Initiation at the UUG codon was 6.9% as efficient as initiation at the wild-type AUG codon when preceded by an A three nucleotides upstream, but was over 10-fold less efficient when a U was substituted for that A. Initiation at AUA was 0.5% as efficient as at AUG. The effects of the sequences preceding the initiation codon are discussed in light of these results. PMID:6390186

  18. Pressure treatment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in low-moisture environments.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Marwen; Espinasse, Vincent; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; Gervais, Patrick

    2009-11-01

    We investigated the influence of cell hydration on the ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CBS 1171 to withstand extreme hydrostatic pressure in order to determine the mechanisms involved in cell resistance. Hydration conditions were modified in two different ways. We first modulated the chemical potential of water by adding glycerol in cell suspensions. Another procedure consisted in dehydrating cells aerobically and immersing them in perfluorooctane, an innocuous hydrophobic liquid used as a pressure-transmitting medium, prior to pressure treatments. This original method made it possible to transmit isostatic pressure to yeast powders without changing the initial water activity (aw) level at which cells had been equilibrated. The aw ranged between 0.11 and 0.99. Pressure treatments were applied at levels of up to 600 MPa for 10 min, 24 h, and 6 days. The dehydration of cells was found to strongly limit, or even prevent, cell inactivation under pressure. Notably, cells suspended in a water-glycerol mixture with aw levels of 0.71 or below were completely protected against all pressure treatments. Moreover, cells dehydrated aerobically survived for 6 days at 600 MPa even when aw levels were relatively high (up to 0.94). We highlighted the crucial role of water content in determining cellular damage under pressure. When water is available in a sufficient amount, high pressure induces membrane permeabilization, causing uncontrolled mass transfers that could lead to death during a prolonged holding under pressure. Possible mechanisms of membrane permeabilization are discussed. PMID:19633838

  19. Saccharomyces boulardii

    MedlinePlus

    ... believed to be a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast). Saccharomyces boulardii is used as medicine. Saccharomyces boulardii ... Hansen CBS 5926), Probiotic, Probiotique, Saccharomyces, Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, S. Boulardii.

  20. mRNA transcription in nuclei isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, J F; Jaehning, J A

    1986-01-01

    We developed an improved method for the isolation of transcriptionally active nuclei from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which allows analysis of specific transcripts. When incubated with alpha-32P-labeled ribonucleoside triphosphates in vitro, nuclei isolated from haploid or diploid cells transcribed rRNA, tRNA, and mRNAs in a strand-specific manner, as shown by slot blot hybridization of the in vitro synthesized RNA to cloned genes encoding 5.8S, 18S and 28S rRNAs, tRNATyr, and GAL7, URA3, TY1 and HIS3 mRNAs. A yeast strain containing a high-copy-number plasmid which overproduced GAL7 mRNA was initially used to facilitate detection of a discrete message. We optimized conditions for the transcription of genes expressed by each of the three yeast nuclear RNA polymerases. Under optimal conditions, labeled transcripts could be detected from single-copy genes normally expressed at low levels in the cells (HIS3 and URA3). We determined that the alpha-amanitin sensitivity of transcript synthesis in the isolated nuclei paralleled the sensitivity of the corresponding purified RNA polymerases; in particular, mRNA synthesis was 50% sensitive to 1 microgram of alpha-amanitin per ml, establishing transcription of mRNA by RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:3537708

  1. Phosphatidylcholine Supply to Peroxisomes of the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Flis, Vid V; Fankl, Ariane; Ramprecht, Claudia; Zellnig, Günther; Leitner, Erich; Hermetter, Albin; Daum, Günther

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, phosphatidylcholine (PC), the major phospholipid (PL) of all organelle membranes, is synthesized via two different pathways. Methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) catalyzed by the methyl transferases Cho2p/Pem1p and Opi3p/Pem2p as well as incorporation of choline through the CDP (cytidine diphosphate)-choline branch of the Kennedy pathway lead to PC formation. To determine the contribution of these two pathways to the supply of PC to peroxisomes (PX), yeast mutants bearing defects in the two pathways were cultivated under peroxisome inducing conditions, i.e. in the presence of oleic acid, and subjected to biochemical and cell biological analyses. Phenotype studies revealed compromised growth of both the cho20Δopi3Δ (mutations in the methylation pathway) and the cki1Δdpl1Δeki1Δ (mutations in the CDP-choline pathway) mutant when grown on oleic acid. Analysis of peroxisomes from the two mutant strains showed that both pathways produce PC for the supply to peroxisomes, although the CDP-choline pathway seemed to contribute with higher efficiency than the methylation pathway. Changes in the peroxisomal lipid pattern of mutants caused by defects in the PC biosynthetic pathways resulted in changes of membrane properties as shown by anisotropy measurements with fluorescent probes. In summary, our data define the origin of peroxisomal PC and demonstrate the importance of PC for peroxisome membrane formation and integrity. PMID:26241051

  2. Phosphatidylcholine Supply to Peroxisomes of the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ramprecht, Claudia; Zellnig, Günther; Leitner, Erich; Hermetter, Albin; Daum, Günther

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, phosphatidylcholine (PC), the major phospholipid (PL) of all organelle membranes, is synthesized via two different pathways. Methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) catalyzed by the methyl transferases Cho2p/Pem1p and Opi3p/Pem2p as well as incorporation of choline through the CDP (cytidine diphosphate)-choline branch of the Kennedy pathway lead to PC formation. To determine the contribution of these two pathways to the supply of PC to peroxisomes (PX), yeast mutants bearing defects in the two pathways were cultivated under peroxisome inducing conditions, i.e. in the presence of oleic acid, and subjected to biochemical and cell biological analyses. Phenotype studies revealed compromised growth of both the cho20Δopi3Δ (mutations in the methylation pathway) and the cki1Δdpl1Δeki1Δ (mutations in the CDP-choline pathway) mutant when grown on oleic acid. Analysis of peroxisomes from the two mutant strains showed that both pathways produce PC for the supply to peroxisomes, although the CDP-choline pathway seemed to contribute with higher efficiency than the methylation pathway. Changes in the peroxisomal lipid pattern of mutants caused by defects in the PC biosynthetic pathways resulted in changes of membrane properties as shown by anisotropy measurements with fluorescent probes. In summary, our data define the origin of peroxisomal PC and demonstrate the importance of PC for peroxisome membrane formation and integrity. PMID:26241051

  3. Oxygen requirements of yeasts. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae; Candida tropicalis

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, W.; Scheffers, W.A.; Batenburg-Van Der Vegte, W.H.; Van Dijken, J.P. )

    1990-12-01

    Type species of 75 yeast genera were examined for their ability to grow anaerobically in complex and mineral media. To define anaerobic conditions, we added a redox indicator, resazurin, to the media to determine low redox potentials. All strains tested were capable of fermenting glucose to ethanol in oxygen-limited shake-flask cultures, even those of species generally regarded as nonfermentative. However, only 23% of the yeast species tested grew under anaerobic conditions. A comparative study with a number of selected strains revealed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae stands out as a yeast capable of rapid growth at low redox potentials. Other yeasts, such as Torulaspora delbrueckii and Candida tropicalis, grew poorly ({mu}{sub max}, 0.03 and 0.05 h{sup {minus}1}, respectively) under anaerobic conditions in mineral medium supplemented with Tween 80 and ergosterol. The latter organisms grew rapidly under oxygen limitation and then displayed a high rate of alcoholic fermentation. It can be concluded that these yeasts have hitherto-unidentified oxygen requirements for growth.

  4. Identification of Genes Affecting Vacuole Membrane Fragmentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Michaillat, Lydie; Mayer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The equilibrium of membrane fusion and fission influences the volume and copy number of organelles. Fusion of yeast vacuoles has been well characterized but their fission and the mechanisms determining vacuole size and abundance remain poorly understood. We therefore attempted to systematically characterize factors necessary for vacuole fission. Here, we present results of an in vivo screening for deficiencies in vacuolar fragmentation activity of an ordered collection deletion mutants, representing 4881 non-essential genes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screen identified 133 mutants with strong defects in vacuole fragmentation. These comprise numerous known fragmentation factors, such as the Fab1p complex, Tor1p, Sit4p and the V-ATPase, thus validating the approach. The screen identified many novel factors promoting vacuole fragmentation. Among those are 22 open reading frames of unknown function and three conspicuous clusters of proteins with known function. The clusters concern the ESCRT machinery, adaptins, and lipases, which influence the production of diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. A common feature of these factors of known function is their capacity to change membrane curvature, suggesting that they might promote vacuole fragmentation via this property. PMID:23383298

  5. Rapid identification of chemical genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, David; Nelson, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Determining the mode of action of bioactive chemicals is of interest to a broad range of academic, pharmaceutical, and industrial scientists. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or budding yeast, is a model eukaryote for which a complete collection of ~6,000 gene deletion mutants and hypomorphic essential gene mutants are commercially available. These collections of mutants can be used to systematically detect chemical-gene interactions, i.e. genes necessary to tolerate a chemical. This information, in turn, reports on the likely mode of action of the compound. Here we describe a protocol for the rapid identification of chemical-genetic interactions in budding yeast. We demonstrate the method using the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which has a well-defined mechanism of action. Our results show that the nuclear TRAMP RNA exosome and DNA repair enzymes are needed for proliferation in the presence of 5-FU, which is consistent with previous microarray based bar-coding chemical genetic approaches and the knowledge that 5-FU adversely affects both RNA and DNA metabolism. The required validation protocols of these high-throughput screens are also described. PMID:25867090

  6. Mating-Type Genes and MAT Switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Haber, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Mating type in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is determined by two nonhomologous alleles, MATa and MATα. These sequences encode regulators of the two different haploid mating types and of the diploids formed by their conjugation. Analysis of the MATa1, MATα1, and MATα2 alleles provided one of the earliest models of cell-type specification by transcriptional activators and repressors. Remarkably, homothallic yeast cells can switch their mating type as often as every generation by a highly choreographed, site-specific homologous recombination event that replaces one MAT allele with different DNA sequences encoding the opposite MAT allele. This replacement process involves the participation of two intact but unexpressed copies of mating-type information at the heterochromatic loci, HMLα and HMRa, which are located at opposite ends of the same chromosome-encoding MAT. The study of MAT switching has yielded important insights into the control of cell lineage, the silencing of gene expression, the formation of heterochromatin, and the regulation of accessibility of the donor sequences. Real-time analysis of MAT switching has provided the most detailed description of the molecular events that occur during the homologous recombinational repair of a programmed double-strand chromosome break. PMID:22555442

  7. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a nomadic yeast with no niche?

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Matthew R.; Greig, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Different species are usually thought to have specific adaptations, which allow them to occupy different ecological niches. But recent neutral ecology theory suggests that species diversity can simply be the result of random sampling, due to finite population sizes and limited dispersal. Neutral models predict that species are not necessarily adapted to specific niches, but are functionally equivalent across a range of habitats. Here, we evaluate the ecology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the most important microbial species in human history. The artificial collection, concentration and fermentation of large volumes of fruit for alcohol production produce an environment in which S. cerevisiae thrives, and therefore it is assumed that fruit is the ecological niche that S. cerevisiae inhabits and has adapted to. We find very little direct evidence that S. cerevisiae is adapted to fruit, or indeed to any other specific niche. We propose instead a neutral nomad model for S. cerevisiae, which we believe should be used as the starting hypothesis in attempting to unravel the ecology of this important microbe. PMID:25725024

  8. Efficient expression of a Paenibacillus barcinonensis endoglucanase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mormeneo, María; Pastor, Fi Javier; Zueco, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    The endoglucanase coded by celA (GenBank Access No. Y12512) from Paenibacillus barcinonensis, an enzyme with good characteristics for application on paper manufacture from agricultural fibers, was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using different domains of the cell wall protein Pir4 as translational fusion partners, to achieve either secretion or cell wall retention of the recombinant enzyme. Given the presence of five potential N-glycosylation sites in the amino acid sequence coded by celA, the effect of glycosylation on the enzymatic activity of the recombinant enzyme was investigated by expressing the recombinant fusion proteins in both, standard and glycosylation-deficient strains of S. cerevisiae. Correct targeting of the recombinant fusion proteins was confirmed by Western immunoblot using Pir-specific antibodies, while enzymatic activity on carboxymethyl cellulose was demonstrated on plate assays, zymographic analysis and colorimetric assays. Hyperglycosylation of the enzyme when expressed in the standard strain of S. cerevisiae did not affect activity, and values of 1.2 U/ml were obtained in growth medium supernatants in ordinary batch cultures after 24 h. These values compare quite favorably with those described for other recombinant endoglucanases expressed in S. cerevisiae. This is one of the few reports describing the expression of Bacillus cellulases in S. cerevisiae, since yeast expressed recombinant cellulases have been mostly of fungal origin. It is also the first report of the yeast expression of this particular endoglucanase. PMID:21701899

  9. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae Internet protein resource now available.

    PubMed

    Latter, G I; Boutell, T; Monardo, P J; Kobayashi, R; Futcher, B; Mclaughlin, C S; Garrels, J I

    1995-07-01

    The QUEST Protein Database Center is now making available two Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein databases via the Internet. The yeast electrophoretic protein database (YEPD) is a database of approximately one hundred protein identifications on two-dimensional gels. The yeast protein database (YPD) is a database of gene names and properties of over 3500 yeast proteins of known sequence. These databases can be accessed via a World-Wide Web (WWW) server (URL http:@siva.cshl.org). YPD is available via public ftp (isis.cshl.org) as well, in a spreadsheet format, and in ASCII format. When accessed via WWW, both of these databases have hypertext links to other biological data, such as the SWISS-PROT protein sequence database and the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SacchDB), and to each other. PMID:7498160

  10. Gains and Losses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus.

    PubMed

    Schaefke, Bernhard; Wang, Tzi-Yuan; Wang, Chuen-Yi; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2015-08-01

    Gene expression evolution occurs through changes in cis- or trans-regulatory elements or both. Interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and their binding sites (TFBSs) constitute one of the most important points where these two regulatory components intersect. In this study, we investigated the evolution of TFBSs in the promoter regions of different Saccharomyces strains and species. We divided the promoter of a gene into the proximal region and the distal region, which are defined, respectively, as the 200-bp region upstream of the transcription starting site and as the 200-bp region upstream of the proximal region. We found that the predicted TFBSs in the proximal promoter regions tend to be evolutionarily more conserved than those in the distal promoter regions. Additionally, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used in the fermentation of alcoholic drinks have experienced more TFBS losses than gains compared with strains from other environments (wild strains, laboratory strains, and clinical strains). We also showed that differences in TFBSs correlate with the cis component of gene expression evolution between species (comparing S. cerevisiae and its sister species Saccharomyces paradoxus) and within species (comparing two closely related S. cerevisiae strains). PMID:26220934

  11. Advanced biofuel production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-06-01

    Replacement of conventional transportation fuels with biofuels will require production of compounds that can cover the complete fuel spectrum, ranging from gasoline to kerosene. Advanced biofuels are expected to play an important role in replacing fossil fuels because they have improved properties compared with ethanol and some of these may have the energy density required for use in heavy duty vehicles, ships, and aviation. Moreover, advanced biofuels can be used as drop-in fuels in existing internal combustion engines. The yeast cell factory Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be turned into a producer of higher alcohols (1-butanol and isobutanol), sesquiterpenes (farnesene and bisabolene), and fatty acid ethyl esters (biodiesel), and here we discusses progress in metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for production of these advanced biofuels. PMID:23628723

  12. Direct evidence for a xylose metabolic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Batt, C.A.; Carvallo, S.; Easson, D.D.; Akedo, M.; Sinskey, A.J.

    1986-04-01

    Xylose transport, xylose reductase, and xylitol dehydrogenase activities are demonstrated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzymes in the xylose catabolic pathway necessary for the conversion of xylose xylulose are present, although S. cerevisiae cannot grow on xylose as a sole carbon source. Xylose transport is less efficient than glucose transport, and its rate is dependent upon aeration. Xylose reductase appears to be a xylose inducible enzyme and xylitol dehydrogenase activity is constitutive, although both are repressed by glucose. Both xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase activities are five- to tenfold lower in S. cerevisie as compared to Candida utilis. In vivo conversion of /sup 14/C-xylose in S. cerevisiage is demonstrated and xylitol is detected, although no significant levels of any other /sup 14/C-labeled metabolites (e.g., ethanol) are observed. 22 references.

  13. Purification of fluorescently labeled Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spindle Pole Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Trisha N.

    2016-01-01

    Centrosomes are components of the mitotic spindle responsible for organizing microtubules and establishing a bipolar spindle for accurate chromosome segregation. In budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the centrosome is called the spindle pole body, a highly organized tri-laminar structure embedded in the nuclear envelope. Here we describe a detailed protocol for the purification of fluorescently labeled spindle pole bodes from S. cerevisiae. Spindle pole bodies are purified from yeast using a TAP-tag purification followed by velocity sedimentation. This highly reproducible TAP-tag purification method improves upon previous techniques and expands the scope of in vitro characterization of yeast spindle pole bodies. The genetic flexibility of this technique allows for the study of spindle pole body mutants as well as the study of spindle pole bodies during different stages of the cell cycle. The ease and reproducibility of the technique makes it possible to study spindle pole bodies using a variety of biochemical, biophysical, and microscopic techniques. PMID:27193850

  14. Energy-dependent effects of resveratrol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Madrigal-Perez, Luis Alberto; Canizal-Garcia, Melina; González-Hernández, Juan Carlos; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalia; Nava, Gerardo M; Ramos-Gomez, Minerva

    2016-06-01

    The metabolic effects induced by resveratrol have been associated mainly with the consumption of high-calorie diets; however, its effects with standard or low-calorie diets remain unclear. To better understand the interactions between resveratrol and cellular energy levels, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model. Herein it is shown that resveratrol: (a) decreased cell viability in an energy-dependent manner; (b) lessening of cell viability occurred specifically when cells were under cellular respiration; and (c) inhibition of oxygen consumption in state 4 occurred at low and standard energy levels, whereas at high energy levels oxygen consumption was promoted. These findings indicate that the effects of resveratrol are dependent on the cellular energy status and linked to metabolic respiration. Importantly, our study also revealed that S. cerevisiae is a suitable and useful model to elucidate the molecular targets of resveratrol under different nutritional statuses. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26945517

  15. ROG1 encodes a monoacylglycerol lipase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vishnu Varthini, Lakshmanaperumal; Selvaraju, Kandasamy; Srinivasan, Malathi; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is extensively studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we report that revertant of glycogen synthase kinase mutation-1 (Rog1p) possesses monoacylglycerol (MAG) lipase activity in S. cerevisiae. The lipase activity of Rog1p was confirmed in two ways: through analysis of a strain with a double deletion of ROG1 and monoglyceride lipase YJU3 (yju3Δrog1Δ) and by site-directed mutagenesis of the ROG1 lipase motif (GXSXG). Rog1p is localized in both the cytosol and the nucleus. Overexpression of ROG1 in a ROG1-deficient strain resulted in an accumulation of reactive oxygen species. These results suggest that Rog1p is a MAG lipase that regulates lipid homeostasis. PMID:25433290

  16. Mutants of the Formyltetrahydrofolate Interconversion Pathway of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, K. Q.; Jones, Elizabeth W.

    1977-01-01

    Thirteen mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that lack one or more of the three enzyme activities of the pathway for interconversion of tetrahydrofolate coenzymes at the formate level of oxidation have been isolated. They do not require adenine. All fail to complement mutations in the ade3 locus. Mutations that greatly reduce activity for one enzyme also reduce activity for the other two interconversion enzymes. The three enzyme activities cochromatograph on TEAE-cellulose columns. A mutation that eliminates synthetase activity also alters the chromatographic behavior of the remaining cyclohydrolase and dehydrogenase activities. It is suggested that the three activities reside in an enzyme complex encoded by the ade3 locus. PMID:328341

  17. Immobilized cell cross-flow reactor. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Chotani, G.K.; Constantinides, A.

    1984-01-01

    A cross-current flow reactor was operated using sodium alginate gel entrapped yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) under growth conditions. Micron-sized silica, incorporated into the biocatalyst particles (1 mm mean diameter) improved mechanical strength and internal surface adhesion. The process showed decreased productivity and stability at 35/sup 0/C compared to the normal study done at 30/sup 0/C. The increased number of cross flows diminish the product inhibition effect. The residence time distribution shows that the cross-flow bioreactor system can be approximated to either a train of backmixed fermentors in series or a plug flow fermentor with moderate axial dispersion.

  18. SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE Recessive Suppressor That Circumvents Phosphatidylserine Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Katharine D.

    1984-01-01

    Phenotypic reversion of six independent Saccharomyces cerevisiae cho1 mutants was shown to be due predominantly to mutation of an unlinked gene, eam1. The eam1 gene was located very close to ino1 on chromosome X by meiotic tetrad analysis. Recessive eam1 mutations did not correct the primary cho1 defect in phosphatidylserine synthesis but made endogenous ethanolamine available for sustained nitrogenous phospholipid synthesis. A novel biochemical contribution to nitrogenous lipid synthesis is indicated by the eam1 mutants. PMID:17246236

  19. RNAi-Assisted Genome Evolution (RAGE) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Si, Tong; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi)-assisted genome evolution (RAGE) applies directed evolution principles to engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes. Here, we use acetic acid tolerance as a target trait to describe the key steps of RAGE. Briefly, iterative cycles of RNAi screening are performed to accumulate multiplex knockdown modifications, enabling directed evolution of the yeast genome and continuous improvement of a target phenotype. Detailed protocols are provided on the reconstitution of RNAi machinery, creation of genome-wide RNAi libraries, identification and integration of beneficial knockdown cassettes, and repeated RAGE cycles. PMID:27581294

  20. Isobutanol production from D-xylose by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brat, Dawid; Boles, Eckhard

    2013-03-01

    Simultaneous overexpression of an optimized, cytosolically localized valine biosynthesis pathway together with overexpression of xylose isomerase XylA from Clostridium phytofermentans, transaldolase Tal1 and xylulokinase Xks1 enabled recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to complement the valine auxotrophy of ilv2,3,5 triple deletion mutants for growth on D-xylose as the sole carbon source. Moreover, after additional overexpression of ketoacid decarboxylase Aro10 and alcohol dehydrogenase Adh2, the cells were able to ferment D-xylose directly to isobutanol. PMID:23279585

  1. Use of bimolecular fluorescence complementation in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Skarp, Kari-Pekka; Zhao, Xueqiang; Weber, Marion; Jantti, Jussi

    2008-01-01

    Visualization of protein-protein interactions in vivo offers a powerful tool to resolve spatial and temporal aspects of cellular functions. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) makes use of nonfluorescent fragments of green fluorescent protein or its variants that are added as "tags" to target proteins under study. Only upon target protein interaction is a fluorescent protein complex assembled and the site of interaction can be monitored by microscopy. In this chapter, we describe the method and tools for use of BiFC in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:19066026

  2. Expression of acylphosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae enhances ethanol fermentation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Raugei, G.; Modesti, A.; Magherini, F.

    1996-06-01

    Previous experiments in vitro have demonstrated the ability of acylphosphatase to increase the rate of glucose fermentation in yeast. To evaluate the possibility of increasing fermentation in vivo also, a chemically synthesized DNA sequence coding for human muscle acylphosphatase was expressed at high level in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Ethanol production was measured in these engineered strains in comparison with a control. Acylphosphatase expression strongly increased the rate of ethanol production both in aerobic and anaerobic culture. This finding may be potentially important for the development of more efficient industrial fermentation processes. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Sucrose and Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a relationship most sweet.

    PubMed

    Marques, Wesley Leoricy; Raghavendran, Vijayendran; Stambuk, Boris Ugarte; Gombert, Andreas Karoly

    2016-02-01

    Sucrose is an abundant, readily available and inexpensive substrate for industrial biotechnology processes and its use is demonstrated with much success in the production of fuel ethanol in Brazil. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which naturally evolved to efficiently consume sugars such as sucrose, is one of the most important cell factories due to its robustness, stress tolerance, genetic accessibility, simple nutrient requirements and long history as an industrial workhorse. This minireview is focused on sucrose metabolism in S. cerevisiae, a rather unexplored subject in the scientific literature. An analysis of sucrose availability in nature and yeast sugar metabolism was performed, in order to understand the molecular background that makes S. cerevisiae consume this sugar efficiently. A historical overview on the use of sucrose and S. cerevisiae by humans is also presented considering sugarcane and sugarbeet as the main sources of this carbohydrate. Physiological aspects of sucrose consumption are compared with those concerning other economically relevant sugars. Also, metabolic engineering efforts to alter sucrose catabolism are presented in a chronological manner. In spite of its extensive use in yeast-based industries, a lot of basic and applied research on sucrose metabolism is imperative, mainly in fields such as genetics, physiology and metabolic engineering. PMID:26658003

  4. Human acylphosphatase cannot replace phosphoglycerate kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Van Hoek, P; Modesti, A; Ramponi, G; Kötter, P; van Dijken, J P; Pron, J T

    2001-10-01

    Human acylphosphatase (h-AP, EC 3.6.1.7) has been reported to catalyse the hydrolysis of the 1-phosphate group of 1,3-diphosphoglycerate. In vivo operation of this reaction in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae would bypass phosphoglycerate kinase and thus reduce the ATP yield from glycolysis. To investigate whether h-AP can indeed replace the S. cerevisiae phosphoglycerate kinase, a multi-copy plasmid carrying the h-AP gene under control of the yeast TDH3 promoter was introduced into a pgk1 delta mutant of S. cerevisiae. A strain carrying the expression vector without the h-AP cassette was used as a reference. For both strains, steady-state carbon- and energy-limited chemostat cultures were obtained at a dilution rate of 0.10 h(-1) on a medium containing a mixture of glucose and ethanol (15% and 85% on a carbon basis, respectively). Although the h-AP strain exhibited a high acylphosphatase activity in cell extracts, switching to glucose as sole carbon and energy source resulted in a complete arrest of glucose consumption and growth. The lack of a functional glycolytic pathway was further evident from the absence of ethanol formation in the presence of excess glucose in the culture. As h-AP cannot replace yeast phosphoglycerate kinase in vivo, the enzyme is not a useful tool to modify the ATP yield of glycolysis in S. cerevisiae. PMID:11761363

  5. Genetic variation of the repeated MAL loci in natural populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus.

    PubMed

    Naumov, G I; Naumova, E S; Michels, C A

    1994-03-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the gene functions required to ferment the disaccharide maltose are encoded by the MAL loci. Any one of five highly sequence homologous MAL loci identified in various S. cerevisiae strains (called MAL1, 2, 3, 4 and 6) is sufficient to ferment maltose. Each is a complex of three genes encoding maltose permease, maltase and a transcription activator. This family of loci maps to telomere-linked positions on different chromosomes and most natural strains contain more than one MAL locus. A number of naturally occurring, mutant alleles of MAL1 and MAL3 have been characterized which lack one or more of the gene functions encoded by the fully functional MAL loci. Loss of these gene functions appears to have resulted from mutation and/or rearrangement within the locus. Studies to date concentrated on the standard maltose fermenting strains of S. cerevisiae available from the Berkeley Yeast Stock Center collection. In this report we extend our genetic analysis of the MAL loci to a number of maltose fermenting and nonfermenting natural strains of S. cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus. No new MAL loci were discovered but several new mutant alleles of MAL1 were identified. The evolution of this gene family is discussed. PMID:8005435

  6. A Computational Approach to Estimating Nondisjunction Frequency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Daniel B.; Burgess, Sean M.

    2016-01-01

    Errors segregating homologous chromosomes during meiosis result in aneuploid gametes and are the largest contributing factor to birth defects and spontaneous abortions in humans. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has long served as a model organism for studying the gene network supporting normal chromosome segregation. Measuring homolog nondisjunction frequencies is laborious, and involves dissecting thousands of tetrads to detect missegregation of individually marked chromosomes. Here we describe a computational method (TetFit) to estimate the relative contributions of meiosis I nondisjunction and random-spore death to spore inviability in wild type and mutant strains. These values are based on finding the best-fit distribution of 4, 3, 2, 1, and 0 viable-spore tetrads to an observed distribution. Using TetFit, we found that meiosis I nondisjunction is an intrinsic component of spore inviability in wild-type strains. We show proof-of-principle that the calculated average meiosis I nondisjunction frequency determined by TetFit closely matches empirically determined values in mutant strains. Using these published data sets, TetFit uncovered two classes of mutants: Class A mutants skew toward increased nondisjunction death, and include those with known defects in establishing pairing, recombination, and/or synapsis of homologous chromosomes. Class B mutants skew toward random spore death, and include those with defects in sister-chromatid cohesion and centromere function. Epistasis analysis using TetFit is facilitated by the low numbers of tetrads (as few as 200) required to compare the contributions to spore death in different mutant backgrounds. TetFit analysis does not require any special strain construction, and can be applied to previously observed tetrad distributions. PMID:26747203

  7. A Computational Approach to Estimating Nondisjunction Frequency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chu, Daniel B; Burgess, Sean M

    2016-03-01

    Errors segregating homologous chromosomes during meiosis result in aneuploid gametes and are the largest contributing factor to birth defects and spontaneous abortions in humans. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has long served as a model organism for studying the gene network supporting normal chromosome segregation. Measuring homolog nondisjunction frequencies is laborious, and involves dissecting thousands of tetrads to detect missegregation of individually marked chromosomes. Here we describe a computational method (TetFit) to estimate the relative contributions of meiosis I nondisjunction and random-spore death to spore inviability in wild type and mutant strains. These values are based on finding the best-fit distribution of 4, 3, 2, 1, and 0 viable-spore tetrads to an observed distribution. Using TetFit, we found that meiosis I nondisjunction is an intrinsic component of spore inviability in wild-type strains. We show proof-of-principle that the calculated average meiosis I nondisjunction frequency determined by TetFit closely matches empirically determined values in mutant strains. Using these published data sets, TetFit uncovered two classes of mutants: Class A mutants skew toward increased nondisjunction death, and include those with known defects in establishing pairing, recombination, and/or synapsis of homologous chromosomes. Class B mutants skew toward random spore death, and include those with defects in sister-chromatid cohesion and centromere function. Epistasis analysis using TetFit is facilitated by the low numbers of tetrads (as few as 200) required to compare the contributions to spore death in different mutant backgrounds. TetFit analysis does not require any special strain construction, and can be applied to previously observed tetrad distributions. PMID:26747203

  8. Candida zemplinina Can Reduce Acetic Acid Produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Sweet Wine Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Dolci, Paola; Giacosa, Simone; Torchio, Fabrizio; Tofalo, Rosanna; Torriani, Sandra; Suzzi, Giovanna; Rolle, Luca

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigated the possibility of using Candida zemplinina, as a partner of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in mixed fermentations of must with a high sugar content, in order to reduce its acetic acid production. Thirty-five C. zemplinina strains, which were isolated from different geographic regions, were molecularly characterized, and their fermentation performances were determined. Five genetically different strains were selected for mixed fermentations with S. cerevisiae. Two types of inoculation were carried out: coinoculation and sequential inoculation. A balance between the two species was generally observed for the first 6 days, after which the levels of C. zemplinina started to decrease. Relevant differences were observed concerning the consumption of sugars, the ethanol and glycerol content, and acetic acid production, depending on which strain was used and which type of inoculation was performed. Sequential inoculation led to the reduction of about half of the acetic acid content compared to the pure S. cerevisiae fermentation, but the ethanol and glycerol amounts were also low. A coinoculation with selected combinations of S. cerevisiae and C. zemplinina resulted in a decrease of ∼0.3 g of acetic acid/liter, while maintaining high ethanol and glycerol levels. This study demonstrates that mixed S. cerevisiae and C. zemplinina fermentation could be applied in sweet wine fermentation to reduce the production of acetic acid, connected to the S. cerevisiae osmotic stress response. PMID:22247148

  9. Diversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Isolated from Two Italian Wine-Producing Regions.

    PubMed

    Capece, Angela; Granchi, Lisa; Guerrini, Simona; Mangani, Silvia; Romaniello, Rossana; Vincenzini, Massimo; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies, based on different molecular techniques analyzing DNA polymorphism, have provided evidence that indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations display biogeographic patterns. Since the differentiated populations of S. cerevisiae seem to be responsible for the regional identity of wine, the aim of this work was to assess a possible relationship between the diversity and the geographical origin of indigenous S. cerevisiae isolates from two different Italian wine-producing regions (Tuscany and Basilicata). For this purpose, sixty-three isolates from Aglianico del Vulture grape must (main cultivar in the Basilicata region) and from Sangiovese grape must (main cultivar in the Tuscany region) were characterized genotypically, by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis and MSP-PCR by using (GTG)5 primers, and phenotypically, by determining technological properties and metabolic compounds of oenological interest after alcoholic fermentation. All the S. cerevisiae isolates from each region were inoculated both in must obtained from Aglianico grape and in must obtained from Sangiovese grape to carry out fermentations at laboratory-scale. Numerical analysis of DNA patterns resulting from both molecular methods and principal component analysis of phenotypic data demonstrated a high diversity among the S. cerevisiae strains. Moreover, a correlation between genotypic and phenotypic groups and geographical origin of the strains was found, supporting the concept that there can be a microbial aspect to terroir. Therefore, exploring the diversity of indigenous S. cerevisiae strains can allow developing tailored strategies to select wine yeast strains better adapted to each viticultural area. PMID:27446054

  10. The distribution of inverted repeat sequences in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Gary; Gelfand, Yevgeniy; Benham, Craig J.

    2010-01-01

    Although a variety of possible functions have been proposed for inverted repeat sequences (IRs), it is not known which of them might occur in vivo. We investigate this question by assessing the distributions and properties of IRs in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SC) genome. Using the IRFinder algorithm we detect 100,514 IRs having copy length greater than 6 bp and spacer length less than 77 bp. To assess statistical significance we also determine the IR distributions in two types of randomization of the S. cerevisiae genome. We find that the S. cerevisiae genome is significantly enriched in IRs relative to random. The S. cerevisiae IRs are significantly longer and contain fewer imperfections than those from the randomized genomes, suggesting that processes to lengthen and/or correct errors in IRs may be operative in vivo. The S. cerevisiae IRs are highly clustered in intergenic regions, while their occurrence in coding sequences is consistent with random. Clustering is stronger in the 3′ flanks of genes than in their 5′ flanks. However, the S. cerevisiae genome is not enriched in those IRs that would extrude cruciforms, suggesting that this is not a common event. Various explanations for these results are considered. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00294-010-0302-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20446088

  11. Diversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Isolated from Two Italian Wine-Producing Regions

    PubMed Central

    Capece, Angela; Granchi, Lisa; Guerrini, Simona; Mangani, Silvia; Romaniello, Rossana; Vincenzini, Massimo; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies, based on different molecular techniques analyzing DNA polymorphism, have provided evidence that indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations display biogeographic patterns. Since the differentiated populations of S. cerevisiae seem to be responsible for the regional identity of wine, the aim of this work was to assess a possible relationship between the diversity and the geographical origin of indigenous S. cerevisiae isolates from two different Italian wine-producing regions (Tuscany and Basilicata). For this purpose, sixty-three isolates from Aglianico del Vulture grape must (main cultivar in the Basilicata region) and from Sangiovese grape must (main cultivar in the Tuscany region) were characterized genotypically, by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis and MSP-PCR by using (GTG)5 primers, and phenotypically, by determining technological properties and metabolic compounds of oenological interest after alcoholic fermentation. All the S. cerevisiae isolates from each region were inoculated both in must obtained from Aglianico grape and in must obtained from Sangiovese grape to carry out fermentations at laboratory-scale. Numerical analysis of DNA patterns resulting from both molecular methods and principal component analysis of phenotypic data demonstrated a high diversity among the S. cerevisiae strains. Moreover, a correlation between genotypic and phenotypic groups and geographical origin of the strains was found, supporting the concept that there can be a microbial aspect to terroir. Therefore, exploring the diversity of indigenous S. cerevisiae strains can allow developing tailored strategies to select wine yeast strains better adapted to each viticultural area. PMID:27446054

  12. Molecular basis of cell integrity and morphogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Cid, V J; Durán, A; del Rey, F; Snyder, M P; Nombela, C; Sánchez, M

    1995-01-01

    In fungi and many other organisms, a thick outer cell wall is responsible for determining the shape of the cell and for maintaining its integrity. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a useful model organism for the study of cell wall synthesis, and over the past few decades, many aspects of the composition, structure, and enzymology of the cell wall have been elucidated. The cell wall of budding yeasts is a complex and dynamic structure; its arrangement alters as the cell grows, and its composition changes in response to different environmental conditions and at different times during the yeast life cycle. In the past few years, we have witnessed a profilic genetic and molecular characterization of some key aspects of cell wall polymer synthesis and hydrolysis in the budding yeast. Furthermore, this organism has been the target of numerous recent studies on the topic of morphogenesis, which have had an enormous impact on our understanding of the intracellular events that participate in directed cell wall synthesis. A number of components that direct polarized secretion, including those involved in assembly and organization of the actin cytoskeleton, secretory pathways, and a series of novel signal transduction systems and regulatory components have been identified. Analysis of these different components has suggested pathways by which polarized secretion is directed and controlled. Our aim is to offer an overall view of the current understanding of cell wall dynamics and of the complex network that controls polarized growth at particular stages of the budding yeast cell cycle and life cycle. PMID:7565410

  13. MET17 and Hydrogen Sulfide Formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Spiropoulos, Apostolos; Bisson, Linda F.

    2000-01-01

    Commercial isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae differ in the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) during fermentation, which has been attributed to variation in the ability to incorporate reduced sulfur into organic compounds. We transformed two commercial strains (UCD522 and UCD713) with a plasmid overexpressing the MET17 gene, which encodes the bifunctional O-acetylserine/O-acetylhomoserine sulfhydrylase (OAS/OAH SHLase), to test the hypothesis that the level of activity of this enzyme limits reduced sulfur incorporation, leading to H2S release. Overexpression of MET17 resulted in a 10- to 70-fold increase in OAS/OAH SHLase activity in UCD522 but had no impact on the level of H2S produced. In contrast, OAS/OAH SHLase activity was not as highly expressed in transformants of UCD713 (0.5- to 10-fold) but resulted in greatly reduced H2S formation. Overexpression of OAS/OAH SHLase activity was greater in UCD713 when grown under low-nitrogen conditions, but the impact on reduction of H2S was greater under high-nitrogen conditions. Thus, there was not a good correlation between the level of enzyme activity and H2S production. We measured cellular levels of cysteine to determine the impact of overexpression of OAS/OAH SHLase activity on sulfur incorporation. While Met17p activity was not correlated with increased cysteine production, conditions that led to elevated cytoplasmic levels of cysteine also reduced H2S formation. Our data do not support the simple hypothesis that variation in OAS/OAH SHLase activity is correlated with H2S production and release. PMID:11010893

  14. Enhanced lysosomal activity by overexpressed aminopeptidase Y in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jihee; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains vacuoles corresponding to lysosomes in higher eukaryotes. Lysosomes are dynamic (not silent) organelles in which enzymes can be easily integrated or released when exposed to stressful conditions. Changes in lysosomal enzymes have been observed due to oxidative stress, resulting in an increased function of lysosomes. The protein profiles from H2O2- and NH4Cl-treated lysosomes showed different expression patterns, observed with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The aminopeptidase Y protein (APE3) that conspicuously enhanced antimicrobial activity than other proteins was selected for further studies. The S. cerevisiae APE3 gene was isolated and inserted into pYES2.0 expression vector. The GFP gene was inserted downstream to the APE3 gene for confirmation of APE3 targeting to lysosomes, and S. cerevisiae was transformed to pYES2::APE3::GFP. The APE3 did not enter in lysosomes and formed an inclusion body at 30 °C, but it inserted to lysosomes as shown by the merger of GFP with lysosomes at 28 °C. Antimicrobial activity of the cloned S. cerevisiae increased about 5 to 10 % against eight strains, compared to normal cells, and galactose induction is increased more two folds than that of normal cells. Therefore, S. cerevisiae was transformed to pYES2::APE3::GFP, accumulating a large amount of APE3, resulting in increased lysosomal activity. Increase in endogenous levels of lysosomes and their activity following genetic modification can lead to its use in applications such as antimicrobial agents and apoptosis-inducing materials for cancer cells, and consequently, it may also be possible to use the organelles for improving in vitro functions. PMID:27221740

  15. Effects of supplementing Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product in sow diets on performance of sows and nursing piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forty-two sows were used to determine the effects of adding Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product to gestation and lactation diets on performance of sows and their progeny. On 5 d before breeding, sows were allotted to 2 dietary treatments representing: (1) sows fed a diet with 12.0 g fermen...

  16. Effects of supplementing a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product in sow diets on performance of sows and nursing piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forty-two sows (Camborough-22, PIC) were used to determine the effects of supplementing a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (SCFP; Diamond V Original XPC) in gestation and lactation diets on performance of sows and their progeny. On 5 d before breeding, sows were allotted to 2 dietary tr...

  17. Membrane trafficking in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model.

    PubMed

    Feyder, Serge; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Bär, Séverine; Bertazzi, Dimitri L; Friant, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic models. The secretory pathway was the first trafficking pathway clearly understood mainly thanks to the work done in the laboratory of Randy Schekman in the 1980s. They have isolated yeast sec mutants unable to secrete an extracellular enzyme and these SEC genes were identified as encoding key effectors of the secretory machinery. For this work, the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded to Randy Schekman; the prize is shared with James Rothman and Thomas Südhof. Here, we present the different trafficking pathways of yeast S. cerevisiae. At the Golgi apparatus newly synthesized proteins are sorted between those transported to the plasma membrane (PM), or the external medium, via the exocytosis or secretory pathway (SEC), and those targeted to the vacuole either through endosomes (vacuolar protein sorting or VPS pathway) or directly (alkaline phosphatase or ALP pathway). Plasma membrane proteins can be internalized by endocytosis (END) and transported to endosomes where they are sorted between those targeted for vacuolar degradation and those redirected to the Golgi (recycling or RCY pathway). Studies in yeast S. cerevisiae allowed the identification of most of the known effectors, protein complexes, and trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells, and most of them are conserved among eukaryotes. PMID:25584613

  18. Multiparameter analysis of apoptosis in puromycin-treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Citterio, Barbara; Albertini, Maria Cristina; Ghibelli, Lina; Falcieri, Elisabetta; Battistelli, Michela; Canonico, Barbara; Rocchi, Marco B L; Teodori, Laura; Ciani, Maurizio; Piatti, Elena

    2015-08-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a typical apoptotic phenotype is induced by some stress factors such as sugars, acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, aspirin and age. Nevertheless, no data have been reported for apoptosis induced by puromycin, a damaging agent known to induce apoptosis in mammalian cells. We treated S. cerevisiae with puromycin to induce apoptosis and evaluated the percentage of dead cells by using Hoechst 33342 staining, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Annexin V flow cytometry (FC) analysis. Hoechst 33342 fluorescence images were processed to acquire parameters to use for multiparameter analysis [and perform a principal component analysis, (PCA)]. Cell viability was evaluated by Rhodamine 123 (Rh 123) and Acridine Orange microscope fluorescence staining. The results show puromycin-induced apoptosis in S. cerevisiae, and the PCA analysis indicated that the increasing percentage of apoptotic cells delineated a well-defined graph profile. The results were supported by TEM and FC. This study gives new insights into yeast apoptosis using puromycin as inducer agent, and PCA analysis may complement molecular analysis facilitating further studies to its detection. PMID:25868793

  19. Functional Diversity of Haloacid Dehalogenase Superfamily Phosphatases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Makarova, Kira S.; Flick, Robert; Wolf, Yuri I.; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Evdokimova, Elena; Jin, Ke; Tan, Kemin; Hanson, Andrew D.; Hasnain, Ghulam; Zallot, Rémi; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Babu, Mohan; Savchenko, Alexei; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Edwards, Aled M.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like enzymes comprise a large superfamily of phosphohydrolases present in all organisms. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes at least 19 soluble HADs, including 10 uncharacterized proteins. Here, we biochemically characterized 13 yeast phosphatases from the HAD superfamily, which includes both specific and promiscuous enzymes active against various phosphorylated metabolites and peptides with several HADs implicated in detoxification of phosphorylated compounds and pseudouridine. The crystal structures of four yeast HADs provided insight into their active sites, whereas the structure of the YKR070W dimer in complex with substrate revealed a composite substrate-binding site. Although the S. cerevisiae and Escherichia coli HADs share low sequence similarities, the comparison of their substrate profiles revealed seven phosphatases with common preferred substrates. The cluster of secondary substrates supporting significant activity of both S. cerevisiae and E. coli HADs includes 28 common metabolites that appear to represent the pool of potential activities for the evolution of novel HAD phosphatases. Evolution of novel substrate specificities of HAD phosphatases shows no strict correlation with sequence divergence. Thus, evolution of the HAD superfamily combines the conservation of the overall substrate pool and the substrate profiles of some enzymes with remarkable biochemical and structural flexibility of other superfamily members. PMID:26071590

  20. Biogeographical characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast by molecular methods

    PubMed Central

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Schirone, Maria; Fasoli, Giuseppe; Aguzzi, Irene; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Biogeography is the descriptive and explanatory study of spatial patterns and processes involved in the distribution of biodiversity. Without biogeography, it would be difficult to study the diversity of microorganisms because there would be no way to visualize patterns in variation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, “the wine yeast,” is the most important species involved in alcoholic fermentation, and in vineyard ecosystems, it follows the principle of “everything is everywhere.” Agricultural practices such as farming (organic versus conventional) and floor management systems have selected different populations within this species that are phylogenetically distinct. In fact, recent ecological and geographic studies highlighted that unique strains are associated with particular grape varieties in specific geographical locations. These studies also highlighted that significant diversity and regional character, or ‘terroir,’ have been introduced into the winemaking process via this association. This diversity of wild strains preserves typicity, the high quality, and the unique flavor of wines. Recently, different molecular methods were developed to study population dynamics of S. cerevisiae strains in both vineyards and wineries. In this review, we will provide an update on the current molecular methods used to reveal the geographical distribution of S. cerevisiae wine yeast. PMID:23805132

  1. Endocytosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: internalization of enveloped viruses into spheroplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Makarow, M

    1985-01-01

    When vesicular stomatitis virus was incubated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae spheroplasts at 37 degrees C, part of the virus was internalized by the spheroplasts as shown by the following criteria. (i) The spheroplast-associated virus was protected from proteinase K digestion, which releases surface-bound virus by degrading the envelope glycoproteins. (ii) The spheroplast-associated virus was resistant to mild Triton X-100 treatment, which readily solubilizes the virus. The same results were obtained with Semliki Forest virus. Internalization of the two viruses followed linear kinetics up to 90 min at 37 degrees C. Internalization was concentration- and temperature-dependent. At 11 degrees C no uptake could be detected for at least 2 h. Homogenization and organelle fractionation protocols were designed for the S. cerevisiae spheroplasts to study the compartments into which the virions were internalized. Three compartments containing both marker viruses could be separated in density gradients. One coincided with vacuole markers, one banded at a slightly higher and one at a similar density to the plasma membrane markers. Thus, S. cerevisiae spheroplasts appear to have the capability of endocytosing particulate markers like viruses. The companion paper describes internalization of two soluble macromolecules, alpha-amylase and fluorescent dextran, into intact cells. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:2992948

  2. [Production of β-carotene by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jiaoyang; Liu, Yi; Yang, Hongjiang; Dai, Zhubo; Zhang, Xueli

    2014-08-01

    β-carotene has a wide range of application in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. For microbial production of β-carotene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the supply of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) was firstly increased in S. cerevisiae BY4742 to obtain strain BY4742-T2 through over-expressing truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (tHMGR), which is the major rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, and GGPP synthase (GGPS), which is a key enzyme in the diterpenoid synthetic pathway. The β-carotene synthetic genes of Pantoea agglomerans and Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous were further integrated into strain BY4742-T2 for comparing β-carotene production. Over-expression of tHMGR and GGPS genes led to 26.0-fold increase of β-carotene production. In addition, genes from X. dendrorhous was more efficient than those from P. agglomerans for β-carotene production in S. cerevisiae. Strain BW02 was obtained which produced 1.56 mg/g (dry cell weight) β-carotene, which could be used further for constructing cell factories for β-carotene production. PMID:25507473

  3. [Production of β-carotene by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jiaoyang; Liu, Yi; Yang, Hongjiang; Dai, Zhubo; Zhang, Xueli

    2014-08-01

    β-carotene has a wide range of application in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. For microbial production of β-carotene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the supply of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) was firstly increased in S. cerevisiae BY4742 to obtain strain BY4742-T2 through over-expressing truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (tHMGR), which is the major rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, and GGPP synthase (GGPS), which is a key enzyme in the diterpenoid synthetic pathway. The β-carotene synthetic genes of Pantoea agglomerans and Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous were further integrated into strain BY4742-T2 for comparing β-carotene production. Over-expression of tHMGR and GGPS genes led to 26.0-fold increase of β-carotene production. In addition, genes from X. dendrorhous was more efficient than those from P. agglomerans for β-carotene production in S. cerevisiae. Strain BW02 was obtained which produced 1.56 mg/g (dry cell weight) β-carotene, which could be used further for constructing cell factories for β-carotene production. PMID:25423750

  4. Combinatorial metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for terminal alkene production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Binbin; Lee, Dong-Yup; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2015-09-01

    Biological production of terminal alkenes has garnered a significant interest due to their industrial applications such as lubricants, detergents and fuels. Here, we engineered the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce terminal alkenes via a one-step fatty acid decarboxylation pathway and improved the alkene production using combinatorial engineering strategies. In brief, we first characterized eight fatty acid decarboxylases to enable and enhance alkene production. We then increased the production titer 7-fold by improving the availability of the precursor fatty acids. We additionally increased the titer about 5-fold through genetic cofactor engineering and gene expression tuning in rich medium. Lastly, we further improved the titer 1.8-fold to 3.7 mg/L by optimizing the culturing conditions in bioreactors. This study represents the first report of terminal alkene biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae, and the abovementioned combinatorial engineering approaches collectively increased the titer 67.4-fold. We envision that these approaches could provide insights into devising engineering strategies to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biochemicals in S. cerevisiae. PMID:26164646

  5. Membrane Trafficking in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Model

    PubMed Central

    Feyder, Serge; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Bär, Séverine; Bertazzi, Dimitri L.; Friant, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic models. The secretory pathway was the first trafficking pathway clearly understood mainly thanks to the work done in the laboratory of Randy Schekman in the 1980s. They have isolated yeast sec mutants unable to secrete an extracellular enzyme and these SEC genes were identified as encoding key effectors of the secretory machinery. For this work, the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded to Randy Schekman; the prize is shared with James Rothman and Thomas Südhof. Here, we present the different trafficking pathways of yeast S. cerevisiae. At the Golgi apparatus newly synthesized proteins are sorted between those transported to the plasma membrane (PM), or the external medium, via the exocytosis or secretory pathway (SEC), and those targeted to the vacuole either through endosomes (vacuolar protein sorting or VPS pathway) or directly (alkaline phosphatase or ALP pathway). Plasma membrane proteins can be internalized by endocytosis (END) and transported to endosomes where they are sorted between those targeted for vacuolar degradation and those redirected to the Golgi (recycling or RCY pathway). Studies in yeast S. cerevisiae allowed the identification of most of the known effectors, protein complexes, and trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells, and most of them are conserved among eukaryotes. PMID:25584613

  6. The postmitotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae after spaceflight showed higher viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zong-Chun; Li, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yan; Wang, Jie; Sun, Yan; Zhuang, Feng-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been proposed as an ideal model organism for clarifying the biological effects caused by spaceflight conditions. The postmitotic S. cerevisiae cells onboard Practice eight recoverable satellite were subjected to spaceflight for 15 days. After recovery, the viability, the glycogen content, the activities of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes, the DNA content and the lipid peroxidation level in yeast cells were analyzed. The viability of the postmitotic yeast cells after spaceflight showed a three-fold increase as compared with that of the ground control cells. Compared to the ground control cells, the lipid peroxidation level in the spaceflight yeast cells markedly decreased. The spaceflight yeast cells also showed an increase in G2/M cell population and a decrease in Sub-G1 cell population. The glycogen content and the activities of hexokinase and succinate dehydrogenase significantly decreased in the yeast cells after spaceflight. In contrast, the activity of malate dehydrogenase showed an obvious increase after spaceflight. These results suggested that microgravity or spaceflight could promote the survival of postmitotic S. cerevisiae cells through regulating carbohydrate metabolism, ROS level and cell cycle progression.

  7. Copper oxide nanoparticles inhibit the metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mashock, Michael J; Kappell, Anthony D; Hallaj, Nadia; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2016-01-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are used increasingly in industrial applications and consumer products and thus may pose risk to human and environmental health. The interaction of CuO NPs with complex media and the impact on cell metabolism when exposed to sublethal concentrations are largely unknown. In the present study, the short-term effects of 2 different sized manufactured CuO NPs on metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. The role of released Cu(2+) during dissolution of NPs in the growth media and the CuO nanostructure were considered. Characterization showed that the 28 nm and 64 nm CuO NPs used in the present study have different primary diameter, similar hydrodynamic diameter, and significantly different concentrations of dissolved Cu(2+) ions in the growth media released from the same initial NP mass. Exposures to CuO NPs or the released Cu(2+) fraction, at doses that do not have impact on cell viability, showed significant inhibition on S. cerevisiae cellular metabolic activity. A greater CuO NP effect on the metabolic activity of S. cerevisiae growth under respiring conditions was observed. Under the tested conditions the observed metabolic inhibition from the NPs was not explained fully by the released Cu ions from the dissolving NPs. PMID:26178758

  8. Molecular Basis for Strain Variation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adhesin Flo11p.

    PubMed

    Barua, Subit; Li, Li; Lipke, Peter N; Dranginis, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    FLO11 encodes a yeast cell wall flocculin that mediates a variety of adhesive phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Flo11p is implicated in many developmental processes, including flocculation, formation of pseudohyphae, agar invasion, and formation of microbial mats and biofilms. However, Flo11p mediates different processes in different yeast strains. To investigate the mechanisms by which FLO11 determines these differences in colony morphology, flocculation, and invasion, we studied gene structure, function, and expression levels. Nonflocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae Σ1278b cells exhibited significantly higher FLO11 mRNA expression, especially in the stationary phase, than highly flocculent S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus. The two strains varied in cell surface hydrophobicity, and Flo11p contributed significantly to surface hydrophobicity in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus but not in strain Σ1278b. Sequencing of the FLO11 gene in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus revealed strain-specific differences, including a 15-amino-acid insertion in the adhesion domain. Flo11p adhesion domains from strain Σ1278b and S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus were expressed and used to coat magnetic beads. The adhesion domain from each strain bound preferentially to homologous cells, and the preferences were independent of the cells in which the adhesion domains were produced. These results are consistent with the idea that strain-specific variations in the amino acid sequences in the adhesion domains cause different Flo11p flocculation activities. The results also imply that strain-specific differences in expression levels, posttranslational modifications, and allelic differences outside the adhesion domains have little effect on flocculation. IMPORTANCE As a nonmotile organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae employs the cell surface flocculin Flo11/Muc1 as an important means of adapting to environmental change. However, there is a great deal of strain variation in the expression of

  9. Molecular Basis for Strain Variation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adhesin Flo11p

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Lipke, Peter N.; Dranginis, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT FLO11 encodes a yeast cell wall flocculin that mediates a variety of adhesive phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Flo11p is implicated in many developmental processes, including flocculation, formation of pseudohyphae, agar invasion, and formation of microbial mats and biofilms. However, Flo11p mediates different processes in different yeast strains. To investigate the mechanisms by which FLO11 determines these differences in colony morphology, flocculation, and invasion, we studied gene structure, function, and expression levels. Nonflocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae Σ1278b cells exhibited significantly higher FLO11 mRNA expression, especially in the stationary phase, than highly flocculent S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus. The two strains varied in cell surface hydrophobicity, and Flo11p contributed significantly to surface hydrophobicity in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus but not in strain Σ1278b. Sequencing of the FLO11 gene in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus revealed strain-specific differences, including a 15-amino-acid insertion in the adhesion domain. Flo11p adhesion domains from strain Σ1278b and S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus were expressed and used to coat magnetic beads. The adhesion domain from each strain bound preferentially to homologous cells, and the preferences were independent of the cells in which the adhesion domains were produced. These results are consistent with the idea that strain-specific variations in the amino acid sequences in the adhesion domains cause different Flo11p flocculation activities. The results also imply that strain-specific differences in expression levels, posttranslational modifications, and allelic differences outside the adhesion domains have little effect on flocculation. IMPORTANCE As a nonmotile organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae employs the cell surface flocculin Flo11/Muc1 as an important means of adapting to environmental change. However, there is a great deal of strain variation in the

  10. Production of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Kristy M; Smolke, Christina D

    2010-01-01

    The benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) are a diverse class of metabolites that exhibit a broad range of pharmacological activities and are synthesized through plant biosynthetic pathways comprised of complex enzyme activities and regulatory strategies. We have engineered yeast to produce the key intermediate reticuline and downstream BIA metabolites from a commercially available substrate. An enzyme tuning strategy was implemented that identified activity differences between variants from different plants and determined optimal expression levels. By synthesizing both stereoisomer forms of reticuline and integrating enzyme activities from three plant sources and humans, we demonstrated the synthesis of metabolites in the sanguinarine/berberine and morphinan branches. We also demonstrated that a human P450 enzyme exhibits a novel activity in the conversion of (R)-reticuline to the morphinan alkaloid salutaridine. Our engineered microbial hosts offer access to a rich group of BIA molecules and associated activities that will be further expanded through synthetic chemistry and biology approaches. PMID:18690217

  11. Comparative proteomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under different nitrogen sources.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shaohui; Zhao, Xinrui; Zou, Huijun; Fu, Jianwei; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2014-04-14

    In cultures containing multiple sources of nitrogen, Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits a sequential use of nitrogen sources through a mechanism known as nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). To identify proteins differentially expressed due to NCR, proteomic analysis of S. cerevisiae S288C under different nitrogen source conditions was performed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), revealing 169 candidate protein spots. Among these 169 protein spots, 121 were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). The identified proteins were closely associated with four main biological processes through Gene Ontology (GO) categorical analysis. The identification of the potential proteins and cellular processes related to NCR offer a global overview of changes elicited by different nitrogen sources, providing clues into how yeast adapt to different nutritional conditions. Moreover, by comparing our proteomic data with corresponding mRNA data, proteins regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level could be distinguished. Biological significance In S. cerevisiae, different nitrogen sources provide different growth characteristics and generate different metabolites. The nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) process plays an important role for S. cerevisiae in the ordinal utilization of different nitrogen sources. NCR process can result in significant shift of global metabolic networks. Previous works on NCR primarily focused on transcriptomic level. The results obtained in this study provided a global atlas of the proteome changes triggered by different nitrogen sources and would facilitate the understanding of mechanisms for how yeast could adapt to different nutritional conditions. PMID:24530623

  12. Transcriptional profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to propolis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Propolis is a natural product of plant resins collected by honeybees (Apis mellifera) from various plant sources. Our previous studies indicated that propolis sensitivity is dependent on the mitochondrial function and that vacuolar acidification and autophagy are important for yeast cell death caused by propolis. Here, we extended our understanding of propolis-mediated cell death in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by applying systems biology tools to analyze the transcriptional profiling of cells exposed to propolis. Methods We have used transcriptional profiling of S. cerevisiae exposed to propolis. We validated our findings by using real-time PCR of selected genes. Systems biology tools (physical protein-protein interaction [PPPI] network) were applied to analyse the propolis-induced transcriptional bevavior, aiming to identify which pathways are modulated by propolis in S. cerevisiae and potentially influencing cell death. Results We were able to observe 1,339 genes modulated in at least one time point when compared to the reference time (propolis untreated samples) (t-test, p-value 0.01). Enrichment analysis performed by Gene Ontology (GO) Term finder tool showed enrichment for several biological categories among the genes up-regulated in the microarray hybridization such as transport and transmembrane transport and response to stress. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of selected genes showed by our microarray hybridization approach was capable of providing information about S. cerevisiae gene expression modulation with a considerably high level of confidence. Finally, a physical protein-protein (PPPI) network design and global topological analysis stressed the importance of these pathways in response of S. cerevisiae to propolis and were correlated with the transcriptional data obtained thorough the microarray analysis. Conclusions In summary, our data indicate that propolis is largely affecting several pathways in the eukaryotic cell. However, the most

  13. A genomic approach highlights common and diverse effects and determinants of susceptibility on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to distinct antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides (AMP) was initially correlated with peptide membrane permeation properties. However, recent evidences indicate that action of a number of AMP is more complex and involves specific interactions at cell envelopes or with intracellular targets. In this study, a genomic approach was undertaken on the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to characterize the antifungal effect of two unrelated AMP. Results Two differentiated peptides were used: the synthetic cell-penetrating PAF26 and the natural cytolytic melittin. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrated distinctive gene expression changes for each peptide. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed differential expression of selected genes. Gene Ontology (GO) annotation of differential gene lists showed that the unique significant terms shared by treatment with both peptides were related to the cell wall (CW). Assays with mutants lacking CW-related genes including those of MAPK signaling pathways revealed genes having influence on sensitivity to peptides. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry demonstrated PAF26 interaction with cells and internalization that correlated with cell killing in sensitive CW-defective mutants such as Δecm33 or Δssd1. GO annotation also showed differential responses between peptides, which included ribosomal biogenesis, ARG genes from the metabolism of amino groups (specifically induced by PAF26), or the reaction to unfolded protein stress. Susceptibility of deletion mutants confirmed the involvement of these processes. Specifically, mutants lacking ARG genes from the metabolism of arginine pathway were markedly more resistant to PAF26 and had a functional CW. In the deletant in the arginosuccinate synthetase (ARG1) gene, PAF26 interaction occurred normally, thus uncoupling peptide interaction from cell killing. The previously described involvement of the glycosphingolipid gene IPT1 was extended to the peptides studied here. Conclusions

  14. Intracellular ethanol accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation.

    PubMed

    D'Amore, T; Panchal, C J; Stewart, G G

    1988-01-01

    An intracellular accumulation of ethanol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was observed during the early stages of fermentation (3 h). However, after 12 h of fermentation, the intracellular and extracellular ethanol concentrations were similar. Increasing the osmotic pressure of the medium caused an increase in the ratio of intracellular to extracellular ethanol concentrations at 3 h of fermentation. As in the previous case, the intracellular and extracellular ethanol concentrations were similar after 12 h of fermentation. Increasing the osmotic pressure also caused a decrease in yeast cell growth and fermentation activities. However, nutrient supplementation of the medium increased the extent of growth and fermentation, resulting in complete glucose utilization, even though intracellular ethanol concentrations were unaltered. These results suggest that nutrient limitation is a major factor responsible for the decreased growth and fermentation activities observed in yeast cells at higher osmotic pressures. PMID:3278685

  15. Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with defective vacuolar function

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamoto, K.; Yoshizawa, K.; Ohsumi, Y.; Anraku, Y.

    1988-06-01

    Mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that have a small vacuolar lysine pool were isolated and characterized. Mutant KL97 (lys1 slp1-1) and strain KL197-1A (slp1-1), a prototrophic derivative of KL97, did not grow well in synthetic medium supplemented with 10 mM lysine. Genetic studies indicated that the slp1-1mutation (for small lysine pool) is recessive and is due to a single chromosomal mutation. Mutant KL97 shows the following pleiotropic defects in vacuolar functions. (i) It has small vacuolar pools for lysine, arginine, and histidine. (ii) Its growth is sensitive to lysine, histidine, Ca/sup 2 +/, heavy metal ions, and antibiotics. (iii) It has many small vesicles but no large central vacuole. (iv) It has a normal amount of the vacuolar membrane marker ..cap alpha..-mannosidase but shows reduced activities of the vacuole sap markers proteinase A, proteinase B, and carboxypeptidase Y.

  16. Bent DNA functions as a replication enhancer in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J S; Eckdahl, T T; Anderson, J N

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bent DNA is a conserved property of Saccharomyces cerevisiae autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs). Here we showed that bending elements are contained within ARS subdomains identified by others as replication enhancers. To provide a direct test for the function of this unusual structure, we analyzed the ARS activity of plasmids that contained synthetic bent DNA substituted for the natural bending element in yeast ARS1. The results demonstrated that deletion of the natural bending locus impaired ARS activity which was restored to a near wild-type level with synthetic bent DNA. Since the only obvious common features of the natural and synthetic bending elements are the sequence patterns that give rise to DNA bending, the results suggest that the bent structure per se is crucial for ARS function. Images PMID:3043195

  17. Identity elements of Saccharomyces cerevisiae tRNA(His).

    PubMed Central

    Nameki, N; Asahara, H; Shimizu, M; Okada, N; Himeno, H

    1995-01-01

    Recognition of tRNA(His) by Saccharomyces cerevisiae histidyl-tRNA synthetase was studied using in vitro transcripts. Histidine tRNA is unique in possessing an extra nucleotide, G-1, at the 5' end. Mutation studies indicate that this irregular secondary structure at the end of the acceptor stem is important for aminoacylation with histidine, while the requirement of either base of this extra base pair is smaller than that in Escherichia coli. The anticodon was also found to be required for histidylation. The regions involved in histidylation are essentially the same as those in E.coli, whereas the proportion of the contributions of the two portions distant from each other, the anticodon and the end of the acceptor stem, makes a substantial difference between the two systems. PMID:7885835

  18. Hormetic Effect of H2O2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Valishkevych, Bohdana V.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between target of rapamycin (TOR) and H2O2-induced hormetic response in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on glucose or fructose. In general, our data suggest that: (1) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induces hormesis in a TOR-dependent manner; (2) the H2O2-induced hormetic dose–response in yeast depends on the type of carbohydrate in growth medium; (3) the concentration-dependent effect of H2O2 on yeast colony growth positively correlates with the activity of glutathione reductase that suggests the enzyme involvement in the H2O2-induced hormetic response; and (4) both TOR1 and TOR2 are involved in the reciprocal regulation of the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glyoxalase 1. PMID:27099601

  19. Bioaccumulation of cadmium by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunsheng; Jiang, Wei; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Yinglian; Dong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dongfeng; Meng, Xianghong; Xu, Ying

    2014-03-01

    Bioaccumulation via growing cells is a potential technique for heavy metal removal from food materials. The cadmium bioaccumulation characteristics by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated. Z. rouxii displayed powerful cadmium removal ability at low cadmium concentrations, which mainly depended on the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation. The percentage of intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts obviously decreased with the increase of initial biomass and cadmium concentrations. Low pH and elevated concentrations of zinc and copper significantly decreased the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts but improved the cadmium tolerance and the cell-surface cadmium bioaccumulation of Z. rouxii. Cadmium removal of Z. rouxii was improved by zinc and copper conditionally. Z. rouxii that possessed more powerful cadmium tolerance and removal ability at low pH and high concentration of competing ions can be developed into a potential cadmium removal agent using in complex food environment in future. PMID:24440489

  20. MPS3 mediates meiotic bouquet formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Michael N; Lee, Chih-Ying; Wilkerson, Joseph L; Dresser, Michael E

    2007-05-22

    In meiotic prophase, telomeres associate with the nuclear envelope and accumulate adjacent to the centrosome/spindle pole to form the chromosome bouquet, a well conserved event that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the meiotic telomere protein Ndj1p. Ndj1p interacts with Mps3p, a nuclear envelope SUN domain protein that is required for spindle pole body duplication and for sister chromatid cohesion. Removal of the Ndj1p-interaction domain from MPS3 creates an ndj1 Delta-like separation-of-function allele, and Ndj1p and Mps3p are codependent for stable association with the telomeres. SUN domain proteins are found in the nuclear envelope across phyla and are implicated in mediating interactions between the interior of the nucleus and the cytoskeleton. Our observations indicate a general mechanism for meiotic telomere movements. PMID:17495028

  1. The Influence of Microgravity on Invasive Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Mulders, Sebastiaan E.; Stassen, Catherine; Daenen, Luk; Devreese, Bart; Siewers, Verena; van Eijsden, Rudy G. E.; Nielsen, Jens; Delvaux, Freddy R.; Willaert, Ronnie

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of microgravity on colony growth and the morphological transition from single cells to short invasive filaments in the model eukaryotic organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two-dimensional spreading of the yeast colonies grown on semi-solid agar medium was reduced under microgravity in the Σ1278b laboratory strain but not in the CMBSESA1 industrial strain. This was supported by the Σ1278b proteome map under microgravity conditions, which revealed upregulation of proteins linked to anaerobic conditions. The Σ1278b strain showed a reduced invasive growth in the center of the yeast colony. Bud scar distribution was slightly affected, with a switch toward more random budding. Together, microgravity conditions disturb spatially programmed budding patterns and generate strain-dependent growth differences in yeast colonies on semi-solid medium.

  2. Heterologous biosynthesis of artemisinic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Li, J; Wang, G; Li, X

    2016-06-01

    Artemisinic acid is a precursor of antimalarial compound artemisinin. The titre of biosynthesis of artemisinic acid using Saccharomyces cerevisiae platform has been achieved up to 25 g l(-1) ; however, the performance of platform cells is still industrial unsatisfied. Many strategies have been proposed to improve the titre of artemisinic acid. The traditional strategies mainly focused on partial target sites, simple up-regulation key genes or repression competing pathways in the total synthesis route. However, this may result in unbalance of carbon fluxes and dysfunction of metabolism. In this review, the recent advances on the promising methods in silico and in vivo for biosynthesis of artemisinic acid have been discussed. The bioinformatics and omics techniques have brought a great prospect for improving production of artemisinin and other pharmacal compounds in heterologous platform. PMID:26743771

  3. Translation initiation factor-dependent extracts from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Altmann, M; Blum, S; Pelletier, J; Sonenberg, N; Wilson, T M; Trachsel, H

    1990-08-27

    Translation initiation factor 4A- and 4E-dependent extracts were developed from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and used to study factor requirements for translation of individual mRNAs in vitro. Whereas all mRNAs tested required eIF-4A, mRNAs devoid of secondary structure in their 5' untranslated region did not require exogenous eIF-4E for translation. The latter included alfalfa mosaic virus RNA4, mRNA containing the untranslated region of tobacco mosaic virus RNA and mRNA containing part of the untranslated region of poliovirus RNA. Furthermore, initiation of translation on mRNAs containing part of the untranslated region of poliovirus RNA is most likely internal. PMID:2169890

  4. Availability of substratum enhances ethanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sankh, Santosh N; Arvindekar, Akalpita U

    2004-12-01

    Novel additives that act as substratum for attachment of the yeast cells, increased ethanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The addition of 2 g rice husk, straw, wood shavings, plastic pieces or silica gel to 100 ml medium enhanced ethanol production by 30-40 (v/v). Six distillery strains showed an average enhancement of 34 from 4.1 (v/v) in control to 5.5 (v/v) on addition of rice husk. The cell wall bound glycogen increased by 40-50 mg g (-1) dry yeast while intracellular glycogen decreased by 10-12 mg g(-1) dry yeast in cells grown in presence of substratum. PMID:15672221

  5. Yap1: a DNA damage responder in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Lori A; Degtyareva, Natalya; Doetsch, Paul W

    2012-04-01

    Activation of signaling pathways in response to genotoxic stress is crucial for cells to properly repair DNA damage. In response to DNA damage, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species increase. One important function of such a response could be to initiate signal transduction processes. We have employed the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae to delineate DNA damage sensing mechanisms. We report a novel, unanticipated role for the transcription factor Yap1 as a DNA damage responder, providing direct evidence that reactive oxygen species are an important component of the DNA damage signaling process. Our findings reveal an epistatic link between Yap1 and the DNA base excision repair pathway. Corruption of the Yap1-mediated DNA damage response influences cell survival and genomic stability in response to exposure to genotoxic agents. PMID:22433435

  6. Protein disorder reduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to survive heat shock.

    PubMed

    Vicedo, Esmeralda; Gasik, Zofia; Dong, Yu-An; Goldberg, Tatyana; Rost, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments established that a culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) survives sudden high temperatures by specifically duplicating the entire chromosome III and two chromosomal fragments (from IV and XII). Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are not significantly over-abundant in the duplication. In contrast, we suggest a simple algorithm to " postdict " the experimental results: Find a small enough chromosome with minimal protein disorder and duplicate this region. This algorithm largely explains all observed duplications. In particular, all regions duplicated in the experiment reduced the overall content of protein disorder. The differential analysis of the functional makeup of the duplication remained inconclusive. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment suggested over-representation in processes related to reproduction and nutrient uptake. Analyzing the protein-protein interaction network (PPI) revealed that few network-central proteins were duplicated. The predictive hypothesis hinges upon the concept of reducing proteins with long regions of disorder in order to become less sensitive to heat shock attack. PMID:26673203

  7. Higher-order structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Lowary, P.T.; Widom, J. )

    1989-11-01

    We have developed a method for partially purifying chromatin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) to a level suitable for studies of its higher-order folding. This has required the use of yeast strains that are free of the ubiquitous yeast killer virus. Results from dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction show that the yeast chromatin undergoes a cation-dependent folding into 30-nm filaments that resemble those characteristic of higher-cell chromatin; moreover, the packing of nucleosomes within the yeast 30-nm filaments is similar to that of higher cells. These results imply that yeast has a protein or protein domain that serves the role of the histone H 1 found in higher cells; physical and genetic studies of the yeast activity could help elucidate the structure and function of H 1. Images of the yeast 30-nm filaments can be used to test crossed-linker models for 30-nm filament structure.

  8. Local Nanomechanical Motion of the Cell Wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelling, Andrew E.; Sehati, Sadaf; Gralla, Edith B.; Valentine, Joan S.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2004-08-01

    We demonstrate that the cell wall of living Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) exhibits local temperature-dependent nanomechanical motion at characteristic frequencies. The periodic motions in the range of 0.8 to 1.6 kHz with amplitudes of ~3 nm were measured using the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Exposure of the cells to a metabolic inhibitor causes the periodic motion to cease. From the strong frequency dependence on temperature, we derive an activation energy of 58 kJ/mol, which is consistent with the cell's metabolism involving molecular motors such as kinesin, dynein, and myosin. The magnitude of the forces observed (~10 nN) suggests concerted nanomechanical activity is operative in the cell.

  9. Construction of a flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermenting lactose.

    PubMed

    Domingues, L; Teixeira, J A; Lima, N

    1999-05-01

    A flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with the ability to express both the LAC4 (coding for beta-galactosidase) and LAC12 (coding for lactose permease) genes of Kluyveromyces marxianus was constructed. This recombinant strain is not only able to grow on lactose, but it can also ferment this substrate. To our knowledge this is the first time that a recombinant S. cervisiae has been found to ferment lactose in a way comparable to that of the existing lactose-fermenting yeast strains. Moreover, the flocculating capacity of the strain used in this work gives the process several advantages. On the one hand, it allows for operation in a continuous mode at high cell concentration, thus increasing the system's overall productivity; on the other hand, the biomass concentration in the effluent is reduced, thus decreasing product separation/purification costs. PMID:10390820

  10. Phenotypic effects of membrane protein overexpression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melén, Karin; Blomberg, Anders; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2006-07-01

    Large-scale protein overexpression phenotype screens provide an important complement to the more common gene knockout screens. Here, we have targeted the so far poorly understood Saccharomyces cerevisiae membrane proteome and report growth phenotypes for a strain collection overexpressing 600 C-terminally tagged integral membrane proteins grown both under normal and three different stress conditions. Although overexpression of most membrane proteins reduce the growth rate in synthetic defined medium, we identify a large number of proteins that, when overexpressed, confer specific resistance to various stress conditions. Our data suggest that regulation of glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor biosynthesis and the Na+/K+ homeostasis system constitute major downstream targets of the yeast PKA/RAS pathway and point to a possible connection between the early secretory pathway and the cells' response to oxidative stress. We also have quantified the expression levels for >550 membrane proteins, facilitating the choice of well expressing proteins for future functional and structural studies. caffeine | paraquat | salt tolerance | yeast

  11. Production of natural products through metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Krivoruchko, Anastasia; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-12-01

    Many high-value metabolites are produced in nature by organisms that are not ideal for large-scale production. Therefore, interest exists in expressing the biosynthetic pathways of these compounds in organisms that are more suitable for industrial production. Recent years have seen developments in both the discovery of various biosynthetic pathways, as well as development of metabolic engineering tools that allow reconstruction of complex pathways in microorganisms. In the present review we discuss recent advances in reconstruction of the biosynthetic pathways of various high-value products in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a commonly used industrial microorganism. Key achievements in the production of different isoprenoids, aromatics and polyketides are presented and the metabolic engineering strategies underlying these accomplishments are discussed. PMID:25544013

  12. Mutations in Ran system affected telomere silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Naoyuki Kobayashi, Masahiko; Shimizu, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Ken-ichi; Murakami, Seishi; Nishimoto, Takeharu

    2007-11-23

    The Ran GTPase system regulates the direction and timing of several cellular events, such as nuclear-cytosolic transport, centrosome formation, and nuclear envelope assembly in telophase. To gain insight into the Ran system's involvement in chromatin formation, we investigated gene silencing at the telomere in several mutants of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which had defects in genes involved in the Ran system. A mutation of the RanGAP gene, rna1-1, caused reduced silencing at the telomere, and partial disruption of the nuclear Ran binding factor, yrb2-{delta}2, increased this silencing. The reduced telomere silencing in rna1-1 cells was suppressed by a high dosage of the SIR3 gene or the SIT4 gene. Furthermore, hyperphosphorylated Sir3 protein accumulated in the rna1-1 mutant. These results suggest that RanGAP is required for the heterochromatin structure at the telomere in budding yeast.

  13. Domestication and Divergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Beer Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Gallone, Brigida; Steensels, Jan; Prahl, Troels; Soriaga, Leah; Saels, Veerle; Herrera-Malaver, Beatriz; Merlevede, Adriaan; Roncoroni, Miguel; Voordeckers, Karin; Miraglia, Loren; Teiling, Clotilde; Steffy, Brian; Taylor, Maryann; Schwartz, Ariel; Richardson, Toby; White, Christopher; Baele, Guy; Maere, Steven; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2016-09-01

    Whereas domestication of livestock, pets, and crops is well documented, it is still unclear to what extent microbes associated with the production of food have also undergone human selection and where the plethora of industrial strains originates from. Here, we present the genomes and phenomes of 157 industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. Our analyses reveal that today's industrial yeasts can be divided into five sublineages that are genetically and phenotypically separated from wild strains and originate from only a few ancestors through complex patterns of domestication and local divergence. Large-scale phenotyping and genome analysis further show strong industry-specific selection for stress tolerance, sugar utilization, and flavor production, while the sexual cycle and other phenotypes related to survival in nature show decay, particularly in beer yeasts. Together, these results shed light on the origins, evolutionary history, and phenotypic diversity of industrial yeasts and provide a resource for further selection of superior strains. PAPERCLIP. PMID:27610566

  14. Exposure to benzene metabolites causes oxidative damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Raj, Abhishek; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-06-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) are known benzene metabolites that form reactive intermediates such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study attempts to understand the effect of benzene metabolites (HQ and BQ) on the antioxidant status, cell morphology, ROS levels and lipid alterations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a reduction in the growth pattern of wild-type cells exposed to HQ/BQ. Exposure of yeast cells to benzene metabolites increased the activity of the anti-oxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase but lead to a decrease in ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione. Increased triglyceride level and decreased phospholipid levels were observed with exposure to HQ and BQ. These results suggest that the enzymatic antioxidants were increased and are involved in the protection against macromolecular damage during oxidative stress; presumptively, these enzymes are essential for scavenging the pro-oxidant effects of benzene metabolites. PMID:27016252

  15. Tolerance of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ultra high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, M.; Torigoe, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Takizawa, N.; Hada, Y.; Mori, Y.; Takarabe, K.; Ono, F.

    2014-05-01

    Our studies on the tolerance of plants and animals against very high pressure of several GPa have been extended to a smaller sized fungus, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several pieces of budding yeast (dry yeast) were sealed in a small teflon capsule with a liquid pressure medium fluorinate, and exposed to 7.5 GPa by using a cubic anvil press. The pressure was kept constant for various duration of time from 2 to 24 h. After the pressure was released, the specimens were brought out from the teflon capsule, and they were cultivated on a potato dextrose agar. It was found that the budding yeast exposed to 7.5 GPa for up to 6 h showed multiplication. However, those exposed to 7.5 GPa for longer than 12 h were found dead. The high pressure tolerance of budding yeast is a little weaker than that of tardigrades.

  16. Functional attributes of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae meiotic recombinase Dmc1.

    PubMed

    Busygina, Valeria; Gaines, William A; Xu, Yuanyuan; Kwon, Youngho; Williams, Gareth J; Lin, Sheng-Wei; Chang, Hao-Yen; Chi, Peter; Wang, Hong-Wei; Sung, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    The role of Dmc1 as a meiosis-specific general recombinase was first demonstrated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Progress in understanding the biochemical mechanism of ScDmc1 has been hampered by its tendency to form inactive aggregates. We have found that the inclusion of ATP during protein purification prevents Dmc1 aggregation. ScDmc1 so prepared is capable of forming D-loops and responsive to its accessory factors Rad54 and Rdh54. Negative staining electron microscopy and iterative helical real-space reconstruction revealed that the ScDmc1-ssDNA nucleoprotein filament harbors 6.5 protomers per turn with a pitch of ∼106Å. The ScDmc1 purification procedure and companion molecular analyses should facilitate future studies on this recombinase. PMID:23769192

  17. Characterization of Encapsulated Berberine in Yeast Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Roshanak; Rajabi, Omid; Khashyarmanesh, Zahra; Fathi Najafi, Mohsen; Fazly Bazzaz, BiBi Sedigheh

    2015-01-01

    Berberine was loaded in yeast cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiaeas a novel pharmaceutical carrier to improve the treatment ofmany diseases. The yeast-encapsulated active materialsshowedhigh stability and bioavailability due to the enhanced solubility and sustained releasing. In this study, different characteristics of prepared berberine loaded yeast cells (loading capacity, release kinetic order, MIC and stability) were evaluatedby different analytical methods (fluorescence spectroscopy, HPLC and SEM).The loading capacity was about 78% ± 0.6%.Berberine release patterns of microcapsules happened in two different stages and followed by zero and first-order kinetic,respectively. About 99% of all active material released during 34 h. MIC was improved by berberine loaded microcapsules in comparison withberberine powder. The microcapsules were completely stable. Berberine loaded Sac. Cerevisiae could be considered as a favorite sustained release drug delivery system. The yeast would be applied as an efficient carrier to improve various properties of different active materials. PMID:26664393

  18. Proteomic characterization of a wild-type wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Trabalzini, Lorenza; Paffetti, Alessandro; Ferro, Elisa; Scaloni, Andrea; Talamo, Fabio; Millucci, Lia; Martelli, Paola; Santucci, Annalisa

    2003-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the optimal eukaryotic model system to study mammalian biological responses. At the same time Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also widely utilized as a biotechnological tool in the food industry. Enological Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains have been so far routinely analyzed for their microbiological aspects. Nevertheless, wine yeasts are gaining an increasing interest in the last years since they strongly affect both the vinification process and the organoleptic properties of the final product wine. The protein repertoire is responsible of such features and, consequently, 2D-PAGE can be an useful tool to evaluate and select optimal wine yeast strains. We present here the first proteomic map of a wild-type wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain selected for the guided fermentation of very high quality wines. PMID:15141481

  19. Water treatment process and system for metals removal using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DOEpatents

    Krauter, Paula A. W.; Krauter, Gordon W.

    2002-01-01

    A process and a system for removal of metals from ground water or from soil by bioreducing or bioaccumulating the metals using metal tolerant microorganisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is tolerant to the metals, able to bioreduce the metals to the less toxic state and to accumulate them. The process and the system is useful for removal or substantial reduction of levels of chromium, molybdenum, cobalt, zinc, nickel, calcium, strontium, mercury and copper in water.

  20. The mannoprotein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an effective bioemulsifier.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, D R; Cooper, D G; Neufeld, R J

    1988-01-01

    The mannoprotein which is a major component of the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an effective bioemulsifier. Mannoprotein emulsifier was extracted in a high yield from whole cells of fresh bakers' yeast by two methods, by autoclaving in neutral citrate buffer and by digestion with Zymolase (Miles Laboratories; Toronto, Ontario, Canada), a beta-1,3-glucanase. Heat-extracted emulsifier was purified by ultrafiltration and contained approximately 44% carbohydrate (mannose) and 17% protein. Treatment of the emulsifier with protease eliminated emulsification. Kerosene-in-water emulsions were stabilized over a broad range of conditions, from pH 2 to 11, with up to 5% sodium chloride or up to 50% ethanol in the aqueous phase. In the presence of a low concentration of various solutes, emulsions were stable to three cycles of freezing and thawing. An emulsifying agent was extracted from each species or strain of yeast tested, including 13 species of genera other than Saccharomyces. Spent yeast from the manufacture of beer and wine was demonstrated to be a possible source for the large-scale production of this bioemulsifier. PMID:3046488

  1. Transcriptional regulation by ergosterol in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S J; Crowley, J H; Parks, L W

    1996-01-01

    Sterol biosynthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an energy-expensive, aerobic process, requiring heme and molecular oxygen. Heme, also synthesized exclusively during aerobic growth, not only acts as an enzymatic cofactor but also is directly and indirectly responsible for the transcriptional control of several yeast genes. Because of their biosynthetic similarities, we hypothesized that ergosterol, like heme, may have a regulatory function. Sterols are known to play a structural role in membrane integrity, but regulatory roles have not been characterized. To test possible regulatory roles of sterol, the promoter for the ERG3 gene, encoding the sterol C-5 desaturase, was fused to the bacterial lacZ reporter gene. This construct was placed in strains making aberrant sterols, and the effect of altered sterol composition on gene expression was monitored by beta-galactosidase activity. The absence of ergosterol resulted in a 35-fold increase in the expression of ERG3 as measured by beta-galactosidase activity. The level of ERG3 mRNA was increased as much as ninefold in erg mutant strains or wild-type strains inhibited in ergosterol biosynthesis by antifungal agents. The observed regulatory effects of ergosterol on ERG3 are specific for ergosterol, as several ergosterol derivatives failed to elicit the same controlling effect. These results demonstrate for the first time that ergosterol exerts a regulatory effect on gene transcription in S. cerevisiae. PMID:8816455

  2. CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Owen W; Poddar, Snigdha; Cate, Jamie H D

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes a method for CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing that results in scarless and marker-free integrations of DNA into Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes. DNA integration results from cotransforming (1) a single plasmid (pCAS) that coexpresses the Cas9 endonuclease and a uniquely engineered single guide RNA (sgRNA) expression cassette and (2) a linear DNA molecule that is used to repair the chromosomal DNA damage by homology-directed repair. For target specificity, the pCAS plasmid requires only a single cloning modification: replacing the 20-bp guide RNA sequence within the sgRNA cassette. This CRISPR-Cas9 protocol includes methods for (1) cloning the unique target sequence into pCAS, (2) assembly of the double-stranded DNA repair oligonucleotides, and (3) cotransformation of pCAS and linear repair DNA into yeast cells. The protocol is technically facile and requires no special equipment. It can be used in any S. cerevisiae strain, including industrial polyploid isolates. Therefore, this CRISPR-Cas9-based DNA integration protocol is achievable by virtually any yeast genetics and molecular biology laboratory. PMID:27250940

  3. Mead production: selection and characterization assays of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana Paula; Dias, Teresa; Andrade, João; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Estevinho, Letícia M

    2009-08-01

    Mead is a traditional drink, which results from the alcoholic fermentation of diluted honey carried out by yeasts. However, when it is produced in a homemade way, mead producers find several problems, namely, the lack of uniformity in the final product, delayed and arrested fermentations, and the production of "off-flavours" by the yeasts. These problems are usually associated with the inability of yeast strains to respond and adapt to unfavourable and stressful growth conditions. The main objectives of this work were to evaluate the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated from honey of the Trás-os-Montes (Northeast Portugal), to produce mead. Five strains from honey, as well as one laboratory strain and one commercial wine strain, were evaluated in terms of their fermentation performance under ethanol, sulphur dioxide and osmotic stress. All the strains showed similar behaviour in these conditions. Two yeasts strains isolated from honey and the commercial wine strain were further tested for mead production, using two different honey (a dark and a light honey), enriched with two supplements (one commercial and one developed by the research team), as fermentation media. The results obtained in this work show that S. cerevisiae strains isolated from honey, are appropriate for mead production. However it is of extreme importance to take into account the characteristics of the honey, and supplements used in the fermentation medium formulation, in order to achieve the best results in mead production. PMID:19481129

  4. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for itaconic acid production.

    PubMed

    Blazeck, John; Miller, Jarrett; Pan, Anny; Gengler, Jon; Holden, Clinton; Jamoussi, Mariam; Alper, Hal S

    2014-10-01

    Renewable alternatives for petroleum-derived chemicals are achievable through biosynthetic production. Here, we utilize Saccharomyces cerevisiae to enable the synthesis of itaconic acid, a molecule with diverse applications as a petrochemical replacement. We first optimize pathway expression within S. cerevisiae through the use of a hybrid promoter. Next, we utilize sequential, in silico computational genome-scanning to identify beneficial genetic perturbations that are metabolically distant from the itaconic acid synthesis pathway. In this manner, we successfully identify three non-obvious genetic targets (∆ade3 ∆bna2 ∆tes1) that successively improve itaconic acid titer. We establish that focused manipulations of upstream pathway enzymes (localized refactoring) and enzyme re-localization to both mitochondria and cytosol fail to improve itaconic acid titers. Finally, we establish a higher cell density fermentation that ultimately achieves itaconic acid titer of 168 mg/L, a sevenfold improvement over initial conditions. This work represents an attempt to increase itaconic acid production in yeast and demonstrates the successful utilization of computationally guided genetic manipulation to increase metabolic capacity. PMID:24997118

  5. Lactose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of fermenting cellobiose.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Oh, Eun Joong; Pathanibul, Panchalee; Turner, Timothy L; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-09-20

    Lactose is an inevitable byproduct of the dairy industry. In addition to cheese manufacturing, the growing Greek yogurt industry generates excess acid whey, which contains lactose. Therefore, rapid and efficient conversion of lactose to fuels and chemicals would be useful for recycling the otherwise harmful acid whey. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a popular metabolic engineering host, cannot natively utilize lactose. However, we discovered that an engineered S. cerevisiae strain (EJ2) capable of fermenting cellobiose can also ferment lactose. This finding suggests that a cellobiose transporter (CDT-1) can transport lactose and a β-glucosidase (GH1-1) can hydrolyze lactose by acting as a β-galactosidase. While the lactose fermentation by the EJ2 strain was much slower than the cellobiose fermentation, a faster lactose-fermenting strain (EJ2e8) was obtained through serial subcultures on lactose. The EJ2e8 strain fermented lactose with a consumption rate of 2.16g/Lh. The improved lactose fermentation by the EJ2e8 strain was due to the increased copy number of cdt-1 and gh1-1 genes. Looking ahead, the EJ2e8 strain could be exploited for the production of other non-ethanol fuels and chemicals from lactose through further metabolic engineering. PMID:27457698

  6. Data on dynamic study of cytoophidia in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Huang, Yong; Wang, Peng-Ye; Ye, Fangfu; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-09-01

    The data in this paper are related to the research article entitled "Filamentation of metabolic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae" Q.J. Shen et al. (2016) [1]. Cytoophidia are filamentous structures discovered in fruit flies (doi:10.1016/S1673-8527(09)60046-1) J.L. Liu (2010) [2], bacteria (doi:10.1038/ncb2087) M. Ingerson-Mahar et al. (2010) [3], yeast (doi:10.1083/jcb.201003001; doi:10.1242/bio.20149613) C. Noree et al. (2010) and J. Zhang, L. Hulme, J.L. Liu (2014) [4], [5] and human cells (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0029690; doi:10.1016/j.jgg.2011.08.004) K. Chen et al. (2011) and W.C. Carcamo et al. (2011) ( [6], [7]. However, there is little research on the motility of the cytoophidia. Here we selected cytoophidia formed by 6 filament-forming proteins in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae, and performed living-cell imaging of cells expressing the proteins fused with GFP. The dynamic features of the six types of cytoophidia were analyzed. In the data, both raw movies and analysed results of the dynamics of cytoophidia are presented. PMID:27274529

  7. Long-chain alkane production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhou, Yongjin J; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-06-01

    In the past decade industrial-scale production of renewable transportation biofuels has been developed as an alternative to fossil fuels, with ethanol as the most prominent biofuel and yeast as the production organism of choice. However, ethanol is a less efficient substitute fuel for heavy-duty and maritime transportation as well as aviation due to its low energy density. Therefore, new types of biofuels, such as alkanes, are being developed that can be used as drop-in fuels and can substitute gasoline, diesel, and kerosene. Here, we describe for the first time the heterologous biosynthesis of long-chain alkanes by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that elimination of the hexadecenal dehydrogenase Hfd1 and expression of a redox system are essential for alkane biosynthesis in yeast. Deletion of HFD1 together with expression of an alkane biosynthesis pathway resulted in the production of the alkanes tridecane, pentadecane, and heptadecane. Our study provides a proof of principle for producing long-chain alkanes in the industrial workhorse S. cerevisiae, which was so far limited to bacteria. We anticipate that these findings will be a key factor for further yeast engineering to enable industrial production of alkane based drop-in biofuels, which can allow the biofuel industry to diversify beyond bioethanol. PMID:25545362

  8. Quantifying separation and similarity in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae metapopulation

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Sarah; Goddard, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic microbes are key ecosystem drivers; however, we have little theory and few data elucidating the processes influencing their observed population patterns. Here we provide an in-depth quantitative analysis of population separation and similarity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the aim of providing a more detailed account of the population processes occurring in microbes. Over 10 000 individual isolates were collected from native plants, vineyards and spontaneous ferments of fruit from six major regions spanning 1000 km across New Zealand. From these, hundreds of S. cerevisiae genotypes were obtained, and using a suite of analytical methods we provide comprehensive quantitative estimates for both population structure and rates of gene flow or migration. No genetic differentiation was detected within geographic regions, even between populations inhabiting native forests and vineyards. We do, however, reveal a picture of national population structure at scales above ∼100 km with distinctive populations in the more remote Nelson and Central Otago regions primarily contributing to this. In addition, differential degrees of connectivity between regional populations are observed and correlate with the movement of fruit by the New Zealand wine industry. This suggests some anthropogenic influence on these observed population patterns. PMID:25062126

  9. Reciprocal translocations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae formed by nonhomologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Gabriel, Abram

    2004-02-01

    Reciprocal translocations are common in cancer cells, but their creation is poorly understood. We have developed an assay system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study reciprocal translocation formation in the absence of homology. We induce two specific double-strand breaks (DSBs) simultaneously on separate chromosomes with HO endonuclease and analyze the subsequent chromosomal rearrangements among surviving cells. Under these conditions, reciprocal translocations via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) occur at frequencies of approximately 2-7 x 10(-5)/cell exposed to the DSBs. Yku80p is a component of the cell's NHEJ machinery. In its absence, reciprocal translocations still occur, but the junctions are associated with deletions and extended overlapping sequences. After induction of a single DSB, translocations and inversions are recovered in wild-type and rad52 strains. In these rearrangements, a nonrandom assortment of sites have fused to the DSB, and their junctions show typical signs of NHEJ. The sites tend to be between open reading frames or within Ty1 LTRs. In some cases the translocation partner is formed by a break at a cryptic HO recognition site. Our results demonstrate that NHEJ-mediated reciprocal translocations can form in S. cerevisiae as a consequence of DSB repair. PMID:15020464

  10. Metabolomic approach for improving ethanol stress tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Erika; Nakayama, Yasumune; Mukai, Yukio; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2016-04-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used for brewing and ethanol production. The ethanol sensitivity of yeast cells is still a serious problem during ethanol fermentation, and a variety of genetic approaches (e.g., random mutant screening under selective pressure of ethanol) have been developed to improve ethanol tolerance. In this study, we developed a strategy for improving ethanol tolerance of yeast cells based on metabolomics as a high-resolution quantitative phenotypic analysis. We performed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis to identify and quantify 36 compounds on 14 mutant strains including knockout strains for transcription factor and metabolic enzyme genes. A strong relation between metabolome of these mutants and their ethanol tolerance was observed. Data mining of the metabolomic analysis showed that several compounds (such as trehalose, valine, inositol and proline) contributed highly to ethanol tolerance. Our approach successfully detected well-known ethanol stress related metabolites such as trehalose and proline thus, to further prove our strategy, we focused on valine and inositol as the most promising target metabolites in our study. Our results show that simultaneous deletion of LEU4 and LEU9 (leading to accumulation of valine) or INM1 and INM2 (leading to reduction of inositol) significantly enhanced ethanol tolerance. This study shows the potential of the metabolomic approach to identify target genes for strain improvement of S. cerevisiae with higher ethanol tolerance. PMID:26344121

  11. Systems biology of GAL regulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pannala, Venkat Reddy; Bhat, Paike Jayadeva; Bhartiya, Sharad; Venkatesh, K V

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary success of an organism depends on its ability to express or adapt to constantly changing environmental conditions. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has evolved an elaborate genetic circuit to regulate the expression of galactose-metabolizing enzymes in the presence of galactose but in the absence of glucose. The circuit possesses molecular mechanisms such as multiple binding sites, cooperativity, autoregulation, nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and substrate sensing mechanism. Furthermore, the GAL system consists of two positive (activating) feedback and one negative (repressing) feedback loops. These individual mechanisms, elucidated through experimental approach, can be integrated to obtain a system-wide behavior. Mathematical models in conjunction with guided experiments have demonstrated system-level properties such as ultrasensitivity, memory, noise attenuation, rapid response, and sensitive response arising out of the molecular interactions. These system-level properties allow S. cerevisiae to adapt and grow in a galactose medium under noisy and changing environments. This review focuses on system-level models and properties of the GAL regulon. PMID:20836013

  12. Human G protein-coupled receptor studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rongfang; Wong, Winsy; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-08-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the largest families of membrane proteins, with approximately 800 different GPCRs in the human genome. Signaling via GPCRs regulates many biological processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and development. In addition, many receptors have a pivotal role in immunophysiology. Many hormones and neurotransmitters are ligands for these receptors, and hence it is not surprising that many drugs, either mimicking or blocking the action of the bodily substances, have been developed. It is estimated that 30-40% of current drugs on the market target GPCRs. Further identifying and elucidating the functions of GPCRs will provide opportunities for novel drug discovery, including for immunotherapy. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) is a very important and useful platform in this respect. There are many advantages of using a yeast assay system, as it is cheap, safe and stable; it is also convenient for rapid feasibility and optimization studies. Moreover, it offers a "null" background when studying human GPCRs. New developments regarding human GPCRs expressed in a yeast platform are providing insight into GPCR activation and signaling, and facilitate agonist and antagonist identification. In this review we summarize the latest findings regarding human G-protein-coupled receptors in studies using S. cerevisiae, ever since the year 2005 when we last published a review on this topic. We describe 11 families of GPCRs in detail, while including the principles and developments of each yeast system applied to these different GPCRs and highlight and generalize the experimental findings of GPCR function in these systems. PMID:26920251

  13. Heat shock response improves heterologous protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jin; Osterlund, Tobias; Liu, Zihe; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-04-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used platform for the production of heterologous proteins of medical or industrial interest. However, heterologous protein productivity is often low due to limitations of the host strain. Heat shock response (HSR) is an inducible, global, cellular stress response, which facilitates the cell recovery from many forms of stress, e.g., heat stress. In S. cerevisiae, HSR is regulated mainly by the transcription factor heat shock factor (Hsf1p) and many of its targets are genes coding for molecular chaperones that promote protein folding and prevent the accumulation of mis-folded or aggregated proteins. In this work, we over-expressed a mutant HSF1 gene HSF1-R206S which can constitutively activate HSR, so the heat shock response was induced at different levels, and we studied the impact of HSR on heterologous protein secretion. We found that moderate and high level over-expression of HSF1-R206S increased heterologous α-amylase yield 25 and 70 % when glucose was fully consumed, and 37 and 62 % at the end of the ethanol phase, respectively. Moderate and high level over-expression also improved endogenous invertase yield 118 and 94 %, respectively. However, human insulin precursor was only improved slightly and this only by high level over-expression of HSF1-R206S, supporting our previous findings that the production of this protein in S. cerevisiae is not limited by secretion. Our results provide an effective strategy to improve protein secretion and demonstrated an approach that can induce ER and cytosolic chaperones simultaneously. PMID:23208612

  14. Heterologous expression of cellulase genes in natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Davison, Steffi A; den Haan, Riaan; van Zyl, Willem Heber

    2016-09-01

    Enzyme cost is a major impediment to second-generation (2G) cellulosic ethanol production. One strategy to reduce enzyme cost is to engineer enzyme production capacity in a fermentative microorganism to enable consolidated bio-processing (CBP). Ideally, a strain with a high secretory phenotype, high fermentative capacity as well as an innate robustness to bioethanol-specific stressors, including tolerance to products formed during pre-treatment and fermentation of lignocellulosic substrates should be used. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a robust fermentative yeast but has limitations as a potential CBP host, such as low heterologous protein secretion titers. In this study, we evaluated natural S. cerevisiae isolate strains for superior secretion activity and other industrially relevant characteristics needed during the process of lignocellulosic ethanol production. Individual cellulases namely Saccharomycopsis fibuligera Cel3A (β-glucosidase), Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A (cellobiohydrolase), and Trichoderma reesei Cel5A (endoglucanase) were utilized as reporter proteins. Natural strain YI13 was identified to have a high secretory phenotype, demonstrating a 3.7- and 3.5-fold higher Cel7A and Cel5A activity, respectively, compared to the reference strain S288c. YI13 also demonstrated other industrially relevant characteristics such as growth vigor, high ethanol titer, multi-tolerance to high temperatures (37 and 40 °C), ethanol (10 % w/v), and towards various concentrations of a cocktail of inhibitory compounds commonly found in lignocellulose hydrolysates. This study accentuates the value of natural S. cerevisiae isolate strains to serve as potential robust and highly productive chassis organisms for CBP strain development. PMID:27470141

  15. Metabolic Engineering of Glycerol Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Overkamp, Karin M.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Kötter, Peter; Luttik, Marijke A. H.; van Dijken, Johannes P.; Pronk, Jack T.

    2002-01-01

    Inactivation of TPI1, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae structural gene encoding triose phosphate isomerase, completely eliminates growth on glucose as the sole carbon source. In tpi1-null mutants, intracellular accumulation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate might be prevented if the cytosolic NADH generated in glycolysis by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were quantitatively used to reduce dihydroxyacetone phosphate to glycerol. We hypothesize that the growth defect of tpi1-null mutants is caused by mitochondrial reoxidation of cytosolic NADH, thus rendering it unavailable for dihydroxyacetone-phosphate reduction. To test this hypothesis, a tpi1Δ nde1Δ nde2Δ gut2Δ quadruple mutant was constructed. NDE1 and NDE2 encode isoenzymes of mitochondrial external NADH dehydrogenase; GUT2 encodes a key enzyme of the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttle. It has recently been demonstrated that these two systems are primarily responsible for mitochondrial oxidation of cytosolic NADH in S. cerevisiae. Consistent with the hypothesis, the quadruple mutant grew on glucose as the sole carbon source. The growth on glucose, which was accompanied by glycerol production, was inhibited at high-glucose concentrations. This inhibition was attributed to glucose repression of respiratory enzymes as, in the quadruple mutant, respiratory pyruvate dissimilation is essential for ATP synthesis and growth. Serial transfer of the quadruple mutant on high-glucose media yielded a spontaneous mutant with much higher specific growth rates in high-glucose media (up to 0.10 h−1 at 100 g of glucose · liter−1). In aerated batch cultures grown on 400 g of glucose · liter−1, this engineered S. cerevisiae strain produced over 200 g of glycerol · liter−1, corresponding to a molar yield of glycerol on glucose close to unity. PMID:12039737

  16. Exploring the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Volatile Metabolome: Indigenous versus Commercial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Zélia; Melo, André; Figueiredo, Ana Raquel; Coimbra, Manuel A.; Gomes, Ana C.; Rocha, Sílvia M.

    2015-01-01

    Winemaking is a highly industrialized process and a number of commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are used around the world, neglecting the diversity of native yeast strains that are responsible for the production of wines peculiar flavours. The aim of this study was to in-depth establish the S. cerevisiae volatile metabolome and to assess inter-strains variability. To fulfill this objective, two indigenous strains (BT2652 and BT2453 isolated from spontaneous fermentation of grapes collected in Bairrada Appellation, Portugal) and two commercial strains (CSc1 and CSc2) S. cerevisiae were analysed using a methodology based on advanced multidimensional gas chromatography (HS-SPME/GC×GC-ToFMS) tandem with multivariate analysis. A total of 257 volatile metabolites were identified, distributed over the chemical families of acetals, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, terpenic compounds, esters, ethers, furan-type compounds, hydrocarbons, pyrans, pyrazines and S-compounds. Some of these families are related with metabolic pathways of amino acid, carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism as well as mono and sesquiterpenic biosynthesis. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used with a dataset comprising all variables (257 volatile components), and a distinction was observed between commercial and indigenous strains, which suggests inter-strains variability. In a second step, a subset containing esters and terpenic compounds (C10 and C15), metabolites of particular relevance to wine aroma, was also analysed using PCA. The terpenic and ester profiles express the strains variability and their potential contribution to the wine aromas, specially the BT2453, which produced the higher terpenic content. This research contributes to understand the metabolic diversity of indigenous wine microflora versus commercial strains and achieved knowledge that may be further exploited to produce wines with peculiar aroma properties. PMID:26600152

  17. Oxygen requirements for formation and activity of the squalene expoxidase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L.; Klein, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of oxygen on squalene epoxidase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. In cells grown in standing cultures, the epoxidase was localized mainly in the 'mitochondrial' fraction. Upon aeration, enzyme activity increased and the newly formed enzyme was associated with the 'microsomal' fraction. At 0.03 percent (vol/vol) oxygen, epoxidase levels doubled, whereas the ergosterol level was only slightly increased. Cycloheximide inhibited the increase in epoxidase under these conditions. An apparent K sub m for oxygen of 0.38 percent (vol/vol) was determined from a crude particulate preparation for the epoxidase.

  18. The pentafunctional arom enzyme of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a mosaic of monofunctional domains.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, K; Edwards, R M; Coggins, J R

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARO1 gene which encodes the arom multifunctional enzyme has been determined. The protein sequence deduced for the pentafunctional arom polypeptide is 1588 amino acids in length and has a calculated Mr of 174555. Functional regions within the polypeptide chain have been identified by comparison with the sequences of the five monofunctional Escherichia coli enzymes whose activities correspond with those of the arom multifunctional enzyme. The observed homologies demonstrate that the arom polypeptide is a mosaic of functional domains and are consistent with the hypothesis that the ARO1 gene evolved by the linking of ancestral E. coli-like genes. PMID:2825635

  19. Creation of a synthetic xylose-inducible promoter for Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is currently used to produce ethanol from glucose, but it cannot utilize five-carbon sugars contained in the hemicellulose component of biomass feedstocks. S. cerevisiae strains engineered for xylose fermentation have been made using constitutive promoters to express the req...

  20. ISOLATION OF A CYTOCHROME P-450 STRUCTURAL GENE FROM SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have transformed a Saccharomyces cerevisiae host with an S. cerevisiae genomic library contained in the shuttle vector YEp24 and screened the resultant transformants for resistance to ketoconazole (Kc), an inhibitor of the cytochrome P-450 (P-450) enzyme lanosterol 14-demethyl...

  1. Metabolism of sulfur amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Surdin-Kerjan, Y

    1997-01-01

    Sulfur amino acid biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a large number of enzymes required for the de novo biosynthesis of methionine and cysteine and the recycling of organic sulfur metabolites. This review summarizes the details of these processes and analyzes the molecular data which have been acquired in this metabolic area. Sulfur biochemistry appears not to be unique through terrestrial life, and S. cerevisiae is one of the species of sulfate-assimilatory organisms possessing a larger set of enzymes for sulfur metabolism. The review also deals with several enzyme deficiencies that lead to a nutritional requirement for organic sulfur, although they do not correspond to defects within the biosynthetic pathway. In S. cerevisiae, the sulfur amino acid biosynthetic pathway is tightly controlled: in response to an increase in the amount of intracellular S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), transcription of the coregulated genes is turned off. The second part of the review is devoted to the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. The coordinated response to AdoMet requires two cis-acting promoter elements. One centers on the sequence TCACGTG, which also constitutes a component of all S. cerevisiae centromeres. Situated upstream of the sulfur genes, this element is the binding site of a transcription activation complex consisting of a basic helix-loop-helix factor, Cbf1p, and two basic leucine zipper factors, Met4p and Met28p. Molecular studies have unraveled the specific functions for each subunit of the Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex as well as the modalities of its assembly on the DNA. The Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex contains only one transcription activation module, the Met4p subunit. Detailed mutational analysis of Met4p has elucidated its functional organization. In addition to its activation and bZIP domains, Met4p contains two regulatory domains, called the inhibitory region and the auxiliary domain. When the level of intracellular AdoMet increases

  2. Raw starch conversion by Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing Aspergillus tubingensis amylases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Starch is one of the most abundant organic polysaccharides available for the production of bio-ethanol as an alternative transport fuel. Cost-effective utilisation of starch requires consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) where a single microorganism can produce the enzymes required for hydrolysis of starch, and also convert the glucose monomers to ethanol. Results The Aspergillus tubingensis T8.4 α-amylase (amyA) and glucoamylase (glaA) genes were cloned and expressed in the laboratory strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y294 and the semi-industrial strain, S. cerevisiae Mnuα1. The recombinant AmyA and GlaA displayed protein sizes of 110–150 kDa and 90 kDa, respectively, suggesting significant glycosylation in S. cerevisiae. The Mnuα1[AmyA-GlaA] and Y294[AmyA-GlaA] strains were able to utilise 20 g l-1 raw corn starch as sole carbohydrate source, with ethanol titers of 9.03 and 6.67 g l-1 (0.038 and 0.028 g l-1 h-1), respectively, after 10 days. With a substrate load of 200 g l-1 raw corn starch, Mnuα1[AmyA-GlaA] yielded 70.07 g l-1 ethanol (0.58 g l-1 h-1) after 120 h of fermentation, whereas Y294[AmyA-GlaA] was less efficient at 43.33 g l-1 ethanol (0.36 g l-1 h-1). Conclusions In a semi-industrial amylolytic S. cerevisiae strain expressing the A. tubingensis α-amylase and glucoamylase genes, 200 g l-1 raw starch was completely hydrolysed (saccharified) in 120 hours with 74% converted to released sugars plus fermentation products and the remainder presumably to biomass. The single-step conversion of raw starch represents significant progress towards the realisation of CBP without the need for any heat pretreatment. Furthermore, the amylases were produced and secreted by the host strain, thus circumventing the need for exogenous amylases. PMID:24286270

  3. The plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: structure, function, and biogenesis.

    PubMed

    van der Rest, M E; Kamminga, A H; Nakano, A; Anraku, Y; Poolman, B; Konings, W N

    1995-06-01

    The composition of phospholipids, sphingolipids, and sterols in the plasma membrane has a strong influence on the activity of the proteins associated or embedded in the lipid bilayer. Since most lipid-synthesizing enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are located in intracellular organelles, an extensive flux of lipids from these organelles to the plasma membrane is required. Although the pathway of protein traffic to the plasma membrane is similar to that of most of the lipids, the bulk flow of lipids is separate from vesicle-mediated protein transport. Recent advances in the analysis of membrane budding and membrane fusion indicate that the mechanisms of protein transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi and from the Golgi to plasma membrane are similar. The majority of plasma membrane proteins transport solutes across the membrane. A number of ATP-dependent export systems have been detected that couple the hydrolysis of ATP to transport of molecules out of the cell. The hydrolysis of ATP by the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase generates a proton motive force which is used to drive secondary transport processes. In S. cerevisiae, many substrates are transported by more than one system. Transport of monosaccharide is catalyzed by uniport systems, while transport of disaccharides, amino acids, and nucleosides is mediated by proton symport systems. Transport activity can be regulated at the level of transcription, e.g., induction and (catabolite) repression, but transport proteins can also be affected posttranslationally by a process termed catabolite inactivation. Catabolite inactivation is triggered by the addition of fermentable sugars, intracellular acidification, stress conditions, and/or nitrogen starvation. Phosphorylation and/or ubiquitination of the transport proteins has been proposed as an initial step in the controlled inactivation and degradation of the target enzyme. The use of artificial membranes, like secretory vesicles and plasma membranes

  4. Septins localize to microtubules during nutritional limitation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pablo-Hernando, M Evangelina; Arnaiz-Pita, Yolanda; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; del Rey, Francisco; Neiman, Aaron M; Vázquez de Aldana, Carlos R

    2008-01-01

    Background In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, nutrient limitation stimulates diploid cells to undergo DNA replication and meiosis, followed by the formation of four haploid spores. Septins are a family of proteins that assemble a ring structure at the mother-daughter neck during vegetative growth, where they control cytokinesis. In sporulating cells, the septin ring disassembles and septins relocalize to the prospore membrane. Results Here, we demonstrate that nutrient limitation triggers a change in the localization of at least two vegetative septins (Cdc10 and Cdc11) from the bud neck to the microtubules. The association of Cdc10 and Cdc11 with microtubules persists into meiosis, and they are found associated with the meiotic spindle until the end of meiosis II. In addition, the meiosis-specific septin Spr28 displays similar behavior, suggesting that this is a common feature of septins. Septin association to microtubules is a consequence of the nutrient limitation signal, since it is also observed when haploid cells are incubated in sporulation medium and when haploid or diploid cells are grown in medium containing non-fermentable carbon sources. Moreover, during meiosis II, when the nascent prospore membrane is formed, septins moved from the microtubules to this membrane. Proper organization of the septins on the membrane requires the sporulation-specific septins Spr3 and Spr28. Conclusion Nutrient limitation in S. cerevisiae triggers the sporulation process, but it also induces the disassembly of the septin bud neck ring and relocalization of the septin subunits to the nucleus. Septins remain associated with microtubules during the meiotic divisions and later, during spore morphogenesis, they are detected associated to the nascent prospore membranes surrounding each nuclear lobe. Septin association to microtubules also occurs during growth in non-fermentable carbon sources. PMID:18826657

  5. Engineering the monomer composition of polyhydroxyalkanoates synthesized in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Carlson, Ross; Srienc, Friedrich

    2006-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) have received considerable interest as renewable-resource-based, biodegradable, and biocompatible plastics with a wide range of potential applications. We have engineered the synthesis of PHA polymers composed of monomers ranging from 4 to 14 carbon atoms in either the cytosol or the peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by harnessing intermediates of fatty acid metabolism. Cytosolic PHA production was supported by establishing in the cytosol critical beta-oxidation chemistries which are found natively in peroxisomes. This platform was utilized to supply medium-chain (C6 to C14) PHA precursors from both fatty acid degradation and synthesis to a cytosolically expressed medium-chain-length (mcl) polymerase from Pseudomonas oleovorans. Synthesis of short-chain-length PHAs (scl-PHAs) was established in the peroxisome of a wild-type yeast strain by targeting the Ralstonia eutropha scl polymerase to the peroxisome. This strain, harboring a peroxisomally targeted scl-PHA synthase, accumulated PHA up to approximately 7% of its cell dry weight. These results indicate (i) that S. cerevisiae expressing a cytosolic mcl-PHA polymerase or a peroxisomal scl-PHA synthase can use the 3-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A intermediates from fatty acid metabolism to synthesize PHAs and (ii) that fatty acid degradation is also possible in the cytosol as beta-oxidation might not be confined only to the peroxisomes. Polymers of even-numbered, odd-numbered, or a combination of even- and odd-numbered monomers can be controlled by feeding the appropriate substrates. This ability should permit the rational design and synthesis of polymers with desired material properties. PMID:16391089

  6. Modulation of efficiency of translation termination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Nizhnikov, Anton A; Antonets, Kirill S; Inge-Vechtomov, Sergey G; Derkatch, Irina L

    2014-01-01

    Nonsense suppression is a readthrough of premature termination codons. It typically occurs either due to the recognition of stop codons by tRNAs with mutant anticodons, or due to a decrease in the fidelity of translation termination. In the latter case, suppressors usually promote the readthrough of different types of nonsense codons and are thus called omnipotent nonsense suppressors. Omnipotent nonsense suppressors were identified in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in 1960s, and most of subsequent studies were performed in this model organism. Initially, omnipotent suppressors were localized by genetic analysis to different protein- and RNA-encoding genes, mostly the components of translational machinery. Later, nonsense suppression was found to be caused not only by genomic mutations, but also by epigenetic elements, prions. Prions are self-perpetuating protein conformations usually manifested by infectious protein aggregates. Modulation of translational accuracy by prions reflects changes in the activity of their structural proteins involved in different aspects of protein synthesis. Overall, nonsense suppression can be seen as a “phenotypic mirror” of events affecting the accuracy of the translational machine. However, the range of proteins participating in the modulation of translation termination fidelity is not fully elucidated. Recently, the list has been expanded significantly by findings that revealed a number of weak genetic and epigenetic nonsense suppressors, the effect of which can be detected only in specific genetic backgrounds. This review summarizes the data on the nonsense suppressors decreasing the fidelity of translation termination in S. cerevisiae, and discusses the functional significance of the modulation of translational accuracy. PMID:25486049

  7. Identification and characterization of phenylpyruvate decarboxylase genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vuralhan, Zeynep; Morais, Marcos A; Tai, Siew-Leng; Piper, Matthew D W; Pronk, Jack T

    2003-08-01

    Catabolism of amino acids via the Ehrlich pathway involves transamination to the corresponding alpha-keto acids, followed by decarboxylation to an aldehyde and then reduction to an alcohol. Alternatively, the aldehyde may be oxidized to an acid. This pathway is functional in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, since during growth in glucose-limited chemostat cultures with phenylalanine as the sole nitrogen source, phenylethanol and phenylacetate were produced in quantities that accounted for all of the phenylalanine consumed. Our objective was to identify the structural gene(s) required for the decarboxylation of phenylpyruvate to phenylacetaldehyde, the first specific step in the Ehrlich pathway. S. cerevisiae possesses five candidate genes with sequence similarity to genes encoding thiamine diphosphate-dependent decarboxylases that could encode this activity: YDR380w/ARO10, YDL080C/THI3, PDC1, PDC5, and PDC6. Phenylpyruvate decarboxylase activity was present in cultures grown with phenylalanine as the sole nitrogen source but was absent from ammonia-grown cultures. Furthermore, the transcript level of one candidate gene (ARO10) increased 30-fold when phenylalanine replaced ammonia as the sole nitrogen source. Analyses of phenylalanine catabolite production and phenylpyruvate decarboxylase enzyme assays indicated that ARO10 was sufficient to encode phenylpyruvate decarboxylase activity in the absence of the four other candidate genes. There was also an alternative activity with a higher capacity but lower affinity for phenylpyruvate. The candidate gene THI3 did not itself encode an active phenylpyruvate decarboxylase but was required along with one or more pyruvate decarboxylase genes (PDC1, PDC5, and PDC6) for the alternative activity. The K(m) and V(max) values of the two activities differed, showing that Aro10p is the physiologically relevant phenylpyruvate decarboxylase in wild-type cells. Modifications to this gene could therefore be important for metabolic engineering

  8. Isolation and characterization of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae peptide transport gene.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, J R; Basrai, M A; Steiner, H Y; Naider, F; Becker, J M

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned and characterized a Saccharomyces cerevisiae peptide transport gene (PTR2) isolated from a genomic DNA library by directly selecting for functional complementation of a peptide transport-deficient mutant. Deletion and frameshift mutageneses were used to localize the complementing activity to a 3.1-kbp region on the transforming plasmid. DNA sequencing of the complementing region identified an open reading frame spanning 1,803 bp. The deduced amino acid sequence predicts a hydrophobic peptide consisting of 601 amino acids, having a molecular mass of 68.1 kDa, composed in part of 12 hydrophobic segments, and sharing significant similarities with a nitrate transport protein encoded by the CHL1 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana. Northern (RNA) hybridization experiments demonstrated a single transcript that was 1.8 kb in length and that was transiently induced by the addition of L-leucine to the growth medium. The PTR2 gene was localized to the right arm of chromosome XI by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field gel chromosome blotting and by hybridization to known chromosome XI lambda phage clones of S. cerevisiae DNA. PTR2 was tightly linked to the UBI2 gene, with the coding sequences being separated by a 466-bp region and oriented so that the genes were transcribed convergently. A chromosomal disruption of the PTR2 gene in a haploid strain was not lethal under standard growth conditions. The cloning of PTR2 represents the first example of the molecular genetic characterization of a eucaryotic peptide transport gene. Images PMID:8264579

  9. The plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: structure, function, and biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    van der Rest, M E; Kamminga, A H; Nakano, A; Anraku, Y; Poolman, B; Konings, W N

    1995-01-01

    The composition of phospholipids, sphingolipids, and sterols in the plasma membrane has a strong influence on the activity of the proteins associated or embedded in the lipid bilayer. Since most lipid-synthesizing enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are located in intracellular organelles, an extensive flux of lipids from these organelles to the plasma membrane is required. Although the pathway of protein traffic to the plasma membrane is similar to that of most of the lipids, the bulk flow of lipids is separate from vesicle-mediated protein transport. Recent advances in the analysis of membrane budding and membrane fusion indicate that the mechanisms of protein transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi and from the Golgi to plasma membrane are similar. The majority of plasma membrane proteins transport solutes across the membrane. A number of ATP-dependent export systems have been detected that couple the hydrolysis of ATP to transport of molecules out of the cell. The hydrolysis of ATP by the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase generates a proton motive force which is used to drive secondary transport processes. In S. cerevisiae, many substrates are transported by more than one system. Transport of monosaccharide is catalyzed by uniport systems, while transport of disaccharides, amino acids, and nucleosides is mediated by proton symport systems. Transport activity can be regulated at the level of transcription, e.g., induction and (catabolite) repression, but transport proteins can also be affected posttranslationally by a process termed catabolite inactivation. Catabolite inactivation is triggered by the addition of fermentable sugars, intracellular acidification, stress conditions, and/or nitrogen starvation. Phosphorylation and/or ubiquitination of the transport proteins has been proposed as an initial step in the controlled inactivation and degradation of the target enzyme. The use of artificial membranes, like secretory vesicles and plasma membranes

  10. Adaptive evolution of a lactose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae recombinant.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Pedro M R; François, Jean; Parrou, Jean Luc; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2008-03-01

    The construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that ferment lactose has biotechnological interest, particularly for cheese whey fermentation. A flocculent lactose-consuming S. cerevisiae recombinant expressing the LAC12 (lactose permease) and LAC4 (beta-galactosidase) genes of Kluyveromyces lactis was constructed previously but showed poor efficiency in lactose fermentation. This strain was therefore subjected to an evolutionary engineering process (serial transfer and dilution in lactose medium), which yielded an evolved recombinant strain that consumed lactose twofold faster, producing 30% more ethanol than the original recombinant. We identified two molecular events that targeted the LAC construct in the evolved strain: a 1,593-bp deletion in the intergenic region (promoter) between LAC4 and LAC12 and a decrease of the plasmid copy number by about 10-fold compared to that in the original recombinant. The results suggest that the intact promoter was unable to mediate the induction of the transcription of LAC4 and LAC12 by lactose in the original recombinant and that the deletion established the transcriptional induction of both genes in the evolved strain. We propose that the tuning of the expression of the heterologous LAC genes in the evolved recombinant was accomplished by the interplay between the decreased copy number of both genes and the different levels of transcriptional induction for LAC4 and LAC12 resulting from the changed promoter structure. Nevertheless, our results do not exclude other possible mutations that may have contributed to the improved lactose fermentation phenotype. This study illustrates the usefulness of simple evolutionary engineering approaches in strain improvement. The evolved strain efficiently fermented threefold-concentrated cheese whey, providing an attractive alternative for the fermentation of lactose-based media. PMID:18245248

  11. Introducing a New Breed of Wine Yeast: Interspecific Hybridisation between a Commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeast and Saccharomyces mikatae

    PubMed Central

    Bellon, Jennifer R.; Schmid, Frank; Capone, Dimitra L.; Dunn, Barbara L.; Chambers, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific hybrids are commonplace in agriculture and horticulture; bread wheat and grapefruit are but two examples. The benefits derived from interspecific hybridisation include the potential of generating advantageous transgressive phenotypes. This paper describes the generation of a new breed of wine yeast by interspecific hybridisation between a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strain and Saccharomyces mikatae, a species hitherto not associated with industrial fermentation environs. While commercially available wine yeast strains provide consistent and reliable fermentations, wines produced using single inocula are thought to lack the sensory complexity and rounded palate structure obtained from spontaneous fermentations. In contrast, interspecific yeast hybrids have the potential to deliver increased complexity to wine sensory properties and alternative wine styles through the formation of novel, and wider ranging, yeast volatile fermentation metabolite profiles, whilst maintaining the robustness of the wine yeast parent. Screening of newly generated hybrids from a cross between a S. cerevisiae wine yeast and S. mikatae (closely-related but ecologically distant members of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade), has identified progeny with robust fermentation properties and winemaking potential. Chemical analysis showed that, relative to the S. cerevisiae wine yeast parent, hybrids produced wines with different concentrations of volatile metabolites that are known to contribute to wine flavour and aroma, including flavour compounds associated with non-Saccharomyces species. The new S. cerevisiae x S. mikatae hybrids have the potential to produce complex wines akin to products of spontaneous fermentation while giving winemakers the safeguard of an inoculated ferment. PMID:23614011

  12. Cycloheximide Chase Analysis of Protein Degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Bryce W; Lloyd, Michael E; Engle, Sarah M; Rubenstein, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of protein abundance is crucial to virtually every cellular process. Protein abundance reflects the integration of the rates of protein synthesis and protein degradation. Many assays reporting on protein abundance (e.g., single-time point western blotting, flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, or growth-based reporter assays) do not allow discrimination of the relative effects of translation and proteolysis on protein levels. This article describes the use of cycloheximide chase followed by western blotting to specifically analyze protein degradation in the model unicellular eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast). In this procedure, yeast cells are incubated in the presence of the translational inhibitor cycloheximide. Aliquots of cells are collected immediately after and at specific time points following addition of cycloheximide. Cells are lysed, and the lysates are separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for western blot analysis of protein abundance at each time point. The cycloheximide chase procedure permits visualization of the degradation kinetics of the steady state population of a variety of cellular proteins. The procedure may be used to investigate the genetic requirements for and environmental influences on protein degradation. PMID:27167179

  13. TOR and RAS pathways regulate desiccation tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Aaron Z.; Gibney, Patrick A.; Botstein, David; Koshland, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    Tolerance to desiccation in cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is inducible; only one in a million cells from an exponential culture survive desiccation compared with one in five cells in stationary phase. Here we exploit the desiccation sensitivity of exponentially dividing cells to understand the stresses imposed by desiccation and their stress response pathways. We found that induction of desiccation tolerance is cell autonomous and that there is an inverse correlation between desiccation tolerance and growth rate in glucose-, ammonia-, or phosphate-limited continuous cultures. A transient heat shock induces a 5000–fold increase in desiccation tolerance, whereas hyper-ionic, -reductive, -oxidative, or -osmotic stress induced much less. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the Sch9p-regulated branch of the TOR and Ras-cAMP pathway inhibits desiccation tolerance by inhibiting the stress response transcription factors Gis1p, Msn2p, and Msn4p and by activating Sfp1p, a ribosome biogenesis transcription factor. Among 41 mutants defective in ribosome biogenesis, a subset defective in 60S showed a dramatic increase in desiccation tolerance independent of growth rate. We suggest that reduction of a specific intermediate in 60S biogenesis, resulting from conditions such as heat shock and nutrient deprivation, increases desiccation tolerance. PMID:23171550

  14. Chromatin remodeling during Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADH2 gene activation.

    PubMed

    Verdone, L; Camilloni, G; Di Mauro, E; Caserta, M

    1996-05-01

    We have analyzed at both low and high resolution the distribution of nucleosomes over the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADH2 promoter region in its chromosomal location, both under repressing (high-glucose) conditions and during derepression. Enzymatic treatments (micrococcal nuclease and restriction endonucleases) were used to probe the in vivo chromatin structure during ADH2 gene activation. Under glucose-repressed conditions, the ADH2 promoter was bound by a precise array of nucleosomes, the principal ones positioned at the RNA initiation sites (nucleosome +1), at the TATA box (nucleosome -1), and upstream of the ADR1-binding site (UAS1) (nucleosome -2). The UAS1 sequence and the adjacent UAS2 sequence constituted a nucleosome-free region. Nucleosomes -1 and +1 were destabilized soon after depletion of glucose and had become so before the appearance of ADH2 mRNA. When the transcription rate was high, nucleosomes -2 and +2 also underwent rearrangement. When spheroplasts were prepared from cells grown in minimal medium, detection of this chromatin remodeling required the addition of a small amount of glucose. Cells lacking the ADR1 protein did not display any of these chromatin modifications upon glucose depletion. Since the UAS1 sequence to which Adr1p binds is located immediately upstream of nucleosome -1, Adr1p is presumably required for destabilization of this nucleosome and for aiding the TATA-box accessibility to the transcription machinery. PMID:8628264

  15. Tanshinones extend chronological lifespan in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziyun; Song, Lixia; Liu, Shao Quan; Huang, Dejian

    2014-10-01

    Natural products with anti-aging property have drawn great attention recently but examples of such compounds are exceedingly scarce. By applying a high-throughput assay based on yeast chronological lifespan measurement, we screened the anti-aging activity of 144 botanical materials and found that dried roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge have significant anti-aging activity. Tanshinones isolated from the plant including cryptotanshione, tanshinone I, and tanshinone IIa, are the active components. Among them, cryptotanshinone can greatly extend the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chronological lifespan (up to 2.5 times) in a dose- and the-time-of-addition-dependent manner at nanomolar concentrations without disruption of cell growth. We demonstrate that cryptotanshinone prolong chronological lifespan via a nutrient-dependent regime, especially essential amino acid sensing, and three conserved protein kinases Tor1, Sch9, and Gcn2 are required for cryptotanshinone-induced lifespan extension. In addition, cryptotanshinone significantly increases the lifespan of SOD2-deleted mutants. Altogether, those data suggest that cryptotanshinone might be involved in the regulation of, Tor1, Sch9, Gcn2, and Sod2, these highly conserved longevity proteins modulated by nutrients from yeast to humans. PMID:24970458

  16. Tor1 regulates protein solubility in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Theodore W.; Rardin, Matthew J.; Czerwieniec, Gregg; Evani, Uday S.; Reis-Rodrigues, Pedro; Lithgow, Gordon J.; Mooney, Sean D.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Hughes, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of insoluble protein in cells is associated with aging and aging-related diseases; however, the roles of insoluble protein in these processes are uncertain. The nature and impact of changes to protein solubility during normal aging are less well understood. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we identify 480 proteins that become insoluble during postmitotic aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and show that this ensemble of insoluble proteins is similar to those that accumulate in aging nematodes. SDS-insoluble protein is present exclusively in a nonquiescent subpopulation of postmitotic cells, indicating an asymmetrical distribution of this protein. In addition, we show that nitrogen starvation of young cells is sufficient to cause accumulation of a similar group of insoluble proteins. Although many of the insoluble proteins identified are known to be autophagic substrates, induction of macroautophagy is not required for insoluble protein formation. However, genetic or chemical inhibition of the Tor1 kinase is sufficient to promote accumulation of insoluble protein. We conclude that target of rapamycin complex 1 regulates accumulation of insoluble proteins via mechanisms acting upstream of macroautophagy. Our data indicate that the accumulation of proteins in an SDS-insoluble state in postmitotic cells represents a novel autophagic cargo preparation process that is regulated by the Tor1 kinase. PMID:23097491

  17. Assembly of evolved ligninolytic genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, David; Alcalde, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The ligninolytic enzymatic consortium produced by white-rot fungi is one of the most efficient oxidative systems found in nature, with many potential applications that range from the production of 2nd generation biofuels to chemicals synthesis. In the current study, two high redox potential oxidoreductase fusion genes (laccase -Lac- and versatile peroxidase -Vp-) that had been evolved in the laboratory were re-assembled in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. First, cell viability and secretion were assessed after co-transforming the Lac and Vp genes into yeast. Several expression cassettes were inserted in vivo into episomal bi-directional vectors in order to evaluate inducible promoter and/or terminator pairs of different strengths in an individual and combined manner. The synthetic white-rot yeast model harboring Vp(GAL1/CYC1)-Lac(GAL10/ADH1) displayed up to 1000 and 100 Units per L of peroxidase and laccase activity, respectively, representing a suitable point of departure for future synthetic biology studies. PMID:24830983

  18. Regulation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD16.

    PubMed Central

    Bang, D D; Timmermans, V; Verhage, R; Zeeman, A M; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1995-01-01

    The RAD16 gene product has been shown to be essential for the repair of the silenced mating type loci [Bang et al. (1992) Nucleic Acids Res. 20, 3925-3931]. More recently we demonstrated that the RAD16 and RAD7 proteins are also required for repair of non-transcribed strands of active genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Waters et al. (1993) Mol. Gen. Genet. 239, 28-32]. We have studied the regulation of the RAD16 gene and found that the RAD16 transcript levels increased up to 7-fold upon UV irradiation. Heat shock at 42 degrees C also results in elevated levels of RAD16 mRNA. In sporulating MAT alpha/MATa diploid cells RAD16 mRNA is also induced. The basal level of the RAD16 transcript is constant during the mitotic cell cycle. G1-arrested cells show normal induction of RAD16 mRNA upon UV irradiation demonstrating that the induction is not a secondary consequence of G2 cell cycle arrest following UV irradiation. However, in cells arrested in G1 the induction of RAD16 mRNA after UV irradiation is not followed by a rapid decline as occurs in normal growing cells suggesting that the down regulation of RAD16 transcription is dependent on progression into the cell cycle. Images PMID:7784171

  19. Dynamics of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Transcriptome during Bread Dough Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Aslankoohi, Elham; Zhu, Bo; Rezaei, Mohammad Naser; Voordeckers, Karin; De Maeyer, Dries; Marchal, Kathleen; Dornez, Emmie

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of yeast cells during industrial processes such as the production of beer, wine, and bioethanol has been extensively studied. In contrast, our knowledge about yeast physiology during solid-state processes, such as bread dough, cheese, or cocoa fermentation, remains limited. We investigated changes in the transcriptomes of three genetically distinct Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during bread dough fermentation. Our results show that regardless of the genetic background, all three strains exhibit similar changes in expression patterns. At the onset of fermentation, expression of glucose-regulated genes changes dramatically, and the osmotic stress response is activated. The middle fermentation phase is characterized by the induction of genes involved in amino acid metabolism. Finally, at the latest time point, cells suffer from nutrient depletion and activate pathways associated with starvation and stress responses. Further analysis shows that genes regulated by the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway, the major pathway involved in the response to osmotic stress and glycerol homeostasis, are among the most differentially expressed genes at the onset of fermentation. More importantly, deletion of HOG1 and other genes of this pathway significantly reduces the fermentation capacity. Together, our results demonstrate that cells embedded in a solid matrix such as bread dough suffer severe osmotic stress and that a proper induction of the HOG pathway is critical for optimal fermentation. PMID:24056467

  20. Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants supersensitive to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, J F; Chan, R K

    1985-01-01

    We describe mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are more sensitive than the wild type to the aminoglycoside antibiotics G418, hygromycin B, destomycin A, and gentamicin X2. In addition, the mutants are sensitive to apramycin, kanamycin B, lividomycin A, neamine, neomycin, paromomycin, and tobramycin--antibiotics which do not inhibit wild-type strains. Mapping studies suggest that supersensitivity is caused by mutations in at least three genes, denoted AGS1, AGS2, and AGS3 (for aminoglycoside antibiotic sensitivity). Mutations in all three genes are required for highest antibiotic sensitivity; ags1 ags2 double mutants have intermediate antibiotic sensitivity. AGS1 was mapped 8 centimorgans distal from LEU2 on chromosome III. Analyses of yeast strains transformed with vectors carrying antibiotic resistance genes revealed that G418, gentamicin X2, kanamycin B, lividomycin A, neamine, and paromomycin are inactivated by the Tn903 phosphotransferase and that destomycin A is inactivated by the hygromycin B phosphotransferase. ags strains are improved host strains for vectors carrying the phosphotransferase genes because a wide spectrum of aminoglycoside antibiotics can be used to select for plasmid maintenance. PMID:2989254

  1. Characterization of the Biotin Transport System in Saccharomyces cerevisiae1

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Thomas O.; Lichstein, Herman C.

    1969-01-01

    The characteristics of the biotin transport mechanism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated in nonproliferating cells. Microbiological and radioisotope assays were employed to measure biotin uptake. The vitamin existed intracellularly in both free and bound forms. Free biotin was extracted by boiling water. Chromatography of the free extract showed it to consist entirely of d-biotin. Cellular bound biotin was released by treating cells with 6 n H2SO4. The rate of biotin uptake was linear with time for 10 min, reaching a maximum at about 20 min followed by a gradual loss of accumulated free vitamin from the cells. Biotin was not degraded or converted to vitamers during uptake. Transport was temperature- and pH-dependent, optimum conditions for uptake being 30 C and pH 4.0. Glucose markedly stimulated biotin transport. In its presence, large intracellular free-biotin concentration gradients were established. Iodoacetate inhibited the glucose stimulation of biotin uptake. The rate of vitamin transport increased in a linear fashion with increasing cell mass. The transport system was saturated with increasing concentrations of the vitamin. The apparent Km for uptake was 3.23 × 10−7m. Uptake of radioactive biotin was inhibited by unlabeled biotin and a number of analogues including homobiotin, desthiobiotin, oxybiotin, norbiotin, and biotin sulfone. Proline, hydroxyproline, and 7,8-diaminopelargonic acid did not inhibit uptake. Unlabeled biotin and desthiobiotin exchanged with accumulated intracellular 14C-biotin, whereas hydroxyproline did not. PMID:5354931

  2. Protective Effects of Arginine on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Against Ethanol Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yanfei; Du, Zhaoli; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Xuena; He, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells are challenged by various environmental stresses in the process of industrial fermentation. As the currently main organism for bio-ethanol production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae suffers from ethanol stress. Some amino acids have been reported to be related to yeast tolerance to stresses. Here the relationship between arginine and yeast response to ethanol stress was investigated. Marked inhibitions of ethanol on cell growth, expression of genes involved in arginine biosynthesis and intracellular accumulation of arginine were observed. Furthermore, extracellular addition of arginine can abate the ethanol damage largely. To further confirm the protective effects of arginine on yeast cells, yeast strains with different levels of arginine content were constructed by overexpression of ARG4 involved in arginine biosynthesis or CAR1 encoding arginase. Intracellular arginine was increased by 18.9% or 13.1% respectively by overexpression of ARG4 or disruption of CAR1, which enhanced yeast tolerance to ethanol stress. Moreover, a 41.1% decrease of intracellular arginine was observed in CAR1 overexpressing strain, which made yeast cells keenly sensitive to ethanol. Further investigations indicated that arginine protected yeast cells from ethanol damage by maintaining the integrity of cell wall and cytoplasma membrane, stabilizing the morphology and function of organellae due to low ROS generation. PMID:27507154

  3. Distribution and regulation of stochasticity and plasticity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, R. D.; Karig, D. K.; Cooke, J. F.; Cox, C. D.; Simpson, M. L.

    2010-09-01

    Stochasticity is an inherent feature of complex systems with nanoscale structure. In such systems information is represented by small collections of elements (e.g. a few electrons on a quantum dot), and small variations in the populations of these elements may lead to big uncertainties in the information. Unfortunately, little is known about how to work within this inherently noisy environment to design robust functionality into complex nanoscale systems. Here, we look to the biological cell as an intriguing model system where evolution has mediated the trade-offs between fluctuations and function, and in particular we look at the relationships and trade-offs between stochastic and deterministic responses in the gene expression of budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). We find gene regulatory arrangements that control the stochastic and deterministic components of expression, and show that genes that have evolved to respond to stimuli (stress) in the most strongly deterministic way exhibit the most noise in the absence of the stimuli. We show that this relationship is consistent with a bursty 2-state model of gene expression, and demonstrate that this regulatory motif generates the most uncertainty in gene expression when there is the greatest uncertainty in the optimal level of gene expression.

  4. Distribution and regulation of stochasticity and plasticity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dar, R. D.; Karig, D. K.; Cooke, J. F.; Cox, C. D.; Simpson, M. L.

    2010-09-01

    Stochasticity is an inherent feature of complex systems with nanoscale structure. In such systems information is represented by small collections of elements (e.g. a few electrons on a quantum dot), and small variations in the populations of these elements may lead to big uncertainties in the information. Unfortunately, little is known about how to work within this inherently noisy environment to design robust functionality into complex nanoscale systems. Here, we look to the biological cell as an intriguing model system where evolution has mediated the trade-offs between fluctuations and function, and in particular we look at the relationships and trade-offsmore » between stochastic and deterministic responses in the gene expression of budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). We find gene regulatory arrangements that control the stochastic and deterministic components of expression, and show that genes that have evolved to respond to stimuli (stress) in the most strongly deterministic way exhibit the most noise in the absence of the stimuli. We show that this relationship is consistent with a bursty 2-state model of gene expression, and demonstrate that this regulatory motif generates the most uncertainty in gene expression when there is the greatest uncertainty in the optimal level of gene expression.« less

  5. MAP kinase pathways in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustin, M. C.; Albertyn, J.; Alexander, M.; Davenport, K.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    A cascade of three protein kinases known as a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is commonly found as part of the signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells. Almost two decades of genetic and biochemical experimentation plus the recently completed DNA sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome have revealed just five functionally distinct MAPK cascades in this yeast. Sexual conjugation, cell growth, and adaptation to stress, for example, all require MAPK-mediated cellular responses. A primary function of these cascades appears to be the regulation of gene expression in response to extracellular signals or as part of specific developmental processes. In addition, the MAPK cascades often appear to regulate the cell cycle and vice versa. Despite the success of the gene hunter era in revealing these pathways, there are still many significant gaps in our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms for activation of these cascades and how the cascades regulate cell function. For example, comparison of different yeast signaling pathways reveals a surprising variety of different types of upstream signaling proteins that function to activate a MAPK cascade, yet how the upstream proteins actually activate the cascade remains unclear. We also know that the yeast MAPK pathways regulate each other and interact with other signaling pathways to produce a coordinated pattern of gene expression, but the molecular mechanisms of this cross talk are poorly understood. This review is therefore an attempt to present the current knowledge of MAPK pathways in yeast and some directions for future research in this area.

  6. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to improve 1-hexadecanol production.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xueyang; Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Fatty alcohols are important components of a vast array of surfactants, lubricants, detergents, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. We have engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce 1-hexadecanol by expressing a fatty acyl-CoA reductase (FAR) from barn owl (Tyto alba). In order to improve fatty alcohol production, we have manipulated both the structural genes and the regulatory genes in yeast lipid metabolism. The acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene (ACC1) was over-expressed, which improved 1-hexadecanol production by 56% (from 45mg/L to 71mg/L). Knocking out the negative regulator of the INO1 gene in phospholipid metabolism, RPD3, further enhanced 1-hexadecanol production by 98% (from 71mg/L to 140mg/L). The cytosolic acetyl-CoA supply was next engineered by expressing a heterologous ATP-dependent citrate lyase, which increased the production of 1-hexadecanol by an additional 136% (from 140mg/L to 330mg/L). Through fed-batch fermentation using resting cells, over 1.1g/L 1-hexadecanol can be produced in glucose minimal medium, which represents the highest titer reported in yeast to date. PMID:25466225

  7. MAP Kinase Pathways in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Gustin, Michael C.; Albertyn, Jacobus; Alexander, Matthew; Davenport, Kenneth

    1998-01-01

    A cascade of three protein kinases known as a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is commonly found as part of the signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells. Almost two decades of genetic and biochemical experimentation plus the recently completed DNA sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome have revealed just five functionally distinct MAPK cascades in this yeast. Sexual conjugation, cell growth, and adaptation to stress, for example, all require MAPK-mediated cellular responses. A primary function of these cascades appears to be the regulation of gene expression in response to extracellular signals or as part of specific developmental processes. In addition, the MAPK cascades often appear to regulate the cell cycle and vice versa. Despite the success of the gene hunter era in revealing these pathways, there are still many significant gaps in our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms for activation of these cascades and how the cascades regulate cell function. For example, comparison of different yeast signaling pathways reveals a surprising variety of different types of upstream signaling proteins that function to activate a MAPK cascade, yet how the upstream proteins actually activate the cascade remains unclear. We also know that the yeast MAPK pathways regulate each other and interact with other signaling pathways to produce a coordinated pattern of gene expression, but the molecular mechanisms of this cross talk are poorly understood. This review is therefore an attempt to present the current knowledge of MAPK pathways in yeast and some directions for future research in this area. PMID:9841672

  8. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Iron Homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Pastor, María Teresa; de Llanos, Rosa; Romero, Antonia María; Puig, Sergi

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for all eukaryotic organisms because it participates as a redox cofactor in a wide variety of biological processes. Recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that in response to iron deficiency, an RNA-binding protein denoted Cth2 coordinates a global metabolic rearrangement that aims to optimize iron utilization. The Cth2 protein contains two Cx8Cx5Cx3H tandem zinc fingers (TZFs) that specifically bind to adenosine/uridine-rich elements within the 3′ untranslated region of many mRNAs to promote their degradation. The Cth2 protein shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Once inside the nucleus, Cth2 binds target mRNAs and stimulates alternative 3′ end processing. A Cth2/mRNA-containing complex is required for export to the cytoplasm, where the mRNA is degraded by the 5′ to 3′ degradation pathway. This post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism limits iron utilization in nonessential pathways and activates essential iron-dependent enzymes such as ribonucleotide reductase, which is required for DNA synthesis and repair. Recent findings indicate that the TZF-containing tristetraprolin protein also functions in modulating human iron homeostasis. Elevated iron concentrations can also be detrimental for cells. The Rnt1 RNase III exonuclease protects cells from excess iron by promoting the degradation of a subset of the Fe acquisition system when iron levels rise. PMID:23903042

  9. Water-Transfer Slows Aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Aviv; Weindling, Esther; Rabinovich, Efrat; Nachman, Iftach; Fuchs, Shai; Chuartzman, Silvia; Gal, Lihi; Schuldiner, Maya; Bar-Nun, Shoshana

    2016-01-01

    Transferring Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to water is known to extend their lifespan. However, it is unclear whether this lifespan extension is due to slowing the aging process or merely keeping old yeast alive. Here we show that in water-transferred yeast, the toxicity of polyQ proteins is decreased and the aging biomarker 47Q aggregates at a reduced rate and to a lesser extent. These beneficial effects of water-transfer could not be reproduced by diluting the growth medium and depended on de novo protein synthesis and proteasomes levels. Interestingly, we found that upon water-transfer 27 proteins are downregulated, 4 proteins are upregulated and 81 proteins change their intracellular localization, hinting at an active genetic program enabling the lifespan extension. Furthermore, the aging-related deterioration of the heat shock response (HSR), the unfolded protein response (UPR) and the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD), was largely prevented in water-transferred yeast, as the activities of these proteostatic network pathways remained nearly as robust as in young yeast. The characteristics of young yeast that are actively maintained upon water-transfer indicate that the extended lifespan is the outcome of slowing the rate of the aging process. PMID:26862897

  10. A novel selection system for chromosome translocations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Tennyson, Rachel B; Ebran, Nathalie; Herrera, Anissa E; Lindsley, Janet E

    2002-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are common genetic abnormalities found in both leukemias and solid tumors. While much has been learned about the effects of specific translocations on cell proliferation, much less is known about what causes these chromosome rearrangements. This article describes the development and use of a system that genetically selects for rare translocation events using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A translocation YAC was created that contains the breakpoint cluster region from the human MLL gene, a gene frequently involved in translocations in leukemia patients, flanked by positive and negative selection markers. A translocation between the YAC and a yeast chromosome, whose breakpoint falls within the MLL DNA, physically separates the markers and forms the basis for the selection. When RAD52 is deleted, essentially all of the selected and screened cells contain simple translocations. The detectable translocation rates are the same in haploids and diploids, although the mechanisms involved and true translocation rates may be distinct. A unique double-strand break induced within the MLL sequences increases the number of detectable translocation events 100- to 1000-fold. This novel system provides a tractable assay for answering basic mechanistic questions about the development of chromosomal translocations. PMID:11973293

  11. Water-Transfer Slows Aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Aviv; Weindling, Esther; Rabinovich, Efrat; Nachman, Iftach; Fuchs, Shai; Chuartzman, Silvia; Gal, Lihi; Schuldiner, Maya; Bar-Nun, Shoshana

    2016-01-01

    Transferring Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to water is known to extend their lifespan. However, it is unclear whether this lifespan extension is due to slowing the aging process or merely keeping old yeast alive. Here we show that in water-transferred yeast, the toxicity of polyQ proteins is decreased and the aging biomarker 47Q aggregates at a reduced rate and to a lesser extent. These beneficial effects of water-transfer could not be reproduced by diluting the growth medium and depended on de novo protein synthesis and proteasomes levels. Interestingly, we found that upon water-transfer 27 proteins are downregulated, 4 proteins are upregulated and 81 proteins change their intracellular localization, hinting at an active genetic program enabling the lifespan extension. Furthermore, the aging-related deterioration of the heat shock response (HSR), the unfolded protein response (UPR) and the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD), was largely prevented in water-transferred yeast, as the activities of these proteostatic network pathways remained nearly as robust as in young yeast. The characteristics of young yeast that are actively maintained upon water-transfer indicate that the extended lifespan is the outcome of slowing the rate of the aging process. PMID:26862897

  12. Biochemical basis of mitochondrial acetaldehyde dismutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Thielen, J; Ciriacy, M

    1991-01-01

    As reported previously, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient in all four known genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH1 through ADH4) produce considerable amounts of ethanol during aerobic growth on glucose. It has been suggested that ethanol production in such adh0 cells is a corollary of acetaldehyde dismutation in mitochondria. This could be substantiated further by showing that mitochondrial ethanol formation requires functional electron transport, while the proton gradient or oxidative phosphorylation does not interfere with reduction of acetaldehyde in isolated mitochondria. This acetaldehyde-reducing activity is different from classical alcohol dehydrogenases in that it is associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane and also is unable to carry out ethanol oxidation. The putative cofactor is NADH + H+ generated by a soluble, matrix-located aldehyde dehydrogenase upon acetaldehyde oxidation to acetate. This enzyme has been purified from mitochondria of glucose-grown cells. It is clearly different from the known mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, which is absent in glucose-grown cells. Both acetaldehyde-reducing and acetaldehyde-oxidizing activities are also present in the mitochondrial fraction of fermentation-proficient (ADH+) cells. Mitochondrial acetaldehyde dismutation may have some significance in the removal of surplus acetaldehyde and in the formation of acetate in mitochondria during aerobic glucose fermentation. Images FIG. 4 PMID:1938903

  13. Electroinduced release of recombinant β-galactosidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ganeva, Valentina; Stefanova, Debora; Angelova, Boyana; Galutzov, Bojidar; Velasco, Isabel; Arévalo-Rodríguez, Miguel

    2015-10-10

    Yeasts are one of the most commonly used systems for recombinant protein production. When the protein is intracelullarly expressed the first step comprises a cell lysis, achieved usually by a mechanical disintegration. This leads to non-selective liberation of the cytoplasmic content, which complicates the following downstream process. Here, we present a new approach suitable for more selective and efficient recovery of large intracellular proteins from yeast, based on the combination of electropermeabilisation and subsequent treatment with lytic enzyme. The experiments were performed with Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains expressing LYTAG-β-galactosidase from Escherichia coli. The permeabilzation of plasma membrane was induced by application of rectangular electric pulses, with 1.25ms duration and field intensity of 4.3-5.4kV/cm. In the presence of a reducing agent the cells released approximately 80% of the total protein 4h after electrical treatment. At the same conditions the release of the recombinant protein was very slow, reaching 45% from total activity 20h after pulse application. The great difference in the release kinetics enabled to remove a part of the total protein, without significant loss of β-galactosidase activity, only by substituting the incubation buffer. The subsequent addition of lyticase (1-2U/ml) led to recovery of approximately 70% from the recombinant enzyme, with a factor of purification 2.6, without provoking a significant cell lysis. The applicability of similar protocol for liberation of large recombinant and native proteins from yeast is discussed. PMID:26142064

  14. Architecture and Biosynthesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Orlean, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The wall gives a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell its osmotic integrity; defines cell shape during budding growth, mating, sporulation, and pseudohypha formation; and presents adhesive glycoproteins to other yeast cells. The wall consists of β1,3- and β1,6-glucans, a small amount of chitin, and many different proteins that may bear N- and O-linked glycans and a glycolipid anchor. These components become cross-linked in various ways to form higher-order complexes. Wall composition and degree of cross-linking vary during growth and development and change in response to cell wall stress. This article reviews wall biogenesis in vegetative cells, covering the structure of wall components and how they are cross-linked; the biosynthesis of N- and O-linked glycans, glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane anchors, β1,3- and β1,6-linked glucans, and chitin; the reactions that cross-link wall components; and the possible functions of enzymatic and nonenzymatic cell wall proteins. PMID:23135325

  15. Assembly of evolved ligninolytic genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Perez, David; Alcalde, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The ligninolytic enzymatic consortium produced by white-rot fungi is one of the most efficient oxidative systems found in nature, with many potential applications that range from the production of 2nd generation biofuels to chemicals synthesis. In the current study, two high redox potential oxidoreductase fusion genes (laccase -Lac- and versatile peroxidase -Vp-) that had been evolved in the laboratory were re-assembled in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. First, cell viability and secretion were assessed after co-transforming the Lac and Vp genes into yeast. Several expression cassettes were inserted in vivo into episomal bi-directional vectors in order to evaluate inducible promoter and/or terminator pairs of different strengths in an individual and combined manner. The synthetic white-rot yeast model harboring Vp(GAL1/CYC1)-Lac(GAL10/ADH1) displayed up to 1000 and 100 Units per L of peroxidase and laccase activity, respectively, representing a suitable point of departure for future synthetic biology studies. PMID:24830983

  16. Functional studies of aldo-keto reductases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qing; Griest, Terry A.; Harter, Theresa M.; Petrash, J. Mark

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY We utilized the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to systematically explore physiological roles for yeast and mammalian aldo-keto reductases. Six open reading frames encoding putative aldo-keto reductases were identified when the yeast genome was queried against the sequence for human aldose reductase, the prototypical mammalian aldo-keto reductase. Recombinant proteins produced from five of these yeast open reading frames demonstrated NADPH-dependent reductase activity with a variety of aldehyde and ketone substrates. A triple aldo-keto reductase null mutant strain demonstrated a glucose-dependent heat shock phenotype which could be rescued by ectopic expression of human aldose reductase. Catalytically-inactive mutants of human or yeast aldo-keto reductases failed to effect a rescue of the heat shock phenotype, suggesting that the phenotype results from either an accumulation of one or more unmetabolized aldo-keto reductase substrates or a synthetic deficiency of aldo-keto reductase products generated in response to heat shock stress. These results suggest that multiple aldo-keto reductases fulfill functionally redundant roles in the stress response in yeast. PMID:17140678

  17. Systematic Identification of Balanced Transposition Polymorphisms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Faddah, Dina A.; Ganko, Eric W.; McCoach, Caroline; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Hanlon, Sean E.; Mann, Frederick G.; Mieczkowska, Joanna O.; Jones, Corbin D.; Lieb, Jason D.; Vision, Todd J.

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput techniques for detecting DNA polymorphisms generally do not identify changes in which the genomic position of a sequence, but not its copy number, varies among individuals. To explore such balanced structural polymorphisms, we used array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) to conduct a genome-wide screen for single-copy genomic segments that occupy different genomic positions in the standard laboratory strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S90) and a polymorphic wild isolate (Y101) through analysis of six tetrads from a cross of these two strains. Paired-end high-throughput sequencing of Y101 validated four of the predicted rearrangements. The transposed segments contained one to four annotated genes each, yet crosses between S90 and Y101 yielded mostly viable tetrads. The longest segment comprised 13.5 kb near the telomere of chromosome XV in the S288C reference strain and Southern blotting confirmed its predicted location on chromosome IX in Y101. Interestingly, inter-locus crossover events between copies of this segment occurred at a detectable rate. The presence of low-copy repetitive sequences at the junctions of this segment suggests that it may have arisen through ectopic recombination. Our methodology and findings provide a starting point for exploring the origins, phenotypic consequences, and evolutionary fate of this largely unexplored form of genomic polymorphism. PMID:19503594

  18. Adaptation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain to high copper concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sarais, I; Manzano, M; De Bertoldi, M; Romandini, P; Beltramini, M; Salvato, B; Rocco, G P

    1994-07-01

    A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been adapted to increasing concentrations of copper at two different pH values. The growth curve at pH 5.5 is characterized by a time generation increasing with the amount of added copper. A significant decrease of cell volume as compared with the control is also observed. At pH 3 the cells grow faster than at pH 5.5 and resist higher copper concentrations (3.8 against 1.2 mM). Experimental evidence indicates that, after copper treatment, the metal is not bound to the cell wall, but is localized intracellularly. A significant precipitation of copper salts in the medium was observed only at pH 5.5. Increased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were observed in copper-treated cells and which persisted after 20 subsequent inocula in a medium without added metal. On the contrary, catalase activity was not stimulated by copper treatment and, hence, not correlated with SOD levels. The mechanism of copper resistance, therefore, probably involves a persistent induction of SOD, but not of catalase, and it is strongly pH-dependent. PMID:8043987

  19. Protective Effects of Arginine on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Against Ethanol Stress.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yanfei; Du, Zhaoli; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Xuena; He, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells are challenged by various environmental stresses in the process of industrial fermentation. As the currently main organism for bio-ethanol production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae suffers from ethanol stress. Some amino acids have been reported to be related to yeast tolerance to stresses. Here the relationship between arginine and yeast response to ethanol stress was investigated. Marked inhibitions of ethanol on cell growth, expression of genes involved in arginine biosynthesis and intracellular accumulation of arginine were observed. Furthermore, extracellular addition of arginine can abate the ethanol damage largely. To further confirm the protective effects of arginine on yeast cells, yeast strains with different levels of arginine content were constructed by overexpression of ARG4 involved in arginine biosynthesis or CAR1 encoding arginase. Intracellular arginine was increased by 18.9% or 13.1% respectively by overexpression of ARG4 or disruption of CAR1, which enhanced yeast tolerance to ethanol stress. Moreover, a 41.1% decrease of intracellular arginine was observed in CAR1 overexpressing strain, which made yeast cells keenly sensitive to ethanol. Further investigations indicated that arginine protected yeast cells from ethanol damage by maintaining the integrity of cell wall and cytoplasma membrane, stabilizing the morphology and function of organellae due to low ROS generation. PMID:27507154

  20. Genetic dissection of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Geng, Peng; Xiao, Yin; Hu, Yun; Sun, Haiye; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Gui-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Dissection of the hereditary architecture underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for ethanol fermentation. In this work, a genomics approach was used to dissect hereditary variations in acetic acid tolerance between two phenotypically different strains. A total of 160 segregants derived from these two strains were obtained. Phenotypic analysis indicated that the acetic acid tolerance displayed a normal distribution in these segregants, and suggested that the acetic acid tolerant traits were controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Thus, 220 SSR markers covering the whole genome were used to detect QTLs of acetic acid tolerant traits. As a result, three QTLs were located on chromosomes 9, 12, and 16, respectively, which explained 38.8-65.9 % of the range of phenotypic variation. Furthermore, twelve genes of the candidates fell into the three QTL regions by integrating the QTL analysis with candidates of acetic acid tolerant genes. These results provided a novel avenue to obtain more robust strains. PMID:27430512

  1. Bread, beer and wine: Saccharomyces cerevisiae diversity reflects human history.

    PubMed

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Merdinoglu, Didier; Cornuet, Jean-Marie; Karst, Francis

    2007-05-01

    Fermented beverages and foods have played a significant role in most societies worldwide for millennia. To better understand how the yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main fermenting agent, evolved along this historical and expansion process, we analysed the genetic diversity among 651 strains from 56 different geographical origins, worldwide. Their genotyping at 12 microsatellite loci revealed 575 distinct genotypes organized in subgroups of yeast types, i.e. bread, beer, wine, sake. Some of these groups presented unexpected relatedness: Bread strains displayed a combination of alleles intermediate between beer and wine strains, and strains used for rice wine and sake were most closely related to beer and bread strains. However, up to 28% of genetic diversity between these technological groups was associated with geographical differences which suggests local domestications. Focusing on wine yeasts, a group of Lebanese strains were basal in an F(ST) tree, suggesting a Mesopotamia-based origin of most wine strains. In Europe, migration of wine strains occurred through the Danube Valley, and around the Mediterranean Sea. An approximate Bayesian computation approach suggested a postglacial divergence (most probable period 10,000-12,000 bp). As our results suggest intimate association between man and wine yeast across centuries, we hypothesize that yeast followed man and vine migrations as a commensal member of grapevine flora. PMID:17498234

  2. Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Caffeine and Theobromine Production

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lu; Bhuiya, Mohammad Wadud; Li, Mengmeng; Liu, XiangQi; Han, Jixiang; Deng, WeiWei; Wang, Min; Yu, Oliver; Zhang, Zhengzhu

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3, 7-dimethylxanthine) are the major purine alkaloids in plants, e.g. tea (Camellia sinensis) and coffee (Coffea arabica). Caffeine is a major component of coffee and is used widely in food and beverage industries. Most of the enzymes involved in the caffeine biosynthetic pathway have been reported previously. Here, we demonstrated the biosynthesis of caffeine (0.38 mg/L) by co-expression of Coffea arabica xanthosine methyltransferase (CaXMT) and Camellia sinensis caffeine synthase (TCS) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, we endeavored to develop this production platform for making other purine-based alkaloids. To increase the catalytic activity of TCS in an effort to increase theobromine production, we identified four amino acid residues based on structural analyses of 3D-model of TCS. Two TCS1 mutants (Val317Met and Phe217Trp) slightly increased in theobromine accumulation and simultaneously decreased in caffeine production. The application and further optimization of this biosynthetic platform are discussed. PMID:25133732

  3. Endomitotic effect of a cell cycle mutation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Schild, D.; Ananthaswamy, H.N.; Mortimer, R.K.

    1981-03-01

    A recessive temperature-sensitive mutation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been isolated and shown to cause an increase in ploidy in both haploids and diploids. Genetic analysis revealed that the strain carrying the mutation was an aa diploid, although MNNG mutagenesis had been done on an a haploid strain. When the mutant strain was crossed with an ..cap alpha cap alpha.. diploid and the resultant tetraploid sporulated, some of the meiotic progeny of this tetraploid were themselves tetraploid, as shown by both genetic analysis and DNA measurements, instead of diploid as expected of tetraploid meiosis. The ability of these tetraploids to continue to produce tetraploid meiotic progeny was followed for four generations. It was found that tetraploidization was independent of sporulation temperature, but was dependent on the temperature of germination and the growth of the spores. Increase in ploidy occurred when the spores were germinated and grown at 30/sup 0/, but did not occur at 23/sup 0/. Two cycles of sporulation and growth at 23/sup 0/ resulted in haploids, which were shown to diploidize within 24 hr when grown at 30/sup 0/.

  4. Transcriptional regulatory network shapes the genome structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songling; Heermann, Dieter W.

    2013-01-01

    Among cellular processes gene transcription is central. More and more evidence is mounting that transcription is tightly connected with the spatial organization of the chromosomes. Spatial proximity of genes sharing transcriptional machinery is one of the consequences of this organization. Motivated by information on the physical relationship among genes identified via chromosomal conformation capture methods, we complement the spatial organization with the idea that genes under similar transcription factor control, but possible scattered throughout the genome, might be in physically proximity to facilitate the access of their commonly used transcription factors. Unlike the transcription factory model, “interacting” genes in our “Gene Proximity Model” are not necessarily immediate physical neighbors but are in spatial proximity. Considering the stochastic nature of TF-promoter binding, this local condensation mechanism could serve as a tie to recruit co-regulated genes to guarantee the swiftness of biological reactions. We tested this idea with a simple eukaryotic organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Chromosomal interaction patterns and folding behavior generated by our model re-construct those obtained from experiments. We show that the transcriptional regulatory network has a close linkage with the genome organization in budding yeast, which is fundamental and instrumental to later studies on other more complex eukaryotes. PMID:23674068

  5. Characterization of Alcohol-induced Filamentous Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Michael C.; Cutler, N. Shane; Heitman, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Diploid cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae starved for nitrogen differentiate into a filamentous growth form. Poor carbon sources such as starches can also stimulate filamentation, whereas haploid cells undergo a similar invasive growth response in rich medium. Previous work has demonstrated a role for various alcohols, by-products of amino acid metabolism, in altering cellular morphology. We found that several alcohols, notably isoamyl alcohol and 1-butanol, stimulate filamentous growth in haploid cells in which this differentiation is normally repressed. Butanol also induces cell elongation and changes in budding pattern, leading to a pseudohyphal morphology, even in liquid medium. The filamentous colony morphology and cell elongation require elements of the pheromone-responsive MAPK cascade and TEC1, whereas components of the nutrient-sensing machinery, such as MEP2, GPA2, and GPR1, do not affect this phenomenon. A screen for 1-butanol–insensitive mutants identified additional proteins that regulate polarized growth (BUD8, BEM1, BEM4, and FIG1), mitochondrial function (MSM1, MRP21, and HMI1), and a transcriptional regulator (CHD1). Furthermore, we have also found that ethanol stimulates hyperfilamentation in diploid cells, again in a MAPK-dependent manner. Together, these results suggest that yeast may sense a combination of nutrient limitation and metabolic by-products to regulate differentiation. PMID:10637301

  6. In vivo Reconstitution of Algal Triacylglycerol Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chun-Hsien; Kanehara, Kazue; Nakamura, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    The current fascination with algal biofuel production stems from a high lipid biosynthetic capacity and little conflict with land plant cultivation. However, the mechanisms which enable algae to accumulate massive oil remain elusive. An enzyme for triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CrDGTT2, can produce a large amount of TAG when expressed in yeast or higher plants, suggesting a unique ability of CrDGTT2 to enhance oil production in a heterologous system. Here, we performed metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by taking advantage of CrDGTT2. We suppressed membrane phospholipid biosynthesis at the log phase by mutating OPI3, enhanced TAG biosynthetic pathway at the stationary phase by overexpressing PAH1 and CrDGTT2, and suppressed TAG hydrolysis on growth resumption from the stationary phase by knocking out DGK1. The resulting engineered yeast cells accumulated about 70-fold of TAG compared with wild type cells. Moreover, TAG production was sustainable. Our results demonstrated the enhanced and sustainable TAG production in the yeast synthetic platform. PMID:26913021

  7. Redundant Regulation of Cdk1 Tyrosine Dephosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Erin K; Dysart, Michael; Lianga, Noel; Williams, Elizabeth C; Pilon, Sophie; Doré, Carole; Deneault, Jean-Sebastien; Rudner, Adam D

    2016-03-01

    Cdk1 activity drives both mitotic entry and the metaphase-to-anaphase transition in all eukaryotes. The kinase Wee1 and the phosphatase Cdc25 regulate the mitotic activity of Cdk1 by the reversible phosphorylation of a conserved tyrosine residue. Mutation of cdc25 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe blocks Cdk1 dephosphorylation and causes cell cycle arrest. In contrast, deletion of MIH1, the cdc25 homolog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is viable. Although Cdk1-Y19 phosphorylation is elevated during mitosis in mih1∆ cells, Cdk1 is dephosphorylated as cells progress into G1, suggesting that additional phosphatases regulate Cdk1 dephosphorylation. Here we show that the phosphatase Ptp1 also regulates Cdk1 dephosphorylation in vivo and can directly dephosphorylate Cdk1 in vitro. Using a novel in vivo phosphatase assay, we also show that PP2A bound to Rts1, the budding yeast B56-regulatory subunit, regulates dephosphorylation of Cdk1 independently of a function regulating Swe1, Mih1, or Ptp1, suggesting that PP2A(Rts1) either directly dephosphorylates Cdk1-Y19 or regulates an unidentified phosphatase. PMID:26715668

  8. Investigation of Batten disease with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pearce, D A; Sherman, F

    1999-04-01

    The CLN3 gene, which encodes the protein whose absence is responsible for Batten disease, the most common inherited neurovisceral storage disease of childhood, was identified in 1995. The function of the protein, Cln3p, still remains elusive. We previously cloned the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog to the human CLN3 gene, designated BTN1, whose product is 39% identical and 59% similar to Cln3p. We report that yeast strains lacking Btn1p, btn1-Delta deletion yeast strains, are more resistant to d-(-)-threo-2-amino-1-[p-nitrophenyl]-1,3-propanediol (ANP), in a pH-dependent manner. This phenotype is complemented in yeast by the human CLN3 gene. In addition, point mutations characterized in CLN3 from individuals with less severe forms of Batten disease, when introduced into BTN1, altered the degree of ANP resistance. Severity of Batten disease due to mutations in CLN3 and the degree of ANP resistance in yeast are related when the equivalent amino acid replacements in Cln3p and Btn1p are compared. These results indicate that yeast can be used as a model for the study of Batten disease. PMID:10191120

  9. Brazilian propolis protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Rafael A.; de Castro, Frederico A.V.; Eleutherio, Elis C.A.; de Souza, Raquel M.; da Silva, Joaquim F.M.; Pereira, Marcos D.

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product widely used for humans. Due to its complex composition, a number of applications (antimicrobial, antiinflammatory, anesthetic, cytostatic and antioxidant) have been attributed to this substance. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a eukaryotic model we investigated the mechanisms underlying the antioxidant effect of propolis from Guarapari against oxidative stress. Submitting a wild type (BY4741) and antioxidant deficient strains (ctt1Δ, sod1Δ, gsh1Δ, gtt1Δ and gtt2Δ) either to 15 mM menadione or to 2 mM hydrogen peroxide during 60 min, we observed that all strains, except the mutant sod1Δ, acquired tolerance when previously treated with 25 μg/mL of alcoholic propolis extract. Such a treatment reduced the levels of ROS generation and of lipid peroxidation, after oxidative stress. The increase in Cu/Zn-Sod activity by propolis suggests that the protection might be acting synergistically with Cu/Zn-Sod. PMID:24516431

  10. Carboxylic Acids Plasma Membrane Transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Casal, Margarida; Queirós, Odília; Talaia, Gabriel; Ribas, David; Paiva, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    This chapter covers the functionally characterized plasma membrane carboxylic acids transporters Jen1, Ady2, Fps1 and Pdr12 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, addressing also their homologues in other microorganisms, as filamentous fungi and bacteria. Carboxylic acids can either be transported into the cells, to be used as nutrients, or extruded in response to acid stress conditions. The secondary active transporters Jen1 and Ady2 can mediate the uptake of the anionic form of these substrates by a H(+)-symport mechanism. The undissociated form of carboxylic acids is lipid-soluble, crossing the plasma membrane by simple diffusion. Furthermore, acetic acid can also be transported by facilitated diffusion via Fps1 channel. At the cytoplasmic physiological pH, the anionic form of the acid prevails and it can be exported by the Pdr12 pump. This review will highlight the mechanisms involving carboxylic acids transporters, and the way they operate according to the yeast cell response to environmental changes, as carbon source availability, extracellular pH and acid stress conditions. PMID:26721276

  11. Global landscape of protein complexes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Krogan, Nevan J; Cagney, Gerard; Yu, Haiyuan; Zhong, Gouqing; Guo, Xinghua; Ignatchenko, Alexandr; Li, Joyce; Pu, Shuye; Datta, Nira; Tikuisis, Aaron P; Punna, Thanuja; Peregrín-Alvarez, José M; Shales, Michael; Zhang, Xin; Davey, Michael; Robinson, Mark D; Paccanaro, Alberto; Bray, James E; Sheung, Anthony; Beattie, Bryan; Richards, Dawn P; Canadien, Veronica; Lalev, Atanas; Mena, Frank; Wong, Peter; Starostine, Andrei; Canete, Myra M; Vlasblom, James; Wu, Samuel; Orsi, Chris; Collins, Sean R; Chandran, Shamanta; Haw, Robin; Rilstone, Jennifer J; Gandi, Kiran; Thompson, Natalie J; Musso, Gabe; St Onge, Peter; Ghanny, Shaun; Lam, Mandy H Y; Butland, Gareth; Altaf-Ul, Amin M; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Shilatifard, Ali; O'Shea, Erin; Weissman, Jonathan S; Ingles, C James; Hughes, Timothy R; Parkinson, John; Gerstein, Mark; Wodak, Shoshana J; Emili, Andrew; Greenblatt, Jack F

    2006-03-30

    Identification of protein-protein interactions often provides insight into protein function, and many cellular processes are performed by stable protein complexes. We used tandem affinity purification to process 4,562 different tagged proteins of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each preparation was analysed by both matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to increase coverage and accuracy. Machine learning was used to integrate the mass spectrometry scores and assign probabilities to the protein-protein interactions. Among 4,087 different proteins identified with high confidence by mass spectrometry from 2,357 successful purifications, our core data set (median precision of 0.69) comprises 7,123 protein-protein interactions involving 2,708 proteins. A Markov clustering algorithm organized these interactions into 547 protein complexes averaging 4.9 subunits per complex, about half of them absent from the MIPS database, as well as 429 additional interactions between pairs of complexes. The data (all of which are available online) will help future studies on individual proteins as well as functional genomics and systems biology. PMID:16554755

  12. Bioflavour production from orange peel hydrolysate using immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lalou, Sofia; Mantzouridou, Fani; Paraskevopoulou, Adamantini; Bugarski, Branko; Levic, Steva; Nedovic, Victor

    2013-11-01

    The rising trend of bioflavour synthesis by microorganisms is hindered by the high manufacturing costs, partially attributed to the cost of the starting material. To overcome this limitation, in the present study, dilute-acid hydrolysate of orange peel was employed as a low-cost, rich in fermentable sugars substrate for the production of flavour-active compounds by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. With this purpose, the use of immobilized cell technology to protect cells against the various inhibitory compounds present in the hydrolysate was evaluated with regard to yeast viability, carbon and nitrogen consumption and cell ability to produce flavour active compounds. For cell immobilization the encapsulation in Ca alginate beads was used. The results were compared with those obtained using free-cell system. Based on the data obtained immobilized cells showed better growth performance and increased ability for de novo synthesis of volatile esters of "fruity" aroma (phenylethyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, octanoate, decanoate and dodecanoate) than those of free cells. The potential for in situ production of new formulations containing flavour-active compounds derive from yeast cells and also from essential oil of orange peel (limonene, α-terpineol) was demonstrated by the fact that bioflavour mixture was found to accumulate within the beads. Furthermore, the ability of the immobilized yeast to perform efficiently repeated batch fermentations of orange peel hydrolysate for bioflavour production was successfully maintained after six consecutive cycles of a total period of 240 h. PMID:23995224

  13. Characterization of a mitochondrial inorganic pyrophosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lundin, M; Deopujari, S W; Lichko, L; da Silva, L P; Baltscheffsky, H

    1992-01-16

    We have studied a mitochondrial inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The uncoupler FCCP (carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone) and the ionophores valinomycin and nigericin stimulate the PPase activity of repeatedly washed yeast mitochondria 2-3-fold. We have previously cloned a yeast gene, PPA2, encoding the catalytic subunit of a mitochondrial PPase. Uncouplers stimulate the PPase activity several-fold in mitochondria from both cells that overexpress PPA2 from a high copy number plasmid and cells with normal expression. These results indicate that the PPA2 polypeptide functions as an energy linked and membrane associated PPase. The stimulation of mitochondrial PPase activity by FCCP, but not by valinomycin and nigericin, was greatly enhanced by the presence of DTT. The antibiotics Dio-9, equisetin and the F0F1-ATPase inhibitor oligomycin also increase mitochondrial PPase activity several fold. This stimulation is much higher, whereas basal PPase activity is lower, in isotonic than in hypotonic solution, which indicates that intact membranes are a prerequisite for maximal effects. PMID:1309654

  14. D-xylulose fermentation to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, L.C.; Gong, C.S.; Chen, L.F.; Tsao, G.T.

    1981-08-01

    Commercial bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was used to study the conversion of D-xylulose to ethanol in the presence of D-xylose. The rate of ethanol production increased with an increase in yeast cell density. The optimal temperature for D-xylulose fermentation was 35 degrees Celcius, and the optimal pH range was 4 to 6. The fermentation of D-xylulose by yeast resulted in the production of ethanol as the major product; small amounts of xylitol and glycerol were also produced. The production of xylitol was influenced by pH as well as temperature. High pH values and low temperatures enhanced xylitol production. The rate of D-xylulose fermentation decreased when the production of ethanol yielded concentrations of 4% or more. The slow conversion rate of D-xylulose to ethanol was increased by increasing the yeast cell density. The overall production of ethanol from D-xylulose by yeast cells under optimal conditions was 90% of the theoretical yield. (Refs. 21).

  15. Symmetric cell division in pseudohyphae of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kron, S J; Styles, C A; Fink, G R

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are dimorphic; in response to nitrogen starvation they switch from a yeast form (YF) to a filamentous pseudohyphal (PH) form. Time-lapse video microscopy of dividing cells reveals that YF and PH cells differ in their cell cycles and budding polarity. The YF cell cycle is controlled at the G1/S transition by the cell-size checkpoint Start. YF cells divide asymmetrically, producing small daughters from full-sized mothers. As a result, mothers and daughters bud asynchronously. Mothers bud immediately but daughters grow in G1 until they achieve a critical cell size. By contrast, PH cells divide symmetrically, restricting mitosis until the bud grows to the size of the mother. Thus, mother and daughter bud synchronously in the next cycle, without a G1 delay before Start. YF and PH cells also exhibit distinct bud-site selection patterns. YF cells are bipolar, producing their second and subsequent buds at either pole. PH cells are unipolar, producing their second and subsequent buds only from the end opposite the junction with their mother. We propose that in PH cells a G2 cell-size checkpoint delays mitosis until bud size reaches that of the mother cell. We conclude that yeast and PH forms are distinct cell types each with a unique cell cycle, budding pattern, and cell shape. Images PMID:7841518

  16. Xylose Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Challenges and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Moysés, Danuza Nogueira; Reis, Viviane Castelo Branco; de Almeida, João Ricardo Moreira; de Moraes, Lidia Maria Pepe; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Many years have passed since the first genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting xylose were obtained with the promise of an environmentally sustainable solution for the conversion of the abundant lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Several challenges emerged from these first experiences, most of them related to solving redox imbalances, discovering new pathways for xylose utilization, modulation of the expression of genes of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and reduction of xylitol formation. Strategies on evolutionary engineering were used to improve fermentation kinetics, but the resulting strains were still far from industrial application. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates proved to have different inhibitors derived from lignin and sugar degradation, along with significant amounts of acetic acid, intrinsically related with biomass deconstruction. This, associated with pH, temperature, high ethanol, and other stress fluctuations presented on large scale fermentations led the search for yeasts with more robust backgrounds, like industrial strains, as engineering targets. Some promising yeasts were obtained both from studies of stress tolerance genes and adaptation on hydrolysates. Since fermentation times on mixed-substrate hydrolysates were still not cost-effective, the more selective search for new or engineered sugar transporters for xylose are still the focus of many recent studies. These challenges, as well as under-appreciated process strategies, will be discussed in this review. PMID:26927067

  17. Regulation of protein synthesis during early limitation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Swedes, J S; Dial, M E; McLaughlin, C S

    1979-01-01

    Arsenate, a competitive inhibitor with phosphate in phosphorylation reactions, has been used to lower adenine and guanine nucleotide levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study nucleotide effects on protein synthesis. By measuring polysome levels, we have shown that initiation of protein synthesis is much more sensitive than elongation or termination to inhibition when the ATP/ADP, GTP/GDP ratios are low. When the arsenate-phosphate molar ratio was 0.27, protein synthesis was inhibited by about 85% and the kinetics of polysome decay was similar to that observed with the initiation inhibitor, verrucarin-76, or with the protein synthesis initiation mutant, ts187, at the restrictive temperature. With this level of arsenate, the adenylate energy charge dropped from 0.9 to 0.7 and the ATP/ADP and GTP/GDP ratios dropped from 6 to 2. The observed correlations between nucleotide ratio changes and inhibition of protein synthesis suggest that the former may be a control signal for the latter. The significance of these in vivo correlations will have to be tested with an in vitro protein synthesizing system. Higher arsenate levels resulted in even lower ATP/ADP, GTP/GDP ratios and in a slower decay of polysomes, implying that, eventually, elongation (in addition to initiation) was being inhibited. PMID:374362

  18. Nutrient sensing and signaling in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Michaela; Schothorst, Joep; Kankipati, Harish Nag; Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a favorite organism for pioneering studies on nutrient-sensing and signaling mechanisms. Many specific nutrient responses have been elucidated in great detail. This has led to important new concepts and insight into nutrient-controlled cellular regulation. Major highlights include the central role of the Snf1 protein kinase in the glucose repression pathway, galactose induction, the discovery of a G-protein-coupled receptor system, and role of Ras in glucose-induced cAMP signaling, the role of the protein synthesis initiation machinery in general control of nitrogen metabolism, the cyclin-controlled protein kinase Pho85 in phosphate regulation, nitrogen catabolite repression and the nitrogen-sensing target of rapamycin pathway, and the discovery of transporter-like proteins acting as nutrient sensors. In addition, a number of cellular targets, like carbohydrate stores, stress tolerance, and ribosomal gene expression, are controlled by the presence of multiple nutrients. The protein kinase A signaling pathway plays a major role in this general nutrient response. It has led to the discovery of nutrient transceptors (transporter receptors) as nutrient sensors. Major shortcomings in our knowledge are the relationship between rapid and steady-state nutrient signaling, the role of metabolic intermediates in intracellular nutrient sensing, and the identity of the nutrient sensors controlling cellular growth. PMID:24483210

  19. Transcriptional Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Desiccation and Rehydration†

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jatinder; Kumar, Deept; Ramakrishnan, Naren; Singhal, Vibha; Jervis, Jody; Garst, James F.; Slaughter, Stephen M.; DeSantis, Andrea M.; Potts, Malcolm; Helm, Richard F.

    2005-01-01

    A transcriptional analysis of the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY4743 to controlled air-drying (desiccation) and subsequent rehydration under minimal glucose conditions was performed. Expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and the glyoxylate cycle was observed to increase during drying and remained in this state during the rehydration phase. When the BY4743 expression profile for the dried sample was compared to that of a commercially prepared dry active yeast, strikingly similar expression changes were observed. The fact that these two samples, dried by different means, possessed very similar transcriptional profiles supports the hypothesis that the response to desiccation is a coordinated event independent of the particular conditions involved in water removal. Similarities between “stationary-phase-essential genes” and those upregulated during desiccation were also noted, suggesting commonalities in different routes to reduced metabolic states. Trends in extracellular and intracellular glucose and trehalose levels suggested that the cells were in a “holding pattern” during the rehydration phase, a concept that was reinforced by cell cycle analyses. Application of a “redescription mining” algorithm suggested that sulfur metabolism is important for cell survival during desiccation and rehydration. PMID:16332871

  20. Genomic Analysis of ATP Efflux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Theodore W.; Miller, Aaron W.; Tourette, Cendrine; Agren, Hannah; Hubbard, Alan; Hughes, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) plays an important role as a primary molecule for the transfer of chemical energy to drive biological processes. ATP also functions as an extracellular signaling molecule in a diverse array of eukaryotic taxa in a conserved process known as purinergic signaling. Given the important roles of extracellular ATP in cell signaling, we sought to comprehensively elucidate the pathways and mechanisms governing ATP efflux from eukaryotic cells. Here, we present results of a genomic analysis of ATP efflux from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by measuring extracellular ATP levels in cultures of 4609 deletion mutants. This screen revealed key cellular processes that regulate extracellular ATP levels, including mitochondrial translation and vesicle sorting in the late endosome, indicating that ATP production and transport through vesicles are required for efflux. We also observed evidence for altered ATP efflux in strains deleted for genes involved in amino acid signaling, and mitochondrial retrograde signaling. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the retrograde signaling pathway potentiates amino acid signaling to promote mitochondrial respiration. This study advances our understanding of the mechanism of ATP secretion in eukaryotes and implicates TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and nutrient signaling pathways in the regulation of ATP efflux. These results will facilitate analysis of ATP efflux mechanisms in higher eukaryotes. PMID:26585826

  1. Xylose Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Challenges and Prospects.

    PubMed

    Moysés, Danuza Nogueira; Reis, Viviane Castelo Branco; de Almeida, João Ricardo Moreira; de Moraes, Lidia Maria Pepe; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Many years have passed since the first genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting xylose were obtained with the promise of an environmentally sustainable solution for the conversion of the abundant lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. Several challenges emerged from these first experiences, most of them related to solving redox imbalances, discovering new pathways for xylose utilization, modulation of the expression of genes of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and reduction of xylitol formation. Strategies on evolutionary engineering were used to improve fermentation kinetics, but the resulting strains were still far from industrial application. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates proved to have different inhibitors derived from lignin and sugar degradation, along with significant amounts of acetic acid, intrinsically related with biomass deconstruction. This, associated with pH, temperature, high ethanol, and other stress fluctuations presented on large scale fermentations led the search for yeasts with more robust backgrounds, like industrial strains, as engineering targets. Some promising yeasts were obtained both from studies of stress tolerance genes and adaptation on hydrolysates. Since fermentation times on mixed-substrate hydrolysates were still not cost-effective, the more selective search for new or engineered sugar transporters for xylose are still the focus of many recent studies. These challenges, as well as under-appreciated process strategies, will be discussed in this review. PMID:26927067

  2. Biotransformation of malachite green by Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 463.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, J P; Govindwar, S P

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, use of microbial biomass for decolourization of textile industry wastewater is becoming a promising alternative in which some bacteria and fungi are used to replace present treatment processes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 463 decolourized the triphenylmethane dyes (malachite green, cotton blue, methyl violet and crystal violet) by biosorption, showing different decolourization patterns. However, malachite green decolourized by biosorption at the initial stage and further biodegradation occurred, about 85% in plain distilled water within 7 h, and about 95.5% in 5% glucose medium within 4 h, under aerobic conditions and at room temperature. Decolourization of malachite green depends on various conditions, such as concentration of dye, concentration of cells, composition of medium and agitation. HPLC, UV-VIS, FTIR and TLC analysis of samples extracted with ethyl acetate from decolourized culture flasks confirmed the biodegradation of malachite green into several metabolites. A study of the enzymes responsible for the biodegradation of malachite green in the control and cells obtained after decolourization showed the activities of laccase, lignin peroxidase, NADH-DCIP reductase, malachite green reductase and aminopyrine N-demethylase in control cells. A significant increase in the activities of NADH-DCIP reductase and MG reductase was observed in the cells obtained after decolourization, indicating a major involvement of reductases in malachite green degradation. PMID:16544273

  3. Antigenic validation of recombinant hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of Newcastle disease virus expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Khulape, S A; Maity, H K; Pathak, D C; Mohan, C Madhan; Dey, S

    2015-09-01

    The outer membrane glycoprotein, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is important for virus infection and subsequent immune response by host, and offers target for development of recombinant antigen-based immunoassays and subunit vaccines. In this study, the expression of HN protein of NDV is attempted in yeast expression system. Yeast offers eukaryotic environment for protein processing and posttranslational modifications like glycosylation, in addition to higher growth rate and easy genetic manipulation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to be better expression system for HN protein than Pichia pastoris as determined by codon usage analysis. The complete coding  sequence of HN gene was amplified with the histidine tag, cloned in pESC-URA under GAL10 promotor and transformed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The recombinant HN (rHN) protein was characterized by western blot, showing glycosylation heterogeneity as observed with other eukaryotic expression systems. The recombinant protein was purified by affinity column purification. The protein could be further used as subunit vaccine. PMID:26435147

  4. Expression level tuning for optimal heterologous protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Parekh, R N; Wittrup, K D

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between expression level and secretion of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) was determined in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a tunable amplifiable delta integration vector. Optimal secretory productivity of 15 mg of BPTI/g cell dry weight yields 180 mg/L secreted active BPTI in test-tube cultures, an order of magnitude increase over 2 mu plasmid-directed secretion. Maximum productivity is determined by the protein folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Unfolded protein accumulates in the ER as synthesis increases, until a physiological instability is reached and secretion decreases precipitously despite high BPTI mRNA levels. Optimal specific productivity of a standard laboratory strain of S. cerevisiae is double that reported for secretion of BPTI by Pichia pastoris, indicating that efficient utilization of S. cerevisiae's available secretory capacity can eliminate apparent differences among yeast species in their capacity for heterologous protein secretion. Although not generally recognized, the existence of an optimum synthesis level for secretion is apparently a general feature of eucaryotic expression systems and could be of substantial significance for maximization of protein secretion in mammalian and insect cell culture. PMID:9104035

  5. Electrophysiology in the eukaryotic model cell Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bertl, A; Bihler, H; Kettner, C; Slayman, C L

    1998-11-01

    Since the mid-1980s, use of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for expression of heterologous (foreign) genes and proteins has burgeoned for several major purposes, including facile genetic manipulation, large-scale production of specific proteins, and preliminary functional analysis. Expression of heterologous membrane proteins in yeast has not kept pace with expression of cytoplasmic proteins for two principal reasons: (1) although plant and fungal proteins express and function easily in yeast membranes, animal proteins do not, at least yet; and (2) the yeast plasma membrane is generally regarded as a difficult system to which to apply the standard electrophysiological techniques for detailed functional analysis of membrane proteins. Especially now, since completion of the genome-sequencing project for Saccharomyces, yeast membranes themselves can be seen as an ample source of diverse membrane proteins - including ion channels, pumps, and cotransporters - which lend themselves to electrophysiological analysis, and specifically to patch-clamping. Using some of these native proteins for assay, we report systematic methods to prepare both the yeast plasma membrane and the yeast vacuolar membrane (tonoplast) for patch-clamp experiments. We also describe optimized ambient conditions - such as electrode preparation, buffer solutions, and time regimens - which facilitate efficient patch recording from Saccharomyces membranes. There are two main keys to successful patch-clamping with Saccharomyces. The first is patience; the second is scrupulous cleanliness. Large cells, such as provided by polyploid strains, are also useful in yeast patch recording, especially while the skill required for gigaseal formation is being learned. Cleanliness is aided by (1) osmotic extrusion of protoplasts, after minimal digestion of yeast walls; (2) use of a rather spare suspension of protoplasts in the recording chamber; (3) maintenance of continuous chamber perfusion prior to

  6. Optimization of pretreatment and saccharification for the production of bioethanol from water hyacinth by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Deuk Joo; Kim, Se Kyung; Yun, Hyun Shik

    2012-01-01

    Alkaline-oxidative (A/O) pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification were optimized for bioethanol fermentation from water hyacinth by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Water hyacinth was subjected to A/O pretreatment at various NaOH and H(2)O(2) concentrations and reaction temperatures for the optimization of bioethanol fermentation by S. cerevisiae. The most effective condition for A/O pretreatment was 7% (w/v) NaOH at 100 °C and 2% (w/v) H(2)O(2). The carbohydrate content was analyzed after reaction at various enzyme concentrations and enzyme ratios using Celluclast 1.5 L and Viscozyme L to determine the effective conditions for enzymatic saccharification. After ethanol fermentation using S. cerevisiae KCTC 7928, the concentration of glucose, ethanol and glycerol was analyzed by HPLC using a RI detector. The yield of ethanol in batch fermentation was 0.35 g ethanol/g biomass. Continuous fermentation was carried out at a dilution rate of 0.11 (per h) and the ethanol productivity was 0.77 [g/(l h)]. PMID:21909939

  7. Physiological analysis of mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae impaired in sulphate assimilation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D; Barbey, R; Henry, D; Surdin-Kerjan, Y

    1992-10-01

    The assimilation of sulphate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, comprising the reduction of sulphate to sulphide and the incorporation of the sulphur atom into a four-carbon chain, requires the integrity of 13 different genes. To date, the functions of nine of these genes are still not clearly established. A set of strains, each bearing a mutation in one MET gene, was studied. Phenotypic studies and enzyme determinations showed that the products of at least five genes are needed for the synthesis of an enzymically active sulphite reductase. These genes are MET1, MET5, MET8, MET10 and MET20. Wild-type strains of S. cerevisiae can use organic metabolites such as homocysteine, cysteine, methionine and S-adenosylmethionine as sulphur sources. They are also able to use inorganic sulphur sources such as sulphate, sulphite, sulphide or thiosulphate. Here we show that both of the two sulphur atoms of thiosulphate are used by S. cerevisiae. Thiosulphate is cleaved into sulphite and sulphide prior to utilization by the sulphate assimilation pathway, as the metabolism of one sulphur atom from thiosulphate requires the presence of an active sulphite reductase. PMID:1479340

  8. Identification of a gene, FMP21, whose expression levels are involved in thermotolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation of the mechanism of high temperature tolerance in yeasts is important for the molecular breeding of high temperature-tolerant yeasts that can be used in bioethanol production. We identified genes whose expression is correlated with the degree of thermotolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA microarray analysis. Gene expression profiles of three S. cerevisiae strains showing different levels of thermotolerance were compared, and we chose three of them as candidate genes. Among these genes, FMP21 was investigated as a thermotolerance-related gene in S. cerevisiae by comparing the growth at high temperature with the gene expression in eight strains. The expression ratio of FMP21 at 37°C was correlated with the doubling time ratio at a coefficient of determination of 0.787. The potential involvement of the Fmp21 in the thermotolerance of yeasts was evaluated. The FMP21 deletion variant showed a decreased respiratory growth rate and increased thermosensitivity. Furthermore, the overexpression of FMP21 improved thermotolerance in yeasts. In conclusion, the function of Fmp21 is important for thermotolerance in yeasts. PMID:25177541

  9. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of n-butanol

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, EricJ.; Chan, Rossana; Prasad, Nilu; Myers, Samuel; Petzold, Christopher; Redding, Alyssa; Ouellet, Mario; Keasling, JayD.

    2008-11-25

    BackgroundIncreasing energy costs and environmental concerns have motivated engineering microbes for the production of ?second generation? biofuels that have better properties than ethanol.Results& ConclusionsSaccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered with an n-butanol biosynthetic pathway, in which isozymes from a number of different organisms (S. cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Ralstonia eutropha) were substituted for the Clostridial enzymes and their effect on n-butanol production was compared. By choosing the appropriate isozymes, we were able to improve production of n-butanol ten-fold to 2.5 mg/L. The most productive strains harbored the C. beijerinckii 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which uses NADH as a co-factor, rather than the R. eutropha isozyme, which uses NADPH, and the acetoacetyl-CoA transferase from S. cerevisiae or E. coli rather than that from R. eutropha. Surprisingly, expression of the genes encoding the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase from C. beijerinckii (bcd and etfAB) did not improve butanol production significantly as previously reported in E. coli. Using metabolite analysis, we were able to determine which steps in the n-butanol biosynthetic pathway were the most problematic and ripe for future improvement.

  10. Rapid and efficient galactose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Quarterman, Josh; Skerker, Jeffrey M; Feng, Xueyang; Liu, Ian Y; Zhao, Huimin; Arkin, Adam P; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-07-10

    In the important industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, galactose metabolism requires energy production by respiration; therefore, this yeast cannot metabolize galactose under strict anaerobic conditions. While the respiratory dependence of galactose metabolism provides benefits in terms of cell growth and population stability, it is not advantageous for producing fuels and chemicals since a substantial fraction of consumed galactose is converted to carbon dioxide. In order to force S. cerevisiae to use galactose without respiration, a subunit (COX9) of a respiratory enzyme was deleted, but the resulting deletion mutant (Δcox9) was impaired in terms of galactose assimilation. Interestingly, after serial sub-cultures on galactose, the mutant evolved rapidly and was able to use galactose via fermentation only. The evolved strain (JQ-G1) produced ethanol from galactose with a 94% increase in yield and 6.9-fold improvement in specific productivity as compared to the wild-type strain. (13)C-metabolic flux analysis demonstrated a three-fold reduction in carbon flux through the TCA cycle of the evolved mutant with redirection of flux toward the fermentation pathway. Genome sequencing of the JQ-G1 strain revealed a loss of function mutation in a master negative regulator of the Leloir pathway (Gal80p). The mutation (Glu348*) in Gal80p was found to act synergistically with deletion of COX9 for efficient galactose fermentation, and thus the double deletion mutant Δcox9Δgal80 produced ethanol 2.4 times faster and with 35% higher yield than a single knockout mutant with deletion of GAL80 alone. When we introduced a functional COX9 cassette back into the JQ-G1 strain, the JQ-G1-COX9 strain showed a 33% reduction in specific galactose uptake rate and a 49% reduction in specific ethanol production rate as compared to JQ-G1. The wild-type strain was also subjected to serial sub-cultures on galactose but we failed to isolate a mutant capable of utilizing galactose without

  11. Ethanol fermentation from Jerusalem artichoke powder using Saccharomyces cerevisiae KCCM50549 without pretreatment for inulin hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seok-Hwan; Ryu, Ji-Myoung; Lee, Hongweon; Jeon, Jae Heung; Sok, Dai-Eun; Choi, Eui-Sung

    2011-01-01

    A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, KCCM50549, was found to efficiently ferment the inulin-containing carbohydrates in Jerusalem artichoke without acidic or enzymatic pretreatment prior to fermentation. S. cerevisiae KCCM50549 could utilize almost completely the fructo-oligosaccharides present in Jerusalem artichoke (up to degree of polymerization (DP) of 15), in contrast to the other S. cerevisiae strain such as NCYC625 that fermented the fructo-oligosaccharides with DP of up to around six. Inulin-fermenting S. cerevisiae KCCM50549 produced c.a. 1.6 times more ethanol from Jerusalem artichoke compared with S. cerevisiae NCYC625. Direct ethanol fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke flour at 180 g/L without any supplements or pretreatments by S. cerevisiae KCCM50549 in a 5 L jar fermentor yielded 36.2 g/L of ethanol within 36 h. The conversion efficiency of inulin-type sugars to ethanol was 70% of the theoretical ethanol yield. PMID:20833540

  12. Single Cell Protein Production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using an Optimized Culture Medium Composition in a Batch Submerged Bioprocess.

    PubMed

    Hezarjaribi, Mehrnoosh; Ardestani, Fatemeh; Ghorbani, Hamid Reza

    2016-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae PTCC5269 growth was evaluated to specify an optimum culture medium to reach the highest protein production. Experiment design was conducted using a fraction of the full factorial methodology, and signal to noise ratio was used for results analysis. Maximum cell of 8.84 log (CFU/mL) was resulted using optimized culture composed of 0.3, 0.15, 1, and 50 g L(-1) of ammonium sulfate, iron sulfate, glycine, and glucose, respectively at 300 rpm and 35 °C. Glycine concentration (39.32 % contribution) and glucose concentration (36.15 % contribution) were determined as the most effective factors on the biomass production, while Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth had showed the least dependence on ammonium sulfate (5.2 % contribution) and iron sulfate (19.28 % contribution). The most interaction was diagnosed between ammonium sulfate and iron sulfate concentrations with interaction severity index of 50.71 %, while the less one recorded for glycine and glucose concentration was equal to 8.12 %. An acceptable consistency of 84.26 % was obtained between optimum theoretical cell numbers determined by software of 8.91 log (CFU/mL), and experimentally measured one at optimal condition confirms the suitability of the applied method. High protein content of 44.6 % using optimum culture suggests that Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a good commercial case for single cell protein production. PMID:27090426

  13. Genetic approaches for identifying kinetochore components in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Doheny, K.F.; Puziss, J.; Spencer, F.; Hieter, P.

    1993-12-31

    A fundamental aspect of the cell division cycle is the chromosome cycle in which each of the chromosomal DNA molecules undergoes a series of morphological changes and complex movements to ensure faithful distribution at mitosis. The gene products responsible for execution of the chromosome cycle include structural components, such as those that assemble into the mitotic spindle apparatus, and regulatory components, such as those that coordinate the ordered series of events leading to chromosome segregation within the cell cycle. We have been taking several genetic approaches to identify genes encoding determinants critical to the chromosome cycle in the budding yeast, S. cerevisiae.

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces yeasts in grape varieties of the São Francisco Valley.

    PubMed

    de Ponzzes-Gomes, Camila M P B S; de Mélo, Dângelly L F M; Santana, Caroline A; Pereira, Giuliano E; Mendonça, Michelle O C; Gomes, Fátima C O; Oliveira, Evelyn S; Barbosa, Antonio M; Trindade, Rita C; Rosa, Carlos A

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this work was to characterise indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in the naturally fermented juice of grape varieties Cabernet Sauvignon, Grenache, Tempranillo, Sauvignon Blanc and Verdejo used in the São Francisco River Valley, northeastern Brazil. In this study, 155 S. cerevisiae and 60 non-Saccharomyces yeasts were isolated and identified using physiological tests and sequencing of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit of the rRNA gene. Among the non-Saccharomyces species, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was the most common species, followed by Pichia kudriavzevii, Candida parapsilosis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Kloeckera apis, P. manshurica, C. orthopsilosis and C. zemplinina. The population counts of these yeasts ranged among 1.0 to 19 × 10(5) cfu/mL. A total of 155 isolates of S. cerevisiae were compared by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis, and five molecular mitochondrial DNA restriction profiles were detected. Indigenous strains of S. cerevisiae isolated from grapes of the São Francisco Valley can be further tested as potential starters for wine production. PMID:25242923

  15. Nanofiltration concentration of extracellular glutathione produced by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kengo; Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Sazuka, Takashi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to optimize extracellular glutathione production by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered strain and to concentrate the extracellular glutathione by membrane separation processes, including ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF). Synthetic defined (SD) medium containing 20 g L(-1) glucose was fermented for 48 h; the fermentation liquid was passed through an UF membrane to remove macromolecules. Glutathione in this permeate was concentrated for 48 h to 545.1 ± 33.6 mg L(-1) using the NF membrane; this was a significantly higher concentration than that obtained with yeast extract peptone dextrose (YPD) medium following 96 h NF concentration (217.9 ± 57.4 mg L(-1)). This higher glutathione concentration results from lower cellular growth in SD medium (final OD600 = 6.9 ± 0.1) than in YPD medium (final OD600 = 11.0 ± 0.6) and thus higher production of extracellular glutathione (16.0 ± 1.3 compared to 9.2 ± 2.1 mg L(-1) in YPD medium, respectively). Similar fermentation and membrane processing of sweet sorghum juice containing 20 g L(-1) total sugars provided 240.3 ± 60.6 mg L(-1) glutathione. Increased extracellular production of glutathione by this engineered strain in SD medium and subsequent UF permeation and NF concentration in shortend time may help realize industrial recovery of extracellular glutathione. PMID:26105794

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genes Involved in Survival of Heat Shock

    PubMed Central

    Jarolim, Stefanie; Ayer, Anita; Pillay, Bethany; Gee, Allison C.; Phrakaysone, Alex; Perrone, Gabriel G.; Breitenbach, Michael; Dawes, Ian W.

    2013-01-01

    The heat-shock response in cells, involving increased transcription of a specific set of genes in response to a sudden increase in temperature, is a highly conserved biological response occurring in all organisms. Despite considerable attention to the processes activated during heat shock, less is known about the role of genes in survival of a sudden temperature increase. Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in the maintenance of heat-shock resistance in exponential and stationary phase were identified by screening the homozygous diploid deletants in nonessential genes and the heterozygous diploid mutants in essential genes for survival after a sudden shift in temperature from 30 to 50°. More than a thousand genes were identified that led to altered sensitivity to heat shock, with little overlap between them and those previously identified to affect thermotolerance. There was also little overlap with genes that are activated or repressed during heat-shock, with only 5% of them regulated by the heat-shock transcription factor. The target of rapamycin and protein kinase A pathways, lipid metabolism, vacuolar H+-ATPase, vacuolar protein sorting, and mitochondrial genome maintenance/translation were critical to maintenance of resistance. Mutants affected in l-tryptophan metabolism were heat-shock resistant in both growth phases; those affected in cytoplasmic ribosome biogenesis and DNA double-strand break repair were resistant in stationary phase, and in mRNA catabolic processes in exponential phase. Mutations affecting mitochondrial genome maintenance were highly represented in sensitive mutants. The cell division transcription factor Swi6p and Hac1p involved in the unfolded protein response also play roles in maintenance of heat-shock resistance. PMID:24142923

  17. Mating-type Gene Switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Sheng; Haber, James E

    2015-04-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has two alternative mating types designated MATa and MATα. These are distinguished by about 700 bp of unique sequences, Ya or Yα, including divergent promoter sequences and part of the open reading frames of genes that regulate mating phenotype. Homothallic budding yeast, carrying an active HO endonuclease gene, HO, can switch mating type through a recombination process known as gene conversion, in which a site-specific double-strand break (DSB) created immediately adjacent to the Y region results in replacement of the Y sequences with a copy of the opposite mating type information, which is harbored in one of two heterochromatic donor loci, HMLα or HMRa. HO gene expression is tightly regulated to ensure that only half of the cells in a lineage switch to the opposite MAT allele, thus promoting conjugation and diploid formation. Study of the silencing of these loci has provided a great deal of information about the role of the Sir2 histone deacetylase and its associated Sir3 and Sir4 proteins in creating heterochromatic regions. MAT switching has been examined in great detail to learn about the steps in homologous recombination. MAT switching is remarkably directional, with MATa recombining preferentially with HMLα and MATα using HMRa. Donor preference is controlled by a cis-acting recombination enhancer located near HML. RE is turned off in MATα cells but in MATa binds multiple copies of the Fkh1 transcription factor whose forkhead-associated phosphothreonine binding domain localizes at the DSB, bringing HML into conjunction with MATa. PMID:26104712

  18. Ergosterol production from molasses by genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    He, Xiuping; Guo, Xuena; Liu, Nan; Zhang, Borun

    2007-05-01

    Ergosterol is an economically important metabolite produced by fungi. Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae YEH56(pHXA42) with increased capacity of ergosterol formation was constructed by combined overexpression of sterol C-24(28) reductase and sterol acyltransferase in the yeast strain YEH56. The production of ergosterol by this recombinant strain using cane molasses (CM) as an inexpensive carbon source was investigated. An ergosterol content of 52.6 mg/g was obtained with 6.1 g/l of biomass from CM medium containing 60 g/l of total sugar in 30 h in shake flask. The ergosterol yield was enhanced through the increasing cell biomass by supplementation of urea to a concentration of 6 g/l in molasses medium. Fermentation was performed in 5-l bioreactor using the optimized molasses medium. In batch fermentation, the effect of agitation velocity on ergosterol production was examined. The highest ergosterol yield was obtained at 400 rpm that increased 60.4 mg/l in comparison with the shake flask culture. In fed-batch fermentation, yeast cells were cultivated, firstly, in the starting medium containing molasses with 20 g/l of total sugar, 1.68 g/l of phosphate acid, and 6 g/l of urea (pH 5.4) for 5 h, then molasses containing 350 g/l of total sugar was fed exponentially into the bioreactor to keep the ethanol level in the broth below 0.5%. After 40 h of cultivation, the ergosterol yield reached 1,707 mg/l, which was 3.1-fold of that in the batch fermentation. PMID:17225097

  19. A vector set for systematic metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Fang; Salmon, Kirsty; Shen, Michael W. Y.; Aeling, Kimberly A.; Ito, Elaine; Irwin, Becky; Tran, Uyen Phuong C.; Hatfield, G. Wesley; Da Silva, Nancy A.; Sandmeyer, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    A set of shuttle vectors was constructed to facilitate expression of genes for metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Selectable markers include the URA3, TRP1, MET15, LEU2-d8, HIS3 and CAN1 genes. Differential expression of genes can be achieved as each marker is available on both CEN/ARS- and 2 μ-containing plasmids. Unique restriction sites downstream of TEF1, PGK1 or HXT7-391 promoters and upstream of the CYC1 terminator allow insertion of open-reading frame cassettes for expression. Furthermore, a fragment appropriate for integration into the genome via homologous recombination can be readily generated in a polymerase chain reaction. Vector marker genes are flanked by loxP recognition sites for the CreA recombinase to allow efficient site-specific marker deletion and recycling. Expression and copy number were characterized for representative high- and low-copy vectors carrying the different marker and promoter sequences. Metabolic engineering typically requires the stable introduction of multiple genes and genomic integration is often preferred. This requires an expanded number of stable expression sites relative to standard gene expression studies. This study demonstrated the practicality of polymerase chain reaction amplification of an expression cassette and genetic marker, and subsequent replacement of endogenous retrotransposons by homologous recombination with flanking sequences. Such reporters were expressed comparably to those inserted at standard integration loci. This expands the number of available characterized integration sites and demonstrates that such sites provide a virtually inexhaustible pool of integration targets for stable expression of multiple genes. Together these vectors and expression loci will facilitate combinatorial gene expression for metabolic engineering. PMID:20936606

  20. [Construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell factories for lycopene production].

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming-Yu; Liu Yi; Wang, Dong; Lu, Fu-Ping; Huang, Lu-Qi; Dai, Zhu-Bo; Zhang, Xue-Li

    2014-10-01

    For microbial production of lycopene, the lycopene synthetic genes from Pantoea agglomerans were integrated into Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY4742, to obtain strain ZD-L-000 for production of 0.17 mg · L(-1) lycopene. Improving supplies of isoprenoid precursors was then investigated for increasing lycopene production. Four key genes were chosen to be overexpressed, inclu- ding truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase gene (tHMG1), which is the major rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, a mutated global regulatory factor gene (upc2.1), a fusion gene of FPP synthase (ERG20) and endogenous GGPP synthase (BTS1), which is a key enzyme in the diterpenoid synthetic pathway, and GGPP synthase gene (SaGGPS) from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Over-expression of upc2.1 could not improve lycopene production, while over-expression of tHMGI , BTS1-ERG20 and SaGGPS genes led to 2-, 16. 9- and20. 5-fold increase of lycopene production, respectively. In addition, three effective genes, tHMG1, BTS1-ERG20 and SaGGPS, were integrated into rDNA sites of ZD-L-000, resulting in strain ZD-L-201 for production of 13.23 mg · L(-1) lycopene, which was 77-fold higher than that of the parent strain. Finally, two-phase extractive fermentation was performed. The titer of lycopene increased 10-fold to 135.21 mg · L(-1). The engineered yeast strains obtained in this work provided the basis for fermentative production of lycopene. PMID:25751950

  1. Comprehensive Analysis of the SUL1 Promoter of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rich, Matthew S; Payen, Celia; Rubin, Alan F; Ong, Giang T; Sanchez, Monica R; Yachie, Nozomu; Dunham, Maitreya J; Fields, Stanley

    2016-05-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, beneficial mutations selected during sulfate-limited growth are typically amplifications of the SUL1 gene, which encodes the high-affinity sulfate transporter, resulting in fitness increases of >35% . Cis-regulatory mutations have not been observed at this locus; however, it is not clear whether this absence is due to a low mutation rate such that these mutations do not arise, or they arise but have limited fitness effects relative to those of amplification. To address this question directly, we assayed the fitness effects of nearly all possible point mutations in a 493-base segment of the gene's promoter through mutagenesis and selection. While most mutations were either neutral or detrimental during sulfate-limited growth, eight mutations increased fitness >5% and as much as 9.4%. Combinations of these beneficial mutations increased fitness only up to 11%. Thus, in the case of SUL1, promoter mutations could not induce a fitness increase similar to that of gene amplification. Using these data, we identified functionally important regions of the SUL1 promoter and analyzed three sites that correspond to potential binding sites for the transcription factors Met32 and Cbf1 Mutations that create new Met32- or Cbf1-binding sites also increased fitness. Some mutations in the untranslated region of the SUL1 transcript decreased fitness, likely due to the formation of inhibitory upstream open reading frames. Our methodology-saturation mutagenesis, chemostat selection, and DNA sequencing to track variants-should be a broadly applicable approach. PMID:26936925

  2. In vivo rearrangement of mitochondrial DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Clark-Walker, G D

    1989-01-01

    A revertant (SPR1) from a high-frequency petite strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been shown by mapping and sequence analysis to have a rearranged mitochondrial genome. In vivo rearrangement has occurred through a subgenomic-recombination pathway involving the initial formation of subgenomic molecules in nascent petite mutants, recombination between these molecules to form an intermediate with direct repeats, and subsequent excision of the resident or symposed duplication to yield a molecule with three novel junctions and a changed gene order. Sequencing of the novel junctions shows that intramolecular recombination in each case occurs by means of G + C-rich short direct repeats of 40-51 base pairs. Mapping and sequence analysis also reveal that the SPR1 mitochondrial genome lacks three sectors of the wild-type molecule of 4.4, 1.7, and 0.5 kilobases. Each of these sectors occurs in nontemplate, base-biased DNA, that is over 90% A + T. Absence of these sectors together with a rearranged gene order does not appear to affect the phenotype of SPR1, as colony morphology and growth rate on a number of different substrates are not detectably different from the wild type. Lack of phenotypic change suggests that mitochondrial gene expression has not been noticeably disrupted in SPR1 despite deletion of the consensus nonomer promoter upstream from the glutamic acid tRNA gene. Dispensability of DNA sectors and the presence of recombinogenic short, direct repeats are mandatory features of the subgenomic-recombination pathway for creating rearrangements in baker's yeast mtDNA. It is proposed that, in other organisms, organelle genomes containing these elements may undergo rearrangement by the same steps. Images PMID:2682661

  3. Microfluidic reactor for continuous cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Astrid; Magdanz, Veronika; Rasch, Detlev; Demming, Stefanie; Aliasghar Zadeh, Shobeir; Segura, Rodrigo; Kähler, Christian; Radespiel, Rolf; Büttgenbach, Stephanus; Franco-Lara, Ezequiel; Krull, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    A diffusion-based microreactor system operated with a reaction volume of 8 μL is presented and characterized to intensify the process understanding in microscale cultivations. Its potential as screening tool for biological processes is evaluated. The advantage of the designed microbioreactor is the use for the continuous cultivation mode by integrating online measurement technique for dissolved oxygen (DO) and optical density (OD). A further advantage is the broaden application for biological systems. The bioreactor geometry was chosen to achieve homogeneous flow during continuous process operation. The device consisted of a microstructured top layer made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), which was designed and fabricated using UV-depth and soft lithography assembled with a glass bottom. CFD simulation data used for geometry design were verified via microparticle-image-velocimetry (μPIV). In the used microreactor geometry no concentration gradients occurred along the entire reaction volume because of rapid diffusive mixing, the homogeneous medium flow inside the growth chamber of the microreactor could be realized. Undesirable bubble formation before and during operation was reduced by using degassed medium as well as moistened and moderate incident air flow above the gas permeable PDMS membrane. Because of this a passive oxygen supply of the culture medium in the device is ensured by diffusion through the PDMS membrane. The oxygen supply itself was monitored online via integrated DO sensors based on a fluorescent dye complex. An adequate overall volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient K(L)a as well as mechanical stability of the device were accomplished for a membrane thickness of 300 μm. Experimental investigations considering measurements of OD (online) and several metabolite concentrations (offline) in a modified Verduyn medium. The used model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae DSM 2155 tended to strong reactor wall growth resembling a biofilm. PMID:20945484

  4. Interaction between Mismatch Repair and Genetic Recombination in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Alani, E.; Reenan, RAG.; Kolodner, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a set of genes that show strong amino acid sequence similarity to MutS and MutL, proteins required for mismatch repair in Escherichia coli. We examined the role of MSH2 and PMS1, yeast homologs of mutS and mutL, respectively, in the repair of base pair mismatches formed during meiotic recombination. By using specifically marked HIS4 and ARG4 alleles, we showed that msh2 mutants displayed a severe defect in the repair of all base pair mismatches as well as 1-, 2- and 4-bp insertion/deletion mispairs. The msh2 and pms1 phenotypes were indistinguishable, suggesting that the wild-type gene products act in the same repair pathway. A comparison of gene conversion events in wild-type and msh2 mutants indicated that mismatch repair plays an important role in genetic recombination. (1) Tetrad analysis at five different loci revealed that, in msh2 mutants, the majority of aberrant segregants displayed a sectored phenotype, consistent with a failure to repair mismatches created during heteroduplex formation. In wild type, base pair mismatches were almost exclusively repaired toward conversion rather than restoration. (2) In msh2 strains 10-19% of the aberrant tetrads were Ab4:4. (3) Polarity gradients at HIS4 and ARG4 were nearly abolished in msh2 mutants. The frequency of gene conversion at the 3' end of these genes was increased and was nearly the frequency observed at the 5' end. (4) Co-conversion studies were consistent with mismatch repair acting to regulate heteroduplex DNA tract length. We favor a model proposing that recombination events occur through the formation and resolution of heteroduplex intermediates and that mismatch repair proteins specifically interact with recombination enzymes to regulate the length of symmetric heteroduplex DNA. PMID:8056309

  5. Ecological and Genetic Barriers Differentiate Natural Populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Clowers, Katie J; Heilberger, Justin; Piotrowski, Jeff S; Will, Jessica L; Gasch, Audrey P

    2015-09-01

    How populations that inhabit the same geographical area become genetically differentiated is not clear. To investigate this, we characterized phenotypic and genetic differences between two populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that in some cases inhabit the same environment but show relatively little gene flow. We profiled stress sensitivity in a group of vineyard isolates and a group of oak-soil strains and found several niche-related phenotypes that distinguish the populations. We performed bulk-segregant mapping on two of the distinguishing traits: The vineyard-specific ability to grow in grape juice and oak-specific tolerance to the cell wall damaging drug Congo red. To implicate causal genes, we also performed a chemical genomic screen in the lab-strain deletion collection and identified many important genes that fell under quantitative trait loci peaks. One gene important for growth in grape juice and identified by both the mapping and the screen was SSU1, a sulfite-nitrite pump implicated in wine fermentations. The beneficial allele is generated by a known translocation that we reasoned may also serve as a genetic barrier. We found that the translocation is prevalent in vineyard strains, but absent in oak strains, and presents a postzygotic barrier to spore viability. Furthermore, the translocation was associated with a fitness cost to the rapid growth rate seen in oak-soil strains. Our results reveal the translocation as a dual-function locus that enforces ecological differentiation while producing a genetic barrier to gene flow in these sympatric populations. PMID:25953281

  6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tti2 Regulates PIKK Proteins and Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Kyle S; Duennwald, Martin L; Karagiannis, Jim; Genereaux, Julie; McCarton, Alexander S; Brandl, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    The TTT complex is composed of the three essential proteins Tel2, Tti1, and Tti2 The complex is required to maintain steady state levels of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) proteins, including mTOR, ATM/Tel1, ATR/Mec1, and TRRAP/Tra1, all of which serve as regulators of critical cell signaling pathways. Due to their association with heat shock proteins, and with newly synthesized PIKK peptides, components of the TTT complex may act as cochaperones. Here, we analyze the consequences of depleting the cellular level of Tti2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae We show that yeast expressing low levels of Tti2 are viable under optimal growth conditions, but the cells are sensitive to a number of stress conditions that involve PIKK pathways. In agreement with this, depleting Tti2 levels decreased expression of Tra1, Mec1, and Tor1, affected their localization and inhibited the stress responses in which these molecules are involved. Tti2 expression was not increased during heat shock, implying that it does not play a general role in the heat shock response. However, steady state levels of Hsp42 increase when Tti2 is depleted, and tti2L187P has a synthetic interaction with exon 1 of the human Huntingtin gene containing a 103 residue polyQ sequence, suggesting a general role in protein quality control. We also find that overexpressing Hsp90 or its cochaperones is synthetic lethal when Tti2 is depleted, an effect possibly due to imbalanced stoichiometry of a complex required for PIKK assembly. These results indicate that Tti2 does not act as a general chaperone, but may have a specialized function in PIKK folding and/or complex assembly. PMID:27172216

  7. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tti2 Regulates PIKK Proteins and Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Kyle S.; Duennwald, Martin L.; Karagiannis, Jim; Genereaux, Julie; McCarton, Alexander S.; Brandl, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The TTT complex is composed of the three essential proteins Tel2, Tti1, and Tti2. The complex is required to maintain steady state levels of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) proteins, including mTOR, ATM/Tel1, ATR/Mec1, and TRRAP/Tra1, all of which serve as regulators of critical cell signaling pathways. Due to their association with heat shock proteins, and with newly synthesized PIKK peptides, components of the TTT complex may act as cochaperones. Here, we analyze the consequences of depleting the cellular level of Tti2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that yeast expressing low levels of Tti2 are viable under optimal growth conditions, but the cells are sensitive to a number of stress conditions that involve PIKK pathways. In agreement with this, depleting Tti2 levels decreased expression of Tra1, Mec1, and Tor1, affected their localization and inhibited the stress responses in which these molecules are involved. Tti2 expression was not increased during heat shock, implying that it does not play a general role in the heat shock response. However, steady state levels of Hsp42 increase when Tti2 is depleted, and tti2L187P has a synthetic interaction with exon 1 of the human Huntingtin gene containing a 103 residue polyQ sequence, suggesting a general role in protein quality control. We also find that overexpressing Hsp90 or its cochaperones is synthetic lethal when Tti2 is depleted, an effect possibly due to imbalanced stoichiometry of a complex required for PIKK assembly. These results indicate that Tti2 does not act as a general chaperone, but may have a specialized function in PIKK folding and/or complex assembly. PMID:27172216

  8. Phenotypic and metabolic traits of commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Currently, pursuing yeast strains that display both a high potential fitness for alcoholic fermentation and a favorable impact on quality is a major goal in the alcoholic beverage industry. This considerable industrial interest has led to many studies characterizing the phenotypic and metabolic traits of commercial yeast populations. In this study, 20 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from different geographical origins exhibited high phenotypic diversity when their response to nine biotechnologically relevant conditions was examined. Next, the fermentation fitness and metabolic traits of eight selected strains with a unique phenotypic profile were evaluated in a high-sugar synthetic medium under two nitrogen regimes. Although the strains exhibited significant differences in nitrogen requirements and utilization rates, a direct relationship between nitrogen consumption, specific growth rate, cell biomass, cell viability, acetic acid and glycerol formation was only observed under high-nitrogen conditions. In contrast, the strains produced more succinic acid under the low-nitrogen regime, and a direct relationship with the final cell biomass was established. Glucose and fructose utilization patterns depended on both yeast strain and nitrogen availability. For low-nitrogen fermentation, three strains did not fully degrade the fructose. This study validates phenotypic and metabolic diversity among commercial wine yeasts and contributes new findings on the relationship between nitrogen availability, yeast cell growth and sugar utilization. We suggest that measuring nitrogen during the stationary growth phase is important because yeast cells fermentative activity is not exclusively related to population size, as previously assumed, but it is also related to the quantity of nitrogen consumed during this growth phase. PMID:24949272

  9. Metabolism and Regulation of Glycerolipids in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Susan A.; Kohlwein, Sepp D.; Carman, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Due to its genetic tractability and increasing wealth of accessible data, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model system of choice for the study of the genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology of eukaryotic lipid metabolism. Glycerolipids (e.g., phospholipids and triacylglycerol) and their precursors are synthesized and metabolized by enzymes associated with the cytosol and membranous organelles, including endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and lipid droplets. Genetic and biochemical analyses have revealed that glycerolipids play important roles in cell signaling, membrane trafficking, and anchoring of membrane proteins in addition to membrane structure. The expression of glycerolipid enzymes is controlled by a variety of conditions including growth stage and nutrient availability. Much of this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level and involves the Ino2–Ino4 activation complex and the Opi1 repressor, which interacts with Ino2 to attenuate transcriptional activation of UASINO-containing glycerolipid biosynthetic genes. Cellular levels of phosphatidic acid, precursor to all membrane phospholipids and the storage lipid triacylglycerol, regulates transcription of UASINO-containing genes by tethering Opi1 to the nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane and controlling its translocation into the nucleus, a mechanism largely controlled by inositol availability. The transcriptional activator Zap1 controls the expression of some phospholipid synthesis genes in response to zinc availability. Regulatory mechanisms also include control of catalytic activity of glycerolipid enzymes by water-soluble precursors, products and lipids, and covalent modification of phosphorylation, while in vivo function of some enzymes is governed by their subcellular location. Genome-wide genetic analysis indicates coordinate regulation between glycerolipid metabolism and a broad spectrum of metabolic pathways. PMID:22345606

  10. Ecological and Genetic Barriers Differentiate Natural Populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Clowers, Katie J.; Heilberger, Justin; Piotrowski, Jeff S.; Will, Jessica L.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2015-01-01

    How populations that inhabit the same geographical area become genetically differentiated is not clear. To investigate this, we characterized phenotypic and genetic differences between two populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that in some cases inhabit the same environment but show relatively little gene flow. We profiled stress sensitivity in a group of vineyard isolates and a group of oak-soil strains and found several niche-related phenotypes that distinguish the populations. We performed bulk-segregant mapping on two of the distinguishing traits: The vineyard-specific ability to grow in grape juice and oak-specific tolerance to the cell wall damaging drug Congo red. To implicate causal genes, we also performed a chemical genomic screen in the lab-strain deletion collection and identified many important genes that fell under quantitative trait loci peaks. One gene important for growth in grape juice and identified by both the mapping and the screen was SSU1, a sulfite-nitrite pump implicated in wine fermentations. The beneficial allele is generated by a known translocation that we reasoned may also serve as a genetic barrier. We found that the translocation is prevalent in vineyard strains, but absent in oak strains, and presents a postzygotic barrier to spore viability. Furthermore, the translocation was associated with a fitness cost to the rapid growth rate seen in oak-soil strains. Our results reveal the translocation as a dual-function locus that enforces ecological differentiation while producing a genetic barrier to gene flow in these sympatric populations. PMID:25953281

  11. Screening of Non- Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains for Tolerance to Formic Acid in Bioethanol Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Oshoma, Cyprian E.; Greetham, Darren; Louis, Edward J.; Smart, Katherine A.; Phister, Trevor G.; Powell, Chris; Du, Chenyu

    2015-01-01

    Formic acid is one of the major inhibitory compounds present in hydrolysates derived from lignocellulosic materials, the presence of which can significantly hamper the efficiency of converting available sugars into bioethanol. This study investigated the potential for screening formic acid tolerance in non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains, which could be used for the development of advanced generation bioethanol processes. Spot plate and phenotypic microarray methods were used to screen the formic acid tolerance of 7 non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. S. kudriavzeii IFO1802 and S. arboricolus 2.3319 displayed a higher formic acid tolerance when compared to other strains in the study. Strain S. arboricolus 2.3319 was selected for further investigation due to its genetic variability among the Saccharomyces species as related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and availability of two sibling strains: S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 in the lab. The tolerance of S. arboricolus strains (2.3317, 2.3318 and 2.3319) to formic acid was further investigated by lab-scale fermentation analysis, and compared with S. cerevisiae NCYC2592. S. arboricolus 2.3319 demonstrated improved formic acid tolerance and a similar bioethanol synthesis capacity to S. cerevisiae NCYC2592, while S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 exhibited an overall inferior performance. Metabolite analysis indicated that S. arboricolus strain 2.3319 accumulated comparatively high concentrations of glycerol and glycogen, which may have contributed to its ability to tolerate high levels of formic acid. PMID:26284784

  12. Rapid Identification and Enumeration of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells in Wine by Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Martorell, P.; Querol, A.; Fernández-Espinar, M. T.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the beneficial role of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the food industry for food and beverage production, it is able to cause spoilage in wines. We have developed a real-time PCR method to directly detect and quantify this yeast species in wine samples to provide winemakers with a rapid and sensitive method to detect and prevent wine spoilage. Specific primers were designed for S. cerevisiae using the sequence information obtained from a cloned random amplified polymorphic DNA band that differentiated S. cerevisiae from its sibling species Saccharomyces bayanus, Saccharomyces pastorianus, and Saccharomyces paradoxus. The specificity of the primers was demonstrated for typical wine spoilage yeast species. The method was useful for estimating the level of S. cerevisiae directly in sweet wines and red wines without preenrichment when yeast is present in concentrations as low as 3.8 and 5 CFU per ml. This detection limit is in the same order as that obtained from glucose-peptone-yeast growth medium (GPY). Moreover, it was possible to quantify S. cerevisiae in artificially contaminated samples accurately. Limits for accurate quantification in wine were established, from 3.8 × 105 to 3.8 CFU/ml in sweet wine and from 5 × 106 to 50 CFU/ml in red wine. PMID:16269715

  13. Screening of Non- Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains for Tolerance to Formic Acid in Bioethanol Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Oshoma, Cyprian E; Greetham, Darren; Louis, Edward J; Smart, Katherine A; Phister, Trevor G; Powell, Chris; Du, Chenyu

    2015-01-01

    Formic acid is one of the major inhibitory compounds present in hydrolysates derived from lignocellulosic materials, the presence of which can significantly hamper the efficiency of converting available sugars into bioethanol. This study investigated the potential for screening formic acid tolerance in non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains, which could be used for the development of advanced generation bioethanol processes. Spot plate and phenotypic microarray methods were used to screen the formic acid tolerance of 7 non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. S. kudriavzeii IFO1802 and S. arboricolus 2.3319 displayed a higher formic acid tolerance when compared to other strains in the study. Strain S. arboricolus 2.3319 was selected for further investigation due to its genetic variability among the Saccharomyces species as related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and availability of two sibling strains: S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 in the lab. The tolerance of S. arboricolus strains (2.3317, 2.3318 and 2.3319) to formic acid was further investigated by lab-scale fermentation analysis, and compared with S. cerevisiae NCYC2592. S. arboricolus 2.3319 demonstrated improved formic acid tolerance and a similar bioethanol synthesis capacity to S. cerevisiae NCYC2592, while S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 exhibited an overall inferior performance. Metabolite analysis indicated that S. arboricolus strain 2.3319 accumulated comparatively high concentrations of glycerol and glycogen, which may have contributed to its ability to tolerate high levels of formic acid. PMID:26284784

  14. Accumulation and chemical states of radiocesium by fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Kozai, Naofumi; Yamasaki, Shinya; Yu, Qianqian

    2014-05-01

    After accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, the fall-out radiocesium was deposited on the ground. Filamentous fungus is known to accumulate radiocesium in environment, even though many minerals are involved in soil. These facts suggest that fungus affect the migration behavior of radiocesium in the environment. However, accumulation mechanism of radiocesium by fungus is not understood. In the present study, accumulation and chemical states change of Cs by unicellular fungus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been studied to elucidate the role of microorganisms in the migration of radiocesium in the environment. Two different experimental conditions were employed; one is the accumulation experiments of radiocesium by S. cerevisiae from the agar medium containing 137Cs and a mineral of zeolite, vermiculite, smectite, mica, or illite. The other is the experiments using stable cesium to examine the chemical states change of Cs. In the former experiment, the cells were grown on membrane filter of 0.45 μm installed on the agar medium. After the grown cells were weighed, radioactivity in the cells was measured by an autoradiography technique. The mineral weight contents were changed from 0.1% to 1% of the medium. In the latter experiment, the cells were grown in the medium containing stable Cs between 1 mM and 10mM. The Cs accumulated cells were analyzed by SEM-EDS and EXAFS. The adsorption experiments of cesium by the cells under resting condition were also conducted to test the effect of cells metabolic activity. Without mineral in the medium, cells of S. cerevisiae accumulated 1.5x103 Bq/g from the medium containing 137Cs of 2.6x102 Bq/g. When mineral was added in the medium, concentration of 137Cs in the cells decreased. The concentration of 137Cs in the cells from the medium containing different minerals were in the following order; smectite, illite, mica > vermiculite > zeolite. This order was nearly the same as the inverse of distribution coefficient of

  15. Nucleotide sequence of the tcml gene (ribosomal protein L3) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, L D; Friesen, J D

    1983-01-01

    The yeast tcml gene, which codes for ribosomal protein L3, has been isolated by using recombinant DNA and genetic complementation. The DNA fragment carrying this gene has been subcloned and we have determined its DNA sequence. The 20 amino acid residues at the amino terminus as inferred from the nucleotide sequence agreed exactly with the amino acid sequence data. The amino acid composition of the encoded protein agreed with that determined for purified ribosomal protein L3. Codon usage in the tcml gene was strongly biased in the direction found for several other abundant Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins. The tcml gene has no introns, which appears to be atypical of ribosomal protein structural genes. PMID:6305925

  16. New integrative computational approaches unveil the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pheno-metabolomic fermentative profile and allow strain selection for winemaking.

    PubMed

    Franco-Duarte, Ricardo; Umek, Lan; Mendes, Inês; Castro, Cristiana C; Fonseca, Nuno; Martins, Rosa; Silva-Ferreira, António C; Sampaio, Paula; Pais, Célia; Schuller, Dorit

    2016-11-15

    During must fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains thousands of volatile aroma compounds are formed. The objective of the present work was to adapt computational approaches to analyze pheno-metabolomic diversity of a S. cerevisiae strain collection with different origins. Phenotypic and genetic characterization together with individual must fermentations were performed, and metabolites relevant to aromatic profiles were determined. Experimental results were projected onto a common coordinates system, revealing 17 statistical-relevant multi-dimensional modules, combining sets of most-correlated features of noteworthy biological importance. The present method allowed, as a breakthrough, to combine genetic, phenotypic and metabolomic data, which has not been possible so far due to difficulties in comparing different types of data. Therefore, the proposed computational approach revealed as successful to shed light into the holistic characterization of S. cerevisiae pheno-metabolome in must fermentative conditions. This will allow the identification of combined relevant features with application in selection of good winemaking strains. PMID:27283661

  17. A Novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae Killer Strain Secreting the X Factor Related to Killer Activity and Inhibition of S. cerevisiae K1, K2 and K28 Killer Toxins.

    PubMed

    Melvydas, Vytautas; Bružauskaitė, Ieva; Gedminienė, Genovaitė; Šiekštelė, Rimantas

    2016-09-01

    It was determined that Kx strains secrete an X factor which can inhibit all known Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer toxins (K1, K2, K28) and some toxins of other yeast species-the phenomenon not yet described in the scientific literature. It was shown that Kx type yeast strains posess a killer phenotype producing small but clear lysis zones not only on the sensitive strain α'1 but also on the lawn of S. cerevisiae K1, K2 and K28 type killer strains at temperatures between 20 and 30 °C. The pH at which killer/antikiller effect of Kx strain reaches its maximum is about 5.0-5.2. The Kx yeast were identified as to belong to S. cerevisiae species. Another newly identified S. cerevisiae killer strain N1 has killer activity but shows no antikilller properties against standard K1, K2 and K28 killer toxins. The genetic basis for Kx killer/antikiller phenotype was associated with the presence of M-dsRNA which is bigger than M-dsRNA of standard S. cerevisiae K1, K2, K28 type killer strains. Killer and antikiller features should be encoded by dsRNA. The phenomenon of antikiller (inhibition) properties was observed against some killer toxins of other yeast species. The molecular weight of newly identified killer toxins which produces Kx type strains might be about 45 kDa. PMID:27407298

  18. Investigation of the dominance behavior of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Benedetta; Giacosa, Simone; Rolle, Luca; Cocolin, Luca; Rantsiou, Kalliopi

    2013-07-15

    During wine fermentation, different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae compete in the same fermenting must and dominance takes place when one strain overcomes all the others. The purpose of this study was to investigate this phenomenon by identifying S. cerevisiae strains endowed with this feature and to test them in laboratory fermentations. First, autochthonous S. cerevisiae from Nebbiolo fermentations were isolated, molecularly identified and characterized. Genetically diverse S. cerevisiae strains were subsequently subjected to physiological characterization and to micro-scale fermentation, the weight loss kinetics was measured and HPLC analysis was performed at the end of the fermentation. Then, the strains that presented good fermentation characteristics were chosen for further analysis and to determine the dominance feature. For this purpose, couples of strains were co-inoculated in Nebbiolo must and the fermentations were monitored by microbiological and chemical analysis. Two different inoculation approaches were used: co-fermentations in flasks with mixed cells and reactor co-fermentations, in which the cells from the two different strains were kept separate by means of a 0.45 μm filter membrane, which allowed the fermenting must to move freely between the two compartments. During the flask co-fermentations, a minisatellite PCR protocol was applied, in order to differentiate the two strains and determine which one was able to dominate. The protocol included a culture-dependent approach and an independent one. In the first case, DNA extraction was performed on all the colonies scraped off the plates after sampling. In the second case, DNA extraction was performed directly on the fermenting must. The strains that were able to dominate were tested against several S. cerevisiae in order to confirm this dominance behavior. Dominance was observed in the early stages of fermentation, as early as 3days. Combinations of dominant and not-dominant strains were

  19. In situ selective determination of methylmercury in river water by diffusive gradient in thin films technique (DGT) using baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) immobilized in agarose gel as binding phase.

    PubMed

    Tafurt-Cardona, Makenly; Eismann, Carlos Eduardo; Suárez, Carlos Alfredo; Menegário, Amauri Antonio; Luko, Karen Silva; Sargentini Junior, Ézio

    2015-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilized in agarose gel as binding phase and polyacrylamide as diffusive layer in the diffusive gradient in thin films technique (DGT) was used for selective determination of methylmercury (MeHg). Deployment tests showed good linearity in mass uptake up to 48 h (3276 ng). When coupling the DGT technique with Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry, the method has a limit of detection of 0.44 ng L(-1) (pre concentration factor of 11 for 48 h deployment). Diffusion coefficient of 7.03 ± 0.77 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) at 23 °C in polyacrylamide gel (pH = 5.5 and ionic strength = 0.05 mol L(-1) NaCl) was obtained. Influence of ionic strength (from 0.0005 mol L(-1) to 0.1 mol L(-1) NaCl) and pH (from 3.5 to 8.5) on MeHg uptake were evaluated. For these range, recoveries of 84-105% and 84-98% were obtained for ionic strength and pH respectively. Potential interference due to presence of Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn was also assessed showing good recoveries (70-87%). The selectivity of the proposed approach was tested by deployments in solutions containing MeHg and Hg(II). Results obtained showed recoveries of 102-115 % for MeHg, while the uptake of Hg(II) was insignificant. The proposed approach was successfully employed for in situ measurements in the Negro River (Manaus-AM, Brazil). PMID:26320783

  20. Saccharomyces kudriavzevii and Saccharomyces uvarum differ from Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the production of aroma-active higher alcohols and acetate esters using their amino acidic precursors.

    PubMed

    Stribny, Jiri; Gamero, Amparo; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Querol, Amparo

    2015-07-16

    Higher alcohols and acetate esters are important flavour and aroma components in the food industry. In alcoholic beverages these compounds are produced by yeast during fermentation. Although Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most extensively used species, other species of the Saccharomyces genus have become common in fermentation processes. This study analyses and compares the production of higher alcohols and acetate esters from their amino acidic precursors in three Saccharomyces species: Saccharomyces kudriavzevii, Saccharomyces uvarum and S. cerevisiae. The global volatile compound analysis revealed that S. kudriavzevii produced large amounts of higher alcohols, whereas S. uvarum excelled in the production of acetate esters. Particularly from phenylalanine, S. uvarum produced the largest amounts of 2-phenylethyl acetate, while S. kudriavzevii obtained the greatest 2-phenylethanol formation from this precursor. The present data indicate differences in the amino acid metabolism and subsequent production of flavour-active higher alcohols and acetate esters among the closely related Saccharomyces species. This knowledge will prove useful for developing new enhanced processes in fragrance, flavour, and food industries. PMID:25886016

  1. Isolation of xylose reductase gene of Pichia stipitis and its expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Takuma, Shinya; Nakashima, Noriyuki; Tantirungkij, Manee

    1991-12-31

    A NADPH/NADH-dependent xylose reductase gene was isolated from the xylose-assimilating yeast, Pichia stipitis. DNA sequence analysis showed that the gene consists of 951 bp. The gene introduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was transcribed to mRNA, and a considerable amount of enzyme activity was observed constitutively, whereas transcription and translation in P steps were inducible. S. cerevisiae carrying the xylose reductase gene could not, however, grow on xylose medium, and could not produce ethanol from xylose. Since xylose uptake and accumulation of xylitol by S. cerevisiae were observed, the conversion of xylitol to xylulose seemed to be limited.

  2. Biophysical characterization of Gir2, a highly acidic protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with anomalous electrophoretic behavior.

    PubMed

    Alves, Viviane S; Pimenta, Daniel C; Sattlegger, Evelyn; Castilho, Beatriz A

    2004-01-30

    Gir2 is an uncharacterized protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, containing a RWD/GI domain. In this work, we report the biophysical characterization of Gir2. His-tagged Gir2, expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, showed an abnormally slow migration on SDS-PAGE. The yeast expressed protein behaves similarly. Using mass spectrometry and peptide mass fingerprinting we demonstrated that the protein has the expected molecular mass (34kDa). EDC modification of carboxylate groups reverted the anomalous migration on SDS-PAGE. Size exclusion chromatography showed that Gir2 has a Stokes radius larger than expected. Gir2 is thermostable and lacks extensive structure, as determined by CD analysis. Based on these findings, we suggest that Gir2 is a representative of the growing group of "natively unfolded" proteins. PMID:14715270

  3. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mixed Culture of Blackberry (Rubus ulmifolius L.) Juice: Synergism in the Aroma Compounds Production

    PubMed Central

    Ragazzo-Sánchez, Juan Arturo; Ortiz-Basurto, Rosa Isela; Luna-Solano, Guadalupe; Calderón-Santoyo, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Blackberry (Rubus sp.) juice was fermented using four different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Vitilevure-CM4457, Enoferm-T306, ICV-K1, and Greroche Rhona-L3574) recognized because of their use in the wine industry. A medium alcoholic graduation spirit (<6°GL) with potential to be produced at an industrial scale was obtained. Alcoholic fermentations were performed at 28°C, 200 rpm, and noncontrolled pH. The synergistic effect on the aromatic compounds production during fermentation in mixed culture was compared with those obtained by monoculture and physic mixture of spirits produced in monoculture. The aromatic composition was determined by HS-SPME-GC. The differences in aromatic profile principally rely on the proportions in aromatic compounds and not on the number of those compounds. The multivariance analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and factorial discriminant analysis (DFA) permit to demonstrate the synergism between the strains. PMID:25506606

  4. By-product inhibition effects of ethanolic fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Maiorella, B.; Blanch, H.W.; Wilke, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    Inhibition by secondary fermentation products may limit the ultimate productivity of new glucose to ethanol fermentation processes. New processes are under development whereby ethanol is selectively removed from the fermenting broth to eliminate ethanol inhibition effects. These processes can concentrate minor secondary products to the point where they become toxic to the yeast. Vacuum fermentation selectively concentrates nonvolatile products in the fermentation broth. Membrane fermentation systems may concentrate large molecules which are sterically blocked from membrane transport. Extractive fermentation systems, employing nonpolar solvents, may concentrate small organic acids. By-product production rates and inhibition levels in continuous fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been determined for acetaldehyde, glycerol, formic, lactic, and acetic acids, 1-propanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, and 2,3- butanediol to assess the potential effects of these by-products on new fermentation processes. Mechanisms are proposed for the various inhibition effects observed. (Refs. 15).

  5. By-product inhibition effects on ethanolic fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Mairoella, B.; Blanch, H.W.; Wilke, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    Inhibition by secondary fermentation products may limit the ultimate productivity of new glucose to ethanol fermentation processes. New processes are under development whereby ethanol is selectively removed from the fermenting broth to eliminate ethanol inhibition effects. These processes can concentrate minor secondary products to the point where they become toxic to the yeast. Vacuum fermentation selectively concentrates nonvolatile products in the fermentation broth. Membrane fermentation systems may concentrate large molecules which are sterically blocked from membrane transport. Extractive fermentation systems, employing nonpolar solvents, may concentrate small organic acids. By-product production rates and inhibition levels in continuous fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been determined for acetaldehyde, glycerol, formic, lactic, and acetic acids, 1-propanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, and 2,3-butanediol to assess the potential effects of these by-products on new fermentation processes. Mechanisms are proposed for the various inhibition effects observed.

  6. Amyloid-like properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall glucantransferase Bgl2p

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikova, Tatyana A; Gorkovskii, Anton A; Selyakh, Irina O; Galzitskaya, Oxana V; Bezsonov, Evgeniy E; Gellissen, Gerd; Kulaev, Igor S

    2008-01-01

    Glucantransferase Bgl2p is a major conserved cell wall constituent described for a wide range of yeast species. In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae it is the only non-covalently bound cell wall protein that cannot be released from cell walls by sequential SDS and trypsin treatment. It contains seven amyloidogenic determinants. Circular dichroism analysis and fluorescence spectroscopy with thioflavin T indicate the presence of β-sheet structures in Bgl2p isolates. Bgl2p forms fibrils, a process that is enforced in the presence of other cell wall components. Thus the data obtained is the first evidence for amyloid-like properties of yeast cell wall protein—glucantransferase Bgl2p. PMID:19098439

  7. Glutamate Synthase: Properties of the Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide-Dependent Enzyme from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Roon, Robert J.; Even, Harvey L.; Larimore, Fred

    1974-01-01

    A reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent glutamate synthase has been detected and partially purified from crude extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzyme is specific for NADH, glutamine, and α-ketoglutarate (Km values of 2.6 μM, 1.0 mM, and 140 μM, respectively) and has a pH optimum between 7.1 and 7.7. The stoichiometry of the reaction has been determined as 2 mol of glutamate synthesized per mol of glutamine consumed. Glutamate synthase can be distinguished from either of the glutamate dehydrogenases of yeast on the basis of its substrate requirements and behavior during agarose gel and ion exchange chromatography. Variations in the specific activity of glutamate synthase, which occur in response to changes in the growth medium, are similar in character to those observed with the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent (anabolic) glutamate dehydrogenase. PMID:4362465

  8. The STF2p Hydrophilin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Required for Dehydration Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    López-Martínez, Gema; Rodríguez-Porrata, Boris; Margalef-Català, Mar; Cordero-Otero, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to overcome cell dehydration; cell metabolic activity is arrested during this period but restarts after rehydration. The yeast genes encoding hydrophilin proteins were characterised to determine their roles in the dehydration-resistant phenotype, and STF2p was found to be a hydrophilin that is essential for survival after the desiccation-rehydration process. Deletion of STF2 promotes the production of reactive oxygen species and apoptotic cell death during stress conditions, whereas the overexpression of STF2, whose gene product localises to the cytoplasm, results in a reduction in ROS production upon oxidative stress as the result of the antioxidant capacity of the STF2p protein. PMID:22442684

  9. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mixed culture of blackberry (Rubus ulmifolius L.) juice: synergism in the aroma compounds production.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Rosales, Pedro Ulises; Ragazzo-Sánchez, Juan Arturo; Ruiz-Montañez, Gabriela; Ortiz-Basurto, Rosa Isela; Luna-Solano, Guadalupe; Calderón-Santoyo, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Blackberry (Rubus sp.) juice was fermented using four different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Vitilevure-CM4457, Enoferm-T306, ICV-K1, and Greroche Rhona-L3574) recognized because of their use in the wine industry. A medium alcoholic graduation spirit (<6°GL) with potential to be produced at an industrial scale was obtained. Alcoholic fermentations were performed at 28°C, 200 rpm, and noncontrolled pH. The synergistic effect on the aromatic compounds production during fermentation in mixed culture was compared with those obtained by monoculture and physic mixture of spirits produced in monoculture. The aromatic composition was determined by HS-SPME-GC. The differences in aromatic profile principally rely on the proportions in aromatic compounds and not on the number of those compounds. The multivariance analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and factorial discriminant analysis (DFA) permit to demonstrate the synergism between the strains. PMID:25506606

  10. Microbial transformations of ferulic acid by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Z; Dostal, L; Rosazza, J P

    1993-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dry baker's yeast) and Pseudomonas fluorescens were used to convert trans-ferulic acid into 4-hydroxy-3-methoxystyrene in 96 and 89% yields, respectively. The metabolites were isolated by solid-phase extraction and analyzed by thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The identities of the metabolites were determined by 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by mass spectrometry. The mechanism of the decarboxylation of ferulic acid was investigated by measuring the degree and position of deuterium incorporated into the styrene derivative from D2O by mass spectrometry and by both proton and deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Resting cells of baker's yeast reduced ferulic acid to 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylpropionic acid in 54% yield when incubations were under an argon atmosphere. PMID:8395165

  11. Ctk1 function is necessary for full translation initiation activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Coordes, Britta; Brünger, Katharina M; Burger, Kaspar; Soufi, Boumediene; Horenk, Juliane; Eick, Dirk; Olsen, Jesper V; Sträßer, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Translation is a fundamental and highly regulated cellular process. Previously, we reported that the kinase and transcription elongation factor Ctk1 increases fidelity during translation elongation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we show that loss of Ctk1 function also affects the initiation step of translation. Translation active extracts from Ctk1-depleted cells show impaired translation activity of capped mRNA, but not mRNA reporters containing the cricket paralysis virus (CrPV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Furthermore, the formation of 80S initiation complexes is decreased, which is probably due to reduced subunit joining. In addition, we determined the changes in the phosphorylation pattern of a ribosome enriched fraction after depletion of Ctk1. Thus, we provide a catalogue of phosphoproteomic changes dependent on Ctk1. Taken together, our data suggest a stimulatory function of Ctk1 in 80S formation during translation initiation. PMID:25416238

  12. The architecture of the DNA replication origin recognition complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Speck, Christian; Wendel, Patricia; Tang, Chunyan; Stillman, Bruce; Li, Huilin

    2008-07-29

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) is conserved in all eukaryotes. The six proteins of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ORC that form a stable complex bind to origins of DNA replication and recruit prereplicative complex (pre-RC) proteins, one of which is Cdc6. To further understand the function of ORC we recently determined by single-particle reconstruction of electron micrographs a low-resolution, 3D structure of S. cerevisiae ORC and the ORC-Cdc6 complex. In this article, the spatial arrangement of the ORC subunits within the ORC structure is described. In one approach, a maltose binding protein (MBP) was systematically fused to the N or the C termini of the five largest ORC subunits, one subunit at a time, generating 10 MBP-fused ORCs, and the MBP density was localized in the averaged, 2D EM images of the MBP-fused ORC particles. Determining the Orc1-5 structure and comparing it with the native ORC structure localized the Orc6 subunit near Orc2 and Orc3. Finally, subunit-subunit interactions were determined by immunoprecipitation of ORC subunits synthesized in vitro. Based on the derived ORC architecture and existing structures of archaeal Orc1-DNA structures, we propose a model for ORC and suggest how ORC interacts with origin DNA and Cdc6. The studies provide a basis for understanding the overall structure of the pre-RC. PMID:18647841

  13. Xylose Isomerase Improves Growth and Ethanol Production Rates from Biomass Sugars for Both Saccharomyces Pastorianus and Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kristen P.; Gowtham, Yogender Kumar; Henson, J. Michael; Harcum, Sarah W.

    2013-01-01

    The demand for biofuel ethanol made from clean, renewable nonfood sources is growing. Cellulosic biomass, such as switch grass (Panicum virgatum L.), is an alternative feedstock for ethanol production; however, cellulosic feedstock hydrolysates contain high levels of xylose, which needs to be converted to ethanol to meet economic feasibility. In this study, the effects of xylose isomerase on cell growth and ethanol production from biomass sugars representative of switch grass were investigated using low cell density cultures. The lager yeast species Saccharomyces pastorianus was grown with immobilized xylose isomerase in the fermentation step to determine the impact of the glucose and xylose concentrations on the ethanol production rates. Ethanol production rates were improved due to xylose isomerase; however, the positive effect was not due solely to the conversion of xylose to xylulose. Xylose isomerase also has glucose isomerase activity, so to better understand the impact of the xylose isomerase on S. pastorianus, growth and ethanol production were examined in cultures provided fructose as the sole carbon. It was observed that growth and ethanol production rates were higher for the fructose cultures with xylose isomerase even in the absence of xylose. To determine whether the positive effects of xylose isomerase extended to other yeast species, a side-by-side comparison of S. pastorianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was conducted. These comparisons demonstrated that the xylose isomerase increased ethanol productivity for both the yeast species by increasing the glucose consumption rate. These results suggest that xylose isomerase can contribute to improved ethanol productivity, even without significant xylose conversion. PMID:22866331

  14. Oral administration of myostatin-specific recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae vaccine in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongtian; Zhou, Gang; Ren, Chonghua; Xu, Kun; Yan, Qiang; Li, Xinyi; Zhang, Tingting; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-04-29

    Yeast is considered as a simple and cost-effective host for protein expression, and our previous studies have proved that Saccharomyces cerevisiae can deliver recombinant protein and DNA into mouse dendritic cells and can further induce immune responses as novel vaccines. In order to know whether similar immune responses can be induced in rabbit by oral administration of such recombinant S. cerevisiae vaccine, we orally fed the rabbits with heat-inactivated myostatin-recombinant S. cerevisiae for 5 weeks, and then myostatin-specific antibody in serum was detected successfully by western blotting and ELISA assay. The rabbits treated with myostatin-recombinant S. cerevisiae vaccine grew faster and their muscles were much heavier than that of the control group. As a common experimental animal and a meat livestock with great economic value, rabbit was proved to be the second animal species that have been successfully orally immunized by recombinant S. cerevisiae vaccine after mice. PMID:27005809

  15. Glucose induces rapid changes in the secretome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein secretion is a fundamental process in all living cells. Proteins can either be secreted via the classical or non-classical pathways. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, gluconeogenic enzymes are in the extracellular fraction/periplasm when cells are grown in media containing low glucose. Following a transfer of cells to high glucose media, their levels in the extracellular fraction are reduced rapidly. We hypothesized that changes in the secretome were not restricted to gluconeogenic enzymes. The goal of the current study was to use a proteomic approach to identify extracellular proteins whose levels changed when cells were transferred from low to high glucose media. Results We performed two iTRAQ experiments and identified 347 proteins that were present in the extracellular fraction including metabolic enzymes, proteins involved in oxidative stress, protein folding, and proteins with unknown functions. Most of these proteins did not contain typical ER-Golgi signal sequences. Moreover, levels of many of these proteins decreased upon a transfer of cells from media containing low to high glucose media. Using an extraction procedure and Western blotting, we confirmed that the metabolic enzymes (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, 3-phosphoglycerate kinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase), proteins involved in oxidative stress (superoxide dismutase and thioredoxin), and heat shock proteins (Ssa1p, Hsc82p, and Hsp104p) were in the extracellular fraction during growth in low glucose and that the levels of these extracellular proteins were reduced when cells were transferred to media containing high glucose. These proteins were associated with membranes in vesicle-enriched fraction. We also showed that small vesicles were present in the extracellular fraction in cells grown in low glucose. Following a transfer from low to high glucose media for 30 minutes, 98% of these vesicles disappeared from the extracellular fraction

  16. Genome Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Double-Stranded RNA Virus L-A-28

    PubMed Central

    Konovalovas, Aleksandras

    2016-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced the complete genome of the L-A-28 virus from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae K28 killer strain. This sequence completes the set of currently identified L-A helper viruses required for expression of double-stranded RNA-originated killer phenotypes in baking yeast. PMID:27313294

  17. Genome Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Double-Stranded RNA Virus L-A-28.

    PubMed

    Konovalovas, Aleksandras; Serviené, Elena; Serva, Saulius

    2016-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced the complete genome of the L-A-28 virus from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae K28 killer strain. This sequence completes the set of currently identified L-A helper viruses required for expression of double-stranded RNA-originated killer phenotypes in baking yeast. PMID:27313294

  18. Construction of ploidy series of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the plasmid YCplac33-GHK.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lihua; Li, Xiaoyang; Wang, Cong; Cao, Xiaohong; Wang, Haiyong

    2013-04-01

    An effective approach, using the plasmid YCplac33-GHK, is developed to construct a ploidy series of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. YCplac33-GHK harbors the HO gene under the control of galactose-inducible promoter and KanMX4 as the selective marker. The simple method can solve the problem of industrial applications of strains with resistance genes. PMID:23430413

  19. An oxalyl-CoA synthetase is important for oxalate metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although oxalic acid is common in nature, our understanding of the mechanism(s) regulating its turnover remains incomplete. In this study we identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae acyl-activating enzyme 3 (ScAAE3) as an enzyme capable of catalyzing the conversion of oxalate to oxalyl-CoA. Based on our fi...

  20. The uptake of different iron salts by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gaensly, Fernanda; Picheth, Geraldo; Brand, Debora; Bonfim, Tania M B

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts can be enriched with microelements, including iron; however, special physicochemical conditions are required to formulate a culture media that promotes both yeast growth and iron uptake. Different iron sources do not affect biomass formation; however, considering efficacy, cost, stability, and compatibility with Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, ferrous sulphate is recommended. PMID:25242932

  1. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of citrus peel waste by Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of limonene concentration, enzyme loading, and pH on ethanol production from simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of citrus peel waste by Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied at 37 C. Prior to SSF, citrus peel waste underwent a steam explosion process combined with fla...

  2. PRIMARY STRUCTURE OF THE P450 LANOSTEROL DEMETHYLASE GENE FROM SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have sequenced the structural gene and flanking regions for lanosterol 14oc-demethylase (14DM) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. n open reading fram of 530 codons encodes a 60.7-kDa protein. hen this gene is disrupted by integrative transformation, the resulting strain requires e...

  3. Heat Shock Protein Genes and Newly Integrated Glucose Metabolic Pathways Promote Ethanol Tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignocellulose-to-ethanol conversion provides a promising alternative means for production of sustainable and cleaner transportation fuels. Development of stress tolerant ethanologenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for low-cost biobased economy. Tolerance to high levels of ethanol has been...

  4. A novel technique to evaluate interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall and mycotoxins: application to zearalenone.

    PubMed

    Yiannikouris, Alexandros; Poughon, Laurent; Cameleyre, Xavier; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; François, Jean; Bertin, Gérard; Jouany, Jean-Pierre

    2003-05-01

    Three models based on sigmoidal plotting were tested for their ability to describe zearalenone adsorption on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell walls in vitro. All three models closely fitted the experimental data, but Hill's equation gave the most accurate parameters, and provided information on the physical and chemical mechanisms involved in the adsorption of mycotoxin on yeast cell walls. PMID:12882008

  5. NDT80, a meiosis-specific gene required for exit from pachytene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liuzhong; Ajimura, M.; Padmore, R.; Klein, C.; Kleckner, N.

    1995-12-01

    This report describes the identification of a new meiosis-specific gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae called NDT80. DNA cloning and molecular analysis revealed that the NDT80 gene maps on the right arm of chromosome 8 and is transcribed during middle meiotic prophase. 82 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae for consolidated bioprocessing in starch and biomass conversion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The conversion of starch or biomass to biofuel is a two-stage process involving enzymatic treatment, followed by yeast fermentation. An alternative route would be to consolidate the process by engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of both saccharification and fermentation. An approach was d...

  7. Chromosomal integration of recombinant alpha-amylase and glucoamylase genes in saccharomyces cerevisiae for starch conversion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant constructs of barley '-amylase and Lentinula edodes glucoamylase genes were integrated into the chromosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The insertion was confirmed by PCR amplification of the gene sequence in the chromosomes. The expression was analyzed by SDS-PAGE of the enzymes puri...

  8. PRIMARY STRUCTURE OF THE P450 LANOSTEROL DEMETHYLASE GENE FROM SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have sequenced the structural gene and flanking regions for lanosterol 14 alpha-demethylase (14DM) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An open reading frame of 530 codons encodes a 60.7-kDa protein. When this gene is disrupted by integrative transformation, the resulting strain req...

  9. Engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce feruloyl esterase for the release of ferulic acid from switchgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Aspergillus niger ferulic acid esterase gene (faeA) was cloned into Saccharomyces cerevisiae via a yeast expression vector, resulting in efficient expression and secretion of the enzyme in the medium. The recombinant enzyme was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange and hydrophobic interactio...

  10. Effect of fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain PJ69-4 on the phytic acid, raffinose, and stachyose contents of soybean meal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three experiments were conducted to determine the impact of submerged fermentation procedures using Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker’s yeast strain PJ69-4a on degradation of phytic acid and the raffinosaccharides, raffinose, and stachyose, in soybean meal. The goal of the research was to identify a n...

  11. Genome Sequences of Industrially Relevant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain M3707, Isolated from a Sample of Distillers Yeast and Four Haploid Derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Courtney M.; Clum, Alicia; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Sharma, Aditi; Zane, Matthew; Barry, Kerrie; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Davison, Brian H.; Lynd, Lee R.; Gilna, Paul; Hau, Heidi; Hogsett, David A.; Froehlich, Allan C.

    2013-04-19

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain M3707 was isolated from a sample of commercial distillers yeast, and its genome sequence together with the genome sequences for the four derived haploid strains M3836, M3837, M3838, and M3839 has been determined. Yeasts have potential for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) for biofuel production, and access to these genome sequences will facilitate their development.

  12. Phosphorylation of protein synthesis initiation factor 2 (elF-2) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    Initiation Factor 2 (elF-2) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is comprised of 3 subunits. The control of protein synthesis in mammalian cells have been shown to involve the phosphorylation of the small (alpha) subunit by a specific protein kinase. Phosphorylation results in an inhibition of protein synthesis. In order to determine whether or not an analogous system is operative in yeast, the phosphorylation state of the alpha subunit of elF-2 in Saccharomyces was determined during various growth and nongrowth conditions. Cells were radiolabelled with /sup 32/P and /sup 35/S, and the whole cell lysates were analyzed by two dimensional gel electrophoresis. These experiments revealed that the smallest subunit (alpha, M/sub r/ = 31,000) is a phosphoprotein in vivo under a variety of growth and nongrowth conditions. This is in direct contrast to the pattern exhibited in mammalian cells. The fact that the small subunit of elF-2 in yeast is phosphorylated under a variety of physiological conditions indicates that such a covalent modification is important for some aspects of elF-2 function. In order to investigate this problem further, a protein kinase that specifically labels the alpha subunit of elF-2 in vitro was isolated. The kinase is not autophosphorylating, utilizes ATP as a phosphate donor, phosphorylates an exogenous protein, casein, modifies serine residues in elF-2, is cyclic nucleotide-independent, and is strongly inhibited by heparin.

  13. Multi-Capillary Column-Ion Mobility Spectrometry of Volatile Metabolites Emitted by Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Halbfeld, Christoph; Ebert, Birgitta E.; Blank, Lars M.

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during microbial fermentations determine the flavor of fermented food and are of interest for the production of fragrances or food additives. However, the microbial synthesis of these compounds from simple carbon sources has not been well investigated so far. Here, we analyzed the headspace over glucose minimal salt medium cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry (MCC-IMS). The high sensitivity and fast data acquisition of the MCC-IMS enabled online analysis of the fermentation off-gas and 19 specific signals were determined. To four of these volatile compounds, we could assign the metabolites ethanol, 2-pentanone, isobutyric acid, and 2,3-hexanedione by MCC-IMS measurements of pure standards and cross validation with thermal desorption–gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements. Despite the huge biochemical knowledge of the biochemistry of the model organism S. cerevisiae, only the biosynthetic pathways for ethanol and isobutyric acid are fully understood, demonstrating the considerable lack of research of volatile metabolites. As monitoring of VOCs produced during microbial fermentations can give valuable insight into the metabolic state of the organism, fast and non-invasive MCC-IMS analyses provide valuable data for process control. PMID:25197771

  14. A genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Reveals Pathways affected By Arsenic Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xue; Arita, Adriana; Ellen, Thomas P.; Liu, Xin; Bai, Jingxiang; Rooney, John P.; Kurtz, Adrienne D.; Klein, Catherine B.; Dai, Wei; Begley, Thomas J.; Costa, Max

    2009-01-01

    We have used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify toxicologically important proteins and pathways involved in arsenic-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity in humans. We performed a systemic screen of the complete set of 4,733 haploid S. cerevisiae single gene deletion mutants to identify those that have decreased or increased growth, relative to wild-type, after exposure to sodium arsenite (NaAsO2). IC50 values for all mutants were determined to further validate our results. Ultimately we identified 248 mutants sensitive to arsenite and 5 mutants resistant to arsenite exposure. We analyzed the proteins corresponding to arsenite-sensitive mutants and determined that they belonged to functional categories that include protein binding, phosphate metabolism, vacuolar/lysosomal transport, protein targeting, sorting, and translocation, cell growth/morphogenesis, cell polarity and filament formation. Furthermore, these data were mapped onto a protein interactome to identify arsenite toxicity-modulating networks. These networks are associated with the cytoskeleton, ubiquitination, histone acetylation and the MAPK signaling pathway. Our studies have potential implications for understanding toxicity and carcinogenesis in arsenic-induced human conditions, such as cancer and aging. PMID:19631266

  15. Regulation of Lactobacillus plantarum contamination on the carbohydrate and energy related metabolisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during bioethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi-Jun; Lin, Xiang-Hua; Li, Hao

    2015-11-01

    During the industrial bioethanol fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells are often stressed by bacterial contaminants, especially lactic acid bacteria. Generally, lactic acid bacteria contamination can inhibit S. cerevisiae cell growth through secreting lactic acid and competing with yeast cells for micronutrients and living space. However, whether are there still any other influences of lactic acid bacteria on yeast or not? In this study, Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014 was co-cultivated with S. cerevisiae S288c to mimic the L. plantarum contamination in industrial bioethanol fermentation. The contaminative L. plantarum-associated expression changes of genes involved in carbohydrate and energy related metabolisms in S. cerevisiae cells were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to evaluate the influence of L. plantarum on carbon source utilization and energy related metabolism in yeast cells during bioethanol fermentation. Contaminative L. plantarum influenced the expression of most of genes which are responsible for encoding key enzymes involved in glucose related metabolisms in S. cerevisiae. Specific for, contaminated L. plantarum inhibited EMP pathway but promoted TCA cycle, glyoxylate cycle, HMP, glycerol synthesis pathway, and redox pathway in S. cerevisiae cells. In the presence of L. plantarum, the carbon flux in S. cerevisiae cells was redistributed from fermentation to respiratory and more reducing power was produced to deal with the excess NADH. Moreover, L. plantarum contamination might confer higher ethanol tolerance to yeast cells through promoting accumulation of glycerol. These results also highlighted our knowledge about relationship between contaminative lactic acid bacteria and S. cerevisiae during bioethanol fermentation. PMID:26279142

  16. Regulation of C1 metabolism by l-methionine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lor, K. L.; Cossins, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    1. The concentrations of folate derivatives in aerobic cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (A.T.C.C. 9763) were determined by microbiological assay employing Lactobacillus casei (A.T.C.C. 7469) and Pediococcus cerevisiae (A.T.C.C. 8081). Cells cultured in media lacking l-methionine contained higher concentrations of folate derivatives than cells grown in the same media supplemented with 2.5μmol of l-methionine/ml. The concentrations of highly conjugated derivatives were also decreased by supplementing the growth medium with l-methionine. 2. DEAE-cellulose column chromatography of extracts prepared from cells grown under these conditions revealed that the concentrations of methylated tetrahydrofolates were drastically decreased by the methionine supplement. Smaller decreases were also observed in the concentrations of formylated and unsubstituted derivatives. 3. The concentrations of four enzymes of C1 metabolism were compared after 6h of growth in the presence and in the absence of l-methionine (2.5μmol/ml). The specific activities of formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and serine hydroxymethyltransferase were not altered by this treatment but that of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate–homocysteine methyltransferase was decreased by approx. 65% when l-methionine was supplied. The activities of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate–homocysteine methyltransferase, serine hydroxymethyltransferase and formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase were not appreciably altered by l-methionine in vitro. In contrast this amino acid was found to inhibit the activity of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. 4. Feeding experiments employing sodium [14C]formate indicated that cells grown in the presence of exogenous methionine, although having less ability to convert formate into methionine, readily incorporated 14C into serine and the adenosyl moiety of S-adenosylmethionine. 5. It is suggested that exogenous l-methionine controls C1 metabolism in Saccharomyces

  17. Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) antigen in obese and normal weight subjects.

    PubMed

    Salamati, S; Martins, C; Kulseng, B

    2015-02-01

    Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and its cell wall components have been used as one of the alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters in the feed industry. Antibodies to cell wall mannan of this yeast (ASCA) have been traditionally used in the study of Crohn's disease (CD). We applied ASCA in relation to obesity. This study aims (i) to determine the concentration of ASCA (immunoglobulin A [IgA] and immunoglobulin G [IgG]) in obese compared with normal weight individuals and (ii) to determine if there is a correlation between ASCA concentrations, obesity indices and C-reactive protein. Forty obese individuals (body mass index [BMI] > 35 kg m(-2) ) and 18 healthy (BMI < 25 kg m(-2) ) volunteers participated in this case-control study. Binding activity of serum IgA and IgG to the cell wall mannan of S. cerevisiae was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. More than one-third of the obese individual (35%) showed elevated titres of ASCA compared with the control group (5%). This antibody was positively associated with weight (P = 0.01), BMI (P = 0.02) and waist circumference (P = 0.02), but not with C-reactive protein. It seems that ASCA are not only specific for CD but are also associated with obesity. S. cerevisiae or a related antigen may play a role in the matrix of this complex condition. PMID:25611585

  18. Effect of limited homology on gene conversion in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae plasmid recombination system

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, B.Y.; Dornfeld, K.J.; Fagrelius, T.J.; Livingston, D.M.

    1988-06-01

    Plasmids containing heteroallelic copies of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HIS3 gene undergo intramolecular gene conservation in mitotically dividing S. cerevisiae cels. The authors used this plasmid system to determine the minimum amount of homology required for gene conversion, to examine how conversion tract lengths are affected by limited homology, and to analyze the role of flanking DNA sequences on the pattern of exchange. Plasmids with homologous sequences greater than 2 kilobases have mitotic exchange rates as high as 2 x 10/sup -3/ event soper cell per generation. As the homology is reduced, the exchange rate decreases dramatically. A plasmid with 26 base pairs (bp) of homology undergones gene conversion at a rate of approximately 1 x 10/sup -10/ events per cell per generation. These studies have also shown that an 8-bp insertion mutation 13 bp from a border between homologous and nonhomologous sequences undergoes conversion, but that a similar 8-bp insertion 5 bp from a border does not. Examination of independent conversion events which occurred in plasmids with heteroallelic copies of the HIS3 gene shows that markers within 280 bp of a border between homologous and nonhomologous sequences undergo conversion less frequently than the same markers within a more extensive homologous sequence. Thus, proximity to a border between homologous and nonhomologous sequences shortens the conversion tract length.

  19. Purification and partial characterization of an aldo-keto reductase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, A; van Zyl, C; van Tonder, A; Prior, B A

    1995-01-01

    A cytosolic aldo-keto reductase was purified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 26602 to homogeneity by affinity chromatography, chromatofocusing, and hydroxylapatite chromatography. The relative molecular weights of the aldo-keto reductase as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and size exclusion chromatography were 36,800 and 35,000, respectively, indicating that the enzyme is monomeric. Amino acid composition and N-terminal sequence analysis revealed that the enzyme is closely related to the aldose reductases of xylose-fermenting yeasts and mammalian tissues. The enzyme was apparently immunologically unrelated to the aldose reductases of other xylose-fermenting yeasts. The aldo-keto reductase is NADPH specific and catalyzes the reduction of a variety of aldehydes. The best substrate for the enzyme is the aromatic aldehyde p-nitrobenzaldehyde (Km = 46 microM; kcat/Km = 52,100 s-1 M-1), whereas among the aldoses, DL-glyceraldehyde was the preferred substrate (Km = 1.44 mM; kcat/Km = 1,790 s-1 M-1). The enzyme failed to catalyze the reduction of menadione and p-benzoquinone, substrates for carbonyl reductase. The enzyme was inhibited only slightly by 2 mM sodium valproate and was activated by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. The optimum pH of the enzyme is 5. These data indicate that the S. cerevisiae aldo-keto reductase is a monomeric NADPH-specific reductase with strong similarities to the aldose reductases. PMID:7747971

  20. Proteome-wide quantitative multiplexed profiling of protein expression: carbon-source dependency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Joao A; O'Connell, Jeremy D; Gaun, Aleksandr; Gygi, Steven P

    2015-11-01

    The global proteomic alterations in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to differences in carbon sources can be comprehensively examined using mass spectrometry-based multiplexing strategies. In this study, we investigate changes in the S. cerevisiae proteome resulting from cultures grown in minimal media using galactose, glucose, or raffinose as the carbon source. We used a tandem mass tag 9-plex strategy to determine alterations in relative protein abundance due to a particular carbon source, in triplicate, thereby permitting subsequent statistical analyses. We quantified more than 4700 proteins across all nine samples; 1003 proteins demonstrated statistically significant differences in abundance in at least one condition. The majority of altered proteins were classified as functioning in metabolic processes and as having cellular origins of plasma membrane and mitochondria. In contrast, proteins remaining relatively unchanged in abundance included those having nucleic acid-related processes, such as transcription and RNA processing. In addition, the comprehensiveness of the data set enabled the analysis of subsets of functionally related proteins, such as phosphatases, kinases, and transcription factors. As a resource, these data can be mined further in efforts to understand better the roles of carbon source fermentation in yeast metabolic pathways and the alterations observed therein, potentially for industrial applications, such as biofuel feedstock production. PMID:26399295

  1. Metabolic Flux Analysis during the Exponential Growth Phase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Wine Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Quirós, Manuel; Martínez-Moreno, Rubén; Albiol, Joan; Morales, Pilar; Vázquez-Lima, Felícitas; Barreiro-Vázquez, Antonio; Ferrer, Pau; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of the increase in global average temperature, grapes with the adequate phenolic and aromatic maturity tend to be overripe by the time of harvest, resulting in increased sugar concentrations and imbalanced C/N ratios in fermenting musts. This fact sets obvious additional hurdles in the challenge of obtaining wines with reduced alcohols levels, a new trend in consumer demands. It would therefore be interesting to understand Saccharomyces cerevisiae physiology during the fermentation of must with these altered characteristics. The present study aims to determine the distribution of metabolic fluxes during the yeast exponential growth phase, when both carbon and nitrogen sources are in excess, using continuous cultures. Two different sugar concentrations were studied under two different winemaking temperature conditions. Although consumption and production rates for key metabolites were severely affected by the different experimental conditions studied, the general distribution of fluxes in central carbon metabolism was basically conserved in all cases. It was also observed that temperature and sugar concentration exerted a higher effect on the pentose phosphate pathway and glycerol formation than on glycolysis and ethanol production. Additionally, nitrogen uptake, both quantitatively and qualitatively, was strongly influenced by environmental conditions. This work provides the most complete stoichiometric model used for Metabolic Flux Analysis of S. cerevisiae in wine fermentations employed so far, including the synthesis and release of relevant aroma compounds and could be used in the design of optimal nitrogen supplementation of wine fermentations. PMID:23967264

  2. Calorie restriction does not elicit a robust extension of replicative lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Huberts, Daphne H E W; González, Javier; Lee, Sung Sik; Litsios, Athanasios; Hubmann, Georg; Wit, Ernst C; Heinemann, Matthias

    2014-08-12

    Calorie restriction (CR) is often described as the most robust manner to extend lifespan in a large variety of organisms. Hence, considerable research effort is directed toward understanding the mechanisms underlying CR, especially in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the effect of CR on lifespan has never been systematically reviewed in this organism. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of replicative lifespan (RLS) data published in more than 40 different papers. Our analysis revealed that there is significant variation in the reported RLS data, which appears to be mainly due to the low number of cells analyzed per experiment. Furthermore, we found that the RLS measured at 2% (wt/vol) glucose in CR experiments is partly biased toward shorter lifespans compared with identical lifespan measurements from other studies. Excluding the 2% (wt/vol) glucose experiments from CR experiments, we determined that the average RLS of the yeast strains BY4741 and BY4742 is 25.9 buds at 2% (wt/vol) glucose and 30.2 buds under CR conditions. RLS measurements with a microfluidic dissection platform produced identical RLS data at 2% (wt/vol) glucose. However, CR conditions did not induce lifespan extension. As we excluded obvious methodological differences, such as temperature and medium, as causes, we conclude that subtle method-specific factors are crucial to induce lifespan extension under CR conditions in S. cerevisiae. PMID:25071164

  3. Novel role for a Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleoporin, Nup170p, in chromosome segregation.

    PubMed Central

    Kerscher, O; Hieter, P; Winey, M; Basrai, M A

    2001-01-01

    We determined that a mutation in the nucleoporin gene NUP170 leads to defects in chromosome transmission fidelity (ctf) and kinetochore integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A ctf mutant strain, termed s141, shows a transcription readthrough phenotype and stabilizes a dicentric chromosome fragment in two assays for kinetochore integrity. Previously, these assays led to the identification of two essential kinetochore components, Ctf13p and Ctf14p. Thus, s141 represents another ctf mutant involved in the maintenance of kinetochore integrity. We cloned and mapped the gene complementing the ctf mutation of s141 and showed that it is identical to the S. cerevisiae NUP170 gene. A deletion strain of NUP170 (nup170 Delta::HIS3) has a Ctf(-) phenotype similar to the s141 mutant (nup170-141) and also exhibits a kinetochore integrity defect. We identified a second nucleoporin, NUP157, a homologue of NUP170, as a suppressor of the Ctf(-) phenotype of nup170-141 and nup170 Delta::HIS3 strains. However, a deletion of NUP157 or several other nucleoporins did not affect chromosome segregation. Our data suggest that NUP170 encodes a specialized nucleoporin with a unique role in chromosome segregation and possibly kinetochore function. PMID:11290711

  4. Proteome-wide quantitative multiplexed profiling of protein expression: carbon-source dependency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; O’Connell, Jeremy D.; Gaun, Aleksandr; Gygi, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    The global proteomic alterations in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to differences in carbon sources can be comprehensively examined using mass spectrometry–based multiplexing strategies. In this study, we investigate changes in the S. cerevisiae proteome resulting from cultures grown in minimal media using galactose, glucose, or raffinose as the carbon source. We used a tandem mass tag 9-plex strategy to determine alterations in relative protein abundance due to a particular carbon source, in triplicate, thereby permitting subsequent statistical analyses. We quantified more than 4700 proteins across all nine samples; 1003 proteins demonstrated statistically significant differences in abundance in at least one condition. The majority of altered proteins were classified as functioning in metabolic processes and as having cellular origins of plasma membrane and mitochondria. In contrast, proteins remaining relatively unchanged in abundance included those having nucleic acid–related processes, such as transcription and RNA processing. In addition, the comprehensiveness of the data set enabled the analysis of subsets of functionally related proteins, such as phosphatases, kinases, and transcription factors. As a resource, these data can be mined further in efforts to understand better the roles of carbon source fermentation in yeast metabolic pathways and the alterations observed therein, potentially for industrial applications, such as biofuel feedstock production. PMID:26399295

  5. Recombinant Production of Human Aquaporin-1 to an Exceptional High Membrane Density in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bomholt, Julie; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus; Scharff-Poulsen, Peter; Pedersen, Per Amstrup

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper we explored the capacity of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as host for heterologous expression of human Aquaporin-1. Aquaporin-1 cDNA was expressed from a galactose inducible promoter situated on a plasmid with an adjustable copy number. Human Aquaporin-1 was C-terminally tagged with yeast enhanced GFP for quantification of functional expression, determination of sub-cellular localization, estimation of in vivo folding efficiency and establishment of a purification protocol. Aquaporin-1 was found to constitute 8.5 percent of total membrane protein content after expression at 15°C in a yeast host over-producing the Gal4p transcriptional activator and growth in amino acid supplemented minimal medium. In-gel fluorescence combined with western blotting showed that low accumulation of correctly folded recombinant Aquaporin-1 at 30°C was due to in vivo mal-folding. Reduction of the expression temperature to 15°C almost completely prevented Aquaporin-1 mal-folding. Bioimaging of live yeast cells revealed that recombinant Aquaporin-1 accumulated in the yeast plasma membrane. A detergent screen for solubilization revealed that CYMAL-5 was superior in solubilizing recombinant Aquaporin-1 and generated a monodisperse protein preparation. A single Ni-affinity chromatography step was used to obtain almost pure Aquaporin-1. Recombinant Aquaporin-1 produced in S. cerevisiae was not N-glycosylated in contrast to the protein found in human erythrocytes. PMID:23409185

  6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression changes during rotating wall vessel suspension culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johanson, Kelly; Allen, Patricia L.; Lewis, Fawn; Cubano, Luis A.; Hyman, Linda E.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2002-01-01

    This study utilizes Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study genetic responses to suspension culture. The suspension culture system used in this study is the high-aspect-ratio vessel, one type of the rotating wall vessel, that provides a high rate of gas exchange necessary for rapidly dividing cells. Cells were grown in the high-aspect-ratio vessel, and DNA microarray and metabolic analyses were used to determine the resulting changes in yeast gene expression. A significant number of genes were found to be up- or downregulated by at least twofold as a result of rotational growth. By using Gibbs promoter alignment, clusters of genes were examined for promoter elements mediating these genetic changes. Candidate binding motifs similar to the Rap1p binding site and the stress-responsive element were identified in the promoter regions of differentially regulated genes. This study shows that, as in higher order organisms, S. cerevisiae changes gene expression in response to rotational culture and also provides clues for investigations into the signaling pathways involved in gravitational response.

  7. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of HMO2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Zhang, Shaocheng; Zhang, Hongpeng; Jin, Li; Zhao, Shasha; Yang, Wei; Tang, Jian; Wang, Deqiang

    2014-01-01

    The high-mobility group protein (HMO2) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a component of the chromatin-remodelling complex INO80, which is involved in double-strand break (DSB) repair. HMO2 can also bind DNA to protect it from exonucleolytic cleavage. Nevertheless, little structural information is available regarding these functions of HMO2. Since determination of three-dimensional structure is a powerful means to facilitate functional characterization, X-ray crystallography has been used to accomplish this task. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of HMO2 from S. cerevisiae are reported. The crystal belonged to space group P222, with unit-cell parameters a = 39.35, b = 75.69, c = 108.03 Å, and diffracted to a resolution of 3.0 Å. The crystals are most likely to contain one molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a VM value of 3.19 Å(3) Da(-1). PMID:24419618

  8. Outlining a future for non-Saccharomyces yeasts: selection of putative spoilage wine strains to be used in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape juice fermentation.

    PubMed

    Domizio, Paola; Romani, Cristina; Lencioni, Livio; Comitini, Francesca; Gobbi, Mirko; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Ciani, Maurizio

    2011-06-30

    The use of non-Saccharomyces yeasts that are generally considered as spoilage yeasts, in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape must fermentation was here evaluated. Analysis of the main oenological characteristics of pure cultures of 55 yeasts belonging to the genera Hanseniaspora, Pichia, Saccharomycodes and Zygosaccharomyces revealed wide biodiversity within each genus. Moreover, many of these non-Saccharomyces strains had interesting oenological properties in terms of fermentation purity, and ethanol and secondary metabolite production. The use of four non-Saccharomyces yeasts (one per genus) in mixed cultures with a commercial S. cerevisiae strain at different S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratios was investigated. This revealed that most of the compounds normally produced at high concentrations by pure cultures of non-Saccharomyces, and which are considered detrimental to wine quality, do not reach threshold taste levels in these mixed fermentations. On the other hand, the analytical profiles of the wines produced by these mixed cultures indicated that depending on the yeast species and the S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratio, these non-Saccharomyces yeasts can be used to increase production of polysaccharides and to modulate the final concentrations of acetic acid and volatile compounds, such as ethyl acetate, phenyl-ethyl acetate, 2-phenyl ethanol, and 2-methyl 1-butanol. PMID:21531033

  9. Cholesterol-Lowering Effect of Beta Glucan Extracted from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kusmiati; Dhewantara, F. X. Rizky

    2016-01-01

    Glucans are present in fungi, plants, algae, and bacteria. β-Glucan, one of the major cell wall components of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been found to enhance immune functions. Glucans are glucose polymers with an α- or β-type glycosidic chain. The role of (1→3)-β-D-glucan is in the maintenance of yeast cell wall shape and rigidity. Studies reveal that soluble glucans can lower total cholesterol and LDL levels in patients with hypercholesterolemia. The important benefit of β-glucan is to improve the immune system and to decrease cholesterol levels in the blood. Several studies have reported the benefits of β-glucan as: antiseptic, antioxidant, anti-aging, immune system activators, protection against radiation, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, anti-cholesterol etc. In this research S. cerevisiae was cultured in yeast extract–peptone–glucose (YPG) broth medium to produce beta-glucan. Cells were harvested at the stationary phase, washed, and disrupted by means of sonication method. The obtained cell walls were used to prepare alkali-soluble β-glucan (glucan-S1). In this regard, 2% sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and 3% acetic acid were used in alkaline–acid extraction, respectively. Potential use of beta-glucan extract as an anticholesterol agent was tested using Sprague dawley strain rats. The experiments were divided into eight groups with four replicates: Group I (normal control), group II (fed with cholesterol without beta-glucan), group III (fed with cholesterol + atorvastatin), group IV (fed with cholesterol + β-glucan standard), group V–VIII (fed of cholesterol + β-glucan of S. cerevisiae with each dose of 10, 20, 30, and 40 mg / BW. Rats were fed with cholesterol for 14 days, except for group I. Analysis of blood was carried out to determine total cholesterol, triglycerides, and malondialdehyde. The results showed that beta-glucan crude obtained from S. cerevisiae cultures was 6.890g.L−1. Βeta-glucan extract of S. cerevisiae can reduce total

  10. Cholesterol-Lowering Effect of Beta Glucan Extracted from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kusmiati; Dhewantara, F X Rizky

    2016-01-01

    Glucans are present in fungi, plants, algae, and bacteria. β-Glucan, one of the major cell wall components of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been found to enhance immune functions. Glucans are glucose polymers with an α- or β-type glycosidic chain. The role of (1→3)-β-D-glucan is in the maintenance of yeast cell wall shape and rigidity. Studies reveal that soluble glucans can lower total cholesterol and LDL levels in patients with hypercholesterolemia. The important benefit of β-glucan is to improve the immune system and to decrease cholesterol levels in the blood. Several studies have reported the benefits of β-glucan as: antiseptic, antioxidant, anti-aging, immune system activators, protection against radiation, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, anti-cholesterol etc. In this research S. cerevisiae was cultured in yeast extract-peptone-glucose (YPG) broth medium to produce beta-glucan. Cells were harvested at the stationary phase, washed, and disrupted by means of sonication method. The obtained cell walls were used to prepare alkali-soluble β-glucan (glucan-S1). In this regard, 2% sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and 3% acetic acid were used in alkaline-acid extraction, respectively. Potential use of beta-glucan extract as an anticholesterol agent was tested using Sprague dawley strain rats. The experiments were divided into eight groups with four replicates: Group I (normal control), group II (fed with cholesterol without beta-glucan), group III (fed with cholesterol + atorvastatin), group IV (fed with cholesterol + β-glucan standard), group V-VIII (fed of cholesterol + β-glucan of S. cerevisiae with each dose of 10, 20, 30, and 40 mg / BW. Rats were fed with cholesterol for 14 days, except for group I. Analysis of blood was carried out to determine total cholesterol, triglycerides, and malondialdehyde. The results showed that beta-glucan crude obtained from S. cerevisiae cultures was 6.890g.L(-1). Βeta-glucan extract of S. cerevisiae can reduce total

  11. Sporulation in soil as an overwinter survival strategy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Knight, Sarah J; Goddard, Matthew R

    2016-02-01

    Due to its commercial value and status as a research model there is an extensive body of knowledge concerning Saccharomyces cerevisiae's cell biology and genetics. Investigations into S. cerevisiae's ecology are comparatively lacking, and are mostly focused on the behaviour of this species in high sugar, fruit-based environments; however, fruit is ephemeral, and presumably, S. cerevisiae has evolved a strategy to survive when this niche is not available. Among other places, S. cerevisiae has been isolated from soil which, in contrast to fruit, is a permanent habitat. We hypothesize that S. cerevisiae employs a life history strategy targeted at self-preservation rather than growth outside of the fruit niche, and resides in forest niches, such as soil, in a dormant and resistant sporulated state, returning to fruit via vectors such as insects. One crucial aspect of this hypothesis is that S. cerevisiae must be able to sporulate in the 'forest' environment. Here, we provide the first evidence for a natural environment (soil) where S. cerevisiae sporulates. While there are further aspects of this hypothesis that require experimental verification, this is the first step towards an inclusive understanding of the more cryptic aspects of S. cerevisiae's ecology. PMID:26568201

  12. Ecological Success of a Group of Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Saccharomyces kudriavzevii Hybrids in the Northern European Wine-Making Environment

    PubMed Central

    Erny, C.; Raoult, P.; Alais, A.; Butterlin, G.; Delobel, P.; Matei-Radoi, F.; Casaregola, S.

    2012-01-01

    The hybrid nature of lager-brewing yeast strains has been known for 25 years; however, yeast hybrids have only recently been described in cider and wine fermentations. In this study, we characterized the hybrid genomes and the relatedness of the Eg8 industrial yeast strain and of 24 Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Saccharomyces kudriavzevii hybrid yeast strains used for wine making in France (Alsace), Germany, Hungary, and the United States. An array-based comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) profile of the Eg8 genome revealed a typical chimeric profile. Measurement of hybrids DNA content per cell by flow cytometry revealed multiple ploidy levels (2n, 3n, or 4n), and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 22 genes indicated variable amounts of S. kudriavzevii genetic content in three representative strains. We developed microsatellite markers for S. kudriavzevii and used them to analyze the diversity of a population isolated from oaks in Ardèche (France). This analysis revealed new insights into the diversity of this species. We then analyzed the diversity of the wine hybrids for 12 S. cerevisiae and 7 S. kudriavzevii microsatellite loci and found that these strains are the products of multiple hybridization events between several S. cerevisiae wine yeast isolates and various S. kudriavzevii strains. The Eg8 lineage appeared remarkable, since it harbors strains found over a wide geographic area, and the interstrain divergence measured with a (δμ)2 genetic distance indicates an ancient origin. These findings reflect the specific adaptations made by S. cerevisiae/S. kudriavzevii cryophilic hybrids to winery environments in cool climates. PMID:22344648

  13. Ecological success of a group of Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Saccharomyces kudriavzevii hybrids in the northern european wine-making environment.

    PubMed

    Erny, C; Raoult, P; Alais, A; Butterlin, G; Delobel, P; Matei-Radoi, F; Casaregola, S; Legras, J L

    2012-05-01

    The hybrid nature of lager-brewing yeast strains has been known for 25 years; however, yeast hybrids have only recently been described in cider and wine fermentations. In this study, we characterized the hybrid genomes and the relatedness of the Eg8 industrial yeast strain and of 24 Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Saccharomyces kudriavzevii hybrid yeast strains used for wine making in France (Alsace), Germany, Hungary, and the United States. An array-based comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) profile of the Eg8 genome revealed a typical chimeric profile. Measurement of hybrids DNA content per cell by flow cytometry revealed multiple ploidy levels (2n, 3n, or 4n), and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 22 genes indicated variable amounts of S. kudriavzevii genetic content in three representative strains. We developed microsatellite markers for S. kudriavzevii and used them to analyze the diversity of a population isolated from oaks in Ardèche (France). This analysis revealed new insights into the diversity of this species. We then analyzed the diversity of the wine hybrids for 12 S. cerevisiae and 7 S. kudriavzevii microsatellite loci and found that these strains are the products of multiple hybridization events between several S. cerevisiae wine yeast isolates and various S. kudriavzevii strains. The Eg8 lineage appeared remarkable, since it harbors strains found over a wide geographic area, and the interstrain divergence measured with a (δμ)(2) genetic distance indicates an ancient origin. These findings reflect the specific adaptations made by S. cerevisiae/S. kudriavzevii cryophilic hybrids to winery environments in cool climates. PMID:22344648

  14. Stress Tolerance Variations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains from Diverse Ecological Sources and Geographical Locations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yan-Lin; Wang, Shi-An

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a platform organism for bioethanol production from various feedstocks and robust strains are desirable for efficient fermentation because yeast cells inevitably encounter stressors during the process. Recently, diverse S. cerevisiae lineages were identified, which provided novel resources for understanding stress tolerance variations and related shaping factors in the yeast. This study characterized the tolerance of diverse S. cerevisiae strains to the stressors of high ethanol concentrations, temperature shocks, and osmotic stress. The results showed that the isolates from human-associated environments overall presented a higher level of stress tolerance compared with those from forests spared anthropogenic influences. Statistical analyses indicated that the variations of stress tolerance were significantly correlated with both ecological sources and geographical locations of the strains. This study provides guidelines for selection of robust S. cerevisiae strains for bioethanol production from nature. PMID:26244846

  15. Microbial Cells as Biosorbents for Heavy Metals: Accumulation of Uranium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, Gerald W.; Shumate, Starling E.; Parrott, John R.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium accumulated extracellularly on the surfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The rate and extent of accumulation were subject to environmental parameters, such as pH, temperature, and interference by certain anions and cations. Uranium accumulation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurred intracellularly and was extremely rapid (<10 s), and no response to environmental parameters could be detected. Metabolism was not required for metal uptake by either organism. Cell-bound uranium reached a concentration of 10 to 15% of the dry cell weight, but only 32% of the S. cerevisiae cells and 44% of the P. aeruginosa cells within a given population possessed visible uranium deposits when examined by electron microscopy. Rates of uranium uptake by S. cerevisiae were increased by chemical pretreatment of the cells. Uranium could be removed chemically from S. cerevisiae cells, and the cells could then be reused as a biosorbent. Images PMID:16345691

  16. Opportunistic Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Potential Risk Sold in Food Products.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Querol, Amparo

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, fungal infections have emerged as an important health problem associated with more people who present deficiencies in the immune system, such as HIV or transplanted patients. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the emerging fungal pathogens with a unique characteristic: its presence in many food products. S. cerevisiae has an impeccably good food safety record compared to other microorganisms like virus, bacteria and some filamentous fungi. However, humans unknowingly and inadvertently ingest large viable populations of S. cerevisiae (home-brewed beer or dietary supplements that contain yeast). In the last few years, researchers have studied the nature of S. cerevisiae strains and the molecular mechanisms related to infections. Here we review the last advance made in this emerging pathogen and we discuss the implication of using this species in food products. PMID:26779173

  17. Opportunistic Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Potential Risk Sold in Food Products

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Querol, Amparo

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, fungal infections have emerged as an important health problem associated with more people who present deficiencies in the immune system, such as HIV or transplanted patients. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the emerging fungal pathogens with a unique characteristic: its presence in many food products. S. cerevisiae has an impeccably good food safety record compared to other microorganisms like virus, bacteria and some filamentous fungi. However, humans unknowingly and inadvertently ingest large viable populations of S. cerevisiae (home-brewed beer or dietary supplements that contain yeast). In the last few years, researchers have studied the nature of S. cerevisiae strains and the molecular mechanisms related to infections. Here we review the last advance made in this emerging pathogen and we discuss the implication of using this species in food products. PMID:26779173

  18. Biosorption of uranium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and surface interactions under culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxue; Dong, Faqin; Yan, Xiuying; Zeng, Wenming; Hou, Liangyu; Pang, Xiaofeng

    2010-11-01

    Few studies have focused on biosorption by microorganisms under culture conditions. To explore the biosorption of uranium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under culture conditions, the S. cerevisiae growth curve, biosorption capacity and surface interaction under batch culture conditions were investigated in this study. The growth curve showed that uranium (<300mgL(-1)) did not markedly inhibit the growth of S. cerevisiae under short culture time. The maximum scavenging efficiency reached 92.4% under 6-10h culture conditions, and the adsorption quantity of S. cerevisiae increased with initial uranium concentration. Centrifuging and drying after biosorption caused the volume reduction ratio to reach 99%. Scanning electron microscope results demonstrated that uranium interacted with yeast cell surfaces, as well as culture medium, and produced uranium precipitate on cell surfaces. Fourier transformed infrared spectra revealed that cell walls were the major sorption sites, and -O--H, -C==O and -PO(2-) contributed to the major binding groups. PMID:20599379

  19. Investigation of fatty acid accumulation in the engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae under nitrogen limited culture condition.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoling; Chen, Wei Ning

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild type strain and engineered strain with an overexpressed heterologous ATP-citrate lyase (acl) were cultured in medium with different carbon and nitrogen concentrations, and their fatty acid production levels were investigated. The results showed that when the S. cerevisiae engineered strain was cultivated under nitrogen limited culture condition, the yield of mono-unsaturated fatty acids showed higher than that under non-nitrogen limited condition; with the carbon concentration increased, the accumulation become more apparent, whereas in the wild type strain, no such correlation was found. Besides, the citrate level in the S. cerevisiae under nitrogen limited condition was found to be much higher than that under non-nitrogen limited condition, which indicated a relationship between the diminution of nitrogen and accumulation of citrate in the S. cerevisiae. The accumulated citrate could be further cleaved by acl to provide substrate for fatty acid synthesis. PMID:24755317

  20. Stress Tolerance Variations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains from Diverse Ecological Sources and Geographical Locations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan-Lin; Wang, Shi-An

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a platform organism for bioethanol production from various feedstocks and robust strains are desirable for efficient fermentation because yeast cells inevitably encounter stressors during the process. Recently, diverse S. cerevisiae lineages were identified, which provided novel resources for understanding stress tolerance variations and related shaping factors in the yeast. This study characterized the tolerance of diverse S. cerevisiae strains to the stressors of high ethanol concentrations, temperature shocks, and osmotic stress. The results showed that the isolates from human-associated environments overall presented a higher level of stress tolerance compared with those from forests spared anthropogenic influences. Statistical analyses indicated that the variations of stress tolerance were significantly correlated with both ecological sources and geographical locations of the strains. This study provides guidelines for selection of robust S. cerevisiae strains for bioethanol production from nature. PMID:26244846

  1. Automated Yeast Mating Protocol Using Open Reading Frames from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genome to Improve Yeast Strains for Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Engineering the industrial ethanologen Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize pentose sugars from lignocellulosic biomass is critical for commercializing cellulosic fuel ethanol production. Approaches to engineer pentose-fermenting yeasts have required expression of additional genes. We implemented a...

  2. Multiple gene mediated aldehyde reduction is a mechanism of in situ detoxification of furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furfural and HMF (5-hydroxymethylfurfural) are representative inhibitors to ethanologenic yeast generated from biomass pretreatment using dilute acid hydrolysis. Few yeast strains tolerant to inhibitors are available. We have developed tolerant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with enhanced bio...

  3. A dynamic flux balance model and bottleneck identification of glucose, xylose, xylulose co-fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Economically viable production of lignocellulosic ethanol requires efficient conversion of feedstock sugars to ethanol. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot ferment xylose, the main five-carbon sugars in biomass, but can ferment xylulose, an enzymatically derived isomer. Xylulose fermentation is slow rel...

  4. WW domains of Rsp5p define different functions: determination of roles in fluid phase and uracil permease endocytosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, B; Kamińska, J; Jesionowska, A; Martin, N C; Hopper, A K; Zoładek, T

    2001-01-01

    Rsp5p, ubiquitin-protein ligase, an enzyme of the ubiquitination pathway, contains three WW domains that mediate protein-protein interactions. To determine if these domains adapt Rsp5p to a subset of substrates involved in numerous cellular processes, we generated mutations in individual or combinations of the WW domains. The rsp5-w1, rsp5-w2, and rsp5-w3 mutant alleles complement RSP5 deletions at 30 degrees. Thus, individual WW domains are not essential. Each rsp5-w mutation caused temperature-sensitive growth. Among variants with mutations in multiple WW domains, only rsp5-w1w2 complemented the deletion. Thus, the WW3 domain is sufficient for Rsp5p essential functions. To determine whether rsp5-w mutations affect endocytosis, fluid phase and uracil permease (Fur4p) endocytosis was examined. The WW3 domain is important for both processes. WW2 appears not to be important for fluid phase endocytosis whereas it is important for Fur4p endocytosis. In contrast, the WW1 domain affects fluid phase endocytosis, but it does not appear to function in Fur4p endocytosis. Thus, various WW domains play different roles in the endocytosis of these two substrates. Rsp5p is located in the cytoplasm in a punctate pattern that does not change during the cell cycle. Altering WW domains does not change the location of Rsp5p. PMID:11139494

  5. Fumaric Acid Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by In Silico Aided Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guoqiang; Zou, Wei; Chen, Xiulai; Xu, Nan; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Fumaric acid (FA) is a promising biomass-derived building-block chemical. Bio-based FA production from renewable feedstock is a promising and sustainable alternative to petroleum-based chemical synthesis. Here we report on FA production by direct fermentation using metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the aid of in silico analysis of a genome-scale metabolic model. First, FUM1 was selected as the target gene on the basis of extensive literature mining. Flux balance analysis (FBA) revealed that FUM1 deletion can lead to FA production and slightly lower growth of S. cerevisiae. The engineered S. cerevisiae strain obtained by deleting FUM1 can produce FA up to a concentration of 610±31 mg L–1 without any apparent change in growth in fed-batch culture. FT-IR and 1H and 13C NMR spectra confirmed that FA was synthesized by the engineered S. cerevisiae strain. FBA identified pyruvate carboxylase as one of the factors limiting higher FA production. When the RoPYC gene was introduced, S. cerevisiae produced 1134±48 mg L–1 FA. Furthermore, the final engineered S. cerevisiae strain was able to produce 1675±52 mg L–1 FA in batch culture when the SFC1 gene encoding a succinate–fumarate transporter was introduced. These results demonstrate that the model shows great predictive capability for metabolic engineering. Moreover, FA production in S. cerevisiae can be efficiently developed with the aid of in silico metabolic engineering. PMID:23300594

  6. Characterization of antimicrobial activity of the lysosomes isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jihee; Park, Jae-Min; Jung, Seung-Ki; Kim, Keun-Young; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2009-07-01

    The antimicrobial activity of lysosomes, a cell organelle, against a range of test microorganisms was examined in this study. The lysosomes isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed antimicrobial activity to Escherichia coli that positively correlated with the pH of the phosphate buffer as a dissolving solvent. The lysosomes from S. cerevisiae exhibited optimal activity at a concentration of 40%, at pH 4.0 of phosphate buffer, and at broad range temperature, except of over 50 degrees C. It was also found that the lysosomes have antimicrobial activity against seven different microorganisms including E. coli. In addition, S. cerevisiae were exposed by a treatment with H(2)O(2) and lysosomes were isolated from H(2)O(2) exposed S. cerevisiae. We found that fluorescent intensities of each isolated lysosomes were increased depending on the increment of treated H(2)O(2) concentration, and the lysosomes from 20 mM H(2)O(2) treated S. cerevisiae showed higher antimicrobial activity than those from normal S. cerevisiae. Therefore, it suggests that lysosomes isolated from S. cerevisiae can be used as an antimicrobial agent. In addition, lysosomes activated by H(2)O(2) enhanced its antimicrobial activity. PMID:19319596

  7. Exposure to the lampricide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol results in increased expression of carbohydrate transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hinkle, Karen L; Anderson, Chad C; Forkey, Blake; Griffin, Jacob; Cone, Kelsey; Vitzthum, Carl; Olsen, Darlene

    2016-07-01

    The lampricide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) is used to control sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) populations in freshwater lakes. Although TFM can have sublethal and lethal effects, little is known about gene expression changes with TFM exposure. Microarray analysis was used to determine differential gene expression over 4 h of exposure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Among the most significantly up-regulated genes were regulators of carbohydrate transport, including HXT1, HXT3, HXT4, IMA5, MIG2, and YKR075C. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1727-1732. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26606276

  8. Bioconversion of lactose/whey to fructose diphosphate with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells

    SciTech Connect

    Compagno, C.; Tura, A.; Ranzi, B.M.; Martegani, E. )

    1993-07-01

    Genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that express Escherichia coli [beta]-galactosidase gene are able to bioconvert lactose or whey into fructose-1,6-diphosphate (FDP). High FDP yields from whey were obtained with an appropriate ratio between cell concentration and inorganic phosphate. The biomass of transformed cells can be obtained from different carbon sources, according to the expression vector bearing the lacZ gene. The authors showed that whey can be used as the carbon source for S. cerevisiae growth and as the substrate for bioconversion to fructose diphosphate.

  9. Advances in metabolic engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Borodina, Irina; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial host for production of enzymes, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and recently also commodity chemicals and biofuels. Here, we review the advances in modeling and synthetic biology tools and how these tools can speed up the development of yeast cell factories. We also present an overview of metabolic engineering strategies for developing yeast strains for production of polymer monomers: lactic, succinic, and cis,cis-muconic acids. S. cerevisiae has already firmly established itself as a cell factory in industrial biotechnology and the advances in yeast strain engineering will stimulate development of novel yeast-based processes for chemicals production. PMID:24677744

  10. Expression of the Escherichia coli xylose isomerase gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Sarthy, A.V.; McConaughy, B.L.; Lobo, Z.; Sundstrom, J.A.; Furlong, C.E.; Hall, B.D.

    1987-09-01

    Transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by yeast expression plasmids bearing the Escherichia coli xylose isomerase gene leads to production of the protein. Western blotting experiments show that immunoreactive protein chains which comigrate with the E. coli enzyme are made in the transformant strains and that the amount produced parallels the copy number of the plasmid. When comparable amounts of immunologically cross-reactive xylose isomerase protein made in E. coli or S. cerevisiae were assayed for enzymatic activity, however, the yeast protein was at least 10/sup 3/-fold less active.

  11. The GDI1 genes from Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris: cloning and functional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brummer, M H; Richard, P; Sundqvist, L; Väänänen, R; Keränen, S

    2001-07-01

    The nucleotide sequences of 2.8 kb and 2.9 kb fragments containing the Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris GDI1 genes, respectively, were determined. K. lactis GDI1 was found during sequencing of a genomic library clone, whereas the P. pastoris GDI1 was obtained from a genomic library by complementing a Saccharomyces cerevisiae sec19-1 mutant strain. The sequenced DNA fragments contain open reading frames of 1338 bp (K.lactis) and 1344 bp (P. pastoris), coding for polypeptides of 445 and 447 residues, respectively. Both sequences fully complement the S. cerevisiae sec19-1 mutation. They have high degrees of homology with known GDP dissociation inhibitors from yeast species and other eukaryotes. PMID:11447595

  12. Finding of thiosulfate pathway for synthesis of organic sulfur compounds in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and improvement of ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Eri; Saiki, Kyohei; Honda, Kurara; Sugiura, Yuki; Kawano, Yusuke; Ohtsu, Iwao; Watanabe, Daisuke; Wakabayashi, Yukari; Abe, Tetsuya; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Suematsu, Makoto; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    We found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae utilizes thiosulfate as a sole sulfur source. The energetically-favored thiosulfate rather than sulfate as sulfur sources is also more effective for improving growth and ethanol-production rate in S. cerevisiae due to high levels of intracellular NADPH during thiosulfate utilization. PMID:26188417

  13. Integrated phospholipidomics and transcriptomics analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with enhanced tolerance to a mixture of acetic acid, furfural, and phenol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A mixture of acetic acid, furfural and phenol (AFP), three representative lignocellulose derived inhibitors, significantly inhibited the growth and bioethanol production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In order to uncover mechanisms behind the enhanced tolerance of an inhibitor-tolerant S.cerevisiae s...

  14. Germination of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ascospores without trehalose mobilization as revealed by in vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Donnini, C; Puglisi, P P; Vecli, A; Marmiroli, N

    1988-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae ascospores germinate in the presence of acetate without any detectable trehalose degradation, as revealed by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by a standard colorimetric assay. The results presented here substantiate the hypothesis that in S. cerevisiae trehalose supplies energy during dormancy of the spores and not during the germination process. PMID:3042762

  15. A comprehensive web resource on RNA helicases from the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Linder, P; Gasteiger, E; Bairoch, A

    2000-04-01

    Members of the RNA helicase protein family are defined by several motifs that have been widely conserved during evolution. They are found in all organisms-from bacteria to humans-and many viruses. The minimum number of RNA helicases present within a eukaryotic cell can be predicted from the complete sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. Recent progress in the functional analysis of various family members has confirmed the significance of RNA helicases for most cellular RNA metabolic processes. We have assembled a web resource that focuses on RNA helicases from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It includes descriptions of RNA helicases and their functions, links to sequence- and yeast-specific databases, an extensive list of references, and links to non-yeast helicase web resources. PMID:10790687

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae boulardii transient fungemia after intravenous self-inoculation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lola; Ranque, Stéphane; Raoult, Didier

    2013-02-14

    We report the case of a young psychotic intravenous drug user injecting herself with Saccharomyces cervisiae (boulardii). She experienced a 24 h fever, resolving spontaneously confirming, quasi experimentally, the inocuity of this yeast in a non-immunocompromised host. PMID:24432219

  17. A coniferyl aldehyde dehydrogenase gene from Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 enhances the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Adeboye, Peter Temitope; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The conversion of coniferyl aldehyde to cinnamic acids by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under aerobic growth conditions was previously observed. Bacteria such as Pseudomonas have been shown to harbor specialized enzymes for converting coniferyl aldehyde but no comparable enzymes have been identified in S. cerevisiae. CALDH from Pseudomonas was expressed in S. cerevisiae. An acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Ald5) was also hypothesized to be actively involved in the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic growth conditions in S. cerevisiae. In a second S. cerevisiae strain, the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD5) was deleted. A prototrophic control strain was also engineered. The engineered S. cerevisiae strains were cultivated in the presence of 1.1mM coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic condition in bioreactors. The results confirmed that expression of CALDH increased endogenous conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae and ALD5 is actively involved with the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae. PMID:27070284

  18. Fractionation of Phenolic Compounds Extracted from Propolis and Their Activity in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Petelinc, Tanja; Polak, Tomaž; Demšar, Lea; Jamnik, Polona

    2013-01-01

    We have here investigated the activities of Slovenian propolis extracts in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and identified the phenolic compounds that appear to contribute to these activities. We correlated changes in intracellular oxidation and cellular metabolic energy in these yeasts with the individual fractions of the propolis extracts obtained following solid-phase extraction. The most effective fraction was further investigated according to its phenolic compounds. PMID:23409133

  19. Analysis of Plasmid Deletion Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Yatsevich, E.; Stepanova, A.; Koltovaya, N.; Sprincova, A.

    2007-11-26

    The article is dedicated to the research of plasmid system YCpL2 with help of quantitative analysis of deletion formation. The cells of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were irradiated by {gamma}-ray with the flux of 0.7 Gy/min and energy of 1.3 MeV as well as heavy ion beam {sup 11}B with energy 32 MeV/n. The deletion of plasmid DNA has been analyzed by genetic and restriction analysis.

  20. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has distinct adaptive responses to both hydrogen peroxide and menadione.

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, D J

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with low concentrations of either hydrogen peroxide or menadione (a superoxide-generating agent) induces adaptive responses which protect cells from the lethal effects of subsequent challenge with higher concentrations of these oxidants. Pretreatment with menadione is protective against cell killing by hydrogen peroxide; however, pretreatment with hydrogen peroxide is unable to protect cells from subsequent challenge with menadione. This suggests that the adaptive responses to these two different oxidants may be distinct. PMID:1400218

  1. Analysis of Plasmid Deletion Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsevich, E.; Stepanova, A.; Sprincova, A.; Koltovaya, N.

    2007-11-01

    The article is dedicated to the research of plasmid system YCpL2 with help of quantitative analysis of deletion formation. The cells of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were irradiated by γ-ray with the flux of 0.7 Gy/min and energy of 1.3 MeV as well as heavy ion beam 11B with energy 32 MeV/n. The deletion of plasmid DNA has been analyzed by genetic and restriction analysis.

  2. A nuclear genetic lesion affecting Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial translation is complemented by a homologous Bacillus gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S I; Stange-Thomann, N; Martins, O; Hong, K W; Söll, D; Fox, T D

    1997-01-01

    A novel Bacillus gene was isolated and characterized. It encodes a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pet112p, a protein that has no characterized relative and is dispensable for cell viability but required for mitochondrial translation. Expression of the Bacillus protein in yeast, modified to ensure mitochondrial targeting, partially complemented the phenotype of the pet112-1 mutation, demonstrating a high degree of evolutionary conservation for this as yet unidentified component of translation. PMID:9287027

  3. Backbone and side chain NMR assignments for the ribosome assembly factor Nop6 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Jan Philip; Lioutikov, Anatoli; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Wöhnert, Jens

    2014-10-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nop6 protein is involved in the maturation of the small ribosomal subunit. It contains a central RNA binding domain and a predicted C-terminal coiled-coil domain. Here we report the almost complete (>90%) (1)H,(13)C,(15)N backbone and side chain NMR assignment of a 15 kDa Nop6 construct comprising the RNA binding and coiled-coil domains. PMID:23921755

  4. Unwinding RNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: DEAD-box proteins and related families.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, J; Kressler, D; Linder, P

    1999-05-01

    Members of the RNA-helicase family are defined by several evolutionary conserved motifs. They are found in all organisms - from bacteria to humans - and many viruses. The minimum number of RNA helicases present within a eukaryotic cell can be predicted from the complete sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. Recent progress in the functional analysis of various family members has given new insights into, and confirmed the significance of these proteins for, most cellular RNA metabolic processes. PMID:10322435

  5. Biosorption of water-soluble dyes on magnetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae subsp. uvarum cells.

    PubMed

    Safaríková, M; Ptácková, L; Kibriková, I; Safarík, I

    2005-05-01

    Brewer's yeast (bottom yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae subsp. uvarum) cells were magnetically modified using water based magnetic fluid stabilized with perchloric acid. Magnetically modified yeast cells efficiently adsorbed various water soluble dyes. The dyes adsorption can be described by the Langmuir adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity of the magnetic cells differed substantially for individual dyes; the highest value was found for aniline blue (approx. 220 mg per g of dried magnetic adsorbent). PMID:15811411

  6. Mutagenic Inverted Repeats Assisted Genome Engineering (MIRAGE) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: deletion of gal7.

    PubMed

    Nair, Nikhil U; Zhao, Huimin

    2012-01-01

    MIRAGE is a unique in vivo genome editing technique that exploits the inherent instability of inverted repeats (palindromes) in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome. As a technique able to quickly create deletions as well as precise point mutations, it is valuable in applications that require creation of designer strains of this yeast. In particular, it has various potential applications in metabolic engineering, systems biology, synthetic biology, and molecular genetics. PMID:22144353

  7. New amylolytic yeast strains for starch and dextrin fermentation. [Schwanniomyces alluvius, Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. diastaticus

    SciTech Connect

    Laluce, C.; Bertolini, M.C.; Ernandes, J.R. ); Martini, A.V.; Martini, A. )

    1988-10-01

    Yeast strains capable of fermenting starch and dextrin to ethanol were isolated from samples collected from Brazilian factories in which cassava flour is produced. Considerable alcohol production was observed for all the strains selected. One strain (DI-10) fermented starch rapidly and secreted 5 times as much amylolytic enzyme than that observed for Schwanniomyces alluvius UCD 54-83. This strain and three other similar isolates were classified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. diastaticus by morphological and physiological characteristics and molecular taxonomy.

  8. Anethole induces apoptotic cell death accompanied by reactive oxygen species production and DNA fragmentation in Aspergillus fumigatus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Tatsumi, Miki; Ogita, Akira; Kubo, Isao; Tanaka, Toshio

    2014-02-01

    trans-Anethole (anethole), a major component of anise oil, has a broad antimicrobial spectrum, and antimicrobial activity that is weaker than that of other antibiotics on the market. When combined with polygodial, nagilactone E, and n-dodecanol, anethole has been shown to possess significant synergistic antifungal activity against a budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and a human opportunistic pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans. However, the antifungal mechanism of anethole has not been completely determined. We found that anethole stimulated cell death of a human opportunistic pathogenic fungus, Aspergillus fumigatus, in addition to S. cerevisiae. The anethole-induced cell death was accompanied by reactive oxygen species production, metacaspase activation, and DNA fragmentation. Several mutants of S. cerevisiae, in which genes related to the apoptosis-initiating execution signals from mitochondria were deleted, were resistant to anethole. These results suggest that anethole-induced cell death could be explained by oxidative stress-dependent apoptosis via typical mitochondrial death cascades in fungi, including A. fumigatus and S. cerevisiae. PMID:24393541

  9. The effect of cryptolepine on the morphology and survival of Escherichia coli, Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sawer, I K; Berry, M I; Brown, M W; Ford, J L

    1995-09-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the indoloquinoline alkaloid, cryptolepine, isolated from Cryptolepis sanguinolenta (Fam. Periplocaceae) was determined against selected micro-organisms. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranges obtained, expressed as microgram ml-1, were: 5-10 for Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCPF 3139; 10-20 for S. cerevisiae NCPF 3178; 20-40 for Escherichia coli NCTC 10418; 40-80 for E. coli NCTC 11560, Candida albicans ATCC 10231 and C. tropicalis NCPF; and 80-160 for C. albicans NCPF 3242 and NCPF 3262. Biocidal effects were noted at concentrations 2-4 times those of the MIC of the alkaloid following challenge with 10(6) cfu ml-1 of micro-organisms. Time-kill studies showed a reduction in viable count from 10(6) to < 10 cfu ml-1 in 4 h in C. albicans ATCC 10231 exposed to 320 micrograms ml-1 of the agent; 3 log cycle reductions were recorded for the 6 h counts of E. coli NCTC 10418 and S. cerevisiae NCPF 3139 exposed to 40 micrograms ml-1 and 160 micrograms ml-1 of the alkaloid respectively. These results were consistent with findings using scanning electron microscopy. Exposure of cells to biocidal concentrations of cryptolepine produced filamentation prior to lysis in E. coli NCTC 10418 and extreme disturbance of surface structure, including partial and total collapse, followed by lysis in C. albicans ATCC 10231 and S. cerevisiae NCPF 3139. PMID:7592125

  10. Improved Acetic Acid Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Overexpression of the WHI2 Gene Identified through Inverse Metabolic Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingying; Stabryla, Lisa; Wei, Na

    2016-01-01

    Development of acetic acid-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for economically viable production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, but the goal remains a critical challenge due to limited information on effective genetic perturbation targets for improving acetic acid resistance in the yeast. This study employed a genomic-library-based inverse metabolic engineering approach to successfully identify a novel gene target, WHI2 (encoding a cytoplasmatic globular scaffold protein), which elicited improved acetic acid resistance in S. cerevisiae. Overexpression of WHI2 significantly improved glucose and/or xylose fermentation under acetic acid stress in engineered yeast. The WHI2-overexpressing strain had 5-times-higher specific ethanol productivity than the control in glucose fermentation with acetic acid. Analysis of the expression of WHI2 gene products (including protein and transcript) determined that acetic acid induced endogenous expression of Whi2 in S. cerevisiae. Meanwhile, the whi2Δ mutant strain had substantially higher susceptibility to acetic acid than the wild type, suggesting the important role of Whi2 in the acetic acid response in S. cerevisiae. Additionally, overexpression of WHI2 and of a cognate phosphatase gene, PSR1, had a synergistic effect in improving acetic acid resistance, suggesting that Whi2 might function in combination with Psr1 to elicit the acetic acid resistance mechanism. These results improve our understanding of the yeast response to acetic acid stress and provide a new strategy to breed acetic acid-resistant yeast strains for renewable biofuel production. PMID:26826231

  11. Inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae suspended in orange juice using high-intensity pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Elez-Martínez, Pedro; Escolà-Hernández, Joan; Soliva-Fortuny, Robert C; Martín-Belloso, Olga

    2004-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often associated with the spoilage of fruit juices. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed electric field (HIPEF) treatment on the survival of S. cerevisiae suspended in orange juice. Commercial heat-sterilized orange juice was inoculated with S. cerevisiae (CECT 1319) (10(8) CFU/ml) and then treated by HIPEFs. The effects of HIPEF parameters (electric field strength, treatment time, pulse polarity, frequency, and pulse width) were evaluated and compared to those of heat pasteurization (90 degrees C/min). In all of the HIPEF experiments, the temperature was kept below 39 degrees C. S. cerevisiae cell damage induced by HIPEF treatment was observed by electron microscopy. HIPEF treatment was effective for the inactivation of S. cerevisiae in orange juice at pasteurization levels. A maximum inactivation of a 5.1-log (CFU per milliliter) reduction was achieved after exposure of S. cerevisiae to HIPEFs for 1,000 micros (4-micros pulse width) at 35 kV/cm and 200 Hz in bipolar mode. Inactivation increased as both the field strength and treatment time increased. For the same electric field strength and treatment time, inactivation decreased when the frequency and pulse width were increased. Electric pulses applied in the bipolar mode were more effective than those in the monopolar mode for destroying S. cerevisiae. HIPEF processing inactivated S. cerevisiae in orange juice, and the extent of inactivation was similar to that obtained during thermal pasteurization. HIPEF treatments caused membrane damage and had a profound effect on the intracellular organization of S. cerevisiae. PMID:15553647

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Baker's Yeast, suppresses the growth of Ehrlich carcinoma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Ghoneum, Mamdooh; Badr El-Din, Nariman K; Noaman, Eman; Tolentino, Lucilene

    2008-04-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness and mechanisms of anti-tumor activity of Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in immunocompetent mice. Swiss albino mice were inoculated intramuscularly in the right thigh with Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma (EAC) cells. At day 8, mice bearing Solid Ehrlich Carcinoma tumor (SEC) were intratumorally (IT) injected with killed S. cerevisiae (10 x 10(6) and 20 x 10(6) cells) for 35 days. Histopathology of yeast-treated mice showed extensive tumor degeneration, apoptosis, and ischemic (coagulative) and liquefactive necrosis. These changes are associated with a tumor growth curve that demonstrates a significant antitumor response that peaked at 35 days. Yeast treatment (20 x 10(6) cells) three times a week resulted in a significant decrease in tumor volume (TV) (67.1%, P < 0.01) as compared to PBS-treated mice. The effect was determined to be dependent on dose and frequency. Yeast administered three and two times per week induced significant decrease in TV as early as 9 and 25 days post-treatment, respectively. Administration of yeast significantly enhanced the recruitment of leukocytes, including macrophages, into the tumors and triggered apoptosis in SEC cells as determined by flow cytometry (78.6%, P < 0.01) at 20 x 10(6) cells, as compared to PBS-treated mice (42.6%). In addition, yeast treatment elevated TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma plasma levels and lowered the elevated IL-10 levels. No adverse side effects from the yeast treatment were observed, including feeding/drinking cycle and life activity patterns. Indeed, yeast-treated mice showed significant final body weight gain (+21.5%, P < 0.01) at day 35. These data may have clinical implications for the treatment of solid cancer with yeast, which is known to be safe for human consumption. PMID:17891396

  13. The 2-oxoglutarate supply exerts significant control on the lysine synthesis flux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Héctor; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Rumjanek, Franklin D; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma

    2013-11-01

    To determine the extent to which the supply of the precursor 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) controls the synthesis of lysine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing exponentially in high glucose, top-down elasticity analysis was used. Three groups of reactions linked by 2-OG were defined. The 2-OG supply group comprised all metabolic steps leading to its formation, and the two 2-OG consumer groups comprised the enzymes and transporters involved in 2-OG transformation into lysine and glutamate and their further utilization for protein synthesis and storage. Various 2-OG steady-state concentrations that produced different fluxes to lysine and glutamate were attained using yeast mutants with increasing activities of Krebs cycle enzymes and decreased activities of Lys synthesis enzymes. The elasticity coefficients of the three enzyme groups were determined from the dependence of the amino acid fluxes on the 2-OG concentration. The respective degrees of control on the flux towards lysine (flux control coefficients) were determined from their elasticities, and were 1.1, 0.41 and -0.52 for the 2-OG producer group and the Lys and Glu branches, respectively. Thus, the predominant control exerted by the 2-OG supply on the rate of lysine synthesis suggests that over-expression of 2-OG producer enzymes may be a highly effective strategy to enhance Lys production. PMID:24034837

  14. Enhancing beta-carotene production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Sun, Zhiqiang; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yansheng

    2013-08-01

    Beta-carotene is known to exhibit a number of pharmacological and nutraceutical benefits to human health. Metabolic engineering of beta-carotene biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been attracting the interest of many researchers. A previous work has shown that S. cerevisiae successfully integrated with phytoene synthase (crtYB) and phytoene desaturase (crtI) from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous could produce beta-carotene. In the present study, we achieved around 200% improvement in beta-carotene production in S. cerevisiae through specific site optimization of crtI and crtYB, in which five codons of crtI and eight codons of crtYB were rationally mutated. Furthermore, the effects of the truncated HMG-CoA reductase (tHMG1) from S. cerevisiae and HMG-CoA reductase (mva) from Staphylococcus aureus on the production of beta-carotene in S. cerevisiae were also evaluated. Our results indicated that mva from a prokaryotic organism might be more effective than tHMG1 for beta-carotene production in S. cerevisiae. PMID:23718229

  15. Highly diverged homologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial mRNA-specific translational activators have orthologous functions in other budding yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Costanzo, M C; Bonnefoy, N; Williams, E H; Clark-Walker, G D; Fox, T D

    2000-01-01

    Translation of mitochondrially coded mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on membrane-bound mRNA-specific activator proteins, whose targets lie in the mRNA 5'-untranslated leaders (5'-UTLs). In at least some cases, the activators function to localize translation of hydrophobic proteins on the inner membrane and are rate limiting for gene expression. We searched unsuccessfully in divergent budding yeasts for orthologs of the COX2- and COX3-specific translational activator genes, PET111, PET54, PET122, and PET494, by direct complementation. However, by screening for complementation of mutations in genes adjacent to the PET genes in S. cerevisiae, we obtained chromosomal segments containing highly diverged homologs of PET111 and PET122 from Saccharomyces kluyveri and of PET111 from Kluyveromyces lactis. All three of these genes failed to function in S. cerevisiae. We also found that the 5'-UTLs of the COX2 and COX3 mRNAs of S. kluyveri and K. lactis have little similarity to each other or to those of S. cerevisiae. To determine whether the PET111 and PET122 homologs carry out orthologous functions, we deleted them from the S. kluyveri genome and deleted PET111 from the K. lactis genome. The pet111 mutations in both species prevented COX2 translation, and the S. kluyveri pet122 mutation prevented COX3 translation. Thus, while the sequences of these translational activator proteins and their 5'-UTL targets are highly diverged, their mRNA-specific functions are orthologous. PMID:10757749

  16. Expression of exoinulinase genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to improve ethanol production from inulin sources.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; Wang, Shi-An; Li, Fu-Li

    2013-10-01

    To improve inulin utilization and ethanol fermentation, exoinulinase genes from the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus and the recently identified yeast, Candida kutaonensis, were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae harboring the exoinulinase gene from C. kutaonensis gave higher ethanol yield and productivity from both inulin (0.38 vs. 0.34 g/g and 1.35 vs. 1.22 g l(-1) h(-1)) and Jerusalem artichoke tuber flour (0.47 vs. 0.46 g/g and 1.62 vs. 1.54 g l(-1) h(-1)) compared with the strain expressing the exoinulinase gene from K. marxianus. Thus, the exoinulinase gene from C. kutaonensis is advantageous for engineering S. cerevisiae to improve ethanol fermentation from inulin sources. PMID:23743955

  17. Two programmed replicative lifespans of Saccharomyces cerevisiae formed by the endogenous molecular-cellular network.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie; Zhu, Xiaomei; Wang, Xinan; Yuan, Ruoshi; Zheng, Wei; Xu, Minjuan; Ao, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Cellular replicative capacity is a therapeutic target for regenerative medicine as well as cancer treatment. The mechanism of replicative senescence and cell immortality is still unclear. We investigated the diauxic growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and demonstrate that the replicative capacity revealed by the yeast growth curve can be understood by using the dynamical property of the molecular-cellular network regulating S. cerevisiae. The endogenous network we proposed has a limit cycle when pheromone signaling is disabled, consistent with the exponential growth phase with an infinite replicative capacity. In the post-diauxic phase, the cooperative effect of the pheromone activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway with the cell cycle leads to a fixed point attractor instead of the limit cycle. The cells stop dividing after several generations counting from the beginning of the post-diauxic growth. By tuning the MAPK pathway, S. cerevisiae therefore programs the number of offsprings it replicates. PMID:24447585

  18. Parameter Optimization for Enhancement of Ethanol Yield by Atmospheric Pressure DBD-Treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Yulian; Tang, Qian; Dou, Shaohua; Di, Lanbo; Zhang, Xiuling

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) was exposed to dielectric barrier discharge plasma (DBD) to improve its ethanol production capacity during fermentation. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the discharge-associated parameters of DBD for the purpose of maximizing the ethanol yield achieved by DBD-treated S. cerevisiae. According to single factor experiments, a mathematical model was established using Box-Behnken central composite experiment design, with plasma exposure time, power supply voltage, and exposed-sample volume as impact factors and ethanol yield as the response. This was followed by response surface analysis. Optimal experimental parameters for plasma discharge-induced enhancement in ethanol yield were plasma exposure time of 1 min, power voltage of 26 V, and an exposed sample volume of 9 mL. Under these conditions, the resulting yield of ethanol was 0.48 g/g, representing an increase of 33% over control.

  19. Utilizing an endogenous pathway for 1-butanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Si, Tong; Luo, Yunzi; Xiao, Han; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-03-01

    Microbial production of higher alcohols from renewable feedstock has attracted intensive attention thanks to its potential as a source for next-generation gasoline substitutes. Here we report the discovery, characterization and engineering of an endogenous 1-butanol pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Upon introduction of a single gene deletion adh1Δ, S. cerevisiae was able to accumulate more than 120 mg/L 1-butanol from glucose in rich medium. Precursor feeding, ¹³C-isotope labeling and gene deletion experiments demonstrated that the endogenous 1-butanol production was dependent on catabolism of threonine in a manner similar to fusel alcohol production by the Ehrlich pathway. Specifically, the leucine biosynthesis pathway was engaged in the conversion of key 2-keto acid intermediates. Overexpression of the pathway enzymes and elimination of competing pathways achieved the highest reported 1-butanol titer in S. cerevisiae (242.8 mg/L). PMID:24412568

  20. Cellular and molecular engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for advanced biobutanol production.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Butanol is an attractive alternative energy fuel owing to several advantages over ethanol. Among the microbial hosts for biobutanol production, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a great potential as a microbial host due to its powerful genetic tools, a history of successful industrial use, and its inherent tolerance to higher alcohols. Butanol production by S. cerevisiae was first attempted by transferring the 1-butanol-producing metabolic pathway from native microorganisms or using the endogenous Ehrlich pathway for isobutanol synthesis. Utilizing alternative enzymes with higher activity, eliminating competitive pathways, and maintaining cofactor balance achieved significant improvements in butanol production. Meeting future challenges, such as enhancing butanol tolerance and implementing a comprehensive strategy by high-throughput screening, would further elevate the biobutanol-producing ability of S. cerevisiae toward an ideal microbial cell factory exhibiting high productivity of biobutanol. PMID:26712533

  1. Toxicity detection using lysosomal enzymes, glycoamylase and thioredoxin fused with fluorescent protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Tu; Shin, Hwa-Yoon; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2015-11-20

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the simplest and a favorite eukaryotic system that contains lysosome and thus, is a suitable organism for monitoring some toxic effects in environmental pollution. In this study, S. cerevisiae was transformed with two recombinant plasmids. Sporulation-specific glycoamylase (SGA1), which was upregulated in response to arsenic, was fused with the blue fluorescent protein (BFP) for the construction of an oxidative stress-causing chemicals sensor. Additionally, thioredoxin (TRX2), a protein overexpressed exclusively under tetracycline's influence, fused with the cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to create a detector for this kind of chemical. In summary, we developed two recombinant S. cerevisiae that facilitate the detection of both kinds of toxic chemicals, specifically visualized by different color indicators. PMID:26410455

  2. A Minimal Set of Glycolytic Genes Reveals Strong Redundancies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Central Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Solis-Escalante, Daniel; Kuijpers, Niels G. A.; Barrajon-Simancas, Nuria; van den Broek, Marcel; Pronk, Jack T.; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    As a result of ancestral whole-genome and small-scale duplication events, the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and many eukaryotes still contain a substantial fraction of duplicated genes. In all investigated organisms, metabolic pathways, and more particularly glycolysis, are specifically enriched for functionally redundant paralogs. In ancestors of the Saccharomyces lineage, the duplication of glycolytic genes is purported to have played an important role leading to S. cerevisiae's current lifestyle favoring fermentative metabolism even in the presence of oxygen and characterized by a high glycolytic capacity. In modern S. cerevisiae strains, the 12 glycolytic reactions leading to the biochemical conversion from glucose to ethanol are encoded by 27 paralogs. In order to experimentally explore the physiological role of this genetic redundancy, a yeast strain with a minimal set of 14 paralogs was constructed (the “minimal glycolysis” [MG] strain). Remarkably, a combination of a quantitative systems approach and semiquantitative analysis in a wide array of growth environments revealed the absence of a phenotypic response to the cumulative deletion of 13 glycolytic paralogs. This observation indicates that duplication of glycolytic genes is not a prerequisite for achieving the high glycolytic fluxes and fermentative capacities that are characteristic of S. cerevisiae and essential for many of its industrial applications and argues against gene dosage effects as a means of fixing minor glycolytic paralogs in the yeast genome. The MG strain was carefully designed and constructed to provide a robust prototrophic platform for quantitative studies and has been made available to the scientific community. PMID:26071034

  3. Evidence of Natural Hybridization in Brazilian Wild Lineages of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Raquel; Almeida, Pedro; Safar, Silvana V B; Santos, Renata Oliveira; Morais, Paula B; Nielly-Thibault, Lou; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Landry, Christian R; Gonçalves, Paula; Rosa, Carlos A; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2016-01-01

    The natural biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the best known unicellular model eukaryote, remains poorly documented and understood although recent progress has started to change this situation. Studies carried out recently in the Northern Hemisphere revealed the existence of wild populations associated with oak trees in North America, Asia, and in the Mediterranean region. However, in spite of these advances, the global distribution of natural populations of S. cerevisiae, especially in regions were oaks and other members of the Fagaceae are absent, is not well understood. Here we investigate the occurrence of S. cerevisiae in Brazil, a tropical region where oaks and other Fagaceae are absent. We report a candidate natural habitat of S. cerevisiae in South America and, using whole-genome data, we uncover new lineages that appear to have as closest relatives the wild populations found in North America and Japan. A population structure analysis revealed the penetration of the wine genotype into the wild Brazilian population, a first observation of the impact of domesticated microbe lineages on the genetic structure of wild populations. Unexpectedly, the Brazilian population shows conspicuous evidence of hybridization with an American population of Saccharomyces paradoxus. Introgressions from S. paradoxus were significantly enriched in genes encoding secondary active transmembrane transporters. We hypothesize that hybridization in tropical wild lineages may have facilitated the habitat transition accompanying the colonization of the tropical ecosystem. PMID:26782936

  4. Evidence of Natural Hybridization in Brazilian Wild Lineages of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Raquel; Almeida, Pedro; Safar, Silvana V.B.; Santos, Renata Oliveira; Morais, Paula B.; Nielly-Thibault, Lou; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Landry, Christian R.; Gonçalves, Paula; Rosa, Carlos A.; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2016-01-01

    The natural biology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the best known unicellular model eukaryote, remains poorly documented and understood although recent progress has started to change this situation. Studies carried out recently in the Northern Hemisphere revealed the existence of wild populations associated with oak trees in North America, Asia, and in the Mediterranean region. However, in spite of these advances, the global distribution of natural populations of S. cerevisiae, especially in regions were oaks and other members of the Fagaceae are absent, is not well understood. Here we investigate the occurrence of S. cerevisiae in Brazil, a tropical region where oaks and other Fagaceae are absent. We report a candidate natural habitat of S. cerevisiae in South America and, using whole-genome data, we uncover new lineages that appear to have as closest relatives the wild populations found in North America and Japan. A population structure analysis revealed the penetration of the wine genotype into the wild Brazilian population, a first observation of the impact of domesticated microbe lineages on the genetic structure of wild populations. Unexpectedly, the Brazilian population shows conspicuous evidence of hybridization with an American population of Saccharomyces paradoxus. Introgressions from S. paradoxus were significantly enriched in genes encoding secondary active transmembrane transporters. We hypothesize that hybridization in tropical wild lineages may have facilitated the habitat transition accompanying the colonization of the tropical ecosystem. PMID:26782936

  5. Size threshold for Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes: generation of telocentric chromosomes from an unstable minichromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Zakian, V A; Blanton, H M; Wetzel, L; Dani, G M

    1986-01-01

    A 9-kilobase pair CEN4 linear minichromosome constructed in vitro transformed Saccharomyces cerevisiae with high frequency but duplicated or segregated inefficiently in most cells. Stable transformants were only produced by events which fundamentally altered the structure of the minichromosome: elimination of telomeres, alteration of the centromere, or an increase of fivefold or greater in its size. Half of the stable transformants arose via homologous recombination between an intact chromosome IV and the CEN4 minichromosome. This event generated a new chromosome from each arm of chromosome IV. The other "arm" of each new chromosome was identical to one "arm" of the unstable minichromosome. Unlike natural yeast chromosomes, these new chromosomes were telocentric: their centromeres were either 3.9 or 5.4 kilobases from one end of the chromosome. The mitotic stability of the telocentric chromosome derived from the right arm of chromosome IV was determined by a visual assay and found to be comparable to that of natural yeast chromosomes. Both new chromosomes duplicated, paired, and segregated properly in meiosis. Moreover, their structure, as deduced from mobilities in orthogonal field gels, did not change with continued mitotic growth or after passage through meiosis, indicating that they did not give rise to isochromosomes or suffer large deletions or additions. Thus, in S. cerevisiae the close spacing of centromeres and telomeres on a DNA molecule of chromosomal size does not markedly alter the efficiency with which it is maintained. Taken together these data suggest that there is a size threshold below which stable propagation of linear chromosomes is no longer possible. Images PMID:3022139

  6. Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: purification and molecular analysis of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Reuter, R; Naumann, M; Bär, J; Miosga, T; Kopperschläger, G

    1998-01-01

    Purification and molecular analysis of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.6) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is described first time. The enzyme was enriched from a haploid deletion mutant containing the wild-type gene on a multicopy plasmid elaborating the following steps: ammonium sulphate precipitation, interfacial salting out on Sepharose 6B, high performance liquid chromatography on Fractogel EMD DEAE and on Resource Phenyl. The enzyme activity was found to be rather unstable possibly caused by removal of stabilizing cofactors or proteins during the purification procedure. The purified enzyme showed a hyperbolic dependence on the substrate ribose-5-phosphate with a K(m)-value of 1.6 +/- 0.3 mmol/l. For the native enzyme a molecular mass of 115 +/- 10 kDa was determined as found by saccharose density gradient centrifugation, sedimentation equilibrium analysis, size exclusion chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting revealed one band with a molecular mass of 31 +/- 2 kDa. Thus, the native enzyme is composed of four subunits of identical size. The molecular mass of the subunit and the identified N-terminal sequence of 33 amino acids fits well the 258 amino acid protein encoded by the S. cerevisiae RKI open reading frame, which was characterized previously only by increasing specific activities of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase in cells after cloning the gene. On the basis of the conserved amino acids an alignment of the amino acid sequence of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase from yeast with those of the enzyme from mouse, spinach and Escherichia coli is presented. PMID:9763699

  7. Mathematical model for the aerobic growth of saccharomyces cerevisiae with a saturated respiratory capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Barford, J.P.; Hall, R.J.

    1981-08-01

    A mathematical model for the aerobic growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in both batch and continuous culture is described. It was based on the experimental observation that the respiratory capacity of this organism may become saturated and exhibit a maximum specific oxygen uptake rate after suitable adaptation. This experimental observation led to the possibility that transport into and out of the mitochondrion was of major importance in the overall metabolism of S. cerevisiae and was subject to long-term adaptation. Consistent with this observation a distributed model was proposed which, as its basis, assumed the control of respiration and fermentation to be the result of saturation of respiration without any specific repression or inhibition of the uptake rates of other substrates. No other regulation of fermentation and respiration was assumed. The model provided a suitable structure allowing precise quantification of the changes in rate and stoichiometry of energy production. The model clearly indicated that growth under the wide range of experimental conditions reported could not be predicted using constant values for the maximum specific respiratory rate or constant values of Yatp (g biomass/mol ATP) and PO ratio of (mol ATP/atom oxygen). The causes of the variation in the respiratory rate were not determined and it was concluded that a more detailed analysis (reported subsequently) was required. The variation of Y atp and PO ratio with specific growth rate implied that the efficiency of ATP generation or ATP utilization decreased with increasing specific growth rate. It was concluded that it was not possible to quantify the individual effect of Yatp and PO ratio until independent means for their reliable estimation is available. (Refs. 84).

  8. Effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation products on dairy calves: Ruminal fermentation, gastrointestinal morphology, and microbial community.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J X; Alugongo, G M; Chung, R; Dong, S Z; Li, S L; Yoon, I; Wu, Z H; Cao, Z J

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation products (SCFP) in the calf starter and milk on ruminal fermentation, gastrointestinal morphology, and microbial community in the first 56 d of life. Thirty Holstein bull calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: a texturized calf starter containing 0 (CON), 0.5, or 1% SCFP (XPC, Diamond V, Cedar Rapids, IA) of dry matter from d 4 to 56. In addition, the XPC-supplemented calves were fed with 1 g/d SCFP (SmartCare, Diamond V, Cedar Rapids, IA) in milk from d 2 to 30. All calves were fed 4 L of colostrum within 1 h of birth and were subsequently fed milk twice daily until weaned on d 56. Rumen fluid was collected by an esophageal tube 4 h after the morning feeding on d 28 and 56 to determine ruminal pH, ammonia-N, and volatile fatty acids concentrations. On d 56, 15 (5 per treatment) calves were harvested and slaughter weight, gastrointestinal morphology parameters, and bacteria community were recorded. Papilla length, width, and surface area were measured from 5 locations within the rumen. Villus height, width, surface area, crypt depth, and villus height-to-crypt depth ratio were measured in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. Next-generation sequencing technology was used to test the microbial community of the rumen and duodenum samples on d 28 and 56. Data were analyzed by MIXED procedure in SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) with contrast statements to declare CON versus all SCFP and 0.5 versus 1% SCFP in starter grains. Ruminal pH, ammonia-N, and total volatile fatty acids were not altered by SCFP. However, the supplemented groups exhibited higher ruminal butyrate concentrations coinciding with higher Butyrivibrio and lower Prevotella richness than CON group. Supplementation of SCFP increased papilla length in the rumen. In the small intestine, SCFP reduced crypt depth of jejunum, and increased villus height-to-crypt depth ratio in all segments of the small intestine

  9. A putative precursor for the small ribosomal RNA from mitochondria of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Osinga, K A; Evers, R F; Van der Laan, J C; Tabak, H F

    1981-01-01

    We have characterized a putative precursor RNA (15.5S) for the 15S ribosomal RNA in mitochondria of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Hybrids were formed with mitochondrial RNA and mtDNA fragments terminally labelled at restriction sites located within the gene coding for 15S ribosomal RNA and treated with S1 nuclease (Berk, A.J. and Sharp, J.A. (1977) 12, 721-732). Sites of resistant hybrids were measured by agarose gel electrophoresis and end points of RNAs determined. The 15.5S RNA is approximately 80 nucleotides longer than the 15S ribosomal RNA, with the extra sequences being located at the 5'-end. Both 15S ribosomal RNA and 15.5S RNA are fully localised within a 2000 base pair HapII fragment. This putative precursor and the mature 15S ribosomal RNA are also found in petite mutants which retain the 15S ribosomal RNA gene. The petite mutant with the smallest genetic complexity has its end point of deletion (junction) just outside the HapII site located in the 5' flank of the 15S ribosomal RNA genes as determined by S1 nuclease analysis. This leaves a DNA stretch approximately 300 base pairs long where an initiation signal for mitochondrial transcription may be present. Images PMID:6262728

  10. Whi5 Regulation by Site Specific CDK-Phosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Michelle V.; Smolka, Marcus B.; de Bruin, Rob A. M.; Zhou, Huilin; Wittenberg, Curt; Dowdy, Steven F.

    2009-01-01

    The Whi5 transcriptional repressor is a negative regulator of G1 cell cycle progression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is functionally equivalent to the Retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor protein in mammals. In early G1, Whi5 binds to and inhibits SBF (Swi4/Swi6) transcriptional complexes. At Start, Cln:Cdc28 kinases phosphorylate and inactivate Whi5, causing its dissociation from SBF promoters and nuclear export, allowing activation of SBF transcription and entry into late G1. In an analysis of Whi5 phosphorylation, we found that 10 of the 12 putative CDK phosphorylation sites on Whi5 were occupied in vivo in asynchronously growing cells. In addition, we identified 6 non-CDK Whi5 phosphorylation sites. Whi5 CDK and non-CDK phosphorylation mutants were functional and able to rescue the small cell size of whi5Δ cells. However, the Whi5 CDK mutant with all 12 putative CDK sites changed to alanine causes a dramatic cell cycle phenotype when expressed with a Swi6 CDK phosphorylation mutant. Mutational analysis of Whi5 determined that only four C-terminal CDK sites were necessary and sufficient for Whi5 inactivation when Swi6 CDK sites were also mutated. Although these four Whi5 CDK sites do not wholly determine Whi5 nuclear export, they do impact regulation of cell size. Taken together, these observations begin to dissect the regulatory role of specific phosphorylation sites on Whi5. PMID:19172996

  11. Improvement of ethanol production by electrochemical redox coupling of Zymomonas mobilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Bo Young; Park, Doo Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis was immobilized in a modified graphite felt cathode with neutral red (NR-graphite cathode) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cultivated on a platinum plate anode to electrochemically activate ethanol fermentation. Electrochemical redox reaction was induced by 3 approximately 4 volt of electric potential charged to a cathode and an anode. Z. mobilis produced 1.3 approximately 1.5 M of ethanol in the cathode compartment and S. cerevisiae did 1.7 approximately 1.9 M in the anode compartment for 96 hr. The ethanol production by Z. mobilis immobilized in the NR-graphite cathode and S. cerevisiae cultivated on the platinum plate was 1.5 approximately 1.6 times higher than those cultivated in the conventional condition. The electrochemical oxidation potential greatly inhibited ethanol fermentation of Z. mobilis but did not S. cerevisiae. Total soluble protein pattern of Z. mobilis cultivated in the electrochemical oxidation condition was getting simplified in proportion to potential intensity based on SDS-PAGE pattern; however the SDS-PAGE pattern of protein extracted from S. cerevisiae cultivated in both oxidation and reduction condition was not changed. When Z. mobilis culture incubated in the cathode compartment for 24 hr was transferred to S. cerevisiae culture in the anode compartment, 0.8 approximately 0.9 M of ethanol was additionally produced by S. cerevisiae for another 24 hr. Conclusively, total 2.0 approximately 2.1 M of ethanol was produced by the electrochemical redox coupling of Z. mobilis and S. cerevisiae for 48 hr. PMID:20134239

  12. Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) Antibody (ASCA) Test Systems. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-11-22

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system into class II (special controls). The special control that will apply to this device is a guidance document entitled "Guidance for Industry and FDA Reviewers: Class II Special Control Guidance Document for Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) Antibody (ASCA) Premarket Notifications." Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register. FDA is announcing the availability of this guidance document. The agency is taking this action in response to a petition submitted under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976, the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990, and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997. The agency is classifying these devices into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of the safety and effectiveness of the devices. PMID:11503713

  13. Screening for hydrolytic enzymes reveals Ayr1p as a novel triacylglycerol lipase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ploier, Birgit; Scharwey, Melanie; Koch, Barbara; Schmidt, Claudia; Schatte, Jessica; Rechberger, Gerald; Kollroser, Manfred; Hermetter, Albin; Daum, Günther

    2013-12-13

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as other eukaryotes, preserves fatty acids and sterols in a biologically inert form, as triacylglycerols and steryl esters. The major triacylglycerol lipases of the yeast S. cerevisiae identified so far are Tgl3p, Tgl4p, and Tgl5p (Athenstaedt, K., and Daum, G. (2003) YMR313c/TGL3 encodes a novel triacylglycerol lipase located in lipid particles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 23317-23323; Athenstaedt, K., and Daum, G. (2005) Tgl4p and Tgl5p, two triacylglycerol lipases of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are localized to lipid particles. J. Biol. Chem. 280, 37301-37309). We observed that upon cultivation on oleic acid, triacylglycerol mobilization did not come to a halt in a yeast strain deficient in all currently known triacylglycerol lipases, indicating the presence of additional not yet characterized lipases/esterases. Functional proteome analysis using lipase and esterase inhibitors revealed a subset of candidate genes for yet unknown hydrolytic enzymes on peroxisomes and lipid droplets. Based on the conserved GXSXG lipase motif, putative functions, and subcellular localizations, a selected number of candidates were characterized by enzyme assays in vitro, gene expression analysis, non-polar lipid analysis, and in vivo triacylglycerol mobilization assays. These investigations led to the identification of Ayr1p as a novel triacylglycerol lipase of yeast lipid droplets and confirmed the hydrolytic potential of the peroxisomal Lpx1p in vivo. Based on these results, we discuss a possible link between lipid storage, lipid mobilization, and peroxisomal utilization of fatty acids as a carbon source. PMID:24187129

  14. The neglected nano-specific toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weicheng; Bao, Shaopan; Fang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with unique physicochemical properties induce nano-specific (excess) toxicity in organisms compared with their bulk counterparts. Evaluation and consideration of nano-specific toxicity are meaningful for the safe design and environmental risk assessment of NPs. However, ZnO NPs have been reported to lack excess toxicity for diverse organisms. In the present study, the nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was evaluated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was not observed in the wild type yeast. However, the ZnO NPs induced very similar nano-specific toxicities in the three mutants with comparable log Te (particle) values (0.64 vs 0.65 vs 0.62), suggesting that the mutants were more sensitive and specific for the NPs’ nano-specific toxicity. The toxic effects in the yeast were slightly attributable to dissolved zinc ions from the ZnO (nano or bulk) particles. Oxidative damage and mechanical damage contributed to the toxic effect of the ZnO particles. The mechanism of mechanical damage is proposed to be an inherent characteristic underlying the nano-specific toxicity in the mutants. The log Te (particle) was a useful parameter for evaluation of NPs nano-specific toxicity, whereas log Te (ion) efficiently determined the NPs toxicity associated with released ions. PMID:27094203

  15. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae quinone oxidoreductase Lot6p: stability, inhibition and cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Megarity, Clare F; Looi, Hong Keat; Timson, David J

    2014-08-01

    Lot6p (EC 1.5.1.39; Ylr011wp) is the sole quinone oxidoreductase in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using hexahistidine tagged, recombinant Lot6p, we determined the steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters with both NADH and NADPH as electron donors; no cooperativity was observed with these substrates. The NQO1 inhibitor curcumin, the NQO2 inhibitor resveratrol, the bacterial nitroreductase inhibitor nicotinamide and the phosphate mimic vanadate all stabilise the enzyme towards thermal denaturation as judged by differential scanning fluorimetry. All except vanadate have no observable effect on the chemical cross-linking of the two subunits of the Lot6p dimer. These compounds all inhibit Lot6p's oxidoreductase activity, and all except nicotinamide exhibit negative cooperativity. Molecular modelling suggests that curcumin, resveratrol and nicotinamide all bind over the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in Lot6p. Resveratrol was predicted to contact an α-helix that links the two active sites. Mutation of Gly-142 (which forms part of this helix) to serine does not greatly affect the thermal stability of the enzyme. However, this variant shows less cooperativity towards resveratrol than the wild type. This suggests a plausible hypothesis for the transmission of information between the subunits and, thus, the molecular mechanism of negative cooperativity in Lot6p. PMID:24866129

  16. A Role for Histone H4K16 Hypoacetylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Kinetochore Function

    PubMed Central

    Choy, John S.; Acuña, Rachel; Au, Wei-Chun; Basrai, Munira A.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoacetylated H4 is present at regional centromeres; however, its role in kinetochore function is poorly understood. We characterized H4 acetylation at point centromeres in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and determined the consequences of altered H4 acetylation on chromosome segregation. We observed low levels of tetra-acetylated and K16 acetylated histone H4 (H4K16Ac) at centromeres. Low levels of H4K16Ac were also observed at noncentromeric regions associated with Cse4p. Inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDAC) using nicotinamide (NAM) caused lethality in cse4 and hhf1-20 kinetochore mutants and increased centromeric H4K16Ac. Overexpression of Sas2-mediated H4K16 acetylation activity in wild-type cells led to increased rates of chromosome loss and synthetic dosage lethality in kinetochore mutants. Consistent with increased H4K16 acetylation as a cause of the phenotypes, deletion of the H4K16 deacetylase SIR2 or a sir2-H364Y catalytic mutant resulted in higher rates of chromosome loss compared to wild-type cells. Moreover, H4K16Q acetylmimic mutants displayed increased rates of chromosome loss compared to H4K16R nonacetylatable mutants and wild-type cells. Our work shows that hypoacetylated centromeric H4 is conserved across eukaryotic centromeres and hypoacetylation of H4K16 at centromeres plays an important role in accurate chromosome segregation. PMID:21652526

  17. Subcellular and submitochondrial localization of phospholipid-synthesizing enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kuchler, K; Daum, G; Paltauf, F

    1986-01-01

    Using highly enriched membrane preparations from lactate-grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, the subcellular and submitochondrial location of eight enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of phospholipids was determined. Phosphatidylserine decarboxylase and phosphatidylglycerolphosphate synthase were localized exclusively in the inner mitochondrial membrane, while phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase activity was confined to microsomal fractions. The other five enzymes tested in this study were common both to the outer mitochondrial membrane and to microsomes. The transmembrane orientation of the mitochondrial enzymes was investigated by protease digestion of intact mitochondria and of outside-out sealed vesicles of the outer mitochondrial membrane. Glycerolphosphate acyltransferase, phosphatidylinositol synthase, and phosphatidylserine synthase were exposed at the cytosolic surface of the outer mitochondrial membrane. Cholinephosphotransferase was apparently located at the inner aspect or within the outer mitochondrial membrane. Phosphatidate cytidylyltransferase was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, on the cytoplasmic side of the outer mitochondrial membrane, and in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Inner membrane activity of this enzyme constituted 80% of total mitochondrial activity; inactivation by trypsin digestion was observed only after preincubation of membranes with detergent (0.1% Triton X-100). Total activity of those enzymes that are common to mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum was about equally distributed between the two organelles. Data concerning susceptibility to various inhibitors, heat sensitivity, and the pH optima indicate that there is a close similarity of the mitochondrial and microsomal enzymes that catalyze the same reaction. Images PMID:3005242

  18. Solution structure of the ubiquitin-binding domain in Swa2p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chim, Nicholas; Gall, Walter E; Xiao, Jing; Harris, Mark P; Graham, Todd R; Krezel, Andrzej M

    2004-03-01

    The SWA2/AUX1 gene has been proposed to encode the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog of mammalian auxilin. Swa2p is required for clathrin assembly/dissassembly in vivo, thereby implicating it in intracellular protein and lipid trafficking. While investigating the 287-residue N-terminal region of Swa2p, we found a single stably folded domain between residues 140 and 180. Using binding assays and structural analysis, we established this to be a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain, unidentified by bioinformatics of the yeast genome. We determined the solution structure of this Swa2p domain and found a characteristic three-helix UBA fold. Comparisons of structures of known UBA folds reveal that the position of the third helix is quite variable. This helix in Swa2p UBA contains a bulkier tyrosine in place of smaller residues found in other UBAs and cannot pack as close to the second helix. The molecular surface of Swa2p UBA has a mostly negative potential, with a single hydrophobic surface patch found also in the UBA domains of human protein, HHR23A. The presence of a UBA domain implicates Swa2p in novel roles involving ubiquitin and ubiquitinated substrates. We propose that Swa2p is a multifunctional protein capable of recognizing several proteins through its protein-protein recognition domains. PMID:14997574

  19. Chemical and enzymatic extraction of heavy metal binding polymers from isolated cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, D.; Stoll, A.D.; Starke, L.; Duncan, J.R. . Dept. of Biochemistry and Microbiology)

    1994-07-01

    Isolated cell walls of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were treated by either chemical (alkali and acid) or enzymatic (protease, mannanase or [beta]-glucuronidase) processes to yield partially purified products. These products were partially characterized by infrared analysis. They were subsequently reacted with heavy metal cation solutions and the quantity of metal accumulated by the cell wall material determined. The Cu[sup 2+] ion (0.24, 0.36, 1.12, and 0.60 [mu]mol/mg) was accumulated to a greater extent than either Co[sup 2+] (0.13, 0.32, 0.43, and 0.32 [mu]mol/mg) or Cd[sup 2+] (0.17, 0.34, 0.39, and 0.46 [mu]mol/mg) by yeast cell walls, glucan, mannan, and chitin, respectively. The isolated components each accumulated greater quantities of the cations than the intact cell wall. Removal of the protein component of the yeast cell wall by Pronase caused a 29.5% decrease in metal accumulation by yeast cell walls per mass, indicating that protein is a heavy metal accumulating component. The data indicate that the outer mannan-protein layer of the yeast cell wall is more important than the inner glucan-chitin layer in heavy metal cation accumulation.

  20. Single sample extraction protocol for the quantification of NAD and NADH redox states in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sporty, Jennifer L.; Kabir, Md. Mohiuddin; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Ognibene, Ted; Lin, Su-Ju; Bench, Graham

    2009-01-01

    A robust redox extraction protocol for quantitative and reproducible metabolite isolation and recovery has been developed for simultaneous measurement of nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its reduced form, NADH, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following culture in liquid media, yeast cells were harvested by centrifugation and then lysed under nonoxidizing conditions by bead blasting in ice-cold, nitrogen-saturated 50 mM ammonium acetate. To enable protein denaturation, ice cold nitrogen-saturated CH3CN/50 mM ammonium acetate (3:1 v/v) was added to the cell lysates. Chloroform extractions were performed on supernatants to remove organic solvent. Samples were lyophilized and resuspended in 50 mM ammonium acetate. NAD and NADH were separated by HPLC and quantified using UV–Vis absorbance detection. NAD and NADH levels were evaluated in yeast grown under normal (2% glucose) and calorie restricted (0.5% glucose) conditions. Results demonstrate that it is possible to perform a single preparation to reliably and robustly quantitate both NAD and NADH contents in the same sample. Robustness of the protocol suggests it will be (i) applicable to quantification of these metabolites in other cell cultures; and (ii) amenable to isotope labeling strategies to determine the relative contribution of specific metabolic pathways to total NAD and NADH levels in cell cultures. PMID:18763242

  1. Single sample extraction protocol for the quantification of NAD and NADH redox states in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sporty, Jennifer L; Kabir, Md Mohiuddin; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Ognibene, Ted; Lin, Su-Ju; Bench, Graham

    2008-10-01

    A robust redox extraction protocol for quantitative and reproducible metabolite isolation and recovery has been developed for simultaneous measurement of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its reduced form, NADH, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following culture in liquid media, yeast cells were harvested by centrifugation and then lysed under nonoxidizing conditions by bead blasting in ice-cold, nitrogen-saturated 50 mM ammonium acetate. To enable protein denaturation, ice cold nitrogen-saturated CH(3)CN/50 mM ammonium acetate (3:1 v/v) was added to the cell lysates. Chloroform extractions were performed on supernatants to remove organic solvent. Samples were lyophilized and resuspended in 50 mM ammonium acetate. NAD and NADH were separated by HPLC and quantified using UV-Vis absorbance detection. NAD and NADH levels were evaluated in yeast grown under normal (2% glucose) and calorie restricted (0.5% glucose) conditions. Results demonstrate that it is possible to perform a single preparation to reliably and robustly quantitate both NAD and NADH contents in the same sample. Robustness of the protocol suggests it will be (i) applicable to quantification of these metabolites in other cell cultures; and (ii) amenable to isotope labeling strategies to determine the relative contribution of specific metabolic pathways to total NAD and NADH levels in cell cultures. PMID:18763242

  2. Antioxidant, antimutagenic, and anticarcinogenic effects of Papaver rhoeas L. extract on Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Teodora; Pesheva, Margarita; Gregan, Fridrich; Chankova, Stephka

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the antioxidant and antimutagenic/anticarcinogenic capacity of Papaver rhoeas L. water extract against standard mutagen/carcinogen methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and radiomimetic zeocin (Zeo) on a test system Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The following assays were used: 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, quantitative determination of superoxide anion (antireactive oxygen species [antiROS test]), DNA topology assay, D7ts1 test--for antimutagenic--and Ty1 transposition test--for anticarcinogenic effects. Strong pro-oxidative capacity of Zeo was shown to correlate with its well-expressed mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. The mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of MMS were also confirmed. Our data concerning the antioxidant activity of P. rhoeas L. extract revealed that concentration corresponding to IC(50) in the DPPH assay possessed the highest antioxidant activity in the antiROS biological assay. It was also observed that a concentration with 50% scavenging activity expressed the most pronounced antimutagenic properties decreasing Zeo-induced gene conversion twofold, reverse mutation fivefold, and total aberrations fourfold. The same concentration possessed well-expressed anticarcinogenic properties measured as reduction of MMS-induced Ty1 transposition rate fivefold and fourfold when Zeo was used as an inductor. Based on the well-expressed antioxidant, antimutagenic, and anticarcinogenic properties obtained in this work, the P. rhoeas L. extract could be recommended for further investigations and possible use as a food additive. PMID:25185065

  3. Aeration strategy: a need for very high ethanol performance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae fed-batch process.

    PubMed

    Alfenore, S; Cameleyre, X; Benbadis, L; Bideaux, C; Uribelarrea, J-L; Goma, G; Molina-Jouve, C; Guillouet, S E

    2004-02-01

    In order to identify an optimal aeration strategy for intensifying bio-fuel ethanol production in fermentation processes where growth and production have to be managed simultaneously, we quantified the effect of aeration conditions--oxygen limited vs non limited culture (micro-aerobic vs aerobic culture)--on the dynamic behaviour of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultivated in very high ethanol performance fed-batch cultures. Fermentation parameters and kinetics were established within a range of ethanol concentrations (up to 147 g l(-1)), which very few studies have addressed. Higher ethanol titres (147 vs 131 g l(-1) in 45 h) and average productivity (3.3 vs 2.6 g l(-1) h(-1)) were obtained in cultures without oxygen limitation. Compared to micro-aerobic culture, full aeration led to a 23% increase in the viable cell mass as a result of the concomitant increase in growth rate and yield, with lower ethanol inhibition. The second beneficial effect of aeration was better management of by-product production, with production of glycerol, the main by-product, being strongly reduced from 12 to 4 g l(-1). We demonstrate that aeration strategy is as much a determining factor as vitamin feeding (Alfenore et al. 2002) in very high ethanol performance (147 g l(-1) in 45 h) in order to achieve a highly competitive dynamic process. PMID:12879304

  4. Optimization of fed-batch Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation using dynamic flux balance models.

    PubMed

    Hjersted, Jared L; Henson, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    We developed a dynamic flux balance model for fed-batch Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation that couples a detailed steady-state description of primary carbon metabolism with dynamic mass balances on key extracellular species. Model-based dynamic optimization is performed to determine fed-batch operating policies that maximize ethanol productivity and/or ethanol yield on glucose. The initial volume and glucose concentrations, the feed flow rate and dissolved oxygen concentration profiles, and the final batch time are treated as decision variables in the dynamic optimization problem. Optimal solutions are generated to analyze the tradeoff between maximal productivity and yield objectives. We find that for both cases the prediction of a microaerobic region is significant. The optimization results are sensitive to network model parameters for the growth associated maintenance and P/O ratio. The results of our computational study motivate continued development of dynamic flux balance models and further exploration of their application to productivity optimization in biochemical reactors. PMID:17022660

  5. Functional Oligomerization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Isoprenylcysteine Carboxyl Methyltransferase, Ste14p

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Amy M.; Hahne, Kalub; Hrycyna, Christine A.

    2010-01-01

    The isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase (Icmt) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also designated Ste14p, is a 26-kDa integral membrane protein that contains six transmembrane spanning segments. This protein is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane where it performs the methylation step of the CAAX post-translational processing pathway. Sequence analysis reveals a putative GXXXG dimerization motif located in transmembrane 1 of Ste14p, but it is not known whether Ste14p forms or functions as a dimer or higher order oligomer. We determined that Ste14p predominantly formed a homodimer in the presence of the cross-linking agent, bis-sulfosuccinimidyl suberate. Wild-type untagged Ste14p also co-immunoprecipitated and co-purified with N-terminal-tagged His10-myc3-Ste14p (His-Ste14p). Furthermore, enzymatically inactive His-Ste14p variants L81F and E213Q both exerted a dominant-negative effect on methyltransferase activity when co-expressed and co-purified with untagged wild-type Ste14p. Together, these data, although indirect, suggest that Ste14p forms and functions as a homodimer or perhaps a higher oligomeric species. PMID:20202940

  6. Deletion of conserved protein phosphatases reverses defects associated with mitochondrial DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Garipler, Görkem; Mutlu, Nebibe; Lack, Nathan A; Dunn, Cory D

    2014-01-28

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is regulated by signaling pathways sensitive to extracellular conditions and to the internal environment of the cell. Therefore, treatments for disease caused by mutation of mtDNA may emerge from studies of how signal transduction pathways command mitochondrial function. We have examined the role of phosphatases under the control of the conserved α4/Tap42 protein in cells lacking a mitochondrial genome. We found that deletion of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) or of protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) protects cells from the reduced proliferation, mitochondrial protein import defects, lower mitochondrial electrochemical potential, and nuclear transcriptional response associated with mtDNA damage. Moreover, PP2A or PP6 deletion allows viability of a sensitized yeast strain after mtDNA loss. Interestingly, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog of the mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase was required for the full benefits of PP6 deletion and also for proliferation of otherwise wild-type cells lacking mtDNA. Our work highlights the important role that nutrient-responsive signaling pathways can play in determining the response to mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:24474773

  7. SPL1-1, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutation affecting tRNA splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Kolman, C; Söll, D

    1993-01-01

    A genetic approach was used to isolate and characterize Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes affecting tRNA processing. Three mutants were isolated which were able to process and utilize splicing-deficient transcripts from inactivated Schizosaccharomyces pombe suppressor tRNA genes. Extragenic recovery of suppressibility was verified by the suppression of nonsense mutations in LEU2, HIS4, and ADE1. One mutant, SPL1-1, was chosen for detailed analysis on the basis of its increased synthesis of mature suppressor tRNA over wild-type cell levels as determined by Northern (RNA) analysis. This mutant exhibited strong suppression exclusively with the defective tRNA gene used in the mutant selection. Genetic analysis revealed that a single, dominant, haplo-lethal mutation was responsible for the suppression phenotype. The mutation mapped on chromosome III to an essential 1.5-kb open reading frame (L. S. Symington and T. D. Petes, Mol. Cell. Biol. 8:595-604, 1988), recently named NFS1 (S. G. Oliver et al., Nature [London] 357:38-46, 1992), located adjacent (centromere proximal) to LEU2. Images PMID:8444805

  8. Cytokine-dependent activation of JAK-STAT pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Ikeda, Yuko; Tatematsu, Kenji; Iijima, Masumi; Nakai, Tadashi; Okajima, Toshihide; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2016-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification for intracellular signaling molecules, mostly found in serine and threonine residues. Tyrosine phosphorylations are very few events (less than 0.1% to phosphorylated serine/threonine residues), but capable of governing cell fate decisions involved in proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and oncogenic transformation. Hence, it is important for drug discovery and system biology to measure the intracellular level of phosphotyrosine. Although mammalian cells have been conventionally utilized for this purpose, accurate determination of phosphotyrosine level often suffers from high background due to the unexpected crosstalk among endogenous signaling molecules. This situation led us firstly to establish the ligand-induced activation of homomeric receptor tyrosine kinase (i.e., epidermal growth factor receptor) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a lower eukaryote possessing organelles similar to higher eukaryote but not showing substantial level of tyrosine kinase activity. In this study, we expressed heteromeric receptor tyrosine kinase (i.e., a complex of interleukin-5 receptor (IL5R) α chain, common β chain, and JAK2 tyrosine kinase) in yeast. When coexpressed with a cell wall-anchored form of IL5, the yeast exerted the autophosphorylation of JAK2, followed by the phosphorylation of transcription factor STAT5a and subsequent nuclear accumulation of phosphorylated STAT5a. Taken together, yeast could be an ideal host for sensitive detection of phosphotyrosine generated by a wide variety of tyrosine kinases. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1796-1804. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26853220

  9. Continuous bioethanol production from oilseed rape straw hydrosylate using immobilised Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Anil Kuruvilla; Crook, Mitch; Chaney, Keith; Humphries, Andrea Clare

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate continuous bioethanol production from oilseed rape (OSR) straw hydrolysate using Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells immobilised in Lentikat® discs. The study evaluated the effect of dilution rate (0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00 h(-1)), substrate concentration (15, 22, 40 and 60 g L(-1)) and cell loading (0.03, 0.16 and 0.24 g d.c.w.mL(-1) Lentikat®) on bioethanol production. Volumetric productivity was found to increase with increasing substrate concentration from 15 g L(-1) to 60 g L(-1). A maximum volumetric productivity of 12.88 g L(-1)h(-1) was achieved at a substrate concentration of 60 g L(-1) and at a dilution rate of 0.5h(-1). An overall mass balance for bioethanol production was created to determine the energy recovery from bioethanol and concluded that a biorefinery approach might be the most appropriate option for maximising the energy recovery from OSR straw. PMID:24406845

  10. Identification of Genes Required for Normal Pheromone-Induced Cell Polarization in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chenevert, J.; Valtz, N.; Herskowitz, I.

    1994-01-01

    In response to mating pheromones, cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae adopt a polarized ``shmoo'' morphology, in which the cytoskeleton and proteins involved in mating are localized to a cell-surface projection. This polarization is presumed to reflect the oriented morphogenesis that occurs between mating partners to facilitate cell and nuclear fusion. To identify genes involved in pheromone-induced cell polarization, we have isolated mutants defective in mating to an enfeebled partner and studied a subset of these mutants. The 34 mutants of interest are proficient for pheromone production, arrest in response to pheromone, mate to wild-type strains, and exhibit normal cell polarity during vegetative growth. The mutants were divided into classes based on their morphological responses to mating pheromone. One class is unable to localize cell-surface growth in response to mating factor and instead enlarges in a uniform manner. These mutants harbor special alleles of genes required for cell polarization during vegetative growth, BEM1 and CDC24. Another class of mutants forms bilobed, peanut-like shapes when treated with pheromone and defines two genes, PEA1 and PEA2. PEA1 is identical to SPA2. A third class forms normally shaped but tiny shmoos and defines the gene TNY1. A final group of mutants exhibits apparently normal shmoo morphology. The nature of their mating defect is yet to be determined. We discuss the possible roles of these gene products in establishing cell polarity during mating. PMID:8013906

  11. Characterization of surface-exposed reactive cysteine residues in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Stefano M.; Li, Yehua; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Agisheva, Natalia; L.Cerny, Ronald; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous cellular processes are subject to redox regulation, and thiol-dependent redox control, acting through reactive cysteine (Cys) residues, is among the major mechanisms of redox regulation. However, information on the sets of proteins that provide thiol-based redox regulation or are affected by it is limited. Here, we describe proteomic approaches to characterize proteins that contain reactive thiols and methods to identify redox Cys in these proteins. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a eukaryotic model organism, we identified 284 proteins with exposed reactive Cys and determined the identities of 185 of these residues. We then characterized subsets of these proteins as in vitro targets of major cellular thiol oxidoreductases, thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, and found that these enzymes can control the redox state of a significant number of thiols in target proteins. We further examined common features of exposed reactive Cys and compared them with an unbiased control set of Cys using computational approaches. This analysis (i) validated the efficacy of targeting exposed Cys in proteins in their native, folded state, (ii) quantified the proportion of targets that can be redox regulated via thiol oxidoreductase systems, and (iii) revealed the theoretical range of the experimental approach with regard to protein abundance and physico-chemical properties of reactive Cys. From these analyses, we estimate that approximately one fourth of exposed Cys in the yeast proteome can be regarded as functional sites, either subject to regulation by thiol oxidoreductases or involved in structural disulfides and metal binding. PMID:20698499

  12. Population genetic variation in gene expression is associated withphenotypic variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, Justin C.; McCullough, Heather L.; Sniegowski, Paul D.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-02-25

    The relationship between genetic variation in gene expression and phenotypic variation observable in nature is not well understood. Identifying how many phenotypes are associated with differences in gene expression and how many gene-expression differences are associated with a phenotype is important to understanding the molecular basis and evolution of complex traits. Results: We compared levels of gene expression among nine natural isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown either in the presence or absence of copper sulfate. Of the nine strains, two show a reduced growth rate and two others are rust colored in the presence of copper sulfate. We identified 633 genes that show significant differences in expression among strains. Of these genes,20 were correlated with resistance to copper sulfate and 24 were correlated with rust coloration. The function of these genes in combination with their expression pattern suggests the presence of both correlative and causative expression differences. But the majority of differentially expressed genes were not correlated with either phenotype and showed the same expression pattern both in the presence and absence of copper sulfate. To determine whether these expression differences may contribute to phenotypic variation under other environmental conditions, we examined one phenotype, freeze tolerance, predicted by the differential expression of the aquaporin gene AQY2. We found freeze tolerance is associated with the expression of AQY2. Conclusions: Gene expression differences provide substantial insight into the molecular basis of naturally occurring traits and can be used to predict environment dependent phenotypic variation.

  13. RAD6 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a protein containing a tract of 13 consecutive aspartates

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, P.; Weber, S.; Prakash, L.

    1985-01-01

    The RAD6 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for postreplication repair of UV-damaged DNA, for induced mutagenesis, and for sporulation. The authors have mapped the transcripts and determined the nucleotide sequence of the cloned RAD6 gene. The RAD6 gene encodes two transcripts of 0.98 and 0.86 kilobases which differ only in their 3' termini. The transcribed region contains an open reading frame of 516 nucleotides. The rad6-1 and rad6-3 mutant alleles, which the authors have cloned and sequenced, introduce amber and ochre nonsense mutations, respectively into the open reading frame, proving that it encodes the RAD6 protein. The RAD6 protein predicted by the nucleotide sequence is 172 amino acids long, has a molecular weight of 19,704, and contains 23.3% acidic and 11.6% basic residues. Its most striking feature is the highly acidic carboxyl terminus: 20 of the 23 terminal amino acids are acidic, including 13 consecutive aspartates. RAD6 protein thus resembles high mobility group proteins HMG-1 and HMG-2, which each contain a carboxyl-proximal tract of acidic amino acids. 48 references, 6 figures.

  14. Senescence Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae with a Defect in Telomere Replication Identify Three Additional Est Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lendvay, T. S.; Morris, D. K.; Sah, J.; Balasubramanian, B.; Lundblad, V.

    1996-01-01

    The primary determinant for telomere replication is the enzyme telomerase, responsible for elongating the G-rich strand of the telomere. The only component of this enzyme that has been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the TLC1 gene, encoding the telomerase RNA subunit. However, a yeast strain defective for the EST1 gene exhibits the same phenotypes (progressively shorter telomeres and a senescence phenotype) as a strain deleted for TLC1, suggesting that EST1 encodes either a component of telomerase or some other factor essential for telomerase function. We designed a multitiered screen that led to the isolation of 22 mutants that display the same phenotypes as est1 and tlc1 mutant strains. These mutations mapped to four complementation groups: the previously identified EST1 gene and three additional genes, called EST2, EST3 and EST4. Cloning of the EST2 gene demonstrated that it encodes a large, extremely basic novel protein with no motifs that provide clues as to function. Epistasis analysis indicated that the four EST genes function in the same pathway for telomere replication as defined by the TLC1 gene, suggesting that the EST genes encode either components of telomerase or factors that positively regulate telomerase activity. PMID:8978029

  15. Physiological Effects of Seven Different Blocks in Glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ciriacy, Michael; Breitenbach, Ingrid

    1979-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants unable to grow and ferment glucose have been isolated. Of 45 clones isolated, 25 had single enzyme defects of one of the following activities: phosphoglucose isomerase (pgi), phosphofructokinase (pfk), triosephosphate isomerase (tpi), phosphoglycerate kinase (pgk), phosphoglyceromutase (pgm), and pyruvate kinase (pyk). Phosphofructokinase activities in crude extracts of the pfk mutant were only 2% of the wild-type level. However, normal growth on glucose medium and normal fermentation of glucose suggested either that the mutant enzyme was considerably more active in vivo or, alternatively, that 2% residual activity was sufficient for normal glycolysis. All other mutants were moderately to strongly inhibited by glucose. Unusually high concentrations of glycolytic metabolites were observed before the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme which was absent in a given mutant strain when incubated on glucose. This confirmed at the cellular level the location of the defect as determined by enzyme assays. With adh (lacks all three alcohol dehydrogenase isozymes) and pgk mutants, accumulation of the typical levels of hexosephosphates was prevented when respiration was blocked with antimycin A. A typical feature of all glycolytic mutants described here was the rapid depletion of the intracellular adenosine 5′-triphosphate pool after transfer to glucose medium. No correlation of low or high levels of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate with the degree of catabolite repression and inactivation could be found. This observation does not support the concept that hexose metabolites are directly involved in these regulatory mechanisms in yeast. PMID:378952

  16. Mechanistic Details of Glutathione Biosynthesis Revealed by Crystal Structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Glutamate Cysteine Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2009-12-01

    Glutathione is a thiol-disulfide exchange peptide critical for buffering oxidative or chemical stress, and an essential cofactor in several biosynthesis and detoxification pathways. The rate-limiting step in its de novo biosynthesis is catalyzed by glutamate cysteine ligase, a broadly expressed enzyme for which limited structural information is available in higher eukaryotic species. Structural data are critical to the understanding of clinical glutathione deficiency, as well as rational design of enzyme modulators that could impact human disease progression. Here, we have determined the structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate cysteine ligase (ScGCL) in the presence of glutamate and MgCl{sub 2} (2.1 {angstrom}; R = 18.2%, R{sub free} = 21.9%), and in complex with glutamate, MgCl{sub 2}, and ADP (2.7 {angstrom}; R = 19.0%, R{sub free} = 24.2%). Inspection of these structures reveals an unusual binding pocket for the {alpha}-carboxylate of the glutamate substrate and an ATP-independent Mg{sup 2+} coordination site, clarifying the Mg{sup 2+} dependence of the enzymatic reaction. The ScGCL structures were further used to generate a credible homology model of the catalytic subunit of human glutamate cysteine ligase (hGCLC). Examination of the hGCLC model suggests that post-translational modifications of cysteine residues may be involved in the regulation of enzymatic activity, and elucidates the molecular basis of glutathione deficiency associated with patient hGCLC mutations.

  17. Structural Basis for Feedback and Pharmacological Inhibition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Glutamate Cysteine Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2010-04-30

    Structural characterization of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), the enzyme that catalyzes the initial, rate-limiting step in glutathione biosynthesis, has revealed many of the molecular details of substrate recognition. To further delineate the mechanistic details of this critical enzyme, we have determined the structures of two inhibited forms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCL (ScGCL), which shares significant sequence identity with the human enzyme. In vivo, GCL activity is feedback regulated by glutathione. Examination of the structure of ScGCL-glutathione complex (2.5 A; R = 19.9%, R(free) = 25.1%) indicates that the inhibitor occupies both the glutamate- and the presumed cysteine-binding site and disrupts the previously observed Mg(2+) coordination in the ATP-binding site. l-Buthionine-S-sulfoximine (BSO) is a mechanism-based inhibitor of GCL and has been used extensively to deplete glutathione in cell culture and in vivo model systems. Inspection of the ScGCL-BSO structure (2.2 A; R = 18.1%, R(free) = 23.9%) confirms that BSO is phosphorylated on the sulfoximine nitrogen to generate the inhibitory species and reveals contacts that likely contribute to transition state stabilization. Overall, these structures advance our understanding of the molecular regulation of this critical enzyme and provide additional details of the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme.

  18. Physiological Effects of GLT1 Modulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Growing on Different Nitrogen Sources.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Marco; Adamo, Giusy Manuela; Frascotti, Gianni; Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola

    2016-02-28

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most employed cell factories for the production of bioproducts. Although monomeric hexose sugars constitute the preferential carbon source, this yeast can grow on a wide variety of nitrogen sources that are catabolized through central nitrogen metabolism (CNM). To evaluate the effects of internal perturbations on nitrogen utilization, we characterized strains deleted or overexpressed in GLT1, encoding for one of the key enzymes of the CNM node, the glutamate synthase. These strains, together with the parental strain as control, have been cultivated in minimal medium formulated with ammonium sulfate, glutamate, or glutamine as nitrogen source. Growth kinetics, together with the determination of protein content, viability, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation at the single cell level, revealed that GLT1 modulations do not significantly influence the cellular physiology, whereas the nitrogen source does. As important exceptions, GLT1 deletion negatively affected the scavenging activity of glutamate against ROS accumulation, when cells were treated with H2O2, whereas Glt1p overproduction led to lower viability in glutamine medium. Overall, this confirms the robustness of the CNM node against internal perturbations, but, at the same time, highlights its plasticity in respect to the environment. Considering that side-stream protein-rich waste materials are emerging as substrates to be used in an integrated biorefinery, these results underline the importance of preliminarily evaluating the best nitrogen source not only for media formulation, but also for the overall economics of the process. PMID:26528537

  19. Mechanisms of strontium uptake by laboratory and brewing strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, S.V.; Tobin, J.M. )

    1992-12-01

    Concern over transfer of toxic metals from microorgansims to higher organisms and interest in the biotechnological potential of microorganisms for metal removal and/or recovery has increased interest in the processes involved in heavy metal uptake. Strontium is a trace element with no know essential biological role, but a long half-live and discharge as a constituent of radioactive wastewaters from nuclear reactors and in fall-out make its fate in the environment a concern. In this study, strontium uptake in biomass obtained from laboratory and industrial sources was examined. The mechanisms of Sr[sup 2+] uptake were examined and uptake capacities for Sr[sup 2+] were compared in both live and denatured forms of laboratory and brewery-derived strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Release of cellular Ca[sup 2+], Mg[sup 2+], and H[sup +] in response to metabolism-independent and -dependent Sr[sup 2+] uptake processes, was determined for all biomass types. The results indicate clear differences in the mechanisms of both Sr[sup 2+] adsorption and intracellular Sr[sup 2+] accumulation between the yeasts examined. They point out the strong influence that the differential ecophysiology of strains from a single genus may exert on metal uptake characteristics and on external binding and intracellular distribution of essential ions.

  20. Novel Sfp1 Transcriptional Regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gene Expression Changes During Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Chasity B.; Allen, Patricia L.; Rupert, Mark; Goulart, Carla; Hoehn, Alexander; Stodieck, Louis S.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2008-12-01

    This study identifies transcriptional regulation of stress response element (STRE) genes in space in the model eukaryotic organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To determine transcription-factor dependence, gene expression changes in space were examined in strains bearing green fluorescent protein tagged (GFP-tagged) reporters for YIL052C (Sfp1 dependent with stress), YST-2 (Sfp1/Rap1 dependent with stress), or SSA4 (Msn4 dependent with stress), along with strains of SSA4-GFP and YIL052C-GFP with individual deletions of the Msn4 or Sfp1. When compared to parallel ground controls, spaceflight induces significant gene expression changes in SSA4 (35% decrease) and YIL052C (45% decrease), while expression of YST-2 (0.08% decrease) did not change. In space, deletion of Sfp1 reversed the SSA4 gene expression effect (0.00% change), but Msn4 deletion yielded a similar decrease in SSA4 expression (34% change), which indicates that SSA4 gene expression is dependent on the Sfp1 transcription factor in space, unlike other stresses. For YIL052C, deletion of Sfp1 reversed the effect (0.01% change), and the Msn4 deletion maintained the decrease in expression (30% change), which indicates that expression of YIL052C is also dependent on Sfp1 in space. Spaceflight has selective and specific effects on SSA4 and YIL052C gene expression, indicated by novel dependence on Sfp1.

  1. Regulation of basal and induced levels of the MEL1 transcript in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Post-Beittenmiller, M A; Hamilton, R W; Hopper, J E

    1984-01-01

    The MEL1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for the production of alpha-galactosidase and for the catabolism of melibiose. Production of alpha-galactosidase is induced by galactose or melibiose and repressed by glucose. Inducibility is controlled by the positive and negative regulatory proteins GAL4 and GAL80, respectively. We have cloned the MEL1 gene to study its transcriptional expression and regulation. Evidence is presented that the MEL1 gene encodes alpha-galactosidase and that mel0 is a naturally occurring allele which lacks the alpha-galactosidase-coding sequences. RNAs prepared from wild-type cells and from cells carrying either the noninducible gal4-2 or GAL80S-100 allele grown on three different carbon sources were examined by Northern hybridization analyses. In wild-type cells under noninducing conditions, such as growth on glycerol-lactic acid, the MEL1 transcript was detected at a basal level which was 1 to 2% of the fully induced level. The basal level of expression was diminished in cells carrying the gal4-2 mutant allele but not in cells carrying the GAL80S-100 allele. The basal and induced RNA levels are repressed by glucose. Size determinations of the MEL1 transcripts detected in glycerol-lactic acid- and galactose-grown cells provided no evidence for two distinct transcripts. Images PMID:6209559

  2. Comprehensive X-Ray Structural Studies of the Quinolinate Phosphoribosyl Transferase (BNA6) From Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    di Luccio, E.; Wilson, D.K.

    2009-05-14

    Quinolinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase (QAPRTase, EC 2.4.2.19) is a 32 kDa enzyme encoded by the BNA6 gene in yeast and catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide from quinolinate and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). QAPRTase plays a key role in the tryptophan degradation pathway via kynurenine, leading to the de novo biosynthesis of NAD{sup +} and clearing the neurotoxin quinolinate. To improve our understanding of the specificity of the eukaryotic enzyme and the course of events associated with catalysis, we have determined the crystal structures of the apo and singly bound forms with the substrates quinolinate and PRPP. This reveals that the enzyme folds in a manner similar to that of various prokaryotic forms which are {approx}30% identical in sequence. In addition, the structure of the Michaelis complex is approximated by PRPP and the quinolinate analogue phthalate bound to the active site. These results allow insight into the kinetic mechanism of QAPRTase and provide an understanding of structural diversity in the active site of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae enzyme when compared to prokaryotic homologues.

  3. In Vivo Analysis of Folate Coenzymes and Their Compartmentation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, J. B.; Bognar, A. L.; Pearlman, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    In eukaryotes, enzymes responsible for the interconversion of one-carbon units exist in parallel in both mitochondria and the cytoplasm. Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were constructed that possess combinations of gene disruptions at the SHM1 [mitochondrial serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMTm)], SHM2 [cytoplasmic SHMT (SHMTc)], MIS1 [mitochondrial C(1)-tetrahydrofolate synthase (C(1)-THFSm)], ADE3 [cytoplasmic C(1)-THF synthase (C(1)-THFSc)], GCV1 [glycine cleavage system (GCV) protein T], and the GLY1 (involved in glycine synthesis) loci. Analysis of the in vivo growth characteristics and phenotypes was used to determine the contribution to cytoplasmic nucleic acid and amino acid anabolism by the mitochondrial enzymes involved in the interconversion of folate coenzymes. The data indicate that mitochondria transport formate to the cytoplasmic compartment and mitochondrial synthesis of formate appears to rely primarily on SHMTm rather than the glycine cleavage system. The glycine cleavage system and SHMTm cooperate to specifically synthesize serine. With the inactivation of SHM1, however, the glycine cleavage system can make an observable contribution to the level of mitochondrial formate. Inactivation of SHM1, SHM2 and ADE3 is required to render yeast auxotrophic for TMP and methionine, suggesting that TMP synthesized in mitochondria may be available to the cytoplasmic compartment. PMID:8852837

  4. The neglected nano-specific toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weicheng; Bao, Shaopan; Fang, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with unique physicochemical properties induce nano-specific (excess) toxicity in organisms compared with their bulk counterparts. Evaluation and consideration of nano-specific toxicity are meaningful for the safe design and environmental risk assessment of NPs. However, ZnO NPs have been reported to lack excess toxicity for diverse organisms. In the present study, the nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was evaluated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was not observed in the wild type yeast. However, the ZnO NPs induced very similar nano-specific toxicities in the three mutants with comparable log Te (particle) values (0.64 vs 0.65 vs 0.62), suggesting that the mutants were more sensitive and specific for the NPs’ nano-specific toxicity. The toxic effects in the yeast were slightly attributable to dissolved zinc ions from the ZnO (nano or bulk) particles. Oxidative damage and mechanical damage contributed to the toxic effect of the ZnO particles. The mechanism of mechanical damage is proposed to be an inherent characteristic underlying the nano-specific toxicity in the mutants. The log Te (particle) was a useful parameter for evaluation of NPs nano-specific toxicity, whereas log Te (ion) efficiently determined the NPs toxicity associated with released ions.

  5. Paradigm for industrial strain improvement identifies sodium acetate tolerance loci in Zymomonas mobilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shihui; Land, Miriam L; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Pelletier, Dale A; Lu, Tse-Yuan; Martin, S L.; Guo, Hao-Bo; Smith, Jeremy C; Brown, Steven D

    2010-01-01

    The application of systems biology tools holds promise for rational industrial microbial strain development. Here, we characterize a Zymomonas mobilis mutant (AcR) demonstrating sodium acetate tolerance that has potential importance in biofuel development. The genome changes associated with AcR are determined using microarray comparative genome sequencing (CGS) and 454-pyrosequencing. Sanger sequencing analysis is employed to validate genomic differences and to investigate CGS and 454-pyrosequencing limitations. Transcriptomics, genetic data and growth studies indicate that over-expression of the sodium-proton antiporter gene nhaA confers the elevated AcR sodium acetate tolerance phenotype. nhaA over-expression mostly confers enhanced sodium (Na{sup +}) tolerance and not acetate (Ac{sup -}) tolerance, unless both ions are present in sufficient quantities. NaAc is more inhibitory than potassium and ammonium acetate for Z. mobilis and the combination of elevated Na{sup +} and Ac{sup -} ions exerts a synergistic inhibitory effect for strain ZM4. A structural model for the NhaA sodium-proton antiporter is constructed to provide mechanistic insights. We demonstrate that Saccharomyces cerevisiae sodium-proton antiporter genes also contribute to sodium acetate, potassium acetate, and ammonium acetate tolerances. The present combination of classical and systems biology tools is a paradigm for accelerated industrial strain improvement and combines benefits of few a priori assumptions with detailed, rapid, mechanistic studies.

  6. Crystal structure of the oxygen-dependant coproporphyrinogen oxidase (Hem13p) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Phillips, John D; Whitby, Frank G; Warby, Christy A; Labbe, Pierre; Yang, Cheng; Pflugrath, James W; Ferrara, Joseph D; Robinson, Howard; Kushner, James P; Hill, Christopher P

    2004-09-10

    Coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO) is an essential enzyme that catalyzes the sixth step of the heme biosynthetic pathway. Unusually for heme biosynthetic enzymes, CPO exists in two evolutionarily and mechanistically distinct families, with eukaryotes and some prokaryotes employing members of the highly conserved oxygen-dependent CPO family. Here, we report the crystal structure of the oxygen-dependent CPO from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Hem13p), which was determined by optimized sulfur anomalous scattering and refined to a resolution of 2.0 A. The protein adopts a novel structure that is quite different from predicted models and features a central flat seven-stranded anti-parallel sheet that is flanked by helices. The dimeric assembly, which is seen in different crystal forms, is formed by packing of helices and a short isolated strand that forms a beta-ladder with its counterpart in the partner subunit. The deep active-site cleft is lined by conserved residues and has been captured in open and closed conformations in two different crystal forms. A substratesized cavity is completely buried in the closed conformation by the approximately 8-A movement of a helix that forms a lid over the active site. The structure therefore suggests residues that likely play critical roles in catalysis and explains the deleterious effect of many of the mutations associated with the disease hereditary coproporphyria. PMID:15194705

  7. Studies on the "Aerobic" Acetyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae: Purification, Crystallization, and Physical Properties of the Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyanarayana, T.; Klein, Harold P.

    1976-01-01

    A procedure for the purification of a stable acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase (ACS) from aerobic cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is presented. The steps include differential centrifugation, solubilization of the bound enzyme from the crude mitochondrial fraction, ammonium sulfate fractionation, crystallization to constant specific activity from ammonium sulfate solutions followed by Bio-Gel A-1.5 m column chromatography. The resulting enzyme preparation is homogeneous as judged by chromatography on Bio-Gel columns, QAE-Sephadex A-50 anion exchange columns, analytical ultracentrifugal studies, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Sedimentation velocity runs revealed a single symmetric peak with an s(sub (20,w)) value of 10.6. The molecular weight of the native enzyme, as determined by gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation, is 250,000 +/- 500. In polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate, the molecular weight of the single polypeptide chain is 83,000 +/- 500. The purified enzyme is inhibited by palmityl-coenzyme A with a Hill interaction coefficient, n, of 2.88. These studies indicate that the ACS of aerobic Saccharomyces cerevisiae is composed of three subunits of identical or nearly identical size.

  8. Functional Genomics Using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Deletion Collections.

    PubMed

    Nislow, Corey; Wong, Lai Hong; Lee, Amy Huei-Yi; Giaever, Guri

    2016-01-01

    Constructed by a consortium of 16 laboratories, the Saccharomyces genome-wide deletion collections have, for the past decade, provided a powerful, rapid, and inexpensive approach for functional profiling of the yeast genome. Loss-of-function deletion mutants were systematically created using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based gene deletion strategy to generate a start-to-stop codon replacement of each open reading frame by homologous recombination. Each strain carries two molecular barcodes that serve as unique strain identifiers, enabling their growth to be analyzed in parallel and the fitness contribution of each gene to be quantitatively assessed by hybridization to high-density oligonucleotide arrays or through the use of next-generation sequencing technologies. Functional profiling of the deletion collections, using either strain-by-strain or parallel assays, provides an unbiased approach to systematically survey the yeast genome. The Saccharomyces yeast deletion collections have proved immensely powerful in contributing to the understanding of gene function, including functional relationships between genes and genetic pathways in response to diverse genetic and environmental perturbations. PMID:27587784

  9. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Population Divergence and Resistance to Oxidative Stress in Clinical, Domesticated and Wild Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Diezmann, Stephanie; Dietrich, Fred S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been associated with human life for millennia in the brewery and bakery. Recently it has been recognized as an emerging opportunistic pathogen. To study the evolutionary history of S. cerevisiae, the origin of clinical isolates and the importance of a virulence-associated trait, population genetics and phenotypic assays have been applied to an ecologically diverse set of 103 strains isolated from clinics, breweries, vineyards, fruits, soil, commercial supplements and insect guts. Methodology/Principal Findings DNA sequence data from five nuclear DNA loci were analyzed for population structure and haplotype distribution. Additionally, all strains were tested for survival of oxidative stress, a trait associated with microbial pathogenicity. DNA sequence analyses identified three genetic subgroups within the recombining S. cerevisiae strains that are associated with ecology, geography and virulence. Shared alleles suggest that the clinical isolates contain genetic contribution from the fruit isolates. Clinical and fruit isolates exhibit high levels of recombination, unlike the genetically homogenous soil isolates in which no recombination was detected. However, clinical and soil isolates were more resistant to oxidative stress than any other population, suggesting a correlation between survival in oxidative stress and yeast pathogenicity. Conclusions/Significance Population genetic analyses of S. cerevisiae delineated three distinct groups, comprising primarily the (i) human-associated brewery and vineyard strains, (ii) clinical and fruit isolates (iii) and wild soil isolates from eastern U.S. The interactions between S. cerevisiae and humans potentiate yeast evolution and the development of genetically, ecologically and geographically divergent groups. PMID:19390633

  10. Behavior of Lactobacillus plantarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in fresh and thermally processed orange juice.

    PubMed

    Alwazeer, Duried; Cachon, Remy; Divies, Charles

    2002-10-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are acid-tolerant microorganisms that are able to spoil citrus juices before and after pasteurization. The growth of these microorganisms in orange juice with and without pasteurization was investigated. Two samples of orange juice were inoculated with ca. 10(5) CFU/ml of each microorganism. Others were inoculated with ca. 10(7) CFU/ml of each microorganism and then thermally treated. L. plantarum populations were reduced by 2.5 and <1 log10 CFU/ml at 60 degrees C for 40 s and at 55 degrees C for 40 s, respectively. For the same treatments, S. cerevisiae populations were reduced by >6 and 2 log10 CFU/ml, respectively. Samples of heated and nonheated juice were incubated at 15 degrees C for 20 days. Injured populations of L. plantarum decreased by ca. 2 log10 CFU/ml during the first 70 h of storage, but those of S. cerevisiae did not decrease. The length of the lag phase after pasteurization increased 6.2-fold for L. plantarum and 1.9-fold for S. cerevisiae, and generation times increased by 41 and 86%, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate the differences in the capabilities of intact and injured cells of spoilage microorganisms to spoil citrus juice and the different thermal resistance levels of cells. While L. plantarum was more resistant to heat treatment than S. cerevisiae was, growth recovery after pasteurization was faster for the latter microorganism. PMID:12380743

  11. Label-Free Proteomic Analysis of Flavohemoglobin Deleted Strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Panja, Chiranjit; Setty, Rakesh K. S.; Vaidyanathan, Gopal; Ghosh, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Yeast flavohemoglobin, YHb, encoded by the nuclear gene YHB1, has been implicated in the nitrosative stress responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is still unclear how S. cerevisiae can withstand this NO level in the absence of flavohemoglobin. To better understand the physiological function of flavohemoglobin in yeast, in the present study a label-free differential proteomics study has been carried out in wild-type and YHB1 deleted strains of S. cerevisiae grown under fermentative conditions. From the analysis, 417 proteins in Y190 and 392 proteins in ΔYHB1 were identified with high confidence. Interestingly, among the differentially expressed identified proteins, 40 proteins were found to be downregulated whereas 41 were found to be upregulated in ΔYHB1 strain of S. cerevisiae (p value < 0.05). The differentially expressed proteins were also classified according to gene ontology (GO) terms. The most enriched and significant GO terms included nitrogen compound biosynthesis, amino acid biosynthesis, translational regulation, and protein folding. Interactions of differentially expressed proteins were generated using Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes (STRING) database. This is the first report which offers a more complete view of the proteome changes in S. cerevisiae in the absence of flavohemoglobin. PMID:26881076

  12. Transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe with linear plasmids containing 2 micron sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Guerrini, A M; Ascenzioni, F; Tribioli, C; Donini, P

    1985-01-01

    Linear plasmids were constructed by adding telomeres prepared from Tetrahymena pyriformis rDNA to a circular hybrid Escherichia coli-yeast vector and transforming Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The parental vector contained the entire 2 mu yeast circle and the LEU gene from S. cerevisiae. Three transformed clones were shown to contain linear plasmids which were characterized by restriction analysis and shown to be rearranged versions of the desired linear plasmids. The plasmids obtained were imperfect palindromes: part of the parental vector was present in duplicated form, part as unique sequences and part was absent. The sequences that had been lost included a large portion of the 2 mu circle. The telomeres were approximately 450 bp longer than those of T. pyriformis. DNA prepared from transformed S. cerevisiae clones was used to transform Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The transformed S. pombe clones contained linear plasmids identical in structure to their linear parents in S. cerevisiae. No structural re-arrangements or integration into S. pombe was observed. Little or no telomere growth had occurred after transfer from S. cerevisiae to S. pombe. A model is proposed to explain the genesis of the plasmids. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:3896773

  13. Molecular genetic study of introgression between Saccharomyces bayanus and S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Naumova, Elena S; Naumov, Gennadi I; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Aigle, Michel; Dubourdieu, Denis

    2005-10-30

    The genomic constitution of different S. bayanus strains and natural interspecific Saccharomyces hybrids has been studied by genetic and molecular methods. Unlike S. bayanus var. uvarum, some S. bayanus var. bayanus strains (the type culture CBS 380, CBS 378, CBS 425, CBS 1548) harbour a number of S. cerevisiae subtelomeric sequences: Y', pEL50, SUC, RTM and MAL. The two varieties, having 86-100% nDNA-nDNA reassociation, are partly genetically isolated from one another but completely isolated from S. cerevisiae. Genetic and molecular data support the maintaining of var. bayanus and var. uvarum strains in the species S. bayanus. Using Southern hybridization with species-specific molecular markers, RFLP of the MET2 gene and flow cytometry analysis, we showed that the non-S. cerevisiae parents are different in lager brewing yeasts and in wine hybrid strains. Our results suggest that S. pastorianus is a hybrid between S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus var. bayanus, while S. bayanus var. uvarum contributed to the formation of the wine hybrids S6U and CID1. According to the partial sequence of ACT1 gene and flow cytometry analysis, strain CID1 is a triple hybrid between S. cerevisiae, S. kudriavzevii and S. bayanus var. uvarum. PMID:16240458

  14. Dominance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in alcoholic fermentation processes: role of physiological fitness and microbial interactions.

    PubMed

    Albergaria, Helena; Arneborg, Nils

    2016-03-01

    Winemaking, brewing and baking are some of the oldest biotechnological processes. In all of them, alcoholic fermentation is the main biotransformation and Saccharomyces cerevisiae the primary microorganism. Although a wide variety of microbial species may participate in alcoholic fermentation and contribute to the sensory properties of end-products, the yeast S. cerevisiae invariably dominates the final stages of fermentation. The ability of S. cerevisiae to outcompete other microbial species during alcoholic fermentation processes, such as winemaking, has traditionally been ascribed to its high fermentative power and capacity to withstand the harsh environmental conditions, i.e. high levels of ethanol and organic acids, low pH values, scarce oxygen availability and depletion of certain nutrients. However, in recent years, several studies have raised evidence that S. cerevisiae, beyond its remarkable fitness for alcoholic fermentation, also uses defensive strategies mediated by different mechanisms, such as cell-to-cell contact and secretion of antimicrobial peptides, to combat other microorganisms. In this paper, we review the main physiological features underlying the special aptitude of S. cerevisiae for alcoholic fermentation and discuss the role of microbial interactions in its dominance during alcoholic fermentation, as well as its relevance for winemaking. PMID:26728020

  15. Metabolic-Flux Profiling of the Yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia stipitis

    PubMed Central

    Fiaux, Jocelyne; Çakar, Z. Petek; Sonderegger, Marco; Wüthrich, Kurt; Szyperski, Thomas; Sauer, Uwe

    2003-01-01

    The so far largely uncharacterized central carbon metabolism of the yeast Pichia stipitis was explored in batch and glucose-limited chemostat cultures using metabolic-flux ratio analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance. The concomitantly characterized network of active metabolic pathways was compared to those identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which led to the following conclusions. (i) There is a remarkably low use of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate (PP) pathway for glucose catabolism in S. cerevisiae when compared to P. stipitis batch cultures. (ii) Metabolism of P. stipitis batch cultures is fully respirative, which contrasts with the predominantly respiro-fermentative metabolic state of S. cerevisiae. (iii) Glucose catabolism in chemostat cultures of both yeasts is primarily oxidative. (iv) In both yeasts there is significant in vivo malic enzyme activity during growth on glucose. (v) The amino acid biosynthesis pathways are identical in both yeasts. The present investigation thus demonstrates the power of metabolic-flux ratio analysis for comparative profiling of central carbon metabolism in lower eukaryotes. Although not used for glucose catabolism in batch culture, we demonstrate that the PP pathway in S. cerevisiae has a generally high catabolic capacity by overexpressing the Escherichia coli transhydrogenase UdhA in phosphoglucose isomerase-deficient S. cerevisiae. PMID:12582134

  16. Functional expression of a heterologous nickel-dependent, ATP-independent urease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Milne, N; Luttik, M A H; Cueto Rojas, H F; Wahl, A; van Maris, A J A; Pronk, J T; Daran, J M

    2015-07-01

    In microbial processes for production of proteins, biomass and nitrogen-containing commodity chemicals, ATP requirements for nitrogen assimilation affect product yields on the energy producing substrate. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a current host for heterologous protein production and potential platform for production of nitrogen-containing chemicals, uptake and assimilation of ammonium requires 1 ATP per incorporated NH3. Urea assimilation by this yeast is more energy efficient but still requires 0.5 ATP per NH3 produced. To decrease ATP costs for nitrogen assimilation, the S. cerevisiae gene encoding ATP-dependent urease (DUR1,2) was replaced by a Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene encoding ATP-independent urease (ure2), along with its accessory genes ureD, ureF and ureG. Since S. pombe ure2 is a Ni(2+)-dependent enzyme and Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not express native Ni(2+)-dependent enzymes, the S. pombe high-affinity nickel-transporter gene (nic1) was also expressed. Expression of the S. pombe genes into dur1,2Δ S. cerevisiae yielded an in vitro ATP-independent urease activity of 0.44±0.01 µmol min(-1) mg protein(-1) and restored growth on urea as sole nitrogen source. Functional expression of the Nic1 transporter was essential for growth on urea at low Ni(2+) concentrations. The maximum specific growth rates of the engineered strain on urea and ammonium were lower than those of a DUR1,2 reference strain. In glucose-limited chemostat cultures with urea as nitrogen source, the engineered strain exhibited an increased release of ammonia and reduced nitrogen content of the biomass. Our results indicate a new strategy for improving yeast-based production of nitrogen-containing chemicals and demonstrate that Ni(2+)-dependent enzymes can be functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae. PMID:26037463

  17. Fermentation profile of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida tropicalis as starter cultures on barley malt medium.

    PubMed

    Alloue-Boraud, Wazé Aimée Mireille; N'Guessan, Kouadio Florent; Djeni, N'Dédé Théodore; Hiligsmann, Serge; Djè, Koffi Marcellin; Delvigne, Franck

    2015-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae C8-5 and Candida tropicalis F0-5 isolated from traditional sorghum beer were tested for kinetic parameters on barley malt extract, YPD (863 medium) and for alcohol production. The results showed that C. tropicalis has the highest maximum growth rate and the lowest doubling time. Values were 0.22 and 0.32 h(-1) for maximum growth rate, 3 h 09 min and 2 h 09 min for doubling time respectively on barley malt extract and YPD. On contrary, glucose consumption was the fastest with S. cerevisiae (-0.36 and -0.722 g/l/h respectively on barley malt extract and YPD). When these two yeasts were used as starters in pure culture and co-culture at proportion of 1:1 and 2:1 (cell/cell) for barley malt extract fermentation, we noticed that maltose content increased first from 12.12 g/l to 13.62-16.46 g/l and then decreased. The highest increase was obtained with starter C. tropicalis + S. cerevisiae 2:1. On contrary, glucose content decreased throughout all the fermentation process. For all the starters used, the major part of the ethanol was produced at 16 h of fermentation. Values obtained in the final beers were 11.4, 11.6, 10.4 and 10.9 g/l for fermentation conducted with S. cerevisiae, C. tropicalis, C. tropicalis + S. cerevisiae 1:1 and C. tropicalis + S. cerevisiae 2:1. Cell viability measurement during the fermentation by using flow cytometry revealed that the lowest mean channel fluorescence for FL3 (yeast rate of death) was obtained with C. tropicalis + S. cerevisiae 2:1 after 48 h of fermentation. PMID:26243947

  18. Functional expression of the lactate permease Jen1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed Central

    Soares-Silva, Isabel; Schuller, Dorit; Andrade, Raquel P; Baltazar, Fátima; Cássio, Fernanda; Casal, Margarida

    2003-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the activity for the lactate-proton symporter is dependent on JEN1 gene expression. Pichia pastoris was transformed with an integrative plasmid containing the JEN1 gene. After 24 h of methanol induction, Northern and Western blotting analyses indicated the expression of JEN1 in the transformants. Lactate permease activity was obtained in P. pastoris cells with a V (max) of 2.1 nmol x s(-1) x mg of dry weight(-1). Reconstitution of the lactate permease activity was achieved by fusing plasma membranes of P. pastoris methanol-induced cells with Escherichia coli liposomes containing cytochrome c oxidase, as proton-motive force. These assays in reconstituted heterologous P. pastoris membrane vesicles demonstrate that S. cerevisiae Jen1p is a functional lactate transporter. Moreover, a S. cerevisiae strain deleted in the JEN1 gene was transformed with a centromeric plasmid containing JEN1 under the control of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase constitutive promotor. Constitutive JEN1 expression and lactic acid uptake were observed in cells grown on either glucose and/or acetic acid. The highest V (max) (0.84 nmol x s(-1) x mg of dry weight(-1)) was obtained in acetic acid-grown cells. Thus overexpression of the S. cerevisiae JEN1 gene in both S. cerevisiae and P. pastoris cells resulted in increased activity of lactate transport when compared with the data previously reported in lactic acid-grown cells of native S. cerevisiae strains. Jen1p is the only S. cerevisiae secondary porter characterized so far by heterologous expression in P. pastoris at both the cell and the membrane-vesicle levels. PMID:12962538

  19. Microencapsulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its evaluation to protect in simulated gastric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani-Choboghlo, Hassan; Zahraei-Salehi, Taghi; Ashrafi-Helan, Javad; Yahyaraeyat, Ramak; Pourjafar, Hadi; Nikaein, Donya; Balal, Asad; Khosravi, Ali-Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Probiotic yeasts are used in production of functional foods and pharmaceutical products. They play an important role in promoting and maintaining human health. Until now, little work has been published on improving the survival of Saccharomyces in stimulated gastrointestinal condition. Material and Methods: In this study the exposure of the yeast in the capsulate and free forms to artificial gastrointestinal conditions was assessed and the number of viable Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells during 0 to 120 mines in these conditions was evaluated by a pour plate method using sabouraud dextrose agar. Results: Results showed the shape of the beads was generally spherical, sometimes elliptical with a mean diameter of about 50–90 μm. Also count of viable probiotic cells obtained for all the microcapsules were above the recommended levels for a probiotic food. Also decrease of approximately 4 logs was noted in the number of free cells after 2 h of incubation at pH 2 and 8, when compared to decreases of about 2 logs in the all microencapsulated S. cerevisiae under similar conditions. Conclusion: It is concluded that microencapsulation process was significantly able to increase the survival rate of Saccharomyces in a simulated gastrointestinal condition (p<0.05).. PMID:26885335

  20. Formation of AAV Single Stranded DNA Genome from a Circular Plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cervelli, Tiziana; Backovic, Ana; Galli, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are promising tools for targeted transfer in gene therapy studies. Many efforts have been accomplished to improve production and purification methods. We thought to develop a simple eukaryotic system allowing AAV replication which could provide an excellent opportunity for studying AAV biology and, more importantly, for AAV vector production. It has been shown that yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to replicate and form the capsid of many viruses. We investigated the ability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to carry out the replication of a recombinant AAV (rAAV). When a plasmid containing a rAAV genome in which the cap gene was replaced with the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene, was co-transformed in yeast with a plasmid expressing Rep68, a significant number of URA3+ clones were scored (more than 30-fold over controls). Molecular analysis of low molecular weight DNA by Southern blotting revealed that single stranded DNA is formed and that the plasmid is entirely replicated. The ssDNA contains the ITRs, URA3 gene and also vector sequences suggesting the presence of two distinct molecules. Its formation was dependent on Rep68 expression and ITR. These data indicate that DNA is not obtained by the canonical AAV replication pathway. PMID:21853137

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE PYROGENICITY OF CANDIDA ALBICANS, SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE, AND CRYPTOCOCCUS NEOFORMANS.

    PubMed

    KOBAYASHI, G S; FRIEDMAN, L

    1964-09-01

    Kobayashi, George S. (Tulane University, New Orleans, La.), and Lorraine Friedman. Characterization of the pyrogenicity of Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Cryptococcus neoformans. J. Bacteriol. 88:660-666. 1964.-The intravenous injection into rabbits of 10(9) yeast cells of Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or Cryptococcus neoformans (both slightly and heavily encapsulated forms) induced a febrile response indistinguishable from that elicited by gram-negative bacterial endotoxin. There was a brisk rise in body temperature which began as early as 30 min after injection, peaked once or twice, and then returned to normal after about 10 hr. With viable C. albicans, the febrile response did not return to normal but remained elevated for several days and terminated at death of the animal. Of three extraction procedures employed in attempts to isolate the endotoxin-like pyrogenically active substances from C. albicans, only one, the phenol extraction method, was successful. Pyrogenic substances were more easily extractable from S. cerevisiae, but extracted cells of both species were still highly pyrogenic. It was concluded that the particulate nature of the yeast cell did not contribute to the induction of fever, for latex particles of a similar size were nonpyrogenic. Viable or heat-killed C. albicans, phenol extract of C. albicans, zymosan, and polystyrene latex particles all failed to induce in rabbits increased dermal reactivity to epinephrine. PMID:14208504

  2. Formation of AAV single stranded DNA genome from a circular plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cervelli, Tiziana; Backovic, Ana; Galli, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are promising tools for targeted transfer in gene therapy studies. Many efforts have been accomplished to improve production and purification methods. We thought to develop a simple eukaryotic system allowing AAV replication which could provide an excellent opportunity for studying AAV biology and, more importantly, for AAV vector production. It has been shown that yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to replicate and form the capsid of many viruses. We investigated the ability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to carry out the replication of a recombinant AAV (rAAV). When a plasmid containing a rAAV genome in which the cap gene was replaced with the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene, was co-transformed in yeast with a plasmid expressing Rep68, a significant number of URA3(+) clones were scored (more than 30-fold over controls). Molecular analysis of low molecular weight DNA by Southern blotting revealed that single stranded DNA is formed and that the plasmid is entirely replicated. The ssDNA contains the ITRs, URA3 gene and also vector sequences suggesting the presence of two distinct molecules. Its formation was dependent on Rep68 expression and ITR. These data indicate that DNA is not obtained by the canonical AAV replication pathway. PMID:21853137

  3. Hydrodynamic cavitation: characterization of a novel design with energy considerations for the inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in apple juice.

    PubMed

    Milly, P J; Toledo, R T; Kerr, W L; Armstead, D

    2008-08-01

    A Shockwave Power Reactor consisting of an annulus with a rotating pock-marked inner cylinder was used to induce hydrodynamic cavitation in calcium-fortified apple juice flowing in the annular space. Lethality on Saccharomyces cerevisiae was assessed at processing temperatures of 65 and 76.7 degrees C. Details of the novel equipment design were presented and energy consumption was compared to conventional and pulsed electric fields processing technologies. The mean log cycle reduction of S. cerevisiae was 6.27 CFU/mL and all treatments resulted in nonrecoverable viable cells. Induced lethality from hydrodynamic cavitation on S. cerevisiae exceeded the predicted values based on experimentally determined thermal resistance. Rotation of 3000 and 3600 rpm at flow rates greater than 1.0 L/min raised product temperature from 20 to 65.6 or 76.7 degrees C, respectively, and energy input was less than 220 kJ/kg. Conversion efficiency from electrical to thermal was 55% to 84%. Hydrodynamic cavitation enhanced lethality of spoilage microorganisms in minimally processed juices and reduced energy usage. PMID:19241562

  4. Non-enzymatic roles for the URE2 glutathione S-transferase in the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Tatina T; Kujumdzieva, Anna V; Vuilleumier, Stéphane

    2010-11-01

    The response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to arsenic involves a large ensemble of genes, many of which are associated with glutathione-related metabolism. The role of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) product of the URE2 gene involved in resistance of S. cerevisiae to a broad range of heavy metals was investigated. Glutathione peroxidase activity, previously reported for the Ure2p protein, was unaffected in cell-free extracts of an ure2Δ mutant of S. cerevisiae. Glutathione levels in the ure2Δ mutant were lowered about threefold compared to the isogenic wild-type strain but, as in the wild-type strain, increased 2-2.5-fold upon addition of either arsenate (As(V)) or arsenite (As(III)). However, lack of URE2 specifically caused sensitivity to arsenite but not to arsenate. The protective role of URE2 against arsenite depended solely on the GST-encoding 3'-end portion of the gene. The nitrogen source used for growth was suggested to be an important determinant of arsenite toxicity, in keeping with non-enzymatic roles of the URE2 gene product in GATA-type regulation. PMID:20740275

  5. Heritable capture of heterochromatin dynamics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Anne E; Rine, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Heterochromatin exerts a heritable form of eukaryotic gene repression and contributes to chromosome segregation fidelity and genome stability. However, to date there has been no quantitative evaluation of the stability of heterochromatic gene repression. We designed a genetic strategy to capture transient losses of gene silencing in Saccharomyces as permanent, heritable changes in genotype and phenotype. This approach revealed rare transcription within heterochromatin that occurred in approximately 1/1000 cell divisions. In concordance with multiple lines of evidence suggesting these events were rare and transient, single-molecule RNA FISH showed that transcription was limited. The ability to monitor fluctuations in heterochromatic repression uncovered previously unappreciated roles for Sir1, a silencing establishment factor, in the maintenance and/or inheritance of silencing. In addition, we identified the sirtuin Hst3 and its histone target as contributors to the stability of the silenced state. These approaches revealed dynamics of a heterochromatin function that have been heretofore inaccessible. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05007.001 PMID:25581000

  6. Purification, characterization, and immunofluorescence localization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae capping protein.

    PubMed

    Amatruda, J F; Cooper, J A

    1992-06-01

    Capping protein binds the barbed ends of actin filaments and nucleates actin filament assembly in vitro. We purified capping protein from Saccharomyces cervisiae. One of the two subunits is the product of the CAP2 gene, which we previously identified as the gene encoding the beta subunit of capping protein based on its sequence similarity to capping protein beta subunits in chicken and Dictyostelium (Amatruda, J. F., J. F. Cannon, K. Tatchell, C. Hug, and J. A. Cooper. 1990. Nature (Lond.) 344:352-354). Yeast capping protein has activity in critical concentration and low-shear viscometry assays consistent with barbed-end capping activity. Like chicken capping protein, yeast capping protein is inhibited by PIP2. By immunofluorescence microscopy yeast capping protein colocalizes with cortical actin spots at the site of bud emergence and at the tips of growing buds and shmoos. In contrast, capping protein does not colocalize with actin cables or with actin rings at the site of cytokinesis. PMID:1315784

  7. Reconstruction of cytosolic fumaric acid biosynthetic pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fumaric acid is a commercially important component of foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals and industrial materials, yet the current methods of production are unsustainable and ecologically destructive. Results In this study, the fumarate biosynthetic pathway involving reductive reactions of the tricarboxylic acid cycle was exogenously introduced in S. cerevisiae by a series of simple genetic modifications. First, the Rhizopus oryzae genes for malate dehydrogenase (RoMDH) and fumarase (RoFUM1) were heterologously expressed. Then, expression of the endogenous pyruvate carboxylase (PYC2) was up-regulated. The resultant yeast strain, FMME-001 ↑PYC2 + ↑RoMDH, was capable of producing significantly higher yields of fumarate in the glucose medium (3.18 ± 0.15 g liter-1) than the control strain FMME-001 empty vector. Conclusions The results presented here provide a novel strategy for fumarate biosynthesis, which represents an important advancement in producing high yields of fumarate in a sustainable and ecologically-friendly manner. PMID:22335940

  8. D-xylulose fermentation to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, L.C.; Gong, C.S. Chen, L.F.; Tsao, G.T.

    1981-01-01

    Commercial bakers' yeast (S. cerevisiae) was used to study the conversion of D-xylulose to ethanol in the presence of D-xylose. The rate of ethanol production increased with an increase in yeast cell density. The optimal temperature for D-xylulose fermentation was 35 degrees, and the optimal pH range was 4-6. The fermentation of D-xylulose by yeast resulted in the production of ethanol as the major product; small amounts of xylitol and glycerol were also produced. The production of xylitol was influenced by pH as well as by temperature. High pH values and low temperatures enhanced xylitol production. The rate of D-xylulose fermentation decreased when the production of ethanol yielded concentrations of greater than 4%. The slow conversion rate of C-xylulose to ethanol was increased by increasing the yeast cell density. The overall production of ethanol from D-xylulose by yeast cells under optimal conditions was 90% of the theoretical yield.

  9. The relationship between enzyme activity, cell geometry, and fitness in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, R L; Kukora, J R; Adams, J

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme activity, cell geometry, and the ploidy levels has been investigated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Diploid cells have 1.57 times the volume of haploid cells under nonlimiting growth conditions (minimal medium). However, when diploid cells are grown under conditions of carbon limitation, they have the same volume as haploid cells. Thus, by altering the environmental conditions, cell size can be varied independently of the degree of ploidy. The results indicate that the basic biochemical parameters of the cell are primarily determined by cell geometry rather than ploidy level. RNA content, protein content, and ornithine transcarbamylase (carbamoylphosphate: L-ornithine carbamoyltransferase, EC 2.1.3.3), tryptophan synthetase [L-serine hydro-lyase (adding indole), EC 4.2.1.20], and invertase (alpha-D-glucoside glucohydrolase, Ec 3.2.1.20) activity are related to cell volume, whereas acid phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.2) activity, a cell surface enzyme, is related to the surface area of the cells. Fitness is determined by the activity of certain cell surface enzymes, such as acid phosphatase, diploids would be expected to have a lower fitness than haploids because of the lower surface area/volume ratio. However, when fitness is determined by the activity of an internal enzyme, diploids would be expected to have the same fitness as haploids. Results from competition experiments between haploids and diploids are consistent with these predictions. The significance of these results to the evolution of diploidy as the predominant phase of the life cycle of higher plants and animals is discussed. PMID:1093169

  10. Multiple Pathways of Recombination Induced by Double-Strand Breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pâques, Frédéric; Haber, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been the principal organism used in experiments to examine genetic recombination in eukaryotes. Studies over the past decade have shown that meiotic recombination and probably most mitotic recombination arise from the repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs). There are multiple pathways by which such DSBs can be repaired, including several homologous recombination pathways and still other nonhomologous mechanisms. Our understanding has also been greatly enriched by the characterization of many proteins involved in recombination and by insights that link aspects of DNA repair to chromosome replication. New molecular models of DSB-induced gene conversion are presented. This review encompasses these different aspects of DSB-induced recombination in Saccharomyces and attempts to relate genetic, molecular biological, and biochemical studies of the processes of DNA repair and recombination. PMID:10357855

  11. Genomic diversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts associated with alcoholic fermentation of bacanora produced by artisanal methods.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Ainza, M L; Zamora-Quiñonez, K A; Moreno-Ibarra, G M; Acedo-Félix, E

    2015-03-01

    Bacanora is a spirituous beverage elaborated with Agave angustifolia Haw in an artisanal process. Natural fermentation is mostly performed with native yeasts and bacteria. In this study, 228 strains of yeast like Saccharomyces were isolated from the natural alcoholic fermentation on the production of bacanora. Restriction analysis of the amplified region ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 of the ribosomal DNA genes (RFLPr) were used to confirm the genus, and 182 strains were identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These strains displayed high genomic variability in their chromosomes profiles by karyotyping. Electrophoretic profiles of the strains evaluated showed a large number of chromosomes the size of which ranged between 225 and 2200 kpb approximately. PMID:25561061

  12. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Ždralević, Maša; Marra, Ersilia

    2013-01-01

    Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications. PMID:23430312

  13. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zdralević, Maša; Marra, Ersilia

    2013-01-01

    Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications. PMID:23430312

  14. Engineering the Saccharomyces cerevisiae isoprenoid pathway for de novo production of aromatic monoterpenes in wine.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Oscar; Ramón, Daniel; Orejas, Margarita

    2008-03-01

    Grape musts contain a variety of terpenols that significantly affect wine aroma. The amounts of these metabolites depend on the grape variety, and many cultivars are non-aromatic. Yeasts like Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot produce and excrete monoterpenes efficiently, mainly due to their lack of monoterpene synthases. By metabolic engineering we have modified the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway in a wine yeast strain of S. cerevisiae expressing the Clarkia breweri S-linalool synthase gene. Under microvinification conditions, without compromising other desirable and useful fermentative traits, the recombinant yeast efficiently excreted linalool to levels exceeding the threshold of human perception. Bearing in mind the possibility of (co-)expressing other genes that encode enzymes leading to the production of various aroma compounds and the feasibility of controlling the levels of their expression, the potential of this achievement for future genetic manipulation of wine varietal aroma or for use in other alcoholic drinks seems very promising. PMID:18155949

  15. Expression and Secretion of a Cellulomonas fimi Exoglucanase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Claudia; Gilkes, Neil; O'Neill, Gary; Miller, Robert C.; Skipper, Nigel

    1988-01-01

    We used the yeast MEL1 gene for secreted α-galactosidase to construct cartridges for the regulated expression of foreign proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The gene for a Cellulomonas fimi β-1,4-exoglucanase was inserted into one cartridge to create a fusion of the α-galactosidase signal peptide to the exoglucanase. Yeast transformed with plasmids containing this construction produced active extracellular exoglucanase when grown under conditions appropriate to MEL1 promoter function. The cells also produced active intracellular enzyme. The secreted exoglucanase was N-glycosylated and was produced continuously during culture growth. It hydrolyzed xylan, carboxymethyl cellulose, 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-cellobiose, and p-nitrophenyl-β-d-cellobiose. A comparison of the recombinant S. cerevisiae enzyme with the native C. fimi enzyme showed the yeast version to have an identical Km and pH optimum but to be more thermostable. Images PMID:16347562

  16. Genome-wide construction of a series of designed segmental aneuploids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Natesuntorn, Waranya; Iwami, Kotaro; Matsubara, Yuki; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Kaneko, Yoshinobu; Harashima, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Segmental aneuploidy can play an important role in environmental adaptation. However, study of segmental aneuploids is severely hampered by the difficulty of creating them in a designed fashion. Here, we describe a PCR-mediated chromosome duplication (PCDup) technology that enables the generation of segmental aneuploidy at any desired chromosomal region in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We constructed multiple strains harboring 100 kb to 200 kb segmental duplications covering the whole of the S. cerevisiae genome. Interestingly, some segmental aneuploidies confer stress tolerance, such as to high temperature, ethanol and strong acids, while others induce cell lethality and stress sensitivity, presumably as result of the simultaneous increases in dosages of multiple genes. We suggest that our PCDup technology will accelerate studies into the phenotypic changes resulting from alteration of gene dosage balance of multiple genes and will provide new insights into the adaptive molecular mechanisms in the genome in segmental aneuploidy-derived human diseases. PMID:26224198

  17. Effects of aeration on formation and localization of the acetyl coenzyme A synthetases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, H. P.; Jahnke, L.

    1979-01-01

    Previous studies on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that two different forms of the enzyme acetyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACS) are present, depending on the conditions under which the cells are grown. The paper evaluates the usefulness of a method designed to assay both synthetases simultaneously in yeast homogenates. The data presented confirm the possibility of simultaneous detection and estimation of the amount of both ACSs of S. cerevisiae in crude homogenates of this strain, making possible the study of physiological factors involved in the formation of these isoenzymes. One important factor for specifying which of the two enzymes is found in these yeast cells is the presence or absence of oxygen in their environment. Aeration not only affects the ratio of the two ACSs but also appears to affect the cellular distribution of these enzymes. Most of the data presented suggest the possibility that the nonaerobic ACS may serve as a precursor to the aerobic form.

  18. Development of a glutathione production process from proteinaceous biomass resources using protease-displaying Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kim, Songhee; Yoshida, Hideyo; Kiriyama, Kentaro; Kondo, Takashi; Okai, Naoko; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-02-01

    Glutathione is a valuable tri-peptide that is widely used in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industries. Glutathione is produced industrially by fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and supplementation of fermentation with several amino acids can increase intracellular GSH content. More recently, however, focus has been given to protein as a resource for biofuel and fine chemical production. We demonstrate that expression of a protease on the cell surface of S. cerevisiae enables the direct use of keratin and soy protein as a source of amino acids and that these substrates enhanced intracellular GSH content. Furthermore, fermentation using soy protein also enhanced cell concentration. GSH fermentation from keratin and to a greater extent from soy protein using protease-displaying yeast yielded greater GSH productivity compared to GSH fermentation with amino acid supplementation. This protease-displaying yeast is potentially applicable to a variety of processes for the bio-production of value-added chemicals from proteinaceous biomass resources. PMID:22075633

  19. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a key cell factory platform for future biorefineries.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kuk-Ki; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-08-01

    Metabolic engineering is the enabling science of development of efficient cell factories for the production of fuels, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and food ingredients through microbial fermentations. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a key cell factory already used for the production of a wide range of industrial products, and here we review ongoing work, particularly in industry, on using this organism for the production of butanol, which can be used as biofuel, and isoprenoids, which can find a wide range of applications including as pharmaceuticals and as biodiesel. We also look into how engineering of yeast can lead to improved uptake of sugars that are present in biomass hydrolyzates, and hereby allow for utilization of biomass as feedstock in the production of fuels and chemicals employing S. cerevisiae. Finally, we discuss the perspectives of how technologies from systems biology and synthetic biology can be used to advance metabolic engineering of yeast. PMID:22388689

  20. Production of Volatile and Sulfur Compounds by 10 Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Inoculated in Trebbiano Must.

    PubMed

    Patrignani, Francesca; Chinnici, Fabio; Serrazanetti, Diana I; Vernocchi, Pamela; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Riponi, Claudio; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    In wines, the presence of sulfur compounds is the resulting of several contributions among which yeast metabolism. The characterization of the starter Saccharomyces cerevisiae needs to be performed also taking into account this ability even if evaluated together with the overall metabolic profile. In this perspective, principal aim of this experimental research was the evaluation of the volatile profiles, throughout GC/MS technique coupled with solid phase micro extraction, of wines obtained throughout the fermentation of 10 strains of S. cerevisiae. In addition, the production of sulfur compounds was further evaluated by using a gas-chromatograph coupled with a Flame Photometric Detector. Specifically, the 10 strains were inoculated in Trebbiano musts and the fermentations were monitored for 19 days. In the produced wines, volatile and sulfur compounds as well as amino acid concentrations were investigated. Also the physico-chemical characteristics of the wines and their electronic nose profiles were evaluated. PMID:26973621

  1. Production of Volatile and Sulfur Compounds by 10 Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Inoculated in Trebbiano Must

    PubMed Central

    Patrignani, Francesca; Chinnici, Fabio; Serrazanetti, Diana I.; Vernocchi, Pamela; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Riponi, Claudio; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    In wines, the presence of sulfur compounds is the resulting of several contributions among which yeast metabolism. The characterization of the starter Saccharomyces cerevisiae needs to be performed also taking into account this ability even if evaluated together with the overall metabolic profile. In this perspective, principal aim of this experimental research was the evaluation of the volatile profiles, throughout GC/MS technique coupled with solid phase micro extraction, of wines obtained throughout the fermentation of 10 strains of S. cerevisiae. In addition, the production of sulfur compounds was further evaluated by using a gas-chromatograph coupled with a Flame Photometric Detector. Specifically, the 10 strains were inoculated in Trebbiano musts and the fermentations were monitored for 19 days. In the produced wines, volatile and sulfur compounds as well as amino acid concentrations were investigated. Also the physico-chemical characteristics of the wines and their electronic nose profiles were evaluated. PMID:26973621

  2. Reversal of the β-oxidation cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-03-20

    Functionally reversing the β-oxidation cycle represents an efficient and versatile strategy for synthesis of a wide variety of fuels and chemicals. However, due to the compartmentalization of cellular metabolisms, reversing the β-oxidation cycle in eukaryotic systems remains elusive. Here, we report the first successful reversal of the β-oxidation cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an important cell factory for large-scale production of fuels and chemicals. After extensive gene cloning and enzyme activity assays, a reversed β-oxidation pathway was functionally constructed in the yeast cytosol, which led to the synthesis of n-butanol, medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs), and medium-chain fatty acid ethyl esters (MCFAEEs). The resultant recombinant strain provides a new broadly applicable platform for synthesis of fuels and chemicals in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24959659

  3. Lead sulfide nanoparticles increase cell wall chitin content and induce apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meiqing; Yu, Qilin; Hu, Mengyuan; Hao, Zhenwei; Zhang, Chengdong; Li, Mingchun

    2014-05-30

    Although there have been numerous studies on bacterial toxicity, the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles toward fungi remains poorly understood. We investigated the toxicity of various sizes of lead sulfide particles against the important model fungus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The smallest particle exerted the highest toxicity, inhibiting cell growth and decreasing cell viability, likely reflecting reduced sedimentation and persistent cell wall attack. In response to cell wall stress, S. cerevisiae showed an increase in the cell wall chitin content and the overexpression of FKS2 and PRM5, two genes of the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Cell wall stress increased the concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis. The contribution of dissolved lead ions to the overall toxicity was negligible. These findings provide the first demonstration of the physiological protective response of a fungus toward nanoparticles, thereby contributing useful information to the assessment of the environmental impact of metal nanoparticles. PMID:24704549

  4. Effect of acetaldehyde on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis subjected to environmental shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, G.A.; Hobley, T.J.; Pamment, N.B.

    1997-01-05

    The lag phase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to a step increase in temperature or ethanol concentration was reduced by as much as 60% when acetaldehyde was added to the medium at concentrations less than 0.1 g/L. Maximum specific growth rates were also substantially increased. Even greater proportional reductions in lag time due to acetaldehyde addition were observed for ethanol-shocked cultures of Zymomonas mobilis. Acetaldehyde had no effect on S. cerevisiae cultures started from stationary phase inocula in the absence of environmental shock and its lag-reducing effects were greater in complex medium than in a defined synthetic medium. Acetaldehyde reacted strongly with the ingredients of complex culture media. It is proposed that the effect of added acetaldehyde may be to compensate for the inability of cells to maintain transmembrane acetaldehyde gradients following an environmental shock.

  5. Budding Yeast for Budding Geneticists: A Primer on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Model System

    PubMed Central

    Duina, Andrea A.; Miller, Mary E.; Keeney, Jill B.

    2014-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a powerful model organism for studying fundamental aspects of eukaryotic cell biology. This Primer article presents a brief historical perspective on the emergence of this organism as a premier experimental system over the course of the past century. An overview of the central features of the S. cerevisiae genome, including the nature of its genetic elements and general organization, is also provided. Some of the most common experimental tools and resources available to yeast geneticists are presented in a way designed to engage and challenge undergraduate and graduate students eager to learn more about the experimental amenability of budding yeast. Finally, a discussion of several major discoveries derived from yeast studies highlights the far-reaching impact that the yeast system has had and will continue to have on our understanding of a variety of cellular processes relevant to all eukaryotes, including humans. PMID:24807111

  6. The effects of microgravity on induced mutation in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, K.; Takahashi, S.; Masukawa, M.; Sekikawa, K.; Amano, T.; Nakano, T.; Nagaoka, S.; Ohnishi, T.

    2001-01-01

    We examined whether microgravity influences the induced-mutation frequencies through in vivo experiments during space flight aboard the space shuttle Discovery (STS-91). We prepared dried samples of repair-deficient strains and parental strains of Escherichia ( E.) coli and Saccharomyces ( S.) cerevisiae given DNA damage treatment. After culture in space, we measured the induced-mutation frequencies and SOS-responses under microgravity. The experimental findings indicate that almost the same induced-mutation frequencies and SOS-responses of space samples were observed in both strains compared with the ground control samples. It is suggested that microgravity might not influence induced-mutation frequencies and SOS-responses at the stages of DNA replication and/or DNA repair. In addition, we developed a new experimental apparatus for space experiments to culture and freeze stocks of E. coli and S. cerevisiae cells.

  7. The isoprenoid pathway and transcriptional response to its inhibitors in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kuranda, Klaudia; François, Jean; Palamarczyk, Grazyna

    2010-02-01

    This review presents new insights into the regulation of the isoprenoid pathway in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in particular the short-term transcriptional response to two inhibitors, lovastatin and zaragozic acid (ZA). Whereas lovastatin blocks whole isoprenoid pathway, ZA only blocks the sterol branch. Consequently, their effects on the cellular level of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) are different. Lovastatin decreases the FPP level, whereas ZA, by inhibiting the main FPP-consuming enzyme, increases FPP availability in the cell. We discuss the role of genes whose expression is affected by both inhibitors and consider possible association of these genes with the regulation of the isoprenoid pathway. PMID:19744247

  8. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants resistant to catabolite repression: use in cheese whey hydrolysate fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, R.B.; Benitez, T.; Woodward, A.

    1982-09-01

    Mutants of an industrial-type strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae which rapidly and completely fermented equimolar mixtures of glucose and galactose to ethanol were isolated. These mutants fell into two general phenotypic classes based upon their fermentation kinetics and enzyme induction patterns. One class apparently specifically effects the utilization of galactose and allows sequential utilization of first glucose and then galactose in an anaerobic fermentation. The second class of mutants was resistant to general catabolite repression and produced maltase, invertase, and galactokinase in the presence of repressive levels of glucose. These mutants were completely dominant and appear to represent an as yet undescribed class of mutant. (Refs. 23).

  9. Synergistic temperature and ethanol effect on Saccharomyces cerevisiae dynamic behaviour in ethanol bio-fuel production.

    PubMed

    Aldiguier, A S; Alfenore, S; Cameleyre, X; Goma, G; Uribelarrea, J L; Guillouet, S E; Molina-Jouve, C

    2004-07-01

    The impact of ethanol and temperature on the dynamic behaviour of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in ethanol biofuel production was studied using an isothermal fed-batch process at five different temperatures. Fermentation parameters and kinetics were quantified. The best performances were found at 30 and 33 degrees C around 120 g l(-1) ethanol produced in 30 h with a slight benefit for growth at 30 degrees C and for ethanol production at 33 degrees C. Glycerol formation, enhanced with increasing temperatures, was coupled with growth for all fermentations; whereas, a decoupling phenomenon occurred at 36 and 39 degrees C pointing out a possible role of glycerol in yeast thermal protection. PMID:15098119

  10. Newly identified protein Imi1 affects mitochondrial integrity and glutathione homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kowalec, Piotr; Grynberg, Marcin; Pająk, Beata; Socha, Anna; Winiarska, Katarzyna; Fronk, Jan; Kurlandzka, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Glutathione homeostasis is crucial for cell functioning. We describe a novel Imi1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affecting mitochondrial integrity and involved in controlling glutathione level. Imi1 is cytoplasmic and, except for its N-terminal Flo11 domain, has a distinct solenoid structure. A lack of Imi1 leads to mitochondrial lesions comprising aberrant morphology of cristae and multifarious mtDNA rearrangements and impaired respiration. The mitochondrial malfunctioning is coupled to significantly decrease the level of intracellular reduced glutathione without affecting oxidized glutathione, which decreases the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. These defects are accompanied by decreased cadmium sensitivity and increased phytochelatin-2 level. PMID:26091838

  11. Mitotic chromosome loss in a radiation-sensitive strain of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Mortimer, R.K.; Contopoulou, R.; Schild, D.

    1981-09-01

    Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with mutations in the RAD52 gene have previously been shown to be defective in meiotic and mitotic recombination, in sporulation, and in repair of radiation-induced damage to DNA. In this study we show that diploid cells homozygous for rad52 lose chromosomes at high frequencies and that these frequencies of loss can be increased dramatically by exposure of these cells to x-rays. Genetic analyses of survivors of x-ray treatment demonstrate that chromosome loss events result in the conversion of diploid cells to cells with near haploid chromosome numbers.

  12. Overexpression of acetyl-CoA synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases acetic acid tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Penner, Michael H.; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T.

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid-mediated inhibition of the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars impedes development of plant biomass as a source of renewable ethanol. In order to overcome this inhibition, the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to synthesize acetyl-CoA from acetic acid was increased by overexpressing ACS2 encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase. Overexpression of ACS2 resulted in higher resistance to acetic acid as measured by an increased growth rate and shorter lag phase relative to a wild-type control strain, suggesting that Acs2-mediated consumption of acetic acid during fermentation contributes to acetic acid detoxification. PMID:25673654

  13. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) technique in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Li, Shiqian; Skarp, Kari-Pekka; Olkkonen, Vesa M; Yan, Daoguang; Jäntti, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of protein-protein interactions in vivo offers a powerful tool to resolve spatial and temporal aspects of cellular functions. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) makes use of nonfluorescent fragments of green fluorescent protein or its variants that are added as "tags" to target proteins under study. Only upon target protein interaction is a fluorescent protein complex assembled, and the site of interaction can be monitored by microscopy. In this chapter, we describe the method and tools for the use of BiFC in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in mammalian cells. PMID:25702124

  14. Model-guided identification of gene deletion targets for metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brochado, Ana Rita; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2014-01-01

    Identification of metabolic engineering strategies for rerouting intracellular fluxes towards a desired product is often a challenging task owing to the topological and regulatory complexity of metabolic networks. Genome-scale metabolic models help tackling this complexity through systematic consideration of mass balance and reaction directionality constraints over the entire network. Here, we describe how genome-scale metabolic models can be used for identifying gene deletion targets leading to increased production of the desired product. Vanillin production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as a case study throughout this chapter. PMID:24744040

  15. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Cuprous-Thiolate Clusters in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Metallothionein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Pickering, I.J.; Winge, D.R.; George, G.N.

    2009-05-28

    Copper (Cu) metallothioneins are cuprous-thiolate proteins that contain multimetallic clusters, and are thought to have dual functions of Cu storage and Cu detoxification. We have used a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density-functional theory (DFT) to investigate the nature of Cu binding to Saccharomyces cerevisiae metallothionein. We found that the XAS of metallothionein prepared, containing a full complement of Cu, was quantitatively consistent with the crystal structure, and that reconstitution of the apo-metallothionein with stoichiometric Cu results in the formation of a tetracopper cluster, indicating cooperative binding of the Cu ions by the metallothionein.

  16. Aneuploidy induction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by two solvent compounds, 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and 2-pyrrolidinone

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, V.M.; Goin, C.J.; Taylor-Mayer, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    A number of solvent compounds, that were tested in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were potent inducers of aneupolidy, although they did not induce any other genetic effects. As an extention of these earlier findings, 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone was tested and was found to induce aneuploidy. Several structurally related compounds were also tested; 2-pyrrolidinone induced aneuploidy, but succinimide, pyrrolidine, 1-methylpyrrolidine, 1-methyl-3-pyrrolidinol, and 2-pyrrolidineethanol did not. Maleimide and its N-hydroxy, N-methyl, and N-ethyl derivatives were also negative for aneuploidy induction.

  17. The impact of catalase expression on the replicative lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Van Zandycke, S M; Sohier, P J; Smart, K A

    2002-02-01

    The role of catalase on Saccharomyces cerevisiae replicative lifespan was investigated using a wild-type haploid laboratory yeast W303a, a catalase A mutant, a catalase T mutant and an acatalasaemic mutant. Lifespan analysis was performed in two different environmental conditions. Under repressing conditions, on glucose media, catalase T activity, but not catalase A activity was necessary to assure longevity. However, under derepressing conditions, on ethanol media, both catalases were required for longevity assurance. Although catalase activity and carbon source influence yeast lifespan, the relationship between oxidative defence and replicative senescence is complex. PMID:11744047

  18. Bioprospecting and evolving alternative xylose and arabinose pathway enzymes for use in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Jellison, Taylor; Alper, Hal S

    2016-03-01

    Bioprospecting is an effective way to find novel enzymes from strains with desirable phenotypes. Such bioprospecting has enabled organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize nonnative pentose sugars. Yet, the efficiency of this pentose catabolism (especially for the case of arabinose) remains suboptimal. Thus, further pathway optimization or identification of novel, optimal pathways is needed. Previously, we identified a novel set of xylan catabolic pathway enzymes from a superior pentose-utilizing strain of Ustilago bevomyces. These enzymes were used to successfully engineer a xylan-utilizing S. cerevisiae through a blended approach of bioprospecting and evolutionary engineering. Here, we expanded this approach to xylose and arabinose catabolic pathway engineering and demonstrated that bioprospected xylose and arabinose catabolic pathways from U. bevomyces offer alternative choices for enabling efficient pentose catabolism in S. cerevisiae. By introducing a novel set of xylose catabolic genes from U. bevomyces, growth rates were improved up to 85 % over a set of traditional Scheffersomyces stipitis pathway genes. In addition, we suggested an alternative arabinose catabolic pathway which, after directed evolution and pathway engineering, enabled S. cerevisiae to grow on arabinose as a sole carbon source in minimal medium with growth rates upwards of 0.05 h(-1). This pathway represents the most efficient growth of yeast on pure arabinose minimal medium. These pathways provide great starting points for further strain development and demonstrate the utility of bioprospecting from U. bevomyces. PMID:26671616

  19. Real time, in situ observation of the photocatalytic inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingtao; Wang, Xiaoxin; Li, Qi; Shang, Jian Ku

    2015-04-01

    An in situ microscopy technique was developed to observe in real time the photocatalytic inactivation process of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) cells by palladium-modified nitrogen-doped titanium oxide (TiON/PdO) under visible light illumination. The technique was based on building a photocatalytic micro-reactor on the sample stage of a fluorescence/phase contrast microscopy capable of simultaneously providing the optical excitation to activate the photocatalyst in the micro-reactor and the illumination to acquire phase contrast images of the cells undergoing the photocatalytic inactivation process. Using TiON/PdO as an example, the technique revealed for the first time the vacuolar activities inside S. cerevisiae cells subjected to a visible light photocatalytic inactivation. The vacuoles responded to the photocatalytic attack by the first expansion of the vacuolar volume and then contraction, before the vacuole disappeared and the cell structure collapsed. Consistent with the aggregate behavior observed from the cell culture experiments, the transition in the vacuolar volume provided clear evidence that photocatalytic disinfection of S. cerevisiae cells started with an initiation period in which cells struggled to offset the photocatalytic damage and moved rapidly after the photocatalytic damage overwhelmed the defense mechanisms of the cells against oxidative attack. PMID:25686929

  20. [Surface display of phytase on Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient bioethanol production from corn starch].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Chen, Xianzhong; Shen, Wei; Yang, Haiquan; Fan, You

    2015-12-01

    Production of bioethanol using starch as raw material has become a very prominent technology. However, phytate in the raw material not only decreases ethanol production efficiency, but also increases phosphorus discharge. In this study, to decrease phytate content in an ethanol fermentationprocess, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered forheterologous expression of phytase on the cell surface. The phy gene encoding phytase gene was fused with the C-terminal-half region of α-agglutinin and then inserted downstream of the secretion signal gene, to produce a yeast surface-display expression vector pMGK-AG-phy, which was then transformed into S. cerevisiae. The recombinant yeast strain, PHY, successfully displayed phytase on the surface of cells producing 6.4 U/g wet cells and its properties were further characterized. The growthrate and ethanol production of the PHY strain were faster than the parent S. cerevisiae strain in the fermentation medium by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. Moreover, the phytate concentration decreased by 91% in dry vinasse compared to the control. In summary, we constructed recombinant S. cerevisiae strain displaying phytase on the cell surface, which could effectively reduce the content of phytate, improve the utilization value of vinasse and reduce the discharge of phosphorus. The strain reported here represents a useful novel engineering platform for developing an environment-friendly system for bioethanol production from a corn substrate. PMID:27093833