Science.gov

Sample records for safe work procedures

  1. Stay Safe at Work

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Print This Topic En español Stay Safe at Work Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Injuries ... The Basics: Overview Staying safe and healthy at work is very important. If you don't work ...

  2. Working safely in confined spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, C.; Versweyveld, J. )

    1992-08-13

    Working in confined spaces is a delicate balance of the correct equipment, hazard knowledge, proper training, and common sense. Anything less has potentially deadly consequences. The dangerous atmospheric and physical hazards often encountered in confined spaces must be recognized and accounted for. In addition, procedures and practices must conform to Occupational Safety and health Administration (OSHA) confined space regulations. Last year, three men were asphyxiated while surveying beneath a manhole in Boulder, CO. An area newspaper called the deaths the result of a freak accident. Whatever the cause, entering a manhole without first monitoring the air and posting an outside attendant is both extremely dangerous and a violation of safe entry procedures. The National Institute for Health and Occupational Safety (NIOSH) estimates that millions of workers from a wide range of occupations and industries are exposed to confined space hazards every year. Although confined space deaths are not a new phenomenon, only recently has the problem received serious study. Government regulatory agencies are becoming more involved OSHA recently proposed ruling 1910.146, Permit Required Confined Spaces, to mandate safe entry practices and procedures. The ruling requires all employers to develop a specific action plan for confined space entry, including entry procedures, worker training, safety equipment, and emergency action. This first article defines a confined space and examines some common hazards, including toxic, combustible, and oxygen-deficient atmospheres and combustible dusts. A subsequent article will review the use of test instruments, personal protective equipment, worker training, and emergency response.

  3. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 8/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    , conditions, or work practices and appropriate control measures. · Identify regulatory risk by assessingSafe Operating Procedure (Revised 8/09) SAFETY AUDIT GUIDELINES FOR OFFICES, CONFERENCE ROOMS, please contact EHS at (402) 472-4925, or visit our web site at http://ehs.unl.edu/) Safety audits

  4. Staying Healthy and Safe at Work

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fighting premature birth About us Annual report Our work Community impact Global programs Research Need help? Local ... safe at work Staying healthy and safe at work Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please ...

  5. Safe Operating Procedure (Reviewed 12/08)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    ://ehs.unl.edu/) According to the American Cancer Society, malignant melanoma, a form of skin cancer, is the most rapidlySafe Operating Procedure (Reviewed 12/08) PROTECT YOUR SKIN (FROM SKIN CANCER increasing form of cancer in the United States. Skin cancer is largely preventable when measures

  6. Safe Operating Procedure (Reviewed 10/11)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    Safe Operating Procedure (Reviewed 10/11) VEHICLE / EQUIPMENT WASHING. Detergents can be used when washing. Do not use normal interior drains, if: 1. The vehicle/equipment is very. Washing vehicles/equipment outside has significant limitations. Detergents can not be used. There can

  7. Rules for Safe Work -Guidelines for 2nd year students of FKKT Rules for Safe Work

    E-print Network

    ?umer, Slobodan

    Rules for Safe Work - Guidelines for 2nd year students of FKKT - 1 - Rules for Safe Work Guidelines for students of FKKT 2nd year July 2009 #12;Rules for Safe Work - Guidelines for 2nd year students of FKKT - 2 ................................................................................................................................4 2.1 HAZARDS IN WORKING WITH FLAMMABLE CHEMICALS

  8. Safe Haven Laws and School Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopels, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    "Safe haven" laws are designed to protect infants from being killed or otherwise harmed. This article examines the safe haven laws from the states that comprise the Midwest School Social Work Council and the variations between these laws regarding the age of the infant, where the infant can be left, who is allowed to leave the infant, whether…

  9. Department of Geoscience Safe Work Instructions Working Alone

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    Department of Geoscience Safe Work Instructions Working Alone May 16, 2008 The intent who work alone in isolated Geoscience facilities, whether after hours or during the day, should and applicable phone numbers. #12;Department of Geoscience Safe Work Instructions If a check call is missed

  10. Safe Operating Procedure (Reviewed 5/08)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    discharged from internal capacitors) before making any disconnection or connections. After use, turn://ehs.unl.edu/) Electrophoresis units do not need to be operating at high voltages required for procedures such as DNA sequencing, or working around or near an electrophoresis unit, avoid unintentional grounding points and conductors (e

  11. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Safe work practices. 35.1350...Activities § 35.1350 Safe work practices. (a) Prohibited...efficacy, and lead-specific detergents or equivalent. (d) De minimis levels. Safe work practices are not...

  12. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Safe work practices. 35.1350...Activities § 35.1350 Safe work practices. (a) Prohibited...efficacy, and lead-specific detergents or equivalent. (d) De minimis levels. Safe work practices are not...

  13. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Safe work practices. 35.1350...Activities § 35.1350 Safe work practices. (a) Prohibited...efficacy, and lead-specific detergents or equivalent. (d) De minimis levels. Safe work practices are not...

  14. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Safe work practices. 35.1350...Activities § 35.1350 Safe work practices. (a) Prohibited...efficacy, and lead-specific detergents or equivalent. (d) De minimis levels. Safe work practices are not...

  15. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Safe work practices. 35.1350...Activities § 35.1350 Safe work practices. (a) Prohibited...efficacy, and lead-specific detergents or equivalent. (d) De minimis levels. Safe work practices are not...

  16. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 7/11)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    the potential for zoonotic infection. It is not intended as a substitute for facility-specific procedures. However, facility specific procedures must be at least as stringent as those contained in this procedure on the likelihood of zoonotic agents (i.e., Q fever, Rabies, Psittacosis, West Nile Virus, SE, etc.). · Necropsy

  17. Appendix GENERAL STANDARDS AND PROCEDURES STANDARD SAFE DIVING PRACTICES

    E-print Network

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    of the established safe diving practices for skin and scuba diving. These practices have been compiled for your. Always have a buoyancy control device and submersible pres- sure gauge when scuba diving. RecognizeAppendix GENERAL STANDARDS AND PROCEDURES A-4 STANDARD SAFE DIVING PRACTICES STATEMENT

  18. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 07/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    Work. The United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) incorporated NFPA 51B work permit may be required, as depicted in the following decision tree. * Source: NFPA 51B Is the work

  19. Working safely in gamma radiography. A training manual for industrial radiographers

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, S.A.; Peabody, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    This manual is designed for classroom training in working safely in industrial radiography using gamma sources. The purpose is to train radiographers' assistants to work safely as a qualified gamma radiographer. The contents cover the essentials of radiation, radiation protection, emergency procedures, gamma cameras, and biological effects of radiation. (ACR)

  20. Working with Self-Injurious Adolescents Using the Safe Kit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article offers a guide for using the Safe Kit when working with clients who self-injure. The Safe Kit can be used as a supplement to more traditional approaches to counseling and offers clients alternatives to self-injury when they need alternatives the most. The Safe Kit works under the assumption that individuals differ in the meaning they…

  1. Safe Operating Procedure LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    Safe Operating Procedure (5/11) LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT: SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES/TO): · Lockout/Tagout for Machines & Equipment: Program Overview · Lockout/Tagout for Machines & Equipment: Written Procedures · Lockout/Tagout for Machines & Equipment: Training & Inspections The specific purpose

  2. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 7/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    for vacuum work should be used for that purpose. · Tongs, a dust pan, and a broom are the best tools to glass contact and scratching. · For manual washing, use only plastic core brushes that have soft non

  3. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 9/08)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    ), electron microscopes, dental X-rays, and open sources of only H-3, C-14, P-33, Fe-55, Ca-45 and S-35; exceptions include radiation workers working with the following: XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Safety · (402) 472-4925 · http://ehs.unl.edu #12;· Analytical X-ray Users: radiation workers operating

  4. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 7/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    for repetitive motion injuries. Examples of repetitive tasks include pipetting, working with microscopes://ehs.unl.edu/) Laboratory researchers who perform repetitive tasks for lengthy periods of time are at increased risk the risk of Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) resulting from common repetitive laboratory tasks Pipetting

  5. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Safe work practices. 35.1350... Lead-Paint Hazard Evaluation and Hazard Reduction Activities § 35.1350 Safe work practices. (a..., in accordance with § 35.1345. A person performing this work shall be trained on hazards and either...

  6. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Safe work practices. 35.1350... Lead-Paint Hazard Evaluation and Hazard Reduction Activities § 35.1350 Safe work practices. (a..., in accordance with § 35.1345. A person performing this work shall be trained on hazards and either...

  7. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Safe work practices. 35.1350... Lead-Paint Hazard Evaluation and Hazard Reduction Activities § 35.1350 Safe work practices. (a..., in accordance with § 35.1345. A person performing this work shall be trained on hazards and either...

  8. Safe Operating Procedure LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    Safe Operating Procedure (5/11) LOCKOUT/TAGOUT FOR MACHINES & EQUIPMENT: TRAINING AND INSPECTIONS or dangerous parts of machines or equipment that could lead to entanglement, amputation. · An "Affected Employee" is an employee whose job requires him/her to operate or use a machine or equipment

  9. MSU at Work in Africa: Safe Water and

    E-print Network

    MSU at Work in Africa: Safe Water and Environmental Health Issues and Problems Water contamination access to safe water. Up to 2.2 million children will die from diarrhea next year, and recurrent of drinking water and sanitation facilities, and deaths attributable to diarrhoeal diseases 10 5 20 25 15 0

  10. Safe Use of Sealed Radioactive Sources Procedure: 7.544 Created: 4/17/2014 Version: 1.0 Revised

    E-print Network

    Jia, Songtao

    Safe Use of Sealed Radioactive Sources Procedure: 7.544 Created: 4/17/2014 Version: 1.0 Revised of sealed sources as well as ensure their safe use. B. Applicability/scope This applies to the Morningside. When working with sealed sources use TIME, DISTANCE and SHIELDING to keep your exposure as low

  11. Introduction to working safely with large animals in containment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript examines biosafety challenges posed when conducting work with animals and zoonotic pathogens. It provides solutions for working with animals in a manner that promotes both safe and responsible research. Good safety and animal husbandry are essential for good science. Best practices w...

  12. Stent placement provides safe esophageal closure in thoracic NOTES™ procedures

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Brian G.; Cizginer, Sevdenur; Kim, Min-Chan; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Ducharme, Richard W.; Surti, Vihar C.; Sylla, Patricia; Brugge, William R.; Rattner, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Safe esophageal closure remains a challenge in transesophageal Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES). Previously described methods, such as suturing devices, clips, or submucosal tunneling, all have weaknesses. In this survival animal series, we demonstrate safe esophageal closure with a prototype retrievable, antimigration stent. Methods Nine Yorkshire swine underwent thoracic NOTES procedures. A double-channel gastroscope equipped with a mucosectomy device was used to create an esophageal mucosal defect. A 5-cm submucosal tunnel was created and the muscular esophageal wall was incised with a needle-knife. Mediastinoscopy and thoracoscopy were performed in all swine; lymphadenectomy was performed in seven swine. A prototype small intestinal submucosal (SurgiSIS) covered stent was deployed over the mucosectomy site and tunnel. Three versions of the prototype stent were developed. Prenecropsy endoscopy confirmed stent location and permitted stent retrieval. Explanted esophagi were sent to pathology. Results Esophageal stenting was successful in all animals. Stent placement took 15.8 ± 4.8 minuted and no stent migration occurred. Prenecropsy endoscopy revealed proximal ingrowth of esophageal mucosa and erosion with Stent A. Mucosal inflammation and erosion was observed proximally with Stent B. No esophageal erosion or pressure damage from proximal radial forces was seen with Stent C. On necropsy, swine 5 had a 0.5-cm periesophageal abscess. Histology revealed a localized inflammatory lesion at the esophageal exit site in swine 1, 3, and 9. The mucosectomy site was partially healed in three swine and poorly healed in six. All swine thrived clinically, except for a brief period of mild lethargy in swine 9 who improved with short-term antibiotic therapy. The submucosal tunnels were completely healed and no esophageal bleeding or stricture formation was observed. All swine survived 13.8 ± 0.4 days and gained weight in the postoperative period. Conclusions Esophageal stenting provides safe closure for NOTES thoracic procedures but may impede healing of the mucosectomy site. PMID:20820811

  13. 29 CFR 1919.77 - Safe working load increase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.77 Safe working... or original design limitations unless such increase meets with the manufacturer's approval. Where the manufacturer's services are not available, or where the equipment is of foreign manufacture, engineering...

  14. 29 CFR 1919.77 - Safe working load increase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.77 Safe working... or original design limitations unless such increase meets with the manufacturer's approval. Where the manufacturer's services are not available, or where the equipment is of foreign manufacture, engineering...

  15. 29 CFR 1919.77 - Safe working load increase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.77 Safe working... or original design limitations unless such increase meets with the manufacturer's approval. Where the manufacturer's services are not available, or where the equipment is of foreign manufacture, engineering...

  16. 29 CFR 1919.77 - Safe working load increase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.77 Safe working... or original design limitations unless such increase meets with the manufacturer's approval. Where the manufacturer's services are not available, or where the equipment is of foreign manufacture, engineering...

  17. 29 CFR 1919.77 - Safe working load increase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.77 Safe working... or original design limitations unless such increase meets with the manufacturer's approval. Where the manufacturer's services are not available, or where the equipment is of foreign manufacture, engineering...

  18. Respectful Working and Learning Environment PROCEDURES

    E-print Network

    Martin, Jeff

    POLICY: Respectful Working and Learning Environment PROCEDURES: APPENDIX: None Approved: January 22, 2013 Revised: Cross Reference: Respectful Work and Learning Environment Procedures Non-Academic Misconduct Policy Respectful Working and Learning Environment Policy AUTHORITY: University Administration

  19. Respectful Working and Learning Environment PROCEDURES

    E-print Network

    Martin, Jeff

    POLICY: Respectful Working and Learning Environment PROCEDURES: APPENDIX: None Approved: January 22, 2013 Revised: Cross Reference: Respectful Working and Learning Environment Procedures Non-Academic Misconduct Policy Respectful Working and Learning Environment Policy AUTHORITY: University Administration

  20. Radiological Work Planning and Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    KURTZ, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In addition, there seems to be confusion as to what should be and what should not be included in the TWD.

  1. Living and Working Safely Around High-Voltage Power Lines.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2001-06-01

    High-voltage transmission lines can be just as safe as the electrical wiring in the homes--or just as dangerous. The crucial factor is ourselves: they must learn to behave safely around them. This booklet is a basic safety guide for those who live and work around power lines. It deals primarily with nuisance shocks due to induced voltages, and with potential electric shock hazards from contact with high-voltage lines. References on possible long-term biological effects of transmission lines are shown. In preparing this booklet, the Bonneville Power Administration has drawn on more than 50 years of experience with high-voltage transmission. BPA operates one of the world`s largest networks of long-distance, high-voltage lines. This system has more than 400 substations and about 15,000 miles of transmission lines, almost 4,400 miles of which are operated at 500,000 volts.

  2. PROCEDURES: Respectful Working and Learning Environment Policy

    E-print Network

    Martin, Jeff

    POLICY: PROCEDURES: Respectful Working and Learning Environment Policy APPENDIX: None Approved: January 22, 2013 Revised: Cross Reference: Respectful Working and Learning Environment Policy Student Non: To implement the Respectful Working and Learning Environment Policy, the following specific actions

  3. Sociotechnical attributes of safe and unsafe work systems

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Brian M.; Hettinger, Lawrence J.; DeJoy, David M.; Huang, Yuang-Hsiang; Love, Peter E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and practical approaches to safety based on sociotechnical systems principles place heavy emphasis on the intersections between social–organisational and technical–work process factors. Within this perspective, work system design emphasises factors such as the joint optimisation of social and technical processes, a focus on reliable human–system performance and safety metrics as design and analysis criteria, the maintenance of a realistic and consistent set of safety objectives and policies, and regular access to the expertise and input of workers. We discuss three current approaches to the analysis and design of complex sociotechnical systems: human–systems integration, macroergonomics and safety climate. Each approach emphasises key sociotechnical systems themes, and each prescribes a more holistic perspective on work systems than do traditional theories and methods. We contrast these perspectives with historical precedents such as system safety and traditional human factors and ergonomics, and describe potential future directions for their application in research and practice. Practitioner Summary: The identification of factors that can reliably distinguish between safe and unsafe work systems is an important concern for ergonomists and other safety professionals. This paper presents a variety of sociotechnical systems perspectives on intersections between social–organisational and technology–work process factors as they impact work system analysis, design and operation. PMID:25909756

  4. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  5. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  6. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the...

  7. Adoption of Sun Safe Work Place Practices by Local Governments

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Allan; Andersen, Peter A.; Buller, David B.; Walkosz, Barbara; Lui, Lucia; Buller, Mary; Scott, Michael D.; Jenkins, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Context Outdoor workers are especially susceptible to skin cancer, the most common, but also one of the most preventable, forms of cancer. Colorado, the location of the study, has the second highest rate of skin cancer deaths in the nation. Objective Local government managers in Colorado—in municipalities, counties and special districts—were surveyed in order to ascertain the extent to which they engage in formal (written) and informal practices to protect their outdoor workers against excessive exposure to sun. Design The survey consisted of 51 question assessing awareness of formal or informal practices for sun protection of outdoor workers. An index of practices--the study's dependent variable--was created that was comprised or practices such as providing employees free or reduced-cost sunscreen, wide-brimmed hats, sunglasses, long-sleeved work shirts, long work pants, and temporary or permanent outdoor shade shelters. Proscriptive policies, such as restricting the use of broad brimmed hats, were subtracted from the index. Surveys were completed by 825 administrators representing 98 jurisdictions. Responses from administrators in the same jurisdiction were averaged. Results Over 40 percent of responding jurisdictions indicated that they engaged in informal sun safety practices. Tests conducted to determine what variables might account for the adoption of these sun protection practices found that the degree to which a community could be regarded as cosmopolite and as having an individualistic political culture were significant predictors. Type of government was also significant. Although, higher community income was a significant predictor, neither local government budget nor size was significant. Conclusions The adoption of sun safe practices bears low costs with potentially high returns. Findings from this study suggest that awareness campaigns might most effectively target cosmopolite communities, but that the greatest impact might be achieved by targeting localite communities. Government size and budget do not appear to be constraints in the adoption of sun safe practices. PMID:24231670

  8. Power and Sample Size Determination for a Stepwise Test Procedure for Finding the Maximum Safe Dose

    E-print Network

    Tamhane, Ajit C.

    Power and Sample Size Determination for a Stepwise Test Procedure for Finding the Maximum Safe Dose This paper addresses the problem of power and sample size calculation for a stepwise multiple test procedure of a compound. A general expression for the power of this procedure is derived. It is used to find the minimum

  9. Safe Handling of Cryogenic Liquids This document describes the principal hazards and appropriate safety procedures associated

    E-print Network

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    92 Safe Handling of Cryogenic Liquids This document describes the principal hazards and appropriate safety procedures associated with three cryogenic liquids that are commonly used in the College: liquid N2, He and O2.. The safe handling of cryogenic liquids involves understanding the unique properties

  10. Flexible Work Schedule Procedure Policy Statement

    E-print Network

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    - 1 - Flexible Work Schedule Procedure Policy Statement It has been the practice of UNLV to allow the use of flexible work schedules where it is a viable management work option, and based institutional requirements. The University recognizes how such work options have benefited employees when both

  11. Procedure for Working with MPTP or MPTP-Treated Animals Page 1 of 12 University of Toronto

    E-print Network

    Chan, Hue Sun

    the subsections under Safe Work Procedures for task-specific PPE requirements. #12 goggles with a mild detergent and water; thoroughly wash hands, face, and neck. 6. Prior to respirator use to arrange training sessions. Safe Work Procedures MPTP PREPARATION 1. Personal protective equipment (PPE

  12. 75 FR 32295 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ...of Contaminants Under the Safe Drinking Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures AGENCY...measuring the levels of contaminants in drinking water and determining compliance with national primary drinking water regulations. The Safe Drinking Water...

  13. 76 FR 37014 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ...of Contaminants Under the Safe Drinking Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures AGENCY...measuring the levels of contaminants in drinking water and determining compliance with national primary drinking water regulations. The Safe Drinking Water...

  14. 78 FR 32558 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ...of Contaminants Under the Safe Drinking Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures AGENCY...measuring the levels of contaminants in drinking water and determining compliance with national primary drinking water regulations. The Safe Drinking Water...

  15. 77 FR 38523 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ...of Contaminants Under the Safe Drinking Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures AGENCY...measuring the levels of contaminants in drinking water and determining compliance with national primary drinking water regulations. The Safe Drinking Water...

  16. Safe Use of Radioactive Materials Procedure: 7.542 Created: 3/7/2014

    E-print Network

    Jia, Songtao

    Safe Use of Radioactive Materials Procedure: 7.542 Created: 3/7/2014 Version: 1.0 Revised of radioactive materials (RAM). They are designed to reduce the risk of a significant contamination event. Applicability/scope This policy applies to all areas, laboratories and facilities where radioactive materials

  17. Microcosm procedure for determining safe levels of chemical exposure in shallow-water communities

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a method for determining safe levels of chemical exposure in shallow-water communities, using laboratory microcosms as test subjects. The safe level is considered to be the maximum exposure that causes no persistent, ecologically significant changes in the ecosystem. In experiments completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, microcosm-derived estimates of safe exposure levels were confirmed using outdoor artificial ponds, which suggests that the microcosm procedure can be an efficient and economical means of determining safe levels for shallow-water communities. Details of microcosm construction, techniques for monitoring ecological variables in microcosms, and an experimental design for determining safe exposure levels are provided here. The microcosms are assembled by transferring components of natural ecosystems to 80-litre aquaria in a controlled laboratory environment. The communities that develop in these systems are typically dominated by common, cosmopolitan littoral species of macrophytes, algae, and invertebrates. Methods are described for measuring changes in water chemistry, phytoplankton, periphyton, macrophytes, zooplankton, and ecosystem production and respiration. By monitoring these variables over a gradient of pollutant exposure levels, the safe level can be determined accurately and precisely. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  18. 49 CFR 230.23 - Responsibility for general construction and safe working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS...construction and safe working pressure. The steam locomotive owner and operator are responsible...the general design and construction of the steam locomotive boilers under their...

  19. No matter how large or how small, oilwell servicing firms work safely

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle, D.

    1995-07-01

    In working safely, the size of the company doesn`t matter as much as the dedication of the people in maintaining a safe workplace. Poe Servicing Inc. of Oberlin, Kan., earned the 1994 Association of Oilwell Servicing Contractors (AOSC) gold safety award for smaller companies that put in 10,000 to 50,000 man-hours of work. AOSC`s group one. The employees watch out for each other, and they use common sense. The common sense part of the program means the company knows new people are most susceptible to accidents, so they send them out to observe before putting them to work.

  20. 21 CFR 330.10 - Procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective... 330.10 Section 330.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION,...

  1. 21 CFR 330.10 - Procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective... 330.10 Section 330.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION,...

  2. 21 CFR 330.10 - Procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective... 330.10 Section 330.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION,...

  3. 21 CFR 330.10 - Procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective... 330.10 Section 330.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION,...

  4. 21 CFR 330.10 - Procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective... 330.10 Section 330.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION,...

  5. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  6. Rapid and Efficient Filtration-Based Procedure for Separation and Safe Analysis of CBRN Mixed Samples

    PubMed Central

    Bentahir, Mostafa; Laduron, Frederic; Irenge, Leonid; Ambroise, Jérôme; Gala, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Separating CBRN mixed samples that contain both chemical and biological warfare agents (CB mixed sample) in liquid and solid matrices remains a very challenging issue. Parameters were set up to assess the performance of a simple filtration-based method first optimized on separate C- and B-agents, and then assessed on a model of CB mixed sample. In this model, MS2 bacteriophage, Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis baculovirus (AcNPV), Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores were used as biological agent simulants whereas ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and pinacolyl methylphophonic acid (PMPA) were used as VX and soman (GD) nerve agent surrogates, respectively. Nanoseparation centrifugal devices with various pore size cut-off (30 kD up to 0.45 µm) and three RNA extraction methods (Invisorb, EZ1 and Nuclisens) were compared. RNA (MS2) and DNA (AcNPV) quantification was carried out by means of specific and sensitive quantitative real-time PCRs (qPCR). Liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) methods was used for quantifying EMPA and PMPA. Culture methods and qPCR demonstrated that membranes with a 30 kD cut-off retain more than 99.99% of biological agents (MS2, AcNPV, Bacillus Atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores) tested separately. A rapid and reliable separation of CB mixed sample models (MS2/PEG-400 and MS2/EMPA/PMPA) contained in simple liquid or complex matrices such as sand and soil was also successfully achieved on a 30 kD filter with more than 99.99% retention of MS2 on the filter membrane, and up to 99% of PEG-400, EMPA and PMPA recovery in the filtrate. The whole separation process turnaround-time (TAT) was less than 10 minutes. The filtration method appears to be rapid, versatile and extremely efficient. The separation method developed in this work constitutes therefore a useful model for further evaluating and comparing additional separation alternative procedures for a safe handling and preparation of CB mixed samples. PMID:24505375

  7. Rapid and efficient filtration-based procedure for separation and safe analysis of CBRN mixed samples.

    PubMed

    Bentahir, Mostafa; Laduron, Frederic; Irenge, Leonid; Ambroise, Jérôme; Gala, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Separating CBRN mixed samples that contain both chemical and biological warfare agents (CB mixed sample) in liquid and solid matrices remains a very challenging issue. Parameters were set up to assess the performance of a simple filtration-based method first optimized on separate C- and B-agents, and then assessed on a model of CB mixed sample. In this model, MS2 bacteriophage, Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis baculovirus (AcNPV), Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores were used as biological agent simulants whereas ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and pinacolyl methylphophonic acid (PMPA) were used as VX and soman (GD) nerve agent surrogates, respectively. Nanoseparation centrifugal devices with various pore size cut-off (30 kD up to 0.45 µm) and three RNA extraction methods (Invisorb, EZ1 and Nuclisens) were compared. RNA (MS2) and DNA (AcNPV) quantification was carried out by means of specific and sensitive quantitative real-time PCRs (qPCR). Liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) methods was used for quantifying EMPA and PMPA. Culture methods and qPCR demonstrated that membranes with a 30 kD cut-off retain more than 99.99% of biological agents (MS2, AcNPV, Bacillus Atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores) tested separately. A rapid and reliable separation of CB mixed sample models (MS2/PEG-400 and MS2/EMPA/PMPA) contained in simple liquid or complex matrices such as sand and soil was also successfully achieved on a 30 kD filter with more than 99.99% retention of MS2 on the filter membrane, and up to 99% of PEG-400, EMPA and PMPA recovery in the filtrate. The whole separation process turnaround-time (TAT) was less than 10 minutes. The filtration method appears to be rapid, versatile and extremely efficient. The separation method developed in this work constitutes therefore a useful model for further evaluating and comparing additional separation alternative procedures for a safe handling and preparation of CB mixed samples. PMID:24505375

  8. 49 CFR 230.23 - Responsibility for general construction and safe working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Responsibility for general construction and safe working pressure. 230.23 Section 230.23 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers...

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL ROOMS & WALK-IN FREEZERS SAFE WORK PRACTICES Uses: Environmental rooms are designed to control

    E-print Network

    Jia, Songtao

    ENVIRONMENTAL ROOMS & WALK-IN FREEZERS ­ SAFE WORK PRACTICES Uses: Environmental rooms are designed chemistry and biology. Ventilation: Environmental rooms typically have a closed circulation system, which. Therefore, the contained atmosphere of an environmental room poses considerable safety concerns. A hazardous

  10. 78 FR 32558 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures. 74 FR 38348. August 3, 2009. USEPA. 2013. EPA Method 524.4... earlier expedited methods approval action (74 FR 38348, August 3, 2009) (USEPA 2009b). Both EPA Methods... Under the Safe Drinking Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures AGENCY: Environmental...

  11. Authentication Procedures - The Procedures and Integration Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Bratcher, Leigh; Gosnell, Tom; Langner, Diana; MacArthur, D.; Mihalczo, John T.; Pura, Carolyn; Riedy, Alex; Rexroth, Paul; Scott, Mary; Springarn, Jay

    2001-05-31

    Authentication is how we establish trust in monitoring systems and measurements to verify compliance with, for example, the storage of nuclear weapons material. Authentication helps assure the monitoring party that accurate and reliable information is provided by any measurement system and that any irregularities are detected. The U.S. is developing its point of view on the procedures for authentication of monitoring systems now planned or contemplated for arms reduction and control applications. The authentication of a system utilizes a set of approaches, including: functional testing using trusted calibration sources, evaluation of documentation, evaluation of software, evaluation of hardware, random selection of hardware and software, tamper-indicating devices, and operational procedures. Authentication of measurement systems should occur throughout their lifecycles, starting with the elements of design, and moving to off-site authentication, on-siste authentication, and continuing with authentication following repair. The most important of these is the initial design of systems. Hardware and software design criteria and procurement decisions can make future authentication relatively straightforward or conversely very difficult. Facility decisions can likewise ease the procedures for authentication since reliable and effective monitoring systems and tampering indicating devices can help provide the assurance needed in the integrity of such items as measurement systems, spare equipment, and reference sources. This paper will summarize the results of the U.S. Authentication Task Force discussion on the role of procedures in authentication.

  12. SUNRAYCE 93: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems

    SciTech Connect

    DePhillips, M.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-11-03

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring SUNRAYCE 93 to advance tile technology and use of photovoltaics and electric vehicles. Participants will use cars powered by photovoltaic modules and lead-acid storage batteries. This brochure, prepared for students and faculty participating in this race, outlines the health hazards presented by these electrical systems, and gives guidance on strategies for their safe usage. At the outset, it should be noted that working with photovoltaic systems and batteries requires electric vehicle drivers and technicians to have {open_quotes}hands-on{close_quotes} contact with the car on a daily basis. It is important that no one work near a photovoltaic energy system or battery, either in a vehicle or on the bench, unless they familiarize themselves with the components in use, and know and observe safe work practices including the safety precautions described in the manuals provided by the various equipment vendors and this document.

  13. SUNRAYCE 1993: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dephillips, M. P.; Moskowitz, P. D.; Fthenakis, V. M.

    1992-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring SUNRAYCE 93 to advance tile technology and use of photovoltaics and electric vehicles. Participants will use cars powered by photovoltaic modules and lead-acid storage batteries. This brochure, prepared for students and faculty participating in this race, outlines the health hazards presented by these electrical systems and gives guidance on strategies for their safe usage. At the outset, it should be noted that working with photovoltaic systems and batteries requires electric vehicle drivers and technicians to have 'hands-on' contact with the car on a daily basis. It is important that no one work near a photovoltaic energy system or battery, either in a vehicle or on the bench, unless they familiarize themselves with the components in use and know and observe safe work practices including the safety precautions described in the manuals provided by the various equipment vendors and this document.

  14. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION... nor design data on safe working loads (including any applicable limitations) are obtainable, the...

  15. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION... nor design data on safe working loads (including any applicable limitations) are obtainable, the...

  16. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION... nor design data on safe working loads (including any applicable limitations) are obtainable, the...

  17. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION... nor design data on safe working loads (including any applicable limitations) are obtainable, the...

  18. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION... nor design data on safe working loads (including any applicable limitations) are obtainable, the...

  19. 30 CFR 250.1914 - What criteria must be documented in my SEMS program for safe work practices and contractor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...renovation; or (5) Specialty work. (e) You must: (1...related to the contractor's work in the operation area, and...including, but not limited to fires, explosions, slips, trips...must develop and implement safe work practices to control the...

  20. 30 CFR 250.1914 - What criteria must be documented in my SEMS program for safe work practices and contractor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...renovation; or (5) Specialty work. (e) You must: (1...related to the contractor's work in the operation area, and...including, but not limited to fires, explosions, slips, trips...must develop and implement safe work practices to control the...

  1. 30 CFR 250.1914 - What criteria must be documented in my SEMS program for safe work practices and contractor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...renovation; or (5) Specialty work. (e) You must: (1...related to the contractor's work in the operation area, and...including, but not limited to fires, explosions, slips, trips...must develop and implement safe work practices to control the...

  2. 30 CFR 250.1914 - What criteria must be documented in my SEMS program for safe work practices and contractor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...renovation; or (5) specialty work. (e) You must: (1...related to the contractor's work in the operation area, and...including, but not limited to fires, explosions, slips, trips...must develop and implement safe work practices to control the...

  3. Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection: Recent technical advances for safe and successful procedures

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Katsumi; Michida, Tomoki; Nishida, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Shiro; Naito, Masafumi; Ito, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is very useful in en bloc resection of large superficial colorectal tumors but is a technically difficult procedure because the colonic wall is thin and endoscopic maneuverability is poor because of colonic flexure and extensibility. A high risk of perforation has been reported in colorectal ESD. To prevent complications such as perforation and unexpected bleeding, it is crucial to ensure good visualization of the submucosal layer by creating a mucosal flap, which is an exfoliated mucosa for inserting the tip of the endoscope under it. The creation of a mucosal flap is often technically difficult; however, various types of equipment, appropriate strategy, and novel procedures including our clip-flap method, appear to facilitate mucosal flap creation, improving the safety and success rate of ESD. Favorable treatment outcomes with colorectal ESD have already been reported in many advanced institutions, and appropriate understanding of techniques and development of training systems are required for world-wide standardization of colorectal ESD. Here, we describe recent technical advances for safe and successful colorectal ESD. PMID:26468335

  4. Planned Cardiac Reexploration in the Intensive Care Unit Is a Safe Procedure

    PubMed Central

    LaPar, Damien J.; Isbell, James M.; Mulloy, Daniel P.; Stone, Matthew L.; Kern, John A.; Ailawadi, Gorav; Kron, Irving L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac surgical reexploration is necessary in approximately 5% of all patients. However, the impact of routine, planned reexploration performed in the intensive care unit (ICU) remains poorly defined. This study evaluated postoperative outcomes after cardiac reexplorations to determine the safety and efficacy of a planned approach in the ICU. Methods All patients undergoing ICU cardiac reexplorations (2000 to 2011) at a single institution were stratified according to a routine, planned ICU approach to reexploration (planned) versus unplanned ICU or operating room reexploration. Patient risk and outcomes were compared by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results 8,151 total patients underwent cardiac operations, including 267 (3.2%) reexplorations (planned ICU = 75% and unplanned ICU = 18%). Among planned ICU reexplorations, 38% of patients had an identifiable surgical bleeding source, and 60% underwent reexploration less than 12 hours after the index procedure. Unplanned ICU reexplorations had a higher Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) predicted mortality (5% vs 3%, p < 0.001) and incurred higher observed mortality (37% vs 6%, p < 0.001) and morbidity. Sternal wound infections were rare and were similar between groups (p = 0.81). Furthermore, upon STS mortality risk adjustment, unplanned ICU reexplorations were associated with significantly increased odds of mortality (OR = 26.6 [7.1, 99.7], p < 0.001) compared with planned ICU reexplorations. Conclusions Planned reexploration in the ICU is a safe procedure with acceptable mortality and morbidity and low infection rates. Unplanned reexplorations, however, increase postoperative risk and are associated with high mortality and morbidity. These data argue for coordinated, routine approaches to planned ICU reexploration to avoid delay in treatment for postoperative hemorrhage. PMID:25173720

  5. 21 CFR 330.14 - Additional criteria and procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01...criteria and procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective... 330.14 Section 330.14 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION,...

  6. 21 CFR 330.10 - Procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective and not misbranded, and for establishing monographs. 330.10 Section 330.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE OVER-THE-COUNTER...

  7. 21 CFR 330.14 - Additional criteria and procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01...criteria and procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective... 330.14 Section 330.14 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION,...

  8. 21 CFR 330.14 - Additional criteria and procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01...criteria and procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective... 330.14 Section 330.14 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION,...

  9. 21 CFR 330.14 - Additional criteria and procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01...criteria and procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective... 330.14 Section 330.14 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION,...

  10. 21 CFR 330.14 - Additional criteria and procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01...criteria and procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective... 330.14 Section 330.14 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION,...

  11. 76 FR 37014 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... expedited methods approval action for determining dalapon in drinking water (75 FR 32295, June 8, 2010... the Safe Drinking Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures. 75 FR 32295. June 8, 2010. List of... action also revised entries in Appendix A to Subpart C of Part 141 for arsenic, barium,...

  12. Work After Graduation & OPT Application Procedures

    E-print Network

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    : Employment Dates · Start Date: Must be within 60 days of Completion Date · Eligible to apply for up to 12 that help you in making important immigration decisions. Overview #12;· Employment: Any work or service authorization: 1. Documented ­ Official approval from authorizing agent 2. Active ­ Authorization start date

  13. Operational and Medical Procedures for a Declared Contingency Shuttle (CSCS) Shuttle Mission Due to a Failure that Precludes a Safe Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Adrien; Patlach, Bob; Duchense, Ted; Chandler, Mike; Stepaniak, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    This poster paper outlines the operational and medical procedures for a shuttle mission that has a failure that precludes a safe return to Earth. Information about the assumptions, procedures and limiting consumables is included.

  14. Safe Schools, Safe Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Julie E.; Pickett, Dean; Pulliam, Janet L.; Schwartz, Richard A.; St. Germaine, Anne-Marie; Underwood, Julie; Worona, Jay

    Schools must work together with agencies, groups, and individuals to eliminate the forces leading children to violence. Chapter 1, "School Safety: Working Together to Keep Schools Safe," stresses the importance of community collaboration in violence prevention. Effective prevention requires sharing information about students, consistent with…

  15. 75 FR 70557 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Draft Policies and Procedures for Screening Safe Drinking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ...Screening Safe Drinking Water Act Chemicals, Second List of Chemicals for...reporting requirements for pesticide chemicals in registered products are established...allegation of significant adverse reactions'' to a chemical substance or mixture that...

  16. 78 FR 35909 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Final Policies and Procedures for Screening Safe Drinking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ...Screening Safe Drinking Water Act Chemicals AGENCY: Environmental Protection...reporting requirements for pesticide chemicals in registered products are established...allegation of significant adverse reactions'' to a chemical substance or mixture that...

  17. A Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbin, Barbara J.; Sulzman, Frank M.; Krenek, Sam

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Agency and the Space Radiation Project is to ensure that astronauts can safely live and work in the space radiation environment. The space radiation environment poses both acute and chronic risks to crew health and safety, but unlike some other aspects of space travel, space radiation exposure has clinically relevant implications for the lifetime of the crew. The term safely means that risks are sufficiently understood such that acceptable limits on mission, post-mission and multi-mission consequences (for example, excess lifetime fatal cancer risk) can be defined. The Space Radiation Project strategy has several elements. The first element is to use a peer-reviewed research program to increase our mechanistic knowledge and genetic capabilities to develop tools for individual risk projection, thereby reducing our dependency on epidemiological data and population-based risk assessment. The second element is to use the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory to provide a ground-based facility to study the understanding of health effects/mechanisms of damage from space radiation exposure and the development and validation of biological models of risk, as well as methods for extrapolation to human risk. The third element is a risk modeling effort that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system damage, degenerative tissue disease, and acute radiation effects. To understand the biological basis for risk, we must also understand the physical aspects of the crew environment. Thus the fourth element develops computer codes to predict radiation transport properties, evaluate integrated shielding technologies and provide design optimization recommendations for the design of human space systems. Understanding the risks and determining methods to mitigate the risks are keys to a successful radiation protection strategy.

  18. NASA Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu; Corbin, Barbara J.; Sulzman, Frank M.; Krenek, Sam

    2007-01-01

    In space, astronauts are constantly bombarded with energetic particles. The goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Agency and the NASA Space Radiation Project is to ensure that astronauts can safely live and work in the space radiation environment. The space radiation environment poses both acute and chronic risks to crew health and safety, but unlike some other aspects of space travel, space radiation exposure has clinically relevant implications for the lifetime of the crew. Among the identified radiation risks are cancer, acute and late CNS damage, chronic and degenerative tissue decease, and acute radiation syndrome. The term "safely" means that risks are sufficiently understood such that acceptable limits on mission, post-mission and multi-mission consequences can be defined. The NASA Space Radiation Project strategy has several elements. The first element is to use a peer-reviewed research program to increase our mechanistic knowledge and genetic capabilities to develop tools for individual risk projection, thereby reducing our dependency on epidemiological data and population-based risk assessment. The second element is to use the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory to provide a ground-based facility to study the health effects/mechanisms of damage from space radiation exposure and the development and validation of biological models of risk, as well as methods for extrapolation to human risk. The third element is a risk modeling effort that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting the identified radiation risks. To understand the biological basis for risk, we must also understand the physical aspects of the crew environment. Thus, the fourth element develops computer algorithms to predict radiation transport properties, evaluate integrated shielding technologies and provide design optimization recommendations for the design of human space systems. Understanding the risks and determining methods to mitigate the risks are keys to a successful radiation protection strategy.

  19. 21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...will be established in accordance with procedures set forth in § 601.25(a). (b) Deliberations of advisory review panels. The deliberations of advisory review panels will be conducted in accordance with § 601.25(d)....

  20. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) "It is the policy of Stanford University to maintain a safe and healthy work environment.

    E-print Network

    PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) "It is the policy of Stanford University to maintain a safe and healthy work environment. Managers and supervisors are responsible for the establishment and maintenance of good health and safety practices."1 The objective of the Personal Protective Equipment Program

  1. Gender-Neutral Washrooms at Western Western is committed to providing a learning and working environment that is safe and

    E-print Network

    Lennard, William N.

    Gender-Neutral Washrooms at Western Western is committed to providing a learning and working environment that is safe and inclusive. Part of this commitment includes making gender-neutral washrooms gender-neutral washrooms and where they are located on campus. Why is it important to have Gender-Neutral

  2. Safe Spaces, Support, Social Capital: A Critical Analysis of Artists Working with Vulnerable Young People in Educational Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellman, Edward

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a critical and thematic analysis of three research projects involving artists working with vulnerable young people in educational contexts. It argues that artists create safe spaces in contrast to traditional educational activities but it will also raise questions about what constitutes such a space for participants. It will…

  3. 75 FR 70557 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Draft Policies and Procedures for Screening Safe Drinking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... published in the Federal Register on April 15, 2009 (74 FR 17560); however, this document was drafted with... procedures that were published in the Federal Register on April 15, 2009 (74 FR 17560) (FRL-8399-9) (FIFRA... to human health or the environment due to disruption of the endocrine system. The determination...

  4. The laparoscopic hiatoplasty with antireflux surgery is a safe and effective procedure to repair giant hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although minimally invasive repair of giant hiatal hernias is a very surgical challenge which requires advanced laparoscopic learning curve, several reports showed that is a safe and effective procedure, with lower morbidity than open approach. In the present study we show the outcomes of 13 patients who underwent a laparoscopic repair of giant hiatal hernia. Methods A total of 13 patients underwent laparoscopic posterior hiatoplasty and Nissen fundoplication. Follow-up evaluation was done clinically at intervals of 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery using the Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Health-Related Quality of Life scale, a barium swallow study, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, an oesophageal manometry, a combined ambulatory 24-h multichannel impedance pH and bilirubin monitoring. Anatomic recurrence was defined as any evidence of gastric herniation above the diaphragmatic edge. Results There were no intraoperative complications and no conversions to open technique. Symptomatic GORD-HQL outcomes demonstrated a statistical significant decrease of mean value equal to 3.2 compare to 37.4 of preoperative assessment (p?procedure and no hernia recurrence was recorded in the study group, treated respecting several crucial surgical principles, e.g., complete sac excision, appropriate crural closure, also with direct hiatal defect where possible, and routine use of antireflux procedure. PMID:24401085

  5. Working from the Inside Out: A Case Study of Mackay Safe Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Dale; Gunning, Colleen; Rose, Judy; McFarlane, Kathryn; Franklin, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Mackay Whitsunday Safe Community (MWSC) was established in 2000 in response to high rates of injury observed in the region. MWSC assumed an ecological perspective, incorporating targeted safety promotion campaigns reinforced by supportive environments and policy. By involving the community in finding its own solutions, MWSC attempted to catalyze…

  6. Safe Handling Practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    In 1977 Compugraphic Corporation was experiencing an unacceptable failure rate on microelectronic chips. Company engineers suspected that static electricity was causing the trouble because some electronic components are highly susceptible to damage by electrostatic charge. From a NASA Tech Brief, they learned that Rockwell International had prepared a report on safe handling practices for electronic components. NASA provided a Technical Support Package detailing 50 safe handling procedures affecting workers, work areas, equipment and packaging materials. Where poor practices were discovered, re-education of employees and other corrective measures were undertaken.

  7. 45 CFR 261.64 - How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work participation measurement? 261.64 Section...AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK How Do We Ensure the Accuracy of Work...

  8. 45 CFR 261.64 - How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work participation measurement? 261.64 Section...AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK How Do We Ensure the Accuracy of Work...

  9. 45 CFR 261.64 - How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work participation measurement? 261.64 Section...AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK How Do We Ensure the Accuracy of Work...

  10. 45 CFR 261.64 - How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work participation measurement? 261.64 Section...AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK How Do We Ensure the Accuracy of Work...

  11. 45 CFR 261.64 - How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work participation measurement? 261.64 Section...AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK How Do We Ensure the Accuracy of Work...

  12. A safe, effective, and facility compatible cleaning in place procedure for affinity resin in large-scale monoclonal antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Dembecki, Jill; Jaffe, Neil E; O'Mara, Brian W; Cai, Hui; Sparks, Colleen N; Zhang, Jian; Laino, Sarah G; Russell, Reb J; Wang, Michelle

    2013-09-20

    Cleaning-in-place (CIP) for column chromatography plays an important role in therapeutic protein production. A robust and efficient CIP procedure ensures product quality, improves column life time and reduces the cost of the purification processes, particularly for those using expensive affinity resins, such as MabSelect protein A resin. Cleaning efficiency, resin compatibility, and facility compatibility are the three major aspects to consider in CIP process design. Cleaning MabSelect resin with 50mM sodium hydroxide (NaOH) along with 1M sodium chloride is one of the most popular cleaning procedures used in biopharmaceutical industries. However, high concentration sodium chloride is a leading cause of corrosion in the stainless steel containers used in large scale manufacture. Corroded containers may potentially introduce metal contaminants into purified drug products. Therefore, it is challenging to apply this cleaning procedure into commercial manufacturing due to facility compatibility and drug safety concerns. This paper reports a safe, effective and environmental and facility-friendly cleaning procedure that is suitable for large scale affinity chromatography. An alternative salt (sodium sulfate) is used to prevent the stainless steel corrosion caused by sodium chloride. Sodium hydroxide and salt concentrations were optimized using a high throughput screening approach to achieve the best combination of facility compatibility, cleaning efficiency and resin stability. Additionally, benzyl alcohol is applied to achieve more effective microbial control. Based on the findings, the recommended optimum cleaning strategy is cleaning MabSelect resin with 25 mM NaOH, 0.25 M Na2SO4 and 1% benzyl alcohol solution every cycle, followed by a more stringent cleaning using 50 mM NaOH with 0.25 M Na2SO4 and 1% benzyl alcohol at the end of each manufacturing campaign. A resin life cycle study using the MabSelect affinity resin demonstrates that the new cleaning strategy prolongs resin life time and consistently delivers high purity drug products. PMID:23953712

  13. Work Control Center Operating Procedure page 1 D-NSTX-OP-AD-129 Rev.OO

    E-print Network

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Work Control Center Operating Procedure page 1 D-NSTX-OP-AD-129 Rev.OO Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Procedure Procedure Title: Work Control Center Operating Procedure For NSTX Upgrade Number Requirements Designated by RLM LABWIDE: Work Planning Form # W-1597 (ENG-032) Confined Space Permit (5008,SEC.8

  14. Potential Health Risks Associated to ICSI: Insights from Animal Models and Strategies for a Safe Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Calabuig, María Jesús; López-Cardona, Angela Patricia; Fernández-González, Raúl; Ramos-Ibeas, Priscila; Fonseca Balvís, Noelia; Laguna-Barraza, Ricardo; Pericuesta, Eva; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Bermejo-Álvarez, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Artificial reproductive techniques are currently responsible for 1.7–4% of the births in developed countries and intracytoplasmatic sperm injection (ICSI) is the most commonly used, accounting for 70–80% of the cycles performed. Despite being an invaluable tool for infertile couples, the technique bypasses several biological barriers that naturally select the gametes to achieve an optimal embryonic and fetal development. In this perspective, ICSI has been associated with an increased risk for diverse health problems, ranging from premature births and diverse metabolic disorders in the offspring to more severe complications such as abortions, congenital malformations, and imprinting disorders. In this review, we discuss the possible implications of the technique per se on these adverse outcomes and highlight the importance of several experiments using mammalian models to truthfully test these implications and to uncover the molecular base that origins these health problems. We also dissect the specific hazards associated to ICSI and describe some strategies that have been developed to mimic the gamete selection occurring in natural conception in order to improve the safety of the procedure. PMID:25478554

  15. [Are disinfectant residues remained after cleaning hemodialysis machine procedure safe for patients?].

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Ma?gorzata; Grzeszczuk, Karolina; Walski, Tomasz; Suder, Marek; Komorowska, Ma?gorzata

    2013-01-01

    The dialysis machine shall be cleaned and disinfected after each patient treatment or after every 72 hours break in working. An acceptable disinfectants such as Puristeril plus or Puristeril 340, Citrosteril, Diasteril and Sporotal are used for decontamination. Puristeril 340 is designed for cold disinfection and due to the low pH value, the necessary decalcification of hemodialysis machines is easily achieved. It can be used for all haemodialysis systems like hemodialysis machines, water treatment devices and circuit pipes. Diluted Puristeril decomposes in a non-toxic way. Degradation products of peracetic acid, which is main component of Puristeril are: hydrogen peroxide and acetic acid. Peracetic acid is widely used for disinfection due to its exceptionally broad spectrum of microbiocidal activity at low concentrations and short exposure times. After use Puristeril is easily removable by rinsing with water. This paper deals with the effect of the Puristeril toxicity on blood as a function of its concentration and incubation time. Concentration range of 3.5-70 ppm was used, with particular emphasis on concentrations close to 5 ppm, a value is the limit of sensitivity of strips of starch potassium iodide, the tests for detection of peracetic acid. There was a strong increase in autohaemolysis and malondialdehyde concentrations with increasing concentration of Puristeril. There were also changes in dependence on the parameters of the incubation time, with the greatest effects obtained after 2 hours incubation with Puristeril. The detection limit of peracetic acid used strips of starch potassium iodide does not guarantee the safety of a patient undergoing hemodialysis. Even the residual concentration of Puristeril plus cause increased lipid peroxidation of membrane, and therefore suggest the routine use of stripes on the lower limit of detection of peracetic acid or implement measurement of hydrogen peroxide residues performed with sensitivity 1 ppm. PMID:24003659

  16. Safe places for pedestrians: using cognitive work analysis to consider the relationships between the engineering and urban design of footpaths.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Nicholas; Salmon, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Footpaths provide an integral component of our urban environments and have the potential to act as safe places for people and the focus for community life. Despite this, the approach to designing footpaths that are safe while providing this sense of place often occurs in silos. There is often very little consideration given to how designing for sense of place impacts safety and vice versa. The aim of this study was to use a systems analysis and design framework to develop a design template for an 'ideal' footpath system that embodies both safety and sense of place. This was achieved through using the first phase of the Cognitive Work Analysis framework, Work Domain Analysis, to specify a model of footpaths as safe places for pedestrians. This model was subsequently used to assess two existing footpath environments to determine the extent to which they meet the design requirements specified. The findings show instances where the existing footpaths both meet and fail to meet the design requirements specified. Through utilising a systems approach for footpaths, this paper has provided a novel design template that can inform new footpath design efforts or be used to evaluate the extent to which existing footpaths achieve their safety and sense of place requirements. PMID:25089766

  17. A Safe and Healthful Work Environment: Development and Testing of an Undergraduate Occupational Health Nursing Curriculum.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Marjorie C; Berry, Peggy

    2015-08-01

    Occupational health nursing focuses on promotion and restoration of health, prevention of illness and injury, protection from work-related and environmental hazards, and corporate profitability. Quality education about the relationship between work and health is critical for nurses' success regardless of work setting, and is consistent with Healthy People 2020 goals, but is lacking or limited in some programs. This report introduces an innovative occupational health nursing curriculum for students enrolled in baccalaureate nursing programs. The process of designing and pilot testing this novel curriculum, its alignment with nursing competencies, and its format and learning activities are described. Preparing professional nurses to understand the role of the occupational health nurse and the relationship between work and health is an essential curricular consideration for contemporary nursing education. PMID:26077879

  18. NASA Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu; Corbin, Barbara; Sulzman, Frank; Kreneck, Sam

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the radiation environment that is a significant potential hazard to NASA's goals for space exploration, of living and working in space. NASA has initiated a Peer reviewed research program that is charged with arriving at an understanding of the space radiation problem. To this end NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed to simulate the harsh cosmic and solar radiation found in space. Another piece of the work was to develop a risk modeling tool that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system damage, degenerative tissue disease, and acute radiation effects acute radiation effects.

  19. The Utility of Caesarean Myomectomy as a Safe Procedure: A Retrospective Analysis of 21 Cases with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Manjula; SA, Shruthi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Myomectomy at the time of caesarean delivery has been discouraged because of the risk of intractable haemorrhage and increased postoperative morbidity. The aim of this study is to determine the safety and feasibility of caesarean myomectomy. Materials and Methods: A retrospective case control study done between June 2012 to May 2013 in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Karnataka, India which included 21 pregnant women with uterine fibroids who underwent myomectomy during caesarean section and were compared with 42 matched controls without uterine fibroids who had caesarean section alone during the same period. Primary outcome measures studied were incidence of haemorrhage and need for blood transfusion. Secondary outcome measures were duration of operation, length of hospital stay, postpartum fever and wound infection. Statistical analysis is done using IBMSPSS 20.0 software and students t-test. For calculation of incidence of haemorrhage Fisher’s exact test is used. Results: Mean age of the 21 cases was 31.81yrs and 47.62% were primigravida. Total 37 fibroids were removed. Subserosal were 30 cases(81.08%) while 1(2.07%) was submucous. 21(56.76%)fibroids were situated in fundal region and 3(8.11%) were in lower segment. Mean change in the haemoglobin from preoperative to postoperative period in the cases was 1.3gm/dl(±1.155mg/dl) and control was 1.05% (±.854mg/dl). Two of the cases(9.52%) required blood transfusion compared to none in control. None in either group required hysterectomy. Mean duration of surgery was 68.57min (±15.012min)and 51.55min (±9.595min) for controls which is statistically significant. Conclusion: This study shows that myomectomy during caesarean section is a safe procedure and is not associated with major intraoperative and postoperative complications. PMID:25386485

  20. Service station requirements for safe use of hydrogen based fuels: NHA work group update

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the results of the meeting of the working group on safety standards. A standard for an odorant for hydrogen leak detection is set forth. Recent activities with the National Fire Protection Association and the International Standard Organization are enumerated. The path forward is also summarized.

  1. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Policy and procedures for work zone safety management. 630.1106 Section 630.1106 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Temporary Traffic Control Devices § 630.1106 Policy and procedures for work zone...

  2. SUNRAYCE 1995: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dephillips, M. P.; Moskowitz, P. D.; Fthenakis, V. M.

    1994-05-01

    This document is a power system and battery safety handbook for participants in the SUNRAYCE 95 solar powered electric vehicle program. The topics of the handbook include batteries, photovoltaic modules, safety equipment needed for working with sulfuric acid electrolyte and batteries, battery transport, accident response, battery recharging and ventilation, electrical risks on-board vehicle, external electrical risks, electrical risk management strategies, and general maintenance including troubleshooting, hydrometer check and voltmeter check.

  3. SUNRAYCE 95: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems

    SciTech Connect

    DePhillips, M.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1994-05-27

    This document is a power system and battery safety handbook for participants in the SUNRAYCE 95 solar powered electric vehicle program. The topics of the handbook include batteries, photovoltaic modules, safety equipment needed for working with sulfuric acid electrolyte and batteries, battery transport, accident response, battery recharging and ventilation, electrical risks on-board vehicle, external electrical risks, electrical risk management strategies, and general maintenance including troubleshooting, hydrometer check and voltmeter check.

  4. Human-rating Automated and Robotic Systems - (How HAL Can Work Safely with Astronauts)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baroff, Lynn; Dischinger, Charlie; Fitts, David

    2009-01-01

    Long duration human space missions, as planned in the Vision for Space Exploration, will not be possible without applying unprecedented levels of automation to support the human endeavors. The automated and robotic systems must carry the load of routine housekeeping for the new generation of explorers, as well as assist their exploration science and engineering work with new precision. Fortunately, the state of automated and robotic systems is sophisticated and sturdy enough to do this work - but the systems themselves have never been human-rated as all other NASA physical systems used in human space flight have. Our intent in this paper is to provide perspective on requirements and architecture for the interfaces and interactions between human beings and the astonishing array of automated systems; and the approach we believe necessary to create human-rated systems and implement them in the space program. We will explain our proposed standard structure for automation and robotic systems, and the process by which we will develop and implement that standard as an addition to NASA s Human Rating requirements. Our work here is based on real experience with both human system and robotic system designs; for surface operations as well as for in-flight monitoring and control; and on the necessities we have discovered for human-systems integration in NASA's Constellation program. We hope this will be an invitation to dialog and to consideration of a new issue facing new generations of explorers and their outfitters.

  5. 48 CFR 808.405-2 - Ordering procedure for services requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Schedules 808.405-2 Ordering procedure for services requiring a statement of work. When placing an order or establishing a BPA for supplies or services requiring a statement of work, the ordering activity, when developing the statement of work...

  6. 48 CFR 808.405-2 - Ordering procedure for services requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Schedules 808.405-2 Ordering procedure for services requiring a statement of work. When placing an order or establishing a BPA for supplies or services requiring a statement of work, the ordering activity, when developing the statement of work...

  7. 49 CFR 214.335 - On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups...Worker Protection § 214.335 On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups...member of a roadway work group to foul a track unless on-track safety is...

  8. 49 CFR 214.335 - On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups...Worker Protection § 214.335 On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups...member of a roadway work group to foul a track unless on-track safety is...

  9. Improving Written Instructions for Procedural Tasks. Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, Catherine

    Guthrie, Bennett, and Weber (1990) have proposed a transformational model of procedural document processing. They suggest that successful completion of written instruction occurs when sources of information are combined with certain cognitive processes. Optimal combinations of information and cognition include the following: using the exposition…

  10. Procedures and Standards Handbook. Version 3.0. What Works Clearinghouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This "What Works Clearinghouse Procedures and Standards Handbook (Version 3.0)" provides a detailed description of the standards and procedures of the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC). The remaining chapters of this Handbook are organized to take the reader through the basic steps that the WWC uses to develop a review protocol, identify…

  11. Procedure for Working with Temozolomide, April 2010 University of Toronto

    E-print Network

    Chan, Hue Sun

    as a Class 2B carcinogen (sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in animals) by IARC (the International of the precautionary principle, TMZ should be treated as a carcinogen by those working with it. Toxicity The lowest that for a carcinogen, exposure should be reduced to as low as reasonably possible. Precautions to be Followed

  12. 78 FR 37463 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ...9221 B.1, B.2 Methods. Coliform Fermentation Technique. Enzyme Substrate Colilert[supreg].... 9223 B Methods. Colisure...F.1 Procedure (following Lactose Fermentation Methods). Enzyme Substrate Colilert[supreg].... 9223 B Methods....

  13. Safe Hazmat Storage Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neville, Angela

    1996-01-01

    Provides a list of recommendations for safely managing hazardous waste containers. Encourages training of employees on the hazards of the wastes they handle and the correct procedures for managing containers. (DDR)

  14. Differential effects of socioeconomic status on working and procedural memory systems

    E-print Network

    Gabrieli, John D. E.

    While prior research has shown a strong relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and working memory performance, the relation between SES and procedural (implicit) memory remains unknown. Convergent research in both ...

  15. 78 FR 32558 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... earlier expedited methods approval action (74 FR 38348, August 3, 2009) (USEPA 2009b). Both EPA Methods... Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures. 74 FR 38348. August 3, 2009. USEPA. 2013. EPA Method 524.4... F, 20th Edition E. coli 40 CFR 141.402(c)(2) (APHA 1998). 9221 F.1 9221 F, 20th Edition E. coli...

  16. 77 FR 38523 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 141 Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants...'s (EPA's) approval of alternative testing methods for use in measuring the levels of contaminants in... action apply to me? Public water systems are the regulated entities required to measure contaminants...

  17. Differences between Presentation Methods in Working Memory Procedures: A Matter of Working Memory Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricker, Timothy J.; Cowan, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Understanding forgetting from working memory, the memory used in ongoing cognitive processing, is critical to understanding human cognition. In the past decade, a number of conflicting findings have been reported regarding the role of time in forgetting from working memory. This has led to a debate concerning whether longer retention intervals…

  18. Adoption Dynamics: An Update on the Impact of the Adoption and Safe Families Act. Chapin Hall Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulczyn, Fred; Hislop, Kristen Brunner; Chen, Lijun

    2005-01-01

    The Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) addresses issues pertaining to prevention of placement in the child welfare system, as well as family reunification, the specific provisions of ASFA that relate to the termination of parental rights and adoption are perhaps most central to the law's overarching purpose. This paper analyzes adoptions from…

  19. Differential effects of socioeconomic status on working and procedural memory systems

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Julia A.; Mackey, Allyson P.; Finn, Amy S.; Gabrieli, John D. E.

    2015-01-01

    While prior research has shown a strong relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and working memory performance, the relation between SES and procedural (implicit) memory remains unknown. Convergent research in both animals and humans has revealed a fundamental dissociation, both behaviorally and neurally, between a working memory system that depends on medial temporal-lobe structures and the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) vs. a procedural memory system that depends on the basal ganglia. Here, we measured performance in adolescents from lower- and higher-SES backgrounds on tests of working memory capacity (complex working memory span) and procedural memory (probabilistic classification) and their hippocampal, DLPFC, and caudate volumes. Lower-SES adolescents had worse working memory performance and smaller hippocampal and DLPFC volumes than their higher-SES peers, but there was no significant difference between the lower- and higher-SES groups on the procedural memory task or in caudate volumes. These findings suggest that SES may have a selective influence on hippocampal-prefrontal-dependent working memory and little influence on striatal-dependent procedural memory. PMID:26500525

  20. Eliciting Young Children's Perceptions of Play, Work and Learning Using the Activity Apperception Story Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Justine

    2002-01-01

    Used the Activity Apperception Story Procedure to elicit perceptions of play, work, and learning from 3- to 6-year-olds. Found that children could distinguish play/work and learning/not learning using photographs. While children attended to anticipated cues for justifying their classification of photos, the justification data suggested that the…

  1. Procedures for safe handling of off-gases from electric vehicle lead-acid batteries during overcharge

    SciTech Connect

    LaBelle, S.J.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Loutfy, R.O.; Varma, R.

    1980-01-25

    The potential for generation of toxic gases from lead-acid batteries has long been recognized. Prior to the current interest in electric vehicles, there were no studies specificaly oriented to toxic gas release from traction batteries, however. As the Department of Energy Demonstration Project (in the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program) progresses, available data from past studies and parallel health effects programs must be digested into guidance to the drivers and maintenance personnel, tailored to their contact with electric vehicles. The basic aspects of lead-acid battery operation, vehicle use, and health effects of stibine and arsine to provide electric vehicle users with the information behind the judgment that vehicle operation and testing may proceed are presented. Specifically, it is concluded that stibine generation or arsine generation at rapid enough rates to induce acute toxic response is not at all likely. Procedures to guard against low-level exposure until more definitive data on ambient concentrations of the gases are collected are presented for both charging the batteries and driving the vehicles. A research plan to collect additional quantitative data from electric traction batteries is presented.

  2. Think safe. Act safe. Be safe. Stormwater Pollution

    E-print Network

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Program Agency #12;Think safe. Act safe. Be safe. Stormwater Regulatory History CLEAN WATER ACT WATER #12;Think safe. Act safe. Be safe. UC Davis Water Quality Program MS4MS4 ConstructionThink safe. Act safe. Be safe. Stormwater Pollution Prevention and Low Impact Development at UC

  3. Fail safe logic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shield, I.

    1983-03-01

    Ideally, a circuit is said to be fail safe, if for every possible failure configuration, the circuit results in a safe side output. In order to guarantee safe side failures, it is imperative that the circuit detects any faults within it. A suitable procedure for doing this can be based on an error detecting code, such as the K out of N code. A number of circuit types are considered, taking into account a fault tolerant circuit, a fault secure circuit, a self testing circuit, a self checking circuit, a self checking checker, and a fail safe circuit. Attention is given to the realization of combinational circuits, aspects of safety and reliability, sequential circuits, the realization of sequential circuits, the occurrence of clock failure, and the design procedure.

  4. Procedure for Working with SEMICARBAZIDE HYDROCHLORIDE or SEMICARBAZIDE HYDROCHLORIDE-Treated Animals

    E-print Network

    Chan, Hue Sun

    must wear the appropriate PPE. ANIMAL HOUSING For the first 24 hours post-injection or before the first with SEMICARBAZIDE HYDROCHLORIDE or SEMICARBAZIDE HYDROCHLORIDE-Treated Animals University of Toronto June 2010 Procedure for Working with Semicarbazide hydrochloride and Semicarbazide hydrochloride-Treated Animals

  5. The relation between receptive grammar and procedural, declarative, and working memory in specific language impairment

    PubMed Central

    Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Ullman, Michael T.; Lum, Jarrad A. G.

    2015-01-01

    What memory systems underlie grammar in children, and do these differ between typically developing (TD) children and children with specific language impairment (SLI)? Whilst there is substantial evidence linking certain memory deficits to the language problems in children with SLI, few studies have investigated multiple memory systems simultaneously, examining not only possible memory deficits but also memory abilities that may play a compensatory role. This study examined the extent to which procedural, declarative, and working memory abilities predict receptive grammar in 45 primary school aged children with SLI (30 males, 15 females) and 46 TD children (30 males, 16 females), both on average 9;10 years of age. Regression analyses probed measures of all three memory systems simultaneously as potential predictors of receptive grammar. The model was significant, explaining 51.6% of the variance. There was a significant main effect of learning in procedural memory and a significant group × procedural learning interaction. Further investigation of the interaction revealed that procedural learning predicted grammar in TD but not in children with SLI. Indeed, procedural learning was the only predictor of grammar in TD. In contrast, only learning in declarative memory significantly predicted grammar in SLI. Thus, different memory systems are associated with receptive grammar abilities in children with SLI and their TD peers. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to demonstrate a significant group by memory system interaction in predicting grammar in children with SLI and their TD peers. In line with Ullman’s Declarative/Procedural model of language and procedural deficit hypothesis of SLI, variability in understanding sentences of varying grammatical complexity appears to be associated with variability in procedural memory abilities in TD children, but with declarative memory, as an apparent compensatory mechanism, in children with SLI. PMID:26284013

  6. Pain and nurses' emotion work in a paediatric clinic: treatment procedures and nurse-child alignments.

    PubMed

    Rindstedt, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    In the treatment of cancer in children, treatment procedures have been reported to be one of the most feared elements, as more painful than the illness as such. This study draws on a video ethnography of routine needle procedure events, as part of fieldwork at a paediatric oncology clinic documenting everyday treatment negotiations between nurses and young children. On the basis of detailed transcriptions of verbal and nonverbal staff-child interaction, the analyses focus on ways in which pain and anxiety can be seen as phenomena that are partly contingent on nurses' emotion work. The school-age children did not display fear. In the preschool group, though, pain and fear seemed to be phenomena that were greatly reduced through nurses' emotion work. This study focuses on three preschoolers facing potentially painful treatment, showing how the nurses engaged in massive emotion work with the children, through online commentaries, interactive formats (delegation of tasks, consent sequences, collaborative 'we'-formats), as well as solidarity-oriented moves (such as praise and endearment terms). Even a young toddler would handle the distress of needle procedures, when interacting with an inventive nurse who mobilized child participation through skilful emotion work. PMID:24851517

  7. Cross-national research on contractor evaluation procedures in public works procurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Seiya; Sato, Naoyoshi; Matsumoto, Naoya

    Contractor evaluation methods in Japan's public works procurement, beginning with construction business licensure, going through biennial preliminary firm rating, up to project-by-project prequalification and comprehensive point rating, were developed during the period when public works were mostly procured through designated competitive bidding. It is essential to focus attention on contractor evaluation methods for introducing different types of procurement procedures which enhance the use of technological capabilities held by private businesses. An overall review of contractor evaluation procedures should be conducted in view of the present situation, where the open competitive bidding has become mainly used in combination with comprehensive evaluation, as well as to allow for further diversification of procurement methods. In Western countries, improvements have been made for the past several years in contractor evaluation procedures with more emphasis on "Value for Money." Advanced efforts made by these countries will be useful as a reference for overhauling Japan's contractor evaluation system. This study conducts a comparative review of contractor evaluation procedures for public procurement in Western countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom and France by identifying similarities and differences between those of Japan and the above mentioned countries. This reveals that a contractor's technical or professional ability is looked at separately from its economic and financial standing in those countries studied, and there is no case like Japan in which those two factors are integrated into one for evaluation.

  8. Safe Nanotechnology in the Work Space Different types of nanoparticles are made or used in various industrial processes. To

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Robert E.

    of animals. Effects in humans. Human studies of exposure and response to engineered nanoparticles in the Work Space Effects in animals. Laboratory studies in animals have shown that some types studies have shown adverse effects such as inflammation and fibrosis in the lungs and other organs

  9. Driving Safely

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hard to drive safely. Exercise can improve older drivers’ strength and flexibility. In one study, 12 weeks of exercise improved older drivers’ flexibility and coordination, and reduced driving errors. some ...

  10. Safe sex

    MedlinePLUS

    Safe sex means taking steps before and during sex that can prevent you from getting an infection, or from ... the skin around the genital area. Before having sex: Get to know your partner and discuss your ...

  11. Probabilistic risk assessment of dietary exposure to single and multiple pesticide residues or contaminants: summary of the work performed within the SAFE FOODS project.

    PubMed

    van Klaveren, Jacob D; Boon, Polly E

    2009-12-01

    This introduction to the journal's supplement on probabilistic risk assessment of single and multiple exposure to pesticide residues or contaminants summarizes the objectives and results of the work performed in work package 3 of the EU-funded project SAFE FOODS. Within this work package, we developed an electronic platform of food consumption and chemical concentration databases harmonised at raw agricultural commodity level. In this platform the databases are connected to probabilistic software to allow probabilistic modelling of dietary exposure in a standardised way. The usefulness of this platform is demonstrated in two papers, which describe the exposure to pesticides and glycoalkaloids in several European countries. Furthermore, an integrated probabilistic risk assessment (IPRA) model was developed: a new tool to integrate exposure and effect modelling, including uncertainty analyses. The use of this model was shown in a paper on the cumulative exposure to anti-androgen pesticides. Combined with a health impact prioritization system, developed within this work package to compare heath risks between chemicals, the IPRA tool can also be used to compare health risks between multiple chemicals in complex risk assessment situation such as risk-benefit and risk trade-off analyses. Both the electronic platform of databases as the IPRA model may proof to be powerful tools to tackle the challenges risk managers are or will be faced with in the future. PMID:19931100

  12. Working Safe and Feeling Fine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milshtein, Amy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the problem of repetitive stress disorders in the administrative workplace and shares some quick fixes to aid ergonomics. Some thoughts on the ergonomics of office chairs are provided as is the use of professional guidance in furniture purchasing. (GR)

  13. Analogous Mechanisms of Selection and Updating in Declarative and Procedural Working Memory: Experiments and a Computational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberauer, Klaus; Souza, Alessandra S.; Druey, Michel D.; Gade, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    The article investigates the mechanisms of selecting and updating representations in declarative and procedural working memory (WM). Declarative WM holds the objects of thought available, whereas procedural WM holds representations of what to do with these objects. Both systems consist of three embedded components: activated long-term memory, a…

  14. The influence of budget-holding on cost containment and work procedures in primary care clinics.

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Nirel, N; Boussidan, S; Zmora, I; Elhayany, A; Regev, S

    1996-07-01

    In 1990, Kupat Holim Clalit (KHC), Israel's largest health insurance fund, initiated a demonstration program for transforming primary care clinics in the Negev district of southern Israel into autonomous budget-holding units. Four program components were implemented in nine clinics: allocation of a fixed budget; expansion of day-to-day decision-making authority; establishment of a computerized information system for producing monthly reports on expenditure; and provision of incentives for budgetary responsibility (returning part of a clinic's savings for use at its discretion). The demonstration program had three objectives: budgetary control and cost containment; improvement of services and increased client satisfaction; and improvement in the motivation, initiative, responsibility, and satisfaction of clinic staff. This report presents interim findings from an evaluation study of the budget-holding program conducted in 1991-1992. The report considers three questions: How was the demonstration program implemented? Did work procedures in the clinics change following implementation of the program? How did budget-holding influence levels of expenditure in the clinics? The program components were implemented gradually in the nine clinics during 1991-1992. Not all, however, were fully implemented. The staff survey conducted after implementation of the program identified a number of changes in the work procedures of the clinics: heightened cost consciousness, discussion of the monthly expenditure reports, emphasis on the need to economize, and attempts to economize. Data on expenditure in the budget-holding clinics were analyzed and compared to data on expenditure in primary care clinics in the Negev district as a whole. It was found that while the average quarterly per capita expenses in the district increased in real terms from 1991-1992, expenses in the budget-holding clinics remained stable or, in some cases, actually decreased. While we cannot conclude categorically from the existing data that the budget-holding program is responsible for the unique patterns of expenditure in the nine clinics, we can confidently state that work procedures in the nine clinics changed following implementation of the program and that the clinics achieved cost containment relative to the district as a whole. Findings from the various research tools support one another, and reinforce the conclusion that budget-holding can potentially promote cost containment. PMID:8844922

  15. TANK OPERATIONS CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGY UTILIZING THE AGENCY METHOD OF CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT TO SAFELY AND EFFECTIVELY COMPLETE NUCLEAR CONSTRUCTION WORK

    SciTech Connect

    LESO KF; HAMILTON HM; FARNER M; HEATH T

    2010-01-14

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has faced significant project management challenges in managing Davis-Bacon construction work that meets contractually required small business goals. The unique challenge is to provide contracting opportunities to multiple small business construction subcontractors while performing high hazard work in a safe and productive manner. Previous to the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC contract, Construction work at the Hanford Tank Farms was contracted to large companies, while current Department of Energy (DOE) Contracts typically emphasize small business awards. As an integral part of Nuclear Project Management at Hanford Tank Farms, construction involves removal of old equipment and structures and installation of new infrastructure to support waste retrieval and waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment Plant. Utilizing the optimum construction approach ensures that the contractors responsible for this work are successful in meeting safety, quality, cost and schedule objectives while working in a very hazardous environment. This paper describes the successful transition from a traditional project delivery method that utilized a large business general contractor and subcontractors to a new project construction management model that is more oriented to small businesses. Construction has selected the Agency Construction Management Method. This method was implemented in the first quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2009, where Construction Management is performed by substantially home office resources from the URS Northwest Office in Richland, Washington. The Agency Method has allowed WRPS to provide proven Construction Managers and Field Leads to mentor and direct small business contractors, thus providing expertise and assurance of a successful project. Construction execution contracts are subcontracted directly by WRPS to small or disadvantaged contractors that are mentored and supported by DRS personnel. Each small contractor is mentored and supported utilizing the principles of the Construction Industry Institute (CII) Partnering process. Some of the key mentoring and partnering areas that are explored in this paper are, internal and external safety professional support, subcontractor safety teams and the interface with project and site safety teams, quality assurance program support to facilitate compliance with NQA-1, construction, team roles and responsibilities, work definition for successful fixed price contracts, scheduling and interface with project schedules and cost projection/accruals. The practical application of the CII Partnering principles, with the Construction Management expertise of URS, has led to a highly successful construction model that also meets small business contracting goals.

  16. When Is Safe, Safe Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neil, Kirk

    2002-01-01

    Discusses events affecting parental school-safety concerns and what school districts can do to alleviate those concerns. Addresses post-September 11 crisis-management procedures, preventing sports-related student deaths, maintaining healthy indoor air quality. (PKP)

  17. Safe Manual Jettison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Jay

    2008-01-01

    In space, the controlled release of certain cargoes is no less useful than the maritime jettisons from which they take their name but is also much more dangerous. Experience has shown that jettisons can be performed safely, but the process is complicated with the path to performing a jettison taking months or even years. In the background, time is also required to write procedures, train the crew, configure the vehicle, and many other activities. This paper outlines the current process used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for manual jettisons, detailing the methods used to assure that the jettisons and the jettisoned objects are as safe as achievable and that the crew is adequately trained to be able to affect the safe jettison. The goal of this paper is not only to capture what it takes to perform safe jettisons in the near Earth environment but to extrapolate this knowledge to future space exploration scenarios that will likely have Extravehicular Activity (EVA) and International Partner (IP) interfaces.

  18. Records Management -Employee Termination Procedures All employees have working records, information or files that are needed to do their job.

    E-print Network

    Fermilab Experiment E831

    records include personnel, medical, accounting, payroll, procurement, audit, travel and budget recordsRecords Management - Employee Termination Procedures All employees have working records, information or files that are needed to do their job. Prior to an employee's leaving the Lab, these records

  19. 41 CFR 102-5.65 - What procedures apply when the need for home-to-work transportation exceeds the initial period?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...procedures apply when the need for home-to-work transportation exceeds the initial period...MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 5-HOME-TO-WORK TRANSPORTATION Authorizing Home-to-Work Transportation § 102-5.65 What...

  20. 41 CFR 102-5.65 - What procedures apply when the need for home-to-work transportation exceeds the initial period?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...procedures apply when the need for home-to-work transportation exceeds the initial period...MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 5-HOME-TO-WORK TRANSPORTATION Authorizing Home-to-Work Transportation § 102-5.65 What...

  1. 41 CFR 102-5.65 - What procedures apply when the need for home-to-work transportation exceeds the initial period?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...procedures apply when the need for home-to-work transportation exceeds the initial period...MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 5-HOME-TO-WORK TRANSPORTATION Authorizing Home-to-Work Transportation § 102-5.65 What...

  2. 41 CFR 102-5.65 - What procedures apply when the need for home-to-work transportation exceeds the initial period?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...procedures apply when the need for home-to-work transportation exceeds the initial period...MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 5-HOME-TO-WORK TRANSPORTATION Authorizing Home-to-Work Transportation § 102-5.65 What...

  3. 41 CFR 102-5.65 - What procedures apply when the need for home-to-work transportation exceeds the initial period?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...procedures apply when the need for home-to-work transportation exceeds the initial period...MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 5-HOME-TO-WORK TRANSPORTATION Authorizing Home-to-Work Transportation § 102-5.65 What...

  4. Outcome 7. Graduates will understand the safety and environmental consequences of their work as chemical engineers and be able to design safe processes.

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    as chemical engineers and be able to design safe processes. This outcome maps to ABET Criterion 3 i Course with chemical process safety, HAZOP, life-cycle analysis, the environmental impact of chemical engineering-depth explanations Apply chemistry, math, physics, life science, engineering science Apply engineering science

  5. Radon Testing for Safe Schools Act. Report (To Accompany S. 1697) from the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.

    This report was written to accompany the Radon Testing for Safe Schools Act (S.1697), a bill that provides for radon testing of schools located in high risk radon areas and provides limited financial assistance to schools for mitigation of high levels of radon. A description of radon, its harmful effects, and the radon levels detected in schools…

  6. Safe Passage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razwick, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Many schools are almost entirely reliant on alarms and sprinklers for their fire protection. As these devices need to be triggered and supplied with power or water to work properly, they are vulnerable to errors. To provide adequate safety, a good fire-protection program must have three primary elements: fire protection and suppression, and…

  7. How Safe Are Kid-Safe Search Engines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masterson-Krum, Hope

    2001-01-01

    Examines search tools available to elementary and secondary school students, both human-compiled and crawler-based, to help direct them to age-appropriate Web sites; analyzes the procedures of search engines labeled family-friendly or kid safe that use filters; and tests the effectiveness of these services to students in school libraries. (LRW)

  8. Safe handling practices for electrostatic-sensitive devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    Review is detailed compilation of safe handling practices for Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) circuit elements and other devices that are susceptible to damage by electrostatic discharge. Article lists safety procedures for all aspects of handling and use of these components. Included are guidelines for setting up static-free work station and list of materials and equipment needed to maintain antistatic protection. Appendix gives vendors of these items.

  9. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road user... the officers, consistent with the training requirements in 23 CFR 630.1008(d); (6) Procedures for... law-enforcement agency during project planning and development; (3) Conditions where law...

  10. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road user... the officers, consistent with the training requirements in 23 CFR 630.1008(d); (6) Procedures for... law-enforcement agency during project planning and development; (3) Conditions where law...

  11. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road user... the officers, consistent with the training requirements in 23 CFR 630.1008(d); (6) Procedures for... law-enforcement agency during project planning and development; (3) Conditions where law...

  12. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road user... the officers, consistent with the training requirements in 23 CFR 630.1008(d); (6) Procedures for... law-enforcement agency during project planning and development; (3) Conditions where law...

  13. 48 CFR 8.405-2 - Ordering procedures for services requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... clearances, travel, special knowledge). To the maximum extent practicable, agency requirements shall be performance-based statements (see subpart 37.6). (c) Request for Quotation procedures. The ordering activity... unsuccessful offerors. If an unsuccessful offeror requests information on an award that was based on...

  14. Working Memory, Task Switching, and Executive Control in the Task Span Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Four experiments explored the task span procedure: Subjects received lists of 1-10 task names to remember and then lists of 1-10 stimuli on which to perform the tasks. Task span is the number of tasks performed in order perfectly. Experiment 1 compared the task span with the traditional memory span in 6 practiced subjects and found little…

  15. Working with stories in nursing research: procedures used in narrative analysis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Teresa; Howie, Linsey

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes the procedures undertaken in a qualitative study that used nurses' stories to examine the influence of Gestalt therapy training on the professional practice of psychiatric nurses. The paper places narrative research methodologies within a nursing context before introducing narrative inquiry, specifically narrative analysis methodology. Procedures used in the study are subsequently described in sufficient detail to serve as a guide for novice researchers interested in undertaking a narrative analysis study. An exemplar of a storied outcome is provided to evidence the product of the narrative analysis research process. The paper concludes with reflections on the importance of articulating the process of narrative analysis as a means of developing interest and competence in narrative research, and using nurses' stories as a means of exploring, understanding, and communicating nursing practice. PMID:17348965

  16. Work-related stress and bullying: gender differences and forensic medicine issues in the diagnostic procedure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The attention of international agencies and scientific community on bullying and work-related stress is increasing. This study describes the gender differences found in victims of bullying and work-related stress in an Italian case series and analyzes the critical issues in the diagnostic workup. Methods Between 2001 and 2009 we examined 345 outpatients (148 males, 197 females; mean age: 41 ± 10.49) for suspected psychopathological work-related problems. Diagnosis of bullying was established using international criteria (ICD-10 and DSM-IV). Results After interdisciplinary diagnostic evaluation (Occupational Medicine Unit, Psychology and Psychiatry Service), the diagnosis of bullying was formulated in 35 subjects, 12 males and 23 females (2 cases of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and 33 of Adjustment Disorder). Fifty-four (20 males, 34 females) suffered from work-related anxiety, while work-unrelated Adjustment Disorder and other psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 7 and 112 subjects, respectively. Women between 34 and 45 years showed a high prevalence (65%) of "mobbing syndrome" or other work-related stress disorders. Conclusions At work, women are more subject to harassment (for personal aspects related to emotional and relational factors) than men. The knowledge of the phenomenon is an essential requisite to contrast bullying; prevention can be carried out only through effective information and training of workers and employers, who have the legal obligation to preserve the integrity of the mental and physical status of their employees during work. PMID:22088163

  17. Procedure-Authoring Tool Improves Safety on Oil Rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Dark, cold, and dangerous environments are plentiful in space and on Earth. To ensure safe operations in difficult surroundings, NASA relies heavily on procedures written well ahead of time. Houston-based TRACLabs Inc. worked with Ames Research Center through the SBIR program to create an electronic procedure authoring tool, now used by NASA and companies in the oil and gas industry.

  18. Aerosols and Particulates Workshop Sampling Procedures and Venues Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pachlhofer, Peter; Howard, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The Sampling Procedures and Venues Workgroup discussed the potential venues available and issues associated with obtaining measurements. Some of the issues included Incoming Air Quality, Sampling Locations, Probes and Sample Systems. The following is a summary of the discussion of the issues and venues. The influence of inlet air to the measurement of exhaust species, especially trace chemical species, must be considered. Analysis procedures for current engine exhaust emissions regulatory measurements require adjustments for air inlet humidity. As a matter of course in scientific investigations, it is recommended that "background" measurements for any species, particulate or chemical, be performed during inlet air flow before initiation of combustion, if possible, and during the engine test period as feasible and practical. For current regulatory measurements, this would be equivalent to setting the "zero" level for conventional gas analyzers. As a minimum, it is recommended that measurements of the humidity and particulates in the incoming air be taken at the start and end of each test run. Additional measurement points taken during the run are desirable if they can be practically obtained. It was felt that the presence of trace gases in the incoming air is not a significant problem. However, investigators should consider the ambient levels and influences of local air pollution for species of interest. Desired measurement locations depend upon the investigation requirements. A complete investigation of phenomenology of particulate formation and growth requires measurements at a number of locations both within the engine and in the exhaust field downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Desirable locations for both extractive and in situ measurements include: (1) Combustion Zone (Multiple axial locations); (2) Combustor Exit (Multiple radial locations for annular combustors); (3) Turbine Stage (Inlet and exit of the stage); (4) Exit Nozzle (Multiple axial locations downstream of the nozzle). Actual locations with potential for extractive or non-intrusive measurements depend upon the test article and test configuration. Committee members expressed the importance of making investigators aware of various ports that could allow access to various stages of the existing engines. Port locations are engine si)ecific and might allow extractive sampling or innovative hybrid optical-probe access. The turbine stage region was one the most desirable locations for obtaining samples and might be accessed through boroscope ports available in some engine designs. Discussions of probes and sampling systems quickly identified issues dependent on particular measurement quantities. With general consensus, the group recommends SAE procedures for measurements and data analyses of currently regulated exhaust species (CO2, CO, THC, NO(x),) using conventional gas sampling techniques. Special procedures following sound scientific practices must be developed as required for species and/or measurement conditions not covered by SAE standards. Several issues arose concerning short lived radicals and highly reactive species. For conventional sampling, there are concerns of perturbing the sample during extraction, line losses, line-wall reactions, and chemical reactions during the sample transport to the analyzers. Sample lines coated with quartz.or other materials should be investigated for minimization of such effects. The group advocates the development of innovative probe techniques and non-intrusive optical techniques for measurement of short lived radicals and highly reactive species that cannot be sampled accurately otherwise. Two innovative probe concepts were discussed. One concept uses specially designed probes to transfer optical beams to and from a region of flow inaccessible by traditional ports or windows. The probe can perturb the flow field but must have a negligible impact on the region to be optically sampled. Such probes are referred to as hybrid probes and are under development at AEDC for measurement in the high press

  19. Method Matters: Systematic Effects of Testing Procedure on Visual Working Memory Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makovski, Tal; Watson, Leah M.; Koutstaal, Wilma; Jiang, Yuhong V.

    2010-01-01

    Visual working memory (WM) is traditionally considered a robust form of visual representation that survives changes in object motion, observer's position, and other visual transients. This article presents data that are inconsistent with the traditional view. We show that memory sensitivity is dramatically influenced by small variations in the…

  20. Page 1 of 8 Procedure for Working on Plumbing Traps in Laboratories

    E-print Network

    Chan, Hue Sun

    activities involving the removal of drainage pipes and traps that potentially contain mercury, specific.office@utoronto.ca. 1.0 APPLICATION For All Work on Sanitary Plumbing Drains from Laboratories There is a small chance mercury remediation is needed, plumbers shall take the following precautions. 1. As a pipe leading from

  1. Load weight determination during dynamic working procedures using the pedar foot pressure distribution measuring system.

    PubMed

    Ellegast, R; Kupfer, J; Reinert, D

    1997-04-01

    INTRODUCTION:: In 1994 a new BIA research project was launched, which deals with the development of a portable measuring system for recording of external stress parameters (e.g. body postures and handled load weights) at different places of employment. The investigations are carried out against the background of a newly recognized occupational disease (since 1993), which is that of damage of the spine following long-term repetitive lifting and carrying of heavy loads as well as working in an extreme trunk bending posture. As a part of the study it should be clarified if the worker's handled load weight can be determined by using a foot pressure distribution measuring system. METHODS:: In the case of a static working posture the handled load weight can simply be calculated by taking the difference of the measured weight and the known body rest weight of the worker. In dynamic situations the measured total foot reaction force consists of a static and a dynamic component, which is caused by the body movement and which is normally bigger than the load gravitational force. For load weight determination it is important to separate the dynamic forces from the measured total force to get an idea about its gravitational rest part. Therefore the body dynamics are measured synchronously to the foot pressure by using angle and angular velocity sensors. The herewith received data are used as input values for a developed biomechanical link segment model, with which it is possible to predict the foot reaction force. So even in dynamic situations an estimation of the handled load weight can be made by comparison of the predicted with the measured foot reaction force. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION:: In laboratory tests the load weight could be determinated reliably for different working processes over a total measuring time of 40 seconds. During the measurements the Pedar insoles were placed directly under the foot so that the accuracy of the static force measurement was reasonably high (with a maximal deviation of 5% to the real force). When the insoles were put in shoes, additional forces resulting from the bent shoe leather complicate the load weight determination. This effect still has to be analysed to compensate for it in future measurements. CONCLUSION:: The laboratory results encourage us for future measurements at places of employment. Currently our work focuses on an increase of the total measuring time and on a modification of the measuring system to a portable system without any connection to a computer. A field study is in preparation. PMID:11415710

  2. Safe Disposal of Highly Reactive Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunn, George; Sansone, Eric B.

    1994-01-01

    Provides specific procedures for the disposal of a variety of highly reactive chemicals and reports the results of a study of their safe disposal. Disposal of some problematic sulfur-containing compounds are included. Procedures are based on a combination of literature review and author development. (LZ)

  3. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 7/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    setting, a probable human carcinogen. As with any chemical, please read the Material Safety Data Sheet is not toxic, but the monomer can cause peripheral neuropathy and is a probable human carcinogen. Symptoms exposure for many if not most symptoms. Cancer Hazards: Acrylamide is a probable human carcinogen. Animal

  4. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 7/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    with water. o Apply calcium gluconate to the site of contact (iced benzalkonium chloride, 0.13% Soaks or calcium gluconate, 2.5% gel). Use gloves while applying to prevent contact with uncontaminated skin. o and away from the eye during irrigation to allow thorough flushing of the eyes. Do not apply calcium

  5. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 7/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    -800 4 5 6 8 8 9 10 4 5 6 8 9 12 14 Torch Brazing (TB) -- -- 3 or 4 Torch Soldering (TS) -- -- 2 Carbon zone without going below the minimum. In oxyfuel gas welding, cutting, or brazing where the torch) standards for eye and face protection during welding: Suitable goggles are required for brazing operations

  6. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 3/10)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    to wood dusts can result in eye and skin irritation, dermatitis, respiratory system effects (including. Therefore, the risk of exposure to wood dusts should be minimized through appropriate control measures) for the respirable fraction of wood dust. These limits are easily exceeded in woodworking operations, particularly

  7. Safe Operating Procedure BIOSAFETY CONTAINMENT LEVELS

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    corridors · Self-closing, double-door access · Exhaust air not recirculated · Negative airflow BSCs or Class I or II BSCs in combination with full-body, air-supplied, positive pressure personnel suit BSL-3 facilities plus: · Separate building or isolated zone · Dedicated supply and exhaust, vacuum, an

  8. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 10/11)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    ). Pollutants in illicit discharges may include sediments, heavy metals, toxic chemicals, oil and grease-fighting activities; · Water that does not contain pollutants; or · Other discharges authorized under the terms Discharges Discharges that are not Illicit (if evaluated and confirmed to be free of pollutants) Effluent

  9. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 7/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    , cavity, trench, or depression in an earth surface, formed by earth removal. The most serious hazard by sloping/benching, shoring, or shielding. The protective structure/design must consider the soil type

  10. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 7/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    ://ehs.unl.edu/) Rotors on high-speed centrifuge and ultracentrifuge units are subject to mechanical stress that can's maximum rated speed for the rotor. o Once a run is complete, make sure the rotor has completely stopped result in rotor failure. Improper loading and balancing of rotors can also cause failure

  11. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 5/08)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    of accidents can be prevented with improved housekeeping, appropriate guardrails, maintenance of walking hazards that may result in slip, trip, and fall accidents. General Housekeeping · Keep passageways

  12. Safe Operating Procedure (Reviewed 7/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    .e., flammable or explosive atmospheres, in the presence of combustible dust, indoors or outdoors, etc.). Follow.e., common combustible materials like cardboard and paper, organic solvent storage areas, etc not be used to dry glassware that has been rinsed with organic solvents. · Do not use mercury thermometers

  13. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 5/08)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    recommendation is use of the mouse by either hand. This will reduce the repetition and strain on one wrist. · Use strain related to typing. For wrists and fingers, gently pulling back on the fingers with the arms prevent neck strain. · Anti-glare screens for monitors can reduce eyestrain associated with reflected

  14. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 7/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    ://ehs.unl.edu/) Custodial workers are at risk for repetitive motion injuries during routine tasks such as using a broom. · If the barrel tips, let go of it to avoid strain or injury. · See also EHS SOP, Cart and Hand Truck Safety

  15. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 12/11)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    bags for any type of waste collection other than biohazardous waste (i.e., regular trash, radioactive equipment and consumables (i.e., pipette tips, glass, cuvettes, etc.). This material must not be incinerated

  16. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 12/08)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    degrees or on wet slopes. Do not operate walk-behind mowers on wet grass, whether flat or sloped, or pulling a walk-behind mower with the blades engaged. · Do not remove the grass catcher or unclog the chute while the motor is running. Gas Powered String Trimmers and Brush Cutters Observe those precautions

  17. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 5/08)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    symptoms, such as: · Dusts and odors (i.e., paint, tar, etc.) from renovation projects · Pet dander carried of Alleged Occupational Injury/Illness form and submit it to the Benefits Office via fax (472-6803). Report

  18. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 10/11)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    ventilated areas, vapors can accumulate to explosive levels. Gasoline is toxic, and is particularly dangerous/08) UNL Environmental Health and Safety · (402) 472-4925 · http://ehs.unl.edu Fuel oil, such as diesel toxic than gasoline. Warning properties and exposure symptoms are similar to gasoline. Bunker oil Bunker

  19. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 3/11)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    to petroleum based, animal, nut, and vegetable fats, oils, and greases, milk and milk products and ethanol by permitting may be required. · Installing fuel tanks or other tanks containing oil (including but not limited-products), may require installation permits as well as compliance with Oil Pollution Prevention regulatory

  20. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 12/08)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    , localized swelling, and itching at the site of the sting. There is no need for alarm with this type and itching on the body at locations away from the bee sting site; swelling of the throat; chest tightness

  1. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 7/11)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    ://ehs.unl.edu/) Definition Cryogenic liquids have boiling points of less than -90º C (-130º F) at 14.7 psia (1 bar). All cryogenic liquids are gases at normal temperatures and pressures. When cooled and placed under pressure cold temperatures. Types of Cryogens & Hazards Various gases can be used as cryogenic liquids. The most

  2. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 3/10)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    material. Ballasts manufactured after 1978, used a PCB substitute or are configured with electronics as an alternative to dielectric fluid. Regardless of the type, ballasts are subject to certain regulatory with the type of lamp (i.e., Spent Phillips Alto

  3. Safe Operating Procedure (Reviewed 5/08)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    centrifuge tubes with o-ring screw caps. · Ensure that the centrifuge is properly balanced. · Use outer. · Decontaminate the inside and outside of the cups or buckets before and after use and inspect seals regularly-duty screw caps that include an O-ring. (Created 5/03; Revised 9/07) UNL Environmental Health and Safety

  4. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 8/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    , gloves, etc.) in a heavy-walled polyethylene bottle with a screw-cap lid (or heavy plastic bag that is sealed after use) and label as "mercury spill residue" and tag for collection by EHS. 5. Wash hands, arms

  5. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 7/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    with plastic wheels, especially when moving heavy loads. Keep pneumatic tires at the rated pressure and check stationary wheels. · Carts with ball-bearings and pneumatic wheels are far superior to lower-quality carts

  6. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 7/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    building opening, at least 10' from weeds and other combustibles, and must be protected from possible vehicle damage, theft, or pilfering. · Storage must be at least 20 foot from any vehicular, equipment be located to minimize exposure to excessive warm temperatures, physical damage, or tampering. Excessive cold

  7. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 1/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    of grains by bacteria, growth of mold, fungi, etc.) can result in production of metabolic gases (i. Thirdly, dusts must be confined. Lastly, an ignition source must be present. Welding and the operation

  8. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 7/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    the mixture. After 20 hours, neutralize the solution with sodium bicarbonate. Note that upon adding sodiumBr solution, add 20 ml of 5% hypophosphorous acid solution and 12 ml 0.5 M sodium nitrite solution. Stir bicarbonate, the solution will foam as CO2 gas is liberated. Dispose of the neutralized solution via

  9. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 4/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    with raw eggs. · Any food additives used that were not purchased from a licensed vendor. · Any meat been evaporated in the cooking process. · Mushroom species picked in the wild. · Raw meats or raw if preparation involves meat, egg, or dairy products. · Re-wash hands and put on a clean pair of gloves after

  10. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 9/09)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    ) Formaldehyde (liquid) Glutaraldehyde Hydrogen peroxide (liquid) Concentration 0.1-2% 0.2-3% 0.01-5% 0.47% 70 by hard water or residual detergent. Effectiveness reduced by alkaline pH and natural soap. Corrosive. Unpleasant odor. Must make fresh solutions before use. Increase in alkalinity decreases efficacy. Corrodes

  11. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 12/11)

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    infectious to humans, animals or plants (e.g., parasites, viruses, bacteria, fungi, prions, rickettsia, such as human blood and certain body fluids as well as human or monkey cell cultures, are also considered) ______________________________________________________________________ (For assistance, please contact EHS at (402) 472-4925, or visit our web site at http

  12. Safe Kids Worldwide

    MedlinePLUS

    ... All Kids Safe Safety Tips Get Involved 4 Star Charity Donate Global Road Safety Sponsors Recalls Media ... All Kids Safe Safety Tips Get Involved 4 Star Charity Donate Main Content Text Share, Act, Give ...

  13. Safe driving for teens

    MedlinePLUS

    Driving and teenagers; Teens and safe driving; Automobile safety - teenage drivers ... Make a Commitment to Safety Teens also need to commit to being safe and responsible drivers in order improve the odds in their favor. Reckless driving is ...

  14. Medicines: Use Them Safely

    MedlinePLUS

    ... raquo Medicines: Use Them Safely Heath and Aging Medicines: Use Them Safely What Are Medicines? What Are ... they’re taking many different drugs. What Are Medicines? What Are Drugs? Some people refer to the ...

  15. Use Medicines Safely

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medicines Safely Print This Topic En español Use Medicines Safely Browse Sections The Basics Overview Prescription Medicines ... Medicines 1 of 8 sections The Basics: Prescription Medicines There are different types of medicine. The 2 ...

  16. Creating Food-Safe Schools: A How-to Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2006

    2006-01-01

    A food-safe school takes the steps to minimize the risk of foodborne illness throughout the school's environment and has procedures in place to identify and manage outbreaks if they occur. This booklet introduces the Food-Safe Schools Action Guide, which helps schools identify gaps in food safety and develop an action plan for becoming food-safe.…

  17. 25 CFR 700.55 - Decent, safe, and sanitary dwelling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Decent, safe, and sanitary dwelling. 700.55 Section 700.55 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.55 Decent, safe, and sanitary dwelling. (a) General. The term decent, safe, and...

  18. 30 CFR 77.312 - Fail safe monitoring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.312 Fail safe monitoring systems. Thermal dryer systems and controls shall be protected by a fail safe monitoring system which...

  19. 30 CFR 77.312 - Fail safe monitoring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.312 Fail safe monitoring systems. Thermal dryer systems and controls shall be protected by a fail safe monitoring system which...

  20. 30 CFR 77.312 - Fail safe monitoring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.312 Fail safe monitoring systems. Thermal dryer systems and controls shall be protected by a fail safe monitoring system which...

  1. 30 CFR 77.312 - Fail safe monitoring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.312 Fail safe monitoring systems. Thermal dryer systems and controls shall be protected by a fail safe monitoring system which...

  2. 30 CFR 77.312 - Fail safe monitoring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.312 Fail safe monitoring systems. Thermal dryer systems and controls shall be protected by a fail safe monitoring system which...

  3. 23 CFR 630.1108 - Work zone safety management measures and strategies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006 should also address safe means for work vehicles and equipment to... requirements of 23 CFR 630.1012, Project-level Procedures, project plans, specifications and estimates (PS&Es... distance in advance of the work zone or immediately adjacent to the work space; and (viii) Other work...

  4. 23 CFR 630.1108 - Work zone safety management measures and strategies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006 should also address safe means for work vehicles and equipment to... requirements of 23 CFR 630.1012, Project-level Procedures, project plans, specifications and estimates (PS&Es... distance in advance of the work zone or immediately adjacent to the work space; and (viii) Other work...

  5. 23 CFR 630.1108 - Work zone safety management measures and strategies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006 should also address safe means for work vehicles and equipment to... requirements of 23 CFR 630.1012, Project-level Procedures, project plans, specifications and estimates (PS&Es... distance in advance of the work zone or immediately adjacent to the work space; and (viii) Other work...

  6. Development of a systems theoretical procedure for evaluation of the work organization of the cockpit crew of a civil transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fricke, M.; Vees, C.

    1983-01-01

    To achieve optimum design for the man machine interface with aircraft, a description of the interaction and work organization of the cockpit crew is needed. The development of system procedure to evaluate the work organization of pilots while structuring the work process is examined. Statistical data are needed to simulate sequences of pilot actions on the computer. Investigations of computer simulation and applicability for evaluation of crew concepts are discussed.

  7. Choosing Safe Baby Products

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Q&A Recipes En Español Teachers - ... to Know Choosing Safe Baby Products KidsHealth > Parents > First Aid & Safety > Home Sweet Home > Choosing Safe Baby Products Print ...

  8. Laser Safety Policy Procedure: 6.15 Version: 2.0 Revised: 09/15/2013

    E-print Network

    Jia, Songtao

    Laser Safety Policy Procedure: 6.15 Version: 2.0 Revised: 09/15/2013 Page 1 of 18 A. Purpose The purpose of this policy is to establish safe procedures for working with Class 3b and Class 4 lasers used that lasers and laser systems be operations in accordance with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI

  9. Improved water does not mean safe water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, L. H.; Guo, Y.; Schwab, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    This work presents a model for estimating global access to drinking water that meets World Health Organization (WHO) water quality guidelines. The currently accepted international estimate of global access to safe water, the WHO and United Nations Children's Fund's (UNICEF) Joint Monitoring Program (JMP) report, estimates the population with access to water service infrastructure that is classified as improved and unimproved. The JMP report uses access to improved water sources as a proxy for access to safe water, but improved water sources do not always meet drinking water quality guidelines. Therefore, this report likely overestimates the number of people with access to safe water. Based on the JMP estimate, the United Nations has recently announced that the world has reached the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target for access to safe water. Our new framework employs a statistical model that incorporates source water quality, water supply interruptions, water storage practices, and point of use water treatment to estimate access to safe water, resulting in a figure that is lower than the JMP estimate of global access to safe water. We estimate that at least 28% of the world does not have access to safe water today, as compared to the JMP estimate of 12%. These findings indicate that much more work is needed on the international scale to meet the MDG target for access to safe water.

  10. The Food-Safe Schools Action Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "The Food-Safe School Needs Assessment and Planning Guide" is a tool that can help schools assess their food safety policies, procedures, and programs and develop plans for improvement. This tool includes a simple, straightforward questionnaire, score card, and planning guide that give administrators, school staff, families, and students a chance…

  11. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-07-06

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  12. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F. (Orland Park, IL)

    1993-01-01

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  13. Safe Passage: Making It through Adolescence in a Risky Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dryfoos, Joy G.

    The primary job of parents is to ensure safe passage for their children from infancy through adolescence to adulthood. Research has indicated many things schools can do to turn the privilege of safe passage into a right. Three research-based programs that work to achieve safe passage are described. The first is Caring Connection, a "one-stop-shop"…

  14. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Sue I. (Berkeley, CA); Fergenson, David P. (Alamo, CA); Srivastava, Abneesh (Santa Clara, CA); Bogan, Michael J. (Dublin, CA); Riot, Vincent J. (Oakland, CA); Frank, Matthias (Oakland, CA)

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  15. Experience with fluorine and its safe use as a propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, D. L.; Guenther, M. E.; Stimpson, L. D.; Toth, L. R.; Young, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The industrial and the propulsion experience with fluorine and its derivatives is surveyed. The hazardous qualities of fluorine and safe handling procedures for the substance are emphasized. Procedures which fulfill the safety requirements during ground operations for handling fluorinated propulsion systems are discussed. Procedures to be implemented for use onboard the Space Transportation System are included.

  16. Emergency Procedures -Radioactive Material Spills This notice must be prominently posted near all work areas where radioactive materials are used. For

    E-print Network

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    Emergency Procedures - Radioactive Material Spills This notice must be prominently posted near all work areas where radioactive materials are used. For information, call the Radiological Safety Office radiation levels or the possibility of airborne contamination from dry or volatile radioactive materials

  17. Time Clock Procedures Each employee is required to have a record of hours worked. In departments using time clocks or the

    E-print Network

    Hung, I-Kuai

    Time Clock Procedures Each employee is required to have a record of hours worked. In departments using time clocks or the web-based time keeping system, the following regulations will apply: 1. Employees are required to clock in prior to their assigned start time, and must clock out when they go off

  18. Health and Safety Procedures Manual for hazardous waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Thate, J.E.

    1992-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Chemical Assessments Team (ORNL/CAT) has developed this Health and Safety Procedures Manual for the guidance, instruction, and protection of ORNL/CAT personnel expected to be involved in hazardous waste site assessments and remedial actions. This manual addresses general and site-specific concerns for protecting personnel, the general public, and the environment from any possible hazardous exposures. The components of this manual include: medical surveillance, guidance for determination and monitoring of hazards, personnel and training requirements, protective clothing and equipment requirements, procedures for controlling work functions, procedures for handling emergency response situations, decontamination procedures for personnel and equipment, associated legal requirements, and safe drilling practices.

  19. Strategies for selecting optimal sampling and work-up procedures for analysing alkylphenol polyethoxylates in effluents from non-activated sludge biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Stenholm, Ake; Holmström, Sara; Hjärthag, Sandra; Lind, Ola

    2012-01-01

    Trace-level analysis of alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APEOs) in wastewater containing sludge requires the prior removal of contaminants and preconcentration. In this study, the effects on optimal work-up procedures of the types of alkylphenols present, their degree of ethoxylation, the biofilm wastewater treatment and the sample matrix were investigated for these purposes. The sampling spot for APEO-containing specimens from an industrial wastewater treatment plant was optimized, including a box that surrounded the tubing outlet carrying the wastewater, to prevent sedimented sludge contaminating the collected samples. Following these changes, the sampling precision (in terms of dry matter content) at a point just under the tubing leading from the biofilm reactors was 0.7% RSD. The findings were applied to develop a work-up procedure for use prior to a high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection analysis method capable of quantifying nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPEOs) and poorly investigated dinonylphenol polyethoxylates (DNPEOs) at low microg L(-1) concentrations in effluents from non-activated sludge biofilm reactors. The selected multi-step work-up procedure includes lyophilization and pressurized fluid extraction (PFE) followed by strong ion exchange solid phase extraction (SPE). The yields of the combined procedure, according to tests with NP10EO-spiked effluent from a wastewater treatment plant, were in the 62-78% range. PMID:22519096

  20. How Safe Are Your Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubel, Robert J.; Blauvelt, Peter D.

    1994-01-01

    As violence in school increases, administrators need to assess school security and take steps to make it effective. School employers must have an understanding of student discipline policies for any security system to work. A security assessment should examine such issues as policies and procedure, school sites, school security staff, and…

  1. Microelectromechanical safe arm device

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W. (Tijeras, NM)

    2012-06-05

    Microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus and methods for operating, for preventing unintentional detonation of energetic components comprising pyrotechnic and explosive materials, such as air bag deployment systems, munitions and pyrotechnics. The MEM apparatus comprises an interrupting member that can be moved to block (interrupt) or complete (uninterrupt) an explosive train that is part of an energetic component. One or more latching members are provided that engage and prevent the movement of the interrupting member, until the one or more latching members are disengaged from the interrupting member. The MEM apparatus can be utilized as a safe and arm device (SAD) and electronic safe and arm device (ESAD) in preventing unintentional detonations. Methods for operating the MEM apparatus include independently applying drive signals to the actuators coupled to the latching members, and an actuator coupled to the interrupting member.

  2. Approaching Suspicious Substances Safely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    A mineral identification tool that was developed for NASA's Mars Rover Technology Development program is now serving as a powerful tool for U.S. law enforcement agencies and military personnel to identify suspicious liquid and solid substances. The tool can measure unknown substances through glass and plastic packaging materials with the RamanProbe(TradeMark) focused fiber-optic probe. The probe length can be extended up to 200 meters to enable users to analyze potentially dangerous substances at a safe distance. In many cases, the spectrometer and personnel are kept in a safe zone while the probe is positioned next to the sample being analyzed. Being able to identify chemicals in remote locations also saves users time and labor, since otherwise the samples would need to be collected, transported, and prepared prior to measurement in the laboratory.

  3. Safe sedation in modern cardiological practice.

    PubMed

    Furniss, Stephen S; Sneyd, J Robert

    2015-10-01

    Safe sedation is fundamental to many modern cardiological procedures, and following the publication of the report on safe sedation by the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, this report discusses sedation specifically in cardiological practice. The major areas within cardiology that use sedation are cardioversion, catheter ablation particularly of atrial fibrillation, transoesophageal echocardiography, implantable device (cardiovascular implantable electronic device) procedures and other procedures such as transcatheter aortic valve replacement. There is increasing demand for cardiological sedation but there is wide geographical variation in its use and there are also growing data to support non-anaesthetists giving sedation. The use of benzodiazepines, particularly for short procedures, is common, but even here good record-keeping and audit together with an understanding of the continuum of sedation and having appropriately trained staff and the necessary facilities are vital. Nurse administration of propofol may be appropriate for some procedures in cardiology that require at least moderate sedation. Appropriate training is essential and the use of capnography and target controlled infusion pumps for propofol administration is recommended. PMID:26085525

  4. Cool and Safe: Multiplicity in Safe Innovation at Unilever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penders, Bart

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the making of a safe innovation: the application of ice structuring protein (ISP) in edible ices. It argues that safety is not the absence of risk but is an active accomplishment; innovations are not "made safe afterward" but "safe innovations are made". Furthermore, there are multiple safeties to be accomplished in the…

  5. Addressing Lead-Based Paint Hazards During Renovation, Remodeling, and Rehabilitation in Federally Owned and Assisted Housing. Instructor Manual for Use in HUD-Sponsored Lead-Safe Work Practices Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics.

    This document is the instructor's manual for a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) training course that reflects the requirements of HUD's Lead Safe Housing Rule and is designed to provide training contractors with information regarding containment, minimization, and cleanup of lead hazards during activities that disturb…

  6. Production Line Materials. Youth Training Scheme. Core Exemplar Work Based Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Staff Coll., Blagdon (England).

    This trainer's guide is intended to assist supervisors of work-based career training projects in helping students understand the operation of an assembly line, including safe working procedures. The guide is one in a series of core curriculum modules that is intended for use in combination on- and off-the-job programs to familiarize youth with the…

  7. 23 CFR 630.1108 - Work zone safety management measures and strategies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006 should also address safe means for work vehicles and equipment to... requirements of 23 CFR 630.1012, Project-level Procedures, project plans, specifications and estimates (PS&Es... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Work zone safety management measures and strategies....

  8. How to Safely Give Acetaminophen

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pregnant? What to Expect How to Safely Give Acetaminophen KidsHealth > Parents > Doctors & Hospitals > Medicine > How to Safely ... without getting a doctor's OK first. What Is Acetaminophen Also Called? Acetaminophen is the generic name of ...

  9. Safe venting of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.F.; Dewart, J.M.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The disposal of hydrogen is often required in the operation of an experimental facility that contains hydrogen. Whether the vented hydrogen can be discharged to the atmosphere safely depends upon a number of factors such as the flow rate and atmospheric conditions. Calculations have been made that predict the distance a combustible mixture can extend from the point of release under some specified atmospheric conditions. Also the quantity of hydrogen in the combustible cloud is estimated. These results can be helpful in deciding of the hydrogen can be released directly to the atmosphere, or if it must be intentionally ignited. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Safe Reasoning Over Ontologies

    E-print Network

    Grabarnik, Genady

    2009-01-01

    As ontologies proliferate and automatic reasoners become more powerful, the problem of protecting sensitive information becomes more serious. In particular, as facts can be inferred from other facts, it becomes increasingly likely that information included in an ontology, while not itself deemed sensitive, may be able to be used to infer other sensitive information. We first consider the problem of testing an ontology for safeness defined as its not being able to be used to derive any sensitive facts using a given collection of inference rules. We then consider the problem of optimizing an ontology based on the criterion of making as much useful information as possible available without revealing any sensitive facts.

  11. Asymptotically safe Higgs inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi; He, Hong-Jian E-mail: hjhe@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2014-10-01

    We construct a new inflation model in which the standard model Higgs boson couples minimally to gravity and acts as the inflaton. Our construction of Higgs inflation incorporates the standard model with Einstein gravity which exhibits asymptotic safety in the ultraviolet region. The slow roll condition is satisfied at large field value due to the asymptotically safe behavior of Higgs self-coupling at high energies. We find that this minimal construction is highly predictive, and is consistent with both cosmological observations and collider experiments.

  12. Safe N’ Sound

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Janice; Nansel, Tonja R.; Weaver, Nancy L.; Tse, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Safe N’ Sound is a computer-based tool that prioritizes key injury risks for toddlers and infants and provides tailored feedback. The program was implemented in 5 pediatric sites. Caregiver risk behaviors were analyzed and compared with corresponding national and state morbidity and mortality data. The priority risks identified were generally consistent with the incidence of injury. Frequencies of several risk behaviors varied across sites and differences were observed across ages. Use of a prioritization scheme may facilitate risk behavior counseling and reasonably result in a decrease in injury mortality or morbidity. PMID:22617412

  13. Type Safe Extensible Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Wonseok

    2009-10-01

    Software products evolve over time. Sometimes they evolve by adding new features, and sometimes by either fixing bugs or replacing outdated implementations with new ones. When software engineers fail to anticipate such evolution during development, they will eventually be forced to re-architect or re-build from scratch. Therefore, it has been common practice to prepare for changes so that software products are extensible over their lifetimes. However, making software extensible is challenging because it is difficult to anticipate successive changes and to provide adequate abstraction mechanisms over potential changes. Such extensibility mechanisms, furthermore, should not compromise any existing functionality during extension. Software engineers would benefit from a tool that provides a way to add extensions in a reliable way. It is natural to expect programming languages to serve this role. Extensible programming is one effort to address these issues. In this thesis, we present type safe extensible programming using the MLPolyR language. MLPolyR is an ML-like functional language whose type system provides type-safe extensibility mechanisms at several levels. After presenting the language, we will show how these extensibility mechanisms can be put to good use in the context of product line engineering. Product line engineering is an emerging software engineering paradigm that aims to manage variations, which originate from successive changes in software.

  14. Quality and operations of portable X-ray examination procedures in the emergency room: queuing theory at work.

    PubMed

    Abujudeh, Hani; Vuong, Bill; Baker, Stephen R

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the operation of the portable X-ray machine in relation to examinations ordered by the Emergency Department at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, as well as to identify any bottlenecks hindering the performance of the aforementioned system. To do so, the activity of the portable X-ray was monitored in the period from 8 June 2004 to 24 June 2004, as well as from 6 July 2004 to 12 July 2004, yielding 11 days of data and 116 individual X-ray examinations. During observation times was noted for various checkpoints in the procedure. Using the data gathered, the average input, output, processing times, and variance were calculated. In turn, these values were used to calculate the response times for the Ordering Phase (5.502 min), traveling (2.483 min), Examination Phase (4.453 min), returning (3.855 min), Order Processing Phase (2.962 min), and the Development Phase (3.437 min). These phases were combined for a total of 22.721 min from the time the examination was placed to the time the X-ray films were uploaded to the PACS computer network. Based on these calculations, the Ordering Phase was determined to be the single largest bottleneck in the portable X-ray system. The Examination Phase also represented the second largest bottleneck for a combined total of 44% of the total response time. PMID:16133619

  15. Protection from Potential Exposure for the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, Dillard B.; Rudko, Vladimir; Batiy, Valeriy; Timmins, Douglas C.; Brothers, Alan J.; Schmidt, John P.; Swearingen, Gary L.; Schmieman, Eric A.

    2004-03-24

    The Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium has recently completed developing the conceptual design for the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement (NSC). Battelle has the scope of work related to environment and safety of the design. As part of the safety analysis, an analysis was performed to determine the degree of protection to be provided during the construction and 100-year operation period for expected upsets and lower-probability events that would occur from errors, procedures, other human factors, and equipment failures, i.e., ''potential exposures'' other than normal operations. The analysis was based on results of the Preliminary Hazards Analysis. The potential exposure analysis was performed in accordance with existing Ukranian regulations and working processes and procedures in place at the Shelter Object. KSK (a Ukranian Consortium), a subcontractor to the Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium, performed much of the dose analysis. The analysis concluded that potential exposures, outside of those expected during normal operations, would be acceptable and that design criteria and features, and preventative and mitigative measures currently in place at the Shelter would be sufficient to meet operating exposure limits.

  16. A Very Simple Safe-Bayesian Random Forest.

    PubMed

    Quadrianto, Novi; Ghahramani, Zoubin

    2015-06-01

    Random forests works by averaging several predictions of de-correlated trees. We show a conceptually radical approach to generate a random forest: random sampling of many trees from a prior distribution, and subsequently performing a weighted ensemble of predictive probabilities. Our approach uses priors that allow sampling of decision trees even before looking at the data, and a power likelihood that explores the space spanned by combination of decision trees. While each tree performs Bayesian inference to compute its predictions, our aggregation procedure uses the power likelihood rather than the likelihood and is therefore strictly speaking not Bayesian. Nonetheless, we refer to it as a Bayesian random forest but with a built-in safety. The safeness comes as it has good predictive performance even if the underlying probabilistic model is wrong. We demonstrate empirically that our Safe-Bayesian random forest outperforms MCMC or SMC based Bayesian decision trees in term of speed and accuracy, and achieves competitive performance to entropy or Gini optimised random forest, yet is very simple to construct. PMID:26357350

  17. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge.

    PubMed

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-10-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective 'titanic'. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the 'Seven C's'. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm. PMID:22738396

  18. Making programmable BMS safe and reliable

    SciTech Connect

    Cusimano, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    Burner management systems ensure safe admission of fuel to the furnace and prevent explosions. This article describes how programmable control systems can be every bit as safe and reliable as hardwired or standard programmable logic controller-based designs. High-pressure boilers are required by regulatory agencies and insurance companies alike to be equipped with a burner management system (BMS) to ensure safe admission of fuel to the furnace and to prevent explosions. These systems work in parallel with, but independently of, the combustion and feedwater control systems that start up, monitor, and shut down burners and furnaces. Safety and reliability are the fundamental requirements of a BMS. Programmable control system for BMS applications are now available that incorporate high safety and reliability into traditional microprocessor-based designs. With one of these control systems, a qualified systems engineer applying relevant standards, such as the National Fire Protection Assn (NFPA) 85 series, can design and implement a superior BMS.

  19. Asymptotically safe cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Litim, Daniel; Rahmede, Christoph

    2011-07-01

    We study quantum modifications to cosmology in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe with and without scalar fields by taking the renormalisation group running of gravitational and matter couplings into account. We exploit the Bianchi identity to relate the renormalisation group scale with scale factor and derive the improved cosmological evolution equations. We find two types of cosmological fixed points where the renormalisation group scale either freezes in, or continues to evolve with scale factor. We discuss the implications of each of these, and classify the different cosmological fixed points with and without gravity displaying an asymptotically safe renormalisation group fixed point. We state conditions of existence for an inflating ultraviolet cosmological fixed point for Einstein gravity coupled to a scalar field. We also discuss other fixed point solutions such as "scaling" solutions, or fixed points with equipartition between kinetic and potential energies.

  20. Creating Safe and Drug-Free Schools: An Action Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    It is essential that communities, businesses, parents, and students work together to develop a disciplined environment for children which includes safe and drug-free schools. Emphasizing the need for commitment and community will, this guide outlines steps each of these groups can take to create safe schools. Communities must place school safety…

  1. Afterschool Keeps Kids Safe. Afterschool Alert. Issue Brief No. 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Afterschool programs provide safe places for youth after school in addition to improving academic achievement and helping working families. Afterschool programs provide youth a safe, supervised environment that reduces their risk of committing or becoming a victim of violent crime. A recent report from Fight Crime: Invest in Kids has found that…

  2. Young Children Can Be Key to Fire-Safe Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kourofsky, Carolyn E.; Cole, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    For more than 15 years, preschool programs nationwide have worked with Fireproof Children/Prevention First, an international center for injury prevention research and education, to bring fire safety education to young children and their families. The "play safe! be safe!"[R] curriculum includes lessons that young children can learn and understand,…

  3. Safety Practices for Demolition Procedures. Module SH-41. Safety and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on safety practices for demolition procedures is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module presents a general outline of the safe work practices that should be followed at a demolition job site in order for workers to avoid injury. Following the introduction, 10 objectives (each keyed to a page in the…

  4. Safe motherhood in Eritrea.

    PubMed

    Trangsrud, R

    1997-05-01

    The Eritrean People's Liberation Front's (EPLF) commitment to women's well-being has led to the recent development of a 3-year National Safe Motherhood Action Plan which has been given high priority in the primary health care system. The plan recognizes and strengthens linkages between maternal health, reproductive health, and women's status, and promises to translate into action the commitment of the EPLF to women's rights and participation. All clinic-based protocols will include services for family planning and sexually transmitted diseases, while health education will address adolescent reproductive health issues and family planning. The long-term objective of improving women's status will be addressed through the formulation of a legislative committee which will review legislation affecting the health and well-being of women and girls. Only 4 years old, Eritrea has almost no health infrastructure and no established system for health training and management. The development of the plan, existing health care choices, and program action are described. PMID:12347950

  5. Methods and Procedures for Shielding Analyses for the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, Franz X.; Iverson, Erik B.; Remec, Igor; Lu, Wei; Popova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide radiologically safe Spallation Neutron Source operation, shielding analyses are performed according to Oak Ridge National Laboratory internal regulations and to comply with the Code of Federal Regulations. An overview of on-going shielding work for the accelerator facility and neutrons beam lines, methods, used for the analyses, and associated procedures and regulations is presented. Methods used to perform shielding analyses are described as well.

  6. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...EMPLOYMENT Confined and Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe...within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the affected space or area shall be...

  7. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...EMPLOYMENT Confined and Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe...within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the affected space or area shall be...

  8. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...EMPLOYMENT Confined and Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe...within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the affected space or area shall be...

  9. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...EMPLOYMENT Confined and Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe...within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the affected space or area shall be...

  10. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...EMPLOYMENT Confined and Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe...within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the affected space or area shall be...

  11. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  12. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  13. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  14. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  15. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  16. Safe Sleep For Your Grandbaby

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    Safe Sleep For Your Grandbaby Reduce the Risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and Other Sleep-Related Causes of Infant Death Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development #12;This is what a safe sleep environment looks like. The baby's sleep area has no bumpers

  17. Keep Food Safe When Cooking Outdoors 

    E-print Network

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-11-07

    spreading: ? Wash your hands before and after touching raw meat, poultry, or seafood. ? Wash work surfaces and cutting boards with hot, soapy water, and sanitize them before and after grilling. You can make a sanitizing solution by mixing 1 teaspoon... of cancer. However, studies have found that eating moderate amounts foods cooked to a safe internal temperature without charring does not appear to increase the risk of cancer. To prevent charring of grilled foods: ? Remove as much of the visible fat...

  18. Human factoring administrative procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Grider, D.A.; Sturdivant, M.H.

    1991-11-01

    In nonnuclear business, administrative procedures bring to mind such mundane topics as filing correspondence and scheduling vacation time. In the nuclear industry, on the other hand, administrative procedures play a vital role in assuring the safe operation of a facility. For some time now, industry focus has been on improving technical procedures. Significant efforts are under way to produce technical procedure requires that a validated technical, regulatory, and administrative basis be developed and that the technical process be established for each procedure. Producing usable technical procedures requires that procedure presentation be engineered to the same human factors principles used in control room design. The vital safety role of administrative procedures requires that they be just as sound, just a rigorously formulated, and documented as technical procedures. Procedure programs at the Tennessee Valley Authority and at Boston Edison's Pilgrim Station demonstrate that human factors engineering techniques can be applied effectively to technical procedures. With a few modifications, those same techniques can be used to produce more effective administrative procedures. Efforts are under way at the US Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and at some utilities (Boston Edison, for instance) to apply human factors engineering to administrative procedures: The techniques being adapted include the following.

  19. Detecting appropriate groundwater-level trends for safe groundwater development

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    Detecting appropriate groundwater-level trends for safe groundwater development Rahul Gokhale-monsoon Groundwater(GW) levels are important for the periodic categorisation of regions in India according to their GW-safety. A specific procedure has been recommended by the Groundwater Estimation Committee, 1997(GEC'97), constituted

  20. Inexpensive and Safe DNA Gel Electrophoresis Using Household Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ens, S.; Olson, A. B.; Dudley, C.; Ross, N. D., III; Siddiqi, A. A.; Umoh, K. M.; Schneegurt, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis is the single most important molecular biology technique and it is central to life sciences research, but it is often too expensive for the secondary science classroom or homeschoolers. A simple safe low-cost procedure is described here that uses household materials to construct and run DNA gel electrophoresis. Plastic…

  1. SAFE DRINKING WATER FROM SMALL SYSTEMS: TREATMENT OPTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bringing small water systems into compliance with the ever-increasing number of regulations will require flexibility in terms of technology application and institional procedures. his article looks at the means by which small systems can provide safe drinking water, focusing on t...

  2. Safe high-pressure freezing of infectious micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Vanhecke, D; Zuber, B; Brugger, S D; Studer, D

    2012-05-01

    We describe how high-pressure freezing of infectious biological material can safely be accomplished with the help of membrane carriers. The method described is easy to perform; however, careful manipulations are required. Existing safety regulations must still be followed. However, the procedure reduces the risk of dissemination of infectious material. PMID:22364646

  3. Radiation Monitoring Equipment Procedure: 7.513 Created: 10/30/2013 Version: 1.0 Revised

    E-print Network

    Jia, Songtao

    Radiation Monitoring Equipment Procedure: 7.513 Created: 10/30/2013 Version: 1.0 Revised materials and/or radiation-producing equipment are required to maintain appropriate radiation monitoring equipment for performing radiation detection surveys. This ensures that the work environment is safe and can

  4. KETTER HALL BUILDING EVACUATION PROCEDURES

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    KETTER HALL BUILDING EVACUATION PROCEDURES General Procedures: It is the personal responsibility personnel after the building has been declared safe by the fire department on location. Evacuation Assembly exit from the building and to facilitate communication between the Ketter Hall Building Evacuation

  5. Walking Safely in Rural Areas

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/Go4Life Walking Safely in Rural Areas Walking is great exercise and can be particularly enjoyable ... the hustle and bustle of city streets. But walking in rural areas requires special care. Unpaved surfaces ...

  6. Keep Kids Safe This Halloween

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155402.html Keep Kids Safe This Halloween Doctors' group offers tips for ... Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Don't let kids' Halloween fun be spoiled by real-life injury ...

  7. How Safe Is Your Job?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nocera, Joseph; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Five articles address the realities of coping with downsizing: "Living with Layoffs" (Nocera); "How Safe Is Your Job?" (Lieber); "Career Makeover" (Robinson); "Ma Bell's Orphans" (O'Reilly); and "Where Are They Now?" (Martin). (SK)

  8. 3 CFR 8981 - Proclamation 8981 of May 17, 2013. National Safe Boating Week, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Proclamation 8981 of May 17, 2013. National Safe..., 2013 Proc. 8981 National Safe Boating Week, 2013By the President of the United States of America A... boating responsibly. We highlight that important work during National Safe Boating Week, and we...

  9. Safe genetically engineered plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosellini, D.; Veronesi, F.

    2007-10-01

    The application of genetic engineering to plants has provided genetically modified plants (GMPs, or transgenic plants) that are cultivated worldwide on increasing areas. The most widespread GMPs are herbicide-resistant soybean and canola and insect-resistant corn and cotton. New GMPs that produce vaccines, pharmaceutical or industrial proteins, and fortified food are approaching the market. The techniques employed to introduce foreign genes into plants allow a quite good degree of predictability of the results, and their genome is minimally modified. However, some aspects of GMPs have raised concern: (a) control of the insertion site of the introduced DNA sequences into the plant genome and of its mutagenic effect; (b) presence of selectable marker genes conferring resistance to an antibiotic or an herbicide, linked to the useful gene; (c) insertion of undesired bacterial plasmid sequences; and (d) gene flow from transgenic plants to non-transgenic crops or wild plants. In response to public concerns, genetic engineering techniques are continuously being improved. Techniques to direct foreign gene integration into chosen genomic sites, to avoid the use of selectable genes or to remove them from the cultivated plants, to reduce the transfer of undesired bacterial sequences, and make use of alternative, safer selectable genes, are all fields of active research. In our laboratory, some of these new techniques are applied to alfalfa, an important forage plant. These emerging methods for plant genetic engineering are briefly reviewed in this work.

  10. Safe Operating Procedure EXPLOSIVE (POWDER) ACTUATED TOOL SAFETY

    E-print Network

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    that will prevent the pin or fastener from passing completely through and creating a flying-missile hazard not be driven through existing holes unless a positive guide is used to secure accurate alignment. No fastener

  11. 105-H Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    E.G. Ison

    2008-11-08

    The following information documents the decontamination and decommissioning of the 105-H Reactor facility, and placement of the reactor core into interim safe storage. The D&D of the facility included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and restoration of the site. The ISS work also included construction of the safe storage enclosure, which required the installation of a new roofing system, power and lighting, a remote monitoring system, and ventilation components.

  12. 49 CFR 109.13 - Closing packages and safe resumption of transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS FOR OPENING OF PACKAGES, EMERGENCY ORDERS, AND EMERGENCY RECALLS Inspections and Investigations § 109.13 Closing packages and safe resumption of transportation. (a) No...

  13. 49 CFR 109.13 - Closing packages and safe resumption of transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS FOR OPENING OF PACKAGES, EMERGENCY ORDERS, AND EMERGENCY RECALLS § 109.13 Closing packages and safe resumption of transportation. (a) No imminent hazard found. If,...

  14. 49 CFR 109.13 - Closing packages and safe resumption of transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS FOR OPENING OF PACKAGES, EMERGENCY ORDERS, AND EMERGENCY RECALLS Inspections and Investigations § 109.13 Closing packages and safe resumption of transportation. (a) No...

  15. Practical Tips for the Safe Handling of Micro-organisms in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, G.

    1974-01-01

    Outlines safe laboratory procedures for the handling of micro-organisms including aseptic technique, manipulation of cultures, and treatment of contaminated equipment. Identifies the principal hazard as the microbial aerosol, explains its possible effects, and describes the appropriate precautions. (GS)

  16. NASA trend analysis procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This publication is primarily intended for use by NASA personnel engaged in managing or implementing trend analysis programs. 'Trend analysis' refers to the observation of current activity in the context of the past in order to infer the expected level of future activity. NASA trend analysis was divided into 5 categories: problem, performance, supportability, programmatic, and reliability. Problem trend analysis uncovers multiple occurrences of historical hardware or software problems or failures in order to focus future corrective action. Performance trend analysis observes changing levels of real-time or historical flight vehicle performance parameters such as temperatures, pressures, and flow rates as compared to specification or 'safe' limits. Supportability trend analysis assesses the adequacy of the spaceflight logistics system; example indicators are repair-turn-around time and parts stockage levels. Programmatic trend analysis uses quantitative indicators to evaluate the 'health' of NASA programs of all types. Finally, reliability trend analysis attempts to evaluate the growth of system reliability based on a decreasing rate of occurrence of hardware problems over time. Procedures for conducting all five types of trend analysis are provided in this publication, prepared through the joint efforts of the NASA Trend Analysis Working Group.

  17. Flywheel Rotor Safe-Life Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratner, J. K. H.; Chang, J. B.; Christopher, D. A.; McLallin, Kerry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since the 1960s, research has been conducted into the use of flywheels as energy storage systems. The-proposed applications include energy storage for hybrid and electric automobiles, attitude control and energy storage for satellites, and uninterruptible power supplies for hospitals and computer centers. For many years, however, the use of flywheels for space applications was restricted by the total weight of a system employing a metal rotor. With recent technological advances in the manufacturing of composite materials, however, lightweight composite rotors have begun to be proposed for such applications. Flywheels with composite rotors provide much higher power and energy storage capabilities than conventional chemical batteries. However, the failure of a high speed flywheel rotor could be a catastrophic event. For this reason, flywheel rotors are classified by the NASA Fracture Control Requirements Standard as fracture critical parts. Currently, there is no industry standard to certify a composite rotor for safe and reliable operation forth( required lifetime of the flywheel. Technical problems hindering the development of this standard include composite manufacturing inconsistencies, insufficient nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for detecting defects and/or impact damage, lack of standard material test methods for characterizing composite rotor design allowables, and no unified proof (over-spin) test for flight rotors. As part of a flywheel rotor safe-life certification pro-ram funded b the government, a review of the state of the art in composite rotors is in progress. The goal of the review is to provide a clear picture of composite flywheel rotor technologies. The literature review has concentrated on the following topics concerning composites and composite rotors: durability (fatigue) and damage tolerance (safe-life) analysis/test methods, in-service NDE and health monitoring techniques, spin test methods/ procedures, and containment options. This report presents the papers selected for their relevance to this topic and summarizes them.

  18. Asymptotically safe inflation from quadratic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, Alfio; Platania, Alessia

    2015-11-01

    Asymptotically Safe theories of gravity have recently received much attention. In this work we discuss a class of inflationary models derived from quantum-gravity modification of quadratic gravity according to the induced scaling around the non-Gaussian fixed point at very high energies. It is argued that the presence of a three dimensional ultraviolet critical surface generates operators of non-integer power of the type R 2 - ? / 2 in the effective Lagrangian, where ? > 0 is a critical exponent. The requirement of a successful inflationary model in agreement with the recent Planck 2015 data puts important constraints on the strength of this new type of couplings.

  19. A Study of Modified-Guttman and IRT-Based Level Scoring Procedures for Work Keys Assessments. ACT Research Report Series 97-7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, E. Matthew; Kolen, Michael J.; Nicewander, W. Alan

    This paper compares modified Guttman and item response theory (IRT) based procedures for classifying examinees in ordered levels when each level is represented by several multiple choice test items. In the modified Guttman procedure, within-level number correct scores are mapped to binary level mastery scores. Examinees are then assigned to levels…

  20. DOPS (Direct Observation of Procedural Skills) in undergraduate skills-lab: Does it work? Analysis of skills-performance and curricular side effects

    PubMed Central

    Profanter, Christoph; Perathoner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Sufficient teaching and assessing clinical skills in the undergraduate setting becomes more and more important. In a surgical skills-lab course at the Medical University of Innsbruck fourth year students were teached with DOPS (direct observation of procedural skills). We analyzed whether DOPS worked or not in this setting, which performance levels could be reached compared to tutor teaching (one tutor, 5 students) and which curricular side effects could be observed. Methods: In a prospective randomized trial in summer 2013 (April – June) four competence-level-based skills were teached in small groups during one week: surgical abdominal examination, urethral catheterization (phantom), rectal-digital examination (phantom), handling of central venous catheters. Group A was teached with DOPS, group B with a classical tutor system. Both groups underwent an OSCE (objective structured clinical examination) for assessment. 193 students were included in the study. Altogether 756 OSCE´s were carried out, 209 (27,6%) in the DOPS- and 547 (72,3%) in the tutor-group. Results: Both groups reached high performance levels. In the first month there was a statistically significant difference (p<0,05) in performance of 95% positive OSCE items in the DOPS-group versus 88% in the tutor group. In the following months the performance rates showed no difference anymore and came to 90% in both groups. In practical skills the analysis revealed a high correspondence between positive DOPS (92,4%) and OSCE (90,8%) results. Discussion: As shown by our data DOPS furnish high performance of clinical skills and work well in the undergraduate setting. Due to the high correspondence of DOPS and OSCE results DOPS should be considered as preferred assessment tool in a students skills-lab. The approximation of performance-rates within the months after initial superiority of DOPS could be explained by an interaction between DOPS and tutor system: DOPS elements seem to have improved tutoring and performance rates as well. DOPS in students ‘skills-lab afford structured feedback and assessment without increased personnel and financial resources compared to classic small group training. Conclusion: In summary, this study shows that DOPS represent an efficient method in teaching clinical skills. Their effects on didactic culture reach beyond the positive influence of performance rates. PMID:26483858

  1. Cultivating the Art of Safe Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Mary Ann

    2008-01-01

    Performance-making and peace-building are processes predicated on the production of safe space. But what is "safe space"? In performance-making, what is it that makes space safe without losing the creative potential of tension? What role is there for risk? And, once achieved, how does safe space become meaningful beyond its immediate community of…

  2. Secure Safe Ambients Michele Bugliesi

    E-print Network

    Castagna, Giuseppe - Laboratoire Preuves, Programmes et Systèmes, Université Paris 7

    Ambients (SSA) are a typed variant of Safe Ambients [9], whose type system allows behavioral invariants security properties, and study a distributed version of SSA and its type system. For the latter, we show- allel composition, and "." enforces sequential execution. Given the above configuration, the ambient b

  3. Secure Safe Ambients Michele Bugliesi

    E-print Network

    Bugliesi, Michele

    Ambients (SSA) are a typed variant of Safe Ambients [9], whose type system allows behavioral invariants security properties, and study a distributed version of SSA and its type system. For the latter, we show par- allel composition, and "." enforces sequential execution. Given the above configuration

  4. There Is No Safe Suntan

    MedlinePLUS

    ... There are no safe tanning pills out there. Tan- • ning pills can cause serious health problems. Not all makeup that has sunscreen in it offers • enough protection. Wear sunscreen, too! Use sunscreen along with self-tanning and • bronzing products — these do not offer ...

  5. How Safe Are Our Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younghusband, Lynda

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses a study she conducted in Newfoundland to determine the level of abuse and/or violence experienced by teachers, the nature of that abuse/violence, its personal impact, and whether Newfoundland teachers feel safe in their workplaces. The experiences presented are those of a focus group of eight teachers,…

  6. Legal Issues Surrounding Safe Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Reed B.

    This handbook provides an overview of legal issues pertaining to the safety of public schools. Following the introduction, chapter 2 describes the governance model and philosophy on which American education is based. Court decisions and federal and state legislation that mandate the right to a safe school are discussed in chapter 3. The fourth…

  7. Safe Schools Programs & Resources Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of School Improvement.

    The first version of this guide was developed in response to the 1993 Safe Schools Act that required the State Board of Education to develop materials, models, and curricula addressing school safety. It recommended the development of conflict resolution and mediation materials to address responsible decision-making among students; the causes and…

  8. Planning and Designing Safe Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidler, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Those who manage physical education, athletic, and recreation programs have a number of legal duties that they are expected to carry out. Among these are an obligation to take reasonable precautions to ensure safe programs and facilities for all participants, spectators, and staff. Physical education and sports facilities that are poorly planned,…

  9. Boating Safety OVERVIEW OF REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES

    E-print Network

    Chen, Shu-Ching

    Boating Safety OVERVIEW OF REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES #12;Website http://research.fiu.edu/facilities/boating-safety-committee/ #12;Scope The Boating Safety Manual applies to all FIU sanctioned research and teaching activities. #12;Purpose To ensure that safe boating practices are followed. Provide a safe boating environment

  10. Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Administrative Forms Standard Forms Skip Navigation Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H1 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... / Topics / ... Chart / Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H3 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Z7_ ...

  11. Outpatient Thyroidectomy: Is it Safe?

    PubMed

    Balentine, Courtney J; Sippel, Rebecca S

    2016-01-01

    Outpatient thyroid surgery is controversial because of concerns over life-threatening cervical hematoma. Despite this concern, outpatient thyroidectomy is becoming increasingly common, especially among high-volume endocrine surgeons. Multiple studies have now demonstrated that careful patient selection combined with surgeon experience can result in successful and safe surgery without a full inpatient admission. This article reviews the data on safety and outcomes for outpatient thyroidectomy and discusses several techniques used to minimize risk to patients. PMID:26610774

  12. Safe-haven locking device

    DOEpatents

    Williams, J.V.

    1984-04-26

    Disclosed is a locking device for eliminating external control of a secured space formed by fixed and movable barriers. The locking device uses externally and internally controlled locksets and a movable strike, operable from the secured side of the movable barrier, to selectively engage either lockset. A disengagement device, for preventing forces from being applied to the lock bolts is also disclosed. In this manner, a secured space can be controlled from the secured side as a safe-haven. 4 figures.

  13. Registered nurse-administered sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedure

    PubMed Central

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2015-01-01

    The rising use of nonanesthesiologist-administered sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy has clinical significances. Most endoscopic patients require some forms of sedation and/or anesthesia. The goals of this sedation are to guard the patient’s safety, minimize physical discomfort, to control behavior and to diminish psychological responses. Generally, moderate sedation for these procedures has been offered by the non-anesthesiologist by using benzodiazepines and/or opioids. Anesthesiologists and non-anesthesiologist personnel will need to work together for these challenges and for safety of the patients. The sedation training courses including clinical skills and knowledge are necessary for the registered nurses to facilitate the patient safety and the successful procedure. However, appropriate patient selection and preparation, adequate monitoring and regular training will ensure that the use of nurse-administered sedation is a feasible and safe technique for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. PMID:26191341

  14. Hot Works Procedures and Protocols Last Updated: 2/14/2014 Owner: Safety and Risk Management Director Page 1 of 6

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    and Standards (including but not limited to OSHA, NFPA, IFC, ANSI) while working on MSU property. Included to OSHA, NFPA, IFC, ANSI). MSU Workers - When hot works must be performed outside a control area or shop

  15. Living and Working Safely: Challenges for Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers

    PubMed Central

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2012-01-01

    Migrant and seasonal farmworkers are essential to North Carolina agriculture, yet they experience major health risks. This commentary describes the characteristics of North Carolina farmworkers, important hazards they face, and the status of regulatory protections. Finally, it presents a summary of policy needed to protect the health of farmworkers. PMID:22523856

  16. Creating a Safe Zone: LGBTQ Work in NCTE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkin, Roxanne

    2011-01-01

    Reading through her files, the author takes a journey back in time to 1991 when a few lesbians and gay men met in a conference room at the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Annual Convention in Seattle to discuss issues relating to their lives and their teaching. It was at this meeting that NCTE first discussed forming a new group…

  17. "WORKING TOGETHER FOR A SAFE CAMPUS" RESIDENCE HALL

    E-print Network

    Zeng, Ning

    .........................................................................................................14, 15 Campus Early Warning System...............................................................................................................................17 Expectations of RAs ................................................................................................................................18 Expectations of RAs...................................................................

  18. Galileo spacecraft anomaly and safing recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basilio, Ralph R.; Durham, David M.

    1993-01-01

    A high-level anomaly recovery plan which identifies the steps necessary to recover from a spacecraft 'Safing' incident was developed for the Galileo spacecraft prior to launch. Since launch, a total of four in-flight anomalies have lead to entry into a system fault protection 'Safing' routine which has required the Galileo flight team to refine and execute the recovery plan. These failures have allowed the flight team to develop an efficient recovery process when permanent spacecraft capability degradation is minimal and the cause of the anomaly is quickly diagnosed. With this previous recovery experience and the very focused boundary conditions of a specific potential failure, a Gaspra asteroid recovery plan was designed to be implemented in as quickly as forty hours (desired goal). This paper documents the work performed above, however, the Galileo project remains challenged to develop a generic detailed recovery plan which can be implemented in a relatively short time to configure the spacecraft to a nominal state prior to future high priority mission objectives.

  19. Simple & Safe Genomic DNA Isolation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for purifying DNA using either bacteria or rat liver is presented. Directions for doing a qualitative DNA assay using diphenylamine and a quantitative DNA assay using spectroscopy are included. (KR)

  20. Family Doctor Can Safely Assist Many Births

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_154273.html Family Doctor Can Safely Assist Many Births Ob-gyn ... risk pregnancies, delivery of the baby by a family doctor or an obstetrician is equally safe, a ...

  1. Lead-Safe Housing Policy Guidance

    E-print Network

    Lead-Safe Housing Policy Guidance #12;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This guidance was prepared by the Alliance Gumm. The Alliance thanks the Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch of the Centers for Disease..............................................................................................................................1 PART I Basic Lead-Safe Housing Standards

  2. Study Says Tdap Vaccine Safe During Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_155245.html Study Says Tdap Vaccine Safe During Pregnancy Tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis combo shot ... safe to give her the tetanus-containing Tdap vaccine while she is pregnant, new research indicates. As ...

  3. Teaching Kids About Using Medicine Safely

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates Teaching Kids About Using Medicine Safely Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... FDA pediatrician on teaching older kids about using medicine safely. To view our entire collection of videos, ...

  4. Exercise Appears Safe, Helpful for Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 154487.html Exercise Appears Safe, Helpful for Pulmonary Hypertension Research review might reassure concerned cardiologists To use ... be beneficial and safe for people with pulmonary hypertension, researchers report. Pulmonary hypertension is a type of ...

  5. Guidance on the severity classification of scientific procedures involving fish: report of a Working Group appointed by the Norwegian Consensus-Platform for the Replacement, Reduction and Refinement of animal experiments (Norecopa)

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, P; Dennison, N; Goodman, G; Hetherington, S; Llywelyn-Jones, S; Ryder, K; Smith, A J

    2011-01-01

    The severity classification of procedures using animals is an important tool to help focus the implementation of refinement and to assist in reporting the application of the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). The recently revised Directive that regulates animal research and testing within the European Union requires Member States to ensure that all procedures are classified as ‘non-recovery’, ‘mild’, ‘moderate’ or ‘severe’, using assignment criteria set out by the European Commission (EC). However, these are focused upon terrestrial species, so are of limited relevance to fish users. A Working Group set up by the Norwegian Consensus-Platform for the 3Rs (Norecopa) has produced guidance on the classification of severity in scientific procedures involving fish, including examples of ‘subthreshold’, ‘mild’, ‘moderate’, ‘severe’ and ‘upper threshold’ procedures. The aims are to complement the EC guidelines and help to ensure that suffering in fish is effectively predicted and minimized. Norecopa has established a website (www.norecopa.no/categories) where more information on severity classification for procedures using fish, including field research, will be made available. PMID:21558168

  6. Students and School Adults: Partners in Keeping Schools Safe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gastic, Billie

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the important roles that students, school staff and teachers play in keeping the school safe particularly from weapons. The author believes that one way that they do this is by working together to reduce the problem of weapons in school. The role of school staff and teachers extends beyond prevention and…

  7. Is There a Safe Level of Exposure to a Carcinogen?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrudey, Steve E.; Krewski, Daniel

    1995-01-01

    Presents an approach to estimating the "safe" levels of low-dose exposure to carcinogens that involves working upward from the smallest conceivable chronic dose instead of extrapolating downward from high exposures. Discusses expert and public opinion and other issues related to quantitative cancer risk assessment. (LZ)

  8. The ethics of safe sex.

    PubMed

    Broom, N D; Rickett, C E

    1988-12-14

    Western society has undergone a vast sociological change during the 20th century in terms of the value of sexuality. Sexual choice has gained a new legitimacy never before experienced. There is less guilt surrounding issues of sexuality and it is now common place to hear and see explicit discussions about sex in the mass media. This acceptance has undoubtedly encouraged many people to be more daring and promiscuous in their sexual activities. Proof of this can be seen in the increase is the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Presently there are more than 20 epidemiologically significant diseases that are sexually transmitted. Beyond the 5 old standards of gonorrhea, syphilis, chancroid, lyphogranuloma venereum, and granuloma inguinala STDs now include: chlamydia trachomatis, genital herpes, human papillomavirus, human immunodeficiency virus, genital mycoplasms, cytomegalovirus, hepatitis, vaginitis, enteric infections, and ectoparasitic diseases. Keeping all this in mind, the question of the ethics of safe sex must be addressed. In many countries, the governments have undertaken large public education programs to encourage safe sex practices. All these programs a founded upon two ideas: that safe sex should be promoted free of any ethical discussions or considerations, and that technology alone, the condom, will protect the public from the problem of STDs. However these campaigns will fail to protect the public unless they try to intervene at some level other than the mechanical aspect of the sex act itself. Condoms have failure rates too high to be relied upon as the sole means of protecting the public. Sex education for children and an inclusion of the ethical aspects of sex, now that the consequences can mean death, must be included in these government programs if they are to be successful. PMID:3060771

  9. Proc. of Workshop on Architecting Dependable Systems (WADS), part of ICSE04, May 2004. Adding Safeness to Dynamic Adaptation Techniques

    E-print Network

    McKinley, Philip K.

    Safeness to Dynamic Adaptation Techniques (Work-in-Progress) Ji Zhang, Zhenxiao Yang, Betty H.C. Cheng to ensure that such adaptations are safe with re- spect to system consistency. The proposed method takes- tive actions and those states in which an adaptive action may be applied safely. We demonstrate

  10. Evaluation of Revised Computer-Based Procedure System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Katya Le Blanc; Johanna Oxstrand; Cheradan Fikstad

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear power industry is very procedure driven, i.e. almost all activities that take place at a nuclear power plant are conducted by following procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by the industry do a good job at keeping the industry safe. However, these procedures are most often paired with methods and tools put in place to anticipate, prevent, and catch errors related to hands-on work. These tools are commonly called human performance tools. The drawback with the current implementation of these tools is that the task of performing one procedure becomes time and labor intensive. For example, concurrent and independent verification of procedure steps are required at times, which essentially means that at least two people have to be actively involved in the task. Even though the current use of PBPs and human performance tools are keeping the industry safe, there is room for improvement. The industry could potentially increase their efficiency and safety by replacing their existing PBPs with CBPs. If implemented correctly, the CBP system could reduce the time and focus spent on using the human performance tools. Some of the tools can be completely incorporated in the CBP system in a manner that the performer does not think about the fact that these tools are being used. Examples of these tools are procedure use and adherence, placekeeping, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduce the time and labor they require, such as concurrent and independent verification. The incorporation of advanced technology, such as CBP systems, may help to manage the effects of aging systems, structures, and components. The introduction of advanced technology may also make the existing LWR fleet more attractive to the future workforce, which will be of importance when the future workforce will chose between existing fleet and the newly built nuclear power plants.

  11. For Your Baby SAFE TO SLEEP

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    Safe Sleep For Your Baby SAFE TO SLEEP Reduce the Risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS and Human Development #12;This is what a safe sleep environment looks like. The baby's sleep area has is the sudden, unexplained death of a baby younger than 1 year of age that doesn't have a known cause even after

  12. For Your Baby SAFE TO SLEEP

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    Safe Sleep For Your Baby SAFE TO SLEEP Reduce the Risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and Other Sleep-Related Causes of Infant Death Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development #12;This is what a safe sleep environment looks like. The baby's sleep area has

  13. 16 CFR 312.10 - Safe harbors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Safe harbors. 312.10...REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S...PROTECTION RULE § 312.10 Safe harbors. (a) In general...The Commission shall act upon a request under...other persons who seek safe harbor treatment...

  14. 16 CFR 312.10 - Safe harbors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Safe harbors. 312.10...REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S...PROTECTION RULE § 312.10 Safe harbors. (a) In general...The Commission shall act upon a request under...other persons who seek safe harbor treatment...

  15. 16 CFR 312.10 - Safe harbors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Safe harbors. 312.10...REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S...PROTECTION RULE § 312.10 Safe harbors. (a) In general...The Commission shall act upon a request under...other persons who seek safe harbor treatment...

  16. 16 CFR 312.10 - Safe harbors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Safe harbors. 312.10...REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S...PROTECTION RULE § 312.10 Safe harbors. (a) In general...The Commission shall act upon a request under...other persons who seek safe harbor treatment...

  17. HOSPITAL SAFE SLEEP POLICY TEMPLATE INTRODUCTION.

    E-print Network

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    HOSPITAL SAFE SLEEP POLICY TEMPLATE INTRODUCTION. First Candle/National SIDS Alliance) are seeking national and local organizations to partner with as we promote our hospital infant safe sleep or update their infant safe sleep policy and protocol. It reflects the most current evidence-based research

  18. Development of safe infrared gas lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainuddin; Singhal, Gaurav; Tyagi, R. K.; Maini, A. K.

    2013-04-01

    Infrared gas lasers find application in numerous civil and military areas. Such lasers are therefore being developed at different institutions around the world. However, the development of chemical infrared gas lasers such as chemical oxygen iodine lasers (COIL) involves the use of several hazardous chemicals. In order to exploit full potential of these lasers, one must take diligent care of the safety issues associated with the handling of these chemicals and the involved processes. The present paper discusses the safety aspects to be taken into account in the development of these infrared gas lasers including various detection sensors working in conjunction with a customized data acquisition system loaded with safety interlocks for safe operation. The developed safety schemes may also be implemented for CO2 gas dynamic laser (GDL) and hydrogen fluoride-deuterium fluoride (HF-DF) Laser.

  19. Primer on tritium safe handling practices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This Primer is designed for use by operations and maintenance personnel to improve their knowledge of tritium safe handling practices. It is applicable to many job classifications and can be used as a reference for classroom work or for self-study. It is presented in general terms for use throughout the DOE Complex. After reading it, one should be able to: describe methods of measuring airborne tritium concentration; list types of protective clothing effective against tritium uptake from surface and airborne contamination; name two methods of reducing the body dose after a tritium uptake; describe the most common method for determining amount of tritium uptake in the body; describe steps to take following an accidental release of airborne tritium; describe the damage to metals that results from absorption of tritium; explain how washing hands or showering in cold water helps reduce tritium uptake; and describe how tritium exchanges with normal hydrogen in water and hydrocarbons.

  20. Safe software standards and XML schemas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Robert C.

    2010-02-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a safe software construction means for an XML based data standard for a class of medical devices, cytometry instruments. Unfortunately, the amount of empirical evidence to archive this goal is minimal. Therefore, technologies associated with high reliability were employed together with reuse of existing designs. The basis for a major part of the design was the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard and the Flow Cytometry Standard (FCS). Since the DICOM Standard is a Class II device, the safety of software should be maximized. The XML Schema Definition Language (XSDL) has been used to develop schemas that maximize readability, modularity, strong typing, and reuse. An instance and an instrument XML schema were created for data obtained with a microscope by importing multiple schemas that each consisted of a class that described one object. This design was checked by validating the schemas and creating XML pages from them.

  1. Safe new reactor for radionuclide production

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.L.

    1995-02-15

    In late 1995, DOE is schedule to announce a new tritium production unit. Near the end of the last NPR (New Production Reactors) program, work was directed towards eliminating risks in current designs and reducing effects of accidents. In the Heavy Water Reactor Program at Savannah River, the coolant was changed from heavy to light water. An alternative, passively safe concept uses a heavy-water-filled, zircaloy reactor calandria near the bottom of a swimming pool; the calandria is supported on a light-water-coolant inlet plenum and has upflow through assemblies in the calandria tubes. The reactor concept eliminates or reduces significantly most design basis and severe accidents that plague other deigns. The proven, current SRS tritium cycle remains intact; production within the US of medical isotopes such as Mo-99 would also be possible.

  2. Writer`s guide for technical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    A primary objective of operations conducted in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex is safety. Procedures are a critical element of maintaining a safety envelope to ensure safe facility operation. This DOE Writer`s Guide for Technical Procedures addresses the content, format, and style of technical procedures that prescribe production, operation of equipment and facilities, and maintenance activities. The DOE Writer`s Guide for Management Control Procedures and DOE Writer`s Guide for Emergency and Alarm Response Procedures are being developed to assist writers in developing nontechnical procedures. DOE is providing this guide to assist writers across the DOE complex in producing accurate, complete, and usable procedures that promote safe and efficient operations that comply with DOE orders, including DOE Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations for DOE Facilities, and 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors.

  3. [Work addiction].

    PubMed

    Mentzel, G

    1979-01-01

    The symptomatology of workaholism (work addiction) was presented in the form of a questionnaire and compared with other forms of addiction, especially alcoholism. Then a case was used as example to illustrate the development of the illness and its psychodynamics. The therapy procedure was also briefly explained. Moreover the psychodynamics of workaholism (work addiction) are described, once again in comparison to other addictions. Finally the author gives general guidelines for therapy. PMID:452731

  4. Reactive, Safe Navigation for Lunar and Planetary Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utz, Hans; Ruland, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    When humans return to the moon, Astronauts will be accompanied by robotic helpers. Enabling robots to safely operate near astronauts on the lunar surface has the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of crew surface operations. Safely operating robots in close proximity to astronauts on the lunar surface requires reactive obstacle avoidance capabilities not available on existing planetary robots. In this paper we present work on safe, reactive navigation using a stereo based high-speed terrain analysis and obstacle avoidance system. Advances in the design of the algorithms allow it to run terrain analysis and obstacle avoidance algorithms at full frame rate (30Hz) on off the shelf hardware. The results of this analysis are fed into a fast, reactive path selection module, enforcing the safety of the chosen actions. The key components of the system are discussed and test results are presented.

  5. Thermodynamics of asymptotically safe theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rischke, Dirk H.; Sannino, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic properties of a novel class of gauge-Yukawa theories that have recently been shown to be completely asymptotically safe, because their short-distance behavior is determined by the presence of an interacting fixed point. Not only do all the coupling constants freeze at a constant and calculable value in the ultraviolet, their values can even be made arbitrarily small for an appropriate choice of the ratio Nc/Nf of fermion colors and flavors in the Veneziano limit. Thus, a perturbative treatment can be justified. We compute the pressure, entropy density, and thermal degrees of freedom of these theories to next-to-next-to-leading order in the coupling constants.

  6. Evaluating a Safe Space Training for School Counselors and Trainees Using a Randomized Control Group Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Rebekah; Hays, Danica G.

    2014-01-01

    School counselors need to advocate and act as an ally for all students. Safe Space, a training designed to facilitate competency for working with and serving LGBTQ youth (i.e., LGBTQ competency), has received increased attention in the field of school counseling. However, limited empirical support exists for training interventions such as Safe

  7. Acknowledgements This work was supported by Walt Disney Company's Animal Programs, New College of Florida and the University of South Florida. All experimental procedures were

    E-print Network

    Gentner, Timothy

    Acknowledgements This work was supported by Walt Disney Company's Animal Programs, New College according to animal welfare regulations specified under National Institutes of Health guidelines. We thank@ncf.edu). .............................................................. Neuronal populations and single cells representing learned auditory objects Timothy Q. Gentner & Daniel

  8. Keeping the workplace safe COMPUTER WORKSTATION

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Keeping the workplace safe COMPUTER WORKSTATION ERGONOMICS #12;Table of Contents Introduction ................................................................................... 2 Office Ergonomics Process at UCDHS ........................................................ 3 UCDHS Ergonomics Demonstration Room ...............................................16 Reference

  9. Mobile Energy Laboratory Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, P.R.; Batishko, C.R.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Stoops, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked to plan and implement a framework for measuring and analyzing the efficiency of on-site energy conversion, distribution, and end-use application on federal facilities as part of its overall technical support to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) Procedures establish guidelines for specific activities performed by PNL staff. PNL provided sophisticated energy monitoring, auditing, and analysis equipment for on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. Specially trained engineers and technicians were provided to conduct tests in a safe and efficient manner with the assistance of host facility staff and contractors. Reports were produced to describe test procedures, results, and suggested courses of action. These reports may be used to justify changes in operating procedures, maintenance efforts, system designs, or energy-using equipment. The MEL capabilities can subsequently be used to assess the results of energy conservation projects. These procedures recognize the need for centralized NM administration, test procedure development, operator training, and technical oversight. This need is evidenced by increasing requests fbr MEL use and the economies available by having trained, full-time MEL operators and near continuous MEL operation. DOE will assign new equipment and upgrade existing equipment as new capabilities are developed. The equipment and trained technicians will be made available to federal agencies that provide funding for the direct costs associated with MEL use.

  10. Embracing Safe Ground Test Facility Operations and Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Steven C.; Green, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting integrated operations and maintenance in wind tunnel ground test facilities requires a balance of meeting due dates, efficient operation, responsiveness to the test customer, data quality, effective maintenance (relating to readiness and reliability), and personnel and facility safety. Safety is non-negotiable, so the balance must be an "and" with other requirements and needs. Pressure to deliver services faster at increasing levels of quality in under-maintained facilities is typical. A challenge for management is to balance the "need for speed" with safety and quality. It s especially important to communicate this balance across the organization - workers, with a desire to perform, can be tempted to cut corners on defined processes to increase speed. Having a lean staff can extend the time required for pre-test preparations, so providing a safe work environment for facility personnel and providing good stewardship for expensive National capabilities can be put at risk by one well-intending person using at-risk behavior. This paper documents a specific, though typical, operational environment and cites management and worker safety initiatives and tools used to provide a safe work environment. Results are presented and clearly show that the work environment is a relatively safe one, though still not good enough to keep from preventing injury. So, the journey to a zero injury work environment - both in measured reality and in the minds of each employee - continues. The intent of this paper is to provide a benchmark for others with operational environments and stimulate additional sharing and discussion on having and keeping a safe work environment.

  11. Safe testing nuclear rockets economically

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S. D.; Travis, B. J.; Zerkle, D. K.

    2002-01-01

    Several studies over the past few decades have recognized the need for advanced propulsion to explore the solar system. As early as the 1960s, Werner Von Braun and others recognized the need for a nuclear rocket for sending humans to Mars. The great distances, the intense radiation levels, and the physiological response to zero-gravity all supported the concept of using a nuclear rocket to decrease mission time. These same needs have been recognized in later studies, especially in the Space Exploration Initiative in 1989. One of the key questions that has arisen in later studies, however, is the ability to test a nuclear rocket engine in the current societal environment. Unlike the RoverMERVA programs in the 1960s, the rocket exhaust can no longer be vented to the open atmosphere. As a consequence, previous studies have examined the feasibility of building a large-scale version of the Nuclear Furnace Scrubber that was demonstrated in 1971. We have investigated an alternative that would deposit the rocket exhaust along with any entrained fission products directly into the ground. The Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust, or SAFE, concept would allow variable sized engines to be tested for long times at a modest expense. A system overview, results of preliminary calculations, and cost estimates of proof of concept demonstrations are presented. The results indicate that a nuclear rocket could be tested at the Nevada Test Site for under $20 M.

  12. SAFE Testing Nuclear Rockets Economically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Steven D.; Travis, Bryan; Zerkle, David K.

    2003-01-01

    Several studies over the past few decades have recognized the need for advanced propulsion to explore the solar system. As early as the 1960s, Werner Von Braun and others recognized the need for a nuclear rocket for sending humans to Mars. The great distances, the intense radiation levels, and the physiological response to zero-gravity all supported the concept of using a nuclear rocket to decrease mission time. These same needs have been recognized in later studies, especially in the Space Exploration Initiative in 1989. One of the key questions that has arisen in later studies, however, is the ability to test a nuclear rocket engine in the current societal environment. Unlike the Rover/NERVA programs in the 1960s, the rocket exhaust can no longer be vented to the open atmosphere. As a consequence, previous studies have examined the feasibility of building a large-scale version of the Nuclear Furnace Scrubber that was demonstrated in 1971. We have investigated an alternative that would deposit the rocket exhaust along with any entrained fission products directly into the ground. The Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust, or SAFE, concept would allow variable sized engines to be tested for long times at a modest expense. A system overview, results of preliminary calculations, and cost estimates of proof of concept demonstrations are presented. The results indicate that a nuclear rocket could be tested at the Nevada Test Site for under $20 M.

  13. Retention of safe diving skills.

    PubMed

    Blitvich, J D; McElroy, G K; Blanksby, B A; Parler, H E

    2003-06-01

    This study investigated diving skill maintenance over an eight-month retention period following an intervention program. Thirty-four recreational swimmers with poor diving skills were measured before and immediately after a diving skills intervention program. Twenty-two returned for follow-up evaluation. Treadwater, Deck and Block dives were video-recorded, and maximum depth, distance, velocity, entry angle and flight distance were compared. Underwater hand and arm positions were examined. Pre-intervention, a breaststroke arm action before maximum depth occurred in 18% of all dives and 38% of Treadwater dives. This was eliminated post-intervention, improving head protection. The Treadwater dive elicited the greatest mean maximum depth, and ANOVA showed depth for this entry decreased (improved) following intervention and remained shallower at follow-up. Deck and Block dives also became shallower following intervention. As seven 10-minute skills sessions resulted in shallower dives with safer hand and arm positions, including safe diving skills in learn-to-swim programs can provide a diving spinal cord injury prevention strategy. PMID:12945622

  14. Safe motherhood through family planning.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    Family planning is an alternative guarantee of safe motherhood, to the option of providing improved obstetric care. Family planning eliminates many high-risk births, and reduces the risk due to sheer number of births, but also may decrease the risk from numbers of dangerous illegal abortions. In some countries, notably Latin America, illegal abortions are responsible for half the maternal deaths, because of consequent infection and hemorrhage. In Chile, for example, deaths from illegal abortion fell from 118 to 24 per 100,000 live births between 1964 and 1979, after expansion of family planning services. Overall maternal deaths fell from 280 to 80 per 100,000 live births, and the birth rate fell 33%. The majority of women with 3 or more children in developing countries want no more, and 2/3 of such women were not using contraception. If people knew that pregnancy is almost always more dangerous than using any kind of contraception, the demand for family planning would probably increase. A study of maternal deaths in Bali showed that pregnancy is 200 times more likely to kill a mother than using contraception. Contraception can also improve maternal survival for those who desire large families, by helping them space their children. PMID:12281273

  15. What is a safe lift?

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Kathy

    2013-09-01

    In a perfect world, a "safe" lift would be 51 pounds if the object is within 7 inches from the front of the body, if it is at waist height, if it is directly in front of the person, if there is a handle on the object, and if the load inside the box/bucket doesn't shift once lifted. If the load to be lifted does not meet all of these criteria, then it is an unsafe lift, and modifications must be made. Modifications would include lightening the load, getting help, or using a mechanical lifting device. There is always a way to turn an unsafe lift into a safer lift. An excellent resource for anyone interested in eliminating some of the hazards associated with lifting is the "Easy Ergonomics" publication from Cal/OSHA. This booklet offers practical advice on how to improve the workplace using engineering and administrative controls, problem-solving strategies and solutions, and a vast amount of ergonomics information and resources. "Easy Ergonomics" can be obtained by calling Cal/OSHA's education and training unit in Sacramento at 800-963-9424. A free copy can be obtained via www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/puborder.asp. PMID:24260936

  16. Safe disposal of prescribed medicines

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Phillip J; Hussainy, Safeera Y; George, Johnson; Kong, David CM; Kirkpatrick, Carl MJ

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The National Return and Disposal of Unwanted Medicines Program provides a free and safe method for the disposal of unwanted and expired medicines. This stops drugs being dumped in landfill and waterways. An audit showed that over 600 tonnes of medicines are returned through the program. A substantial proportion of these medicines were still within their expiry dates. Salbutamol, insulin and frusemide are the most commonly discarded medicines. More than $2 million of public money is wasted each year. Hoarding and non-adherence to treatment contribute to waste. Health professionals may be able to help minimise waste by informing patients about the importance of completing prescribed courses of treatment, and discouraging them from hoarding medicines after reaching the safety net threshold on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. Prescribe no more than the required quantity of medicines. When starting a new therapy, prescribe a minimal quantity in case the drug is unsuitable for the patient. Advise patients to return all unwanted medicines to a pharmacy for disposal. PMID:26648628

  17. Improved Quick Disconnect (QD) Interface Through Fail Safe Parts Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanch-Payne, Evelyn

    2001-01-01

    An extensive review of existing Quick Disconnects (QDs) mating and demating operations was performed to determine which shuttle part interface identifications and procedures contribute to human factor errors. The research methods used consisted of interviews with engineers and technicians, examination of incident reports, critiques of video and audio tapes of QD operations, and attendance of a Hyper QD operational course. The data strongly suggests that there are inherit human factor errors involved in QD operations. To promote fail-safe operations, QD interface problem areas and recommendations were outlined and reviewed. It is suggested that dialogue, investigations and recommendations continue.

  18. Safe Use of Pesticides, Guidelines. Occupational Safety and Health Series No. 38.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Labour Office, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This document provides guidance on the safe use of pesticides in agricultural work. General principles are given and followed by more detailed safety requirements for the various pesticide application techniques. Finally, the medical aspects of pesticides are considered. (BB)

  19. 75 FR 38168 - Hazardous Materials: International Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (TS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ...International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) ``Regulations for the Safe Transport...submitting comments on the draft document to the IAEA. We are requesting input from the public...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The IAEA works with its Member States and...

  20. Review of "Successful, Safe, and Healthy Students"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Gene V.; Barnett, Steven; Welner, Kevin G.

    2010-01-01

    The research summary "Successful, Safe, and Healthy Students" presents the research background for the Obama administration's proposals for comprehensive, community-wide services in high-poverty neighborhoods, extended learning time, family engagement and safe schools. While these policies have broad and common-sense appeal, the research…

  1. Creating Safe Spaces for Music Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendricks, Karin S.; Smith, Tawnya D.; Stanuch, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a practical model for fostering emotionally safe learning environments that instill in music students a positive sense of self-belief, freedom, and purpose. The authors examine the implications for music educators of creating effective learning environments and present recommendations for creating a safe space for learning,…

  2. STANDARD SAFE DIVING PRACTICES STATEMENT OF UNDERSTANDING

    E-print Network

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    . This is a statement in which you are informed of the established safe diving practices for skin and scuba diving/monitoring device (dive computer, RDP/dive tables--which- ever you are trained to use) when scuba diving. Deny useSTANDARD SAFE DIVING PRACTICES STATEMENT OF UNDERSTANDING Please read carefully before signing

  3. Safe Haven Laws as "Crime Control Theater"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Michelle; Miller, Monica K.; Griffin, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This article examines safe haven laws, which allow parents to legally abandon their infants. The main objective is to determine whether safe haven laws fit the criteria of "crime control theater", a term used to describe public policies that produce the appearance, but not the effect, of crime control, and as such are essentially…

  4. Safe Schools: The Threat from within?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Donn

    2011-01-01

    Safe school policies in many urban schools in Ontario have featured security guards, electronic surveillance, student identification tags, discipline, and zero tolerance. In 2000, the Ontario Ministry of Education passed the Safe Schools Act, which set out a list of offences that could trigger expulsion, suspension, and other disciplinary…

  5. Smoking Fish at Home--Safely

    E-print Network

    Tullos, Desiree

    PNW238 Smoking Fish at Home--Safely A PACIFIC NORTHWEST EXTENSION PUBLICATION WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY · OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY · UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO Three common factors in all hot fish-smok- ing-smoked fish safely. It also recom- mends refrigerated storage for all smoked fish. Note that the process

  6. SAFE-100 Module Fabrication and Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ring, Peter J.; Sayre, Edwin D.; Sena, J. Tom

    2003-01-01

    Reliable, long-life, low-cost heat pipes can enable safe, affordable space fission power and propulsion systems. Advanced versions of these systems can in turn allow rapid access to any point in the solar system. Stainless steel heat pipe modules are being built at Advanced Methods and Materials for use in a non-nuclear thermal hydraulic simulation of the SAFE-100 reactor. SAFE-100 is a near-term, low-cost space fission system demonstration. The heat pipes were designed to remove thermal power from the SAFE-100 core, and transfer this power to an electrical power conversion system. These heat pipe modules are being delivered to NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to be filled and tested in a prototypical configuration during CY2003. The construction and test of a SAFE-100 module prototype is described.

  7. A ‘Simple Anterior Fish Excluder’ (SAFE) for Mitigating Penaeid-Trawl Bycatch

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew J.; Broadhurst, Matt K.; Sterling, David J.; Millar, Russell B.

    2015-01-01

    Various plastic strips and sheets (termed ‘simple anterior fish excluders’?SAFEs) were positioned across the openings of penaeid trawls in attempts at reducing the unwanted bycatches of small teleosts. Initially, three SAFEs (a single wire without, and with small and large plastic panels) were compared against a control (no SAFE) on paired beam trawls. All SAFEs maintained targeted Metapenaeus macleayi catches, while the largest plastic SAFE significantly reduced total bycatch by 51% and the numbers of Pomatomus saltatrix, Mugil cephalus and Herklotsichthys castelnaui by up to 58%. A redesigned SAFE (‘continuous plastic’) was subsequently tested (against a control) on paired otter trawls, significantly reducing total bycatch by 28% and P. saltatrix and H. castelnaui by up to 42%. The continuous-plastic SAFE also significantly reduced M. macleayi catches by ~7%, but this was explained by ~5% less wing-end spread, and could be simply negated through otter-board refinement. Further work is required to refine the tested SAFEs, and to quantify species-specific escape mechanisms. Nevertheless, the SAFE concept might represent an effective approach for improving penaeid-trawl selectivity. PMID:25837892

  8. A 'simple anterior fish excluder' (SAFE) for mitigating penaeid-trawl bycatch.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Matthew J; Broadhurst, Matt K; Sterling, David J; Millar, Russell B

    2015-01-01

    Various plastic strips and sheets (termed 'simple anterior fish excluders'-SAFEs) were positioned across the openings of penaeid trawls in attempts at reducing the unwanted bycatches of small teleosts. Initially, three SAFEs (a single wire without, and with small and large plastic panels) were compared against a control (no SAFE) on paired beam trawls. All SAFEs maintained targeted Metapenaeus macleayi catches, while the largest plastic SAFE significantly reduced total bycatch by 51% and the numbers of Pomatomus saltatrix, Mugil cephalus and Herklotsichthys castelnaui by up to 58%. A redesigned SAFE ('continuous plastic') was subsequently tested (against a control) on paired otter trawls, significantly reducing total bycatch by 28% and P. saltatrix and H. castelnaui by up to 42%. The continuous-plastic SAFE also significantly reduced M. macleayi catches by ~7%, but this was explained by ~5% less wing-end spread, and could be simply negated through otter-board refinement. Further work is required to refine the tested SAFEs, and to quantify species-specific escape mechanisms. Nevertheless, the SAFE concept might represent an effective approach for improving penaeid-trawl selectivity. PMID:25837892

  9. POLICY ON SAFE DISCLOSURE October 30, 2007 1 POLICY ON SAFE DISCLOSURE

    E-print Network

    Shoubridge, Eric

    of this Policy. #12;POLICY ON SAFE DISCLOSURE ­ October 30, 2007 2 2.7 "Improper Activity" is an act or omissionPOLICY ON SAFE DISCLOSURE ­ October 30, 2007 1 POLICY ON SAFE DISCLOSURE Preamble In all its to accompany the Discloser or the Respondent and act in an advisory capacity. The Advisor is not paid for his

  10. InaSAFE applications in disaster preparedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranantyo, Ignatius Ryan; Fadmastuti, Mahardika; Chandra, Fredy

    2015-04-01

    Disaster preparedness activities aim to reduce the impact of disasters by being better prepared to respond when a disaster occurs. In order to better anticipate requirements during a disaster, contingency planning activities can be undertaken prior to a disaster based on a realistic disaster scenario. InaSAFE is a tool that can inform this process. InaSAFE is a free and open source software that estimates the impact to people and infrastructure from potential hazard scenarios. By using InaSAFE, disaster managers can develop scenarios of disaster impacts (people and infrastructures affected) to inform their contingency plan and emergency response operation plan. While InaSAFE provides the software framework exposure data and hazard data are needed as inputs to run this software. Then InaSAFE can be used to forecast the impact of the hazard scenario to the exposure data. InaSAFE outputs include estimates of the number of people, buildings and roads are affected, list of minimum needs (rice and clean water), and response checklist. InaSAFE is developed by Indonesia's National Disaster Management Agency (BNPB) and the Australian Government, through the Australia-Indonesia Facility for Disaster Reduction (AIFDR), in partnership with the World Bank - Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR). This software has been used in many parts of Indonesia, including Padang, Maumere, Jakarta, and Slamet Mountain for emergency response and contingency planning.

  11. Evaluation of Computer-Based Procedure System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Johanna Oxstrand; Katya Le Blanc; Seth Hays

    2012-09-01

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs, to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The introduction of advanced technology in existing nuclear power plants may help to manage the effects of aging systems, structures, and components. In addition, the incorporation of advanced technology in the existing LWR fleet may entice the future workforce, who will be familiar with advanced technology, to work for these utilities rather than more newly built nuclear power plants. Advantages are being sought by developing and deploying technologies that will increase safety and efficiency. One significant opportunity for existing plants to increase efficiency is to phase out the paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used at most nuclear power plants and replace them, where feasible, with computer-based procedures (CBPs). PBPs have ensured safe operation of plants for decades, but limitations in paper-based systems do not allow them to reach the full potential for procedures to prevent human errors. The environment in a nuclear power plant is constantly changing depending on current plant status and operating mode. PBPs, which are static by nature, are being applied to a constantly changing context. This constraint often results in PBPs that are written in a manner that is intended to cover many potential operating scenarios. Hence, the procedure layout forces the operator to search through a large amount of irrelevant information to locate the pieces of information relevant for the task and situation at hand, which has potential consequences of taking up valuable time when operators must be responding to the situation, and potentially leading operators down an incorrect response path. Other challenges related to PBPs are the management of multiple procedures, place-keeping, finding the correct procedure for the task at hand, and relying on other sources of additional information to ensure a functional and accurate understanding of the current plant status (Converse, 1995; Fink, Killian, Hanes, & Naser, 2009; Le Blanc & Oxstrand, 2012). The main focus of this report is to describe the research activities conducted to address the remaining two objectives; Develop a prototype CBP system based on requirements identified and Evaluate the CBP prototype. The emphasis will be on the evaluation of an initial CBP prototype in at a Nuclear Power Plant.

  12. 6/5/2013 Page 1 of 8 Nitric Acid SOP Standard Operating Procedures

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    6/5/2013 Page 1 of 8 Nitric Acid SOP Standard Operating Procedures Strong Corrosives - Strong Acids (SA) Nitric Acid Print a copy and insert covers the precautions and safe handling procedures for the use of Nitric Acid

  13. Safe Use of Hydrogen and Hydrogen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maes, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    This is a viewgraph presentation that is a course for teaching the safe use of hydrogen. The objectives of the course are 1. To familiarize the student with H2 safety properties 2. To enable the identification, evaluations and addressing of H2 system hazards 3. To teach: a. Safe practices for, b. Design, c. Materials selection, d. H2 system operation, e. Physical principles and empirical observations on which these safe practices are based, f. How to respond to emergency situations involving H2, g How to visualize safety concepts through in-class exercises, h. Identify numerous parameters important to H2 safety.

  14. 21 CFR 570.30 - Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Additive Safety § 570.30 Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS). (a) General... obtain approval of a food additive regulation for the ingredient. General recognition of safety through... scientific procedures required for approval of a food additive regulation. General recognition of...

  15. 21 CFR 570.30 - Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Additive Safety § 570.30 Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS). (a) General... obtain approval of a food additive regulation for the ingredient. General recognition of safety through... scientific procedures required for approval of a food additive regulation. General recognition of...

  16. 21 CFR 570.30 - Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Additive Safety § 570.30 Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS). (a) General... obtain approval of a food additive regulation for the ingredient. General recognition of safety through... scientific procedures required for approval of a food additive regulation. General recognition of...

  17. 21 CFR 570.30 - Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Additive Safety § 570.30 Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS). (a) General... obtain approval of a food additive regulation for the ingredient. General recognition of safety through... scientific procedures required for approval of a food additive regulation. General recognition of...

  18. 21 CFR 570.30 - Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Additive Safety § 570.30 Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS). (a) General... obtain approval of a food additive regulation for the ingredient. General recognition of safety through... scientific procedures required for approval of a food additive regulation. General recognition of...

  19. Technique of laser in-line ignition all electronic safe and arming device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ze-rong; Zhou, Guang-wei

    2009-07-01

    In modern warfare the performance of weapon system safe and arming device has been put forward higher requirements because the battlefield environment has become increasingly sophisticated. The safe and arming device should have good safety of mechanical, electrical, thermal and other aspects and reliable initiation. This paper analyses the laser initiation of three ways, the laser could initiate the insensitive acceptable charge for the in-line ignition system, so that the laser in-line ignition can be realized and the laser in-line ignition all electronic safe and arming device is built. Then, studies the composition and working principle of the laser in-line ignition all electronic safe and arming device and the various subsystems in-depth. The laser in-line ignition all electronic safe and arming device can be applied to fixed-point, directional and multi-point initiation and has laid an important foundation of the theory and engineering in the future weapon system.

  20. Safe Handling of Fresh Tomatoes 

    E-print Network

    Scott, Amanda

    2008-09-05

    the stem end Avoid tomatoes that: ? Are very soft ? Are poorly colored ? Have cuts, mold, cracks or sunken areas Damaged tomatoes will spoil quickly and could carry pathogens that cause food- borne illness. In the shopping cart and in the gro- cery bags... of Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics, Acts of Congress of May 8, 1914, as amended, and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture. Edward G. Smith, Director, Texas AgriLife Extension Service...

  1. Safe trajectory planning of autonomous vehicles

    E-print Network

    Schouwenaars, Tom

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents a novel framework for safe online trajectory planning of unmanned vehicles through partially unknown environments. The basic planning problem is formulated as a receding horizon optimization problem ...

  2. Ensuring Safe Use of Contact Lens Solution

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Consumer Updates RSS Feed Ensuring Safe Use of Contact Lens Solution Printer-friendly PDF (234 KB) On ... About Eye Infections Dos and Don'ts for Contact Lens Wearers Not emptying the solution out of ...

  3. Child Care Provider's Guide to Safe Sleep

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share A Child Care Provider's Guide to Safe Sleep Article Body Did ... Caused By: Immunizations Vomiting or choking What can child care providers do? Follow these guidelines to help protect ...

  4. Institute of Technology Typechecking Safe Process Synchronization

    E-print Network

    Compagnoni, Adriana

    Compagnoni Department of Computer Science Stevens Institute of Technology Hoboken, NJ, 07030, USA ebonelli Point on Hudson · Hoboken, NJ 07030 · USA #12;#12;Typechecking Safe Process Synchronization Eduardo

  5. Safe Tractor Operation: Driving on Highways 

    E-print Network

    Smith, David

    2004-09-16

    About 50 tractor drivers are killed each year in collisions with other vehicles on public roads. Many of these accidents could be prevented. This publication describes the legal requirements for operating a tractor on public roads, safe driving...

  6. Bottled Water Everywhere: Keeping it Safe

    MedlinePLUS

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Bottled Water Everywhere: Keeping it Safe Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... sanitary conditions back to top Types of Bottled Water FDA describes bottled water as water that’s intended ...

  7. Safe Storage of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 

    E-print Network

    Scott, Amanda

    2008-09-05

    Proper storage of fresh fruits and vegetables can help consumers avoid foodborne illness. This publication explains how to safely store apples, bananas, berries, beets, broccoli, carrots, corn, grapes, herbs, lettuce and greens, melons, nectarines...

  8. Can Naturoptics for Safe Recovery of Vision Fund Brazilians' Educations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flávia Ribiero, Silvia; Carmem Ribeiro Duarte, Célia; Mc Leod, Roger David

    2008-10-01

    Directors of Naturoptics for Safe Recovery of Vision, Inc., US Patent Office, April 8, 2008, trademark issued, grants ``The David Matthew Mc Leod Memorial Award,'' to individuals like Sylvia Flavia Ribeiro. Instructions at American locations enhance patenting, trade-marking, and propagation to individuals, and youth through parents. Naturoptics' earnings go by agreed percentages to named academic entities and awardees who sign non-disclosure agreements. These say the US Government trademarked the processes as safe, and that diagnostic or treatment techniques are not used, necessary, or allowed for Naturoptic Methods. These educationally explain how the inventor, Roger David Mc Leod, recovered his vision. Taught processes are released to awardees signing agreements this is an educational service, providing teaching services for clients. Non-disclosure agreements are required from clients. Work-study grants, ``The Kaan Balam Matagamon Memorial Award,'' in memory of DMM, may be awarded through the American Indians in Science and Engineering Society, AISES, and to other women and minorities.

  9. Civil Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byer, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Briefly reviews the historical development of civil procedure (the rules that dictate how a civil case can proceed through the courts) and identifies some of its main components. Discusses procedures such as subject matter jurisdiction, personal jurisdiction, venue, discovery, motions practice, pleadings, pretrial conference, and trials. (MJP)

  10. Curiosity's Autonomous Surface Safing Behavior Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilson, Tracy A.; Manning, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The safing routines on all robotic deep-space vehicles are designed to put the vehicle in a power and thermally safe configuration, enabling communication with the mission operators on Earth. Achieving this goal is made a little more difficult on Curiosity because the power requirements for the core avionics and the telecommunication equipment exceed the capability of the single power source, the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator. This drove the system design to create an operational mode, called "sleep mode", where the vehicle turns off most of the loads in order to charge the two Li-ion batteries. The system must keep the vehicle safe from over-heat and under-heat conditions, battery cell failures, under-voltage conditions, and clock failures, both while the computer is running and while the system is sleeping. The other goal of a safing routine is to communicate. On most spacecraft, this simply involves turning on the receiver and transmitter continuously. For Curiosity, Earth is above the horizon only a part of the day for direct communication to the Earth, and the orbiter overpass opportunities only occur a few times a day. The design must robustly place the Rover in a communicable condition at the correct time. This paper discusses Curiosity's autonomous safing behavior and describes how the vehicle remains power and thermally safe while sleeping, as well as a description of how the Rover communicates with the orbiters and Earth at specific times.

  11. Managing Cassini Safe Mode Attitude at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft was launched on October 15, 1997 and arrived at Saturn on June 30, 2004. It has performed detailed observations and remote sensing of Saturn, its rings, and its satellites since that time. In the event safe mode interrupts normal orbital operations, Cassini has flight software fault protection algorithms to detect, isolate, and recover to a thermally safe and commandable attitude and then wait for further instructions from the ground. But the Saturn environment is complex, and safety hazards change depending on where Cassini is in its orbital trajectory around Saturn. Selecting an appropriate safe mode attitude that insures safe operation in the Saturn environment, including keeping the star tracker field of view clear of bright bodies, while maintaining a quiescent, commandable attitude, is a significant challenge. This paper discusses the Cassini safe table management strategy and the key criteria that must be considered, especially during low altitude flybys of Titan, in deciding what spacecraft attitude should be used in the event of safe mode.

  12. Toward standardising gamma camera quality control procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhorayef, M. A.; Alnaaimi, M. A.; Alduaij, M. A.; Mohamed, M. O.; Ibahim, S. Y.; Alkandari, F. A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    Attaining high standards of efficiency and reliability in the practice of nuclear medicine requires appropriate quality control (QC) programs. For instance, the regular evaluation and comparison of extrinsic and intrinsic flood-field uniformity enables the quick correction of many gamma camera problems. Whereas QC tests for uniformity are usually performed by exposing the gamma camera crystal to a uniform flux of gamma radiation from a source of known activity, such protocols can vary significantly. Thus, there is a need for optimization and standardization, in part to allow direct comparison between gamma cameras from different vendors. In the present study, intrinsic uniformity was examined as a function of source distance, source activity, source volume and number of counts. The extrinsic uniformity and spatial resolution were also examined. Proper standard QC procedures need to be implemented because of the continual development of nuclear medicine imaging technology and the rapid expansion and increasing complexity of hybrid imaging system data. The present work seeks to promote a set of standard testing procedures to contribute to the delivery of safe and effective nuclear medicine services.

  13. Impact of a lead-safe training program on workers conducting renovation, painting, and maintenance activities.

    PubMed Central

    Buzzetti, Alan J.; Greene, Frank; Needham, Dottie

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: An important source of lead exposure is lead-based paint that is disturbed when unsafe work practices are used during renovation, remodeling, and maintenance activities. This study explores the success of a pilot lead-safe skills training program for home improvement contractors and their employees (including renovators, remodelers, and painters) and small property owners. METHODS: The study evaluates whether attendees at eight-hour lead-safe work practices training courses learned and retained information about lead exposure; developed and retained positive attitudes toward lead-safe work practices; and developed lasting, positive behavioral intentions to use lead-safe work practice skills and techniques. A questionnaire was administered immediately before, immediately following, and several months following the training program. Coded data from the questionnaires were analyzed using SPSS software. RESULTS: Respondents showed statistically significant changes from before to after the training program, and the changes were maintained over time. Knowledge improved, and attitudes and behavioral intentions changed in a favorable direction. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that lead-safe training can be successful and can create lasting changes in lead-safe knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. PMID:15736328

  14. The use of collaboration to implement evidence-based safe practices.

    PubMed

    Clarke, John R

    2013-12-01

    The Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority receives over 235,000 reports of medical error per year. Near miss and serious event reports of common and interesting problems are analysed to identify best practices for preventing harmful errors. Dissemination of this evidence-based information in the peer-reviewed Pennsylvania Patient Safety Advisory and presentations to medical staffs are not sufficient for adoption of best practices. Adoption of best practices has required working with institutions to identify local barriers to and incentives for adopting best practices and redesigning the delivery system to make desired behaviour easy and undesirable behaviour more difficult. Collaborations, where institutions can learn from the experiences of others, have show decreases in harmful events. The Pennsylvania Program to Prevent Wrong-Site Surgery is used as an example. Two collaborations to prevent wrong-site surgery have been completed, one with 30 institutions in eastern Pennsylvania and one with 19 in western Pennsylvania. The first collaboration achieved a 73% decrease in the rolling average of wrong-site events over 18 months. The second collaboration experienced no wrong-site operating room procedures over more than one year. Significance for public healthSince the Institute of Medicine's To Err is Human identified medical errors as a major cause of death, the public has been interested in the recommendations for reporting of medical errors and implementing safe systems for the delivery of healthcare. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has followed those recommendations and found that an essential intermediate step between analysing reports and implementing safe systems is collaborative learning among healthcare institutions. The experience in Pennsylvania should be useful to other public organizations wishing to improve safety. PMID:25170497

  15. Investigation of safe-life fail-safe criteria for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the effects of a safe-life design approach and a fail-safe design approach on the space shuttle booster vehicle structure, and to recommend any changes to the structural design criteria. Two configurations of the booster vehicle were considered, one incorporating a delta wing (B-9U configuration) and the other a swept wing (B-16B configuration). Several major structural components of the booster were studied to determine the fatigue life, safe-life, and fail-safe capabilities of the baseline design. Each component was investigated to determine the practicability of applying a safe-life or fail-safe design philosophy, the changes such design approaches might require, and the impact of these changes on weight, cost, development plans, and performance.

  16. 26 CFR 1.475(a)-4 - Valuation safe harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Valuation safe harbor. 1.475(a)-4 Section...Inventories § 1.475(a)-4 Valuation safe harbor. (a) Overview —(1) Purpose. This section sets forth a safe harbor that, under certain...

  17. 24 CFR 30.69 - SAFE Mortgage Licensing violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false SAFE Mortgage Licensing violations. 30...CONDUCT Violations § 30.69 SAFE Mortgage Licensing violations. ...comply with any requirement of the SAFE Act, the provisions of 24 CFR part...

  18. 26 CFR 1.475(a)-4 - Valuation safe harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Valuation safe harbor. 1.475(a)-4 Section...Inventories § 1.475(a)-4 Valuation safe harbor. (a) Overview —(1) Purpose. This section sets forth a safe harbor that, under certain...

  19. 24 CFR 30.69 - SAFE Mortgage Licensing violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false SAFE Mortgage Licensing violations. 30...CONDUCT Violations § 30.69 SAFE Mortgage Licensing violations. ...comply with any requirement of the SAFE Act, the provisions of 24 CFR part...

  20. 24 CFR 30.69 - SAFE Mortgage Licensing violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false SAFE Mortgage Licensing violations. 30...CONDUCT Violations § 30.69 SAFE Mortgage Licensing violations. ...comply with any requirement of the SAFE Act, the provisions of 24 CFR part...

  1. 50 CFR 216.91 - Dolphin-safe labeling standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dolphin-safe labeling standards. 216.91 Section...THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.91 Dolphin-safe labeling standards. (a)...

  2. 50 CFR 216.91 - Dolphin-safe labeling standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dolphin-safe labeling standards. 216.91 Section...THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.91 Dolphin-safe labeling standards. (a)...

  3. 50 CFR 216.91 - Dolphin-safe labeling standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dolphin-safe labeling standards. 216.91 Section...THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.91 Dolphin-safe labeling standards. (a)...

  4. 50 CFR 216.91 - Dolphin-safe labeling standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dolphin-safe labeling standards. 216.91 Section...THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.91 Dolphin-safe labeling standards. (a)...

  5. 50 CFR 216.91 - Dolphin-safe labeling standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dolphin-safe labeling standards. 216.91 Section...THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.91 Dolphin-safe labeling standards. (a)...

  6. Musculoskeletal Aspiration Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Hansford, Barry Glenn; Stacy, Gregory Scott

    2012-01-01

    With advances in imaging technology, there has been a significant increase in the number and range of interventional musculoskeletal image-guided procedures. One of the most commonly performed image-guided musculoskeletal interventions is the diagnostic and therapeutic percutaneous aspiration and drainage of multiple types of intra-articular, juxta-articular, and intramuscular pathologic fluid collections. These procedures may be performed under fluoroscopic, ultrasound, computed tomography, or even magnetic resonance guidance depending on the location to be accessed, type of pathology, patient characteristics, and operator preference. Musculoskeletal image-guided aspiration and drainage procedures are minimally invasive and generally very safe while offering valuable diagnostic information as well as therapeutic benefit. This article focuses on the appropriate indications, contraindications, and general technique for accessing the major joints via imaging guidance. For each joint, we discuss pertinent anatomy, appropriate imaging modalities, and preferred approaches to gaining intra-articular access. Additionally, the article discusses some of the more frequently encountered juxta-articular and intramuscular fluid collections that can be accessed and aspirated via percutaneous intervention, with mention of the importance of recognizing extremity sarcomas that can mimic these benign collections. PMID:24293800

  7. Percutaneous renal biopsy as an outpatient procedure.

    PubMed Central

    Alebiosu, Christopher O.; Kadiri, Solomon

    2004-01-01

    Percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) is a safe and effective tool in the diagnosis and management of renal disease. It is the gold standard for evaluating renal parenchymal disease. It is both useful for diagnosis and monitoring progress of renal diseases. Where facilities and personnel are available to carry out the procedure in developing countries, it has become increasingly difficult for patients to pay for hospital admission fees, the procedure, and processing of the samples obtained. Information on the success rate and safety of the procedure is of interest to nephrologists for cost-benefit considerations and medicolegal purposes. This paper reports the outcome of outpatient PRB done among patients of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. With the use of ultrasound guidance, PRB remains a safe procedure and can be done on an outpatient basis. PMID:15481751

  8. Building Evacuation Procedures General Procedures

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    Bell Hall Building Evacuation Procedures General Procedures: It is the personal responsibility of all occupants of University buildings to immediately exit the building when the fire alarm is activated. Remaining in the building is unacceptable, regardless of the reason. Occupants should exit from

  9. Building Evacuation Procedures General Procedures

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    Davis Hall Building Evacuation Procedures General Procedures: It is the personal responsibility of all occupants of University buildings to immediately exit the building when the fire alarm is activated. Remaining in the building is unacceptable, regardless of the reason. Occupants should exit from

  10. Directors of Naturoptics for Safe Recovery of Vision, Inc. Release Patented Process to Awardees for their Personal Use and Mentored Teaching of the Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Paul J.; D., N.; C., D.; McLeod, Roger David

    2008-05-01

    The Board of Directors of Naturoptics for Safe Recovery of Vision, Inc., US Patent Office, trademark issued, patent issue date April 8, 2008, has granted ``The David Matthew Mc Leod Memorial Award,'' to named individuals. Naturoptics teaching earnings by recipients are to be disbursed according to agreed percentages to named academic entities and to the awardees. When awardees sign non-disclosure agreements, they are shown why the process is safe. They are also taught that no diagnostic or treatment techniques are used, necessary or allowed for the processes. This is an educational consultation that explains how Naturoptics inventor, Roger David Mc Leod, safely and rapidly recovered his vision. The now patented processes as taught is released for the use of those awardees that sign agreements that they were merely provided a teaching service, and will only be doing educational consulting for their clients. Such clients must follow similar procedures. Other equivalent work-study grants are named ``The Kaan Balam Matagamon Memorial Award,'' also in memory of DMM. The American Indians in Science and Engineering Society may also be participating.

  11. 75 FR 7149 - SAFE Mortgage Licensing Act: HUD Responsibilities Under the SAFE Act; Extension of Public Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-17

    ...Act: HUD Responsibilities Under the SAFE Act; Extension of Public Comment Deadline...Enforcement Mortgage Licensing Act of 2008 (SAFE Act), which was published on December...extending the public comment period on its SAFE Act proposed rule, published on...

  12. Cosmetic Procedures

    MedlinePLUS

    Explore Cosmetic Procedures Dental Implants Dental implants replace the roots of lost teeth. A dental implant–along with a ... positions and what future movement is possible. Your cosmetic dentist now has many options available, from conventional ...

  13. Transient Approximation of SAFE-100 Heat Pipe Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Reid, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    Engineers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have designed several heat pipe cooled reactor concepts, ranging in power from 15 kWt to 800 kWt, for both surface power systems and nuclear electric propulsion systems. The Safe, Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) is now being developed in a collaborative effort between LANL and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC). NASA is responsible for fabrication and testing of non-nuclear, electrically heated modules in the Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at MSFC. In-core heat pipes must be properly thawed as the reactor power starts. Computational models have been developed to assess the expected operation of a specific heat pipe design during start-up, steady state operation, and shutdown. While computationally intensive codes provide complete, detailed analyses of heat pipe thaw, a relatively simple. concise routine can also be applied to approximate the response of a heat pipe to changes in the evaporator heat transfer rate during start-up and power transients (e.g., modification of reactor power level) with reasonably accurate results. This paper describes a simplified model of heat pipe start-up that extends previous work and compares the results to experimental measurements for a SAFE-100 type heat pipe design.

  14. Emergency Procedures for After 5pm and Weekends Important Phone Numbers

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    -threatening Emergencies From any office or campus land line phone 911 From a cell phone (510) 642-3333 Non. Evacuation ­ When evacuating your building or work area: Stay calm; do not rush or panic. Safely stop your work. If safe, gather your personal belongings; take prescription medications with you. If safe, close

  15. 28 CFR 42.530 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Procedures § 42.530...applicable to title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (28 CFR 42.106-42...I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act, as amended by the Justice...

  16. 28 CFR 42.530 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Procedures § 42.530...applicable to title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (28 CFR 42.106-42...I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act, as amended by the Justice...

  17. 28 CFR 42.530 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Procedures § 42.530...applicable to title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (28 CFR 42.106-42...I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act, as amended by the Justice...

  18. 28 CFR 42.530 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Procedures § 42.530...applicable to title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (28 CFR 42.106-42...I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act, as amended by the Justice...

  19. 28 CFR 42.530 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Procedures § 42.530...applicable to title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (28 CFR 42.106-42...I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act, as amended by the Justice...

  20. Promoting safe IV management in practice using H.A.N.D.S.

    PubMed

    Frimpong, Angela; Caguioa, Jennifer; Octavo, Genevi

    The aim of this article is to promote best practice for the insertion and care of intravascular (IV) devices. The H.A.N.D.S. acronym was created to serve as an aide memoire to general and specialist nurses regarding the 5 key interventions to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs). In order to promote safe and evidence-based practice in IV therapy a practical guide with clinical information about common IV procedures has been developed. This article provides back-to-basics guidance on how to deliver IV therapy safely and effectively. PMID:25616127

  1. Police Juvenile Procedures Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Champaign. Community Research Center.

    This manual provides an overview of the law relating to juvenile proceedings, focusing primarily on arrest and detention procedures, which are a major concern of police officers who work with juveniles. The manual does not provide specific instruction in state law but does describe federal Constitutional rulings that affect treatment of juveniles.…

  2. Sun Safe Mode Controller Design for LADEE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusco, Jesse C.; Swei, Sean S. M.; Nakamura, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of sun safe controllers which are designed to keep the spacecraft power positive and thermally balanced in the event an anomaly is detected. Employed by NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), the controllers utilize the measured sun vector and the spacecraft body rates for feedback control. To improve the accuracy of sun vector estimation, the least square minimization approach is applied to process the sensor data, which is proven to be effective and accurate. To validate the controllers, the LADEE spacecraft model engaging the sun safe mode was first simulated and then compared with the actual LADEE orbital fight data. The results demonstrated the applicability of the proposed sun safe controllers.

  3. "Safe Schools within Safe Communities: A Regional Summit in the Heartland." Policy Briefs Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huertas, Aurelio, Jr.; Sullivan, Carol

    This report documents the proceedings of a regional policy seminar hosted by the Iowa Department of Education with support from the North Central Regional Educational Laboratory (NCREL) and the Midwest Regional Center for Drug-Free Schools and Communities (MRC). The seminar, "Safe Schools Within Safe Communities," was held on September 19-20,…

  4. Lessons Learned from Safe Kids/Safe Streets. Juvenile Justice Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Roberta; Gragg, Frances; Schultz, Dana; Eisen, Karla

    2006-01-01

    This bulletin reports results from an evaluation of six sites of the Safe Kids/Safe Streets (SK/SS) program, which applies a comprehensive, collaborative approach to the child maltreatment field. The bulletin provides insights into collaboration building, systems reform, service options, and other strategies. Among the findings were that the SK/SS…

  5. Is your hospital safe? Disruptive behavior and workplace bullying.

    PubMed

    Martin, William F

    2008-01-01

    The author defines disruptive behavior; distinguishes among disruptive, impaired, and incompetent behavior; describes the prevalence of disruptive behavior; and identifies some recommendations to prevent and resolve disruptive behavior in hospitals. The proactive prevention and management of workplace bullying have implications on managing costs, quality, and satisfaction in hospitals among patients, families, staff, and physicians. The author describes an evidence-based framework and recommends that hospital administrators use it to design an organizational approach to promoting a work environment that is psychologically and physiologically safe and that enables staff to focus on delivering high-quality, cost-effective, and satisfying care. PMID:18694856

  6. Myocardial bridging prevents safe laparoscopy? A case report.

    PubMed

    Reiss, D L; Williams, M D; Rodning, C B

    1996-08-01

    A 49-year-old male presented with atypical chest pain. Complete cardiac evaluation was normal except for cardiac catheterization, which revealed a myocardial bridge across the LAD (left anterior descending coronary artery) that caused a 50% systolic stenosis. Abdominal ultrasound revealed cholelithiasis. The patient became asymptomatic and was discharged only to return with biliary pancreatitis, which resolved over 2 weeks and laparoscopic cholecystectomy was attempted. Upon establishment of a pneumoperitoneum, he began to suffer cardiac ischemia, which immediately resolved upon desufflation. The procedure was converted to an uneventful open cholecystectomy. He did well without any further problems. This is the first report of myocardial bridging, a well-known cardiac anomaly, possibly preventing safe laparoscopy. This was possibly due to transmitted intraperitoneal pressure effect on the pericardium pushing closed that myocardial bridge. PMID:8877744

  7. Human round trip to Mars: Six months and radiation safe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazareth, O. W.; Schmidt, E.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J. R.

    We describe a different type of round trip to Mars, using a combination of spacecraft. Compared to typical proposals, this flight is relatively fast and relatively safe from biological radiation dosage. Our study is concerned with the trip from Earth orbit to Mars orbit. Four spacecraft are required for the round trip. The crew spends most of their time on board a comparatively large, well shielded spacecraft (LC) which is in free (non-powered) orbit about the sun. The crew travels from Earth orbit to the LC while on board a comparatively small, powered spacecraft (SC). At Mars, the procedure is reversed and the crew returns on a second LC. In addition, a cargo craft, with no crew, is sent to Mars prior to the crew leaving Earth orbit. The trip time is about six months and the radiation dose equivalent is within guidelines recommended by the National Commission on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  8. Human round trip to Mars: Six months and radiation safe

    SciTech Connect

    Lazareth, O.W.; Schmidt, E.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a different type of round trip to Mars, using a combination of spacecraft. Compared to typical proposals, this flight is relatively fast and relatively safe from biological radiation dosage. Our study is concerned with the trip from Earth orbit to Mars orbit. Four spacecraft are required for the round trip. The crew spends most of their time on board a comparatively large, well shielded spacecraft (LC) which is in free (non-powered) orbit about the sun. The crew travels from Earth orbit to the LC while on board a comparatively small, powered spacecraft (SC). At Mars, the procedure is reversed and the crew returns on a second LC. In addition, a cargo craft, with no crew, is sent to Mars prior to the crew leaving Earth orbit. The trip time is about six months and the radiation dose equivalent is within guidelines recommended by the National Commission on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  9. Inexpensive and safe DNA gel electrophoresis using household materials.

    PubMed

    Ens, S; Olson, A B; Dudley, C; Ross, N D; Siddiqi, A A; Umoh, K M; Schneegurt, M A

    2012-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis is the single most important molecular biology technique and it is central to life sciences research, but it is often too expensive for the secondary science classroom or homeschoolers. A simple safe low-cost procedure is described here that uses household materials to construct and run DNA gel electrophoresis. Plastic containers are fitted with aluminum foil electrodes and 9-V batteries to run food-grade agar-agar gels using aquarium pH buffers and then stained with gentian violet. This activity was tested in a high school biology classroom with significantly positive responses on postactivity reflective surveys. The electrophoresis activity addresses several Life Science Content Standard C criteria, including aspects of cell biology, genetics, and evolution. It also can be used to teach aspects of motion and force in the physical science classroom. PMID:22615228

  10. Safe delivery practices: experience from cross-sectional data of Bangladeshi women.

    PubMed

    Kabir, M A; Goh, Kim-Leng; Khan, M M H; Al-Amin, Abul Quasem; Azam, Mohammad Nurul

    2015-03-01

    This study examines the safe delivery practices of Bangladeshi women using data on 4905 ever-married women aged 15 to 49 years from the 2007 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey. Variables that included age, region of origin, education level of respondent and spouse, residence, working status, religion, involvement in NGOs, mass media exposure, and wealth index were analyzed to find correlates of safe delivery practices. More than 80% of the deliveries took place at home, and only 18% were under safe and hygienic conditions. The likelihood of safe deliveries was significantly lower among younger and older mothers than middle-aged mothers and higher among educated mothers and those living in urban areas. Economically better-off mothers and those with greater exposure to mass media had a significantly higher incidence of safe delivery practices. A significant association with religion and safe delivery practices was revealed. Demographic, socioeconomic, cultural, and programmatic factors that are strongly associated with safe delivery practices should be considered in the formulation of reproductive health policy. PMID:22426560

  11. Working for Cairo Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Harold L.

    This paper reports the personal experiences of a Fulbright scholar working in the Egyptian government's Cairo broadcast facility, offering an inside understanding of some of the broadcasting procedures used by Egyptian mass media. Besides descriptions of the broadcasting procedures at Cairo Radio, the paper contains notes on announcers' training…

  12. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Sun Safe Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrick, Joseph; Roger, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), a spacecraft designed and built at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, MD, was launched on June 18, 2009 from Cape Canaveral. It is currently in orbit about the Moon taking detailed science measurements and providing a highly accurate mapping of the suface in preparation for the future return of astronauts to a permanent moon base. Onboard the spacecraft is a complex set of algorithms designed by the attitude control engineers at GSFC to control the pointig for all operational events, including anomalies that require the spacecraft to be put into a well known attitude configuration for a sufficiently long duration to allow for the investigation and correction of the anomaly. GSFC level requirements state that each spacecraft s control system design must include a configuration for this pointing and lso be able to maintain a thermally safe and power positive attitude. This stable control algorithm for anomalous events is commonly referred to as the safe mode and consists of control logic thatwill put the spacecraft in this safe configuration defined by the spacecraft s hardware, power and environment capabilities and limitations. The LRO Sun Safe mode consists of a coarse sun-pointing set of algorithms that puts the spacecraft into this thermally safe and power positive attitude and can be achieved wihin a required amount of time from any initial attitude, provided that the system momentum is within the momentum capability of the reaction wheels. On LRO the Sun Safe mode makes use of coarse sun sensors (CSS), an inertial reference unit (IRU) and reaction wheels (RW) to slew the spacecraft to a solar inertial pointing. The CSS and reaction wheels have some level of redundancy because of their numbers. However, the IRU is a single-point-failure piece of hardware. Without the rate information provided by the IRU, the Sun Safe control algorithms could not maintain the required pointing, so a sub-mode of the Sun Safe mode that does not use the IRU was designed. This submode, referred to as the Sun Safe Gyroless control mode, consists of an algorithm that estimates rate information from the CSS and the RW measurements. RW momentum information is used to estimate the body rate parallel to the target sunline, which CSS alone would not be able to observe. Sun Safe can be autonomously, or via ground command, entered from any other control mode and in the event the IRU is not providing rate information, the control mode is switched to the gyroless submode. This paper looks at the design of the Sun Safe modes and discusses the constraints placed on the algorithm and how the mode wored around these constraints. Items of particular interest include CSS placement on the Solar Array (SA) and its implications to design, estimation of body rate information for the Sun Safe Gyroless control mode, and the effect of solar eclipse on each of the Sun Safe modes. Placing CSS on the SA was necessary for the means to put the Sun along the targeted sun-line, nominally normal to the SA panels, for all operational considerations. This had design implications for determining a sun vector during normal SA operations, if one or both gimbals become inoperable and when the SA is in a stowed configuration. The ability of body rate estimation in Sun Safe Gyroless not only uses CSS sun vector data but requires RW momentum measuremens to estimate rates parallel to the sun-line. LRO encounters solar eclipses of some length for most of its orbits about the Moon. With the lack of CSS measurement data a design was implemented in both Sun Safe and Sun Safe Gyroless, they differ because of having or not having IRU measurement data, to carry the spacecraft through these eclipse periods. This paper also includes some discussion of sun avoidance and how it affected design decisions during nominal and eclipse perids for each of the Sun Safe modes.

  13. 50 CFR 216.91 - Dolphin-safe labeling standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dolphin-safe labeling standards. 216.91... MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.91 Dolphin-safe labeling standards. (a) It is a violation of... include on the label of those products the term “dolphin-safe” or any other term or symbol that claims...

  14. 50 CFR 216.91 - Dolphin-safe labeling standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dolphin-safe labeling standards. 216.91... MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.91 Dolphin-safe labeling standards. (a) It is a violation of... include on the label of those products the term “dolphin-safe” or any other term or symbol that claims...

  15. Fail-safe bidirectional valve driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimoto, H.

    1974-01-01

    Cross-coupled diodes are added to commonly used bidirectional valve driver circuit to protect circuit and power supply. Circuit may be used in systems requiring fail-safe bidirectional valve operation, particularly in chemical- and petroleum-processing control systems and computer-controlled hydraulic or pneumatic systems.

  16. Guidance Document SafeHandlingofHydrofluoricAcid

    E-print Network

    hydrofluoric acid in containers made of polyethylene, polypropylene, Teflon, lead or platinum. Do not useGuidance Document SafeHandlingofHydrofluoricAcid [This is a brief summary. Read the full MSDS for more details before handling.] Introduction: Hydrofluoric acid is hydrogen fluoride (HF) dissolved

  17. Human papillomavirus vaccine: safe, effective, underused.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xian Wen; Lipold, Laura; Sikon, Andrea; Rome, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) is safe and effective. It is recommended for females age 9 to 26 and for males age 11 to 26, yet vaccination rates are low. We review the host immune response, the data behind the recommendations for HPV vaccination, and the challenges of implementing the vaccination program. PMID:23288945

  18. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J.S.

    1993-09-21

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process. 8 figures.

  19. Safe Schools: What the Southeast Is Doing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SERVE Policy Brief, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Virtually no school is safe from violence. FBI statistics, which show that juvenile crimes actually peaked during the mid-1970s, are at odds with the public perception that crime rates among young people are at an all-time high. The FBI acknowledges, however, that the crimes committed by young people tend to be more serious than in the past, and…

  20. Safe Schools: A Best Practices Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Educational Facility Planners International, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Every day in America more than 50 million children go to neighborhood public schools. Parents send them off with every hope they will be safe while there. And yet, as has been the case in too many cities, violence shatters that hope. The Council of Educational Facilities Planners International (CEFPI) seeks to lead in the effort to bolster schools…

  1. Hitting the Road: Safe Student Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labriola, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights the importance of school administrators' taking an active role in selecting motor coach carriers for their school trips. School administrators must be able to prove due diligence in selecting safe motor carriers. If not, they risk significant liability exposure for neglecting this critical responsibility. The article…

  2. Staying Safe during Exercise and Physical Activity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/Go4Life Staying Safe during Exercise and Physical Activity There’s a way for almost every older adult ... have specific health conditions, discuss your exercise and physical activity plan with your health care provider. Endurance. Listen ...

  3. How to Keep Your Baby's Slumber Safe

    MedlinePLUS

    ... bumpers. "Despite the progress we've made, some surveys show as many as half of parents do not put infants to sleep on their backs," Jones said in a Loyola news release. "It's important for physicians to take the time to emphasize safe sleeping, and parents shouldn't ...

  4. 16 CFR 312.10 - Safe harbors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safe harbors. 312.10 Section 312.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S ONLINE..., issued by representatives of the marketing or online industries, or by other persons, that, after...

  5. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J. Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  6. Campaign Safe & Sober. Youth & Generation X Planner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This packet contains information on safe and sober driving for members of Generation X. The packet includes information on "Buckle Up America! Week 1998," which was designed to encourage everyone on the road to use seat belts and child safety seats and to use them properly. It also offers a safety city brochure and multiple program materials…

  7. Going Online to Save Data Safely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsbourough, Reid

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of saving data safely. Suggestions include making backup copies of all important computer documents; frequently hitting the Ctrl-S keys to save current documents to the hard disk; periodically save a backup copy to a floppy disk; periodically saving a copy through the Internet to an offsite backup disk; and…

  8. Exploring Safely: A Guide for Elementary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Terry; Texley, Juliana

    It is very important to provide a safe learning environment for students while engaging them in investigative and observational hands-on science activities. This teacher's guide provides information on safety rules and regulations in a narrative style while discussing both self-contained classroom teachers and science specialists in the elementary…

  9. 49 CFR 230.70 - Safe condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and... of each day the locomotive is used, the steam locomotive operator shall ensure that: (1) The brakes on the steam locomotive and tender are in safe and suitable condition for service; (2) The...

  10. 49 CFR 230.70 - Safe condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and... of each day the locomotive is used, the steam locomotive operator shall ensure that: (1) The brakes on the steam locomotive and tender are in safe and suitable condition for service; (2) The...

  11. 49 CFR 230.70 - Safe condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and... of each day the locomotive is used, the steam locomotive operator shall ensure that: (1) The brakes on the steam locomotive and tender are in safe and suitable condition for service; (2) The...

  12. 49 CFR 230.70 - Safe condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and... of each day the locomotive is used, the steam locomotive operator shall ensure that: (1) The brakes on the steam locomotive and tender are in safe and suitable condition for service; (2) The...

  13. 49 CFR 230.70 - Safe condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and... of each day the locomotive is used, the steam locomotive operator shall ensure that: (1) The brakes on the steam locomotive and tender are in safe and suitable condition for service; (2) The...

  14. Disabled Children: The Right to Feel Safe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mepham, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the fundamental right of disabled children to feel safe and be free from bullying, harassment and abuse. The article proposes that, 20 years since the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, disabled children are still facing barriers to securing this right. The article focuses on recent Mencap research that…

  15. SAFE DRINKING WATER INFORMATION SYSTEM (STATE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:The Safe Drinking Water Information System (STATE) (SDWIS/STATE) is an information system OGWDW is developing for states and EPA regions to manage their water industry. SDWIS/STATE is not an information system for which EPA HQ is using to store or retrie...

  16. SAFE FOOD MULTI-YEAR PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Safe Food Research Program, developed in response to the passage of the Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA), builds on earlier research to reduce scientific uncertainty in risk assessment. Research results will provide data needed to develop refined aggregate and cumulative ri...

  17. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.

    1991-12-31

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  18. Driving Procedures. A Resource Guide for Driver Education Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Dept. of Public Safety, Austin.

    Designed to provide instructors with resource materials for driver education, this book contains mainly materials on established safe driving procedures. An introduction defines a procedure as describing ways in which a driver can comply with the law to do something extra that will increase his/her safety and prevent congestion and collision.…

  19. Media Procedures Category: Community Relations

    E-print Network

    Mucina, Ladislav

    1 Media Procedures Category: Community Relations 1. LEGISLATION/ENTERPRISE AGREEMENT view. 3. PROCEDURAL DETAILS 3.1 Commenting to the media 3.1.1 An appropriately qualified staff member may offer expert comment to the media on their work or in relation to a broader community issue

  20. Safe handling of potential peroxide forming compounds and their corresponding peroxide yielded derivatives.

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Boyle, Timothy J.; Dean, Christopher J.

    2013-06-01

    This report addresses recent developments concerning the identification and handling of potential peroxide forming (PPF) and peroxide yielded derivative (PYD) chemicals. PPF chemicals are described in terms of labeling, shelf lives, and safe handling requirements as required at SNL. The general peroxide chemistry concerning formation, prevention, and identification is cursorily presented to give some perspective to the generation of peroxides. The procedure for determining peroxide concentrations and the proper disposal methods established by the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility are also provided. Techniques such as neutralization and dilution are provided for the safe handling of any PYD chemicals to allow for safe handling. The appendices are a collection of all available SNL documentation pertaining to PPF/PYD chemicals to serve as a single reference.

  1. Safe Affordable Fission Engine-(SAFE-) 100a Heat Exchanger Thermal and Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steeve, B. E.

    2005-01-01

    A potential fission power system for in-space missions is a heat pipe-cooled reactor coupled to a Brayton cycle. In this system, a heat exchanger (HX) transfers the heat of the reactor core to the Brayton gas. The Safe Affordable Fission Engine- (SAFE-) 100a is a test program designed to thermally and hydraulically simulate a 95 Btu/s prototypic heat pipe-cooled reactor using electrical resistance heaters on the ground. This Technical Memorandum documents the thermal and structural assessment of the HX used in the SAFE-100a program.

  2. Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure (LEEP)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that acts like a scalpel (surgical knife). An electric current is passed through the loop, which cuts away ... A procedure in which an instrument works with electric current to destroy tissue. Local Anesthesia: The use of ...

  3. Safely Enabling Civilian Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Operations In Low-Altitude Airspace By Unmanned Aerial System Traffic Management (UTM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopardekar, Parimal H.

    2015-01-01

    Many UAS will operate at lower altitude (Class G, below 2000 feet)There is urgent need for a system for civilian low-altitude airspace and UAS operations. Stakeholders want to work with NASA to enable safe operations.

  4. Revised Unfilling Procedure for Solid Lithium Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Leveling, A.

    2003-06-03

    A procedure for unfilling used lithium lenses to has been described in Pbar Note 664. To date, the procedure has been used to disassemble lenses 20, 21, 17, 18, and 16. As a result of this work, some parts of the original procedure were found to be time consuming and ineffective. Modifications to the original procedure have been made to streamline the process and are discussed in this note. The revised procedure is included in this note.

  5. SAFE users manual. Volume 4. Computer programs. [Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE)

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, L.M.

    1983-06-01

    Documentation for the Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE) computer programs is presented. The documentation is in the form of subprogram trees, program abstracts, flowcharts, and listings. Listings are provided on microfiche.

  6. Development of an ultra-safe, ultra-low emissions natural gas fueled school bus: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kubesh, J.T.

    1998-03-01

    This report documents work conducted under Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Project 03-6871, ``Development of an Ultra-Safe and Low-Emission Dedicated Alternative Fuel School Bus.`` The project was sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Subcontract No. ZCF-5-13519-01. This report documents Phase 3 -- Integration and Phase 4 -- Demonstration and serves as the final report for this project. Phase 1 -- Systems Design and Phase 2 -- Prototype Hardware Development were documented in NREL publications TP-425-7609 and TP-425-2 1081, respectively. Several significant areas of work are summarized in this report. Integration of the engine technologies developed under Phase 2 into a production Deere 8.1-L, spark-ignition compressed natural gas engine is detailed, including information on the engine and control system modifications that were made. Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions results verifying the ultra-low emissions output of this engine are also included. The informal project goal of producing oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions less than or equal to 1.0 g/bhp-hr over the FTP heavy-duty engine cycle was attained. In addition, a test run that resulted in less than one half of the Ultra-Low Emissions Vehicle limit for NO{sub x} plus non-methane hydrocarbons was obtained. These results were for engine-out (no catalyst) emissions. Results using a catalyst produced very low formaldehyde emissions and virtually zero carbon monoxide and particulate matter emissions. Following these excellent results, a duplicate engine was assembled and integrated into the prototype ultra-safe school bus, the Envirobus 2000. Many of the new and modified subsystems developed during this project for the engine are considered strong candidates for inclusion into the production Deere 8.1-L gas engine in the near future.

  7. Safe delivery of optical power from space.

    PubMed

    Smith, M; Fork, R L; Cole, S

    2001-05-01

    More than a billion gigawatts of sunlight pass through the area extending from Earth out to geostationary orbit. A small fraction of this clean renewable power appears more than adequate to satisfy the projected needs of Earth, and of human exploration and development of space far into the future. Recent studies suggest safe and efficient access to this power can be achieved within 10 to 40 years. Light, enhanced in spatial and temporal coherence, as compared to natural sunlight, offers a means, and probably the only practical means, of usefully transmitting this power to Earth. We describe safety standards for satellite constellations and Earth based sites designed, respectively, to transmit, and receive this power. The spectral properties, number of satellites, and angle subtended at Earth that are required for safe delivery are identified and discussed. PMID:19417851

  8. Human cloning: can it be made safe?

    PubMed

    Rhind, Susan M; Taylor, Jane E; De Sousa, Paul A; King, Tim J; McGarry, Michelle; Wilmut, Ian

    2003-11-01

    There are continued claims of attempts to clone humans using nuclear transfer, despite the serious problems that have been encountered in cloning other mammals. It is known that epigenetic and genetic mechanisms are involved in clone failure, but we still do not know exactly how. Human reproductive cloning is unethical, but the production of cells from cloned embryos could offer many potential benefits. So, can human cloning be made safe? PMID:14634633

  9. Keeping Food Safe during an Emergency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Administrative Forms Standard Forms Skip Navigation Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H1 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... / Topics / ... Keeping Food Safe During an Emergency Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H3 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Z7_ ...

  10. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery.

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  11. Microbial ecology laboratory procedures manual NASA/MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Timothy L.

    1990-01-01

    An essential part of the efficient operation of any microbiology laboratory involved in sample analysis is a standard procedures manual. The purpose of this manual is to provide concise and well defined instructions on routine technical procedures involving sample analysis and methods for monitoring and maintaining quality control within the laboratory. Of equal importance is the safe operation of the laboratory. This manual outlines detailed procedures to be followed in the microbial ecology laboratory to assure safety, analytical control, and validity of results.

  12. POLICY: VP: HR/A/S: #/ Employment Equity and PROCEDURES

    E-print Network

    Martin, Jeff

    : Cross Reference: Respectful Working and Learning Environment Policy Respectful Working and Learning and Learning Environment Policy Respectful Working and Learning Environment Procedures responsible for the day: Approved: Revised: Cross Reference: Respectful Working and Learning Environment Policy Respectful Working

  13. Laser patterning of platinum electrodes for safe neurostimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. A.; Matteucci, P. B.; Dodds, C. W. D.; Palmer, J.; Dueck, W. F.; Hassarati, R. T.; Byrnes-Preston, P. J.; Lovell, N. H.; Suaning, G. J.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Laser surface modification of platinum (Pt) electrodes was investigated for use in neuroprosthetics. Surface modification was applied to increase the surface area of the electrode and improve its ability to transfer charge within safe electrochemical stimulation limits. Approach. Electrode arrays were laser micromachined to produce Pt electrodes with smooth surfaces, which were then modified with four laser patterning techniques to produce surface structures which were nanosecond patterned, square profile, triangular profile and roughened on the micron scale through structured laser interference patterning (SLIP). Improvements in charge transfer were shown through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and biphasic stimulation at clinically relevant levels. A new method was investigated and validated which enabled the assessment of in vivo electrochemically safe charge injection limits. Main results. All of the modified surfaces provided electrical advantage over the smooth Pt. The SLIP surface provided the greatest benefit both in vitro and in vivo, and this surface was the only type which had injection limits above the threshold for neural stimulation, at a level shown to produce a response in the feline visual cortex when using an electrode array implanted in the suprachoroidal space of the eye. This surface was found to be stable when stimulated with more than 150 million clinically relevant pulses in physiological saline. Significance. Critical to the assessment of implant devices is accurate determination of safe usage limits in an in vivo environment. Laser patterning, in particular SLIP, is a superior technique for improving the performance of implant electrodes without altering the interfacial electrode chemistry through coating. Future work will require chronic in vivo assessment of these electrode patterns.

  14. Procedures in complex systems: the airline cockpit.

    PubMed

    Degani, A; Wiener, E L

    1997-05-01

    In complex human-machine systems, successful operations depend on an elaborate set of procedures which are specified by the operational management of the organization. These procedures indicate to the human operator (in this case the pilot) the manner in which operational management intends to have various tasks done. The intent is to provide guidance to the pilots and to ensure a safe, logical, efficient, and predictable (standardized) means of carrying out the objectives of the job. However, procedures can become a hodge-podge. Inconsistent or illogical procedures may lead to noncompliance by operators. Based on a field study with three major airlines, the authors propose a model for procedure development called the "Four P's": philosophy, policies, procedures, and practices. Using this model as a framework, the authors discuss the intricate issue of designing flight-deck procedures, and propose a conceptual approach for designing any set of procedures. The various factors, both external and internal to the cockpit, that must be considered for procedure design are presented. In particular, the paper addresses the development of procedures for automated cockpits--a decade-long, and highly controversial issue in commercial aviation. Although this paper is based on airline operations, we assume that the principles discussed here are also applicable to other high-risk supervisory control systems, such as space flight, manufacturing process control, nuclear power production, and military operations. PMID:11541101

  15. Safe patient care – safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    St. Pierre, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization’s vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture (“top-down process”). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization’s maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization’s general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed “informed culture”. An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. “Incident reporting systems” are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organization’s safe surgery checklist” is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality. Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate stimulation based team trainings into their curriculum. PMID:24403977

  16. Global cancer surgery: delivering safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Richard; Alatise, Olusegun Isaac; Anderson, Benjamin O; Audisio, Riccardo; Autier, Philippe; Aggarwal, Ajay; Balch, Charles; Brennan, Murray F; Dare, Anna; D'Cruz, Anil; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Fleming, Kenneth; Gueye, Serigne Magueye; Hagander, Lars; Herrera, Cristian A; Holmer, Hampus; Ilbawi, André M; Jarnheimer, Anton; Ji, Jia-Fu; Kingham, T Peter; Liberman, Jonathan; Leather, Andrew J M; Meara, John G; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Murthy, Shilpa S; Omar, Sherif; Parham, Groesbeck P; Pramesh, C S; Riviello, Robert; Rodin, Danielle; Santini, Luiz; Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Shrime, Mark; Thomas, Robert; Tsunoda, Audrey T; van de Velde, Cornelis; Veronesi, Umberto; Vijaykumar, Dehannathparambil Kottarathil; Watters, David; Wang, Shan; Wu, Yi-Long; Zeiton, Moez; Purushotham, Arnie

    2015-09-01

    Surgery is essential for global cancer care in all resource settings. Of the 15·2 million new cases of cancer in 2015, over 80% of cases will need surgery, some several times. By 2030, we estimate that annually 45 million surgical procedures will be needed worldwide. Yet, less than 25% of patients with cancer worldwide actually get safe, affordable, or timely surgery. This Commission on global cancer surgery, building on Global Surgery 2030, has examined the state of global cancer surgery through an analysis of the burden of surgical disease and breadth of cancer surgery, economics and financing, factors for strengthening surgical systems for cancer with multiple-country studies, the research agenda, and the political factors that frame policy making in this area. We found wide equity and economic gaps in global cancer surgery. Many patients throughout the world do not have access to cancer surgery, and the failure to train more cancer surgeons and strengthen systems could result in as much as US$6·2 trillion in lost cumulative gross domestic product by 2030. Many of the key adjunct treatment modalities for cancer surgery-eg, pathology and imaging-are also inadequate. Our analysis identified substantial issues, but also highlights solutions and innovations. Issues of access, a paucity of investment in public surgical systems, low investment in research, and training and education gaps are remarkably widespread. Solutions include better regulated public systems, international partnerships, super-centralisation of surgical services, novel surgical clinical trials, and new approaches to improve quality and scale up cancer surgical systems through education and training. Our key messages are directed at many global stakeholders, but the central message is that to deliver safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery to all, surgery must be at the heart of global and national cancer control planning. PMID:26427363

  17. Conceptual Design of the Chornobyl New Safe Confinement - an Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kulishenko, Valery N.; Hogg, Charles; Schmieman, Eric A.; Wrona, Matthew W.; Convert, Philippe; Nemchinov, Yuriy I.; Shenderovich, Victor; Shcherbin, Vladimir; Belicard, Pascal; Durst, Bruce M.

    2006-05-01

    The Object Shelter, constructed over the Chornobyl nuclear power plant that was destroyed by a 1986 accident, is at risk of collapse. The Consortium of Bechtel, Electricité De France, and Battelle, in cooperation with subcontractor ???, recently completed the conceptual design for a New Safe Confinement (NSC) building to reduce Shelter corrosion, to mitigate the consequences of potential collapse, and to enable the safe deconstruction of unstable structures. The arch-shaped NSC will be constructed at a distance from the Shelter to minimize radiation exposure to construction workers, and then slid into place over the Shelter. After sliding, cranes and other tools inside the NSC will be remotely operated for deconstruction of the Shelter. The NSC is designed for a 100-year life. Bechtel designed the arch structure and was responsible for project management functions. Electricité De France designed the foundations and designed deconstruction of the Object Shelter unstable elements. Battelle performed safety analyses and environmental impact assessment. ??? (a consortium of ?I?? [KIEP], ??I?? [NIISK], and ???? [ISTC]), as a working partner in all aspects of the design and analysis processes, was the Ukrainian licensed engineer for conceptual design. The design is currently being reviewed by Ukrainian regulatory authorities. An open international tender for detailed design and construction is anticipated to be announced by the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development in December, 2003, with two-stage bid evaluation beginning in April, 2004.

  18. Patient Safety: Guide to Safe Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Near You 1-800-514-5058 Search Home Cosmetic 3D Animations Cosmetic Procedure Animations Body Lifts Arm Lift Body Contouring ... Surgeon Call Now Menu Search Search Cancel Home Cosmetic Reconstructive Articles & Videos Photo Gallery Find a Surgeon ...

  19. Safe bending of boron/aluminum sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liskay, G. G.; Yoshino, S. Y.

    1980-01-01

    Low cost procedure utilizing aluminum backing sheets protects boron/aluminum sheet from cracking during bending. Process utilizes inexpensive universal-brake bending dies rather than special hydroforming dies.

  20. Medical Marijuana Seems Safe for Chronic Pain Patients, Study Finds

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155032.html Medical Marijuana Seems Safe for Chronic Pain Patients, Study Finds ... 7, 2015 WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medical marijuana appears mostly safe for treating chronic pain, at ...

  1. 33 CFR 62.27 - Safe water marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    Safe water marks indicate that there is navigable water all around the mark. They are often used to indicate fairways or midchannels, or the seaward end of channels. Safe water marks are colored with red and white vertical...

  2. 33 CFR 62.27 - Safe water marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    Safe water marks indicate that there is navigable water all around the mark. They are often used to indicate fairways or midchannels, or the seaward end of channels. Safe water marks are colored with red and white vertical...

  3. 33 CFR 62.27 - Safe water marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    Safe water marks indicate that there is navigable water all around the mark. They are often used to indicate fairways or midchannels, or the seaward end of channels. Safe water marks are colored with red and white vertical...

  4. Medicines: Use Them Safely | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Taking Medicines Safely Medicines: Use Them Safely Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Questions To Ask Your Doctor About A New Medicine What is the name of the medicine, and ...

  5. Be Food Safe: Protect Yourself from Food Poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Be Food Safe: Protect Yourself from Food Poisoning Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Most ... had diarrhea for more than 3 days. Be Food-Safe Savvy: Know the Risks and Rules Everyone ...

  6. Traps and Treasures: How To Stay Safe and Avoid the Perils of School Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Colin A.

    2002-01-01

    Provides steps school administrators can take to ensure safe construction: stay visible, update students, separate students and construction workers, engage workers in the educational process, monitor student movement, observe construction workers, barricade work areas, watch for stored materials, check emergency exits daily, conduct fire drills,…

  7. UCSD Parents and Families -Frequently Asked Questions Q. How safe is the UC San Diego campus?

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    is the protection and safety of persons, property, and buildings on campus. For more information, you may access the annual `CLERY' crime statistic report online at http:// police.ucsd.edu . Q. Is the campus safe to walk surroundings. SARC educates students on this issue using various campaigns and work- shops. SARC also provides

  8. FYI: Infant Colic...Teenaged Mothers--17 Years Later...Celebrating Safely...and More.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Today, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Presents information about various topics, including (1) an invention, Sleep Tight, that eases colic symptoms in infants; (2) a 17-year follow-up study on teenage mothers' lives; (3) working mothers; (4) discussion of child care; (5) safe adolescent celebrations; (6) homosexuality; and (7) child abuse. (BB)

  9. Interventional MSK procedures: the hip.

    PubMed

    Dodré, Emilie; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Cockenpot, Eric; Chastanet, Patrick; Cotten, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous musculoskeletal procedures are widely accepted as low invasive, highly effective, efficient and safe methods in a vast amount of hip pathologies either in diagnostic or in therapeutic management. Hip intra-articular injections are used for the symptomatic treatment of osteoarthritis. Peritendinous or intrabursal corticosteroid injections can be used for the symptomatic treatment of greater trochanteric pain syndrome and anterior iliopsoas impingement. In past decades, the role of interventional radiology has rapidly increased in metastatic disease, thanks to the development of many ablative techniques. Image-guided percutaneous ablation of skeletal metastases provides a minimally invasive treatment option that appears to be a safe and effective palliative treatment for localized painful lytic lesion. Methods of tumour destruction based on temperature, such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and cryotherapy, are performed for the management of musculoskeletal metastases. MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery provides a non-invasive alternative to these ablative methods. Cementoplasty is now widely used for pain management and consolidation of acetabular metastases and can be combined with RFA. RFA is also used to treat benign tumours, namely osteoid osteomas. New interventional procedures such as percutaneous screw fixation are also proposed to treat non-displaced or minimally displaced acetabular roof fractures. PMID:26317896

  10. 75 FR 21151 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Revenue Procedure 2004-18

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Revenue Procedure 2004- 18 AGENCY...-18, Average Area Purchase Price Safe Harbors and Nationwide Purchase Prices under section 143. DATES...: Revenue Procedure 2004-18. Abstract: Revenue Procedure 2004-18 provides issuers of qualified...

  11. Promoting safe motherhood in rural India.

    PubMed

    Maclean, G

    1997-01-01

    This article identifies some activities performed to promote safe motherhood in rural India. Nurses from a voluntary organization in Hyderabad, India, trained women's groups from 32 villages in rural Andhra Pradesh state over 3 days in 1996 in maternal and child care, health and family welfare, gender issues, sanitation, leadership, literacy, negotiating skills, and health monitoring. The women were encouraged to perform health activities in their villages. In October 1996, a Conference of Women celebrated the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi, with women's groups reporting on health activities in specific villages. Each women's group had its own banner. Every woman wore a conference delegate badge. One woman's group was rewarded for making the most significant progress. Participants included women from 29 villages and auxiliary nurse-midwives. For some women, this was the first time away from home. Conference delegates toured the primary health center facilities at Shamirpet and met with staff. The aim was to reduce fear and reluctance to use the services and to promote awareness of available health care. Most villages in India rely on auxiliary nurse-midwives for maternal and child health care. Promotion of safe motherhood requires close cooperation between the auxiliary nurse-midwifes and women's groups. The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare of India is introducing in-service training to improve the clinical skills of auxiliary nurse-midwives in eight states. The nurse-midwives use adapted and new educational material from WHO's safe motherhood midwifery training modules. A workshop was used to introduce the new modules and to propose teaching methods for senior project staff. The five modules include a trainers' manual of educational methods. PMID:12321357

  12. Keeping sports participants safe in hot weather.

    PubMed

    Sparling, P B; Millard-Stafford, M

    1999-07-01

    Keeping in mind the key concepts of heat dissipation and using sound strategies for heat acclimatization and fluid replacement can help keep participants and spectators safe during hot-weather sports activities. Acclimatization to heat requires 10 to 14 days of training. Prudent hydration involves drinking plenty of fluid 2 hours before exercise, 5 to 10 oz of fluid every 15 minutes during exercise, and fluids with increased sodium content after exercise. A sidebar on environmental conditions and heat-related medical encounters during the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta illustrates the importance of prevention strategies at the individual and event level. PMID:20086731

  13. The Journey from Safe Yield to Sustainability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alley, W.M.; Leake, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    Safe-yield concepts historically focused attention on the economic and legal aspects of ground water development. Sustainability concerns have brought environmental aspects more to the forefront and have resulted in a more integrated outlook. Water resources sustainability is not a purely scientific concept, but rather a perspective that can frame scientific analysis. The evolving concept of sustainability presents a challenge to hydrologists to translate complex, and sometimes vague, socioeconomic and political questions into technical questions that can be quantified systematically. Hydrologists can contribute to sustainable water resources management by presenting the longer-term implications of ground water development as an integral part of their analyses.

  14. How NIF Works

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2010-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is the world's largest laser system... 192 huge laser beams in a massive building, all focused down at the last moment at a 2 millimeter ball containing frozen hydrogen gas. The goal is to achieve fusion... getting more energy out than was used to create it. It's never been done before under controlled conditions, just in nuclear weapons and in stars. We expect to do it within the next 2-3 years. The purpose is threefold: to create an almost limitless supply of safe, carbon-free, proliferation-free electricity; examine new regimes of astrophysics as well as basic science; and study the inner-workings of the U.S. stockpile of nuclear weapons to ensure they remain safe, secure and reliable without the need for underground testing. More information about NIF can be found at:

  15. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-3 - Safe harbor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Safe harbor requirements. 1.401(k)-3 Section 1.401(k)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(k)-3 Safe harbor requirements. (a) ADP test safe...

  16. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-3 - Safe harbor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Safe harbor requirements. 1.401(k)-3 Section 1.401(k)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(k)-3 Safe harbor requirements. (a) ADP test safe...

  17. EHSD 3/2008 1 MOVING YOUR OFFICE SAFELY

    E-print Network

    Knowles, David William

    EHSD 3/2008 1 MOVING YOUR OFFICE SAFELY Helpful video: http://www.lbl.gov/Workplace/CFO/cfo_ehs/MovingSafelyPartI.html http://www.lbl.gov/Workplace/CFO/cfo_ehs/MovingSafelyPartII.html Please consider the following when

  18. Safe Prime Generation with a Combined Sieve Michael J. Wiener

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Safe Prime Generation with a Combined Sieve Michael J. Wiener Cryptographic Clarity, 20 Hennepin St p and (p - 1)/2 are prime. This note describes a method of generating safe primes that is considerably faster than repeatedly generating random primes q until p = 2q + 1 is also prime. Key words. Safe

  19. Safe Prime Generation with a Combined Sieve Michael J. Wiener

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Safe Prime Generation with a Combined Sieve Michael J. Wiener Cryptographic Clarity, 20 Hennepin St p and (p 1)=2 are prime. This note describes a method of generating safe primes that is considerably faster than repeatedly generating random primes q until p = 2q + 1 is also prime. Key words. Safe primes

  20. 33 CFR 62.27 - Safe water marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safe water marks. 62.27 Section... UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.27 Safe water marks. Safe water marks indicate that there is navigable water all around the mark. They are often used to...