Science.gov

Sample records for safe work procedures

  1. Stay Safe at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print This Topic En español Stay Safe at Work Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Injuries ... need to take steps to prevent injuries at work? All types of jobs – even desk jobs – can ...

  2. Safe Haven Laws and School Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopels, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    "Safe haven" laws are designed to protect infants from being killed or otherwise harmed. This article examines the safe haven laws from the states that comprise the Midwest School Social Work Council and the variations between these laws regarding the age of the infant, where the infant can be left, who is allowed to leave the infant, whether…

  3. Working with Self-Injurious Adolescents Using the Safe Kit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article offers a guide for using the Safe Kit when working with clients who self-injure. The Safe Kit can be used as a supplement to more traditional approaches to counseling and offers clients alternatives to self-injury when they need alternatives the most. The Safe Kit works under the assumption that individuals differ in the meaning they…

  4. Working safely in gamma radiography. A training manual for industrial radiographers

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, S.A.; Peabody, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    This manual is designed for classroom training in working safely in industrial radiography using gamma sources. The purpose is to train radiographers' assistants to work safely as a qualified gamma radiographer. The contents cover the essentials of radiation, radiation protection, emergency procedures, gamma cameras, and biological effects of radiation. (ACR)

  5. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Safe work practices. 35.1350... Lead-Paint Hazard Evaluation and Hazard Reduction Activities § 35.1350 Safe work practices. (a..., in accordance with § 35.1345. A person performing this work shall be trained on hazards and either...

  6. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Safe work practices. 35.1350... Lead-Paint Hazard Evaluation and Hazard Reduction Activities § 35.1350 Safe work practices. (a..., in accordance with § 35.1345. A person performing this work shall be trained on hazards and either...

  7. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Safe work practices. 35.1350... Lead-Paint Hazard Evaluation and Hazard Reduction Activities § 35.1350 Safe work practices. (a..., in accordance with § 35.1345. A person performing this work shall be trained on hazards and either...

  8. 29 CFR 1919.77 - Safe working load increase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safe working load increase. 1919.77 Section 1919.77 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... load increase. (a) In no case shall safe working loads be increased beyond the manufacturer's...

  9. A Safe and Healthful Work Environment

    PubMed Central

    McCullagh, Marjorie C.; Berry, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Occupational health nursing focuses on promotion and restoration of health, prevention of illness and injury, protection from work-related and environmental hazards, and corporate profitability. Quality education about the relationship between work and health is critical for nurses’ success regardless of work setting, and is consistent with Healthy People 2020 goals, but is lacking or limited in some programs. This report introduces an innovative occupational health nursing curriculum for students enrolled in baccalaureate nursing programs. The process of designing and pilot testing this novel curriculum, its alignment with nursing competencies, and its format and learning activities are described. Preparing professional nurses to understand the role of the occupational health nurse and the relationship between work and health is an essential curricular consideration for contemporary nursing education. PMID:26077879

  10. 29 CFR 1919.76 - Safe working load reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safe working load reduction. 1919.76 Section 1919.76 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.76 Safe...

  11. Laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann procedure: is it safe and feasible?

    PubMed

    Lucchetta, Alessandra; De Manzini, Nicolò

    2016-03-01

    The Hartmann procedure (HP) consists of a sigmoidectomy followed by a terminal colostomy in the left iliac fossa and closure of the rectal stump. Although done as a temporary procedure, up to 74 % of patients will not have stoma reversal with subsequent negative impact on the quality of life. A literature search was performed using MEDLINE (PubMed), The Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar, and the articles from January 2000 until December 2015, edited in English, Italian and French, prospective or retrospective, were analyzed. Outcome variables included number of patients, mean age, sex, etiology of Hartmann's procedure, time interval between initial procedure and reversal procedure (in days), mean operative time (in minutes), number of patients converted to open surgery, causes of conversion, length of hospital stay, mortality, and complication rates. For the purpose of this review, only 21 studies were considered for the final analysis and a total of 681 patients were evaluated. The mean time interval between the initial procedure and the reversal (reported in 18 articles) was 181.6 days (range 95-330 days), while the mean operative time (reported in 20 articles) was 163.2 min (range 62-285). Overall, 80 patients (11.7 %) were converted to open technique. The length of hospitalization was between 3 and 12 days. The mortality rate was reported in 19 articles and was 0.7 % (5 patients). 113 patients (16.6 %) underwent post-operative complications. The HP reversal is a challenging procedure, but it can be safely performed laparoscopically providing various advantages when compared to the open technique and it should be proposed only to a selected group of patients, young and without a severe peritonitis at the first operation. PMID:27075662

  12. Introduction to working safely with large animals in containment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript examines biosafety challenges posed when conducting work with animals and zoonotic pathogens. It provides solutions for working with animals in a manner that promotes both safe and responsible research. Good safety and animal husbandry are essential for good science. Best practices w...

  13. Radiological Work Planning and Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    KURTZ, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In addition, there seems to be confusion as to what should be and what should not be included in the TWD.

  14. Diagnostic anterior chamber paracentesis in uveitis: a safe procedure?

    PubMed Central

    Van der Lelij, A.; Rothova, A.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Differentiation between infectious and non-infectious uveitis is of crucial value for accurate management of patients with uveitis. Tests performed on aqueous humour yield more relevant information than those done in serum. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the aqueous humour tap for diagnostic purposes is a safe procedure to perform in uveitis patients.
METHODS—In this retrospective study 361 patients with uveitis, who underwent a diagnostic anterior chamber paracentesis in an outpatient clinic, were investigated. 72 of the 361 patients were examined 30 minutes after the puncture. The site of the paracentesis, the depth of the anterior chamber, and cells in the anterior chamber were examined. All 361 patients were evaluated within 2 weeks after the paracentesis was performed. The final follow up period varied from 6 months to more than 3 years. The clinical data were analysed with the emphasis on the occurrence of cataract and a history of corneal infections or endophthalmitis.
RESULTS—In this series no serious side effects such as cataract, keratitis, or endophthalmitis were observed. The depth of the anterior chamber of all evaluated patients was restored after 30 minutes. In five out of 72 cases (three AIDS patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis and two patients with anterior uveitis due to herpes simplex virus) a small hyphaema was observed 30 minutes after the paracentesis took place.
CONCLUSION—Anterior chamber paracentesis appears to be a safe procedure in the hands of an experienced ophthalmologist.

 PMID:9505822

  15. Robotic surgery in Cardiology: a safe and effective procedure

    PubMed Central

    Poffo, Robinson; Toschi, Alisson Parrilha; Pope, Renato Bastos; Celullare, Alex Luiz; Benício, Anderson; Fischer, Claudio Henrique; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Teruya, Alexandre; Hatanaka, Dina Mie; Rusca, Gabriel Franzin; Makdisse, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the short and medium-term outcomes of patients undergoing robotic-assisted minimally invasive cardiac surgery. Methods: From March 2010 to March 2013, 21 patients underwent robotic-assisted cardiac surgery. The procedures performed were: mitral valve repair, mitral valve replacement, surgical correction of atrial fibrillation, surgical correction of atrial septal defect, intracardiac tumor resection, totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass surgery and pericardiectomy. Results: The mean age was 48.39±18.05 years. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 151.7±99.97 minutes, and the mean aortic cross-clamp time was 109.94±81.34 minutes. The mean duration of intubation was 7.52±15.2 hours, and 16 (76.2%) patients were extubated in the operating room immediately after the procedure. The mean length of intensive care unit stay was 1.67±1.46 days. There were no conversions to sternotomy. There was no in-hospital death or deaths during the medium-term follow-up. Patients mean follow up time was 684±346 days, ranging from 28 to 1096 days. Conclusion: Robotic-assisted cardiac surgery proved to be feasible, safe and effective and can be applied in the correction of various intra and extracardiac pathologies. PMID:24136755

  16. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Safe work practices. 35.1350 Section 35.1350 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Methods and Standards...

  17. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Safe work practices. 35.1350 Section 35.1350 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Methods and Standards for Lead-Paint Hazard Evaluation and...

  18. Living and Working Safely Around High-Voltage Power Lines.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2001-06-01

    High-voltage transmission lines can be just as safe as the electrical wiring in the homes--or just as dangerous. The crucial factor is ourselves: they must learn to behave safely around them. This booklet is a basic safety guide for those who live and work around power lines. It deals primarily with nuisance shocks due to induced voltages, and with potential electric shock hazards from contact with high-voltage lines. References on possible long-term biological effects of transmission lines are shown. In preparing this booklet, the Bonneville Power Administration has drawn on more than 50 years of experience with high-voltage transmission. BPA operates one of the world`s largest networks of long-distance, high-voltage lines. This system has more than 400 substations and about 15,000 miles of transmission lines, almost 4,400 miles of which are operated at 500,000 volts.

  19. Sociotechnical attributes of safe and unsafe work systems

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Brian M.; Hettinger, Lawrence J.; DeJoy, David M.; Huang, Yuang-Hsiang; Love, Peter E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and practical approaches to safety based on sociotechnical systems principles place heavy emphasis on the intersections between social–organisational and technical–work process factors. Within this perspective, work system design emphasises factors such as the joint optimisation of social and technical processes, a focus on reliable human–system performance and safety metrics as design and analysis criteria, the maintenance of a realistic and consistent set of safety objectives and policies, and regular access to the expertise and input of workers. We discuss three current approaches to the analysis and design of complex sociotechnical systems: human–systems integration, macroergonomics and safety climate. Each approach emphasises key sociotechnical systems themes, and each prescribes a more holistic perspective on work systems than do traditional theories and methods. We contrast these perspectives with historical precedents such as system safety and traditional human factors and ergonomics, and describe potential future directions for their application in research and practice. Practitioner Summary: The identification of factors that can reliably distinguish between safe and unsafe work systems is an important concern for ergonomists and other safety professionals. This paper presents a variety of sociotechnical systems perspectives on intersections between social–organisational and technology–work process factors as they impact work system analysis, design and operation. PMID:25909756

  20. Adoption of Sun Safe Work Place Practices by Local Governments

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Allan; Andersen, Peter A.; Buller, David B.; Walkosz, Barbara; Lui, Lucia; Buller, Mary; Scott, Michael D.; Jenkins, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Context Outdoor workers are especially susceptible to skin cancer, the most common, but also one of the most preventable, forms of cancer. Colorado, the location of the study, has the second highest rate of skin cancer deaths in the nation. Objective Local government managers in Colorado—in municipalities, counties and special districts—were surveyed in order to ascertain the extent to which they engage in formal (written) and informal practices to protect their outdoor workers against excessive exposure to sun. Design The survey consisted of 51 question assessing awareness of formal or informal practices for sun protection of outdoor workers. An index of practices--the study's dependent variable--was created that was comprised or practices such as providing employees free or reduced-cost sunscreen, wide-brimmed hats, sunglasses, long-sleeved work shirts, long work pants, and temporary or permanent outdoor shade shelters. Proscriptive policies, such as restricting the use of broad brimmed hats, were subtracted from the index. Surveys were completed by 825 administrators representing 98 jurisdictions. Responses from administrators in the same jurisdiction were averaged. Results Over 40 percent of responding jurisdictions indicated that they engaged in informal sun safety practices. Tests conducted to determine what variables might account for the adoption of these sun protection practices found that the degree to which a community could be regarded as cosmopolite and as having an individualistic political culture were significant predictors. Type of government was also significant. Although, higher community income was a significant predictor, neither local government budget nor size was significant. Conclusions The adoption of sun safe practices bears low costs with potentially high returns. Findings from this study suggest that awareness campaigns might most effectively target cosmopolite communities, but that the greatest impact might be achieved by targeting

  1. 21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or... Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded... for the reclassification of all biological products that have been classified into Category IIIA....

  2. 21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or... Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded... for the reclassification of all biological products that have been classified into Category IIIA....

  3. 21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or... Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded... for the reclassification of all biological products that have been classified into Category IIIA....

  4. 21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or... Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded... for the reclassification of all biological products that have been classified into Category IIIA....

  5. 21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or... Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded... for the reclassification of all biological products that have been classified into Category IIIA....

  6. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  7. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  8. Working safely with robot workers: Recommendations for the new workplace.

    PubMed

    Murashov, Vladimir; Hearl, Frank; Howard, John

    2016-01-01

    The increasing use of robots in performing tasks alongside or together with human co-workers raises novel occupational safety and health issues. The new 21st century workplace will be one in which occupational robotics plays an increasing role. This article describes the increasing complexity of robots and proposes a number of recommendations for the practice of safe occupational robotics. PMID:26554511

  9. 75 FR 70557 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Draft Policies and Procedures for Screening Safe Drinking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ...This document describes EPA's draft policies and procedures for requiring Tier 1 screening under the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) of substances for which EPA may issue testing orders pursuant to section 1457 of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) and section 408(p) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA). FFDCA section 408(p) directed EPA to develop a chemical......

  10. Microcosm procedure for determining safe levels of chemical exposure in shallow-water communities

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a method for determining safe levels of chemical exposure in shallow-water communities, using laboratory microcosms as test subjects. The safe level is considered to be the maximum exposure that causes no persistent, ecologically significant changes in the ecosystem. In experiments completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, microcosm-derived estimates of safe exposure levels were confirmed using outdoor artificial ponds, which suggests that the microcosm procedure can be an efficient and economical means of determining safe levels for shallow-water communities. Details of microcosm construction, techniques for monitoring ecological variables in microcosms, and an experimental design for determining safe exposure levels are provided here. The microcosms are assembled by transferring components of natural ecosystems to 80-litre aquaria in a controlled laboratory environment. The communities that develop in these systems are typically dominated by common, cosmopolitan littoral species of macrophytes, algae, and invertebrates. Methods are described for measuring changes in water chemistry, phytoplankton, periphyton, macrophytes, zooplankton, and ecosystem production and respiration. By monitoring these variables over a gradient of pollutant exposure levels, the safe level can be determined accurately and precisely. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  11. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  12. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  13. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  14. Making policy and procedure systems work effectively.

    PubMed

    Virani, T

    1996-01-01

    Policy and procedure manuals can be cumbersome to keep current and updated. One approach to meet this challenge is by implementing a decentralized system to develop, review, revise and approve policies and procedures. Mechanisms to operationalize such a system involve sharing of responsibility and accountability of specified policies and procedures by various existing committees and development of coordinating systems and support mechanisms. Other key attributes of a decentralized system included collaboration and extensive communication strategies. PMID:8695607

  15. Authentication Procedures - The Procedures and Integration Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Bratcher, Leigh; Gosnell, Tom; Langner, Diana; MacArthur, D.; Mihalczo, John T.; Pura, Carolyn; Riedy, Alex; Rexroth, Paul; Scott, Mary; Springarn, Jay

    2001-05-31

    Authentication is how we establish trust in monitoring systems and measurements to verify compliance with, for example, the storage of nuclear weapons material. Authentication helps assure the monitoring party that accurate and reliable information is provided by any measurement system and that any irregularities are detected. The U.S. is developing its point of view on the procedures for authentication of monitoring systems now planned or contemplated for arms reduction and control applications. The authentication of a system utilizes a set of approaches, including: functional testing using trusted calibration sources, evaluation of documentation, evaluation of software, evaluation of hardware, random selection of hardware and software, tamper-indicating devices, and operational procedures. Authentication of measurement systems should occur throughout their lifecycles, starting with the elements of design, and moving to off-site authentication, on-siste authentication, and continuing with authentication following repair. The most important of these is the initial design of systems. Hardware and software design criteria and procurement decisions can make future authentication relatively straightforward or conversely very difficult. Facility decisions can likewise ease the procedures for authentication since reliable and effective monitoring systems and tampering indicating devices can help provide the assurance needed in the integrity of such items as measurement systems, spare equipment, and reference sources. This paper will summarize the results of the U.S. Authentication Task Force discussion on the role of procedures in authentication.

  16. [Bioethical procedure: judicial experience, working of committees].

    PubMed

    Michaud, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Is it possible to speak of procedure in bioethics? The answer ought to be negative if one had to express an opinion on procedure in ethics. What could be more contradictory than a notion of philosophical colour asserted and a group of rules guaranteeing the effective realisation of an objective? That is where the prefix "bio" helps to avoid the difficulty. By using it, it is no longer a question exclusively of ethics, but of ethics applied to life sciences. From this angle it is not unjustified to accept some procedure. We shall see that in France there has been no reluctance to do this. PMID:17902322

  17. No matter how large or how small, oilwell servicing firms work safely

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle, D.

    1995-07-01

    In working safely, the size of the company doesn`t matter as much as the dedication of the people in maintaining a safe workplace. Poe Servicing Inc. of Oberlin, Kan., earned the 1994 Association of Oilwell Servicing Contractors (AOSC) gold safety award for smaller companies that put in 10,000 to 50,000 man-hours of work. AOSC`s group one. The employees watch out for each other, and they use common sense. The common sense part of the program means the company knows new people are most susceptible to accidents, so they send them out to observe before putting them to work.

  18. Management Procedures for Anticipated Work Stoppages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Matthew R.; And Others

    This document is a guide for school administrators in New York State in preparation for a district strike plan. The forms provided in the appendix may be reproduced for use within the school district. Information on strike management procedures are provided for superintendents and principals, including such topics as legal measures to take,…

  19. Adult bipolar diathermy circumcision and related procedures in adults – a safe and efficient technique

    PubMed Central

    Nalavenkata, Sunny; Winter, Matthew; Kour, Rachel; Kour, Nam-Wee; Ruljancich, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To present our novel technique and step-by-step approach to bipolar diathermy circumcision and related procedures in adult males. Methods We reviewed our technique of bipolar circumcision and related procedures in 54 cases over a 22-month period at our day procedure center. Bipolar diathermy cutting and hemostasis was performed using bipolar forceps with a Valleylab machine set at 15. Sleeve circumcision was used. A dorsal slit was made, followed by frenulum release and ventral slit, and was completed with bilateral circumferential cutting. Frenuloplasties released the frenulum. Preputioplasties used multiple 2–3 mm longitudinal cuts to release the constriction, with frenulum left intact. All wounds were closed with interrupted 4/0 Vicryl Rapide™. Results A total of 54 nonemergency bipolar circumcision procedures were carried out from November 2010–August 2012 (42 circumcisions, eight frenuloplasties, and four preputioplasties). Patients were aged 18–72 years (mean, 34 years). There was minimal to no intraoperative bleeding in all cases, allowing for precise dissection. All patients were requested to attend outpatient reviews; three frenuloplasty and two circumcision patients failed to return. Of the remaining 49, mean interval to review was 49 days, with a range of 9–121 days. Two circumcision patients reported mild bleeding with nocturnal erections within a week postoperatively, but they did not require medical attention. Two others presented to family practitioners with possible wound infections which resolved with oral antibiotics. All 49 patients had well-healed wounds. Conclusion The bipolar diathermy technique is a simple procedure, easily taught, and reproducible. It is associated with minimal bleeding, is safe and efficient, uses routine operating equipment and is universally applicable to circumcision/frenuloplasty/preputioplasty. In addition, it has minimal postoperative complications, and has associated excellent cosmesis. PMID

  20. Local anesthesia and minilaparotomy: a safe procedure for tubal occlusion in women with severe health problems.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Sánchez, V; Bonilla, C; Reyes, A; Valero, A; Domenzáin, M; Pérez-Palacios, G

    1987-08-01

    From 1982 to 1986, 79 women with severe health problems underwent tubal occlusion by minilaparotomy using local anesthesia and intravenous sedation as a permanent method of fertility regulation. All the patients reported herein were classified as "high risk" population for a surgical procedure due to the following medical reasons: cardiovascular (30.2%); diabetes mellitus (25.3%); thyroid disease (18.9%); adrenal dysfunction (11.3%); kidney transplantation (6.3%); severe hypertension (3.7%); and pulmonary problems (3.7%). The procedure morbidity was 3.7% and the mortality 0%. The follow-up rate at 1 year was 86% and no pregnancies or complications of the primary disease due to the surgical procedure have been reported. It was concluded that tubal ligation by minilaparotomy performed by well-trained staff and with back-up hospital services on an out-patient basis is a safe and effective method of family planning in patients considered as a "high risk" population. Post-doctoral research fellows in Reproductive Biology. PMID:3427966

  1. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  2. 29 CFR 1919.29 - Limitations on safe working loads and proof loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Limitations on safe working loads and proof loads. 1919.29 Section 1919.29 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels: Tests and Proof Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons...

  3. 29 CFR 1919.29 - Limitations on safe working loads and proof loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Limitations on safe working loads and proof loads. 1919.29 Section 1919.29 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels: Tests and...

  4. Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection: Recent technical advances for safe and successful procedures

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Katsumi; Michida, Tomoki; Nishida, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Shiro; Naito, Masafumi; Ito, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is very useful in en bloc resection of large superficial colorectal tumors but is a technically difficult procedure because the colonic wall is thin and endoscopic maneuverability is poor because of colonic flexure and extensibility. A high risk of perforation has been reported in colorectal ESD. To prevent complications such as perforation and unexpected bleeding, it is crucial to ensure good visualization of the submucosal layer by creating a mucosal flap, which is an exfoliated mucosa for inserting the tip of the endoscope under it. The creation of a mucosal flap is often technically difficult; however, various types of equipment, appropriate strategy, and novel procedures including our clip-flap method, appear to facilitate mucosal flap creation, improving the safety and success rate of ESD. Favorable treatment outcomes with colorectal ESD have already been reported in many advanced institutions, and appropriate understanding of techniques and development of training systems are required for world-wide standardization of colorectal ESD. Here, we describe recent technical advances for safe and successful colorectal ESD. PMID:26468335

  5. SUNRAYCE 1993: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dephillips, M. P.; Moskowitz, P. D.; Fthenakis, V. M.

    1992-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring SUNRAYCE 93 to advance tile technology and use of photovoltaics and electric vehicles. Participants will use cars powered by photovoltaic modules and lead-acid storage batteries. This brochure, prepared for students and faculty participating in this race, outlines the health hazards presented by these electrical systems and gives guidance on strategies for their safe usage. At the outset, it should be noted that working with photovoltaic systems and batteries requires electric vehicle drivers and technicians to have 'hands-on' contact with the car on a daily basis. It is important that no one work near a photovoltaic energy system or battery, either in a vehicle or on the bench, unless they familiarize themselves with the components in use and know and observe safe work practices including the safety precautions described in the manuals provided by the various equipment vendors and this document.

  6. SUNRAYCE 93: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems

    SciTech Connect

    DePhillips, M.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-11-03

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring SUNRAYCE 93 to advance tile technology and use of photovoltaics and electric vehicles. Participants will use cars powered by photovoltaic modules and lead-acid storage batteries. This brochure, prepared for students and faculty participating in this race, outlines the health hazards presented by these electrical systems, and gives guidance on strategies for their safe usage. At the outset, it should be noted that working with photovoltaic systems and batteries requires electric vehicle drivers and technicians to have {open_quotes}hands-on{close_quotes} contact with the car on a daily basis. It is important that no one work near a photovoltaic energy system or battery, either in a vehicle or on the bench, unless they familiarize themselves with the components in use, and know and observe safe work practices including the safety precautions described in the manuals provided by the various equipment vendors and this document.

  7. Minimally invasive valve sparing aortic root replacement (David procedure) is safe

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Heike; Umminger, Julia; Koigeldiyev, Nurbol; Beckmann, Erik; Haverich, Axel; Martens, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Objective Even though minimally invasive cardiac surgery may reduce morbidity, this approach is not routinely performed for aortic root replacements. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the safety and feasibility of valve sparing aortic root replacement via an upper mini-sternotomy up to the 3rd intercostal space. Methods Between April 2011 and March 2014, 26 patients (22 males, age 47.6±13 years) underwent elective minimally invasive aortic valve sparing root replacement (David procedure, group A). Twelve patients underwent additional leaflet repair. Concomitant procedures were: four proximal aortic arch replacements and one coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) to the proximal right coronary artery (RCA). During the same time period, 14 patients (ten males, age 64.2±9.5 years) underwent elective David procedure via median full sternotomy (group B). Concomitant procedures included six proximal aortic arch replacements. Although the patient cohorts were small, the results of these two groups were compared. Results In group A, there were no intra-operative conversions to full sternotomy. The aortic cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) times were 115.6±30.3 and 175.8±41.9 min, respectively. One patient was re-opened (via same access) due to post-operative bleeding. The post-operative ventilation time and hospital stay were 0.5±0.3 and 10.4±6.8 days, respectively. There was no 30-day mortality. The patient questionnaire showed that the convalescence time was approximately two weeks. In group B: the cross-clamp and CPB times were 114.1±19.9 and 163.0±24.5 min, respectively. One patient was re-opened (7.1%) due to post-operative bleeding. The post-operative ventilation time and hospital stay were 0.6±0.7 and 14.2±16.7 days, respectively. There was no 30-day mortality. Conclusions Minimally invasive valve sparing aortic root replacement can be safely performed in selected patients. The results are comparable to those operated via a full

  8. Tibial tubercle osteotomy in primary total knee arthroplasty: a safe procedure or not?

    PubMed

    Piedade, Sérgio Rocha; Pinaroli, Alban; Servien, Elvire; Neyret, Philippe

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of tibial tubercle osteotomy on postoperative outcome, intra- and postoperative complications, as well as postoperative clinical results and failures in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In a continuous, consecutive series of 1474 primary TKA, we analysed 126 cases where a tibial tubercle osteotomy approach was performed and 1348 cases without tibial tubercle osteotomy. Before surgery, all patients underwent a systematic assessment that included a clinical examination, radiographs (stress hip-knee-ankle film [pangonogram], weight bearing, anteroposterior knee view, schuss view, profile and patellar axial view at 30 degrees, stress valgus and varus view) and International Knee Society scores. When analysing intraoperative complications, tibial plateau fissures or fractures and tibial tubercle fracture were considered as complications relating to the tibial tubercle osteotomy group (p<0.001, p=0.007). With a 2-year minimum follow-up, there was no statistical difference in the number of revisions carried out in the two study groups (p=0.084). However, postoperative tibial tubercle fracture and skin necrosis were significantly related to the osteotomy (p=0.001 and psafe procedure in primary TKA as it is associated with local complications, particularly skin necrosis and fracture of the tibial tubercle. Therefore, tibial tubercle osteotomy should be performed only when necessary, i.e. in cases where there are difficulties gaining adequate surgical exposure, ligament balance and correct implant positioning. The procedure also demands considerable surgical experience to achieve a good outcome. PMID:18771928

  9. 76 FR 37014 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... expedited methods approval action for determining dalapon in drinking water (75 FR 32295, June 8, 2010... the Safe Drinking Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures. 75 FR 32295. June 8, 2010. List of... and Alkaline Earth Cations and Ammonium in Water and Wastewater by Ion Chromatography....

  10. Operational and Medical Procedures for a Declared Contingency Shuttle (CSCS) Shuttle Mission Due to a Failure that Precludes a Safe Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Adrien; Patlach, Bob; Duchense, Ted; Chandler, Mike; Stepaniak, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    This poster paper outlines the operational and medical procedures for a shuttle mission that has a failure that precludes a safe return to Earth. Information about the assumptions, procedures and limiting consumables is included.

  11. CEL Working procedures for WRAP 2A formulation development test

    SciTech Connect

    Duchsherer, M.J.

    1994-08-02

    The WRAP 2A facility will encapsulate retrieved, stored, and newly generated contact-handled mixed low level waste (MLLW) into 55-500 gal cementitous forms. Standardized test procedures will be required to facilitate this process. Cementitous specimens will be prepared from simulated drum wastes and will be tested in the Chemical Engineering Laboratory using the laboratory operating/working procedures encorporated into this document.

  12. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  13. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  14. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  15. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  16. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  17. Safe Schools, Safe Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Julie E.; Pickett, Dean; Pulliam, Janet L.; Schwartz, Richard A.; St. Germaine, Anne-Marie; Underwood, Julie; Worona, Jay

    Schools must work together with agencies, groups, and individuals to eliminate the forces leading children to violence. Chapter 1, "School Safety: Working Together to Keep Schools Safe," stresses the importance of community collaboration in violence prevention. Effective prevention requires sharing information about students, consistent with…

  18. Coordinated Study Individual Interview Procedures. Working Paper No. 290.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cookson, Connie; Moser, James M.

    This paper describes the various procedures associated with the individual interviews that are part of the data gathering processes of the Coordinated Study being carried out by the Mathematics Work Group of the Wisconsin Research and Development Center for Individualized Schooling. The first major section describes the six basic verbal addition…

  19. Metabolic energy costs of USAF Explosive Ordnance Disposal render-safe procedures: Field determinations. Interim report, 1 Jun-1 Dec 87

    SciTech Connect

    Kroch, L.P.

    1991-05-01

    The primary mission of the USAF Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) technicians is to render safe munition--conventional chemical, biological or nuclears--that pose a safety hazard during peacetime as well as wartime. The physical work is quite varied; a specific task may require only a few minutes with minimal physical effort, or may require many hours and be very physically demanding. This study measured the metabolic requirements of two EOD teams performing separate typical render safe procedures (RSO) on a chemical bomb. Data show the average work rate was between 0.68 and 0.80 liters of 02 per min for both RSP operations. This work requirement is considered moderate-to-hard, however, the EOD technician should be capable of performing this type of work on an extended daily basis without accumulating fatigue, provided there are no other external stresses. The extended duration and acute dexterity, both mental and physical, required for successful completion of an RSP operation add a unique and intangible level of difficulty to the metabolic requirements. The data from the present study represents an estimation of the energy required to perform a typical chemical operation RSP and should be useful in making management decisions regarding work tolerance for EOD technicians.

  20. NASA Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu; Corbin, Barbara J.; Sulzman, Frank M.; Krenek, Sam

    2007-01-01

    In space, astronauts are constantly bombarded with energetic particles. The goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Agency and the NASA Space Radiation Project is to ensure that astronauts can safely live and work in the space radiation environment. The space radiation environment poses both acute and chronic risks to crew health and safety, but unlike some other aspects of space travel, space radiation exposure has clinically relevant implications for the lifetime of the crew. Among the identified radiation risks are cancer, acute and late CNS damage, chronic and degenerative tissue decease, and acute radiation syndrome. The term "safely" means that risks are sufficiently understood such that acceptable limits on mission, post-mission and multi-mission consequences can be defined. The NASA Space Radiation Project strategy has several elements. The first element is to use a peer-reviewed research program to increase our mechanistic knowledge and genetic capabilities to develop tools for individual risk projection, thereby reducing our dependency on epidemiological data and population-based risk assessment. The second element is to use the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory to provide a ground-based facility to study the health effects/mechanisms of damage from space radiation exposure and the development and validation of biological models of risk, as well as methods for extrapolation to human risk. The third element is a risk modeling effort that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting the identified radiation risks. To understand the biological basis for risk, we must also understand the physical aspects of the crew environment. Thus, the fourth element develops computer algorithms to predict radiation transport properties, evaluate integrated shielding technologies and provide design optimization recommendations for the design of human space systems. Understanding the risks and determining

  1. A Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbin, Barbara J.; Sulzman, Frank M.; Krenek, Sam

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Agency and the Space Radiation Project is to ensure that astronauts can safely live and work in the space radiation environment. The space radiation environment poses both acute and chronic risks to crew health and safety, but unlike some other aspects of space travel, space radiation exposure has clinically relevant implications for the lifetime of the crew. The term safely means that risks are sufficiently understood such that acceptable limits on mission, post-mission and multi-mission consequences (for example, excess lifetime fatal cancer risk) can be defined. The Space Radiation Project strategy has several elements. The first element is to use a peer-reviewed research program to increase our mechanistic knowledge and genetic capabilities to develop tools for individual risk projection, thereby reducing our dependency on epidemiological data and population-based risk assessment. The second element is to use the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory to provide a ground-based facility to study the understanding of health effects/mechanisms of damage from space radiation exposure and the development and validation of biological models of risk, as well as methods for extrapolation to human risk. The third element is a risk modeling effort that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system damage, degenerative tissue disease, and acute radiation effects. To understand the biological basis for risk, we must also understand the physical aspects of the crew environment. Thus the fourth element develops computer codes to predict radiation transport properties, evaluate integrated shielding technologies and provide design optimization recommendations for the design of human space systems. Understanding the risks and determining methods to mitigate the risks are keys to a successful radiation protection strategy.

  2. Construction and maintenance procedure recommendations for proposed federal guidelines of safe havens for vehicles carrying Class A or Class B explosives

    SciTech Connect

    1985-02-10

    This document focuses on the design, construction, and maintenance of commercial safe havens operated by truck stops. In the context of this document, the term `safe haven` describes a designated area for parking motor vehicles transporting Class A or Class B explosives. Its objective is to inculcate acceptable construction practices and maintenance procedures in the organization of commercial safe havens in order to insure public safety.

  3. Transplantation of Human Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Non-Immunosuppressed GRMD Dogs is a Safe Procedure.

    PubMed

    Pelatti, M V; Gomes, J P A; Vieira, N M S; Cangussu, E; Landini, V; Andrade, T; Sartori, M; Petrus, L; Zatz, Mayana

    2016-08-01

    The possibility to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a lethal X-linked disorder, through cell therapy with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been widely investigated in different animal models. However, some crucial questions need to be addressed before starting human therapeutic trials, particularly regarding its use for genetic disorders. How safe is the procedure? Are there any side effects following mesenchymal stem cell transplantation? To address these questions for DMD the best model is the golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog (GRMD), which is the closest model to the human condition displaying a much longer lifespan than other models. Here we report the follow-up of 5 GRMD dogs, which were repeatedly transplanted with human adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hASC), derived from different donors. Xenogeneic cell transplantation, which was done without immunosuppression, was well tolerated in all animals with no apparent long-term adverse effect. In the present study, we show that repeated heterologous stem-cell injection is a safe procedure, which is fundamental before starting human clinical trials. PMID:27193781

  4. Video-assisted thoracic surgery for pulmonary sequestration: a safe alternative procedure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu-Ming; Cao, Jin-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary sequestration (PS), a rare congenital anatomic anomaly of the lung, is usually treated through resection by a conventional thoracotomy procedure. The efficacy and safety of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) in PS treatment has seldom been evaluated. To address this research gap, we assessed the efficacy and safety of VATS in the treatment of PS in a large Chinese cohort. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 58 patients with PS who had undergone surgical resection in our department between January 2003 and April 2014. Of these patients, 42 (72.4%) underwent thoracotomy, and 16 (27.6%) underwent attempted VATS resection. Clinical and demographic data, including patients’ age, sex, complaints, sequestration characteristics, approach and procedures, operative time, resection range, blood loss, drainage volume, chest tube duration, hospital stay, and complications were collected, in addition to short-term follow-up data. Results Of the 58 participating patients, 55 accepted anatomic lobectomy, 2 accepted wedge resection, and 1 accepted left lower lobectomy combined with lingular segmentectomy. All lesions were located in the lower lobe, with 1–4 aberrant arteries, except one right upper lobe sequestration. Three cases (18.8%) in the VATS group were converted to thoracotomy because of dense adhesion (n=1), hilar fusion (n=1), or bleeding (n=1). No significant differences in operative time, postoperative hospital stay, or perioperative complications were observed between the VATS and thoracotomy groups, although the VATS patients had less blood loss (P=0.032), a greater drainage volume (P=0.001), and a longer chest tube duration (P=0.001) than their thoracotomy counterparts. Conclusions VATS is a viable alternative procedure for PS in some patients. Simple sequestration without a thoracic cavity or hilum adhesion is a good indication for VATS resection, particularly for VATS anatomic lobectomy. Thoracic cavity and hilum adhesion remain a

  5. The laparoscopic hiatoplasty with antireflux surgery is a safe and effective procedure to repair giant hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although minimally invasive repair of giant hiatal hernias is a very surgical challenge which requires advanced laparoscopic learning curve, several reports showed that is a safe and effective procedure, with lower morbidity than open approach. In the present study we show the outcomes of 13 patients who underwent a laparoscopic repair of giant hiatal hernia. Methods A total of 13 patients underwent laparoscopic posterior hiatoplasty and Nissen fundoplication. Follow-up evaluation was done clinically at intervals of 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery using the Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Health-Related Quality of Life scale, a barium swallow study, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, an oesophageal manometry, a combined ambulatory 24-h multichannel impedance pH and bilirubin monitoring. Anatomic recurrence was defined as any evidence of gastric herniation above the diaphragmatic edge. Results There were no intraoperative complications and no conversions to open technique. Symptomatic GORD-HQL outcomes demonstrated a statistical significant decrease of mean value equal to 3.2 compare to 37.4 of preoperative assessment (p < 0.0001). Combined 24-h multichannel impedance pH and bilirubin monitoring after 12 months did not show any evidence of pathological acid or non acid reflux. Conclusion All patients were satisfied of procedure and no hernia recurrence was recorded in the study group, treated respecting several crucial surgical principles, e.g., complete sac excision, appropriate crural closure, also with direct hiatal defect where possible, and routine use of antireflux procedure. PMID:24401085

  6. Safe Spaces, Support, Social Capital: A Critical Analysis of Artists Working with Vulnerable Young People in Educational Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellman, Edward

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a critical and thematic analysis of three research projects involving artists working with vulnerable young people in educational contexts. It argues that artists create safe spaces in contrast to traditional educational activities but it will also raise questions about what constitutes such a space for participants. It will…

  7. Working from the Inside Out: A Case Study of Mackay Safe Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Dale; Gunning, Colleen; Rose, Judy; McFarlane, Kathryn; Franklin, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Mackay Whitsunday Safe Community (MWSC) was established in 2000 in response to high rates of injury observed in the region. MWSC assumed an ecological perspective, incorporating targeted safety promotion campaigns reinforced by supportive environments and policy. By involving the community in finding its own solutions, MWSC attempted to catalyze…

  8. Safety on the Job. Some Guidelines for Working Safely. Instructor's Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This teacher's guide was developed to help teachers (especially in Oklahoma) promote safe practices on the job. As a supplement to existing programs in the requirements for job safety, this book can also promote same basic safety attitudes and help support basic safety concepts, with an emphasis on accident prevention. The guide contains eight…

  9. [Are disinfectant residues remained after cleaning hemodialysis machine procedure safe for patients?].

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Małgorzata; Grzeszczuk, Karolina; Walski, Tomasz; Suder, Marek; Komorowska, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    The dialysis machine shall be cleaned and disinfected after each patient treatment or after every 72 hours break in working. An acceptable disinfectants such as Puristeril plus or Puristeril 340, Citrosteril, Diasteril and Sporotal are used for decontamination. Puristeril 340 is designed for cold disinfection and due to the low pH value, the necessary decalcification of hemodialysis machines is easily achieved. It can be used for all haemodialysis systems like hemodialysis machines, water treatment devices and circuit pipes. Diluted Puristeril decomposes in a non-toxic way. Degradation products of peracetic acid, which is main component of Puristeril are: hydrogen peroxide and acetic acid. Peracetic acid is widely used for disinfection due to its exceptionally broad spectrum of microbiocidal activity at low concentrations and short exposure times. After use Puristeril is easily removable by rinsing with water. This paper deals with the effect of the Puristeril toxicity on blood as a function of its concentration and incubation time. Concentration range of 3.5-70 ppm was used, with particular emphasis on concentrations close to 5 ppm, a value is the limit of sensitivity of strips of starch potassium iodide, the tests for detection of peracetic acid. There was a strong increase in autohaemolysis and malondialdehyde concentrations with increasing concentration of Puristeril. There were also changes in dependence on the parameters of the incubation time, with the greatest effects obtained after 2 hours incubation with Puristeril. The detection limit of peracetic acid used strips of starch potassium iodide does not guarantee the safety of a patient undergoing hemodialysis. Even the residual concentration of Puristeril plus cause increased lipid peroxidation of membrane, and therefore suggest the routine use of stripes on the lower limit of detection of peracetic acid or implement measurement of hydrogen peroxide residues performed with sensitivity 1 ppm. PMID:24003659

  10. Cairo work schedule, procedures outlined in letter to governments.

    PubMed

    1994-06-01

    A brief description of key points of a May 25, 1994, letter from Dr. Nafis Sadik to countries participating in the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) was provided. The letter indicated the draft provisional rules of procedure for the ICPD and included some comments and suggestions. The UN General Assembly resolution 47/176 stipulated that the head of each delegation should be a government minister or higher public official. Heads of State and Foreign Ministers were asked to provide the names of each delegate well in advance of the ICPD and to submit credentials at least a week beforehand. On August 25, 1994, delegates will be formally registered on site. Dr. Sadik strongly urged that delegations be gender-balanced and include representatives of nongovernmental organizations, various sectors, and national groups involved with population and development strategies. The traditional agenda includes preliminary meetings on September 3 and 4 for discussion of procedural and organizational issues. The provisional agenda includes opening remarks, election of the president, adoption of rules of procedure, adoption of the agenda, election of other officers, organization of work, credentials of representatives to the ICPD, experiences in population and development strategies, Programme of Action of the ICPD, and adoption of the report of the ICPD. The general debate will be conducted during plenary sessions from September 5-9, with a focus on item 8 of the provisional agenda. The Main Committee will meet concurrently to complete negotiations on the Programme of Action (item 9), and then submit its report to the plenary. The report adopted at the ICPD will be submitted to the UN General Assembly one week after the conference ends. The draft Programme of Action was a result of PrepCom III deliberations among the delegations and countries represented. Dr. Sadik expects the Egyptian President and the UN Secretary General to address the plenary

  11. 21 CFR 601.25 - Review procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or suggested... determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or suggested conditions of use. For purposes of reviewing biological products that have...

  12. 21 CFR 601.25 - Review procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or suggested... determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or suggested conditions of use. For purposes of reviewing biological products that have...

  13. 21 CFR 601.25 - Review procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or suggested... determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or suggested conditions of use. For purposes of reviewing biological products that have...

  14. 21 CFR 601.25 - Review procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or suggested... determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or suggested conditions of use. For purposes of reviewing biological products that have...

  15. 21 CFR 601.25 - Review procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or suggested... determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or suggested conditions of use. For purposes of reviewing biological products that have...

  16. 21 CFR 330.14 - Additional criteria and procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective and not misbranded. 330.14 Section 330.14 Food... HUMAN USE OVER-THE-COUNTER (OTC) HUMAN DRUGS WHICH ARE GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE AND... OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective and not misbranded. (a) Introduction....

  17. Methods to produce and safely work with large numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts and bradyzoite cysts

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, H.; Barr, B.; Packham, A.; Melli, A.; Conrad, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    for oocyst studies. Given the potential risks of working with live oocysts in the laboratory, we also tested a method of oocyst inactivation by freeze-thaw treatment. This procedure proved to completely inactivate oocysts without evidence of significant alteration of the oocyst molecular integrity. PMID:22037023

  18. Is Stapled Hemorrhoidectomy a Safe Procedure for Third and Fourth Grade Hemorrhoids? An Experience at Civil Hospital Karachi.

    PubMed

    Bota, Rafaqat; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Aziz, Adnan

    2015-12-01

    Hemorrhoids are amongst the most frequent anorectal conditions affecting approximately 4-36 % of the general population. The study was carried out to assess the clinical consequences of stapled hemorrhoidectomy comparing results with other published literature regarding postoperative pain, bleeding, incontinence, and other complications. A total of 120 patients were included in this study with symptomatic grade 3 or 4 prolapsed hemorrhoids, who underwent stapled hemorrhoidectomy from January 2006 to January 2012 at the Civil Hospital Karachi, Pakistan. In 92 patients (76.6 %), proctological examination showed grade 3 hemorrhoids. Fourth degree hemorrhoids were found in 28 cases (23.4 %). Hospitalization time ranged between 1 and 3 days (median time was 34 h). Seventy-eight patients were discharged on the first postoperative day, without severe pain, and the remaining 42 patients were discharge on the third day. Two cases of postoperative pain and thrombosis were found as postoperative complications. Stapled hemorrhoidectomy is a safe and quick procedure associated with less pain, better outcome, and early recovery with shorter hospital stay. PMID:27011510

  19. Safe Handling Practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    In 1977 Compugraphic Corporation was experiencing an unacceptable failure rate on microelectronic chips. Company engineers suspected that static electricity was causing the trouble because some electronic components are highly susceptible to damage by electrostatic charge. From a NASA Tech Brief, they learned that Rockwell International had prepared a report on safe handling practices for electronic components. NASA provided a Technical Support Package detailing 50 safe handling procedures affecting workers, work areas, equipment and packaging materials. Where poor practices were discovered, re-education of employees and other corrective measures were undertaken.

  20. Working from the inside out: a case study of Mackay Safe Community.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Dale; Gunning, Colleen; Rose, Judy; McFarlane, Kathryn; Franklin, Richard C

    2015-04-01

    Mackay Whitsunday Safe Community (MWSC) was established in 2000 in response to high rates of injury observed in the region. MWSC assumed an ecological perspective, incorporating targeted safety promotion campaigns reinforced by supportive environments and policy. By involving the community in finding its own solutions, MWSC attempted to catalyze structural, social, and political changes that empowered the community and, ultimately, individuals within the community, to modify their environment and their behavior to reduce the risk of injury. A community network consisting of 118 members and an external support network of 50 members was established. A social network analysis conducted in 2000 and 2004 indicated that the network doubled its cohesiveness, thereby strengthening its ability to collaborate for mutual benefit. However, while MWSC was rich in social resources, human and financial resources were largely controlled by external agencies. The bridging and linking relationships that connected MWSC to its external support network were the social mechanism MWSC used to access the resources it required to run programs. These boundary-spanning relationships accessed an estimated 6.5 full-time equivalents of human resources and US$750,000 in 2004 that it used to deliver a suite of injury control and safety promotion activities, associated with a 33% reduction in injury deaths over the period 2002 to 2010. MWSC can only be understood in its ecological context. The productivity of MWSC was vulnerable to the changing policy priorities of external sponsoring agents and critically dependent on the advocacy skills of its leaders. PMID:25829116

  1. A Safe and Healthful Work Environment: Development and Testing of an Undergraduate Occupational Health Nursing Curriculum.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Marjorie C; Berry, Peggy

    2015-08-01

    Occupational health nursing focuses on promotion and restoration of health, prevention of illness and injury, protection from work-related and environmental hazards, and corporate profitability. Quality education about the relationship between work and health is critical for nurses' success regardless of work setting, and is consistent with Healthy People 2020 goals, but is lacking or limited in some programs. This report introduces an innovative occupational health nursing curriculum for students enrolled in baccalaureate nursing programs. The process of designing and pilot testing this novel curriculum, its alignment with nursing competencies, and its format and learning activities are described. Preparing professional nurses to understand the role of the occupational health nurse and the relationship between work and health is an essential curricular consideration for contemporary nursing education. PMID:26077879

  2. An economical and safe procedure to synthesize 2-hydroxy-4-pentynoic acid: A precursor towards 'clickable' biodegradable polylactide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanxuan; Ren, Hong; Baker, Gregory L

    2014-01-01

    2-Hydroxy-4-pentynoic acid (1) is a key intermediate towards 'clickable' polylactide which allows for efficient introduction of a broad range of pendant functional groups onto polymers from a single monomer via convenient 'click' chemistry with organic azides. The incorporation of various pendant functional groups could effectively tailor the physicochemical properties of polylactide. The reported synthesis of 1 started from propargyl bromide and ethyl glyoxylate. However, both of starting materials are expensive and unstable; especially, propargyl bromide is shock-sensitive and subjected to thermal explosive decomposition, which makes the preparation of 1 impractical with high cost and high risk of explosion. Herein, we report a simple, economical and safe synthetic route to prepare 1 using cheap and commercially available diethyl 2-acetamidomalonate (4) and propargyl alcohol. The desired product 1 was obtained via alkylation of malonate 4 with propargyl tosylate followed by a one-pot four-step sequence of hydrolysis, decarboxylation, diazotization and hydroxylation of propargylic malonate 5 without work-up of any intermediate. PMID:24991290

  3. NASA Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu; Corbin, Barbara; Sulzman, Frank; Kreneck, Sam

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the radiation environment that is a significant potential hazard to NASA's goals for space exploration, of living and working in space. NASA has initiated a Peer reviewed research program that is charged with arriving at an understanding of the space radiation problem. To this end NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed to simulate the harsh cosmic and solar radiation found in space. Another piece of the work was to develop a risk modeling tool that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system damage, degenerative tissue disease, and acute radiation effects acute radiation effects.

  4. How Safe Are You at Work? Occupational Health and Safety Issues for School Counsellors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, John A.

    Schools are becoming increasingly violent places. This workshop presentation examines ways to improve counselor facilities and to enhance work safety. Client populations for school counselors have changed significantly in recent times as school administrators refer more welfare related problems for help. Although violent attacks on counselors may…

  5. Service station requirements for safe use of hydrogen based fuels: NHA work group update

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the results of the meeting of the working group on safety standards. A standard for an odorant for hydrogen leak detection is set forth. Recent activities with the National Fire Protection Association and the International Standard Organization are enumerated. The path forward is also summarized.

  6. Safety and the Supervisor. A Safe System of Work. Members' Occasional Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corfield, Tony

    In 1981 four supervisors at a chemical company in Great Britain were each fined 100 pounds under the country's 1974 Health and Safety at Work Act after a fifth supervisor was injured because of a faulty interlock guard. The supervisors were convicted because they had all known about but had done nothing to rectify the potential safety hazard. The…

  7. SUNRAYCE 1995: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dephillips, M. P.; Moskowitz, P. D.; Fthenakis, V. M.

    1994-05-01

    This document is a power system and battery safety handbook for participants in the SUNRAYCE 95 solar powered electric vehicle program. The topics of the handbook include batteries, photovoltaic modules, safety equipment needed for working with sulfuric acid electrolyte and batteries, battery transport, accident response, battery recharging and ventilation, electrical risks on-board vehicle, external electrical risks, electrical risk management strategies, and general maintenance including troubleshooting, hydrometer check and voltmeter check.

  8. SUNRAYCE 95: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems

    SciTech Connect

    DePhillips, M.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1994-05-27

    This document is a power system and battery safety handbook for participants in the SUNRAYCE 95 solar powered electric vehicle program. The topics of the handbook include batteries, photovoltaic modules, safety equipment needed for working with sulfuric acid electrolyte and batteries, battery transport, accident response, battery recharging and ventilation, electrical risks on-board vehicle, external electrical risks, electrical risk management strategies, and general maintenance including troubleshooting, hydrometer check and voltmeter check.

  9. Human-rating Automated and Robotic Systems - (How HAL Can Work Safely with Astronauts)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baroff, Lynn; Dischinger, Charlie; Fitts, David

    2009-01-01

    Long duration human space missions, as planned in the Vision for Space Exploration, will not be possible without applying unprecedented levels of automation to support the human endeavors. The automated and robotic systems must carry the load of routine housekeeping for the new generation of explorers, as well as assist their exploration science and engineering work with new precision. Fortunately, the state of automated and robotic systems is sophisticated and sturdy enough to do this work - but the systems themselves have never been human-rated as all other NASA physical systems used in human space flight have. Our intent in this paper is to provide perspective on requirements and architecture for the interfaces and interactions between human beings and the astonishing array of automated systems; and the approach we believe necessary to create human-rated systems and implement them in the space program. We will explain our proposed standard structure for automation and robotic systems, and the process by which we will develop and implement that standard as an addition to NASA s Human Rating requirements. Our work here is based on real experience with both human system and robotic system designs; for surface operations as well as for in-flight monitoring and control; and on the necessities we have discovered for human-systems integration in NASA's Constellation program. We hope this will be an invitation to dialog and to consideration of a new issue facing new generations of explorers and their outfitters.

  10. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Policy and procedures for work zone safety management... Policy and procedures for work zone safety management. (a) Each agency's policy and processes, procedures... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road...

  11. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Policy and procedures for work zone safety management... Policy and procedures for work zone safety management. (a) Each agency's policy and processes, procedures... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road...

  12. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Policy and procedures for work zone safety management... Policy and procedures for work zone safety management. (a) Each agency's policy and processes, procedures... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road...

  13. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Policy and procedures for work zone safety management... Policy and procedures for work zone safety management. (a) Each agency's policy and processes, procedures... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road...

  14. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Policy and procedures for work zone safety management. 630.1106 Section 630.1106 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Temporary Traffic Control Devices § 630.1106 Policy and procedures for work zone...

  15. Assessing the 'system' in safe systems-based road designs: using cognitive work analysis to evaluate intersection designs.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, M; Salmon, P M; Stanton, N A; McClure, R

    2015-01-01

    While a safe systems approach has long been acknowledged as the underlying philosophy of contemporary road safety strategies, systemic applications are sparse. This article argues that systems-based methods from the discipline of Ergonomics have a key role to play in road transport design and evaluation. To demonstrate, the Cognitive Work Analysis framework was used to evaluate two road designs - a traditional Melbourne intersection and a cut-through design for future intersections based on road safety safe systems principles. The results demonstrate that, although the cut-through intersection appears different in layout from the traditional intersection, system constraints are not markedly different. Furthermore, the analyses demonstrated that redistribution of constraints in the cut-through intersection resulted in emergent behaviour, which was not anticipated and could prove problematic. Further, based on the lack of understanding of emergent behaviour, similar design induced problems are apparent across both intersections. Specifically, incompatibilities between infrastructure, vehicles and different road users were not dealt with by the proposed design changes. The importance of applying systems methods in the design and evaluation of road transport systems is discussed. PMID:24225066

  16. Stay Safe at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... from drinks with caffeine (like coffee, soda, and energy drinks) several hours before you go to sleep. Get regular physical activity, but don’t exercise right before you go to bed. Make sure your bedroom is dark and quiet. Stay healthy. A healthy body helps ...

  17. 45 CFR 261.64 - How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work participation measurement? 261.64 Section 261.64 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES,...

  18. 45 CFR 261.64 - How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work participation measurement? 261.64 Section 261.64 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES,...

  19. 78 FR 32558 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... earlier expedited methods approval action (74 FR 38348, August 3, 2009) (USEPA 2009b). Both EPA Methods... Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures. 74 FR 38348. August 3, 2009. USEPA. 2013. EPA Method 524.4... temperature, which make the method more rapid. Fast Phage is able to detect coliphages in 16 to 30...

  20. Rapid Training and Implementation of the Pollock Technique, a Safe, Effective Newborn Circumcision Procedure, in a Low-Resource Setting

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Claire C.; Pollock, Neil; Crouse, Pierre; Theodore, Harry; Bonhomme, Jerry; Gaston, Claire F. Stéphanie; Dévieux, Jessy G.; Pape, Jean William; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Male circumcision is highly protective against urinary tract infections, inflammatory conditions of the penis, sexually transmitted infections, and urogenital cancers. We aimed to reintroduce newborn male circumcision through the creation of a training program in Port-au-Prince, Haiti—an area with a considerable burden of preventable urogenital infections, sexually transmitted infections, and low circumcision rate—after an earlier study reported that a majority of Haitian medical providers were in need of and wanted newborn circumcision training. The program was conducted at the GHESKIO Health Centers, a large, non-governmental clinic offering comprehensive pediatric and adult health services. Two Haitian obstetricians and seven nurses learned circumcision procedures. On training completion, one of two obstetricians achieved surgical competence. Introduction of a newborn male circumcision training program was feasible, achieving an acceptable rate of procedural competency and high-quality services. Permanent resources now exist in Haiti to train additional providers to perform newborn male circumcisions. PMID:27335959

  1. Differences between Presentation Methods in Working Memory Procedures: A Matter of Working Memory Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricker, Timothy J.; Cowan, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Understanding forgetting from working memory, the memory used in ongoing cognitive processing, is critical to understanding human cognition. In the past decade, a number of conflicting findings have been reported regarding the role of time in forgetting from working memory. This has led to a debate concerning whether longer retention intervals…

  2. Complete and safe resection of challenging retroperitoneal tumors: anticipation of multi-organ and major vascular resection and use of adjunct procedures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Retroperitoneal tumors are often massive and can involve adjacent organs and/or vital structures, making them difficult to resect. Completeness of resection is within the surgeon's control and critical for long-term survival, particularly for malignant disease. Few studies directly address strategies for complete and safe resection of challenging retroperitoneal tumors. Methods Fifty-six patients representing 63 cases of primary or recurrent retroperitoneal tumor resection between 2004-2009 were identified and a retrospective chart review was performed. Rates of complete resection, use of adjunct procedures, and perioperative complications were recorded. Results In 95% of cases, complete resection was achieved. Fifty-eight percent of these cases required en bloc multi-organ resection, and 8% required major vascular resection. Complete resection rates were higher for primary versus recurrent disease. Adjunct procedures (ureteral stents, femoral nerve monitoring, posterior laminotomy, etc.) were used in 54% of cases. Major postoperative complications occurred in 16% of cases, and one patient died (2% mortality). Conclusions Complete resection of challenging retroperitoneal tumors is feasible and can be done safely with important pre- and intraoperative considerations in mind. PMID:22054416

  3. Sentinel Lymph Node Navigation Surgery for Early Gastric Cancer: Is It a Safe Procedure in Countries with Non-Endemic Gastric Cancer Levels? A Preliminary Experience

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Elizabeth Gomes; Victer, Felipe Carvalho; Neves, Marcelo Soares; Pinto, Márcia Ferreira; Carvalho, Carlos Eduardo De Souza

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Early diagnosis of gastric cancer is still the exception in Western countries. In the East, as in Japan and Korea, this disease is an endemic disorder. More conservative surgical procedures are frequently performed in early gastric cancer cases in these countries where sentinel lymph node navigation surgery is becoming a safe option for some patients. This study aims to evaluate preliminary outcomes of patients with early gastric cancer who underwent sentinel node navigation surgeries in Brazil, a country with non-endemic gastric cancer levels. Materials and Methods From September 2008 to March 2014, 14 out of 205 gastric cancer patients underwent sentinel lymph node navigation surgeries, which were performed using intraoperative, endoscopic, and peritumoral injection of patent blue dye. Results Antrectomies with Billroth I gastroduodenostomies were performed in seven patients with distal tumors. The other seven patients underwent wedge resections. Sentinel basin resections were performed in four patients, and lymphadenectomies were extended to stations 7, 8, and 9 in the other 10. Two patients received false-negative results from sentinel node biopsies, and one of those patients had micrometastasis. There was one postoperative death from liver failure in a cirrhotic patient. Another cirrhotic patient died after two years without recurrence of gastric cancer, also from liver failure. All other patients were followed-up for 13 to 79 months with no evidence of recurrence. Conclusions Sentinel lymph node navigation surgery appears to be a safe procedure in a country with non-endemic levels of gastric cancer. PMID:27104022

  4. Total hepatectomy and liver transplantation as a two-stage procedure for fulminant hepatic failure: A safe procedure in exceptional circumstances

    PubMed Central

    Sanabria Mateos, Rebeca; Hogan, Niamh M; Dorcaratto, Dimitri; Heneghan, Helen; Udupa, Venkatesh; Maguire, Donal; Geoghegan, Justin; Hoti, Emir

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the outcomes of two-stage liver transplant at a single institution, between 1993 and March 2015. METHODS: We reviewed our institutional experience with emergency hepatectomy followed by transplantation for fulminant liver failure over a twenty-year period. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained liver transplant database was undertaken at a national liver transplant centre. Demographic data, clinical presentation, preoperative investigations, cardiocirculatory parameters, operative and postoperative data were recorded. RESULTS: In the study period, six two-stage liver transplants were undertaken. Indications for transplantation included acute paracetamol poisoning (n = 3), fulminant hepatitis A (n = 1), trauma (n = 1) and exertional heat stroke (n = 1). Anhepatic time ranged from 330 to 2640 min. All patients demonstrated systemic inflammatory response syndrome in the first post-operative week and the incidence of sepsis was high at 50%. There was one mortality, secondary to cardiac arrest 12 h following re-perfusion. Two patients required re-transplantation secondary to arterial thrombosis. At a median follow-up of 112 mo, 5 of 6 patients are alive and without evidence of graft dysfunciton. CONCLUSION: Two-stage liver transplantation represents a safe and potentially life-saving treatment for carefully selected exceptional cases of fulminant hepatic failure. PMID:26855693

  5. Are Environmental Procedures Relating To Visual Health, In the Workplace, Academia, Computer Usage, and Governmental Jobs, Adequately Safe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillger, Robert; Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2004-03-01

    Visual acuity diminishes following extensive computer use in workplace environments. Similar job-induced damage must surely be noticed by many millions of independent observers. Nonetheless, academia, some businesses, governmental and other parties which should be engaged in protecting the productivity and visual health of their constituencies seem to be reluctant to do so. Practical procedures to achieve this end were empirically established over a hundred years ago by the late ophthalmologist, Dr. William Bates. RDM has proposed that Bates results are predictable on the basis of a straightforward formulation from spatial Fourier optics. It is the first zero radius distance in the diffraction pattern produced by the human pupil, r = 1.22 lf/a, where chromatic aberration yields the isolated quasi-monochromatic wavelength range l, in product with that wavelength's focal length f, divided by the pupil diameter, a. Procedural and other practices may yield benefits! *This paper does not necessarily represent the views of the U.S. E.P.A.

  6. Construction work practices and conditions improved after 2-years' participation in the HomeSafe pilot program.

    PubMed

    Gilkey, David P; Hautaluoma, Jacob E; Ahmed, Taslim P; Keefe, Thomas J; Herron, Robert E; Bigelow, Philip L

    2003-01-01

    This study reevaluated changes in job-site safety audit scores for a cohort of residential construction workers that had protracted exposure to the HomeSafe pilot program for 2(1/2) years. The investigation was a repeated measure of a cohort study underway in the six-county metro area of Denver, Colo. The larger study was a longitudinal, quasi-experimental design with a cohort of residential construction workers within the HomeSafe strategic partnership between Occupational Safety and Health Administration Region VIII and the Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Denver (HBA). Audits were conducted on residential construction sites. Study subjects were construction workers employed by partner or control companies within the study. Repeated measures of 41 companies showed significant improvement (p=.01) in audit scores, increasing from 71.8 to 76.8 after 2(1/2) years in the program. HomeSafe companies out-performed controls (p=.01) for both the retest group and previously unaudited HomeSafe companies. Prolonged exposure in the HomeSafe pilot program resulted in improved audit scores for companies within the program for at least 2 years. PMID:12809540

  7. Differential effects of socioeconomic status on working and procedural memory systems.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Julia A; Mackey, Allyson P; Finn, Amy S; Gabrieli, John D E

    2015-01-01

    While prior research has shown a strong relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and working memory performance, the relation between SES and procedural (implicit) memory remains unknown. Convergent research in both animals and humans has revealed a fundamental dissociation, both behaviorally and neurally, between a working memory system that depends on medial temporal-lobe structures and the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) vs. a procedural memory system that depends on the basal ganglia. Here, we measured performance in adolescents from lower- and higher-SES backgrounds on tests of working memory capacity (complex working memory span) and procedural memory (probabilistic classification) and their hippocampal, DLPFC, and caudate volumes. Lower-SES adolescents had worse working memory performance and smaller hippocampal and DLPFC volumes than their higher-SES peers, but there was no significant difference between the lower- and higher-SES groups on the procedural memory task or in caudate volumes. These findings suggest that SES may have a selective influence on hippocampal-prefrontal-dependent working memory and little influence on striatal-dependent procedural memory. PMID:26500525

  8. Differential effects of socioeconomic status on working and procedural memory systems

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Julia A.; Mackey, Allyson P.; Finn, Amy S.; Gabrieli, John D. E.

    2015-01-01

    While prior research has shown a strong relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and working memory performance, the relation between SES and procedural (implicit) memory remains unknown. Convergent research in both animals and humans has revealed a fundamental dissociation, both behaviorally and neurally, between a working memory system that depends on medial temporal-lobe structures and the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) vs. a procedural memory system that depends on the basal ganglia. Here, we measured performance in adolescents from lower- and higher-SES backgrounds on tests of working memory capacity (complex working memory span) and procedural memory (probabilistic classification) and their hippocampal, DLPFC, and caudate volumes. Lower-SES adolescents had worse working memory performance and smaller hippocampal and DLPFC volumes than their higher-SES peers, but there was no significant difference between the lower- and higher-SES groups on the procedural memory task or in caudate volumes. These findings suggest that SES may have a selective influence on hippocampal-prefrontal-dependent working memory and little influence on striatal-dependent procedural memory. PMID:26500525

  9. A prototype on-line work procedure system for radioisotope thermoelectric generator production

    SciTech Connect

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1991-09-01

    An on-line system to manage work procedures is being developed to support radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) assembly and testing in a new production facility. This system implements production work procedures as interactive electronic documents executed at the work site with no intermediate printed form. It provides good control of the creation and application of work procedures and provides active assistance to the worker in performing them and in documenting the results. An extensive prototype of this system is being evaluated to ensure that it will have all the necessary features and that it will fit the user's needs and expectations. This effort has involved the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) operations organization and technology transfer between Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) and EG G Mound Applied Technologies Inc. (Mound) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Mound Site. 1 ref.

  10. Procedures for safe handling of off-gases from electric vehicle lead-acid batteries during overcharge

    SciTech Connect

    LaBelle, S.J.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Loutfy, R.O.; Varma, R.

    1980-01-25

    The potential for generation of toxic gases from lead-acid batteries has long been recognized. Prior to the current interest in electric vehicles, there were no studies specificaly oriented to toxic gas release from traction batteries, however. As the Department of Energy Demonstration Project (in the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program) progresses, available data from past studies and parallel health effects programs must be digested into guidance to the drivers and maintenance personnel, tailored to their contact with electric vehicles. The basic aspects of lead-acid battery operation, vehicle use, and health effects of stibine and arsine to provide electric vehicle users with the information behind the judgment that vehicle operation and testing may proceed are presented. Specifically, it is concluded that stibine generation or arsine generation at rapid enough rates to induce acute toxic response is not at all likely. Procedures to guard against low-level exposure until more definitive data on ambient concentrations of the gases are collected are presented for both charging the batteries and driving the vehicles. A research plan to collect additional quantitative data from electric traction batteries is presented.

  11. Safe Hazmat Storage Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neville, Angela

    1996-01-01

    Provides a list of recommendations for safely managing hazardous waste containers. Encourages training of employees on the hazards of the wastes they handle and the correct procedures for managing containers. (DDR)

  12. 49 CFR 214.335 - On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups. 214.335 Section 214.335 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway Worker Protection § 214.335 On-track safety...

  13. Granting Credit for Work Experience: A Guide to Policies and Procedures of Wisconsin Education Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Green Bay.

    The ways that Wisconsin colleges, technical institutes and high schools award credit for learning acquired through work experience are described. This guide was written after a statewide study of the policies and procedures of both postsecondary and secondary schools. Data were gathered in interviews with nearly every postsecondary school in…

  14. Calculation procedures for oil free scroll compressors based on mathematical modelling of working process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranin, Y.; Burmistrov, A.; Salikeev, S.; Fomina, M.

    2015-08-01

    Basic propositions of calculation procedures for oil free scroll compressors characteristics are presented. It is shown that mathematical modelling of working process in a scroll compressor makes it possible to take into account such factors influencing the working process as heat and mass exchange, mechanical interaction in working chambers, leakage through slots, etc. The basic mathematical model may be supplemented by taking into account external heat exchange, elastic deformation of scrolls, inlet and outlet losses, etc. To evaluate the influence of procedure on scroll compressor characteristics calculations accuracy different calculations were carried out. Internal adiabatic efficiency was chosen as a comparative parameter which evaluates the perfection of internal thermodynamic and gas-dynamic compressor processes. Calculated characteristics are compared with experimental values obtained for the compressor pilot sample.

  15. The relation between receptive grammar and procedural, declarative, and working memory in specific language impairment

    PubMed Central

    Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Ullman, Michael T.; Lum, Jarrad A. G.

    2015-01-01

    What memory systems underlie grammar in children, and do these differ between typically developing (TD) children and children with specific language impairment (SLI)? Whilst there is substantial evidence linking certain memory deficits to the language problems in children with SLI, few studies have investigated multiple memory systems simultaneously, examining not only possible memory deficits but also memory abilities that may play a compensatory role. This study examined the extent to which procedural, declarative, and working memory abilities predict receptive grammar in 45 primary school aged children with SLI (30 males, 15 females) and 46 TD children (30 males, 16 females), both on average 9;10 years of age. Regression analyses probed measures of all three memory systems simultaneously as potential predictors of receptive grammar. The model was significant, explaining 51.6% of the variance. There was a significant main effect of learning in procedural memory and a significant group × procedural learning interaction. Further investigation of the interaction revealed that procedural learning predicted grammar in TD but not in children with SLI. Indeed, procedural learning was the only predictor of grammar in TD. In contrast, only learning in declarative memory significantly predicted grammar in SLI. Thus, different memory systems are associated with receptive grammar abilities in children with SLI and their TD peers. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to demonstrate a significant group by memory system interaction in predicting grammar in children with SLI and their TD peers. In line with Ullman’s Declarative/Procedural model of language and procedural deficit hypothesis of SLI, variability in understanding sentences of varying grammatical complexity appears to be associated with variability in procedural memory abilities in TD children, but with declarative memory, as an apparent compensatory mechanism, in children with SLI. PMID:26284013

  16. When the science fails and the ethics works: 'Fail-safe' ethics in the FEM-PrEP study.

    PubMed

    Kingori, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    This paper will explore the concept of 'fail safe' ethics in the FEM PrEP trial, and the practice of research and ethics on the ground. FEM-PrEP examined the efficacy of PrEP in African women after promising outcomes in research conducted with MSM. This was a hugely optimistic time and FEM-PrEP was mobilised using rights-based ethical arguments that women should have access to PrEP. This paper will present data collected during an ethnographic study of frontline research workers involved in FEM-PrEP. During our discussions, 'fail-safe' ethics emerged as concept that encapsulated their confidence that their ethics could not fail. However, in 2011, FEM-PrEP was halted and deemed a failure. The women involved in the study were held responsible because contrary to researcher's expectations they were not taking the oral PrEP being researched. This examination of FEM-PrEP will show that ethical arguments are increasingly deployed to mobilise, maintain and in some cases stop trials in ways which, at times, are superseded or co-opted by other interests. While promoting the interests of women, rights-based approaches are argued to indirectly justify the continuation of individualised, biomedical interventions which have been problematic in other women-centred trials. In this examination of FEM-PrEP, the rights-based approach obscured: ethical concerns beyond access to PrEP; the complexities of power relationships between donor and host countries; the operations of the HIV industry in research-saturated areas and the cumulative effect of unfilled expectations in HIV research and how this has shaped ideas of research and ethics. PMID:26484946

  17. Pain and nurses' emotion work in a paediatric clinic: treatment procedures and nurse-child alignments.

    PubMed

    Rindstedt, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    In the treatment of cancer in children, treatment procedures have been reported to be one of the most feared elements, as more painful than the illness as such. This study draws on a video ethnography of routine needle procedure events, as part of fieldwork at a paediatric oncology clinic documenting everyday treatment negotiations between nurses and young children. On the basis of detailed transcriptions of verbal and nonverbal staff-child interaction, the analyses focus on ways in which pain and anxiety can be seen as phenomena that are partly contingent on nurses' emotion work. The school-age children did not display fear. In the preschool group, though, pain and fear seemed to be phenomena that were greatly reduced through nurses' emotion work. This study focuses on three preschoolers facing potentially painful treatment, showing how the nurses engaged in massive emotion work with the children, through online commentaries, interactive formats (delegation of tasks, consent sequences, collaborative 'we'-formats), as well as solidarity-oriented moves (such as praise and endearment terms). Even a young toddler would handle the distress of needle procedures, when interacting with an inventive nurse who mobilized child participation through skilful emotion work. PMID:24851517

  18. Simultaneous determination of carbamate insecticides and mycotoxins in cereals by reversed phase liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using a quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe extraction procedure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Ming; Wu, Yin-Liang; Lu, Yao-Bin

    2013-02-01

    A simple, sensitive and reliable analytical method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 22 carbamate insecticides and 17 mycotoxins in cereals by ultra high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS). Carbamates and mycotoxins were extracted from cereal samples using a QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) procedure without any further clean-up step. The extract was diluted with water containing 0.1% formic acid and 5.0mM ammonium acetate, and analyzed by LC-MS/MS on a Waters Acquity BEH C(18) column with water (0.1% formic acid, 0.50mM ammonium acetate)/methanol as mobile phase with gradient elution. Matrix-matched calibration was used for quantification. Blank samples (rice, wheat and corn) were fortified at 5, 10 and 50 μg/kg except for five zearalenonic compounds at 25, 50 and 250 μg/kg, and recoveries were in the range of 70-120%. Relative standard deviations were lower than 20% in all cases. The LOQ values were in the range of 0.20-29.7 μg/kg. The method is suitable for the simultaneous determination of carbamate insecticides and mycotoxins in cereals. The total time required for the analysis of one sample, including sample preparation, was about 35 min. PMID:23314399

  19. Cross-national research on contractor evaluation procedures in public works procurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Seiya; Sato, Naoyoshi; Matsumoto, Naoya

    Contractor evaluation methods in Japan's public works procurement, beginning with construction business licensure, going through biennial preliminary firm rating, up to project-by-project prequalification and comprehensive point rating, were developed during the period when public works were mostly procured through designated competitive bidding. It is essential to focus attention on contractor evaluation methods for introducing different types of procurement procedures which enhance the use of technological capabilities held by private businesses. An overall review of contractor evaluation procedures should be conducted in view of the present situation, where the open competitive bidding has become mainly used in combination with comprehensive evaluation, as well as to allow for further diversification of procurement methods. In Western countries, improvements have been made for the past several years in contractor evaluation procedures with more emphasis on "Value for Money." Advanced efforts made by these countries will be useful as a reference for overhauling Japan's contractor evaluation system. This study conducts a comparative review of contractor evaluation procedures for public procurement in Western countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom and France by identifying similarities and differences between those of Japan and the above mentioned countries. This reveals that a contractor's technical or professional ability is looked at separately from its economic and financial standing in those countries studied, and there is no case like Japan in which those two factors are integrated into one for evaluation.

  20. Measurement of Nursing's Complex Health Care Work: Evolution of the Science For Determining the Required Staffing For Safe and Effective Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Malloch, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    The availability of technology to monitor and manage data increases our ability to better understand the processes and outcomes needed for patient care. It is important to remember this work requires not only the science of data management, but also the art of integrating the multiple variables involved in the dynamic of safe staffing. Fasoli and Haddock (2010) provided an excellent summary of the literature. Nurse leaders must be open to new additions to this work and the possibility that the essential ingredient of the gold standard for patient classification systems (PCS) might still be missing. The goal of a new approach to determine time for nurse work was to advance the science of PCS from the perspective of the characteristics identified by Fasoli and Haddock. PMID:26214934

  1. Prevalence of gallstones in 1,229 patients submitted to surgical laparoscopic treatment of GERD and esophageal achalasia: associated cholecystectomy was a safe procedure

    PubMed Central

    SALLUM, Rubens Antonio Aissar; PADRÃO, Eduardo Messias Hirano; SZACHNOWICZ, Sergio; SEGURO, Francisco C. B. C.; BIANCHI, Edno Tales; CECCONELLO, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Background Association between esophageal achalasia/ gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and cholelithiasis is not clear. Epidemiological data are controversial due to different methodologies applied, the regional differences and the number of patients involved. Results of concomitant cholecistectomy associated to surgical treatment of both diseases regarding safety is poorly understood. Aim To analyze the prevalence of cholelithiasis in patients with esophageal achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux submitted to cardiomyotomy or fundoplication. Also, to evaluate the safety of concomitant cholecistectomy. Methods Retrospective analysis of 1410 patients operated from 2000 to 2013. They were divided into two groups: patients with GERD submitted to laparocopic hiatoplasty plus Nissen fundoplication and patients with esophageal achalasia to laparoscopic cardiomyotomy plus partial fundoplication. It was collected epidemiological data, specific diagnosis and subgroups, the presence or absence of gallstones, surgical procedure, operative and clinical complications and mortality. All groups/subgroups were compared. Results From 1,229 patients with GERD or esophageal achalasia, submitted to laparoscopic cardiomyotomy or fundoplication, 138 (11.43%) had cholelitiasis, occurring more in females (2.38:1) with mean age of 50,27 years old. In 604 patients with GERD, 79 (13,08%) had cholelitiasis. Lower prevalence occurred in Barrett's esophagus patients 7/105 (6.67%) (p=0.037). In 625 with esophageal achalasia, 59 (9.44%) had cholelitiasis, with no difference between chagasic and idiopathic forms (p=0.677). Complications of patients with or without cholecystectomy were similar in fundoplication and cardiomyotomy (p=0.78 and p=1.00).There was no mortality or complications related to cholecystectomy in this series. Conclusions Prevalence of cholelithiasis was higher in patients submitted to fundoplication (GERD). Patients with chagasic or idiopatic forms of achalasia had the

  2. The MERSADE (European Union) project: testing procedures and environmental impact for the safe storage of liquid mercury in the Almadén district, Spain.

    PubMed

    Llanos, W; Higueras, P; Oyarzun, R; Esbrí, J M; López-Berdonces, M A; García-Noguero, E M; Martínez-Coronado, A

    2010-09-15

    The MERSADE Project (LIFE--European Union) tested the Las Cuevas decommissioned mining complex (Almadén mercury district, Spain) as a potential site for the installation of a future European prototype safe deposit of surplus mercury from industrial activities. We here present the results of a baseline study on the distribution of mercury in soils and air in the Las Cuevas complex and surrounding areas, and show the results of a plume contamination model using the ISC-AERMOD software. Despite restoration works carried out in 2004, the Las Cuevas complex can still be regarded as hotspot of mercury contamination, with large anomalies above 800 microg g(-1) Hg (soils) and 300 ng Hg m(-3) (air). In the case of soils, high, and persistent concentrations above 26 microg g(-1) Hg extend well beyond the complex perimeter for more than 2 km. These concentrations are about three orders of magnitude above world baselines. The same applies to mercury in air, with high concentrations above 300 ng Hg m(-3) inside the perimeter, which nonetheless fade away in a few hundred meters. Air contamination modelling (Hg gas) predicts formation of a NW-SE oriented narrow plume extending for a few hundred meters from the complex perimeter. The geographic isolation of Las Cuevas and its mining past make the complex an ideal site for mercury stocking. The only potential environmental hazards are the raising of livestock only a few hundred meters away from the complex and flash floods. PMID:20598346

  3. Safe Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PTA Today, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Though most art materials are safe for children (and labelled accordingly), parents and teachers should follow recommended safety guidelines, such as those presented in this article, when choosing, using, and storing children's art materials. (SM)

  4. Safe sex

    MedlinePlus

    Safe sex means taking steps before and during sex that can prevent you from getting an infection, or from ... the skin around the genital area. Before having sex: Get to know your partner and discuss your ...

  5. A system to test the ground surface conditions of construction sites--for safe and efficient work without physical strain.

    PubMed

    Koningsveld, Ernst; van der Grinten, Maarten; van der Molen, Henk; Krause, Frank

    2005-07-01

    Ground surface conditions on construction sites have an important influence on the health and safety of workers and their productivity. The development of an expert-based "working conditions evaluation" system is described, intended to assist site managers in recognising unsatisfactory ground conditions and remedying these. The system was evaluated in the period 2002-2003. The evaluation shows that companies recognize poor soil/ground conditions as problematic, but are not aware of the specific physical workload hazards. The developed methods allow assessment of the ground surface quality and selection of appropriate measures for improvement. However, barriers exist at present to wide implementation of the system across the industry. Most significant of these is that responsibility for a site's condition is not clearly located within contracting arrangements, nor is it a topic of serious negotiation. PMID:15892938

  6. Measurement of functional capacity requirements to aid in development of an occupation-specific rehabilitation training program to help firefighters with cardiac disease safely return to work.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jenny; Roberts, Joanne; Simms, Kay; Cheng, Dunlei; Hartman, Julie; Bartlett, Charles

    2009-03-15

    We designed a study to measure the functional capacity requirements of firefighters to aid in the development of an occupation-specific training program in cardiac rehabilitation; 23 healthy male firefighters with no history of heart disease completed a fire and rescue obstacle course that simulated 7 common firefighting tasks. They wore complete personal protective equipment and portable metabolic instruments that included a data collection mask. We monitored each subject's oxygen consumption (VO(2)) and working heart rate, then calculated age-predicted maximum heart rates (220 - age) and training target heart rates (85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate). During performance of the obstacle course, the subjects' mean working heart rates and peak heart rates were higher than the calculated training target heart rates (t(22) = 5.69 [working vs target, p <0.001] and t(22) = 15.14 [peak vs target, p <0.001]). These findings, with mean results for peak VO(2) (3,447 ml/min) and metabolic equivalents (11.9 METs), show that our subjects' functional capacity greatly exceeded that typically attained by patients in traditional cardiac rehabilitation programs (5 to 8 METs). In conclusion, our results indicate the need for intense, occupation-specific cardiac rehabilitation training that will help firefighters safely return to work after a cardiac event. PMID:19268728

  7. Working Safe and Feeling Fine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milshtein, Amy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the problem of repetitive stress disorders in the administrative workplace and shares some quick fixes to aid ergonomics. Some thoughts on the ergonomics of office chairs are provided as is the use of professional guidance in furniture purchasing. (GR)

  8. 48 CFR 8.405-1 - Ordering procedures for supplies, and services not requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... supplies, and services not requiring a statement of work. 8.405-1 Section 8.405-1 Federal Acquisition... statement of work. (a) Ordering activities shall use the procedures of this subsection when ordering... specific task, where a statement of work is not required (e.g., installation, maintenance, and repair)....

  9. Analogous Mechanisms of Selection and Updating in Declarative and Procedural Working Memory: Experiments and a Computational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberauer, Klaus; Souza, Alessandra S.; Druey, Michel D.; Gade, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    The article investigates the mechanisms of selecting and updating representations in declarative and procedural working memory (WM). Declarative WM holds the objects of thought available, whereas procedural WM holds representations of what to do with these objects. Both systems consist of three embedded components: activated long-term memory, a…

  10. Safe sex.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, G; Ghosh, T K

    1994-01-01

    The main objectives of health care for people with AIDS are to help them adjust to changing sexual status and to provide them with information on safe sex. Sections consider the risks of various types of sexual activity and safe sex education. With regard to the risk of transmitting or contracting HIV, sexual activities may be high risk, medium risk, low risk, or no risk. High-risk activities include unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse, oral-anal sexual contact, sharing sex toys, and traumatic sexual activity. Medium-risk activities include anal and vaginal intercourse using a latex condom with or without spermicide, and sex using a vaginal diaphragm or contraceptive vaginal sponge. Oral sex on a woman or oral sex on a man without ejaculation into the mouth are low-risk activities. Mutual masturbation, erotic touching, caressing and massage, kissing and non-genital licking pose no risk of infection. All general practitioners and family physicians should teach about safe sex. Prevention messages may be conveyed through individual and social counseling as well as with printed media and other forms of mass media. Messages should definitely reach prostitutes and brothel owners, as well as pre-pubertal children and older youths. PMID:8207282

  11. TANK OPERATIONS CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGY UTILIZING THE AGENCY METHOD OF CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT TO SAFELY AND EFFECTIVELY COMPLETE NUCLEAR CONSTRUCTION WORK

    SciTech Connect

    LESO KF; HAMILTON HM; FARNER M; HEATH T

    2010-01-14

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has faced significant project management challenges in managing Davis-Bacon construction work that meets contractually required small business goals. The unique challenge is to provide contracting opportunities to multiple small business construction subcontractors while performing high hazard work in a safe and productive manner. Previous to the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC contract, Construction work at the Hanford Tank Farms was contracted to large companies, while current Department of Energy (DOE) Contracts typically emphasize small business awards. As an integral part of Nuclear Project Management at Hanford Tank Farms, construction involves removal of old equipment and structures and installation of new infrastructure to support waste retrieval and waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment Plant. Utilizing the optimum construction approach ensures that the contractors responsible for this work are successful in meeting safety, quality, cost and schedule objectives while working in a very hazardous environment. This paper describes the successful transition from a traditional project delivery method that utilized a large business general contractor and subcontractors to a new project construction management model that is more oriented to small businesses. Construction has selected the Agency Construction Management Method. This method was implemented in the first quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2009, where Construction Management is performed by substantially home office resources from the URS Northwest Office in Richland, Washington. The Agency Method has allowed WRPS to provide proven Construction Managers and Field Leads to mentor and direct small business contractors, thus providing expertise and assurance of a successful project. Construction execution contracts are subcontracted directly by WRPS to small or disadvantaged contractors that are mentored and supported by DRS personnel. Each small

  12. Collaborative work during interventional radiological procedures based on a multicast satellite-terrestrial network.

    PubMed

    Gortzis, Lefteris G; Papadopoulos, Homer; Roelofs, Theo A; Rakowsky, Stefan; Karnabatidis, Dimitris; Siablis, Dimitris; Makropoulos, Constantinos; Nikiforidis, George; Graschew, Georgi

    2007-09-01

    Collaboration is a key requirement in several contemporary interventional radiology procedures (IRPs). This work proposes a multicast hybrid satellite system capable of supporting advanced IRP collaboration, and evaluates its feasibility and applicability. Following a detailed IRP requirements study, we have developed a system which supports IRP collaboration through the employment of a hybrid satellite-terrestrial network, a prototype multicast version of wavelet based interactive communication system (WinVicos) application, and a partition aggregation and conditional coding (PACC) wavelet codec. A semistructured questionnaire was also used to receive evaluative feedback from collaborating participants. The departments of interventional radiology of University Hospital of Patras, Greece and of Charite Hospital of Berlin, Germany have been connected on the system. Eight interventional radiologists and a vascular surgeon participated periodically in three satellite-terrestrial "fully collaborative" IRPs (average time 90 min) of high complexity and in four terrestrial educational sessions with great success, evidenced by considerable improving the IRP outcomes (clinical and educational). In case of high complexity, where the simultaneous presence of remote interventional expert and/or surgeon is required, advanced collaboration among staff of geographically dispersed international centers is feasible via integration of existing networking and other technologies. PMID:17912978

  13. When Is Safe, Safe Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neil, Kirk

    2002-01-01

    Discusses events affecting parental school-safety concerns and what school districts can do to alleviate those concerns. Addresses post-September 11 crisis-management procedures, preventing sports-related student deaths, maintaining healthy indoor air quality. (PKP)

  14. Aerosols and Particulates Workshop Sampling Procedures and Venues Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pachlhofer, Peter; Howard, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The Sampling Procedures and Venues Workgroup discussed the potential venues available and issues associated with obtaining measurements. Some of the issues included Incoming Air Quality, Sampling Locations, Probes and Sample Systems. The following is a summary of the discussion of the issues and venues. The influence of inlet air to the measurement of exhaust species, especially trace chemical species, must be considered. Analysis procedures for current engine exhaust emissions regulatory measurements require adjustments for air inlet humidity. As a matter of course in scientific investigations, it is recommended that "background" measurements for any species, particulate or chemical, be performed during inlet air flow before initiation of combustion, if possible, and during the engine test period as feasible and practical. For current regulatory measurements, this would be equivalent to setting the "zero" level for conventional gas analyzers. As a minimum, it is recommended that measurements of the humidity and particulates in the incoming air be taken at the start and end of each test run. Additional measurement points taken during the run are desirable if they can be practically obtained. It was felt that the presence of trace gases in the incoming air is not a significant problem. However, investigators should consider the ambient levels and influences of local air pollution for species of interest. Desired measurement locations depend upon the investigation requirements. A complete investigation of phenomenology of particulate formation and growth requires measurements at a number of locations both within the engine and in the exhaust field downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Desirable locations for both extractive and in situ measurements include: (1) Combustion Zone (Multiple axial locations); (2) Combustor Exit (Multiple radial locations for annular combustors); (3) Turbine Stage (Inlet and exit of the stage); (4) Exit Nozzle (Multiple axial locations

  15. Additional criteria and procedures for classifying over-the-counter drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective and not misbranded. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2002-01-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule establishing additional criteria and procedures by which over-the- counter (OTC) conditions may become eligible for consideration in the OTC drug monograph system. The criteria and procedures address how OTC drugs initially marketed in the United States after the OTC drug review began in 1972, and OTC drugs without any U.S. marketing experience, can meet the statutory definition of marketing to a "material extent" and "for a material time" and become eligible. If found eligible, the condition would be evaluated for general recognition of safety and effectiveness in accordance with FDA's OTC drug monograph regulations. FDA is also changing the current OTC drug monograph procedures to streamline the process and provide additional information in the review. PMID:11820251

  16. The safe home project.

    PubMed

    Arphorn, Sara; Jiraniratisai, Sopaphan; Rungtakul, Rungsri; Phutta, Nikom

    2011-12-01

    The Thai Health Promotion Foundation supported the Improvement of Quality of Life of Informal Workers project in Ban Luang District, Amphur Photaram, Ratchaburi Province. There were many informal workers in Ban Luang District. Sweet-crispy fish producers in Ban Luang were the largest group among the sweet-crispy fish producers in Thailand. This project was aimed at improving living and working conditions of informal workers, with a focus on the sweet-crispy fish group. Good practices of improved living and working conditions were used to help informal workers build safe, healthy and productive work environments. These informal workers often worked in substandard conditions and were exposed to various hazards in the working area. These hazards included risk of exposure to hot work environment, ergonomics-related injuries, chemical hazards, electrical hazards etc. Ergonomics problems were commonly in the sweet-crispy fish group. Unnatural postures such as prolonged sitting were performed dominantly. One hundred and fifty informal workers participated in this project. Occupational health volunteers were selected to encourage occupational health and safety in four groups of informal workers in 2009. The occupational health volunteers trained in 2008 were farmers, beauty salon workers and doll makers. The occupational health and safety knowledge is extended to a new informal worker group: sweet-crispy fish producer, in 2009. The occupational health and safety training for sweet-crispy fish group is conducted by occupational health volunteers. The occupational health volunteers increased their skills and knowledge assist in to make safe home and safe community through participatory oriented training. The improvement of living and working condition is conducted by using a modified WISH, Work Improvement for Safe Home, checklist. The plans of improvement were recorded. The informal workers showed improvement mostly on material handling and storage. The safe uses and safe

  17. Safe handling of large animals.

    PubMed

    Grandin, T

    1999-01-01

    The major causes of accidents with cattle, horses, and other grazing animals are: panic due to fear, male dominance aggression, or the maternal aggression of a mother protecting her newborn. Danger is inherent when handling large animals. Understanding their behavior patterns improves safety, but working with animals will never be completely safe. Calm, quiet handling and non-slip flooring are beneficial. Rough handling and excessive use of electric prods increase chances of injury to both people and animals, because fearful animals may jump, kick, or rear. Training animals to voluntarily cooperate with veterinary procedures reduces stress and improves safety. Grazing animals have a herd instinct, and a lone, isolated animal can become agitated. Providing a companion animal helps keep an animal calm. PMID:10329901

  18. Professional Skills and Competence for Safe and Effective Procedural Sedation in Children: Recommendations Based on a Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Piet L. J. M.; Schipper, Daphne M.; Knape, Hans (J. ) T. A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate which skills and competence are imperative to assure optimal effectiveness and safety of procedural sedation (PS) in children and to analyze the underlying levels of evidence. Study Design and methods. Systematic review of literature published between 1993 and March 2009. Selected papers were classified according to their methodological quality and summarized in evidence-based conclusions. Next, conclusions were used to formulate recommendations. Results. Although the safety profiles vary among PS drugs, the possibility of potentially serious adverse events and the predictability of depth and duration of sedation define the imperative skills and competence necessary for a timely recognition and appropriate management. The level of effectiveness is mainly determined by the ability to apply titratable PS, including deep sedation using short-acting anesthetics for invasive procedures and nitrous oxide for minor painful procedures, and the implementation of non-pharmacological techniques. Conclusions. PS related safety and effectiveness are determined by the circumstances and professional skills rather than by specific pharmacologic characteristics. Evidence based recommendations regarding necessary skills and competence should be used to set up training programs and to define which professionals can and cannot be credentialed for PS in children. PMID:20652062

  19. SAFE Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Whitehouse, Sheldon [D-RI

    2013-06-20

    07/16/2014 Committee on Environment and Public Works Subcommittee on Water and Wildlife. Hearings held. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. Safe Manual Jettison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Jay

    2008-01-01

    In space, the controlled release of certain cargoes is no less useful than the maritime jettisons from which they take their name but is also much more dangerous. Experience has shown that jettisons can be performed safely, but the process is complicated with the path to performing a jettison taking months or even years. In the background, time is also required to write procedures, train the crew, configure the vehicle, and many other activities. This paper outlines the current process used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for manual jettisons, detailing the methods used to assure that the jettisons and the jettisoned objects are as safe as achievable and that the crew is adequately trained to be able to affect the safe jettison. The goal of this paper is not only to capture what it takes to perform safe jettisons in the near Earth environment but to extrapolate this knowledge to future space exploration scenarios that will likely have Extravehicular Activity (EVA) and International Partner (IP) interfaces.

  1. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 197 - Procedures for Historical Researchers Permanently Assigned Within the Executive Branch Working on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Procedures for Historical Researchers Permanently Assigned Within the Executive Branch Working on Official Projects B Appendix B to Part 197 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS HISTORICAL RESEARCH IN THE FILES OF...

  2. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 197 - Procedures for Historical Researchers Permanently Assigned Within the Executive Branch Working on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Permanently Assigned Within the Executive Branch Working on Official Projects B Appendix B to Part 197... Appendix B to Part 197—Procedures for Historical Researchers Permanently Assigned Within the Executive... OSD Records Administrator shall: a. Process all requests from Executive Branch employees...

  3. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 197 - Procedures for Historical Researchers Permanently Assigned Within the Executive Branch Working on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Permanently Assigned Within the Executive Branch Working on Official Projects B Appendix B to Part 197... Appendix B to Part 197—Procedures for Historical Researchers Permanently Assigned Within the Executive... OSD Records Administrator shall: a. Process all requests from Executive Branch employees...

  4. Safe Passage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razwick, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Many schools are almost entirely reliant on alarms and sprinklers for their fire protection. As these devices need to be triggered and supplied with power or water to work properly, they are vulnerable to errors. To provide adequate safety, a good fire-protection program must have three primary elements: fire protection and suppression, and…

  5. Working Memory, Task Switching, and Executive Control in the Task Span Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Four experiments explored the task span procedure: Subjects received lists of 1-10 task names to remember and then lists of 1-10 stimuli on which to perform the tasks. Task span is the number of tasks performed in order perfectly. Experiment 1 compared the task span with the traditional memory span in 6 practiced subjects and found little…

  6. Alignment Analysis and Standard-Setting Procedures for Alternate Assessments. Working Paper No. 2004-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Andrew T.; Elliott, Stephen N.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the methods and results of alignment analyses and standard-setting procedures used in investigations conducted during the development of alternate assessments in two states: Wisconsin and Idaho. To meet the assessment and accountability mandates contained in the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act…

  7. Prenatal Diagnosis: Current Procedures and Implications for Early Interventionists Working with Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasco, Patricia M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This article provides an overview of procedures commonly used in prenatal screening and diagnosis including ultrasound, amniocentesis, chorionic villus biopsy, maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis. Emphasis is on the role of the early interventionist in supporting families during prenatal diagnosis. (Author/DB)

  8. Social Science Research and the Grievance Arbitration Procedure. Work Place Topics, Volume 1, Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work Place Topics, 1989

    1989-01-01

    This report contains four papers presented at conferences jointly sponsored by trade unionists and members of the academic community. As explained in the introduction by Michael E. Gordon, the papers focus on grievance procedures, examining both recent research on the topic and its implications for organized labor. The following papers are…

  9. Teaching Common Errors in Applying a Procedure. IDD&E Working Paper No. 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garduno, Alberto O.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to replicate the Bentti, Golden, and Reigeluth study (1983), which explored the use of nonexamples to teach common errors as an effective strategy in teaching a procedure. A total of 24 undergraduate students enrolled in the Syracuse University Symphonic Band were randomly assigned to an experimental group and a…

  10. Guidelines for safe work practices in human and animal medical diagnostic laboratories. Recommendations of a CDC-convened, Biosafety Blue Ribbon Panel.

    PubMed

    Miller, J Michael; Astles, Rex; Baszler, Timothy; Chapin, Kimberle; Carey, Roberta; Garcia, Lynne; Gray, Larry; Larone, Davise; Pentella, Michael; Pollock, Anne; Shapiro, Daniel S; Weirich, Elizabeth; Wiedbrauk, Danny

    2012-01-01

    Prevention of injuries and occupational infections in U.S. laboratories has been a concern for many years. CDC and the National Institutes of Health addressed the topic in their publication Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories, now in its 5th edition (BMBL-5). BMBL-5, however, was not designed to address the day-to-day operations of diagnostic laboratories in human and animal medicine. In 2008, CDC convened a Blue Ribbon Panel of laboratory representatives from a variety of agencies, laboratory organizations, and facilities to review laboratory biosafety in diagnostic laboratories. The members of this panel recommended that biosafety guidelines be developed to address the unique operational needs of the diagnostic laboratory community and that they be science based and made available broadly. These guidelines promote a culture of safety and include recommendations that supplement BMBL-5 by addressing the unique needs of the diagnostic laboratory. They are not requirements but recommendations that represent current science and sound judgment that can foster a safe working environment for all laboratorians. Throughout these guidelines, quality laboratory science is reinforced by a common-sense approach to biosafety in day-to-day activities. Because many of the same diagnostic techniques are used in human and animal diagnostic laboratories, the text is presented with this in mind. All functions of the human and animal diagnostic laboratory--microbiology, chemistry, hematology, and pathology with autopsy and necropsy guidance--are addressed. A specific section for veterinary diagnostic laboratories addresses the veterinary issues not shared by other human laboratory departments. Recommendations for all laboratories include use of Class IIA2 biological safety cabinets that are inspected annually; frequent hand washing; use of appropriate disinfectants, including 1:10 dilutions of household bleach; dependence on risk assessments for many activities

  11. Radon Testing for Safe Schools Act. Report (To Accompany S. 1697) from the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.

    This report was written to accompany the Radon Testing for Safe Schools Act (S.1697), a bill that provides for radon testing of schools located in high risk radon areas and provides limited financial assistance to schools for mitigation of high levels of radon. A description of radon, its harmful effects, and the radon levels detected in schools…

  12. Work-related stress and bullying: gender differences and forensic medicine issues in the diagnostic procedure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The attention of international agencies and scientific community on bullying and work-related stress is increasing. This study describes the gender differences found in victims of bullying and work-related stress in an Italian case series and analyzes the critical issues in the diagnostic workup. Methods Between 2001 and 2009 we examined 345 outpatients (148 males, 197 females; mean age: 41 ± 10.49) for suspected psychopathological work-related problems. Diagnosis of bullying was established using international criteria (ICD-10 and DSM-IV). Results After interdisciplinary diagnostic evaluation (Occupational Medicine Unit, Psychology and Psychiatry Service), the diagnosis of bullying was formulated in 35 subjects, 12 males and 23 females (2 cases of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and 33 of Adjustment Disorder). Fifty-four (20 males, 34 females) suffered from work-related anxiety, while work-unrelated Adjustment Disorder and other psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 7 and 112 subjects, respectively. Women between 34 and 45 years showed a high prevalence (65%) of "mobbing syndrome" or other work-related stress disorders. Conclusions At work, women are more subject to harassment (for personal aspects related to emotional and relational factors) than men. The knowledge of the phenomenon is an essential requisite to contrast bullying; prevention can be carried out only through effective information and training of workers and employers, who have the legal obligation to preserve the integrity of the mental and physical status of their employees during work. PMID:22088163

  13. When do procedural fairness and outcome fairness interact to influence employees' work attitudes and behaviors? The moderating effect of uncertainty.

    PubMed

    De Cremer, David; Brockner, Joel; Fishman, Ariel; van Dijke, Marius; van Olffen, Woody; Mayer, David M

    2010-03-01

    Prior research has shown that procedural fairness interacts with outcome fairness to influence employees' work attitudes (e.g., organizational commitment) and behaviors (e.g., job performance, organizational citizenship behavior), such that employees' tendencies to respond more positively to higher procedural fairness are stronger when outcome fairness is relatively low. In the present studies, we posited that people's uncertainty about their standing as organizational members would have a moderating influence on this interactive relationship between procedural fairness and outcome fairness, in that the interactive relationship was expected to be more pronounced when uncertainty was high. Using different operationalizations of uncertainty of standing (i.e., length of tenure as a proxy, along with self-reports and coworkers' reports), we found support for this hypothesis in 4 field studies spanning 3 different countries. PMID:20230070

  14. Mesothelioma in a wine cellar man: detailed description of working procedures and past asbestos exposure estimation.

    PubMed

    Nemo, Alessandro; Silvestri, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    A pleural mesothelioma arose in an employee of a wine farm whose work history shows an unusual occupational exposure to asbestos. The information, gathered directly from the case and from a work colleague, clarifies some aspects of the use of asbestos in the process of winemaking which has not been previously reported in such details. The man had worked as a winemaker from 1960 to 1988 in a farm, which in those years produced around 2500 hectoliters of wine per year, mostly white. The wine was filtered to remove impurities; the filter was created by dispersing in the wine asbestos fibers followed by diatomite while the wine was circulating several times and clogging a prefilter made of a dense stainless steel net. Chrysotile asbestos was the sole asbestos mineralogical variety used in these filters and exposure could occur during the phase of mixing dry fibers in the wine and during the filter replacement. A daily and annual time weighted average level of exposure and cumulative dose have been estimated in the absence of airborne asbestos fiber monitoring performed in that workplace. Since 1993, the Italian National Mesothelioma Register, an epidemiological surveillance system, has recorded eight cases with at least one work period spent as winemaker. Four of them never used asbestos filters and presented exposures during other work periods, the other four used asbestos filters but had also other exposures in other industrial divisions. For the information hitherto available, this is the first mesothelioma case with exclusive exposure in the job of winemaking. PMID:25296690

  15. Aerosols and Particulates Workshop Sampling Procedures and Venues Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pachlhofer, Peter; Howard, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The Sampling Procedures and Venues Workgroup discussed the potential venues available and issues associated with obtaining measurements. Some of the issues included Incoming Air Quality, Sampling Locations, Probes and Sample Systems. The following is a summary of the discussion of the issues and venues. The influence of inlet air to the measurement of exhaust species, especially trace chemical species, must be considered. Analysis procedures for current engine exhaust emissions regulatory measurements require adjustments for air inlet humidity. As a matter of course in scientific investigations, it is recommended that "background" measurements for any species, particulate or chemical, be performed during inlet air flow before initiation of combustion, if possible, and during the engine test period as feasible and practical. For current regulatory measurements, this would be equivalent to setting the "zero" level for conventional gas analyzers. As a minimum, it is recommended that measurements of the humidity and particulates in the incoming air be taken at the start and end of each test run. Additional measurement points taken during the run are desirable if they can be practically obtained. It was felt that the presence of trace gases in the incoming air is not a significant problem. However, investigators should consider the ambient levels and influences of local air pollution for species of interest. Desired measurement locations depend upon the investigation requirements. A complete investigation of phenomenology of particulate formation and growth requires measurements at a number of locations both within the engine and in the exhaust field downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Desirable locations for both extractive and in situ measurements include: (1) Combustion Zone (Multiple axial locations); (2) Combustor Exit (Multiple radial locations for annular combustors); (3) Turbine Stage (Inlet and exit of the stage); (4) Exit Nozzle (Multiple axial locations

  16. Method Matters: Systematic Effects of Testing Procedure on Visual Working Memory Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makovski, Tal; Watson, Leah M.; Koutstaal, Wilma; Jiang, Yuhong V.

    2010-01-01

    Visual working memory (WM) is traditionally considered a robust form of visual representation that survives changes in object motion, observer's position, and other visual transients. This article presents data that are inconsistent with the traditional view. We show that memory sensitivity is dramatically influenced by small variations in the…

  17. POLICY AND PROCEDURE FOR A VOCATIONAL EDUCATION WORK-STUDY PROGRAM FOR SEVERELY MENTALLY RETARDED PUPILS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Cruz County Superintendent of Schools, CA.

    THE SANTA CRUZ COUNTY PROGRAM FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION OF TRAINABLE MENTALLY HANDICAPPED STUDENTS IS OUTLINED IN TERMS OF THE STAFF AND ITS RESPONSIBILITIES. SAMPLE FORMS ARE ILLUSTRATED. A SECOND SECTION OF THE DOCUMENT PRESENTS INFORMATION TO ASSIST LOCAL SCHOOL SYSTEMS IN THE PREPARATION OF APPLICATIONS FOR A "VOCATIONAL EDUCATION WORK-STUDY…

  18. How Safe Are Kid-Safe Search Engines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masterson-Krum, Hope

    2001-01-01

    Examines search tools available to elementary and secondary school students, both human-compiled and crawler-based, to help direct them to age-appropriate Web sites; analyzes the procedures of search engines labeled family-friendly or kid safe that use filters; and tests the effectiveness of these services to students in school libraries. (LRW)

  19. Electric overhead traveling cranes: procedures for certification, inspection, and preventive maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this procedure is to describe the overhead crane maintenance, inspection, and certification procedures in sufficient detail so that an experienced craftsman can perform the required work efficiently and safely. It is expected that job procedures will be standardized, that criteria for satisfactory job performance will be provided, and that responsibilities will be established. Applicable sections of safety standards and codes are given to assist with their compliance and to make possible the use of safe work practices.

  20. Developing a Safe Cycling Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Amy Backus

    1983-01-01

    A cycling course can take advantage of students' interests, teach safe cycling, and give students a fuller appreciation of a lifetime sport. Suggestions for planning and scheduling a cycling course, covering safety procedures, and considering other elements necessary for a successful course are given. (PP)

  1. Traveling Safely with Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medications Safely My Medicine List How to Administer Traveling Safely with Medicines Planes, trains, cars – even boats ... your trip, ask your pharmacist about how to travel safely with your medicines. Make sure that you ...

  2. The Effect of Principle-Procedure and Procedure-Principle Sequencing on Learning Outcomes. IDD&E Working Paper No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim-Quek, Muriel; And Others

    This study tested the effects of two instructional sequences--principle-procedure and procedure-principle--on the application and transfer of learning. It was hypothesized that a principle-procedure sequence would result in better near-transfer and far-transfer and that students would prefer this sequence. The 38 freshmen enrolled in a business…

  3. 30 CFR 56.11001 - Safe access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safe access. 56.11001 Section 56.11001 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Travelways § 56.11001 Safe access. Safe means of access shall be provided and maintained to all working places....

  4. 30 CFR 56.11001 - Safe access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safe access. 56.11001 Section 56.11001 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Travelways § 56.11001 Safe access. Safe means of access shall be provided and maintained to all working places....

  5. Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Annette M.

    2003-01-01

    Draws upon Maria Montessori's writings to examine work as a universal human tendency throughout life. Discusses the work of adaptation of the infant, work of "psycho-muscular organism" for the preschooler, work of the imagination for the elementary child, community work of the adolescent, and work of the adult. Asserts that Montessorians' role is…

  6. Safe Finger Tourniquet--Ideas.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lin-Gwei; Chen, Chieh-Feng; Hwang, Chun-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Chiu, Wen-Kuan; Li, Chun-Chang; Wang, Hsian-Jenn

    2016-03-01

    Tourniquets are often needed for optimized phalangeal surgeries. However, few surgeons forget to remove them and caused ischemic injuries. We have a modified method to create a safe finger tourniquet for short duration finger surgeries, which can avoid such tragedy. It is done by donning a glove, cutting the tip of the glove over the finger of interest, and rolling the glove finger to the base. From 2010 to 2013, approximately 54 patients underwent digital surgical procedures with our safe finger tourniquet. Because the glove cannot be forgotten to be removed, the tourniquet must be released and removed. This is a simple and efficient way to apply a safe finger tourniquet by using hand rubber glove for a short-term bloodless finger surgery and can achieve an excellent surgical result. PMID:26855166

  7. Use Medicines Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicines Safely Print This Topic En español Use Medicines Safely Browse Sections The Basics Overview Prescription Medicines ... Medicines 1 of 7 sections The Basics: Prescription Medicines There are different types of medicine. The 2 ...

  8. Use Medicines Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicines Safely Print This Topic En español Use Medicines Safely Browse Sections The Basics Overview Prescription Medicines ... Take these simple steps to avoid problems with medicines. Follow the directions on the medicine label carefully. ...

  9. Is it safe to work with iodine-131 if you are pregnant? A risk assessment for nuclear medicine staff involved with cleaning and decontamination.

    PubMed

    Barber, R W; Parkin, A; Goldstone, K E

    2003-05-01

    In the UK, Regulation 8(5) of the Ionising Radiation Regulations 1999 (In: Work with ionising radiation. London: HSE Books, 2000) requires employers to ensure that the dose to the foetus of a pregnant worker is unlikely to exceed 1 mSv. Risk assessments are required which are capable of predicting the total foetal dose. Work involving 131I is a particular problem. Foetal dose coefficients from the maternal intake of 131I for all stages of pregnancy have been published (Phipps AW, Smith TJ, Fell TP, Harrison JD. Doses to the embryo/fetus and neonate from intake of radionuclides by the mother. NRPB contract research report 397/2001. Didcot, Oxon.: National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB), 2001. Available on website www.hse.gov.uk/research/crr_pdf/2001/crr01397.pdf), and range from 0.08 microSv x kBq(-1) at conception to 55 microSv x kBq(-1) at week 35. This paper examines one aspect of work in a nuclear medicine department in which the source of 131I is uncontrolled to determine whether the risk assessment indicates that restrictions should apply to a pregnant member of staff. Following in-patient treatment with 131I, rooms are checked and decontaminated before being decontrolled. Cleaning staff were monitored immediately after the cleaning process with hand-held detectors and by whole-body monitoring. Total body contamination ranged up to 3.2 kBq; after a change of clothing, the maximum remaining activity was 0.68 kBq. Acquired contamination correlated with the total activity administered to the patient. Hand-held monitoring rarely detected contamination. Whole-body monitoring indicated that the levels of contamination encountered could lead to a dose limit for the foetus being exceeded. These levels are very difficult to detect with hand-held monitoring. The conclusion to be drawn is that pregnant staff should be excluded from situations in which accidents could arise, or where the source of 131I is uncontrolled or unpredictable. PMID:12717076

  10. Procedure-Authoring Tool Improves Safety on Oil Rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Dark, cold, and dangerous environments are plentiful in space and on Earth. To ensure safe operations in difficult surroundings, NASA relies heavily on procedures written well ahead of time. Houston-based TRACLabs Inc. worked with Ames Research Center through the SBIR program to create an electronic procedure authoring tool, now used by NASA and companies in the oil and gas industry.

  11. Safe Disposal of Highly Reactive Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunn, George; Sansone, Eric B.

    1994-01-01

    Provides specific procedures for the disposal of a variety of highly reactive chemicals and reports the results of a study of their safe disposal. Disposal of some problematic sulfur-containing compounds are included. Procedures are based on a combination of literature review and author development. (LZ)

  12. Handbook for Sponsors; Standards and Procedures for Work-Training Experience Programs under the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, as Amended.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Bureau of Work-Training Programs.

    The standards and procedures presented establish the basic rules governing the development and operation of various programs administered by the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Work Programs under the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, as amended. Basic standards relate to qualification of sponsors, eligibility of enrollees, hours of work,…

  13. Development of a systems theoretical procedure for evaluation of the work organization of the cockpit crew of a civil transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fricke, M.; Vees, C.

    1983-01-01

    To achieve optimum design for the man machine interface with aircraft, a description of the interaction and work organization of the cockpit crew is needed. The development of system procedure to evaluate the work organization of pilots while structuring the work process is examined. Statistical data are needed to simulate sequences of pilot actions on the computer. Investigations of computer simulation and applicability for evaluation of crew concepts are discussed.

  14. Staying Healthy and Safe at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... rest often throughout the day. Wear comfortable shoes. Computers and desks Many of today's jobs involve computer ... rest often throughout the day. Wear comfortable shoes. Computers and desks Many of today's jobs involve computer ...

  15. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 197 - Procedures for Historical Researchers Permanently Assigned Within the Executive Branch Working on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures for Historical Researchers...) MISCELLANEOUS HISTORICAL RESEARCH IN THE FILES OF THE OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (OSD) Pt. 197, App. B Appendix B to Part 197—Procedures for Historical Researchers Permanently Assigned Within the...

  16. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 197 - Procedures for Historical Researchers Permanently Assigned Within the Executive Branch Working on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Procedures for Historical Researchers...) MISCELLANEOUS HISTORICAL RESEARCH IN THE FILES OF THE OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (OSD) Pt. 197, App. B Appendix B to Part 197—Procedures for Historical Researchers Permanently Assigned Within the...

  17. Choosing Safe Baby Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Choosing Safe Baby Products KidsHealth > For Parents > Choosing Safe Baby Products Print A A A Text Size Even though ... nothing small or simple about their accessories! Selecting products for your baby can be confusing, especially with ...

  18. Aflatoxins and safe storage.

    PubMed

    Villers, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The paper examines both field experience and research on the prevention of the exponential growth of aflatoxins during multi-month post-harvest storage in hot, humid countries. The approach described is the application of modern safe storage methods using flexible, Ultra Hermetic™ structures that create an unbreatheable atmosphere through insect and microorganism respiration alone, without use of chemicals, fumigants, or pumps. Laboratory and field data are cited and specific examples are given describing the uses of Ultra Hermetic storage to prevent the growth of aflatoxins with their significant public health consequences. Also discussed is the presently limited quantitative information on the relative occurrence of excessive levels of aflatoxin (>20 ppb) before vs. after multi-month storage of such crops as maize, rice, and peanuts when under high humidity, high temperature conditions and, consequently, the need for further research to determine the frequency at which excessive aflatoxin levels are reached in the field vs. after months of post-harvest storage. The significant work being done to reduce aflatoxin levels in the field is mentioned, as well as its probable implications on post-harvest storage. Also described is why, with some crops such as peanuts, using Ultra Hermetic storage may require injection of carbon dioxide, or use of an oxygen absorber as an accelerant. The case of peanuts is discussed and experimental data is described. PMID:24782846

  19. Safe handling and disposal of laboratory animal waste.

    PubMed

    Hill, D

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory animal handlers have a strict obligation to consider the safe handling and disposal of their animal waste streams. It is their responsibility to evaluate the hazards, assess the risks, and choose an appropriate strategy. Potential hazards include chemicals, such as commonly used sterilants and disinfectants; physical risks, such as heavy or repetitive lifting activities; hazardous micro-organisms or allergens; and radiologic agents. Furthermore, many animal studies involve compounds with unknown toxicity, which may require special precautions. Animal handlers must protect themselves by using appropriate engineering controls of work practice to minimize their exposure, adding the use of personal protective equipment when necessary. In addition, compliance with institutional waste handling procedures that meet federal, state, and local environmental requirements is essential to ensure the safe transport and disposal of animal waste streams. PMID:10329914

  20. Development of Procedures and Instruments for Assessing the Productivity and Impact of Post-Secondary Cooperative Education and Work Experience Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaschke, Charles L.; And Others

    A project was conducted to assess the evaluation needs of post secondary cooperative education program administrators and to develop procedures and checklists for assessing productivity and impact of postsecondary cooperative education. This work built upon a general design developed in 1976 under part C of Public Law 90-576 for improving…

  1. Safe patient handling and movement in a pediatric setting.

    PubMed

    Motacki, Kathleen; Motacki, Lisa Marie

    2009-01-01

    Although evidence-based practice exists to apply the principles of safe patient handling and movement (SPHM) to prevent nursing musculoskeletal injuries in the workplace, nurses and nursing staff continue to use "body mechanics" when moving, lifting, and transferring patients. In this day of a nursing shortage, one that will continue to worsen, valued professionals must remain on the job and free from preventable, work-related injuries. As states enact laws requiring health care facilities to develop and institute SPHM programs, hospitals will be held to task to produce SPHM policies, procedures, plans, and protocols in their institutions. PMID:19785301

  2. Karate: Keep It Safe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, David

    1981-01-01

    Safety guidelines for each phase of a karate practice session are presented to provide an accident-free and safe environment for teaching karate in a physical education or traditional karate training program. (JMF)

  3. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-07-06

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  4. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-01-01

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  5. Taking multiple medicines safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000883.htm Taking multiple medicines safely To use the sharing features on this ... directed. Why you may Need More Than one Medicine You may take more than one medicine to ...

  6. Creating a Safe Haven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    Examines security issues that planners must address at the programming and schematic design phase in key areas of the school building. They include the front door, safe halls and stairs, positive classrooms, and secure assembly. (EV)

  7. Medicines: Use Them Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... Track of Your Medicines Taking Medicines Safely Saving Money on Medicines, Shopping Online For More Information about ... half doses of a prescription drug to save money. ( Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if you ...

  8. Using Medications Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... health systems play an important role in preventing medication errors. To make sure you use medicines safely and effectively, ASHP recommends that you: Keep a list of all medications that you take (prescribed drugs, nonprescription medicines, herbal ...

  9. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  10. Strategies for selecting optimal sampling and work-up procedures for analysing alkylphenol polyethoxylates in effluents from non-activated sludge biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Stenholm, Ake; Holmström, Sara; Hjärthag, Sandra; Lind, Ola

    2012-01-01

    Trace-level analysis of alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APEOs) in wastewater containing sludge requires the prior removal of contaminants and preconcentration. In this study, the effects on optimal work-up procedures of the types of alkylphenols present, their degree of ethoxylation, the biofilm wastewater treatment and the sample matrix were investigated for these purposes. The sampling spot for APEO-containing specimens from an industrial wastewater treatment plant was optimized, including a box that surrounded the tubing outlet carrying the wastewater, to prevent sedimented sludge contaminating the collected samples. Following these changes, the sampling precision (in terms of dry matter content) at a point just under the tubing leading from the biofilm reactors was 0.7% RSD. The findings were applied to develop a work-up procedure for use prior to a high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection analysis method capable of quantifying nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPEOs) and poorly investigated dinonylphenol polyethoxylates (DNPEOs) at low microg L(-1) concentrations in effluents from non-activated sludge biofilm reactors. The selected multi-step work-up procedure includes lyophilization and pressurized fluid extraction (PFE) followed by strong ion exchange solid phase extraction (SPE). The yields of the combined procedure, according to tests with NP10EO-spiked effluent from a wastewater treatment plant, were in the 62-78% range. PMID:22519096

  11. The Food-Safe Schools Action Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "The Food-Safe School Needs Assessment and Planning Guide" is a tool that can help schools assess their food safety policies, procedures, and programs and develop plans for improvement. This tool includes a simple, straightforward questionnaire, score card, and planning guide that give administrators, school staff, families, and students a chance…

  12. Strategies for safe injections.

    PubMed Central

    Battersby, A.; Feilden, R.; Stoeckel, P.; Da Silva, A.; Nelson, C.; Bass, A.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, faced with growing international concern, WHO set out an approach for achieving injection safety that encompassed all elements from patients' expectations and doctors' prescribing habits to waste disposal. This article follows that lead and describes the implications of the approach for two injection technologies: sterilizable and disposable. It argues that focusing on any single technology diverts attention from the more fundamental need for health services to develop their own comprehensive strategies for safe injections. National health authorities will only be able to ensure that injections are administered safely if they take an approach that encompasses the whole system, and choose injection technologies that fit their circumstances. PMID:10680247

  13. An adsorptive stripping voltammetry procedure for ultra-trace determination of U(VI) using double accumulation step on two lead-film working electrodes.

    PubMed

    Korolczuk, Mieczyslaw; Grabarczyk, Malgorzata; Rutyna, Iwona

    2014-12-01

    We report a very sensitive stripping voltammetric procedure for determination of ultra-trace quantity of U(VI) in water samples. A very low detection limit was achieved owing to the application of a new construction of the voltammetric electrode cell with two built-in working electrodes that differed significantly in their surface area. The procedure was based on the double adsorptive accumulation of the U(VI)-cupferron complex onto two lead film working electrodes. Under optimal conditions the detection limit for accumulation time of 120 s for the big electrode and 120 s for the small electrode was about 3.1 × 10(-11) mol L(-1), whereas for accumulation time of 480 s for the big electrode and 240 s for the small electrode it was about 1.1 × 10(-11) mol L(-1). The proposed method was successfully validated using certified reference material seawater NASS-5. PMID:25159419

  14. Nuclear weapon safety: How safe is safe

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The safety criteria that have been specified for modern nuclear weapons are very demanding. The majority of the weapons in the current stockpile will have to be modified to meet them, unless they are retired. Moreover, for some weapons we still lack necessary data to perform credible safety analyses. Although plutonium dispersal is a much less threatening danger than a sizable nuclear yield, it is nevertheless a potentially serious hazard, particularly if the plutonium is aerosolized in a chemical detonation. The panel recommended the following actions: (1) equip all stockpiled weapons with Enhanced Nuclear Detonation Safety, and build all aircraft-launched bombs and cruise missiles with insensitive high explosive and fire-resistant cores; (2) began an immediate review of the acceptability of retaining missile systems without IHE, fire-resistant cores, or 1.3 class propellant in close proximity to the warheads; (3) continue safety studies and allocate necessary resources to weapons and military laboratories; (4) affirm enhanced safety as the top priority goal of the US nuclear weapons program, and design all future weapons to be as safe as practically achievable, consistent with reasonable military requirements.

  15. Keeping Campuses Safe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Describes how colleges and universities are using technology, as well as traditional methods, to keep campuses safe and reduce crime. Topics include using free pizza in a successful contest to teach students about campus safety, installing security cameras, using access-control cards, providing adequate lighting, and creating a bicycle patrol…

  16. A Safe Haven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lupinacci, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    Presents four key steps in planning for school security and creating a safe, secure environment for students: deterring the possibility of crime; detecting when something potentially troublesome has occurred; delaying criminals in order to give law enforcement officials the additional time needed to catch them; and recovering and continuing the…

  17. Safe Entry, Easy Exit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2008-01-01

    After violent episodes too numerous to list and too terrible to forget, schools and universities have been focused for several years on enhancing security in their facilities. Doors are among the most critical points of concern for school personnel responsible for keeping buildings safe. Education institutions want doors that let the right people…

  18. Safe Passage: Making It through Adolescence in a Risky Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dryfoos, Joy G.

    The primary job of parents is to ensure safe passage for their children from infancy through adolescence to adulthood. Research has indicated many things schools can do to turn the privilege of safe passage into a right. Three research-based programs that work to achieve safe passage are described. The first is Caring Connection, a "one-stop-shop"…

  19. 49 CFR 214.336 - On-track safety procedures for certain roadway work groups and adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... through § 214.319 (Working limits, generally) or § 214.329 (Train approach warning provided by watchmen... more train or other on-track equipment movements authorized or permitted at a speed of 25 mph or less (or 40 mph or less for one or more passenger train or other passenger on-track equipment...

  20. 49 CFR 214.336 - On-track safety procedures for certain roadway work groups and adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... through § 214.319 (Working limits, generally) or § 214.329 (Train approach warning provided by watchmen... one of these adjacent controlled tracks has one or more train or other on-track equipment movements... concurrent train or other on-track equipment movements authorized or permitted at a speed over 25 mph,...

  1. Is herniography useful and safe?

    PubMed

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, Gregor R; Kidambi, Ananta V

    2011-11-01

    117 consecutive herniograms were reviewed for patients who had symptoms suggestive of hernia but with no evidence or inconclusive findings on physical examination. The traditional approach has been to explore patients with suspected occult hernias. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of herniography in minimizing needless groin exploration and to evaluate its safety. Thirty-three herniograms were positive and showed unilateral and bilateral inguinal hernias. There were no false positive examinations and two false negative examinations. No complications were present. Patients with positive herniograms were explored, and operative findings correlated well with herniographic findings. Twenty-four patients were referred to other specialities. Follow-up in clinic and telephone interviews showed symptomatic improvement in the majority of patients. Herniography is useful in evaluating obscure groin pain and occult hernias. It is a safe procedure and more cost effective than a negative exploration or diagnostic laparoscopy. PMID:20833494

  2. Experience with fluorine and its safe use as a propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, D. L.; Guenther, M. E.; Stimpson, L. D.; Toth, L. R.; Young, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The industrial and the propulsion experience with fluorine and its derivatives is surveyed. The hazardous qualities of fluorine and safe handling procedures for the substance are emphasized. Procedures which fulfill the safety requirements during ground operations for handling fluorinated propulsion systems are discussed. Procedures to be implemented for use onboard the Space Transportation System are included.

  3. Analysis of organo-chlorine pesticides residue in raw coffee with a modified "quick easy cheap effective rugged and safe" extraction/clean up procedure for reducing the impact of caffeine on the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurement.

    PubMed

    Bresin, Bruno; Piol, Maria; Fabbro, Denis; Mancini, Maria Antonietta; Casetta, Bruno; Del Bianco, Clorinda

    2015-01-01

    The control of pesticide residues on raw coffee is a task of great importance due to high consumption of this beverage in Italy and in many other countries. High caffeine content can hamper extraction and measurement of any pesticide residue. A tandem extraction protocol has been devised by exploiting the quick easy cheap effective rugged and safe (QuEChERS) scheme for extraction, coupled to a dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (DLLME) in order to drastically reduce caffeine content in the final extract. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been used for quantification of organo-chlorine pesticides in single ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Method has been validated and performances meet the criteria prescribed by European Union regulations. PMID:25537171

  4. Microelectromechanical safe arm device

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.

    2012-06-05

    Microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus and methods for operating, for preventing unintentional detonation of energetic components comprising pyrotechnic and explosive materials, such as air bag deployment systems, munitions and pyrotechnics. The MEM apparatus comprises an interrupting member that can be moved to block (interrupt) or complete (uninterrupt) an explosive train that is part of an energetic component. One or more latching members are provided that engage and prevent the movement of the interrupting member, until the one or more latching members are disengaged from the interrupting member. The MEM apparatus can be utilized as a safe and arm device (SAD) and electronic safe and arm device (ESAD) in preventing unintentional detonations. Methods for operating the MEM apparatus include independently applying drive signals to the actuators coupled to the latching members, and an actuator coupled to the interrupting member.

  5. Approaching Suspicious Substances Safely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    A mineral identification tool that was developed for NASA's Mars Rover Technology Development program is now serving as a powerful tool for U.S. law enforcement agencies and military personnel to identify suspicious liquid and solid substances. The tool can measure unknown substances through glass and plastic packaging materials with the RamanProbe(TradeMark) focused fiber-optic probe. The probe length can be extended up to 200 meters to enable users to analyze potentially dangerous substances at a safe distance. In many cases, the spectrometer and personnel are kept in a safe zone while the probe is positioned next to the sample being analyzed. Being able to identify chemicals in remote locations also saves users time and labor, since otherwise the samples would need to be collected, transported, and prepared prior to measurement in the laboratory.

  6. Safe Motherhood Initiative.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    In 1991, staff of Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS)/Macro International met with WHO to discuss the prospect of collecting data on maternal health and morbidity so DHS could set up an international database. The database's purpose would be to gauge the progress of Safe Motherhood programs worldwide and to determine their strengths and weaknesses. WHO and Marc wrote a proposal for the development of a core data collection questionnaire and the implementation of Safe Motherhood Surveys in 3 countries. They recommended that these surveys be follow-up surveys to DHS surveys. The Rockefeller Foundation provided Macro funding for the development of the core questionnaire and documentation, for technical assistance to the Philippines, and for a meeting to develop the best possible questionnaire. 20 international specialists attended the December 1992 meeting at the World Bank. The USAID-funded Mothercare Project took care of local costs of the Philippines Safe Motherhood Survey. Between March and June 1993, Macro along with the Philippines Department of Health, the National Statistics Office, and the Clinical Epidemiology Unit of the Philippines General Hospital collected data for the validation study and conducted qualitative research on women's perceptions when informed about obstetric complications. They next pretested the questionnaire. Training of trainers was in September 1993 and interviewer training followed in early October. The actual Safe Motherhood survey began in mid-October, 5-6 months after the Philippines DHS survey ended. Macro expected preliminary results in early 1994. The questionnaire concentrated on prenatal and postnatal care, delivery, and potentially fatal complications (especially their treatment). Other topics included morbidity, sexually transmitted diseases, domestic violence, and nutritional status. Macro will use the results of the Philippine survey to revise the questionnaire. PMID:12287321

  7. Health and Safety Procedures Manual for hazardous waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Thate, J.E.

    1992-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Chemical Assessments Team (ORNL/CAT) has developed this Health and Safety Procedures Manual for the guidance, instruction, and protection of ORNL/CAT personnel expected to be involved in hazardous waste site assessments and remedial actions. This manual addresses general and site-specific concerns for protecting personnel, the general public, and the environment from any possible hazardous exposures. The components of this manual include: medical surveillance, guidance for determination and monitoring of hazards, personnel and training requirements, protective clothing and equipment requirements, procedures for controlling work functions, procedures for handling emergency response situations, decontamination procedures for personnel and equipment, associated legal requirements, and safe drilling practices.

  8. Safe handling of cytotoxic compounds in a biopharmaceutical environment.

    PubMed

    Hensgen, Miriam I; Stump, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Handling cytotoxic drugs such as antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) in a biopharmaceutical environment represents a challenge based on the potency of the compounds. These derivatives are dangerous to humans if they accidentally get in contact with the skin, are inhaled, or are ingested, either as pure compounds in their solid state or as a solution dissolved in a co-solvent. Any contamination of people involved in the manufacturing process has to be avoided. On the other hand, biopharmaceuticals need to be protected simultaneously against any contamination from the manufacturing personnel. Therefore, a tailor-made work environment is mandatory in order to manufacture ADCs. This asks for appropriate technical equipment to keep potential hazardous substances contained. In addition, clearly defined working procedures based on risk assessments as well as proper training for all personnel involved in the manufacturing process are needed to safely handle these highly potent pharmaceuticals. PMID:23913145

  9. Addressing Lead-Based Paint Hazards During Renovation, Remodeling, and Rehabilitation in Federally Owned and Assisted Housing. Instructor Manual for Use in HUD-Sponsored Lead-Safe Work Practices Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics.

    This document is the instructor's manual for a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) training course that reflects the requirements of HUD's Lead Safe Housing Rule and is designed to provide training contractors with information regarding containment, minimization, and cleanup of lead hazards during activities that disturb…

  10. Transcoding abilities in typical and atypical mathematics achievers: the role of working memory and procedural and lexical competencies.

    PubMed

    Moura, Ricardo; Wood, Guilherme; Pinheiro-Chagas, Pedro; Lonnemann, Jan; Krinzinger, Helga; Willmes, Klaus; Haase, Vitor Geraldi

    2013-11-01

    Transcoding between numerical systems is one of the most basic abilities acquired by children during their early school years. One important topic that requires further exploration is how mathematics proficiency can affect number transcoding. The aim of the current study was to investigate transcoding abilities (i.e., reading Arabic numerals and writing dictation) in Brazilian children with and without mathematics difficulties, focusing on different school grades. We observed that children with learning difficulties in mathematics demonstrated lower achievement in number transcoding in both early and middle elementary school. In early elementary school, difficulties were observed in both the basic numerical lexicon and the management of numerical syntax. In middle elementary school, difficulties appeared mainly in the transcoding of more complex numbers. An error analysis revealed that the children with mathematics difficulties struggled mainly with the acquisition of transcoding rules. Although we confirmed the previous evidence on the impact of working memory capacity on number transcoding, we found that it did not fully account for the observed group differences. The results are discussed in the context of a maturational lag in number transcoding ability in children with mathematics difficulties. PMID:24007971

  11. Safe venting of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.F.; Dewart, J.M.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The disposal of hydrogen is often required in the operation of an experimental facility that contains hydrogen. Whether the vented hydrogen can be discharged to the atmosphere safely depends upon a number of factors such as the flow rate and atmospheric conditions. Calculations have been made that predict the distance a combustible mixture can extend from the point of release under some specified atmospheric conditions. Also the quantity of hydrogen in the combustible cloud is estimated. These results can be helpful in deciding of the hydrogen can be released directly to the atmosphere, or if it must be intentionally ignited. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Asymptotically safe Higgs inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi; He, Hong-Jian E-mail: hjhe@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2014-10-01

    We construct a new inflation model in which the standard model Higgs boson couples minimally to gravity and acts as the inflaton. Our construction of Higgs inflation incorporates the standard model with Einstein gravity which exhibits asymptotic safety in the ultraviolet region. The slow roll condition is satisfied at large field value due to the asymptotically safe behavior of Higgs self-coupling at high energies. We find that this minimal construction is highly predictive, and is consistent with both cosmological observations and collider experiments.

  13. Cool and Safe: Multiplicity in Safe Innovation at Unilever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penders, Bart

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the making of a safe innovation: the application of ice structuring protein (ISP) in edible ices. It argues that safety is not the absence of risk but is an active accomplishment; innovations are not "made safe afterward" but "safe innovations are made". Furthermore, there are multiple safeties to be accomplished in the…

  14. Type Safe Extensible Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Wonseok

    2009-10-01

    Software products evolve over time. Sometimes they evolve by adding new features, and sometimes by either fixing bugs or replacing outdated implementations with new ones. When software engineers fail to anticipate such evolution during development, they will eventually be forced to re-architect or re-build from scratch. Therefore, it has been common practice to prepare for changes so that software products are extensible over their lifetimes. However, making software extensible is challenging because it is difficult to anticipate successive changes and to provide adequate abstraction mechanisms over potential changes. Such extensibility mechanisms, furthermore, should not compromise any existing functionality during extension. Software engineers would benefit from a tool that provides a way to add extensions in a reliable way. It is natural to expect programming languages to serve this role. Extensible programming is one effort to address these issues. In this thesis, we present type safe extensible programming using the MLPolyR language. MLPolyR is an ML-like functional language whose type system provides type-safe extensibility mechanisms at several levels. After presenting the language, we will show how these extensibility mechanisms can be put to good use in the context of product line engineering. Product line engineering is an emerging software engineering paradigm that aims to manage variations, which originate from successive changes in software.

  15. Inserting IUDs safely.

    PubMed

    Burnhill, M S

    1989-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of safe insertion of IUDs in the contemporary U.S. setting, when any IUD complication may provoke litigation, includes explanations of complications listed on package inserts, what to look for in the pelvic exam, now to handle the inserter, whether to give prophylactic antibiotics or a cervical block, follow-up management, and advice on safe sex and hygiene. The similarities and differences in listed contraindications for the ParaGard and Progestasert IUDs are analyzed. It is important to know these listed contraindications to avoid being the sole defendant in a court case. Neither explicitly rules out nulliparas, and some women who have completed childbearing may be willing to risk ectopic pregnancy. The physician must be sure to avoid any possible risks of pelvic infection, however. It is important to postpone IUD insertion if there is any suggestion of lower genital tract infection. Similarly, IUD insertion is intended to last for years, so a paracervical block is recommended if access is difficult. Tips for ensuring scrupulous asepsis are suggested. Women for whom prophylactic antibiotics are advised include diabetics, those with heart valve disease or transplants. IUD patients should be clearly identified when they call in with complaints, and seen urgently. Finally, a sexual history should be taken to avoid candidates who engage in anal sex practices. PMID:12284992

  16. Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart

    MedlinePlus

    ... JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart Safe steps in food handling, cooking, and ... from other foods. Cook —Cook to the right temperature. Chill —Refrigerate food promptly. Cook all food to ...

  17. Safe sedation in modern cardiological practice.

    PubMed

    Furniss, Stephen S; Sneyd, J Robert

    2015-10-01

    Safe sedation is fundamental to many modern cardiological procedures, and following the publication of the report on safe sedation by the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, this report discusses sedation specifically in cardiological practice. The major areas within cardiology that use sedation are cardioversion, catheter ablation particularly of atrial fibrillation, transoesophageal echocardiography, implantable device (cardiovascular implantable electronic device) procedures and other procedures such as transcatheter aortic valve replacement. There is increasing demand for cardiological sedation but there is wide geographical variation in its use and there are also growing data to support non-anaesthetists giving sedation. The use of benzodiazepines, particularly for short procedures, is common, but even here good record-keeping and audit together with an understanding of the continuum of sedation and having appropriately trained staff and the necessary facilities are vital. Nurse administration of propofol may be appropriate for some procedures in cardiology that require at least moderate sedation. Appropriate training is essential and the use of capnography and target controlled infusion pumps for propofol administration is recommended. PMID:26085525

  18. SUPRAPUR®: Safe and convenient percutaneous suprapubic catheterisation in high-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Philipp; Ritter, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound-guided percutaneous placement of a suprapubic cystostomy is a common and generally safe procedure in everyday surgery. In case of adverse patient characteristics such as small bladder capacity or high body mass index, however, the procedure carries an increased risk of severe complications, including bowel perforation. The Suprapur® cystostomy set is supposed to enable a safer procedure. The aim of our work was to evaluate the safety and ease of use of the Suprapur® cystostomy set. Material and methods We prospectively evaluated the Suprapur® set in high-risk patients, having either a small bladder capacity below 250 ml or a BMI above 30 kg/m2. Complications and surgical outcome were monitored. In addition, patients’ contentment and pain during the procedure was assessed with a visual analogue scale (VAS). Possible drawbacks and ease of use were evaluated by customized questionnaires for the operating physician. Results In total, 26 cystostomies were performed by 15 different physicians, 40% (n = 6) of whom were inexperienced first or second year residents. No complications occurred. Mild gross haematuria occurred in 11.5% (n = 4) of cases. Average VAS for pain during and two hours after the procedure was 2.1 (±1.2) and 0.3 (±0.5) respectively. In 91%, (n = 20) of the procedures, the physicians claimed to have felt safe using SUPRAPUR® and more comfortable (82%, n = 18) than with a conventional cystostomy set. Conclusions SUPRAPUR® allows a safe and simple placement of a suprapubic cystostomy even in high-risk patients or in inexperienced hands. It might help to reduce the complications of a common and frequent surgical procedure. PMID:26855806

  19. Safe pill-dispensing.

    PubMed

    Testa, Massimiliano; Pollard, John

    2007-01-01

    Each patient is supplied with a smart-card containing a Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) chip storing a unique identification code. The patient places the Smart-card on a pill-dispenser unit containing an RFID reader. The RFID chip is read and the code sent to a Base-station via a wireless Bluetooth link. A database containing both patient details and treatment information is queried at the Base-station using the RFID as the search key. The patient's treatment data (i.e., drug names, quantities, time, etc.) are retrieved and sent back to the pill-dispenser unit via Bluetooth. Appropriate quantities of the required medications are automatically dispensed, unless the patient has already taken his/her daily dose. Safe, confidential communication and operation is ensured. PMID:17901607

  20. Strategies for safe motherhood.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, A

    1995-02-01

    The Safe Motherhood Initiative was launched in 1988 as a global effort to halve maternal mortality and morbidity by the year 2000. The program uses a combination of health and nonhealth strategies to emphasize the need for maternal health services, extend family planning services, and improve the status of women. The maternal mortality rate (per 100,000 live births) is 390 for the world, 20-30 for developed countries, 450 for developing countries, and 420 for Asia. This translates into 308,000 maternal deaths in Asia, of which 100,000 occur in India. The direct causes of maternal mortality include sepsis, hemorrhage, eclampsia, and ruptured uterus. Indirect causes occur when associated medical conditions, such as anemia and jaundice, are exacerbated by pregnancy. Underlying causes are ineffective health services, inadequate obstetric care, unregulated fertility, infections, illiteracy, early marriage, poverty, malnutrition, and ignorance. India's Child Survival and Safe Motherhood Program seeks to achieve immediate improvements by improving health care. Longterm improvements will occur as nutrition, income, education, and the status of women improve. Improvements in health care will occur in through the provision of 1) essential obstetric care for all women (which will be essentially designed for low-risk women), 2) early detection of complications during pregnancy and labor, and 3) emergency services. Services will be provided to pregnant women at their door by field staff, at a first referral hospital, perhaps at maternity villages where high risk cases can be housed in the latter part of their pregnancies, and through the continual accessibility of government vehicles. In addition, family planning services will be improved so that fertility regulation can have its expected beneficial effect on the maternal mortality rate. The professional health organizations in India will also play a vital role in the success of this effort to reduce maternal mortality. PMID

  1. A new safe and cost-effective percutaneous dilatational tracheotomy: SafeTrach.

    PubMed

    Ullman, Johan; Karling, Jonas; Margolin, Gregori

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion SafeTrach is a new simplified and safe technique to perform percutaneous dilatational tracheotomy (PDT) that eliminates known risk factors compared with existing percutaneous techniques. In the present clinical study, also patients with disadvantageous anatomy not suitable for conventional PDT (CPDT) were treated without complications using SafeTrach. PDT with SafeTrach (STPDT) offers an excellent solution for patients who need tracheotomy in connection with elective ear, nose, and throat (ENT) surgery. Objectives To assess a new technique for percutaneous tracheotomy. Methods Seventeen patients were tracheotomized with STPDT using SafeTrach for the initial penetration sequence and single step dilatational techniques for the dilatational sequence. The patients represented a variety of different neck anatomies. Fifteen patients were head- and neck cancer patients that were subjects of free flap transplants. Results This study showed that STPDT was safe and easy to perform and time-efficient. The median duration of the procedure was 11.5 min and the puncture was in all cases located in the midline of the trachea either between the 2nd and 3rd tracheal ring (n = 13) or between the 3rd and 4th ring (n = 4). PMID:26902954

  2. 29 CFR 1910.420 - Safe practices manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations General Operations Procedures § 1910.420... requirements of this standard. (2) For each diving mode engaged in, the safe practices manual shall include: (i) Safety procedures and checklists for diving operations; (ii) Assignments and responsibilities of the...

  3. 29 CFR 1910.420 - Safe practices manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations General Operations Procedures § 1910.420... requirements of this standard. (2) For each diving mode engaged in, the safe practices manual shall include: (i) Safety procedures and checklists for diving operations; (ii) Assignments and responsibilities of the...

  4. 29 CFR 1910.420 - Safe practices manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations General Operations Procedures § 1910.420... requirements of this standard. (2) For each diving mode engaged in, the safe practices manual shall include: (i) Safety procedures and checklists for diving operations; (ii) Assignments and responsibilities of the...

  5. 29 CFR 1910.420 - Safe practices manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations General Operations Procedures § 1910.420... requirements of this standard. (2) For each diving mode engaged in, the safe practices manual shall include: (i) Safety procedures and checklists for diving operations; (ii) Assignments and responsibilities of the...

  6. Safe Spaces, Nurturing Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrell, Linda; Littlefield, Melissa; Washington, Earlie M.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the limited yet important literature on the contributions of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) to students and the profession of social work. The vital role of HBCUs in social work education and their mission to advocate for social and economic justice for disenfranchised populations is also discussed. A…

  7. On safe motherhood.

    PubMed

    Mahler, H

    1988-05-01

    After a general discussion of the factors contributing to maternal mortality and morbidity, a solution to both of these problems is suggested for India: an initiative at the district level to improve support, supervision, training, essential midwifery and obstetric care. The general causes of the 200 or more times higher maternal morality risks in developing countries act throughout the woman's lifetime: powerlessness, illiteracy, malnutrition, deficiency of calcium, vitamin D and iron, heavy physical labor, unchecked fertility, lack of prenatal and obstetric care and illegal abortion. The most common causes of maternal morality and morbidity, eclampsia, obstructed labor, hemorrhage and sepsis, have been prevented in developed countries and in China. We know how to prevent them, by technical support and management at the district level. 4 elements are required: 1) adequate primary health care, food and universal family planning; 2) prenatal care and nutrition with referral if needed; 3) assistance of a trained person at every childbirth; 4) access to obstetric care for those at high risk. Rather than spend money or urban specialized hospital centers, half to 2/3 of all fatal complications of childbirth can be eliminated by local hospitals with the ability to do basic obstetrics such as caesareans and blood transfusions. There is a need for further health systems research in the given locale, but what we need now is an initiative on making pregnancy and childbirth safe for all women. PMID:3420000

  8. Injections--how safe.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Saurabh

    2005-04-01

    Injection, is a skin-piercing event performed by a syringe and needle with the purpose of introducing a curative substance or vaccine in a patient. According to WHO, safe injection is one which does not harm to the recepient, does not expose the health worker to any risk and does not result in waste that is dangerous for the community. To achieve this injection should be prepared on a clean workspace, provider should clean his hands appropriately, sterility of the syringe and needle to be maintained, skin of the recipient should be cleaned and above all sharps waste should be managed appropriately. Common danger of unsafe injection is infection. Most medication used in primary care can be administered orally. So firstly the behaviour of healthcare providers and patients must be changed so as to decrease overuse of injections, secondly provision of sufficient quantities of appropriate injection equipment and infection control supplies should be made available and thirdly a sharp waste management system should be set up. PMID:16173426

  9. OPINION: Safe exponential manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoenix, Chris; Drexler, Eric

    2004-08-01

    In 1959, Richard Feynman pointed out that nanometre-scale machines could be built and operated, and that the precision inherent in molecular construction would make it easy to build multiple identical copies. This raised the possibility of exponential manufacturing, in which production systems could rapidly and cheaply increase their productive capacity, which in turn suggested the possibility of destructive runaway self-replication. Early proposals for artificial nanomachinery focused on small self-replicating machines, discussing their potential productivity and their potential destructiveness if abused. In the light of controversy regarding scenarios based on runaway replication (so-called 'grey goo'), a review of current thinking regarding nanotechnology-based manufacturing is in order. Nanotechnology-based fabrication can be thoroughly non-biological and inherently safe: such systems need have no ability to move about, use natural resources, or undergo incremental mutation. Moreover, self-replication is unnecessary: the development and use of highly productive systems of nanomachinery (nanofactories) need not involve the construction of autonomous self-replicating nanomachines. Accordingly, the construction of anything resembling a dangerous self-replicating nanomachine can and should be prohibited. Although advanced nanotechnologies could (with great difficulty and little incentive) be used to build such devices, other concerns present greater problems. Since weapon systems will be both easier to build and more likely to draw investment, the potential for dangerous systems is best considered in the context of military competition and arms control.

  10. Take Your Medicines Safely

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... better, the antibiotic is working in killing the bacteria, but it might not completely give what they call a "bactericidal effect." That means taking the bacteria completely out of the system. It might be ...

  11. Preschooler test or procedure preparation

    MedlinePlus

    ... procedure or other situation to ensure your child's safety. Restraints may be used to keep your child safe when staff temporarily have to leave the room during x-ray and nuclear studies. They may also be used when a ...

  12. Protection from Potential Exposure for the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, Dillard B.; Rudko, Vladimir; Batiy, Valeriy; Timmins, Douglas C.; Brothers, Alan J.; Schmidt, John P.; Swearingen, Gary L.; Schmieman, Eric A.

    2004-03-24

    The Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium has recently completed developing the conceptual design for the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement (NSC). Battelle has the scope of work related to environment and safety of the design. As part of the safety analysis, an analysis was performed to determine the degree of protection to be provided during the construction and 100-year operation period for expected upsets and lower-probability events that would occur from errors, procedures, other human factors, and equipment failures, i.e., ''potential exposures'' other than normal operations. The analysis was based on results of the Preliminary Hazards Analysis. The potential exposure analysis was performed in accordance with existing Ukranian regulations and working processes and procedures in place at the Shelter Object. KSK (a Ukranian Consortium), a subcontractor to the Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium, performed much of the dose analysis. The analysis concluded that potential exposures, outside of those expected during normal operations, would be acceptable and that design criteria and features, and preventative and mitigative measures currently in place at the Shelter would be sufficient to meet operating exposure limits.

  13. SAFE Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Alkali metal heat pipes are among the best understood and tested of components for first generation space fission reactors. A flight reactor will require production of a hundred or more heat pipes with assured reliability over a number of years. To date, alkali metal heat pipes have been built mostly in low budget development environments with little formal quality assurance. Despite this, heat pipe test samples suggest that high reliability can be achieved with the care justified for space flight qualification. Fabrication procedures have been established that, if consistently applied, ensure long-term trouble-free heat pipe operation. Alkali metal heat pipes have been successfully flight tested in micro gravity and also have been shown capable of multi-year operation with no evidence of sensitivity to fast neutron fluence up to 1023 n/cm2. This represents 50 times the fluence of the proposed Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE-100) heat pipe reactor core.

  14. A Very Simple Safe-Bayesian Random Forest.

    PubMed

    Quadrianto, Novi; Ghahramani, Zoubin

    2015-06-01

    Random forests works by averaging several predictions of de-correlated trees. We show a conceptually radical approach to generate a random forest: random sampling of many trees from a prior distribution, and subsequently performing a weighted ensemble of predictive probabilities. Our approach uses priors that allow sampling of decision trees even before looking at the data, and a power likelihood that explores the space spanned by combination of decision trees. While each tree performs Bayesian inference to compute its predictions, our aggregation procedure uses the power likelihood rather than the likelihood and is therefore strictly speaking not Bayesian. Nonetheless, we refer to it as a Bayesian random forest but with a built-in safety. The safeness comes as it has good predictive performance even if the underlying probabilistic model is wrong. We demonstrate empirically that our Safe-Bayesian random forest outperforms MCMC or SMC based Bayesian decision trees in term of speed and accuracy, and achieves competitive performance to entropy or Gini optimised random forest, yet is very simple to construct. PMID:26357350

  15. Medications: Using Them Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicine may upset an empty stomach or that food may improve its absorption. In this case, your child should eat a snack or meal right before or after taking the ... after a meal because food may prevent the medicine from working properly or ...

  16. Troubleshooting procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Puzio, H.W.

    1985-03-01

    In order to properly, efficiently and safely perform service and repair on heating and air conditioning systems there are several basic rules that should be examined and followed by the service technician: (1) know the system, (2) determine what is or what is not happening in the system, (3) follow an intelligent, logical process of elimination, (4) make the repair, and (5) attempt to determine the cause of the failure. Knowing the system starts with education and training. The service technician must know the system, how it works, what component parts comprise the system, what their function is, how they work, their relationship with other components of the system and the effect on the system should any one component fail. These and other features of a troubleshooting system are discussed.

  17. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-01-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective ‘titanic’. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the ‘Seven C's’. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm. PMID:22738396

  18. Young Children Can Be Key to Fire-Safe Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kourofsky, Carolyn E.; Cole, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    For more than 15 years, preschool programs nationwide have worked with Fireproof Children/Prevention First, an international center for injury prevention research and education, to bring fire safety education to young children and their families. The "play safe! be safe!"[R] curriculum includes lessons that young children can learn and understand,…

  19. Creating Safe and Drug-Free Schools: An Action Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    It is essential that communities, businesses, parents, and students work together to develop a disciplined environment for children which includes safe and drug-free schools. Emphasizing the need for commitment and community will, this guide outlines steps each of these groups can take to create safe schools. Communities must place school safety…

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1080 - Safe practices manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safe practices manual. 1926.1080 Section 1926.1080 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Safe practices manual. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section...

  1. Adventure Programming: Keeping It Safe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spacht, Roger J.; Hirsch, Jude

    1995-01-01

    Addresses issues related to administration of adventure programs, including liability, hiring well-trained staff, conducting safe activities, supervising safe adventure programs, maintaining appropriate facilities and equipment, keeping accurate records, posting information about potentially unsafe sites and activities, carrying adequate insurance…

  2. A Safe Protocol for Amalgam Removal

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Dana G.

    2012-01-01

    Today's environment has different impacts on our body than previous generations. Heavy metals are a growing concern in medicine. Doctors and individuals request the removal of their amalgam (silver mercury) restorations due to the high mercury content. A safe protocol to replace the silver mercury filling will ensure that there is minimal if any absorption of materials while being removed. Strong alternative white composite and lab-processed materials are available today to create a healthy and functioning mouth. Preparation of the patient prior to the procedure and after treatment is vital to establish the excretion of the mercury from the body. PMID:22315627

  3. Production Line Materials. Youth Training Scheme. Core Exemplar Work Based Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Staff Coll., Blagdon (England).

    This trainer's guide is intended to assist supervisors of work-based career training projects in helping students understand the operation of an assembly line, including safe working procedures. The guide is one in a series of core curriculum modules that is intended for use in combination on- and off-the-job programs to familiarize youth with the…

  4. Safety Practices for Demolition Procedures. Module SH-41. Safety and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on safety practices for demolition procedures is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module presents a general outline of the safe work practices that should be followed at a demolition job site in order for workers to avoid injury. Following the introduction, 10 objectives (each keyed to a page in the…

  5. Implantable medical devices MRI safe.

    PubMed

    Dal Molin, Renzo; Hecker, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Pacemakers, ICDs, neurostimulators like deep brain stimulator electrodes, spiral cord stimulators, insulin pumps, cochlear implants, retinal implants, hearing aids, electro cardio gram (ECG) leads, or devices in interventional MRI such as vascular guide wires or catheters are affected by MRI magnetic and electromagnetic fields. Design of MRI Safe medical devices requires computer modeling, bench testing, phantom testing, and animal studies. Implanted medical devices can be MRI unsafe, MRI conditional or MRI safe (see glossary). In the following paragraphs we will investigate how to design implanted medical devices MRI safe. PMID:23739365

  6. Staying Safe in the Car and on the Bus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids Home How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Recipes & Cooking Staying Safe Health Problems Illnesses & Injuries Health Problems of Grown Ups People, Places & Things That Help Feelings Q&A ...

  7. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  8. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  9. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  10. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...