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Last update: November 12, 2013.
1

Guide for preparing Safe Operating Procedures (SOPs)  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories' Safe Operating Procedures (SOP) are written for activities that involve the use of explosives, dangerous chemicals, radioactive materials, hazardous systems, and for certain types of operational facilities that present hazards. This guide states SOP requirements for Sandia Livermore in detail and gives a format for writing an SOP.

Devlin, T.K.; Patrician, D.E.; Lucas, H.; Ware, R.A.; Wright, D.A.; Izzo, J.

1981-10-01

2

Safe Haven Laws and School Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Safe haven" laws are designed to protect infants from being killed or otherwise harmed. This article examines the safe haven laws from the states that comprise the Midwest School Social Work Council and the variations between these laws regarding the age of the infant, where the infant can be left, who is allowed to leave the infant, whether…

Kopels, Sandra

2012-01-01

3

Guideline for the preparation of safe operating procedures  

SciTech Connect

These procedures are written for activities that involve the use of explosives, dangerous chemicals, radioactive materials, hazardous sytems, and for certain types of operational facilities which present hazards. This guideline presents a suggested Safe Operating Procedures format.

Stinnett, L.; Carroll, M.M.; Crooks, D.L.; Doyle, J.R.; Jeblick, H.G.; Kessel, D.S.; Tippy, M.W.; Stuckey, J.M.

1981-03-01

4

Is Hartmann's procedure safe in Crohn's disease?  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Crohn's disease-associated colorectal cancer may occur in an area of defunctioning bowel. Some patients with Crohn's colitis undergo subtotal colectomy, ileostomy, and low Hartmann's procedure in an effort to preserve the rectum. This procedure has also been advocated for patients with severe anorectal Crohn's disease, in whom nonhealing of the perineal wound after proctectomy occurs with alarming frequency. The

Elizabeth Cirincione; Stephen R. Gorfine; Joel J. Bauer

2000-01-01

5

Zoonotic Diseases: Work Smart, Stay Safe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How can people who work around wildlife stay safe? It's an important question, especially considering the spread of zoonotic diseases. This helpful instructional 90-minute seminar created by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) is designed to provide a basic overview of these diseases and their transmission. Visitors to the site can also learn about common routes of disease exposure and biosafety recommendations. The diseases discussed here include the plague, rabies, Lyme disease, giardia, and tularemia. This resource is perfect for persons in a variety of occupational settings, including zookeepers, animal control experts, and others.

2011-05-13

6

Working safely in gamma radiography. A training manual for industrial radiographers  

SciTech Connect

This manual is designed for classroom training in working safely in industrial radiography using gamma sources. The purpose is to train radiographers' assistants to work safely as a qualified gamma radiographer. The contents cover the essentials of radiation, radiation protection, emergency procedures, gamma cameras, and biological effects of radiation. (ACR)

McGuire, S.A.; Peabody, C.A.

1982-09-01

7

Thoracoscopic enucleation of esophageal leiomyomas: a feasible and safe procedure.  

PubMed

In recent years, minimally invasive approaches have been introduced, providing thoracoscopic/laparoscopic techniques in the treatment of esophageal leiomyomas. We determined the technical feasibility and patient safety of thoracoscopic enucleation of esophageal leiomyomas by evaluation of 10 consecutive patients undergoing this procedure. For the surgical approach, a four-trocar access via the right pleural cavity in single-lung ventilation was chosen. All minimally invasive procedures were successfully completed without conversion to open surgery. Every tumor was completely resected without opening of the mucosa. No relevant intra- or postoperative complications were detected. These data suggest that thoracoscopic enucleation is a feasible and safe procedure for esophageal leiomyomas. PMID:18072062

Vallböhmer, D; Hölscher, A H; Brabender, J; Bollschweiler, E; Gutschow, C

2007-12-01

8

Longwall Mining Principles for Safely Working Steep Coal Seams.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report summarizes the principles of safely working steep coal seams using longwall mining methods. The report presents the state of the art and identifies the problems that result from seam inclination. Details are given on foreign longwall faces ach...

R. F. J. Adam W. J. Douglas B. J. Reese

1981-01-01

9

49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Safe working pressure; factor of safety. 229.103 Section 229...103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure...of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety shall be four. The fixed...

2010-10-01

10

49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Safe working pressure; factor of safety. 229.103 Section 229...103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure...of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety shall be four. The fixed...

2009-10-01

11

Living and Working Safely Around High-Voltage Power Lines.  

SciTech Connect

High-voltage transmission lines can be just as safe as the electrical wiring in the homes--or just as dangerous. The crucial factor is ourselves: they must learn to behave safely around them. This booklet is a basic safety guide for those who live and work around power lines. It deals primarily with nuisance shocks due to induced voltages, and with potential electric shock hazards from contact with high-voltage lines. References on possible long-term biological effects of transmission lines are shown. In preparing this booklet, the Bonneville Power Administration has drawn on more than 50 years of experience with high-voltage transmission. BPA operates one of the world`s largest networks of long-distance, high-voltage lines. This system has more than 400 substations and about 15,000 miles of transmission lines, almost 4,400 miles of which are operated at 500,000 volts.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

2001-06-01

12

49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Steam Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the...

2013-10-01

13

Orthodontic radiographic procedures--how safe are they?  

PubMed

Parents of children subjected to radiographic procedures for orthodontic purposes occasionally express concern about possible radiation overdose to sensitive structures in the head and neck region. The following study was designed to determine this. Twenty Harshaw lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were irradiated using a calibrated RT 100 X-ray source. These were read in a Toledo 654 TLD reader. The readings of all dosimeters fell within 10% on either side of the mean reading for the dosimeters. Twelve were finally selected which fell closest to the mean. Six of the TLDs were randomly selected and placed in a Rando female phantom in a position corresponding to the lens of the eye-3 in the left and 3 in the right eye. A standard pantomogram was taken of the phantom using an Orthophos machine. The TLDs were then replaced by another two groups of 3 in the same positions in the phantom and a lateral cephalogram taken on the same machine. The TLDs were read in the Toledo reader. Six of the 12 TLDs were then randomly selected for re-use. Three were placed in the phantom in the region of the thyroid and a pantomogram again taken. The procedure was repeated for a cephalogram and the TLDs again read. In all cases the readings of each group of 3 TLDs did not vary by more than 10% on either side of the mean readings. The TLD readings were then converted by means of a conversion factor to actual dose measurements. The doses to left and right eyes and to the thyroid were respectively found to be 0,0151, 0,0222 & 0,0896 mSv for the pantomogram and 0,0351, 0,0183 & 0,0177 mSv for the cephalogram--an almost insignificant dose in terms of the "background equivalent" concept. PMID:12705098

Buch, B; Fensham, R

2003-02-01

14

76 FR 37014 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Contaminants Under the Safe Drinking Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures AGENCY...measuring the levels of contaminants in drinking water and determining compliance with national primary drinking water regulations. The Safe Drinking Water...

2011-06-24

15

77 FR 38523 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Contaminants Under the Safe Drinking Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures AGENCY...measuring the levels of contaminants in drinking water and determining compliance with national primary drinking water regulations. The Safe Drinking Water...

2012-06-28

16

75 FR 32295 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Contaminants Under the Safe Drinking Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures AGENCY...measuring the levels of contaminants in drinking water and determining compliance with national primary drinking water regulations. The Safe Drinking Water...

2010-06-08

17

78 FR 32558 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Contaminants Under the Safe Drinking Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures AGENCY...measuring the levels of contaminants in drinking water and determining compliance with national primary drinking water regulations. The Safe Drinking Water...

2013-05-31

18

Keeping safe: Teaching undergraduate social work students about interpersonal violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

While most social work graduates will not practice in organizations specializing in the threat or aftermath of violence, they will encounter clients affected by interpersonal violence and trauma in almost all fields of practice. Therefore, the social work curriculum should provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to work with these clients. In developing a suitable curriculum it is

Kylie Agllias

2011-01-01

19

A Simple and Safe Procedure to Repair Rectal Prolapse Perineally Using Stapling Devices  

PubMed Central

Rectal prolapses are not life-threatening, however the bleeding and fecal incontinence associated with them significantly erode quality of life and can cause concern among patients’ caregivers in nursing homes. Many procedures have been reported that repair rectal prolapses, and the procedure used depends on the severity of the prolapse; however, the treatments are yet to be established. Here we report a simple and safe procedure to repair rectal prolapse perineally using stapling devices. We performed this procedure on 5 patients within a short time. All patients were followed up for over 24 months and none had any recurrences of their rectal prolapses. No complications occurred during the operations and postoperative periods. Most patients who have prolapses are elderly and fragile, so the treatment must be easy, safe, and rapid. While rectal prolapse is not life-threatening, the goal of treatment is to alleviate its symptoms. The procedure we describe is consistent with this concept. We suggest that this procedure, which uses surgical stapling devices, might be a better option for the treatment of complete rectal prolapse. We will continue to surgically correct complete rectal prolapses and investigate the long-term outcomes of the procedure.

Hata, Fumitake; Nishimori, Hidefumi; Ikeda, Shinichiro; Yajima, Tomomi; Nishio, Akihiko; Ishiyama, Yuji

2014-01-01

20

Rapid and efficient filtration-based procedure for separation and safe analysis of CBRN mixed samples.  

PubMed

Separating CBRN mixed samples that contain both chemical and biological warfare agents (CB mixed sample) in liquid and solid matrices remains a very challenging issue. Parameters were set up to assess the performance of a simple filtration-based method first optimized on separate C- and B-agents, and then assessed on a model of CB mixed sample. In this model, MS2 bacteriophage, Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis baculovirus (AcNPV), Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores were used as biological agent simulants whereas ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and pinacolyl methylphophonic acid (PMPA) were used as VX and soman (GD) nerve agent surrogates, respectively. Nanoseparation centrifugal devices with various pore size cut-off (30 kD up to 0.45 µm) and three RNA extraction methods (Invisorb, EZ1 and Nuclisens) were compared. RNA (MS2) and DNA (AcNPV) quantification was carried out by means of specific and sensitive quantitative real-time PCRs (qPCR). Liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) methods was used for quantifying EMPA and PMPA. Culture methods and qPCR demonstrated that membranes with a 30 kD cut-off retain more than 99.99% of biological agents (MS2, AcNPV, Bacillus Atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores) tested separately. A rapid and reliable separation of CB mixed sample models (MS2/PEG-400 and MS2/EMPA/PMPA) contained in simple liquid or complex matrices such as sand and soil was also successfully achieved on a 30 kD filter with more than 99.99% retention of MS2 on the filter membrane, and up to 99% of PEG-400, EMPA and PMPA recovery in the filtrate. The whole separation process turnaround-time (TAT) was less than 10 minutes. The filtration method appears to be rapid, versatile and extremely efficient. The separation method developed in this work constitutes therefore a useful model for further evaluating and comparing additional separation alternative procedures for a safe handling and preparation of CB mixed samples. PMID:24505375

Bentahir, Mostafa; Laduron, Frederic; Irenge, Leonid; Ambroise, Jérôme; Gala, Jean-Luc

2014-01-01

21

Rapid and Efficient Filtration-Based Procedure for Separation and Safe Analysis of CBRN Mixed Samples  

PubMed Central

Separating CBRN mixed samples that contain both chemical and biological warfare agents (CB mixed sample) in liquid and solid matrices remains a very challenging issue. Parameters were set up to assess the performance of a simple filtration-based method first optimized on separate C- and B-agents, and then assessed on a model of CB mixed sample. In this model, MS2 bacteriophage, Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis baculovirus (AcNPV), Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores were used as biological agent simulants whereas ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and pinacolyl methylphophonic acid (PMPA) were used as VX and soman (GD) nerve agent surrogates, respectively. Nanoseparation centrifugal devices with various pore size cut-off (30 kD up to 0.45 µm) and three RNA extraction methods (Invisorb, EZ1 and Nuclisens) were compared. RNA (MS2) and DNA (AcNPV) quantification was carried out by means of specific and sensitive quantitative real-time PCRs (qPCR). Liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) methods was used for quantifying EMPA and PMPA. Culture methods and qPCR demonstrated that membranes with a 30 kD cut-off retain more than 99.99% of biological agents (MS2, AcNPV, Bacillus Atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores) tested separately. A rapid and reliable separation of CB mixed sample models (MS2/PEG-400 and MS2/EMPA/PMPA) contained in simple liquid or complex matrices such as sand and soil was also successfully achieved on a 30 kD filter with more than 99.99% retention of MS2 on the filter membrane, and up to 99% of PEG-400, EMPA and PMPA recovery in the filtrate. The whole separation process turnaround-time (TAT) was less than 10 minutes. The filtration method appears to be rapid, versatile and extremely efficient. The separation method developed in this work constitutes therefore a useful model for further evaluating and comparing additional separation alternative procedures for a safe handling and preparation of CB mixed samples.

Bentahir, Mostafa; Laduron, Frederic; Irenge, Leonid; Ambroise, Jerome; Gala, Jean-Luc

2014-01-01

22

Adult bipolar diathermy circumcision and related procedures in adults - a safe and efficient technique  

PubMed Central

Objectives To present our novel technique and step-by-step approach to bipolar diathermy circumcision and related procedures in adult males. Methods We reviewed our technique of bipolar circumcision and related procedures in 54 cases over a 22-month period at our day procedure center. Bipolar diathermy cutting and hemostasis was performed using bipolar forceps with a Valleylab machine set at 15. Sleeve circumcision was used. A dorsal slit was made, followed by frenulum release and ventral slit, and was completed with bilateral circumferential cutting. Frenuloplasties released the frenulum. Preputioplasties used multiple 2–3 mm longitudinal cuts to release the constriction, with frenulum left intact. All wounds were closed with interrupted 4/0 Vicryl Rapide™. Results A total of 54 nonemergency bipolar circumcision procedures were carried out from November 2010–August 2012 (42 circumcisions, eight frenuloplasties, and four preputioplasties). Patients were aged 18–72 years (mean, 34 years). There was minimal to no intraoperative bleeding in all cases, allowing for precise dissection. All patients were requested to attend outpatient reviews; three frenuloplasty and two circumcision patients failed to return. Of the remaining 49, mean interval to review was 49 days, with a range of 9–121 days. Two circumcision patients reported mild bleeding with nocturnal erections within a week postoperatively, but they did not require medical attention. Two others presented to family practitioners with possible wound infections which resolved with oral antibiotics. All 49 patients had well-healed wounds. Conclusion The bipolar diathermy technique is a simple procedure, easily taught, and reproducible. It is associated with minimal bleeding, is safe and efficient, uses routine operating equipment and is universally applicable to circumcision/frenuloplasty/preputioplasty. In addition, it has minimal postoperative complications, and has associated excellent cosmesis.

Nalavenkata, Sunny; Winter, Matthew; Kour, Rachel; Kour, Nam-Wee; Ruljancich, Paul

2014-01-01

23

Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities  

SciTech Connect

To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

1986-12-01

24

Pancreatic Remnant Occlusion after Whipple's Procedure: An Alternative Oncologically Safe Method  

PubMed Central

Introduction. To present our experience regarding the use of pancreatic stump occlusion technique as an alternative management of the pancreatic remnant after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD). Methods. Between 2002 and 2009, hospital records of 93 patients who had undergone a Whipple's procedure for either pancreatic-periampullary cancer or chronic pancreatitis were retrospectively studied. In 37 patients the pancreatic duct was occluded by stapling and running suture without anastomosis of the pancreatic remnant, whereas in 56 patients a pancreaticojejunostomy was performed. Operative data, postoperative complications, oncological parameters, and survival rates were recorded. Results. 2/37 patients of the occlusion group and 9/56 patients of the anastomosis group were treated for chronic pancreatitis, whereas 35/37 and 47/56 patients for periampullary malignancies. The duration of surgery for the anastomosis group was significantly longer (mean time 220 versus 180 minutes). Mean hospitalization time was 6 days for both groups. The occlusion group had a lower morbidity rate (24% versus 32%). With regard to postoperative complications, a slightly higher incidence of pancreatic fistulas was observed in the anastomosis group. Conclusions. Pancreatic remnant occlusion is a safe, technically feasible, and reducing postoperative complications alternative approach of the pancreatic stump during Whipple's procedure.

Theodosopoulos, Theodosios; Dellaportas, Dionysios; Yiallourou, Anneza I.; Gkiokas, George; Polymeneas, George; Fotopoulos, Alexios

2013-01-01

25

Working, declarative and procedural memory in specific language impairment  

PubMed Central

According to the Procedural Deficit Hypothesis (PDH), abnormalities of brain structures underlying procedural memory largely explain the language deficits in children with specific language impairment (SLI). These abnormalities are posited to result in core deficits of procedural memory, which in turn explain the grammar problems in the disorder. The abnormalities are also likely to lead to problems with other, non-procedural functions, such as working memory, that rely at least partly on the affected brain structures. In contrast, declarative memory is expected to remain largely intact, and should play an important compensatory role for grammar. These claims were tested by examining measures of working, declarative and procedural memory in 51 children with SLI and 51 matched typically-developing (TD) children (mean age 10). Working memory was assessed with the Working Memory Test Battery for Children, declarative memory with the Children’s Memory Scale, and procedural memory with a visuo-spatial Serial Reaction Time task. As compared to the TD children, the children with SLI were impaired at procedural memory, even when holding working memory constant. In contrast, they were spared at declarative memory for visual information, and at declarative memory in the verbal domain after controlling for working memory and language. Visuo-spatial short-term memory was intact, whereas verbal working memory was impaired, even when language deficits were held constant. Correlation analyses showed neither visuo-spatial nor verbal working memory was associated with either lexical or grammatical abilities in either the SLI or TD children. Declarative memory correlated with lexical abilities in both groups of children. Finally, grammatical abilities were associated with procedural memory in the TD children, but with declarative memory in the children with SLI. These findings replicate and extend previous studies of working, declarative and procedural memory in SLI. Overall, we suggest that the evidence largely supports the predictions of the PDH.

Lum, Jarrad A.G.; Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Page, Debra; Ullman, Michael T.

2012-01-01

26

SUNRAYCE 93: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring SUNRAYCE 93 to advance tile technology and use of photovoltaics and electric vehicles. Participants will use cars powered by photovoltaic modules and lead-acid storage batteries. This brochure, prepared for students and faculty participating in this race, outlines the health hazards presented by these electrical systems, and gives guidance on strategies for their safe usage. At the outset, it should be noted that working with photovoltaic systems and batteries requires electric vehicle drivers and technicians to have {open_quotes}hands-on{close_quotes} contact with the car on a daily basis. It is important that no one work near a photovoltaic energy system or battery, either in a vehicle or on the bench, unless they familiarize themselves with the components in use, and know and observe safe work practices including the safety precautions described in the manuals provided by the various equipment vendors and this document.

DePhillips, M.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

1992-11-03

27

SUNRAYCE 93: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring SUNRAYCE 93 to advance tile technology and use of photovoltaics and electric vehicles. Participants will use cars powered by photovoltaic modules and lead-acid storage batteries. This brochure, prepared for students and faculty participating in this race, outlines the health hazards presented by these electrical systems, and gives guidance on strategies for their safe usage. At the outset, it should be noted that working with photovoltaic systems and batteries requires electric vehicle drivers and technicians to have [open quotes]hands-on[close quotes] contact with the car on a daily basis. It is important that no one work near a photovoltaic energy system or battery, either in a vehicle or on the bench, unless they familiarize themselves with the components in use, and know and observe safe work practices including the safety precautions described in the manuals provided by the various equipment vendors and this document.

DePhillips, M.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

1992-11-03

28

SUNRAYCE 1993: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring SUNRAYCE 93 to advance tile technology and use of photovoltaics and electric vehicles. Participants will use cars powered by photovoltaic modules and lead-acid storage batteries. This brochure, prepared for students and faculty participating in this race, outlines the health hazards presented by these electrical systems and gives guidance on strategies for their safe usage. At the outset, it should be noted that working with photovoltaic systems and batteries requires electric vehicle drivers and technicians to have 'hands-on' contact with the car on a daily basis. It is important that no one work near a photovoltaic energy system or battery, either in a vehicle or on the bench, unless they familiarize themselves with the components in use and know and observe safe work practices including the safety precautions described in the manuals provided by the various equipment vendors and this document.

Dephillips, M. P.; Moskowitz, P. D.; Fthenakis, V. M.

1992-11-01

29

Head and neck cancer in elderly patients: is microsurgical free-tissue transfer a safe procedure?  

PubMed

The safety and success of microvascular transfer have been well documented in the general population, but the good results achieved with the use of free flaps in elderly patients have received little attention. This study sought to identify differences in complications, morbidity and functional outcomes between elderly (? 75 years) and younger (< 75 years) patients treated surgically for advanced head and neck cancer using the Head and Neck 35 module of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaire. Patient treatment consisted of composite resection, including excision of the primary tumour with ipsilateral or bilateral neck dissection and microvascular reconstruction. Eighty-five microvascular tissue transfers were performed to reconstruct major surgical defects. Postoperative radiation therapy was performed when indicated. Total flap loss occurred in three cases in elderly patients and two cases in younger patients. The rates of major surgical complication were 9% in young patients and 11% in elderly patients. No significant difference was observed between the two groups in the rates of major and minor flap complications, morbidity or long-term functional outcome. The results of the present analysis indicate that free-flap microvascular reconstruction can be considered a safe procedure in elderly patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:23349555

Tarsitano, A; Pizzigallo, A; Sgarzani, R; Oranges, C M; Cipriani, R; Marchetti, C

2012-12-01

30

Why do workers behave unsafely at work? Determinants of safe work practices in industrial workers  

PubMed Central

Aims: To explore the relation between safety climate (workers' perceptions regarding management's attitudes towards occupational safety and health) and workers' behaviour at work. Methods: Cross sectional survey of workers at the pottery industry in Castellon, Spain. Sampling was stratified by plant size and workers' gender, according to data on the working population at this setting. A total of 734 production workers were interviewed. Information was collected on safety climate and workers' behaviour towards occupational risks with a specific questionnaire. A safety climate index (SCI, scale 0–100) was constructed adding scores for each item measuring safety climate in the questionnaire. Workers' unsafe behaviour was analysed for the different safety climate index levels. Results: Mean score for SCI was 71.90 (SD 19.19). There were no differences in SCI scores according to age, gender, education, children at charge, seniority at work, or type of employment. Small workplaces (<50 workers) showed significantly worse SCI (mean 67.23, SD 19.73) than the largest factories (>200 workers). Lower levels of SCI (SCI <50) were related to workers' unsafe behaviours (full/high accord with the statement "I excessively expose myself to hazards in my work", adjusted odds ratio ORa 2.79, 95% CI 1.60 to 4.88), and to lack of compliance with safety rules (ORa 12.83, 95% CI 5.92 to 27.80). Conclusions: Safety climate measures workers' perception of organisational factors related to occupational health and safety (for example, management commitment to risk prevention or priorities of safety versus production). In this study these factors are strongly associated with workers' attitudes towards safety at work. Longitudinal studies can further clarify the relation between safety climate and workers' behaviour regarding occupational safety and health.

Garcia, A; Boix, P; Canosa, C

2004-01-01

31

Coordinated Study Individual Interview Procedures. Working Paper No. 290.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the various procedures associated with the individual interviews that are part of the data gathering processes of the Coordinated Study being carried out by the Mathematics Work Group of the Wisconsin Research and Development Center for Individualized Schooling. The first major section describes the six basic verbal addition…

Cookson, Connie; Moser, James M.

32

Operational and Medical Procedures for a Declared Contingency Shuttle (CSCS) Shuttle Mission Due to a Failure that Precludes a Safe Return  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This poster paper outlines the operational and medical procedures for a shuttle mission that has a failure that precludes a safe return to Earth. Information about the assumptions, procedures and limiting consumables is included.

Adams, Adrien; Patlach, Bob; Duchense, Ted; Chandler, Mike; Stepaniak, Philip C.

2011-01-01

33

Evaluation of safe, effective intravenous sedation for utilization in endoscopic procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The prevention of anesthetic mishaps during endoscopic procedures is of great importance to physicians in training. With the\\u000a large number of such procedures performed each year, even infrequent adverse anesthetic reactions may result in a significant\\u000a number of problems. To establish the safety and efficacy of an anesthetic regimen using intravenous meperidine and diazepam,\\u000a all endoscopic procedures performed at one

Charles H. Andrusl; Philip A. Dean; Jeffrey L. Ponsky

1990-01-01

34

45 CFR 261.64 - How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work participation measurement? 261.64 Section 261.64...procedures ensure an accurate work participation measurement? (a) We will determine...

2010-10-01

35

45 CFR 261.64 - How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work participation measurement? 261.64 Section 261.64...procedures ensure an accurate work participation measurement? (a) We will determine...

2013-10-01

36

Construction and maintenance procedure recommendations for proposed federal guidelines of safe havens for vehicles carrying Class A or Class B explosives  

SciTech Connect

This document focuses on the design, construction, and maintenance of commercial safe havens operated by truck stops. In the context of this document, the term `safe haven` describes a designated area for parking motor vehicles transporting Class A or Class B explosives. Its objective is to inculcate acceptable construction practices and maintenance procedures in the organization of commercial safe havens in order to insure public safety.

NONE

1985-02-10

37

23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Policy and procedures for work zone safety management...TRAFFIC OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Temporary Traffic Control Devices § 630.1106 Policy and procedures for work zone safety...

2013-04-01

38

Are urological procedures in tetraplegic patients safely performed without anesthesia? a report of three cases  

PubMed Central

Background Some tetraplegic patients may wish to undergo urological procedures without anaesthesia, but these patients can develop autonomic dysreflexia if cystoscopy and vesical lithotripsy are performed without anaesthesia. Case presentation We describe three tetraplegic patients, who developed autonomic dysreflexia when cystoscopy and laser lithotripsy were carried out without anesthesia. In two patients, who declined anaesthesia, blood pressure increased to more than 200/110 mmHg during cystoscopy. One of these patients developed severe bleeding from bladder mucosa and lithotripsy was abandoned. Laser lithotripsy was carried out under subarachnoid block a week later in this patient, and this patient did not develop autonomic dysreflexia. The third patient with C-3 tetraplegia had undergone correction of kyphoscoliotic deformity of spine with spinal rods and pedicular screws from the level of T-2 to S-2. Pulmonary function test revealed moderate to severe restricted curve. This patient developed vesical calculus and did not wish to have general anaesthesia because of possible need for respiratory support post-operatively. Subarachnoid block was not considered in view of previous spinal fixation. When cystoscopy and laser lithotripsy were carried out under sedation, blood pressure increased from 110/50 mmHg to 160/80 mmHg. Conclusion These cases show that tetraplegic patients are likely to develop autonomic dysreflexia during cystoscopy and vesical lithotripsy, performed without anaesthesia. Health professionals should educate spinal cord injury patients regarding risks of autonomic dysreflexia, when urological procedures are carried out without anaesthesia. If spinal cord injury patients are made aware of potentially life-threatening complications of autonomic dysreflexia, they are less likely to decline anaesthesia for urological procedures. Subrachnoid block or epidural meperidine blocks nociceptive impulses from urinary bladder and prevents occurrence of autonomic dysreflexia. If spinal cord injury patients with lesions above T-6 decline anaesthesia, nifedipine 10 mg should be given sublingually prior to cystoscopy to prevent increase in blood pressure due to autonomic dysreflexia.

2012-01-01

39

How Safe is Safe.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This program was prepared to provide an awareness of how FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine works to regulate the safe production of animal-derived human food--meat, milk, eggs, and poultry. It presents the scope of the center for veterinary medicine fu...

1994-01-01

40

A safe, effective, and facility compatible cleaning in place procedure for affinity resin in large-scale monoclonal antibody purification.  

PubMed

Cleaning-in-place (CIP) for column chromatography plays an important role in therapeutic protein production. A robust and efficient CIP procedure ensures product quality, improves column life time and reduces the cost of the purification processes, particularly for those using expensive affinity resins, such as MabSelect protein A resin. Cleaning efficiency, resin compatibility, and facility compatibility are the three major aspects to consider in CIP process design. Cleaning MabSelect resin with 50mM sodium hydroxide (NaOH) along with 1M sodium chloride is one of the most popular cleaning procedures used in biopharmaceutical industries. However, high concentration sodium chloride is a leading cause of corrosion in the stainless steel containers used in large scale manufacture. Corroded containers may potentially introduce metal contaminants into purified drug products. Therefore, it is challenging to apply this cleaning procedure into commercial manufacturing due to facility compatibility and drug safety concerns. This paper reports a safe, effective and environmental and facility-friendly cleaning procedure that is suitable for large scale affinity chromatography. An alternative salt (sodium sulfate) is used to prevent the stainless steel corrosion caused by sodium chloride. Sodium hydroxide and salt concentrations were optimized using a high throughput screening approach to achieve the best combination of facility compatibility, cleaning efficiency and resin stability. Additionally, benzyl alcohol is applied to achieve more effective microbial control. Based on the findings, the recommended optimum cleaning strategy is cleaning MabSelect resin with 25 mM NaOH, 0.25 M Na2SO4 and 1% benzyl alcohol solution every cycle, followed by a more stringent cleaning using 50 mM NaOH with 0.25 M Na2SO4 and 1% benzyl alcohol at the end of each manufacturing campaign. A resin life cycle study using the MabSelect affinity resin demonstrates that the new cleaning strategy prolongs resin life time and consistently delivers high purity drug products. PMID:23953712

Wang, Lu; Dembecki, Jill; Jaffe, Neil E; O'Mara, Brian W; Cai, Hui; Sparks, Colleen N; Zhang, Jian; Laino, Sarah G; Russell, Reb J; Wang, Michelle

2013-09-20

41

[Are disinfectant residues remained after cleaning hemodialysis machine procedure safe for patients?].  

PubMed

The dialysis machine shall be cleaned and disinfected after each patient treatment or after every 72 hours break in working. An acceptable disinfectants such as Puristeril plus or Puristeril 340, Citrosteril, Diasteril and Sporotal are used for decontamination. Puristeril 340 is designed for cold disinfection and due to the low pH value, the necessary decalcification of hemodialysis machines is easily achieved. It can be used for all haemodialysis systems like hemodialysis machines, water treatment devices and circuit pipes. Diluted Puristeril decomposes in a non-toxic way. Degradation products of peracetic acid, which is main component of Puristeril are: hydrogen peroxide and acetic acid. Peracetic acid is widely used for disinfection due to its exceptionally broad spectrum of microbiocidal activity at low concentrations and short exposure times. After use Puristeril is easily removable by rinsing with water. This paper deals with the effect of the Puristeril toxicity on blood as a function of its concentration and incubation time. Concentration range of 3.5-70 ppm was used, with particular emphasis on concentrations close to 5 ppm, a value is the limit of sensitivity of strips of starch potassium iodide, the tests for detection of peracetic acid. There was a strong increase in autohaemolysis and malondialdehyde concentrations with increasing concentration of Puristeril. There were also changes in dependence on the parameters of the incubation time, with the greatest effects obtained after 2 hours incubation with Puristeril. The detection limit of peracetic acid used strips of starch potassium iodide does not guarantee the safety of a patient undergoing hemodialysis. Even the residual concentration of Puristeril plus cause increased lipid peroxidation of membrane, and therefore suggest the routine use of stripes on the lower limit of detection of peracetic acid or implement measurement of hydrogen peroxide residues performed with sensitivity 1 ppm. PMID:24003659

Szewczyk, Ma?gorzata; Grzeszczuk, Karolina; Walski, Tomasz; Suder, Marek; Komorowska, Ma?gorzata

2013-01-01

42

Safe and Smart. Making the After-School Hours Work for Kids.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to present positive research and examples illustrating the potential of quality after-school activities to keep children safe, out of trouble, and learning. Specifically, it presents evidence of success--both empirical and an...

J. Pederson A. de Kanter L. M. Bobo K. Weinig K. Noeth

1998-01-01

43

Safety on the Job. Some Guidelines for Working Safely. Instructor's Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teacher's guide was developed to help teachers (especially in Oklahoma) promote safe practices on the job. As a supplement to existing programs in the requirements for job safety, this book can also promote same basic safety attitudes and help support basic safety concepts, with an emphasis on accident prevention. The guide contains eight…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

44

Do procedural skills workshops during family practice residency work?  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine if participation in a procedural skills workshop during family practice residency affects future use of these skills in postgraduate clinical practice. DESIGN Survey involving self-assessment of procedural skills experience and competence. SETTING British Columbia. PARTICIPANTS Former University of British Columbia family practice residents who trained in Vancouver, BC, including residents who participated in a procedural skills workshop in 2001 or 2003 and residents graduating in 2000 and 2002 who did not participate in the procedural skills workshop. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Self-assessed experience and competence in the 6 office-based procedural skills that were taught during the procedural skills workshops in 2001 and 2003. RESULTS Participation in a procedural skills workshop had no positive effect on future use of these skills in clinical practice. Participation in the workshop was associated with less reported experience (P = .091) in injection of lateral epicondylitis. As with previous Canadian studies, more women than men reported experience and competence in gynecologic procedures. More women than men reported experience (P = .001) and competence (P = .004) in intrauterine device insertion and experience (P = .091) in endometrial aspiration biopsy. More men than women reported competence (P = .052) in injection of trochanteric bursae. A third year of emergency training was correlated with an increase in reported experience (P = .021) in shoulder injection. CONCLUSION Participation in a procedural skills workshop during family practice residency did not produce a significant increase in the performance of these skills on the part of participants once they were in clinical practice. The benefit of a skills workshop might be lost when there is no opportunity to practise and perfect these skills. Sex bias in the case of some procedures might represent a needs-based acquisition of skills on the part of practising physicians. Short procedural skills workshops might be better suited to graduated physicians with more clinical experience.

MacKenzie, Mark S.; Berkowitz, Jonathan

2010-01-01

45

Procedure for determining the SSE response from the OBE response. [Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE) and Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE)  

SciTech Connect

Regulatory Guide 1.61 specifies the damping that should be used for all modes that are considered in an elastic spectral or time history dynamic seismic analysis of Seismic Category I components. Table 1 of R.G 1.61 specifies damping values for dynamic analysis for two different earthquakes, the Safe Shutdown Earthquake and the Operating Basis Earthquake. The guide specifies that ''...if the maximum stresses due to static, seismic and other dynamic loading are significantly lower than the yield stresses and 1/2 yield stress for SSE and 1/2 SSE respectively, in any structure a component damping values lower than those specified in Table 1 ....should be used .... to avoid underestimating the amplitude of vibration of dynamic stress.'' The guide requires that the appropiate damping values be used which reflect the state of stress that will be experienced by the equipment. In applying these values to the response of equipment, to an OBE and to an SSE, the selected damping should result in a dynamic response for the SSE that is greater than the response due to the OBE, all other factors being equal. The purpose of the statement in the guide is to note that at higher stress levels, the higher damping values could be used, but at lower stress levels, the lower values of damping should be used. Current procedures that are used in implementing R.G. 1.61 frequently result in an OBE response that is greater than the SSE response. This is because the higher damping under the SSE is used at all stress levels, low as well as high. This is obviously not the intent of the Regulatory Guide. A procedure has been developed which derives an expression relating the SSE response to the OBE response. Two factors are involved in the equation. The first involves the damping ratios for the SSE and OBE events and the second is the ratio between the levels of the OBE and SSE.

Curreri, J.

1985-01-01

46

Safe Handling Practices  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1977 Compugraphic Corporation was experiencing an unacceptable failure rate on microelectronic chips. Company engineers suspected that static electricity was causing the trouble because some electronic components are highly susceptible to damage by electrostatic charge. From a NASA Tech Brief, they learned that Rockwell International had prepared a report on safe handling practices for electronic components. NASA provided a Technical Support Package detailing 50 safe handling procedures affecting workers, work areas, equipment and packaging materials. Where poor practices were discovered, re-education of employees and other corrective measures were undertaken.

1980-01-01

47

Characteristics of low-temperature throttle installations with ozone-safe working media  

Microsoft Academic Search

it is necessary to have good operational and technical characteristics of the stage of preparation of the working medium (SPWM) of small installations. The compressor for compressing multicomponent working media has to be hermetic compact, have long life, high efficiency, and ensure delivery pressure from 1 to 3.5 MPa. One of the basic compressors satisfying these requirements could be the

S. D. Ladokhin

1995-01-01

48

An economical and safe procedure to synthesize 2-hydroxy-4-pentynoic acid: A precursor towards 'clickable' biodegradable polylactide  

PubMed Central

Summary 2-Hydroxy-4-pentynoic acid (1) is a key intermediate towards ‘clickable’ polylactide which allows for efficient introduction of a broad range of pendant functional groups onto polymers from a single monomer via convenient ‘click’ chemistry with organic azides. The incorporation of various pendant functional groups could effectively tailor the physicochemical properties of polylactide. The reported synthesis of 1 started from propargyl bromide and ethyl glyoxylate. However, both of starting materials are expensive and unstable; especially, propargyl bromide is shock-sensitive and subjected to thermal explosive decomposition, which makes the preparation of 1 impractical with high cost and high risk of explosion. Herein, we report a simple, economical and safe synthetic route to prepare 1 using cheap and commercially available diethyl 2-acetamidomalonate (4) and propargyl alcohol. The desired product 1 was obtained via alkylation of malonate 4 with propargyl tosylate followed by a one-pot four-step sequence of hydrolysis, decarboxylation, diazotization and hydroxylation of propargylic malonate 5 without work-up of any intermediate.

Ren, Hong; Baker, Gregory L

2014-01-01

49

SUNRAYCE 95: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document is a power system and battery safety handbook for participants in the SUNRAYCE 95 solar powered electric vehicle program. The topics of the handbook include batteries, photovoltaic modules, safety equipment needed for working with sulfuric a...

M. P. DePhillips P. D. Moskowitz V. M. Fthenakis

1994-01-01

50

NASA Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph document reviews the radiation environment that is a significant potential hazard to NASA's goals for space exploration, of living and working in space. NASA has initiated a Peer reviewed research program that is charged with arriving at an understanding of the space radiation problem. To this end NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed to simulate the harsh cosmic and solar radiation found in space. Another piece of the work was to develop a risk modeling tool that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system damage, degenerative tissue disease, and acute radiation effects acute radiation effects.

Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu; Corbin, Barbara; Sulzman, Frank; Kreneck, Sam

2007-01-01

51

How Safe Are You at Work? Occupational Health and Safety Issues for School Counsellors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Schools are becoming increasingly violent places. This workshop presentation examines ways to improve counselor facilities and to enhance work safety. Client populations for school counselors have changed significantly in recent times as school administrators refer more welfare related problems for help. Although violent attacks on counselors may…

Low, John A.

52

SUNRAYCE 1995: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document is a power system and battery safety handbook for participants in the SUNRAYCE 95 solar powered electric vehicle program. The topics of the handbook include batteries, photovoltaic modules, safety equipment needed for working with sulfuric acid electrolyte and batteries, battery transport, accident response, battery recharging and ventilation, electrical risks on-board vehicle, external electrical risks, electrical risk management strategies,

M. P. Dephillips; P. D. Moskowitz; V. M. Fthenakis

1994-01-01

53

Let's Talk with Jill Ferris about Living and Working in Antarctica Safely  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

At this site students discover that each year, more than 1,000 researchers and support staff travel to Antarctica and it is the job of the manager of field support services to make sure that each one has safety training plus the right supplies and transportation. This in-depth profile takes a look at the work of the manager of field support services for the United States Antarctica Field Program (USAFP). In the question and answer profile she answers more than 15 questions, including how she got to her present position, the nature of safety training, and things that most people take for granted but she must concern herself about. In addition she describes her work day and explains her continued concentration on weather reports.

54

SUNRAYCE 95: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems  

SciTech Connect

This document is a power system and battery safety handbook for participants in the SUNRAYCE 95 solar powered electric vehicle program. The topics of the handbook include batteries, photovoltaic modules, safety equipment needed for working with sulfuric acid electrolyte and batteries, battery transport, accident response, battery recharging and ventilation, electrical risks on-board vehicle, external electrical risks, electrical risk management strategies, and general maintenance including troubleshooting, hydrometer check and voltmeter check.

DePhillips, M.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Biomedical and Environmental Assessment Group

1994-05-27

55

SUNRAYCE 1995: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is a power system and battery safety handbook for participants in the SUNRAYCE 95 solar powered electric vehicle program. The topics of the handbook include batteries, photovoltaic modules, safety equipment needed for working with sulfuric acid electrolyte and batteries, battery transport, accident response, battery recharging and ventilation, electrical risks on-board vehicle, external electrical risks, electrical risk management strategies, and general maintenance including troubleshooting, hydrometer check and voltmeter check.

Dephillips, M. P.; Moskowitz, P. D.; Fthenakis, V. M.

1994-05-01

56

Human-rating Automated and Robotic Systems - (How HAL Can Work Safely with Astronauts)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Long duration human space missions, as planned in the Vision for Space Exploration, will not be possible without applying unprecedented levels of automation to support the human endeavors. The automated and robotic systems must carry the load of routine housekeeping for the new generation of explorers, as well as assist their exploration science and engineering work with new precision. Fortunately, the state of automated and robotic systems is sophisticated and sturdy enough to do this work - but the systems themselves have never been human-rated as all other NASA physical systems used in human space flight have. Our intent in this paper is to provide perspective on requirements and architecture for the interfaces and interactions between human beings and the astonishing array of automated systems; and the approach we believe necessary to create human-rated systems and implement them in the space program. We will explain our proposed standard structure for automation and robotic systems, and the process by which we will develop and implement that standard as an addition to NASA s Human Rating requirements. Our work here is based on real experience with both human system and robotic system designs; for surface operations as well as for in-flight monitoring and control; and on the necessities we have discovered for human-systems integration in NASA's Constellation program. We hope this will be an invitation to dialog and to consideration of a new issue facing new generations of explorers and their outfitters.

Baroff, Lynn; Dischinger, Charlie; Fitts, David

2009-01-01

57

45 CFR 261.64 - How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work participation measurement? 261.64 Section 261.64...procedures ensure an accurate work participation measurement? (a) We will determine...

2009-10-01

58

Working Safely with Pesticides.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The booklet gives general hints on handling chemicals used for pest control. Topics include: personal protection of eyes, skin and respiratory system; handling, storage, and mixing of chemicals; housekeeping, waste disposal, and maintenance of equipment; ...

1976-01-01

59

Stay Safe at Work  

MedlinePLUS

... Archive Find Services Near You National Health Observances Health Care Reform Adults Women and Pregnant Women Children Related Resources En español Home > Health Topics A to Z > Everyday Healthy Living > Safety > ...

60

A new, simple, safe, effective and cost-effective procedure for genuine stress incontinence: Midurethral polypropylene sling  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed a cost-effective procedure for genuine stress incontinence (GSI) that has the advantages of the tension-free vaginal tape (TVT). The midurethral polypropylene sling procedure (MPS) is carried out under local anaesthesia. A self-fashioned sling (7.5 ? 1 cm) was created from a polypropylene mesh with two lengthening polypropylene sutures at the ends. The sutures are carried through the rectus

Fuat Demirci; Ismail Ozdemir; Oguz Yucel; Ali Alhan

2003-01-01

61

Investigation of the Role of Working Memory in Procedural Skill Acquisition.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On the basis of the ACT production system theory of skill acquisition (Anderson, 1983a, 1987), predictions were generated concerning the role of two proposed classes of working-memory limitations in procedural learning. Individual differences analysis of ...

D. J. Woltz

1988-01-01

62

Differences between presentation methods in working memory procedures: a matter of working memory consolidation.  

PubMed

Understanding forgetting from working memory, the memory used in ongoing cognitive processing, is critical to understanding human cognition. In the past decade, a number of conflicting findings have been reported regarding the role of time in forgetting from working memory. This has led to a debate concerning whether longer retention intervals necessarily result in more forgetting. An obstacle to directly comparing conflicting reports is a divergence in methodology across studies. Studies that find no forgetting as a function of retention-interval duration tend to use sequential presentation of memory items, while studies that find forgetting as a function of retention-interval duration tend to use simultaneous presentation of memory items. Here, we manipulate the duration of retention and the presentation method of memory items, presenting items either sequentially or simultaneously. We find that these differing presentation methods can lead to different rates of forgetting because they tend to differ in the time available for consolidation into working memory. The experiments detailed here show that equating the time available for working memory consolidation equates the rates of forgetting across presentation methods. We discuss the meaning of this finding in the interpretation of previous forgetting studies and in the construction of working memory models. PMID:24059859

Ricker, Timothy J; Cowan, Nelson

2014-03-01

63

A Procedure for an Economic Comparison of Work Measurement Techniques, Part I: The Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

A procedure is developed whereby an organization is able to determine, within the constraints of its own practices and environment, the most economical work measurement technique to use in studying a particular work operation. Application of the Delphi Method permits the costs and benefits of each available technique to be estimated. An economic model is then developed to determine the

S. Keith Adams; Timothy J. McGrath

1979-01-01

64

A prototype on-line work procedure system for radioisotope thermoelectric generator production  

SciTech Connect

An on-line system to manage work procedures is being developed to support radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) assembly and testing in a new production facility. This system implements production work procedures as interactive electronic documents executed at the work site with no intermediate printed form. It provides good control of the creation and application of work procedures and provides active assistance to the worker in performing them and in documenting the results. An extensive prototype of this system is being evaluated to ensure that it will have all the necessary features and that it will fit the user's needs and expectations. This effort has involved the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) operations organization and technology transfer between Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) and EG G Mound Applied Technologies Inc. (Mound) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Mound Site. 1 ref.

Kiebel, G.R.

1991-09-01

65

Complete and safe resection of challenging retroperitoneal tumors: anticipation of multi-organ and major vascular resection and use of adjunct procedures  

PubMed Central

Background Retroperitoneal tumors are often massive and can involve adjacent organs and/or vital structures, making them difficult to resect. Completeness of resection is within the surgeon's control and critical for long-term survival, particularly for malignant disease. Few studies directly address strategies for complete and safe resection of challenging retroperitoneal tumors. Methods Fifty-six patients representing 63 cases of primary or recurrent retroperitoneal tumor resection between 2004-2009 were identified and a retrospective chart review was performed. Rates of complete resection, use of adjunct procedures, and perioperative complications were recorded. Results In 95% of cases, complete resection was achieved. Fifty-eight percent of these cases required en bloc multi-organ resection, and 8% required major vascular resection. Complete resection rates were higher for primary versus recurrent disease. Adjunct procedures (ureteral stents, femoral nerve monitoring, posterior laminotomy, etc.) were used in 54% of cases. Major postoperative complications occurred in 16% of cases, and one patient died (2% mortality). Conclusions Complete resection of challenging retroperitoneal tumors is feasible and can be done safely with important pre- and intraoperative considerations in mind.

2011-01-01

66

Ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy: Is this procedure safe in pregnant women with ureteral stones at different locations?  

PubMed

Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the safety and effectiveness of ureteroscopy and Holmium: Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet lithotripsy for the treatment of ureteral stones with different localizations in symptomatic pregnant women. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 19 pregnant patients referred to our center between January 2005 and December 2012 with symptomatic hydronephrosis requiring surgical intervention. 7.5 F and 9.5 F semirigid ureterorenoscopy with Holmium laser lithotripsy was used for treatment in all patients. Complications were stratified according to modified Clavien criteria. Results: The mean age of patients was 25.4 (18-41) years, and the mean gestation duration was 24.8 (7-33) weeks. Six cases (31.5%) had a history of stone. Solitary kidney secondary to previous nephrectomy was observed in 2 patients and 1 patient had a hypoplastic kidney. Abdominal ultrasonography was used as the main diagnostic tool. Mean stone size was 9.2 mm (6-13). The location of the stones was the lower, middle, and upper ureter in 8 (42.1%), 5 (26.3%) and 6 (31.5%) cases, respectively. All stones were fragmented with Holmium laser lithotripsy. Of the 19 patients, 11 (57.8%) required doublr J stent insertion peroperatively. Intraoperative urological and obstetric complications were not observed. Postoperatively two complications were noted. According to Clavien criteria a complication was level 1, and the other was level 2. Conclusions: For treatment of pregnant women with symptomatic ureteral stones in every location, Holmium laser lithotripsy with a semirigid ureteroscopy can be used as judicious treatment. This approach is effective and safe with an acceptable complication rate. PMID:25017585

Adanur, Senol; Ziypak, Tevfik; Bedir, Fevzi; Yapanoglu, Turgut; Ayd?n, Hasan Riza; Y?lmaz, Mehmet; Aksoy, Mehmet; Ozbey, Isa

2014-06-01

67

Safe Grid  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The biggest users of GRID technologies came from the science and technology communities. These consist of government, industry and academia (national and international). The NASA GRID is moving into a higher technology readiness level (TRL) today; and as a joint effort among these leaders within government, academia, and industry, the NASA GRID plans to extend availability to enable scientists and engineers across these geographical boundaries collaborate to solve important problems facing the world in the 21 st century. In order to enable NASA programs and missions to use IPG resources for program and mission design, the IPG capabilities needs to be accessible from inside the NASA center networks. However, because different NASA centers maintain different security domains, the GRID penetration across different firewalls is a concern for center security people. This is the reason why some IPG resources are been separated from the NASA center network. Also, because of the center network security and ITAR concerns, the NASA IPG resource owner may not have full control over who can access remotely from outside the NASA center. In order to obtain organizational approval for secured remote access, the IPG infrastructure needs to be adapted to work with the NASA business process. Improvements need to be made before the IPG can be used for NASA program and mission development. The Secured Advanced Federated Environment (SAFE) technology is designed to provide federated security across NASA center and NASA partner's security domains. Instead of one giant center firewall which can be difficult to modify for different GRID applications, the SAFE "micro security domain" provide large number of professionally managed "micro firewalls" that can allow NASA centers to accept remote IPG access without the worry of damaging other center resources. The SAFE policy-driven capability-based federated security mechanism can enable joint organizational and resource owner approved remote access from outside of NASA centers. A SAFE enabled IPG can enable IPG capabilities to be available to NASA mission design teams across different NASA center and partner company firewalls. This paper will first discuss some of the potential security issues for IPG to work across NASA center firewalls. We will then present the SAFE federated security model. Finally we will present the concept of the architecture of a SAFE enabled IPG and how it can benefit NASA mission development.

Chow, Edward T.; Stewart, Helen; Korsmeyer, David (Technical Monitor)

2003-01-01

68

Procedures for safe handling of off-gases from electric vehicle lead-acid batteries during overcharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The potential for generation of toxic gases from lead-acid batteries has long been recognized. Prior to the current interest in electric vehicles, there were no studies specificaly oriented to toxic gas release from traction batteries, however. As the Department of Energy Demonstration Project (in the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program) progresses, available data from past studies and parallel health effects programs must be digested into guidance to the drivers and maintenance personnel, tailored to their contact with electric vehicles. The basic aspects of lead-acid battery operation, vehicle use, and health effects of stibine and arsine to provide electric vehicle users with the information behind the judgment that vehicle operation and testing may proceed are presented. Specifically, it is concluded that stibine generation or arsine generation at rapid enough rates to induce acute toxic response is not at all likely. Procedures to guard against low-level exposure until more definitive data on ambient concentrations of the gases are collected are presented for both charging the batteries and driving the vehicles. A research plan to collect additional quantitative data from electric traction batteries is presented.

Labelle, S. J.; Bhattacharyya, M. H.; Loutfy, R. O.; Varma, R.

1980-01-01

69

Procedures for safe handling of off-gases from electric vehicle lead-acid batteries during overcharge  

SciTech Connect

The potential for generation of toxic gases from lead-acid batteries has long been recognized. Prior to the current interest in electric vehicles, there were no studies specificaly oriented to toxic gas release from traction batteries, however. As the Department of Energy Demonstration Project (in the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program) progresses, available data from past studies and parallel health effects programs must be digested into guidance to the drivers and maintenance personnel, tailored to their contact with electric vehicles. The basic aspects of lead-acid battery operation, vehicle use, and health effects of stibine and arsine to provide electric vehicle users with the information behind the judgment that vehicle operation and testing may proceed are presented. Specifically, it is concluded that stibine generation or arsine generation at rapid enough rates to induce acute toxic response is not at all likely. Procedures to guard against low-level exposure until more definitive data on ambient concentrations of the gases are collected are presented for both charging the batteries and driving the vehicles. A research plan to collect additional quantitative data from electric traction batteries is presented.

LaBelle, S.J.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Loutfy, R.O.; Varma, R.

1980-01-25

70

MOT Test Procedures. Youth Training Scheme. Core Exemplar Work Based Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This trainer's guide is intended to assist supervisors of work-based career training projects in teaching students the procedures of conducting the MOT (Ministry of Transportation) Test (Great Britain's motor vehicle inspection test) and dealing with the customers on whose cars the inspection is performed. The guide is one in a series of core…

Further Education Staff Coll., Blagdon (England).

71

Cross-national research on contractor evaluation procedures in public works procurement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contractor evaluation methods in Japan's public works procurement, beginning with construction business licensure, going through biennial preliminary firm rating, up to project-by-project prequalification and comprehensive point rating, were developed during the period when public works were mostly procured through designated competitive bidding. It is essential to focus attention on contractor evaluation methods for introducing different types of procurement procedures which enhance the use of technological capabilities held by private businesses. An overall review of contractor evaluation procedures should be conducted in view of the present situation, where the open competitive bidding has become mainly used in combination with comprehensive evaluation, as well as to allow for further diversification of procurement methods. In Western countries, improvements have been made for the past several years in contractor evaluation procedures with more emphasis on "Value for Money." Advanced efforts made by these countries will be useful as a reference for overhauling Japan's contractor evaluation system. This study conducts a comparative review of contractor evaluation procedures for public procurement in Western countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom and France by identifying similarities and differences between those of Japan and the above mentioned countries. This reveals that a contractor's technical or professional ability is looked at separately from its economic and financial standing in those countries studied, and there is no case like Japan in which those two factors are integrated into one for evaluation.

Kinoshita, Seiya; Sato, Naoyoshi; Matsumoto, Naoya

72

Construction and Maintenance Procedure Recommendations for Proposed Federal Guidelines of Safe Havens for Vehicles Carrying Class A or Class B Explosives.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document focuses on the design, construction, and maintenance of commercial safe havens operated by truck stops. In the context of this document, the term 'safe haven' describes a designated area for parking motor vehicles transporting Class A or Cla...

1984-01-01

73

Construction and Maintenance Procedure Recommendations for Proposed Federal Guidelines of Safe Havens for Vehicles Carrying Class A or Class B Explosives.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document focuses on the design, construction, and maintenance of commercial safe havens operated by truck stops. In the context of this document, the term 'safe haven' describes a designated area for parking motor vehicles transporting Class A or Cla...

1985-01-01

74

Simultaneous determination of pesticides, biopesticides and mycotoxins in organic products applying a quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe extraction procedure and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method for the simultaneous determination of pesticides, biopesticides and mycotoxins from organic products was developed. Extraction of more than 90 compounds was evaluated and performed by using a modified QuEChERS-based (acronym of Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe) sample preparation procedure. The method was based on a single extraction with acidified acetonitrile, followed by partitioning with salts, avoiding

R. Romero-González; A. Garrido Frenich; J. L. Martínez Vidal; O. D. Prestes; S. L. Grio

2011-01-01

75

California Painters Project. Helping Small Business Work Safely with Lead. Occupational Lead Poisining Prevention Program. California Department of Health Services.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Occupational Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (OLPPP) of the California Department of Health Services (CDHS) provides statewide preventive services aimed at reducing the occurrence of work-related lead poisoning. Its activities include: managing the ...

E. Merideth L. Sampton M. Smith P. Coyle

1998-01-01

76

Safe Harbor  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Safe Harbor was created as a response to the European Commission's Directive on Data Privacy which was launched in October 1998 and prohibits the transfer of personal data to countries outside of the European Union that do not meet the EU's standards for privacy protection. Because the United States has significantly lower standards for privacy protection, the Directive on Data Privacy would have prohibited many transactions between the US and EU nations. Safe Harbor is a framework of US organizations that have agreed to comply with the Directive. The Safe Harbor Website contains a basic overview of the initiative which explains its history and mission. Safe Harbor documents include privacy principles, an in-depth collection of FAQs, information on how Safe Harbor is enforced, and other documents from both the US and the EU.

77

In Vitro Evaluation of ScopeSafe Fibers and the Scope Guardian Sheath in Prevention of Ureteroscope Endolumenal Working Damage  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background and Purpose Ureteroscope breakage is commonly related to laser fiber damage. Often, the damage is mechanical and not energy related. As such, we evaluated a novel laser fiber and sheath system in preventing mechanical ureteroscope damage during fiber insertion. Materials and Methods We assessed 200-?m/272/3-?m laser fibers with the laser sheath in a flexible ureteroscope. Diminishment of active deflection and irrigation flow rates were compared with a standard laser fiber alone. Eight nonassembled working channel components were tested in a 0-degree/90-degree/210-degree deflection model. After insertion cycles, external and endolumenal damage to the working channel were classified. We also tested the sheath system in a 0-degree/90-degree/210-degree deflection model for fiber failure and laser damage. Results In all test trials with the sheath and for standard laser fibers in the 0-degree model, there were no channel perforations or damage. With standard laser fibers, in the 210-degree model, superficial scratches and demarcated abrasions were visible after 10 and 60 to 70 insertions for the 273-?m laser fiber and after 30 insertions (superficial scratches) for the 200-?m laser fiber. In the 90-degree model, superficial scratches occurred after 20 insertions for the 273-?m fibers and after 40 insertions for the 200-?m laser fibers. No demarcated abrasions were seen after 100 insertions. In the 210-degree model, there was one perforation with the 272-?m fiber, but none with 200-?m fiber. There were no fiber failures with sheath use; however, the sheath did not prevent laser energy damage. The laser sheath resulted in a 4.7-degree/3.8-degree (1.2%/1.5%) diminishment in deflection (up/down) for the 200??m and a 3.5-degree/4.3-degree (1.8%/1.5%) diminishment for 272-?m laser fiber compared with standard 200/272-?m laser fiber. Irrigation flow was diminished with the sheath on both the 200-?m and 272-?m laser fiber by 28.7% and 32.6%, respectively. Conclusion The Scope Guardian Sheath prevented mechanical working channel damage with minimal diminishment of deflection and irrigation flow.

Abdelshehid, Corollos; Liss, Michael A.; Alipanah, Reza; McDougall, Elspeth M.; Landman, Jaime

2013-01-01

78

Analogous Mechanisms of Selection and Updating in Declarative and Procedural Working Memory: Experiments and a Computational Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article investigates the mechanisms of selecting and updating representations in declarative and procedural working memory (WM). Declarative WM holds the objects of thought available, whereas procedural WM holds representations of what to do with these objects. Both systems consist of three embedded components: activated long-term memory, a…

Oberauer, Klaus; Souza, Alessandra S.; Druey, Michel D.; Gade, Miriam

2013-01-01

79

Safe sex  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

There are many diseases that humans can contract through sexual contact with each other. Humans can lower their risk of contracting these diseases by practicing safe sex techniques if they choose to participate in those kinds of actions.

Olivia Worland (Purdue University;Biological Sciences)

2008-07-09

80

Working Safe and Feeling Fine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the problem of repetitive stress disorders in the administrative workplace and shares some quick fixes to aid ergonomics. Some thoughts on the ergonomics of office chairs are provided as is the use of professional guidance in furniture purchasing. (GR)

Milshtein, Amy

1999-01-01

81

Plastic matters: an analytical procedure to evaluate the degradability of contemporary works of art.  

PubMed

The most significant results concerning a chemical study to evaluate the degradability of polymeric components in four contemporary works of art, partially or completely realized in plastics, are presented and discussed in this paper. The procedure applied is mainly based on the use of Fourier transform IR and UV-vis spectroscopies and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and consists of the following steps: (1) compositional analysis of the artworks, with particular attention to components which may have a negative effect on the overall ageing; (2) evaluation of the actual state of conservation; (3) investigation of the accelerated ageing of reference polymer samples; and (4) monitoring of the natural ageing of the artworks. On such a basis, the following could be concluded. Stage Evidence by Loris Cecchini is made of poly(ether urethane) elastomer which contains a high amount of phthalates. Their exudation gives a sticky appearance to the artwork and their removal during ageing is the main cause of the loss of flexibility. The latex used by Andrés Pinal for tailoring Traxe de Home is a natural polyisoprene, whose oxidative degradation accounts for the extensive deterioration and yellowing of the artwork. The plaster sculptures of 3D Bodyscans 1:9 by Karin Sander are coated with an aliphatic epoxy resin. Its oxidation with formation of amides is the cause of the surface yellowing. The adhesive used by Dario Villalba for Tierra, Ladrillo y Agua is a commercial poly(vinyl acetate). Simulated photoageing suggests a fast deterioration due to deacetylation and cross-linking, which possibly is the main reason for the actual detachment of debris from the support. PMID:21249336

Lazzari, Massimo; Ledo-Suárez, Ana; López, Thaïs; Scalarone, Dominique; López-Quintela, M Arturo

2011-03-01

82

Sun Safely  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

www.sunsafely.org is a site promoting sun protection and sun safety for children and teens. It contains resources for teachers, schools, teens, children, and parents to help prevent skin cancer and teach sun safe behavior from the U.S and around the world.

83

Prenatal Diagnosis: Current Procedures and Implications for Early Interventionists Working with Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides an overview of procedures commonly used in prenatal screening and diagnosis including ultrasound, amniocentesis, chorionic villus biopsy, maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis. Emphasis is on the role of the early interventionist in supporting families during prenatal diagnosis. (Author/DB)

Blasco, Patricia M.; And Others

1994-01-01

84

Safe Lock  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Model 1150 electronic spring latch, which provides controlled and timed access to a safe, was developed by Burnett Electronics Lab, Inc., San Diego, CA, and is marketed by KeyOne, Inc. also of San Diego. The Model 1150 is a spinoff from a spinoff. The original spinoff, the acoustic pinger, is an underwater transmitting device developed by Langley Research Center and the Navy for location and recovery of sounding rocket research payloads from the ocean. Long functioning life is a vital requirement for both the acoustic pinger and the Model 1150. The electronic spring latch employs the pinger power management technology to get long life out of the battery power source.

1991-01-01

85

Work-related stress and bullying: gender differences and forensic medicine issues in the diagnostic procedure  

PubMed Central

Background The attention of international agencies and scientific community on bullying and work-related stress is increasing. This study describes the gender differences found in victims of bullying and work-related stress in an Italian case series and analyzes the critical issues in the diagnostic workup. Methods Between 2001 and 2009 we examined 345 outpatients (148 males, 197 females; mean age: 41 ± 10.49) for suspected psychopathological work-related problems. Diagnosis of bullying was established using international criteria (ICD-10 and DSM-IV). Results After interdisciplinary diagnostic evaluation (Occupational Medicine Unit, Psychology and Psychiatry Service), the diagnosis of bullying was formulated in 35 subjects, 12 males and 23 females (2 cases of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and 33 of Adjustment Disorder). Fifty-four (20 males, 34 females) suffered from work-related anxiety, while work-unrelated Adjustment Disorder and other psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 7 and 112 subjects, respectively. Women between 34 and 45 years showed a high prevalence (65%) of "mobbing syndrome" or other work-related stress disorders. Conclusions At work, women are more subject to harassment (for personal aspects related to emotional and relational factors) than men. The knowledge of the phenomenon is an essential requisite to contrast bullying; prevention can be carried out only through effective information and training of workers and employers, who have the legal obligation to preserve the integrity of the mental and physical status of their employees during work.

2011-01-01

86

Professional Skills and Competence for Safe and Effective Procedural Sedation in Children: Recommendations Based on a Systematic Review of the Literature  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To investigate which skills and competence are imperative to assure optimal effectiveness and safety of procedural sedation (PS) in children and to analyze the underlying levels of evidence. Study Design and methods. Systematic review of literature published between 1993 and March 2009. Selected papers were classified according to their methodological quality and summarized in evidence-based conclusions. Next, conclusions were used to formulate recommendations. Results. Although the safety profiles vary among PS drugs, the possibility of potentially serious adverse events and the predictability of depth and duration of sedation define the imperative skills and competence necessary for a timely recognition and appropriate management. The level of effectiveness is mainly determined by the ability to apply titratable PS, including deep sedation using short-acting anesthetics for invasive procedures and nitrous oxide for minor painful procedures, and the implementation of non-pharmacological techniques. Conclusions. PS related safety and effectiveness are determined by the circumstances and professional skills rather than by specific pharmacologic characteristics. Evidence based recommendations regarding necessary skills and competence should be used to set up training programs and to define which professionals can and cannot be credentialed for PS in children.

Leroy, Piet L. J. M.; Schipper, Daphne M.; Knape, Hans (J. ) T. A.

2010-01-01

87

When Is Safe, Safe Enough?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses events affecting parental school-safety concerns and what school districts can do to alleviate those concerns. Addresses post-September 11 crisis-management procedures, preventing sports-related student deaths, maintaining healthy indoor air quality. (PKP)

Neil, Kirk

2002-01-01

88

Safety Training and Safe Operating Procedures Written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and Applicable to Other Pulsed Power Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies an...

G. L. Donovan S. A. Goldstein

1986-01-01

89

Student Admissions Policies and Procedures: Seriously Carry Out the Work of Student Recruitment in the Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Chairman Mao's directive concerning student recruitment is used as the basis for selection of students from among workers and peasants to study at socialist institutes for higher learning. Support is stated for the Party organization's policies for educational reform and for development of a force of intellectuals from the working class. (SM)

Chinese Education, 1973

1973-01-01

90

Method Matters: Systematic Effects of Testing Procedure on Visual Working Memory Sensitivity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Visual working memory (WM) is traditionally considered a robust form of visual representation that survives changes in object motion, observer's position, and other visual transients. This article presents data that are inconsistent with the traditional view. We show that memory sensitivity is dramatically influenced by small variations in the…

Makovski, Tal; Watson, Leah M.; Koutstaal, Wilma; Jiang, Yuhong V.

2010-01-01

91

Guidelines and Procedures: Directed Work-Experience Programs in Vocational Agricultural Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The growing demand for increased diversification of programs and greater specialization in work experience for students of vocational agriculture has created a need for sound teacher guidelines for initiating, establishing, and administering a vocational education program that combines the benefits of school instruction, on-the-job training, and…

Cushman, Harold R.; And Others

92

Safe Manual Jettison  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In space, the controlled release of certain cargoes is no less useful than the maritime jettisons from which they take their name but is also much more dangerous. Experience has shown that jettisons can be performed safely, but the process is complicated with the path to performing a jettison taking months or even years. In the background, time is also required to write procedures, train the crew, configure the vehicle, and many other activities. This paper outlines the current process used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for manual jettisons, detailing the methods used to assure that the jettisons and the jettisoned objects are as safe as achievable and that the crew is adequately trained to be able to affect the safe jettison. The goal of this paper is not only to capture what it takes to perform safe jettisons in the near Earth environment but to extrapolate this knowledge to future space exploration scenarios that will likely have Extravehicular Activity (EVA) and International Partner (IP) interfaces.

Barton, Jay

2008-01-01

93

Radon Testing for Safe Schools Act. Report (To Accompany S. 1697) from the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report was written to accompany the Radon Testing for Safe Schools Act (S.1697), a bill that provides for radon testing of schools located in high risk radon areas and provides limited financial assistance to schools for mitigation of high levels of radon. A description of radon, its harmful effects, and the radon levels detected in schools…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.

94

The Effect of Principle-Procedure and Procedure-Principle Sequencing on Learning Outcomes. IDD&E Working Paper No. 19.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tested the effects of two instructional sequences--principle-procedure and procedure-principle--on the application and transfer of learning. It was hypothesized that a principle-procedure sequence would result in better near-transfer and far-transfer and that students would prefer this sequence. The 38 freshmen enrolled in a business…

Lim-Quek, Muriel; And Others

95

Safe Passage  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many schools are almost entirely reliant on alarms and sprinklers for their fire protection. As these devices need to be triggered and supplied with power or water to work properly, they are vulnerable to errors. To provide adequate safety, a good fire-protection program must have three primary elements: fire protection and suppression, and…

Razwick, Jeff

2007-01-01

96

IRRADIATION OF TUMORS, A SAFE PROCEDURE  

Microsoft Academic Search

T HE availability of selective per- cutaneous angiography has given the radiologist the unique opportunity of treat- ing tumors directly by injecting radio- active material into the tumor vessels or into the organ containing tumor. There is enough experience and interest in intra- arterial radiation in this country and abroad to warrant an appraisal of the benefits and risks of

NORMAN SIMON; SIDNEY M. SILVERSTONE; LAWRENCE C. ROACH; RICHARD R. P. WARNER; MURRAY G. BARON; AMIEL Z. RUDAVSKY

97

Effect of clozapine on interval timing and working memory for time in the peak-interval procedure with gaps  

PubMed Central

Previous research indicates that dopamine controls both the speed of an internal clock (Maricq and Church, 1983) and sharing of resources between the timer and other cognitive processes (Buhusi, 2003). For example, dopamine agonist methamphetamine increases the speed of an internal clock and resets timing after a gap, while dopamine antagonist haloperidol decreases the speed of an internal clock and stops timing during a gap (Buhusi and Meck, 2002a). Using a 20-s peak-interval procedure with gaps we examined the acute effects of clozapine (2.0 mg/kg i.p.), which exerts differential effects on dopamine and serotonin in the cortex and striatum, two brain areas involved in interval timing and working memory. Relative to saline, clozapine injections shifted the response functions leftward both in trials with and without gaps, suggesting that clozapine increased the speed of an internal clock and facilitated the maintenance of the pre-gap interval in working memory. These results suggest that clozapine exerts effects in different brain areas in a manner that allows for the pharmacological separation of clock speed and working memory as a function of peak trials without and with gaps.

Buhusi, Catalin V.; Meck, Warren H.

2007-01-01

98

Developing a Safe Cycling Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A cycling course can take advantage of students' interests, teach safe cycling, and give students a fuller appreciation of a lifetime sport. Suggestions for planning and scheduling a cycling course, covering safety procedures, and considering other elements necessary for a successful course are given. (PP)

Riddle, Amy Backus

1983-01-01

99

Safe handling practices for electrostatic-sensitive devices  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Review is detailed compilation of safe handling practices for Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) circuit elements and other devices that are susceptible to damage by electrostatic discharge. Article lists safety procedures for all aspects of handling and use of these components. Included are guidelines for setting up static-free work station and list of materials and equipment needed to maintain antistatic protection. Appendix gives vendors of these items.

Herring, L. L.

1977-01-01

100

Effect of clozapine on interval timing and working memory for time in the peak-interval procedure with gaps.  

PubMed

Previous research indicates that dopamine controls both the speed of an internal clock [Maricq, A.V., Church, R.M., 1983. The differential effects of haloperidol and methamphetamine on time estimation in the rat. Psychopharmacology 79, 10-15] and sharing of resources between the timer and other cognitive processes [Buhusi, C.V., 2003. Dopaminergic mechanisms of interval timing and attention. In: Meck, W.H. (Ed.), Functional and Neural Mechanisms of Interval Timing. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, pp. 317-338]. For example, dopamine agonist methamphetamine increases the speed of an internal clock and resets timing after a gap, while dopamine antagonist haloperidol decreases the speed of an internal clock and stops timing during a gap [Buhusi, C.V., Meck, W.H., 2002. Differential effects of methamphetamine and haloperidol on the control of an internal clock. Behav. Neurosci. 116, 291-297]. Using a 20-s peak-interval procedure with gaps we examined the acute effects of clozapine (2.0mg/kg i.p.), which exerts differential effects on dopamine and serotonin in the cortex and striatum, two brain areas involved in interval timing and working memory. Relative to saline, clozapine injections shifted the response functions leftward both in trials with and without gaps, suggesting that clozapine increased the speed of an internal clock and facilitated the maintenance of the pre-gap interval in working memory. These results suggest that clozapine exerts effects in different brain areas in a manner that allows for the pharmacological separation of clock speed and working memory as a function of peak trials without and with gaps. PMID:17141425

Buhusi, Catalin V; Meck, Warren H

2007-02-22

101

Procedure-Authoring Tool Improves Safety on Oil Rigs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dark, cold, and dangerous environments are plentiful in space and on Earth. To ensure safe operations in difficult surroundings, NASA relies heavily on procedures written well ahead of time. Houston-based TRACLabs Inc. worked with Ames Research Center through the SBIR program to create an electronic procedure authoring tool, now used by NASA and companies in the oil and gas industry.

2014-01-01

102

Promoting Safe Work for Young Workers: A Community-Based Approach. A Resource Guide Documenting the Experiences of Three Young Worker Projects.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide presents the lessons learned from three health education projects that focused on young worker issues and were funded by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. In these projects, occupational health educators worked for 3 years, in three different communities, to raise the awareness of young worker issues, including…

Bush, Diane; Gonzalez-Arroyo, Michele; Stock, Laura; Delp, Linda; Miara, Christine; Dewey, Robin; Sinclair, Raymond C.; Ortega, Maria J.

103

Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These web pages introduce the concept of work and its relation to energy. An example of electric work and energy using the example of a Van de Graaff Generator. These pages are part of "From Stargazers to Starships", an extensive web site that introduces topics in physics and astronomy using space exploration and space science. Translations are available in French and Spanish.

Stern, David

2006-07-16

104

Development of a systems theoretical procedure for evaluation of the work organization of the cockpit crew of a civil transport airplane  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To achieve optimum design for the man machine interface with aircraft, a description of the interaction and work organization of the cockpit crew is needed. The development of system procedure to evaluate the work organization of pilots while structuring the work process is examined. Statistical data are needed to simulate sequences of pilot actions on the computer. Investigations of computer simulation and applicability for evaluation of crew concepts are discussed.

Fricke, M.; Vees, C.

1983-01-01

105

Safe driving for teens  

MedlinePLUS

Driving and teenagers; Teens and safe driving; Automobile safety - teenage drivers ... Make a Commitment to Safety Teens also need to commit to being safe and responsible drivers in order improve the odds in their favor. Reckless driving is ...

106

Working  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A new special section in the New York Times, Working, features articles on the American worker. For example, the current issue contains stories on the contrast between the recent trend in layoffs and employers's complaints that they are unable to fill job openings; what is "retaining and motivating...the American worker"; and the shortage of qualified legal talent. The site also offers a great deal of career and job advice such as an article on non-traditional jobs, job forecasts, and office design. Interviews include an audio piece with Robert B. Reich, the former US Secretary of Labor. And of course, what would a newspaper section on work be without a link to the Dilbert comic strip?

107

Safe Disposal of Highly Reactive Chemicals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides specific procedures for the disposal of a variety of highly reactive chemicals and reports the results of a study of their safe disposal. Disposal of some problematic sulfur-containing compounds are included. Procedures are based on a combination of literature review and author development. (LZ)

Lunn, George; Sansone, Eric B.

1994-01-01

108

NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR DEFINING WORKING DATABASES AND DATA ENTRY FORMS (HAND ENTRY) (UA-D-3.0)  

EPA Science Inventory

The purpose of this SOP is to outline a standard approach to naming and defining variables, data types, and data entry forms. This procedure applies to all working databases created during the NHEXAS project and the "Border" study. Keywords: databases; standards. The National...

109

Making the System WorkTraining Pediatric Oncology Patients to Cope and Their Parents to Coach them during BMAILP Procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three 4-to 7-year-old pediatric oncology patients were taught to engage in distraction prior to painful bone marrow asporations and limber puncture and to use party blowers as a breathing technique during the painful procedures. Parents were taught to coach their children to use these coping behavior. Using a multiple baseline across subjects design, results indicated that all of the parents

Ronald L. Blount; Scort W. Powers; Melanie W. Cotter; Suzanne Swan; Kay Free

1994-01-01

110

Organizing Safe Transitions from Intensive Care  

PubMed Central

Background. Organizing and performing patient transfers in the continuum of care is part of the work of nurses and other staff of a multiprofessional healthcare team. An understanding of discharge practices is needed in order to ultimate patients' transfers from high technological intensive care units (ICU) to general wards. Aim. To describe, as experienced by intensive care and general ward staff, what strategies could be used when organizing patient's care before, during, and after transfer from intensive care. Method. Interviews of 15 participants were conducted, audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results. The results showed that the categories secure, encourage, and collaborate are strategies used in the three phases of the ICU transitional care process. The main category; a safe, interactive rehabilitation process, illustrated how all strategies were characterized by an intention to create and maintain safety during the process. A three-way interaction was described: between staff and patient/families, between team members and involved units, and between patient/family and environment. Discussion/Conclusions. The findings highlight that ICU transitional care implies critical care rehabilitation. Discharge procedures need to be safe and structured and involve collaboration, encouraging support, optimal timing, early mobilization, and a multidiscipline approach.

Haggstrom, Marie; Backstrom, Britt

2014-01-01

111

The Fire Safe Council  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Utilizing the combined expertise, resources and distribution channels of its members, the Fire Safe Council fulfills its mission to preserve California's natural and manmade resources by mobilizing all Californians to make their homes, neighborhoods and communities fire safe. The Council has distributed fire prevention education materials to industry leaders and their constituents, evaluated legislation pertaining to fire safety and empowered grassroots organizations to spearhead fire safety programs. The site offers information on workshops and conferences, meeting minutes and details about local councils, an electronic newsletter, and fire safe education tools for individuals, business or local Fire Safe councils to raise awareness of the need to prepare for wildfires.

2002-10-15

112

Safe Space: Student Perspectives on Classroom Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on data from a survey of 121 baccalaureate and master of social work students at a western university, this study explores students' perspectives of "safe" and "unsafe" classroom environments. The majority reported that being in a safe classroom changed both what and how much they learned. Students offered a wide range of instructor, fellow…

Holley, Lynn C.; Steiner, Sue

2005-01-01

113

Beth Reis and the Safe Schools Coalition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article chronicles the formation and organization of the Safe Schools Coalition (SCC) through the experiences of Beth Reis, co-founder and co-Chair. The article suggests ways in which the SCC can serve as a model for both collective and individual work in promoting safe schools.

Vaught, Sabina E.

2007-01-01

114

Color Me Safe Coloring Book  

MedlinePLUS

... to... Añadir en... Favorites Delicious Digg Google Bookmarks Color Me Safe Color Me Safe is a coloring book designed for ... the pictures and reading about the Safe Family. Color Me Safe can help parents talk with their ...

115

Stay Safe While Boating  

MedlinePLUS

... Guard-approved life jackets are now widely available. Send an eCard Boating Safety Safe Boating Don't ... on the Water [PODCAST - 3:45 minutes] (2008) Send an eCard Boating Safety Safe Boating Week Protect ...

116

Counterpane Labs: Password Safe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Tired of trying to memorize numerous computer passwords? Password Safe is a free Windows 9x/2000 utility that provides users the opportunity to keep their passwords securely encrypted on their computers and provides a single Safe Combination that unlocks all passwords. Password Safe "protects passwords with the Blowfish encryption algorithm, a fast, free alternative to DES." The program's security has been thoroughly verified by Counterpane Labs under the supervision of Bruce Schneier, author of Applied Cryptography and creator of the Blowfish algorithm. Password Safe features a simple, intuitive interface that lets users set up their password database in minutes. One can copy a password just by double clicking and pasting it directly into his/her application. Best of all, Password Safe is completely free: no license requirements, shareware fees, or other strings attached.

2001-01-01

117

Aflatoxins and safe storage  

PubMed Central

The paper examines both field experience and research on the prevention of the exponential growth of aflatoxins during multi-month post-harvest storage in hot, humid countries. The approach described is the application of modern safe storage methods using flexible, Ultra Hermetic™ structures that create an unbreatheable atmosphere through insect and microorganism respiration alone, without use of chemicals, fumigants, or pumps. Laboratory and field data are cited and specific examples are given describing the uses of Ultra Hermetic storage to prevent the growth of aflatoxins with their significant public health consequences. Also discussed is the presently limited quantitative information on the relative occurrence of excessive levels of aflatoxin (>20 ppb) before vs. after multi-month storage of such crops as maize, rice, and peanuts when under high humidity, high temperature conditions and, consequently, the need for further research to determine the frequency at which excessive aflatoxin levels are reached in the field vs. after months of post-harvest storage. The significant work being done to reduce aflatoxin levels in the field is mentioned, as well as its probable implications on post-harvest storage. Also described is why, with some crops such as peanuts, using Ultra Hermetic storage may require injection of carbon dioxide, or use of an oxygen absorber as an accelerant. The case of peanuts is discussed and experimental data is described.

Villers, Philippe

2014-01-01

118

Aflatoxins and safe storage.  

PubMed

The paper examines both field experience and research on the prevention of the exponential growth of aflatoxins during multi-month post-harvest storage in hot, humid countries. The approach described is the application of modern safe storage methods using flexible, Ultra Hermetic™ structures that create an unbreatheable atmosphere through insect and microorganism respiration alone, without use of chemicals, fumigants, or pumps. Laboratory and field data are cited and specific examples are given describing the uses of Ultra Hermetic storage to prevent the growth of aflatoxins with their significant public health consequences. Also discussed is the presently limited quantitative information on the relative occurrence of excessive levels of aflatoxin (>20 ppb) before vs. after multi-month storage of such crops as maize, rice, and peanuts when under high humidity, high temperature conditions and, consequently, the need for further research to determine the frequency at which excessive aflatoxin levels are reached in the field vs. after months of post-harvest storage. The significant work being done to reduce aflatoxin levels in the field is mentioned, as well as its probable implications on post-harvest storage. Also described is why, with some crops such as peanuts, using Ultra Hermetic storage may require injection of carbon dioxide, or use of an oxygen absorber as an accelerant. The case of peanuts is discussed and experimental data is described. PMID:24782846

Villers, Philippe

2014-01-01

119

29 CFR 1926.1080 - Safe practices manual.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Safe practices manual. 1926.1080...HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving General Operations...1926.1080 Safe practices manual. Note: ...requirements applicable to construction work under this...

2013-07-01

120

A FORCED-CHOICE PROCEDURE FOR MEASUREMENT OF PUPILS' ATTITUDES TOWARD MAJOR DIMENSIONS OF WORK, REPORT NUMBER 3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

AN INSTRUMENT WAS DEVELOPED AND PILOT TESTED FOR MEASURING OCCUPATIONAL ATTITUDES OF SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS TOWARD COMPONENT DIMENSIONS OF NONPROFESSIONAL-LEVEL WORK INVOLVED IN OFFICE, RETAIL, HEALTH SERVICE, AND CONSTRUCTION VOCATIONS. THE DIMENSIONS MEASURED WERE TOOLS, MATERIALS, NATURE OF TASKS, PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS, AND PHYSICAL…

HEINER, HAROLD G.; AND OTHERS

121

Flame Tests Performed Safely  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The trend toward inquiry-based learning is providing today's students with a more enriching education. When implementing inquiry it is important to recognize the great number of safety concerns that accompany this paradigm shift. Fortunately, with some consideration, teachers can shape students' laboratory experiments into safe and valuable learning experiences. One very popular demonstration is the flame test. The author provides a safe and effective alternative to the traditional flame test without the traditional use of methanol, and provides strategies that allow students to safely gain a better understanding of the atomic structure, the nature of light, and the electromagnetic spectrum.

Dogancay, Deborah

2005-09-01

122

Safe Streets in Tacoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Tacoma, Washington, the Safe Street Campaign united the schools, government agencies, labor groups, community and religious organizations, businesses, youth, and substance abuse agencies in responding to gangs and drugs. (MLF)

Nebgen, Mary

1990-01-01

123

Safe Food Preparation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity about food safety and nutrition, learners investigate safe food preparation by making fruit ice cream. This lesson guide includes background information, variations and bilingual (English/Spanish) recipe cards.

Moreno, Nancy P.; Tharp, Barbara Z.

2011-01-01

124

Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles  

DOEpatents

A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

Martin, Sue I. (Berkeley, CA); Fergenson, David P. (Alamo, CA); Srivastava, Abneesh (Santa Clara, CA); Bogan, Michael J. (Dublin, CA); Riot, Vincent J. (Oakland, CA); Frank, Matthias (Oakland, CA)

2010-08-24

125

The Food-Safe Schools Action Guide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"The Food-Safe School Needs Assessment and Planning Guide" is a tool that can help schools assess their food safety policies, procedures, and programs and develop plans for improvement. This tool includes a simple, straightforward questionnaire, score card, and planning guide that give administrators, school staff, families, and students a chance…

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

2007-01-01

126

Safe cooperative robot dynamics on graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract This paper initiates the use of vector fields to design, optimize, and implement reactive schedules for safe cooperative robot pat- terns on planar graphs. We consider Automated Guided Vehicles (AGV’s) operating upon a predefined network of pathways. contrast to the case of locally Euclidean configuration spaces, reg- ularization of collisions is no longer a local procedure, and issues

Robert Ghrist; Daniel E. Koditschek

2000-01-01

127

Transcoding abilities in typical and atypical mathematics achievers: the role of working memory and procedural and lexical competencies.  

PubMed

Transcoding between numerical systems is one of the most basic abilities acquired by children during their early school years. One important topic that requires further exploration is how mathematics proficiency can affect number transcoding. The aim of the current study was to investigate transcoding abilities (i.e., reading Arabic numerals and writing dictation) in Brazilian children with and without mathematics difficulties, focusing on different school grades. We observed that children with learning difficulties in mathematics demonstrated lower achievement in number transcoding in both early and middle elementary school. In early elementary school, difficulties were observed in both the basic numerical lexicon and the management of numerical syntax. In middle elementary school, difficulties appeared mainly in the transcoding of more complex numbers. An error analysis revealed that the children with mathematics difficulties struggled mainly with the acquisition of transcoding rules. Although we confirmed the previous evidence on the impact of working memory capacity on number transcoding, we found that it did not fully account for the observed group differences. The results are discussed in the context of a maturational lag in number transcoding ability in children with mathematics difficulties. PMID:24007971

Moura, Ricardo; Wood, Guilherme; Pinheiro-Chagas, Pedro; Lonnemann, Jan; Krinzinger, Helga; Willmes, Klaus; Haase, Vitor Geraldi

2013-11-01

128

Eating Outdoors, Handling Food Safely  

MedlinePLUS

... it safely once you've arrived. Pack and Transport Food Safely Keep your food safe: from the ... foods won’t be exposed to warm outdoor air temperatures. Keep coolers closed. Once at the picnic ...

129

Health and Safety Procedures Manual for hazardous waste sites  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Chemical Assessments Team (ORNL/CAT) has developed this Health and Safety Procedures Manual for the guidance, instruction, and protection of ORNL/CAT personnel expected to be involved in hazardous waste site assessments and remedial actions. This manual addresses general and site-specific concerns for protecting personnel, the general public, and the environment from any possible hazardous exposures. The components of this manual include: medical surveillance, guidance for determination and monitoring of hazards, personnel and training requirements, protective clothing and equipment requirements, procedures for controlling work functions, procedures for handling emergency response situations, decontamination procedures for personnel and equipment, associated legal requirements, and safe drilling practices.

Thate, J.E.

1992-09-01

130

YMCA National Safe Place  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In today's world where many social services for young people are being scaled back due to budgetary constraints, outreach programs such as Project Safe Place are important to know about. The program got its start in 1983 in Louisville, and since then has spread to many parts of the country. Essentially, the Safe Place program creates a network of locations (such as schools, fire stations, YMCAs, and libraries) where young people who may be distressed by difficult and threatening situations, such as domestic disputes or other such problems, can find help and support resources. On the site, visitors can learn in great detail about the program, find Safe Place locations around the country, and read about the organization's history and current leadership. One highlight to note on the site is the Teen Topics area, which has been designed specifically for teenagers as a place to read about topics they may have questions about, such as eating disorders, suicide, and teen crime.

131

Safe Passage: Making It through Adolescence in a Risky Society.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary job of parents is to ensure safe passage for their children from infancy through adolescence to adulthood. Research has indicated many things schools can do to turn the privilege of safe passage into a right. Three research-based programs that work to achieve safe passage are described. The first is Caring Connection, a "one-stop-shop"…

Dryfoos, Joy G.

132

Hit the Safe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This game presents students with a number and asks them to find all the factors (divisors) of it between 1-10. There are two modes: the first uses numbers 1-100 and the second uses 101-999. Students then select which numbers are factors and try to open the safe. If they are correct, the safe will open. If they are incorrect, the simulation gives a hint as to how many they have correct and two more tries. There is a calculator built in to the site for students to use to help solve each problem.

Moerlands, Frans

2004-01-01

133

Managing hazards in the workplace using organisational safety management systems: a safe place, safe person, safe systems approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Not all hazards in the workplace manifest in the same way. Some are obvious because their impacts are direct and easily felt, such as physical workplace hazards; others are indirect because the effects are long term or further downstream from the original work process; and some are hazards because their absence, for example the lack of safe systems of work,

Chris Winder

2009-01-01

134

Safe Halloween Thrills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two PTAs sponsored events that capitalized on Halloween themes, engaged their communities in fall celebrations, and were safe, wholesome, and fun. With help from local volunteers, one school turned its gymnasium into a 19th-century British town with a fall/Halloween theme. Another PTA hosted a carnival, Spooktacular, that involved community…

Kuersten, Joan

1998-01-01

135

Keeping Campuses Safe.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes how colleges and universities are using technology, as well as traditional methods, to keep campuses safe and reduce crime. Topics include using free pizza in a successful contest to teach students about campus safety, installing security cameras, using access-control cards, providing adequate lighting, and creating a bicycle patrol…

Kennedy, Mike

1999-01-01

136

Safe Entry, Easy Exit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After violent episodes too numerous to list and too terrible to forget, schools and universities have been focused for several years on enhancing security in their facilities. Doors are among the most critical points of concern for school personnel responsible for keeping buildings safe. Education institutions want doors that let the right people…

Kennedy, Mike

2008-01-01

137

Experience with fluorine and its safe use as a propellant  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The industrial and the propulsion experience with fluorine and its derivatives is surveyed. The hazardous qualities of fluorine and safe handling procedures for the substance are emphasized. Procedures which fulfill the safety requirements during ground operations for handling fluorinated propulsion systems are discussed. Procedures to be implemented for use onboard the Space Transportation System are included.

Bond, D. L.; Guenther, M. E.; Stimpson, L. D.; Toth, L. R.; Young, D. L.

1979-01-01

138

How Safe Are Your Schools?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As violence in school increases, administrators need to assess school security and take steps to make it effective. School employers must have an understanding of student discipline policies for any security system to work. A security assessment should examine such issues as policies and procedure, school sites, school security staff, and…

Rubel, Robert J.; Blauvelt, Peter D.

1994-01-01

139

Refinements in husbandry, care and common procedures for non-human primates: Ninth report of the BVAAWF/FRAME/RSPCA/UFAW Joint Working Group on Refinement.  

PubMed

Preface Whenever animals are used in research, minimizing pain and distress and promoting good welfare should be as important an objective as achieving the experimental results. This is important for humanitarian reasons, for good science, for economic reasons and in order to satisfy the broad legal principles in international legislation. It is possible to refine both husbandry and procedures to minimize suffering and improve welfare in a number of ways, and this can be greatly facilitated by ensuring that up-to-date information is readily available. The need to provide such information led the British Veterinary Association Animal Welfare Foundation (BVAAWF), the Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical Experiments (FRAME), the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) and the Universities Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW) to establish a Joint Working Group on Refinement (JWGR) in the UK. The chair is Professor David Morton and the secretariat is provided by the RSPCA. This report is the ninth in the JWGR series. The RSPCA is opposed to the use of animals in experiments that cause pain, suffering, distress or lasting harm and together with FRAME has particular concerns about the continued use of non-human primates. The replacement of primate experiments is a primary goal for the RSPCA and FRAME. However, both organizations share with others in the Working Group, the common aim of replacing primate experiments wherever possible, reducing suffering and improving welfare while primate use continues. The reports of the refinement workshops are intended to help achieve these aims. This report produced by the British Veterinary Association Animal Welfare Foundation (BVAAWF)/Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical Experiments (FRAME)/Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA)/Universities Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW) Joint Working Group on Refinement (JWGR) sets out practical guidance on refining the husbandry and care of non-human primates (hereinafter primates) and on minimizing the adverse effects of some common procedures. It provides a valuable resource to help understand the physical, social and behavioural characteristics and needs of individual primates, and is intended to develop and complement the existing literature and legislative guidelines. Topics covered include refinements in housing, husbandry and common procedures such as restraint, identification and sampling, with comprehensive advice on issues such as primate communication, assessing and facilitating primate wellbeing, establishing and maintaining social groups, environmental and nutritional enrichment and animal passports. The most commonly used species are the key focus of this resource, but its information and recommendations are generally applicable to other species, provided that relevant individual species characteristics are taken into account. PMID:19286892

Jennings, M; Prescott, M J; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M; Gamble, Malcolm R; Gore, Mauvis; Hawkins, Penny; Hubrecht, Robert; Hudson, Shirley; Jennings, Maggy; Keeley, Joanne R; Morris, Keith; Morton, David B; Owen, Steve; Pearce, Peter C; Prescott, Mark J; Robb, David; Rumble, Rob J; Wolfensohn, Sarah; Buist, David

2009-04-01

140

Addressing Lead-Based Paint Hazards During Renovation, Remodeling, and Rehabilitation in Federally Owned and Assisted Housing. Instructor Manual for Use in HUD-Sponsored Lead-Safe Work Practices Training.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is the instructor's manual for a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) training course that reflects the requirements of HUD's Lead Safe Housing Rule and is designed to provide training contractors with information regarding containment, minimization, and cleanup of lead hazards during activities that disturb…

Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics.

141

Microelectromechanical safe arm device  

SciTech Connect

Microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus and methods for operating, for preventing unintentional detonation of energetic components comprising pyrotechnic and explosive materials, such as air bag deployment systems, munitions and pyrotechnics. The MEM apparatus comprises an interrupting member that can be moved to block (interrupt) or complete (uninterrupt) an explosive train that is part of an energetic component. One or more latching members are provided that engage and prevent the movement of the interrupting member, until the one or more latching members are disengaged from the interrupting member. The MEM apparatus can be utilized as a safe and arm device (SAD) and electronic safe and arm device (ESAD) in preventing unintentional detonations. Methods for operating the MEM apparatus include independently applying drive signals to the actuators coupled to the latching members, and an actuator coupled to the interrupting member.

Roesler, Alexander W. (Tijeras, NM)

2012-06-05

142

Approaching Suspicious Substances Safely  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A mineral identification tool that was developed for NASA's Mars Rover Technology Development program is now serving as a powerful tool for U.S. law enforcement agencies and military personnel to identify suspicious liquid and solid substances. The tool can measure unknown substances through glass and plastic packaging materials with the RamanProbe(TradeMark) focused fiber-optic probe. The probe length can be extended up to 200 meters to enable users to analyze potentially dangerous substances at a safe distance. In many cases, the spectrometer and personnel are kept in a safe zone while the probe is positioned next to the sample being analyzed. Being able to identify chemicals in remote locations also saves users time and labor, since otherwise the samples would need to be collected, transported, and prepared prior to measurement in the laboratory.

2004-01-01

143

Keratorefractive procedures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two laser types are going to find a place in refractive surgery of the cornea: the excimer laser (193 nm) and mid-infrared YAG lasers, such as Ho:YAG (2.1 micrometers ) and Er:YAG (2.94 micrometers ). Whereas the excimer laser used for photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) is currently studied in clinical trials, Ho:YAG and Er:YAG lasers are still in the state of preclinical evaluation. For myopic corrections excimer laser PRK has shown to be safe and effective in the range up to -7.0 D. The results compare favorably with conventional procedures such as radial keratotomy. Complications are rare. Hyperopic and astigmatic corrections using the Ho:YAG laser (HOT) are effective, but safety and stability has yet to be proven. Er:YAG laser photoablation yields a healing response in animal eyes similar to the excimer laser.

Seiler, Theo

1991-11-01

144

UNFPA supports safe motherhood.  

PubMed

The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) is supporting a range of safe motherhood activities around the world. Together with the government of Iran, the agency sponsored a regional conference on family planning in Teheran in September 1993. The conference included sessions on the delivery and quality of care in maternal and child health programs, on birth spacing, and on the reproductive health of women. Representatives came from countries as far apart as China and Turkey, including the central Asian republics of the former Soviet Union. A southern Asian conference on safe motherhood was also partially funded by UNFPA in Chandigarh, India. In Bhutan, UNFPA is supporting a project to cut maternal mortality through a better system of referral of high-risk pregnancies. In Mongolia, the agency has initiated a 4-year project to help cut maternal mortality by half. The project includes increasing knowledge of complications and referral during pregnancy and delivery. Mongolia has started publishing a quarterly Safe Motherhood newsletter in English with support from UNFPA. The first issue includes features on the problems of maternity waiting homes in a period of economic transition and on maternal mortality and fertility in Mongolia. The country's maternal mortality rate among women who give birth at home is 352/100,000 live births, while for those who deliver in hospital the rate is 17/100,000 live births. PMID:12345697

1994-01-01

145

Lessons Learned from Safe Kids/Safe Streets.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Child abuse and neglect may place youth at risk for delinquency, criminality, and other problem behaviors. The Department of Justice developed the Safe Kids/Safe Streets program to break this cycle of early victimization and subsequent behavioral problems...

R. Cronin F. Gragg D. Schultz K. Eisen

2006-01-01

146

Safe venting of hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

The disposal of hydrogen is often required in the operation of an experimental facility that contains hydrogen. Whether the vented hydrogen can be discharged to the atmosphere safely depends upon a number of factors such as the flow rate and atmospheric conditions. Calculations have been made that predict the distance a combustible mixture can extend from the point of release under some specified atmospheric conditions. Also the quantity of hydrogen in the combustible cloud is estimated. These results can be helpful in deciding of the hydrogen can be released directly to the atmosphere, or if it must be intentionally ignited. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Stewart, W.F.; Dewart, J.M.; Edeskuty, F.J.

1990-01-01

147

Keeping food safe.  

PubMed

Legislation passed during this year's legislative session will help the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) identify the source of food-borne illness outbreaks. Senate Bill 81 increases the number of food wholesalers and warehouse operators that must obtain licenses from DSHS. DSHS enforcement activities include follow-up inspections at establishments that have problems, sending warning letters, holding management meetings with the firms, and providing technical assistance. When a food-borne illness outbreak involves a Texas manufacturer, wholesaler, or warehouse, DSHS can recall contaminated products, close establishments temporarily until they can ensure their food is safe or close them permanently, and levy fines. PMID:22714694

Conde, Crystal

2011-11-01

148

Hit the Safe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive game provides practice for students in identifying factors of a composite number. A player can open the safe by clicking on all of the numbers (1-10) in the outer ring that are a factor (divisor) of the number in the middle. There are two modes for the middle number: the first uses numbers 1-100 and the second uses 101-999. If the student is incorrect, the simulation gives a hint as to how many factors are identified correctly and offers two more tries to find the others. A calculator is built in to the site for students to use to help solve each problem.

Van Galen, Frans

2012-07-01

149

Keep Kids Safe This Summer  

MedlinePLUS

... Añadir en... Favorites Delicious Digg Google Bookmarks Keep Kids Safe This Summer Help your kids stay safe and healthy while they enjoy summer ... simple health tips at home and at play. Kids like to dive into summer to relax, unwind, ...

150

Safe Space Oddity: Revisiting Critical Pedagogy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Inspired by an incident in a social work graduate classroom in which she was a teaching assistant, the author reflects on her commitment to constructivist teaching methods, critical theory, and critical pedagogy. Exploring the educational utility of notions such as public space and safe space, the author employs this personal experience to examine…

Redmond, Melissa

2010-01-01

151

Safe pill-dispensing.  

PubMed

Each patient is supplied with a smart-card containing a Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) chip storing a unique identification code. The patient places the Smart-card on a pill-dispenser unit containing an RFID reader. The RFID chip is read and the code sent to a Base-station via a wireless Bluetooth link. A database containing both patient details and treatment information is queried at the Base-station using the RFID as the search key. The patient's treatment data (i.e., drug names, quantities, time, etc.) are retrieved and sent back to the pill-dispenser unit via Bluetooth. Appropriate quantities of the required medications are automatically dispensed, unless the patient has already taken his/her daily dose. Safe, confidential communication and operation is ensured. PMID:17901607

Testa, Massimiliano; Pollard, John

2007-01-01

152

Healthy Air at Work  

MedlinePLUS

... for ENews Home > Healthy Air > At Work Healthy Air at Work Employees should be safe while on ... air in the workplace threatens workers' lives. Healthy Air at Work Healthy air quality is an important ...

153

Time-efficient and convenient synthesis of [(18)F]altanserin for human PET imaging by a new work-up procedure.  

PubMed

[(18)F]Altanserin, an important PET radioligand for the in vivo imaging of the 5-HT(2A) receptor, was synthesized from its precursor nitro-altanserin in DMF or DMSO at high temperatures of 150 degrees C in an overall radiochemical yield (EOB) of 23-25% after 75min. A new solid phase work-up procedure involving the acidification of the crude reaction mixture and a C18-SepPak-solid phase separation preceded the final HPLC purification. This led to a significantly reduced synthesis time as a result of a stable and early elution from the HPLC column using improved HPLC conditions (MeOH/THF/NaOAc 0.05N pH 5: 27/18/55, flow: 5 mL/min, Symetry Prep 7 microm C18 (Waters)). The synthesis was performed semi-automatically in a modified GE TracerLab synthesis module using an in-house-developed program. The synthesized [(18)F]altanserin was used in our ongoing human and animal PET imaging studies. PMID:19692252

Massarweh, G; Kovacevic, M; Rosa-Neto, P; Evans, A C; Diksic, M; Schirrmacher, R

2009-11-01

154

Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge.  

PubMed

The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective 'titanic'. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the 'Seven C's'. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm. PMID:22738396

Routledge, Philip A

2012-10-01

155

Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge  

PubMed Central

The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective ‘titanic’. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the ‘Seven C's’. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm.

Routledge, Philip A

2012-01-01

156

Making programmable BMS safe and reliable  

SciTech Connect

Burner management systems ensure safe admission of fuel to the furnace and prevent explosions. This article describes how programmable control systems can be every bit as safe and reliable as hardwired or standard programmable logic controller-based designs. High-pressure boilers are required by regulatory agencies and insurance companies alike to be equipped with a burner management system (BMS) to ensure safe admission of fuel to the furnace and to prevent explosions. These systems work in parallel with, but independently of, the combustion and feedwater control systems that start up, monitor, and shut down burners and furnaces. Safety and reliability are the fundamental requirements of a BMS. Programmable control system for BMS applications are now available that incorporate high safety and reliability into traditional microprocessor-based designs. With one of these control systems, a qualified systems engineer applying relevant standards, such as the National Fire Protection Assn (NFPA) 85 series, can design and implement a superior BMS.

Cusimano, J.A.

1995-12-01

157

OPINION: Safe exponential manufacturing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1959, Richard Feynman pointed out that nanometre-scale machines could be built and operated, and that the precision inherent in molecular construction would make it easy to build multiple identical copies. This raised the possibility of exponential manufacturing, in which production systems could rapidly and cheaply increase their productive capacity, which in turn suggested the possibility of destructive runaway self-replication. Early proposals for artificial nanomachinery focused on small self-replicating machines, discussing their potential productivity and their potential destructiveness if abused. In the light of controversy regarding scenarios based on runaway replication (so-called 'grey goo'), a review of current thinking regarding nanotechnology-based manufacturing is in order. Nanotechnology-based fabrication can be thoroughly non-biological and inherently safe: such systems need have no ability to move about, use natural resources, or undergo incremental mutation. Moreover, self-replication is unnecessary: the development and use of highly productive systems of nanomachinery (nanofactories) need not involve the construction of autonomous self-replicating nanomachines. Accordingly, the construction of anything resembling a dangerous self-replicating nanomachine can and should be prohibited. Although advanced nanotechnologies could (with great difficulty and little incentive) be used to build such devices, other concerns present greater problems. Since weapon systems will be both easier to build and more likely to draw investment, the potential for dangerous systems is best considered in the context of military competition and arms control.

Phoenix, Chris; Drexler, Eric

2004-08-01

158

Safe water for Africa.  

PubMed

Most morbidity in Africa is linked to unsafe water supplies and a lack of adequate sanitation facilities. According to official government statistics, only 57% of Africans had access to safe water in 1990. The treatment of contaminated water sources or the development of alternative, cleaner water sources is insufficient. The provision of community water points must be integrated with latrine construction and intensive hygiene education based on traditional cultural activities. In rural areas, where people generally collect water from surface sources or shallow wells, intensive education is required to convince community members of the health benefits of improved sources (e.g., protected wells or bore holes with hand pumps), especially when these sources are more distant. In high-density urban areas, even water from the taps and public standpipes is often contaminated and household treatment of drinking water must be promoted. Greater emphasis is being placed on selecting equipment that can be maintained with local technical and organizational capacities and strengthening local maintenance and repair capacities through training village-based mechanics and establishing networks of spare parts suppliers. PMID:12321818

Kirkwood, A

1998-09-01

159

Production Line Materials. Youth Training Scheme. Core Exemplar Work Based Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This trainer's guide is intended to assist supervisors of work-based career training projects in helping students understand the operation of an assembly line, including safe working procedures. The guide is one in a series of core curriculum modules that is intended for use in combination on- and off-the-job programs to familiarize youth with the…

Further Education Staff Coll., Blagdon (England).

160

Safe laboratory handling of Neisseria meningitidis.  

PubMed

Transmission of Neisseria meningitidis mainly occurs by formation of aerosols generated in the nasopharynx. Working with meningococci in vitro and performing manipulations where aerosols may be generated may result in laboratory acquired infections if appropriate safety precautions are not taken. This review details the practical aspects and experience of safe working with N. meningitidis in the laboratory. The specific risk factor for laboratory-acquired infection is exposure to aerosols containing meningococci. Prevention should therefore focus on the use of microbiology safety cabinets during manipulation of meningococci and this should be reflected in local risk assessments, supported by safe practices of work appropriate facilities and equipment, training/competency and immunisation policies. PMID:24440738

Borrow, Ray; Findlow, Jamie; Gray, Steve; Taylor, Stephen; Kaczmarski, Ed

2014-04-01

161

Safety Practices for Demolition Procedures. Module SH-41. Safety and Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This student module on safety practices for demolition procedures is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module presents a general outline of the safe work practices that should be followed at a demolition job site in order for workers to avoid injury. Following the introduction, 10 objectives (each keyed to a page in the…

Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

162

Humeral lengthening by distraction osteogenesis: a safe procedure?  

PubMed

This study was conducted to assess the safety of humeral lengthening using an Ilizarov frame. We retrospectively reviewed 26 humeral segments in 17 patients that were lengthened at our department between 1993 and 2011. There were varying aetiologies including achondroplasia, epiphyseal dysplasia, Oilier disease, trauma or infection of the proximal humeral growth-plate, unicameral bone cyst and brachial plexus injury. Mean age at start of surgery was 17.05 years (range : 5-40). The mean lengthening achieved was 8.85 (3-13) cm. Mean lengthening percentage was 353% (range : 10-48). Average healing index was 30.56 days/cm (range : 17.46-4232). There was a significant difference in healing index between achondroplasia patients (28.79 days/cm) compared to others (33.41 days/cm). Minor problems included pin tract infection (14 segments). More important obstacles were temporary elbow flexion contracture (7 segments), premature consolidation (6 segments), radial nerve dysaesthesia (6 segments) and loosening of a Schanz screw (1 segment). Complications included one fracture and one progressive bowing after frame removal. One planned lengthening was not completely achieved. Despite a lot of obstacles, humeral lengthening using an Ilizarov frame provided a reliable method to treat the functional or cosmetic problems of upper limb shortening. PMID:24563967

Ruette, Peter; Lammens, Johan

2013-12-01

163

Safe in the city.  

PubMed

Workplace danger and violence are complex problems that affect nurses more often than is recognized. The home healthcare work environment is challenging enough without the additional risks associated with working out in the open or within a client's home. Every clinician working in home health today understands the demands of visits or extended care in the home and often reluctantly accepts the involved risk. The clinician working in the rural setting may experience similar challenges, but in large metropolitan cities, it has become increasingly frightening as crime, drug use, gangs, violence, homelessness, and transportation issues have made the clinician's job much tougher. It is important to renew awareness and remind clinicians to maintain constant vigilance for personal safety. PMID:18849719

Anderson, Norma R

2008-10-01

164

Teens for Safe Cosmetics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this video adapted from Earth Island Institute's New Leaders Initiative, meet a high school student who worked to enact a state law to make cosmetics safer, after she learned they contained toxic chemicals linked to cancer.

Foundation, Wgbh E.

2011-07-01

165

75 FR 21151 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Revenue Procedure 2004-18  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Comment Request for Revenue Procedure 2004- 18 AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service...soliciting comments concerning Revenue Procedure 2004-18, Average Area Purchase Price Safe...Revenue Procedure Number: Revenue Procedure 2004-18. Abstract: Revenue Procedure...

2010-04-22

166

Young Children Can Be Key to Fire-Safe Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For more than 15 years, preschool programs nationwide have worked with Fireproof Children/Prevention First, an international center for injury prevention research and education, to bring fire safety education to young children and their families. The "play safe! be safe!"[R] curriculum includes lessons that young children can learn and understand,…

Kourofsky, Carolyn E.; Cole, Robert E.

2010-01-01

167

NASA trend analysis procedures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This publication is primarily intended for use by NASA personnel engaged in managing or implementing trend analysis programs. 'Trend analysis' refers to the observation of current activity in the context of the past in order to infer the expected level of future activity. NASA trend analysis was divided into 5 categories: problem, performance, supportability, programmatic, and reliability. Problem trend analysis uncovers multiple occurrences of historical hardware or software problems or failures in order to focus future corrective action. Performance trend analysis observes changing levels of real-time or historical flight vehicle performance parameters such as temperatures, pressures, and flow rates as compared to specification or 'safe' limits. Supportability trend analysis assesses the adequacy of the spaceflight logistics system; example indicators are repair-turn-around time and parts stockage levels. Programmatic trend analysis uses quantitative indicators to evaluate the 'health' of NASA programs of all types. Finally, reliability trend analysis attempts to evaluate the growth of system reliability based on a decreasing rate of occurrence of hardware problems over time. Procedures for conducting all five types of trend analysis are provided in this publication, prepared through the joint efforts of the NASA Trend Analysis Working Group.

1993-01-01

168

Implementing AORN recommended practices for a safe environment of care.  

PubMed

Providing a safe environment for every patient undergoing a surgical or other invasive procedure is imperative. AORN's "Recommended practices for a safe environment of care" provides guidance on a wide range of topics related to the safety of perioperative patients and health care personnel. The recommendations are intended to provide guidance for establishing best practices and implementing safety measures in all perioperative practice settings. Perioperative nurses should be aware of risks related to musculoskeletal injuries, fire, equipment, latex, and chemicals, among others, and understand strategies for reducing the risks. Evidence-based recommendations can give practitioners the tools to guide safe practice. PMID:23890564

Hughes, Antonia B

2013-08-01

169

Findings from the Safe Kids/Safe Streets National Evaluation: Safe Kids/Safe Streets, Toledo, Ohio.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Many studies suggest that child abuse and neglect are risk factors for the development of juvenile delinquency and other problem behaviors. The Safe Kids/Safe Streets (SK/SS) program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Justice Program...

2005-01-01

170

A Safe Protocol for Amalgam Removal  

PubMed Central

Today's environment has different impacts on our body than previous generations. Heavy metals are a growing concern in medicine. Doctors and individuals request the removal of their amalgam (silver mercury) restorations due to the high mercury content. A safe protocol to replace the silver mercury filling will ensure that there is minimal if any absorption of materials while being removed. Strong alternative white composite and lab-processed materials are available today to create a healthy and functioning mouth. Preparation of the patient prior to the procedure and after treatment is vital to establish the excretion of the mercury from the body.

Colson, Dana G.

2012-01-01

171

A safe protocol for amalgam removal.  

PubMed

Today's environment has different impacts on our body than previous generations. Heavy metals are a growing concern in medicine. Doctors and individuals request the removal of their amalgam (silver mercury) restorations due to the high mercury content. A safe protocol to replace the silver mercury filling will ensure that there is minimal if any absorption of materials while being removed. Strong alternative white composite and lab-processed materials are available today to create a healthy and functioning mouth. Preparation of the patient prior to the procedure and after treatment is vital to establish the excretion of the mercury from the body. PMID:22315627

Colson, Dana G

2012-01-01

172

Safe learning assessment for anaesthetic apparatus checks.  

PubMed

This article discusses the safe learning and assessment for a component of the anaesthetic apparatus check. It reports on an innovation to facilitate a realistic medical gas pressure check. For clarity, the term 'anaesthetic practitioner' (Wicker & Smith 2006) is used to refer to operating department practitioners and perioperative nurses who work as members of the anaesthetic team, as opposed to 'anaesthesia practitioner' (Wilkinson 2007) which refers to non-medical anaesthetists. PMID:18578391

Bowers, Mark

2008-04-01

173

Implantable medical devices MRI safe.  

PubMed

Pacemakers, ICDs, neurostimulators like deep brain stimulator electrodes, spiral cord stimulators, insulin pumps, cochlear implants, retinal implants, hearing aids, electro cardio gram (ECG) leads, or devices in interventional MRI such as vascular guide wires or catheters are affected by MRI magnetic and electromagnetic fields. Design of MRI Safe medical devices requires computer modeling, bench testing, phantom testing, and animal studies. Implanted medical devices can be MRI unsafe, MRI conditional or MRI safe (see glossary). In the following paragraphs we will investigate how to design implanted medical devices MRI safe. PMID:23739365

Dal Molin, Renzo; Hecker, Bertrand

2013-01-01

174

Plastibell Circumcision: How Safe is it?  

PubMed Central

Background: Plastibell circumcision complications can be life-threatening. Objective: The aim of this paper is to review the complications of Plastibell circumcision reported in the literature and in our own patients to determine the safety of the procedure. Method: A retrospective study of 171 neonates circumcised in Sultan Qaboos University Hospital over a 4-year period from 1997 to 2000. Results: Minor complications occurred in 4 (2.3 %) of circumcisions. Two cases were converted to formal circumcision due to bleeding and failure to introduce the bell respectively. One had delayed passage of urine for 24 hours and in one neonate, the parents were concerned about inadequate removal of foreskin. Conclusion: Plastibell circumcision is a safe technique in experienced hands. The risk of complications with this procedure is increased eight-fold when performed by nurses compared to surgeons.

Al-Marhoon, Mohammed S; Jaboub, Said M

2006-01-01

175

Bowel preparation for gastrointestinal procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adequate colonic cleansing is essential for accurate and safe colonic procedures. Common preparations for cleansing include\\u000a diet in combination with a cathartic agent, gut lavage, and phosphate preparations. The diet used with a cathartic consists\\u000a of clear liquids or is designed to leave a minimal colonic fecal residue with laxatives. Gut lavage solutions wash out the\\u000a colon in a safe

Andrew R. Brown; Jack A. DiPalma

2004-01-01

176

Stay Safe in Cold Weather!  

MedlinePLUS

... Aging Stay Safe in Cold Weather! What is hypothermia? If you are like most people, you feel ... knows what’s happening. Doctors call this serious problem hypothermia (hi-po- ther -mee-uh). Hypothermia is what ...

177

Safe genetically engineered plants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The application of genetic engineering to plants has provided genetically modified plants (GMPs, or transgenic plants) that are cultivated worldwide on increasing areas. The most widespread GMPs are herbicide-resistant soybean and canola and insect-resistant corn and cotton. New GMPs that produce vaccines, pharmaceutical or industrial proteins, and fortified food are approaching the market. The techniques employed to introduce foreign genes into plants allow a quite good degree of predictability of the results, and their genome is minimally modified. However, some aspects of GMPs have raised concern: (a) control of the insertion site of the introduced DNA sequences into the plant genome and of its mutagenic effect; (b) presence of selectable marker genes conferring resistance to an antibiotic or an herbicide, linked to the useful gene; (c) insertion of undesired bacterial plasmid sequences; and (d) gene flow from transgenic plants to non-transgenic crops or wild plants. In response to public concerns, genetic engineering techniques are continuously being improved. Techniques to direct foreign gene integration into chosen genomic sites, to avoid the use of selectable genes or to remove them from the cultivated plants, to reduce the transfer of undesired bacterial sequences, and make use of alternative, safer selectable genes, are all fields of active research. In our laboratory, some of these new techniques are applied to alfalfa, an important forage plant. These emerging methods for plant genetic engineering are briefly reviewed in this work.

Rosellini, D.; Veronesi, F.

2007-10-01

178

A simple and safe technique of creating closed pneumoperitoneum.  

PubMed

Laparoscopic surgery has become the standard of care for many diseases like symptomatic gallstone disease, acute appendicitis, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease. One of the key steps in the procedure is to obtain pneumoperitoneum and insert the first trocar safely. We describe a simple technique which detects the precise entry point when the reusable metallic Veress needle enters the peritoneal cavity. PMID:24426447

Roy, Amarendra Nath; Ghatak, Supriyo

2013-08-01

179

Safe high-pressure freezing of infectious micro-organisms.  

PubMed

We describe how high-pressure freezing of infectious biological material can safely be accomplished with the help of membrane carriers. The method described is easy to perform; however, careful manipulations are required. Existing safety regulations must still be followed. However, the procedure reduces the risk of dissemination of infectious material. PMID:22364646

Vanhecke, D; Zuber, B; Brugger, S D; Studer, D

2012-05-01

180

SAFE DRINKING WATER FROM SMALL SYSTEMS: TREATMENT OPTIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Bringing small water systems into compliance with the ever-increasing number of regulations will require flexibility in terms of technology application and institional procedures. his article looks at the means by which small systems can provide safe drinking water, focusing on t...

181

Safe and efficient local gene delivery into skeletal muscle via a combination of Pluronic L64 and modified electrotransfer.  

PubMed

Efficient DNA electrotransfer into muscles can be achieved by combining two types of electronic pulses sequentially: short high-voltage (HV) pulse for the cell electropermeabilization and long low-voltage (LV) pulse for the DNA electrophoresis into cells. However, the voltages currently applied can still induce histological and functional damages to tissues. Pluronic L64 has been considered as a molecule possessing cell membrane-disturbing ability. For these reasons, we hope that L64 can be used as a substitute for the HV pulse in cell membrane permeabilization, and a safe LV pulse may still keep the ability to drive plasmid DNA across the permeabilized membrane. In this work, we optimized the electrotransfer parameters to establish a safe and efficient procedure using a clinically applied instrument, and found out that the critical condition for a successful combination of electrotransfer with L64 was that the injection of plasmid/L64 mixture should be applied 1?h before the electrotransfer. In addition, we revealed that the combined procedure could not efficiently transfer plasmid into solid tumor because the uncompressed plasmid may rapidly permeate the leaky tumor vessels and flow away. Altogether, the results demonstrate that the combined procedure has the potential for plasmid-based gene therapy through safe and efficient local gene delivery into skeletal muscles. PMID:24694536

Liu, S; Ma, L; Tan, R; Lu, Q; Geng, Y; Wang, G; Gu, Z

2014-06-01

182

Guidance on the severity classification of scientific procedures involving fish: report of a Working Group appointed by the Norwegian Consensus-Platform for the Replacement, Reduction and Refinement of animal experiments (Norecopa).  

PubMed

The severity classification of procedures using animals is an important tool to help focus the implementation of refinement and to assist in reporting the application of the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). The recently revised Directive that regulates animal research and testing within the European Union requires Member States to ensure that all procedures are classified as 'non-recovery', 'mild', 'moderate' or 'severe', using assignment criteria set out by the European Commission (EC). However, these are focused upon terrestrial species, so are of limited relevance to fish users. A Working Group set up by the Norwegian Consensus-Platform for the 3Rs (Norecopa) has produced guidance on the classification of severity in scientific procedures involving fish, including examples of 'subthreshold', 'mild', 'moderate', 'severe' and 'upper threshold' procedures. The aims are to complement the EC guidelines and help to ensure that suffering in fish is effectively predicted and minimized. Norecopa has established a website (www.norecopa.no/categories) where more information on severity classification for procedures using fish, including field research, will be made available. PMID:21558168

Hawkins, P; Dennison, N; Goodman, G; Hetherington, S; Llywelyn-Jones, S; Ryder, K; Smith, A J

2011-10-01

183

Flywheel Rotor Safe-Life Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since the 1960s, research has been conducted into the use of flywheels as energy storage systems. The-proposed applications include energy storage for hybrid and electric automobiles, attitude control and energy storage for satellites, and uninterruptible power supplies for hospitals and computer centers. For many years, however, the use of flywheels for space applications was restricted by the total weight of a system employing a metal rotor. With recent technological advances in the manufacturing of composite materials, however, lightweight composite rotors have begun to be proposed for such applications. Flywheels with composite rotors provide much higher power and energy storage capabilities than conventional chemical batteries. However, the failure of a high speed flywheel rotor could be a catastrophic event. For this reason, flywheel rotors are classified by the NASA Fracture Control Requirements Standard as fracture critical parts. Currently, there is no industry standard to certify a composite rotor for safe and reliable operation forth( required lifetime of the flywheel. Technical problems hindering the development of this standard include composite manufacturing inconsistencies, insufficient nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for detecting defects and/or impact damage, lack of standard material test methods for characterizing composite rotor design allowables, and no unified proof (over-spin) test for flight rotors. As part of a flywheel rotor safe-life certification pro-ram funded b the government, a review of the state of the art in composite rotors is in progress. The goal of the review is to provide a clear picture of composite flywheel rotor technologies. The literature review has concentrated on the following topics concerning composites and composite rotors: durability (fatigue) and damage tolerance (safe-life) analysis/test methods, in-service NDE and health monitoring techniques, spin test methods/ procedures, and containment options. This report presents the papers selected for their relevance to this topic and summarizes them.

Ratner, J. K. H.; Chang, J. B.; Christopher, D. A.; McLallin, Kerry L. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

184

Ways To Keep Grandstands Safe.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides guidelines that maintenance staff can use to help make sporting grandstands safe through preventive measures and paying attention to all exposed areas. Recommends using maintenance-and-inspection checklists that also have comments sections. Explores inspections of guardrails, areas beneath grandstands, concession stands, and exit routes.…

Krall, Robert

1999-01-01

185

Walking Safely in Rural Areas  

MedlinePLUS

Everyday Fitness Ideas from the National Institute on Aging at NIH www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Walking Safely in ... For more information, see the Go4Life tip sheet Fitness Clothes and Shoes . www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life ...

186

Safe Implementations of Supervisory Commands  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper compares two different types of control strategies used to safely implement supervisorycommands of hybrid dynamical systems. Both approaches considered in this paperswitch between members of a family of control agents to ensure that constraints on the plantstate are not violated at any time. The first approach is motivated by a hybrid system architectureoutlined in [6] and uses a

Michael D. Lemmon; Christopher J. Bett

1996-01-01

187

How Safe Are Our Teachers?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author discusses a study she conducted in Newfoundland to determine the level of abuse and/or violence experienced by teachers, the nature of that abuse/violence, its personal impact, and whether Newfoundland teachers feel safe in their workplaces. The experiences presented are those of a focus group of eight teachers,…

Younghusband, Lynda

2009-01-01

188

Legal Issues Surrounding Safe Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This handbook provides an overview of legal issues pertaining to the safety of public schools. Following the introduction, chapter 2 describes the governance model and philosophy on which American education is based. Court decisions and federal and state legislation that mandate the right to a safe school are discussed in chapter 3. The fourth…

Day, Reed B.

189

Planning and Designing Safe Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Those who manage physical education, athletic, and recreation programs have a number of legal duties that they are expected to carry out. Among these are an obligation to take reasonable precautions to ensure safe programs and facilities for all participants, spectators, and staff. Physical education and sports facilities that are poorly planned,…

Seidler, Todd

2006-01-01

190

Whipple Procedure  

MedlinePLUS

... Lab Sol Goldman Center Discussion Board The Whipple Procedure Also called a pancreaticoduodenectomy, which is generally the ... have been many modifications and improvements of the procedure. There is a detailed account of the operative ...

191

Checkout Procedures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The reliable performance of some oceanographic instruments is dependent on proper checkout procedures. The Reliability Division of the National Oceanographic Instrumentation Center develops checkout procedures when necessary and disseminates them througho...

1971-01-01

192

Photodigitizing procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report documents procedures and programs for efficiently running the Photo Digitizing System at the Naval Biodynamics Laboratory. Procedures have been tested and have been found to be effective. Any future acquisitions of programs or changes to current programs should be incorporated in these procedures. On-going research programs use high speed instrumentation cameras to record the motion of test subjects

P. D. Kilgore; J. H. Gottbrath

1984-01-01

193

Organizing delivery care: what works for safe motherhood?  

PubMed Central

The various means of delivering essential obstetric services are described for settings in which the maternal mortality ratio is relatively low. This review yields four basic models of care, which are best described by organizational characteristics relating to where women give birth and who performs deliveries. In Model 1, deliveries are conducted at home by a community member who has received brief training. In Model 2, delivery takes place at home but is performed by a professional. In Model 3, delivery is performed by a professional in a basic essential obstetric care facility, and in Model 4 all women give birth in a comprehensive essential obstetric care facility with the help of professionals. In each of these models it is assumed that providers do not increase the risk to women, either iatrogenically or through traditional practices. Although there have been some successes with Model 1, there is no evidence that it can provide a maternal mortality ratio under 100 per 100,000 live births. If strong referral mechanisms are in place the introduction of a professional attendant can lead to a marked reduction in the maternal mortality ratio. Countries using Models 2-4, involving the use of professional attendants at delivery, have reduced maternal mortality ratios to 50 or less per 100,000. However, Model 4, although arguably the most advanced, does not necessarily reduce the maternal mortality ratio to less than 100 per 100,000. It appears that not all countries are ready to adopt Model 4, and its affordability by many developing countries is doubtful. There are few data making it possible to determine which configuration with professional attendance is the most cost-effective, and what the constraints are with respect to training, skill maintenance, supervision, regulation, acceptability to women, and other criteria. A successful transition to Models 2-4 requires strong links with the community through either traditional providers or popular demand.

Koblinsky, M. A.; Campbell, O.; Heichelheim, J.

1999-01-01

194

Working Safely with HIV in the Research Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This video was designed as a visual planning document to stimulate discussion about biosafety practices among laboratory workers, research administrators, and safety experts. Its goal is to emphasize the need for you to analyze your research with the huma...

1994-01-01

195

Cultivating the Art of Safe Space  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Performance-making and peace-building are processes predicated on the production of safe space. But what is "safe space"? In performance-making, what is it that makes space safe without losing the creative potential of tension? What role is there for risk? And, once achieved, how does safe space become meaningful beyond its immediate community of…

Hunter, Mary Ann

2008-01-01

196

ToP: a trend-of-disease-progression procedure works well for identifying cancer genes from multi-state cohort gene expression data for human colorectal cancer.  

PubMed

Significantly expressed genes extracted from microarray gene expression data have proved very useful for identifying genetic biomarkers of diseases, including cancer. However, deriving a disease related inference from a list of differentially expressed genes has proven less than straightforward. In a systems disease such as cancer, how genes interact with each other should matter just as much as the level of gene expression. Here, in a novel approach, we used the network and disease progression properties of individual genes in state-specific gene-gene interaction networks (GGINs) to select cancer genes for human colorectal cancer (CRC) and obtain a much higher hit rate of known cancer genes when compared with methods not based on network theory. We constructed GGINs by integrating gene expression microarray data from multiple states--healthy control (Nor), adenoma (Ade), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and CRC--with protein-protein interaction database and Gene Ontology. We tracked changes in the network degrees and clustering coefficients of individual genes in the GGINs as the disease state changed from one to another. From these we inferred the state sequences Nor-Ade-CRC and Nor-IBD-CRC both exhibited a trend of (disease) progression (ToP) toward CRC, and devised a ToP procedure for selecting cancer genes for CRC. Of the 141 candidates selected using ToP, ?50% had literature support as cancer genes, compared to hit rates of 20% to 30% for standard methods using only gene expression data. Among the 16 candidate cancer genes that encoded transcription factors, 13 were known to be tumorigenic and three were novel: CDK1, SNRPF, and ILF2. We identified 13 of the 141 predicted cancer genes as candidate markers for early detection of CRC, 11 and 2 at the Ade and IBD states, respectively. PMID:23799036

Chung, Feng-Hsiang; Lee, Henry Hsin-Chung; Lee, Hoong-Chien

2013-01-01

197

From Barrier Free to Safe Environments: The New Zealand Experience. Monograph #44.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intrinsically safe design is presented as a logical extension of the principles of barrier free design, and as a higher level design strategy for effecting widespread implementation of the basic accessibility requirements for people with disabilities. Two fundamental planning procedures are proposed: including principles of safe and accessible…

Wrightson, William; Pope, Campbell

198

Work crew performance model: A method for evaluating training and performance in the mining industry. Information circular/1994  

SciTech Connect

The Work Crew Performance Model (WCPM) seeks to define performance variability within similar tasks of an underground work crew and relate observed variability to a cost consequence. Performance variability is described using work site observations to determine the adherence to job elements contained within a standard operating procedure. Key components of the WCPM include (1) job definition through task analysis and the ranking of job elements by perceived cost consequence, (2) observational techniques for establishing performance baselines by measuring adherence to safe and proficient job procedures, and (3) cost linkages between adherence to task procedures and measures of consequence for noncompliance.

Wiehagen, W.J.; Lineberry, G.T.; Lacefield, W.E.; Brnich, M.J.; Rethi, L.L.

1994-01-21

199

Practical Tips for the Safe Handling of Micro-organisms in Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Outlines safe laboratory procedures for the handling of micro-organisms including aseptic technique, manipulation of cultures, and treatment of contaminated equipment. Identifies the principal hazard as the microbial aerosol, explains its possible effects, and describes the appropriate precautions. (GS)

Holt, G.

1974-01-01

200

Exploring Safely: A Guide for Elementary Teachers (e-book)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Take the fear factor out of science lessons. This easy-to-digest book relieves many of the safety worries that come with teaching science in elementary school. The emphasis is on positive options for heading off potential hazards, from handling special equipment to conducting field studies. Chapters cover: - making safe work habits second nature to students - equipping your classroom for safety and conveniene, including organizational systems for preparation, setup, and cleanup - choosing and culturing live plants and animals for classroom study - working safely with electricity, chemicals, and volunteers A special added ingredient: model forms that can be adapted for your needs, including permission slips and student contracts. Best of all, a wealth of anecdotes about what works--and what doesn't--in real-life classrooms makes Exploring Safely enjoyable to read as well as to reference.

Texley, Juliana; Kwan, Terry

2009-06-09

201

Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart  

MedlinePLUS

... Administrative Forms Standard Forms Skip Navigation Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H1 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... / Topics / ... Chart / Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H3 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Z7_ ...

202

Safe-haven locking device  

DOEpatents

Disclosed is a locking device for eliminating external control of a secured space formed by fixed and movable barriers. The locking device uses externally and internally controlled locksets and a movable strike, operable from the secured side of the movable barrier, to selectively engage either lockset. A disengagement device, for preventing forces from being applied to the lock bolts is also disclosed. In this manner, a secured space can be controlled from the secured side as a safe-haven. 4 figures.

Williams, J.V.

1984-04-26

203

Safe Practice of Cosmetic Dermatology: Avoiding Legal Tangles  

PubMed Central

The present day dermatologists, in addition to conventional skin physicians, are also dermatologic-surgeons and cosmetologists in their practice. The cosmetic procedures have the inherent risk of malpractice litigations leaving an unsatisfied patient and a troublesome lawsuit against the doctor. A MEDLINE search was conducted for article with words such as legal issues and dermatology, malpractice in dermatology, safe practice of cosmetology etc. The selected articles are scrutinized and compiled so as to help the young dermatologists to have a comprehensive overview of safe cosmetology practice. This article aims at sensitizing the young dermatologists for the possible complications and provides an overview of safe practice. It also provides a list of simple routine precautions which helps the dermatologist to avoid unnecessary trips to the courthouse.

Sacchidanand, Sarvajnamurthy A; Bhat, Shilpa

2012-01-01

204

Mobile Energy Laboratory Procedures  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked to plan and implement a framework for measuring and analyzing the efficiency of on-site energy conversion, distribution, and end-use application on federal facilities as part of its overall technical support to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) Procedures establish guidelines for specific activities performed by PNL staff. PNL provided sophisticated energy monitoring, auditing, and analysis equipment for on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. Specially trained engineers and technicians were provided to conduct tests in a safe and efficient manner with the assistance of host facility staff and contractors. Reports were produced to describe test procedures, results, and suggested courses of action. These reports may be used to justify changes in operating procedures, maintenance efforts, system designs, or energy-using equipment. The MEL capabilities can subsequently be used to assess the results of energy conservation projects. These procedures recognize the need for centralized NM administration, test procedure development, operator training, and technical oversight. This need is evidenced by increasing requests fbr MEL use and the economies available by having trained, full-time MEL operators and near continuous MEL operation. DOE will assign new equipment and upgrade existing equipment as new capabilities are developed. The equipment and trained technicians will be made available to federal agencies that provide funding for the direct costs associated with MEL use.

Armstrong, P.R.; Batishko, C.R.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Stoops, J.L.

1993-09-01

205

Omission of the habituation procedure in the acquisition of a working memory task - evidence from Balb/c, C57/BL6J, and CD-1 mice.  

PubMed

Training animals in spatial mazes have always been preceded by prior habituation to the test apparatus and testing conditions with the main goal to reduce fear and anxiety from exposure to the unfamiliar maze environment. This approach makes assumptions about the baseline level of emotionality in animals without actual objective measurements. It also ignores that genetic factors and experimental manipulations can reduce or prolong fear and anxiety from novelty, hence affecting the acquisition of a memory task. In the present study, C57, CD-1 and Balb/c mice were introduced to a working memory task in a radial-arm maze without habituation. Fear-induced anxiety from exposure to the novelty in this maze is demonstrated by a very low number of arm entries. Animals have to climb onto a bridge in order to reach an arm of the maze. In the first session block, Bab/c mice made very few arm entries and made more arm repeats than CD-1 and C57 mice, and CD-1 made few arm entries and made more arm repeats than C57/BL6J mice. In the second session block, all three strains of mice did make 8 arm entries. Balb/c mice seem to perform better than C57 and CD-1 mice as shown by a low number of arm repeats in the second session block, a high number of correct choices before first errors in the third session block, and low number of errors and sessions to criterion. In the present case, a high baseline level of emotionality did not prevent Balb/c mice to perform better than C57 and CD-1 mice. PMID:21549759

Ennaceur, A

2011-09-30

206

Writer`s guide for technical procedures  

SciTech Connect

A primary objective of operations conducted in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex is safety. Procedures are a critical element of maintaining a safety envelope to ensure safe facility operation. This DOE Writer`s Guide for Technical Procedures addresses the content, format, and style of technical procedures that prescribe production, operation of equipment and facilities, and maintenance activities. The DOE Writer`s Guide for Management Control Procedures and DOE Writer`s Guide for Emergency and Alarm Response Procedures are being developed to assist writers in developing nontechnical procedures. DOE is providing this guide to assist writers across the DOE complex in producing accurate, complete, and usable procedures that promote safe and efficient operations that comply with DOE orders, including DOE Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations for DOE Facilities, and 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors.

NONE

1998-12-01

207

Essential elements of national Safe Motherhood programmes.  

PubMed

The Safe Motherhood Programme has developed a diagram explaining the necessary components of maternal health care at local centers and district hospitals. It helps countries identify gaps in local and district services. Communities need to organize efforts geared to preventing maternal deaths and health authorities need to provide local services to achieve suitable community care for women during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period. These efforts and services must include available, accessible, appropriate, and affordable family planning information and services. Health centers and district hospitals must provide the essential elements of obstetric care to handle complications of pregnancy and delivery and to guarantee the health and survival of infants. Reliable transportation and communication plans are essential so women can be referred to the district hospital or a first level referral center with emergency capabilities. Countries need to develop safe motherhood programs in the context of primary health care (PHC): equity, community participation, and intersectoral coordination. Centralized support and political commitment at the highest levels of government, redistribution of resources, and preferential help for the most disadvantaged groups are needed to achieve equity in health care for women. Community leaders and women's groups should work together to solve social, cultural, and economic problems that restrict access to health services. They also should mobilize resources and support and create demand for services. Collaboration among all sectors involved in development, both inside and outside the health system, is needed to achieve successful integration of safe motherhood programs into PHC. Some factors which contribute to effective functioning of health services and which reach those in greatest need include literacy, water and sanitation, and transport and communications. PMID:12318985

1992-01-01

208

How safe are nuclear plants. How safe should they be  

SciTech Connect

It has become customary to think about safety of nuclear plants in terms of risk as defined by the WASH-1400 study that some of the implications for the non-specialist escape our attention. Yet it is known that a rational program to understand safety, to identify unsafe events, and to use this kind of information or analysis to improve safety, requires us to use the methods of quantitative risk assessment. How this process can be made more understandable to a broader group of nontechnical people and how can a wider acceptance of the results of the process be developed have been questions under study and are addressed in this report. These are questions that have been struggled with for some time in the world of nuclear plant safety. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission examined them for several years as it moved toward developing a position on safety goals for nuclear plants, a requirement that had been assigned it by Congress. Opinion was sought from a broad spectrum of individuals, within the field of nuclear power and outside it, on the topic that was popularly called, ''How safe is safe enough.'' Views were solicited on the answer to the question and also on the way the answer should be framed when it was adopted. This report discusses the public policy and its implementation.

Kouts, H.

1988-01-01

209

Simple & Safe Genomic DNA Isolation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A procedure for purifying DNA using either bacteria or rat liver is presented. Directions for doing a qualitative DNA assay using diphenylamine and a quantitative DNA assay using spectroscopy are included. (KR)

Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

1991-01-01

210

Evaluation of Revised Computer-Based Procedure System Prototype  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear power industry is very procedure driven, i.e. almost all activities that take place at a nuclear power plant are conducted by following procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by the industry do a good job at keeping the industry safe. However, these procedures are most often paired with methods and tools put in place to anticipate, prevent, and catch errors related to hands-on work. These tools are commonly called human performance tools. The drawback with the current implementation of these tools is that the task of performing one procedure becomes time and labor intensive. For example, concurrent and independent verification of procedure steps are required at times, which essentially means that at least two people have to be actively involved in the task. Even though the current use of PBPs and human performance tools are keeping the industry safe, there is room for improvement. The industry could potentially increase their efficiency and safety by replacing their existing PBPs with CBPs. If implemented correctly, the CBP system could reduce the time and focus spent on using the human performance tools. Some of the tools can be completely incorporated in the CBP system in a manner that the performer does not think about the fact that these tools are being used. Examples of these tools are procedure use and adherence, placekeeping, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduce the time and labor they require, such as concurrent and independent verification. The incorporation of advanced technology, such as CBP systems, may help to manage the effects of aging systems, structures, and components. The introduction of advanced technology may also make the existing LWR fleet more attractive to the future workforce, which will be of importance when the future workforce will chose between existing fleet and the newly built nuclear power plants.

Katya Le Blanc; Johanna Oxstrand; Cheradan Fikstad

2013-01-01

211

The Task Matrix Procedure.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A method for developing work samples geared to a range of entry-level jobs in an occupation or industry, rather than to a specific job, was developed in 1975. Differences between the task matrix procedure and conventional work sample development are discu...

T. A. Korn D. J. Dunn

1975-01-01

212

Making Energy Fun and Safe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Making Energy Fun and Safe Web site is made possible by utility corporation Alliant Energy. The colorful cartoon feel of the site provides kids a fun way to learn the basics of electricity with topics such as What is Energy?, How Do I Use Energy?, and How Electricity Gets to Your House. Other sections of the site include ways to save energy and electricity safety at home, including many interactive games that are related to all of the topics covered. This well designed site does a great job of introducing a large amount of information in a format that is easy and fun for kids to explore.

213

Galileo spacecraft anomaly and safing recovery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A high-level anomaly recovery plan which identifies the steps necessary to recover from a spacecraft 'Safing' incident was developed for the Galileo spacecraft prior to launch. Since launch, a total of four in-flight anomalies have lead to entry into a system fault protection 'Safing' routine which has required the Galileo flight team to refine and execute the recovery plan. These failures have allowed the flight team to develop an efficient recovery process when permanent spacecraft capability degradation is minimal and the cause of the anomaly is quickly diagnosed. With this previous recovery experience and the very focused boundary conditions of a specific potential failure, a Gaspra asteroid recovery plan was designed to be implemented in as quickly as forty hours (desired goal). This paper documents the work performed above, however, the Galileo project remains challenged to develop a generic detailed recovery plan which can be implemented in a relatively short time to configure the spacecraft to a nominal state prior to future high priority mission objectives.

Basilio, Ralph R.; Durham, David M.

1993-01-01

214

Galileo spacecraft anomaly and safing recovery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A high-level anomaly recovery plan which identifies the steps necessary to recover from a spacecraft 'Safing' incident was developed for the Galileo spacecraft prior to launch. Since launch, a total of four in-flight anomalies have lead to entry into a system fault protection 'Safing' routine which has required the Galileo flight team to refine and execute the recovery plan. These failures have allowed the flight team to develop an efficient recovery process when permanent spacecraft capability degradation is minimal and the cause of the anomaly is quickly diagnosed. With this previous recovery experience and the very focused boundary conditions of a specific potential failure, a Gaspra asteroid recovery plan was designed to be implemented in as quickly as forty hours (desired goal). This paper documents the work performed above, however, the Galileo project remains challenged to develop a generic detailed recovery plan which can be implemented in a relatively short time to configure the spacecraft to a nominal state prior to future high priority mission objectives.

Basilio, Ralph R.; Durham, David M.

1993-03-01

215

[Wrinkle fillers in cosmetic facial procedures].  

PubMed

During the last decade cosmeticfacial procedures have become part of the professional work of both dentists and maxillofacial surgeons. A shift has taken place from invasive surgical treatment towards minimally invasive treatments. Besides the use ofbotulinum toxin type A, non-permanent wrinkle fillers can be an alternative to invasive surgical treatment. Since botulism was first described in the 18th century, the neurotoxin has continued to develop, as a result of which Botox, now available in synthetically produced form, can safely be employed in healthcare. The frequency with which patients visit dentists and maxillofacial surgeons offers the professional group the possibility to inform patients about cosmetic facial treatments and to carry them out according to diagnosis. PMID:24881255

Jaspers, G W C; Schepers, R H; Pijpe, J; Jansma, J

2014-05-01

216

Sexting: How Teens Can Stay Safe  

MedlinePLUS

Sexting is sending sexually explicit text or photographs via mobile devices. Sometimes teens share the photographs voluntarily, ... Good friends try to keep each other safe. Sexting: HOw teenS Can Stay Safe national Crime Prevention ...

217

Safe Landings in Extreme Terrain  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Following the failure of the Mars Polar Lander and the re-evaluation of the Mars Sample Return mission status, a Safe Landing Tiger team was established on January 7, 2000. The charter of the team was to re-evaluate large scale (1000-2000 Kg) Mars lander designs with the principal objective being the assurance of safe landing in hazardous terrain. The tiger team developed a number of concepts, two of the most notable and promising concepts, are both based on a Mobile Lander paradigm. Unlike the Pathfinder and Surveyor class landers, this paradigm groups all of the landed equipment into one of two categories: (1) EDL only equipment (i.e., not used after touchdown) and (2) multi-use equipment, those used during and or after touchdown. The objective is to maximize the use of all equipment being brought to the surface by placing the bulk of the avionics and mechanical systems onto a much larger 'rover' and leaving only the bare essentials on a 'dead-on-arrival' landing system. All of the hardware that the surface roving mission needs is enlisted into performing the EDL tasks. Any EDL specific avionics not used after touchdown are placed on the landing system.

Rivellini, Tom; Ortiz, Gary; Steltzner, Adam

2000-01-01

218

Photodigitizing procedures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report documents procedures and programs for efficiently running the Photo Digitizing System at the Naval Biodynamics Laboratory. Procedures have been tested and have been found to be effective. Any future acquisitions of programs or changes to current programs should be incorporated in these procedures. On-going research programs use high speed instrumentation cameras to record the motion of test subjects during biodynamic experiments. The films are digitized and the 3-dimensional motion is reconstructed and analyzed. Experimental research is performed to determine the effects of aircraft crashes, ship motion, vibration, aircraft ejection and parachute opening forces on the health and performance of Navy personnel.

Kilgore, P. D.; Gottbrath, J. H.

1984-02-01

219

Writer's Guide for technical procedures  

SciTech Connect

A primary objective throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex is that operations be conducted in a deliberate and controlled manner with emphasis upon recognition and maintenance of the facility-specific safety envelope. One critical element of maintaining the safety envelope is procedures. DOE is providing guidance through this and other writer's guides to assist procedure writers across the DOE complex in producing accurate, complete, and usable procedures that promote safe and efficient operations in keeping with such DOE Orders as 5480.19, Conduct of Operations for DOE Facilities'', 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear facilities'', and 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors''. This Writer's Guide addresses the content, format, and style of technical procedures (procedures that prescribe production, operation of equipment and facilities, and maintenance activities) and is intended to be applied in a manner appropriate to the individual facility, 15 refs.

Not Available

1991-09-01

220

Preparation and Patient Evaluation for Safe Gastrointestinal Endoscopy  

PubMed Central

Patient evaluation and preparation is the first and mandatory step to ensure safety and quality of endoscopic procedures. This begins and ends with identifying the patient, procedure type, and indication. Every patient has the right to be fully informed about risks and benefits of what is to be performed on them, and the medical personnel should respect the decision made by the patients. Thoroughly performed history taking and physical examination will guide the endoscopists to better stratify risk and plan sedation. Special attention should be given to higher-risk patients with higher-risk condition undergoing higher-risk procedures. Making preparations to monitor the patients and being ready to handle emergency situations throughout the endoscopic procedure are sine qua non to warrant safe endoscopy.

Kang, Seong Hee

2013-01-01

221

Developing Safe Schools Partnerships with Law Enforcement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Safe schools are the concern of communities throughout the world. If a school is safe, and if children feel safe, students "are better able to learn. But what are the steps to make" this happen? First, it is important to understand the problem: What are the threats to school safety? These include crime-related behaviors that find their way to…

Rosiak, John

2009-01-01

222

Safe new reactor for radionuclide production  

SciTech Connect

In late 1995, DOE is schedule to announce a new tritium production unit. Near the end of the last NPR (New Production Reactors) program, work was directed towards eliminating risks in current designs and reducing effects of accidents. In the Heavy Water Reactor Program at Savannah River, the coolant was changed from heavy to light water. An alternative, passively safe concept uses a heavy-water-filled, zircaloy reactor calandria near the bottom of a swimming pool; the calandria is supported on a light-water-coolant inlet plenum and has upflow through assemblies in the calandria tubes. The reactor concept eliminates or reduces significantly most design basis and severe accidents that plague other deigns. The proven, current SRS tritium cycle remains intact; production within the US of medical isotopes such as Mo-99 would also be possible.

Gray, P.L.

1995-02-15

223

Cosmetic Procedures  

MedlinePLUS

... 11.14 Read More Find a Cosmetic Dentist Teeth Whitening Accredited and General Member Dental Patients ? Cosmetic Procedures ... offered by your dentist’s use of modern technology. Teeth Whitening Most teeth can be whitened (some call it ...

224

Discovering frequent work procedures from resource connections  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intelligent desktop assistants could provide more help for users if they could learn models of the users' workflows. However, discovering desktop workflows is difficult because they unfold over extended periods of time (days or weeks) and they are interleaved with many other workflows because of user multi-tasking. This paper describes an approach to discovering desktop workflows based on rich instrumenta-

Jianqiang Shen; Erin Fitzhenry; Thomas G. Dietterich

2009-01-01

225

Newsgroups Float Into Safe Harbor, and Copyright Holders Are Sunk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Usenet newsgroups are swiftly becoming a popular vehicle for pirating digital music, movies, books, and other copyrighted works. Meanwhile, courts ignore Usenet’s tremendous potential for copyright infringement. In Ellison v. Robertson, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals found that America Online’s Usenet service might qualify for safe harbor under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. According to the district court below,

Alicia L. Wright

2006-01-01

226

Students and School Adults: Partners in Keeping Schools Safe  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author discusses the important roles that students, school staff and teachers play in keeping the school safe particularly from weapons. The author believes that one way that they do this is by working together to reduce the problem of weapons in school. The role of school staff and teachers extends beyond prevention and…

Gastic, Billie

2010-01-01

227

Exercising for Two. What's Safe for the Active Pregnant Woman?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Clinical experience and recent research challenge the current standards of exercise duration and intensity for pregnant women. By carefully assessing patients' self-monitoring techniques, physicians can work with active women to create safe exercise programs during pregnancy. Safety guidelines for developing home exercise programs are included.…

White, Jacqueline

1992-01-01

228

Scope on Safety: Debugging safely  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The hazards of pests in the classroom are numerous. Mice can contaminate food and supplies and trigger asthma attacks, cockroaches can cause allergic reactions and aggravate asthma, flies can spread disease, bee and yellow jacket stings can be life threatening, and spiders and ant bites can cause pain and even death. As teachers, we want to provide a safe classroom for our students, but we are also concerned about the indiscriminant use of hazardous pesticides in schools and on school grounds. Numerous studies have shown the dangers of exposure to these chemicals, especially for children. This is a real issue and one that finally is being addressed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and many state legislators.

Roy, Ken

2007-12-01

229

Cardiotoxicity from 'safe' herbomineral formulations.  

PubMed

Many herbomineral preparations are currently being used as therapeutic remedies for common ailments. Commonly known cardiotoxic herbs are Aconitum ferox (aconite), Areca catechu (betel nut), Thevetia peruviana (yellow oleander) and Cleistanus collinus (oduvan). Herbs mixed with lead, copper and/or mercury are known to be highly toxic. They produce cardiac arrhythmias, mainly ventricular ectopics, ventricular tachycardia and various degrees of arterioventricular (AV) blocks. We report 12 such successive cases where the patients developed vague feelings of discomfort, dizziness, chest discomfort and ventricular arrhythmias following herbal drug ingestion which warranted the immediate discontinuation of the drug. Three of the patients died. This paper emphasizes the risk of unsupervised use of herbomineral preparations by patients who believe that the remedies are always 'safe' and the urgent necessity for the pharmacognostic identification of the constituent herbs, their toxicological studies, uniform nomenclature, authenticity and standardization of plants and their parts before advocating them for therapeutic use. PMID:21262956

Dwivedi, Shridhar; Aggarwal, Amitesh; Sharma, Vishal

2011-04-01

230

Safe motherhood: when to begin.  

PubMed

Two thousand five hundred college girls were assessed for their knowledge and attitudes regarding sex, pregnancy and child rearing with the help of a pretested questionnaire. The site of menstruation was known to only 35.3% of the girls. The knowledge about the time and site of conception was 25.3% and 58.2%, respectively. Only 16.3% of the respondents knew the normal route of delivery although the duration of normal pregnancy was known to majority (87.7%). The girls were aware of the ideal timing of abortion (67.5%) but the safe method and legality were poorly known facts. Only 5% of the girls believed in pre-marital sex. More than half (54.9%) of the girls knew about some form of contraceptive, Copper-T being the best known. Nearly one fifth of the girls were either undecided or wished family members to decide about antenatal check-ups. The need for better diet and injections during pregnancy was well known although few (15.2%) were aware of the injections being tetanus toxoid. Only about 10% wanted a home delivery but one fourth felt that a Dai or a relative was suitable for conducting the delivery. An overwhelming majority of the students stated that knowledge about above facts was important and they would like to learn about them preferably during college education. It is recommended that 'Family life education' be provided during pre-adolescent and adolescent years to ensure a safe motherhood and a healthy child. PMID:7883341

Verma, M; Chhatwal, J; Mathew, E

1994-08-01

231

Is thoracoscopic talc pleurodesis really safe?  

PubMed

Talc is a mineral defined as hydrated magnesium silicate in its pure form. It is mined in open pits throughout the world. For induction of chemical pleurodesis, talc has been shown to be superior to all other products. The safety of the use of talc for pleurodesis is subject to discussion in the literature. In early days, there was concern about asbestos contamination of talc, which could cause mesothelioma in patients who had undergone talc pleurodesis. The long-term safety of talc was proven in several studies, and today talc for pharmaceutical use is asbestos-free. Today the discussion is concentrated on the early complications of talc; Acute respiratory failure, sometimes with fatal outcome, has been attributed to the intrapleural use of talc particles. In recent animal studies, a relation was demonstrated between the size of talc particles and pulmonary injury as well as dissemination to other organs. Pulmonary injury and dissemination to other organs are related to a talc particle size of less than 10 micro. With certain precautions, talc can be used safely for pleurodesis; Simultaneous bilateral procedures, concomitant pulmonary biopsies and use of more than 5 grams of talc should be avoided. As long as the hypothesis about the influence of particle size on complications has not been confirmed by studies in humans, the use of talc with a large mean particle diameter is to be preferred. PMID:15366334

Janssen, J P

2004-01-01

232

Reactive, Safe Navigation for Lunar and Planetary Robots  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

When humans return to the moon, Astronauts will be accompanied by robotic helpers. Enabling robots to safely operate near astronauts on the lunar surface has the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of crew surface operations. Safely operating robots in close proximity to astronauts on the lunar surface requires reactive obstacle avoidance capabilities not available on existing planetary robots. In this paper we present work on safe, reactive navigation using a stereo based high-speed terrain analysis and obstacle avoidance system. Advances in the design of the algorithms allow it to run terrain analysis and obstacle avoidance algorithms at full frame rate (30Hz) on off the shelf hardware. The results of this analysis are fed into a fast, reactive path selection module, enforcing the safety of the chosen actions. The key components of the system are discussed and test results are presented.

Utz, Hans; Ruland, Thomas

2008-01-01

233

Musculoskeletal aspiration procedures.  

PubMed

With advances in imaging technology, there has been a significant increase in the number and range of interventional musculoskeletal image-guided procedures. One of the most commonly performed image-guided musculoskeletal interventions is the diagnostic and therapeutic percutaneous aspiration and drainage of multiple types of intra-articular, juxta-articular, and intramuscular pathologic fluid collections. These procedures may be performed under fluoroscopic, ultrasound, computed tomography, or even magnetic resonance guidance depending on the location to be accessed, type of pathology, patient characteristics, and operator preference. Musculoskeletal image-guided aspiration and drainage procedures are minimally invasive and generally very safe while offering valuable diagnostic information as well as therapeutic benefit. This article focuses on the appropriate indications, contraindications, and general technique for accessing the major joints via imaging guidance. For each joint, we discuss pertinent anatomy, appropriate imaging modalities, and preferred approaches to gaining intra-articular access. Additionally, the article discusses some of the more frequently encountered juxta-articular and intramuscular fluid collections that can be accessed and aspirated via percutaneous intervention, with mention of the importance of recognizing extremity sarcomas that can mimic these benign collections. PMID:24293800

Hansford, Barry Glenn; Stacy, Gregory Scott

2012-12-01

234

Musculoskeletal Aspiration Procedures  

PubMed Central

With advances in imaging technology, there has been a significant increase in the number and range of interventional musculoskeletal image-guided procedures. One of the most commonly performed image-guided musculoskeletal interventions is the diagnostic and therapeutic percutaneous aspiration and drainage of multiple types of intra-articular, juxta-articular, and intramuscular pathologic fluid collections. These procedures may be performed under fluoroscopic, ultrasound, computed tomography, or even magnetic resonance guidance depending on the location to be accessed, type of pathology, patient characteristics, and operator preference. Musculoskeletal image-guided aspiration and drainage procedures are minimally invasive and generally very safe while offering valuable diagnostic information as well as therapeutic benefit. This article focuses on the appropriate indications, contraindications, and general technique for accessing the major joints via imaging guidance. For each joint, we discuss pertinent anatomy, appropriate imaging modalities, and preferred approaches to gaining intra-articular access. Additionally, the article discusses some of the more frequently encountered juxta-articular and intramuscular fluid collections that can be accessed and aspirated via percutaneous intervention, with mention of the importance of recognizing extremity sarcomas that can mimic these benign collections.

Hansford, Barry Glenn; Stacy, Gregory Scott

2012-01-01

235

Grievance Procedures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because grievances are unavoidable, it is essential for organizations, such as the schools, to utilize an efficient, effective procedure to handle friction between employers and employees. Through successive steps, representatives of labor and management attempt to resolve the grievance, first with meetings of lower level representatives (such as…

Eisenhower, R. Warren

236

Deinstitutionalization Procedures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is a step by step procedure for normalizing the life situations of institutionalized handicapped persons by establishing comprehensive community services on a local level. Available from: American Association for the Education of the Severely/Profoundly Handicapped, 1600 West Armory Way, Seattle, Washington 98119. (GW)

Neufeld, G. R.

1977-01-01

237

Working Rules  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Statutes of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) define the goals and organizational structure of the Union, while the Bye-Laws specify the main tasks of the various bodies of the Union in implementing the provisions of the Statutes. The Working Rules are designed to assist the membership and governing bodies of the Union in carrying out these tasks in an appropriate and effective manner. Each of the sections below is preceded by an introduction outlining the goals to be accomplished by the procedures specified in the succeeding paragraphs. The Executive Committee updates the Working Rules as necessary to reflect current procedures and to optimize the services of the IAU to its membership.

2007-12-01

238

Safe testing nuclear rockets economically  

SciTech Connect

Several studies over the past few decades have recognized the need for advanced propulsion to explore the solar system. As early as the 1960s, Werner Von Braun and others recognized the need for a nuclear rocket for sending humans to Mars. The great distances, the intense radiation levels, and the physiological response to zero-gravity all supported the concept of using a nuclear rocket to decrease mission time. These same needs have been recognized in later studies, especially in the Space Exploration Initiative in 1989. One of the key questions that has arisen in later studies, however, is the ability to test a nuclear rocket engine in the current societal environment. Unlike the RoverMERVA programs in the 1960s, the rocket exhaust can no longer be vented to the open atmosphere. As a consequence, previous studies have examined the feasibility of building a large-scale version of the Nuclear Furnace Scrubber that was demonstrated in 1971. We have investigated an alternative that would deposit the rocket exhaust along with any entrained fission products directly into the ground. The Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust, or SAFE, concept would allow variable sized engines to be tested for long times at a modest expense. A system overview, results of preliminary calculations, and cost estimates of proof of concept demonstrations are presented. The results indicate that a nuclear rocket could be tested at the Nevada Test Site for under $20 M.

Howe, S. D. (Steven D.); Travis, B. J. (Bryan J.); Zerkle, D. K. (David K.)

2002-01-01

239

Staying Safe While Consuming Alcohol  

PubMed Central

Objective In this qualitative study, the authors examined how students attempt to minimize harm to themselves and others when drinking. Participants The authors recruited freshmen at a large, mid-Atlantic US public university during the fall semester of 2005 to participate in 8 focus groups. Methods The moderator’s guide was developed through an iterative process that included input from experts and pilot testing. The researchers audiotaped focus group conversations, transcribed them, and subjected them to an interrater reliability check. Analysis was based on the framework of Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model and a phenomenological approach. Results College students have a repertoire of coping strategies they use in an attempt to safeguard themselves and their friends from harm when drinking. Strategies encompass planning a safe context for drinking, using safety measures to minimize harm when drinking, and taking care of someone who has consumed too much alcohol. Conclusions A harm-reduction focus that acknowledges and builds on existing protective strategies may be a promising avenue for alcohol interventions.

Howard, Donna Elise; Griffin, Melinda; Boekeloo, Bradley; Lake, Kristin; Bellows, Denise

2009-01-01

240

What is a safe lift?  

PubMed

In a perfect world, a "safe" lift would be 51 pounds if the object is within 7 inches from the front of the body, if it is at waist height, if it is directly in front of the person, if there is a handle on the object, and if the load inside the box/bucket doesn't shift once lifted. If the load to be lifted does not meet all of these criteria, then it is an unsafe lift, and modifications must be made. Modifications would include lightening the load, getting help, or using a mechanical lifting device. There is always a way to turn an unsafe lift into a safer lift. An excellent resource for anyone interested in eliminating some of the hazards associated with lifting is the "Easy Ergonomics" publication from Cal/OSHA. This booklet offers practical advice on how to improve the workplace using engineering and administrative controls, problem-solving strategies and solutions, and a vast amount of ergonomics information and resources. "Easy Ergonomics" can be obtained by calling Cal/OSHA's education and training unit in Sacramento at 800-963-9424. A free copy can be obtained via www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/puborder.asp. PMID:24260936

Espinoza, Kathy

2013-09-01

241

Materials for passively safe reactors  

SciTech Connect

Future nuclear power capacity will be based on reactor designs that include passive safety features if recent progress in advanced nuclear power developments is realized. There is a high potential for nuclear systems that are smaller and easier to operate than the current generation of reactors, especially when passive or intrinsic characteristics are applied to provide inherent stability of the chain reaction and to minimize the burden on equipment and operating personnel. Taylor, has listed the following common generic technical features as the most important goals for the principal reactor development systems: passive stability, simplification, ruggedness, case of operation, and modularity. Economic competitiveness also depends on standardization and assurance of licensing. The performance of passively safe reactors will be greatly influenced by the successful development of advanced fuels and materials that will provide lower fuel-cycle costs. A dozen new designs of advanced power reactors have been described recently, covering a wide spectrum of reactor types, including pressurized water reactors, boiling water reactors, heavy-water reactors, modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs), and fast breeder reactors. These new designs address the need for passive safety features as well as the requirement of economic competitiveness.

Simnad, T. (Univ. of California, San Diego, (United States))

1993-01-01

242

Costing imaging procedures.  

PubMed

The existing National Health Service financial system makes comprehensive costing of any service very difficult. A method of costing using modern commercial methods has been devised, classifying costs into variable, semi-variable and fixed and using the principle of overhead absorption for expenditure not readily allocated to individual procedures. It proved possible to establish a cost spectrum over the financial year 1984-85. The cheapest examinations were plain radiographs outside normal working hours, followed by plain radiographs, ultrasound, special procedures, fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, angiography and angiographic interventional procedures in normal working hours. This differs from some published figures, particularly those in the Körner report. There was some overlap between fluoroscopic interventional and the cheaper nuclear medicine procedures, and between some of the more expensive nuclear medicine procedures and the cheaper angiographic ones. Only angiographic and the few more expensive nuclear medicine procedures exceed the cost of the inpatient day. The total cost of the imaging service to the district was about 4% of total hospital expenditure. It is shown that where more procedures are undertaken, the semi-variable and fixed (including capital) elements of the cost decrease (and vice versa) so that careful study is required to assess the value of proposed economies. The method is initially time-consuming and requires a computer system with 512 Kb of memory, but once the basic costing system is established in a department, detailed financial monitoring should become practicable. The necessity for a standard comprehensive costing procedure of this nature, based on sound cost accounting principles, appears inescapable, particularly in view of its potential application to management budgeting. PMID:3349241

Bretland, P M

1988-01-01

243

On the accuracy of statistical procedures in Microsoft Excel 2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

Excel 2007, like its predecessors, fails a standard set of intermediate-level accuracy tests in three areas: statistical distributions, random number generation, and estimation. Additional errors in specific Excel procedures are discussed. Microsoft’s continuing inability to correctly fix errors is discussed. No statistical procedure in Excel should be used until Microsoft documents that the procedure is correct; it is not safe

B. D. Mccullough; David A. Heiser

2008-01-01

244

Endoscopic cochlear implant procedure.  

PubMed

The objective was to asses the feasibility of the endoscopic technique for cochlear implant (CI) positioning avoiding mastoidectomy and to discuss the benefits and drawbacks of the technique. The study design is a surgical procedure description and prospective case series report. From December 2011 to October 2012, six patients underwent endoscopic CI. All cases were selected based on CT and MRI studies. All surgical steps were analyzed; intra-and post-operative complications were noted. The length of time for each surgical procedure was recorded. The surgical procedure was described step by step focusing on the anatomy of the round window (RW) niche, analyzing the critical point during the dissection. The timing of the surgical procedures was 120 ± 21 (mean ± SD) min. In 1/6 patients, intra-operative injury of the chorda tympani occurred. In all cases, an endoscopic identification was performed and the anatomical details of the RW niche were noted. In 6/6 cases, a RW niche magnification was performed endoscopically. 5/6 cases showed a normal conformation of the RW. In 1/6 patients, obliteration of the RW niche was found. In 4/6 patients, an endoscopic cochleostomy through the RW was performed. In 1/6 patients, a difficult insertion of the array was observed. The current follow-up is 7.3 months (SD ± 3.7). No post-operative short- or long-term complications were noted in this series. Endoscopic CI is a safe and viable technique with a low rate of complications and with good outcomes. PMID:23595616

Marchioni, Daniele; Grammatica, Alberto; Alicandri-Ciufelli, Matteo; Genovese, Elisabetta; Presutti, Livio

2014-05-01

245

Embracing Safe Ground Test Facility Operations and Maintenance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Conducting integrated operations and maintenance in wind tunnel ground test facilities requires a balance of meeting due dates, efficient operation, responsiveness to the test customer, data quality, effective maintenance (relating to readiness and reliability), and personnel and facility safety. Safety is non-negotiable, so the balance must be an "and" with other requirements and needs. Pressure to deliver services faster at increasing levels of quality in under-maintained facilities is typical. A challenge for management is to balance the "need for speed" with safety and quality. It s especially important to communicate this balance across the organization - workers, with a desire to perform, can be tempted to cut corners on defined processes to increase speed. Having a lean staff can extend the time required for pre-test preparations, so providing a safe work environment for facility personnel and providing good stewardship for expensive National capabilities can be put at risk by one well-intending person using at-risk behavior. This paper documents a specific, though typical, operational environment and cites management and worker safety initiatives and tools used to provide a safe work environment. Results are presented and clearly show that the work environment is a relatively safe one, though still not good enough to keep from preventing injury. So, the journey to a zero injury work environment - both in measured reality and in the minds of each employee - continues. The intent of this paper is to provide a benchmark for others with operational environments and stimulate additional sharing and discussion on having and keeping a safe work environment.

Dunn, Steven C.; Green, Donald R.

2010-01-01

246

Designing Safe, Reliable Systems using Scade  

Microsoft Academic Search

As safety critical systems increase in size and complexity, the need for ecien t tools to verify their reliability grows. In this paper we present a tool that helps engineers design safe and reliable systems. Sys- tems are reliable if they keep operating safely when components fail. Our tool is at the core of the Scade Design Verier integrated within

Parosh Aziz Abdulla; Johann Deneux; Herman Agren; Ove Akerlund

247

Designing Safe, Reliable Systems Using Scade  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract. As safety critical systems increase in size and complexity, the need for ecien t tools to verify their reliability grows. In this paper we present a tool that helps engineers design safe and reliable systems. Systems are reliable if they keep operating safely when components fail. Our tool is at the core of the Scade Design Verier integrated within

Parosh Aziz Abdulla; Johann Deneux; Gunnar Stålmarck; Herman Ågren; Ove Åkerlund

2004-01-01

248

Safe Haven Laws as "Crime Control Theater"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: This article examines safe haven laws, which allow parents to legally abandon their infants. The main objective is to determine whether safe haven laws fit the criteria of "crime control theater", a term used to describe public policies that produce the appearance, but not the effect, of crime control, and as such are essentially…

Hammond, Michelle; Miller, Monica K.; Griffin, Timothy

2010-01-01

249

Virus Alert: Ten Steps to Safe Computing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses computer viruses and explains how to detect them; discusses virus protection and the need to update antivirus software; and offers 10 safe computing tips, including scanning floppy disks and commercial software, how to safely download files from the Internet, avoiding pirated software copies, and backing up files. (LRW)

Gunter, Glenda A.

1997-01-01

250

Contraceptive procedures.  

PubMed

Although most women desire to control the size and spacing of their family, the rate of unintended pregnancy in the United States remains high, with approximately half of all pregnancies being unintended. Reducing unintended pregnancy is a national public health goal, and the increased use of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) (intrauterine devices and implants) can help meet this goal. LARCs are among the most effective forms of contraception available. There are few contraindications to their use, and insertion and removal are straightforward procedures that are well tolerated in the outpatient office setting. PMID:24286997

Beasley, Anitra; Schutt-Ainé, Ann

2013-12-01

251

Evaluation of Computer-Based Procedure System Prototype  

SciTech Connect

This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs, to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The introduction of advanced technology in existing nuclear power plants may help to manage the effects of aging systems, structures, and components. In addition, the incorporation of advanced technology in the existing LWR fleet may entice the future workforce, who will be familiar with advanced technology, to work for these utilities rather than more newly built nuclear power plants. Advantages are being sought by developing and deploying technologies that will increase safety and efficiency. One significant opportunity for existing plants to increase efficiency is to phase out the paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used at most nuclear power plants and replace them, where feasible, with computer-based procedures (CBPs). PBPs have ensured safe operation of plants for decades, but limitations in paper-based systems do not allow them to reach the full potential for procedures to prevent human errors. The environment in a nuclear power plant is constantly changing depending on current plant status and operating mode. PBPs, which are static by nature, are being applied to a constantly changing context. This constraint often results in PBPs that are written in a manner that is intended to cover many potential operating scenarios. Hence, the procedure layout forces the operator to search through a large amount of irrelevant information to locate the pieces of information relevant for the task and situation at hand, which has potential consequences of taking up valuable time when operators must be responding to the situation, and potentially leading operators down an incorrect response path. Other challenges related to PBPs are the management of multiple procedures, place-keeping, finding the correct procedure for the task at hand, and relying on other sources of additional information to ensure a functional and accurate understanding of the current plant status (Converse, 1995; Fink, Killian, Hanes, & Naser, 2009; Le Blanc & Oxstrand, 2012). The main focus of this report is to describe the research activities conducted to address the remaining two objectives; Develop a prototype CBP system based on requirements identified and Evaluate the CBP prototype. The emphasis will be on the evaluation of an initial CBP prototype in at a Nuclear Power Plant.

Johanna Oxstrand; Katya Le Blanc; Seth Hays

2012-09-01

252

SafeNet: A methodology for integrating general-purpose unsafe devices in safe-robot rehabilitation systems.  

PubMed

Robot-assisted neurorehabilitation often involves networked systems of sensors ("sensory rooms") and powerful devices in physical interaction with weak users. Safety is unquestionably a primary concern. Some lightweight robot platforms and devices designed on purpose include safety properties using redundant sensors or intrinsic safety design (e.g. compliance and backdrivability, limited exchange of energy). Nonetheless, the entire "sensory room" shall be required to be fail-safe and safely monitored as a system at large. Yet, sensor capabilities and control algorithms used in functional therapies require, in general, frequent updates or re-configurations, making a safety-grade release of such devices hardly sustainable in cost-effectiveness and development time. As such, promising integrated platforms for human-in-the-loop therapies could not find clinical application and manufacturing support because of lacking in the maintenance of global fail-safe properties. Under the general context of cross-machinery safety standards, the paper presents a methodology called SafeNet for helping in extending the safety rate of Human Robot Interaction (HRI) systems using unsafe components, including sensors and controllers. SafeNet considers, in fact, the robotic system as a device at large and applies the principles of functional safety (as in ISO 13489-1) through a set of architectural procedures and implementation rules. The enabled capability of monitoring a network of unsafe devices through redundant computational nodes, allows the usage of any custom sensors and algorithms, usually planned and assembled at therapy planning-time rather than at platform design-time. A case study is presented with an actual implementation of the proposed methodology. A specific architectural solution is applied to an example of robot-assisted upper-limb rehabilitation with online motion tracking. PMID:24750989

Vicentini, Federico; Pedrocchi, Nicola; Malosio, Matteo; Molinari Tosatti, Lorenzo

2014-09-01

253

Using Performance-Based Assessments to Prepare Safe Science Teachers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Standard 9 of the National Science Teachers Association Standards for Science Teacher Preparation is designed to ensure that science teacher preparation programs provide preservice science teachers with the knowledge and skills to understand and successfully engage students in a safe and ethical manner. This standard contains four components describing science teachers’ legal and ethical responsibilities, appropriate use of instructional materials (chemicals in particular), emergency procedures and safety equipment, and guidelines for proper use of living organisms in the classroom. In this article, we describe the requirements of Standard 9 and provide guidance on assessments that can be used to present evidence for preservice teachers’ competence in each of the four components.

Allan, Elizabeth; Shane, Joseph; Brownstein, Erica M.; Ezrailson, Cathy; Hagevik, Rita; Veal, William

2009-12-01

254

Improved Quick Disconnect (QD) Interface Through Fail Safe Parts Identification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An extensive review of existing Quick Disconnects (QDs) mating and demating operations was performed to determine which shuttle part interface identifications and procedures contribute to human factor errors. The research methods used consisted of interviews with engineers and technicians, examination of incident reports, critiques of video and audio tapes of QD operations, and attendance of a Hyper QD operational course. The data strongly suggests that there are inherit human factor errors involved in QD operations. To promote fail-safe operations, QD interface problem areas and recommendations were outlined and reviewed. It is suggested that dialogue, investigations and recommendations continue.

Blanch-Payne, Evelyn

2001-01-01

255

32 CFR 105.9 - Commander and management procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... (5) Require adequate supplies of SAFE Kits be maintained by the active component. The supplies shall be routinely evaluated...personnel to comply with prescribed chain of custody procedures described...otherwise in the victim's chain of command, the SARC...

2013-07-01

256

Interactive eLearning - a safe place to practice.  

PubMed

Interactive web-based learning environment offers refreshing opportunities to create innovative solutions to explore and exploit informatics support on-the-job training. We report from a study where a hospital is created a interactive eLearning resource. The modules are creating a safe place to practice - to be used for introduction to the work and preparation for certification or re-certification of competencies. PMID:19593010

Einarson, Elisabeth; Moen, Anne; Kolberg, Ragnhild; Flingtorp, Gry; Linnerud, Eva

2009-01-01

257

30 CFR 77.902-1 - Fail safe ground check circuits; maximum voltage.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Low- and Medium-Voltage Alternating Current Circuits § 77.902-1 Fail safe ground check circuits; maximum voltage. The maximum voltage used...

2013-07-01

258

Safe Use of Pesticides, Guidelines. Occupational Safety and Health Series No. 38.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document provides guidance on the safe use of pesticides in agricultural work. General principles are given and followed by more detailed safety requirements for the various pesticide application techniques. Finally, the medical aspects of pesticides are considered. (BB)

International Labour Office, Geneva (Switzerland).

259

30 CFR 75.831 - Electrical work; troubleshooting and testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...continuous mining machine electrical work procedures. Prior to performing electrical work, other than...determine voltages and currents; (3) By qualified... (d) Power center electrical work procedures....

2013-07-01

260

Inquiring Safely: A Guide for Middle School Teachers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Not your average safety guide, Inquiring Safely is a uniquely readable resource from experienced teachers who know both middle school science content and how middle school students behave. The authors go beyond the standard rules and regulations to discuss safety concepts in the context of real classrooms--and to help you make students your partners-in-safety within an inquiry-based science curriculum. New and veteran teachers alike can use Inquiring Safely to develop better approaches to equip labs, dispose of chemicals and other hazardous materials, maintain documentation, and organize field trips. Some chapters cover specific disciplines, such as physical science, chemistry, Earth science, and biology. Others deal with general topics such as supervising students' online activities, accommodating students with special needs, and working with volunteers. Special features include an unusually detailed index plus model student contracts and permission forms. Like Exploring Safely: A Guide for Elementary Teachers, this essential book emphasizes a preventive approach to an up-to-date range of potential hazards. Given increased scrutiny of teaching practices and growing concerns about liability, Inquiring Safely belongs on the reference shelf of every middle school science teacher.

Texley, Juliana; Kwan, Terry

2003-01-01

261

District approach boosts safe motherhood efforts in Lesotho.  

PubMed

In Lesotho, safe motherhood has joined disease prevention and control and water/sanitation as one of three priority areas identified for intervention in a "minimum district health package." The intervention will be the responsibility of an operational support team based in each of the countries three regions, and each team will work with three or four districts. The Lesotho Safe Motherhood Initiative was launched in 1993 in response to a maternal mortality rate which could be as high as 610/100,000 live births. The 3-year plan of action includes 1) ensuring sustained political commitment and advocacy, 2) improving quality and accessibility of maternal health and obstetric care, 3) ensuring access to family planning, 4) developing human resources for safe motherhood, 5) strengthening safe motherhood education, 6) streamlining management and the health information system, 7) conducting research, and 8) redressing social inequities. In an important step, the government has signed an agreement which allows for the possible upgrading of the Private Health Association of Lesotho's facilities to improve obstetric care. In addition, the World Health Organization (WHO) has donated essential obstetric equipment to the hospital in Maseru, the UN Children's Fund has ordered equipment for all health centers, WHO field-tested its new midwifery training modules in Lesotho, and the Ministry of Health is promoting the use of maternity waiting homes for women who live far from a health center. PMID:12347545

1996-01-01

262

Bowel preparation for gastrointestinal procedures.  

PubMed

Adequate colonic cleansing is essential for accurate and safe colonic procedures. Common preparations for cleansing include diet in combination with a cathartic agent, gut lavage, and phosphate preparations. The diet used with a cathartic consists of clear liquids or is designed to leave a minimal colonic fecal residue with laxatives. Gut lavage solutions wash out the colon in a safe and effective manner. Phosphate preparations offer an attractive alternative due to smaller volumes required for ingestion; however, electrolyte disturbances can occur. This review discusses the development and clinical experience with various colon cleansing regimens and efforts to improve the tolerability and safety of preparation for colonoscopy, virtual colonoscopy, colon surgery, barium enema, and flexible sigmoidoscopy. PMID:15341716

Brown, Andrew R; DiPalma, Jack A

2004-10-01

263

Stay Safe in and around Swimming Pools  

MedlinePLUS

... and are not designed to keep swimmers safe. Supervision Preventing unintended pool access Children should never be ... lawn. Drowning can happen very quickly and quietly. Supervision is important even when there are lifeguards at ...

264

Expedition 25 Crew Lands Safely in Kazakhstan  

NASA Video Gallery

Expedition 25 Soyuz Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin, NASA International Space Station Commander Doug Wheelock and NASA Flight Engineer Shannon Walker landed safely on the steppe of Kazakhstan on Nov. 2...

265

Keeping the Person with Alzheimer's Disease Safe  

MedlinePLUS

... things you need to know about driving and memory loss: A person with some memory loss may be able to drive safely sometimes. ... that the person can drive. Some people with memory problems decide on their own not to drive. ...

266

Bottled Water Everywhere: Keeping it Safe  

MedlinePLUS

... Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol Bottled Water Everywhere: Keeping it Safe Search the Consumer Updates ... RSS Feed On this page Types of Bottled Water It May Be Tap Water Ensuring Quality and ...

267

Design Packing to Safely Mail Raw Spaghetti  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students use their creative skills to determine a way to safely mail raw (dry, uncooked) spaghetti using only the provided materials. To test the packing designs, the spaghetti is mailed through the postal system and evaluated after delivery.

Center For Engineering Educational Outreach

268

Ensuring Safe Use of Contact Lens Solution  

MedlinePLUS

... Consumer Updates RSS Feed Ensuring Safe Use of Contact Lens Solution Search the Consumer Updates Section Printer- ... About Eye Infections Dos and Don'ts for Contact Lens Wearers Not emptying the solution out of ...

269

Patient Safety: Guide to Safe Plastic Surgery  

MedlinePLUS

... and Consumer Information > Patient Safety Guide to Safe Plastic Surgery Patient Safety More Resources... Choose a surgeon ... Important facts about the safety and risks of plastic surgery Questions to ask my plastic surgeon Choose ...

270

Skate Safely - Always Wear Safety Gear  

MedlinePLUS

... instruction. Learn to stop safely by using the brake pads at the heel of most inline skates. ... front foot and push down on the heel brake. ? Skate on smooth, paved surfaces without any traffic. ...

271

Safe teleradiology: information assurance as project planning methodology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This project demonstrates use of OCTAVE, an information security risk assessment method, as an approach to the safe design and planning of a teleradiology system. By adopting this approach to project planning, we intended to provide evidence that including information security as an intrinsic component of project planning improves information assurance and that using information assurance as a planning tool produces and improves the general system management plan. Several considerations justify this approach to planning a safe teleradiology system. First, because OCTAVE was designed as a method for retrospectively assessing and proposing enhancements for the security of existing information management systems, it should function well as a guide to prospectively designing and deploying a secure information system such as teleradiology. Second, because OCTAVE provides assessment and planning tools for use primarily by interdisciplinary teams from user organizations, not consultants, it should enhance the ability of such teams at the local level to plan safe information systems. Third, from the perspective of sociological theory, OCTAVE explicitly attempts to enhance organizational conditions identified as necessary to safely manage complex technologies. Approaching information system design from the perspective of information security risk management proactively integrates health information assurance into a project"s core. This contrasts with typical approaches that perceive "security" as a secondary attribute to be "added" after designing the system and with approaches that identify information assurance only with security devices and user training. The perspective of health information assurance embraces so many dimensions of a computerized health information system"s design that one may successfully deploy a method for retrospectively assessing information security risk as a prospective planning tool. From a sociological perspective, this approach enhances the general conditions as well as establishes specific policies and procedures for reliable performance of health information assurance.

Collmann, Jeff R.; Alaoui, Adil; Nguyen, Dan; Lindisch, David

2003-05-01

272

Safe Flight 21: ground broadcast service system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The FAA-initiated Safe Flight 21 program is a cooperative government\\/industry effort to evaluate enhanced aerodome and aircraft capabilities based on evolving communications, navigation and surveillance (CNS) technologies. Safe Flight 21 will demonstrate the in-cockpit display of traffic, weather, terrain, and obstacle information for pilots and will provide improved information to controllers. The Ground Broadcast Service (GBS) System will act as

J. Rezeppa

2003-01-01

273

Ground Broadcast Service - Safe Flight 21  

Microsoft Academic Search

The FAA-initiated Safe Flight 21 program is a cooperative government\\/industry effort to evaluate enhanced aerodrome and aircraft capabilities based on evolving Communications, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS) technologies. Safe Flight 21 will demonstrate the in-cockpit display of traffic, weather, terrain and obstacle information for pilots and will provide improved information to controllers. The Ground Broadcast Service (GBS) will act as the

J. Rezeppa

2002-01-01

274

Tests and Procedures  

MedlinePLUS

... Tests and Procedures General Procedures Blood Tests Imaging Tests Nuclear Medicine Scans Anxiety Around Medical Procedures Treatment Options Treatment Side Effects Relapse Late Effects of Treatment Clinical Trials Glossary Tests and Procedures Many tests and procedures are done ...

275

Investigation of safe-life fail-safe criteria for the space shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was made to determine the effects of a safe-life design approach and a fail-safe design approach on the space shuttle booster vehicle structure, and to recommend any changes to the structural design criteria. Two configurations of the booster vehicle were considered, one incorporating a delta wing (B-9U configuration) and the other a swept wing (B-16B configuration). Several major structural components of the booster were studied to determine the fatigue life, safe-life, and fail-safe capabilities of the baseline design. Each component was investigated to determine the practicability of applying a safe-life or fail-safe design philosophy, the changes such design approaches might require, and the impact of these changes on weight, cost, development plans, and performance.

1972-01-01

276

Staying Safe during Pregnancy: Spa Treatments, Tattoo and Air Travel  

MedlinePLUS

... Most common questions Is air travel safe during pregnancy? If your pregnancy is healthy, it’s usually safe ... safe to get or have a tattoo during pregnancy? It's best to wait until after having your ...

277

Office procedures: practical and safety considerations.  

PubMed

Gynecologic invasive procedures have moved into the physician's office due to improved reimbursement and convenience. Creating a just and safe office culture has generated robust conversations in the medical literature. This article reviews the foundational principles relating to safe practices in the office including: checklists, drills, selecting a safety officer, achieving office certification, medication usage, and engaging the patient in the safety culture. Reduction of medical errors in the office will require open dialogue between the stake holders: providers, insurers, patients, state and federal agencies, and educational bodies such as the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. PMID:22828095

Erickson, Ty B

2012-09-01

278

Driving Procedures. A Resource Guide for Driver Education Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to provide instructors with resource materials for driver education, this book contains mainly materials on established safe driving procedures. An introduction defines a procedure as describing ways in which a driver can comply with the law to do something extra that will increase his/her safety and prevent congestion and collision.…

Texas State Dept. of Public Safety, Austin.

279

Student Discipline Rights and Procedures: A Guide for Advocates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To be both fair and effective, student discipline law and policy must balance two separate rights of students: the constitutional right to a public education, and the right to a safe and orderly learning environment. Procedures and laws to protect students from arbitrary and wrongful discipline are necessary, as are procedures and laws to allow…

Boylan, Ellen

2004-01-01

280

Utility of Work Samples  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A work sample test can provide a high degree of content validity, and offers a practical method of screening job applicants in accordance with guidelines on employee selection procedures set forth by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. (MW)

Muchinsky, Paul M.

1975-01-01

281

National Evaluation of the Safe Kids/Safe Streets Program: Final Report. Executive Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Many studies suggest that child abuse and neglect are risk factors for the development of juvenile delinquency and other problem behaviors. The Safe Kids/Safe Streets (SK/SS) program is designed to break the cycle by funding community collaboratives to un...

D. Schultz F. Gragg K. Eisen R. Cronin

2004-01-01

282

Findings from the Safe Kids/Safe Streets National Evaluation: KIDSAFE, Kansas City, Missouri.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Many studies suggest that child abuse and neglect are risk factors for the development of juvenile delinquency and other problem behaviors. The Safe Kids/Safe Streets (SK/SS) program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Justices Office of Justice Programs...

2005-01-01

283

What promotes sustainability in Safe Community programmes?  

PubMed Central

Background The theory and practice of safety promotion has traditionally focused on the safety of individuals. This study also includes systems, environments, and organizations. Safety promotion programmes are designed to support community health initiatives taking a bottom-up approach. This is a long-term and complex process. The aim of this study was to try to empirically identify factors that promote sustainability in the structures of programmes that are managed and coordinated by the local government. Methods Four focus group sessions with local government politicians and administrators in designated Safe Communities were conducted and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results Collaboration was found to be the basis for sustainability. Networks, enabling municipalities to exchange ideas, were reported to positively influence the programmes. Personal contacts rather than organizations themselves, determine whether collaboration is sustained. Participants reported an increase in cross-disciplinary collaboration among staff categories. Administrators and politicians were reported to collaborate well, which was perceived to speed up decision-making and thus to facilitate the programme work. Support from the politicians and the county council was seen as a prerequisite. Participants reported an increased willingness to share information between units, which, in their view, supports sustainability. A structure in which all local authorities' offices were located in close proximity to one another was considered to support collaboration. Appointing a public health coordinator responsible for the programme was seen as a way to strengthen the relational resources of the programme. Conclusion With a public health coordinator, the 'external' negotiating power was concentrated in one person. Also, the 'internal' programme strength increased when the coordination was based on a bureaucratic function rather than on one individual. Increased relational resources facilitated the transfer of information. A regular flow of information to policy-makers, residents, and staff was needed in order to integrate safety programmes into routines. Adopting a bottom-up approach requires that informal and ad hoc activities in information management be replaced by formalized, organizationally sanctioned routines. In contrast to injury prevention, which focuses on technical solutions, safety promotion tries to influence attitudes. Collaboration with the media was an area that could be improved.

Nordqvist, Cecilia; Timpka, Toomas; Lindqvist, Kent

2009-01-01

284

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Sun Safe Mode  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), a spacecraft designed and built at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, MD, was launched on June 18, 2009 from Cape Canaveral. It is currently in orbit about the Moon taking detailed science measurements and providing a highly accurate mapping of the suface in preparation for the future return of astronauts to a permanent moon base. Onboard the spacecraft is a complex set of algorithms designed by the attitude control engineers at GSFC to control the pointig for all operational events, including anomalies that require the spacecraft to be put into a well known attitude configuration for a sufficiently long duration to allow for the investigation and correction of the anomaly. GSFC level requirements state that each spacecraft s control system design must include a configuration for this pointing and lso be able to maintain a thermally safe and power positive attitude. This stable control algorithm for anomalous events is commonly referred to as the safe mode and consists of control logic thatwill put the spacecraft in this safe configuration defined by the spacecraft s hardware, power and environment capabilities and limitations. The LRO Sun Safe mode consists of a coarse sun-pointing set of algorithms that puts the spacecraft into this thermally safe and power positive attitude and can be achieved wihin a required amount of time from any initial attitude, provided that the system momentum is within the momentum capability of the reaction wheels. On LRO the Sun Safe mode makes use of coarse sun sensors (CSS), an inertial reference unit (IRU) and reaction wheels (RW) to slew the spacecraft to a solar inertial pointing. The CSS and reaction wheels have some level of redundancy because of their numbers. However, the IRU is a single-point-failure piece of hardware. Without the rate information provided by the IRU, the Sun Safe control algorithms could not maintain the required pointing, so a sub-mode of the Sun Safe mode that does not use the IRU was designed. This submode, referred to as the Sun Safe Gyroless control mode, consists of an algorithm that estimates rate information from the CSS and the RW measurements. RW momentum information is used to estimate the body rate parallel to the target sunline, which CSS alone would not be able to observe. Sun Safe can be autonomously, or via ground command, entered from any other control mode and in the event the IRU is not providing rate information, the control mode is switched to the gyroless submode. This paper looks at the design of the Sun Safe modes and discusses the constraints placed on the algorithm and how the mode wored around these constraints. Items of particular interest include CSS placement on the Solar Array (SA) and its implications to design, estimation of body rate information for the Sun Safe Gyroless control mode, and the effect of solar eclipse on each of the Sun Safe modes. Placing CSS on the SA was necessary for the means to put the Sun along the targeted sun-line, nominally normal to the SA panels, for all operational considerations. This had design implications for determining a sun vector during normal SA operations, if one or both gimbals become inoperable and when the SA is in a stowed configuration. The ability of body rate estimation in Sun Safe Gyroless not only uses CSS sun vector data but requires RW momentum measuremens to estimate rates parallel to the sun-line. LRO encounters solar eclipses of some length for most of its orbits about the Moon. With the lack of CSS measurement data a design was implemented in both Sun Safe and Sun Safe Gyroless, they differ because of having or not having IRU measurement data, to carry the spacecraft through these eclipse periods. This paper also includes some discussion of sun avoidance and how it affected design decisions during nominal and eclipse perids for each of the Sun Safe modes.

Garrick, Joseph; Roger, J.

2010-01-01

285

Procedures in complex systems: the airline cockpit.  

PubMed

In complex human-machine systems, successful operations depend on an elaborate set of procedures which are specified by the operational management of the organization. These procedures indicate to the human operator (in this case the pilot) the manner in which operational management intends to have various tasks done. The intent is to provide guidance to the pilots and to ensure a safe, logical, efficient, and predictable (standardized) means of carrying out the objectives of the job. However, procedures can become a hodge-podge. Inconsistent or illogical procedures may lead to noncompliance by operators. Based on a field study with three major airlines, the authors propose a model for procedure development called the "Four P's": philosophy, policies, procedures, and practices. Using this model as a framework, the authors discuss the intricate issue of designing flight-deck procedures, and propose a conceptual approach for designing any set of procedures. The various factors, both external and internal to the cockpit, that must be considered for procedure design are presented. In particular, the paper addresses the development of procedures for automated cockpits--a decade-long, and highly controversial issue in commercial aviation. Although this paper is based on airline operations, we assume that the principles discussed here are also applicable to other high-risk supervisory control systems, such as space flight, manufacturing process control, nuclear power production, and military operations. PMID:11541101

Degani, A; Wiener, E L

1997-05-01

286

Campaign Safe & Sober. Youth & Generation X Planner.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This packet contains information on safe and sober driving for members of Generation X. The packet includes information on "Buckle Up America! Week 1998," which was designed to encourage everyone on the road to use seat belts and child safety seats and to use them properly. It also offers a safety city brochure and multiple program materials…

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

287

Classrooms as Safe Places To Be Wrong.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper contends that classrooms should be safe places for students and their teachers to be wrong, suggesting that this concept should provide the mainspring for educational reform in Hong Kong and in other places in the world. It notes that education in Hong Kong is harsh and has a tendency to label students; for the majority of students,…

Sankey, Derek

288

Birth kits for safe motherhood in Bangladesh.  

PubMed

Tetanus infection remains the leading cause of high neonatal mortality in Bangladesh. Birth kits which instruct and assist in a clean, safe birth are seen as a key measure in reducing the high incidence of neonatal deaths. A multisectoral programme has developed a simple kit and tested its potential for distribution to pregnant women. Initial results are positive and development is continuing. PMID:1637478

Nessa, S; Arco, E S; Kabir, I A

1992-01-01

289

Creating a Safe and Positive Classroom Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To insure that each child has a safe and positive environment at school, teachers should earn their pupils' respect and classroom activities should be oriented to helping each child succeed. Three key phrases reinforce the expectation of success. These phrases, which teacher and pupils should understand and remember, are: (1) It is O.K. to make a…

White, Kimberly A.

290

Viability and predictive control for safe locomotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of safe locomotion of legged and wheeled robots, when trying to avoid falling, tipping over or hitting obstacles, appears to be a problem of viability and not of Lyapunov stability. Theoretically speaking, viability and Model Predictive Control are unquestionably related, but both can quickly lead to untractable numerical problems. We present here a promising approach for the problem

Pierre-brice Wieber

2008-01-01

291

Viability and Predictive Control for Safe Locomotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of safe locomotion of legged and wheeled robots, when trying to avoid falling, tipping over or hitting obstacles, appears to be a problem of viability and not of Lyapunov stability. Theoretically speaking, viability and Model Predictive Control are unquestionably related, but both can quickly lead to untractable numerical problems. We present here a very promising approach for the

Wieber Pierre-Brice

292

Staying Safe during Exercise and Physical Activity  

MedlinePLUS

... nih.gov/Go4Life Staying Safe during Exercise and Physical Activity There’s a way for almost every older adult ... have specific health conditions, discuss your exercise and physical activity plan with your health care provider. Endurance. Listen ...

293

Safe Water Technology for Arsenic Removal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Arsenic contamination of drinking water has been reported from many parts of world. In some arsenic affected areas, substitution of drinking water source by a safe and easily available one may not be possible during part or all of the year, or may be very expensive. Arsenic removal may be a more appropriate water supply option in these situations. This

Richard Johnston; Han Heijnen

294

Disabled Children: The Right to Feel Safe  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the fundamental right of disabled children to feel safe and be free from bullying, harassment and abuse. The article proposes that, 20 years since the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, disabled children are still facing barriers to securing this right. The article focuses on recent Mencap research that…

Mepham, Sarah

2010-01-01

295

Safe transportation for children with disabilities.  

PubMed

Few guidelines are available on providing safe transportation for children who cannot use conventional auto restraints. This article discusses the misuse of restraints and reviews several modified car seats and other restraints that have been tested and that meet safety standards. PMID:2522277

Stout, J D; Bull, M J; Stroup, K B

1989-01-01

296

Cyclone: A safe dialect of C  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cyclone is a safe dialect of C. It has been designed from the ground up to prevent the buer overflows, format string attacks, and memory management er- rors that are common in C programs, while retain- ing C's syntax and semantics. This paper examines safety violations enabled by C's design, and shows how Cyclone avoids them, without giving up C's

Trevor JimGreg Morrisett; Dan Grossman; Michael Hicks; James Cheney; Yanling Wang

2001-01-01

297

Safe Schools: A Best Practices Guide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Every day in America more than 50 million children go to neighborhood public schools. Parents send them off with every hope they will be safe while there. And yet, as has been the case in too many cities, violence shatters that hope. The Council of Educational Facilities Planners International (CEFPI) seeks to lead in the effort to bolster schools…

Council of Educational Facility Planners International, 2013

2013-01-01

298

Evaluation of Concepts for Safe Speed Enforcement.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The final report evaluates the suitability of existing and developmental safe speed enforcement concepts/systems for application to a high-speed maglev control system in the U.S. Requirements, functions and needs are identified and discussed for two major...

J. F. Luedeke R. E. Thompson

1992-01-01

299

Submerged passively-safe power plant  

DOEpatents

The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process. 8 figures.

Herring, J.S.

1993-09-21

300

Submerged passively-safe power plant  

DOEpatents

The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

Herring, J. Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01

301

Travelling Safely on Ice: Algonquin Park.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides safety considerations for snowshoe travel on iced waterways such as those of Algonquin Park (Ontario). Addresses what season is safe for waterway travel, how to determine the strength of the ice, reasonable travel time per day, what to do if you fall through the ice, and appropriate sites for winter camping. (LP)

MacDonald, Craig

1994-01-01

302

Leukocyte depletion for safe blood transfusion.  

PubMed

Leukocytes have ability to distinguish between self cells (body own cells) and foreign (allogenic) cells on the basis of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins that are present on the cell membrane and are effectively unique to a person. During allogenic blood transfusion a person receives large number of allogenic donor leukocytes and these are recognized as foreign cells by the recipient immune system which leads to several adverse reactions. To avoid such leukocyte-mediated adverse reactions leukodepleted blood transfusion is required. Leukocytes can be separated on the basis of size, dielectric properties, by affinity separation, freeze-thawing and centrifugation but all these methods are time consuming and costly. Filtration is another method for leukocyte depletion that is comparatively less expensive and more efficient as it gives more than 90% leukodepletion of blood along with minimal cell loss. However, present filtration procedures also have some limitations as they work efficiently with blood components but not with whole blood and show non-specific adhesion of large number of platelets and red blood cells along with leukocytes. All the currently available filters are costly, which has been a major reason for their limited application. Therefore, demand for a more efficient and cost-effective filter is high in medical community and scientists are attenpting to improve the efficiency of currently available filters. The present review gives an overview of the significance of leukodepleted blood transfusion and focuses on different methods for leukocyte depletion and challenges involved in all these technologies. PMID:19418471

Singh, Shikha; Kumar, Ashok

2009-08-01

303

Hazard avoidance via descent images for safe landing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In planetary or lunar landing missions, hazard avoidance is critical for landing safety. Therefore, it is very important to correctly detect hazards and effectively find a safe landing area during the last stage of descent. In this paper, we propose a passive sensing based HDA (hazard detection and avoidance) approach via descent images to lower the landing risk. In hazard detection stage, a statistical probability model on the basis of the hazard similarity is adopted to evaluate the image and detect hazardous areas, so that a binary hazard image can be generated. Afterwards, a safety coefficient, which jointly utilized the proportion of hazards in the local region and the inside hazard distribution, is proposed to find potential regions with less hazards in the binary hazard image. By using the safety coefficient in a coarse-to-fine procedure and combining it with the local ISD (intensity standard deviation) measure, the safe landing area is determined. The algorithm is evaluated and verified with many simulated descent downward looking images rendered from lunar orbital satellite images.

Yan, Ruicheng; Cao, Zhiguo; Zhu, Lei; Fang, Zhiwen

2013-10-01

304

Work Out at Work  

MedlinePLUS

Everyday Fitness Ideas from the National Institute on Aging at NIH www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Work Out at ... and enjoy the walk. l Join your company’s fitness center if there is one. Fit exercise into ...

305

Human round trip to Mars: Six months and radiation safe  

SciTech Connect

We describe a different type of round trip to Mars, using a combination of spacecraft. Compared to typical proposals, this flight is relatively fast and relatively safe from biological radiation dosage. Our study is concerned with the trip from Earth orbit to Mars orbit. Four spacecraft are required for the round trip. The crew spends most of their time on board a comparatively large, well shielded spacecraft (LC) which is in free (non-powered) orbit about the sun. The crew travels from Earth orbit to the LC while on board a comparatively small, powered spacecraft (SC). At Mars, the procedure is reversed and the crew returns on a second LC. In addition, a cargo craft, with no crew, is sent to Mars prior to the crew leaving Earth orbit. The trip time is about six months and the radiation dose equivalent is within guidelines recommended by the National Commission on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

Lazareth, O.W.; Schmidt, E.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.

1991-01-01

306

Inexpensive and safe DNA gel electrophoresis using household materials.  

PubMed

Gel electrophoresis is the single most important molecular biology technique and it is central to life sciences research, but it is often too expensive for the secondary science classroom or homeschoolers. A simple safe low-cost procedure is described here that uses household materials to construct and run DNA gel electrophoresis. Plastic containers are fitted with aluminum foil electrodes and 9-V batteries to run food-grade agar-agar gels using aquarium pH buffers and then stained with gentian violet. This activity was tested in a high school biology classroom with significantly positive responses on postactivity reflective surveys. The electrophoresis activity addresses several Life Science Content Standard C criteria, including aspects of cell biology, genetics, and evolution. It also can be used to teach aspects of motion and force in the physical science classroom. PMID:22615228

Ens, S; Olson, A B; Dudley, C; Ross, N D; Siddiqi, A A; Umoh, K M; Schneegurt, M A

2012-01-01

307

Improved Ventilation and Use of Respirators to Allow Safe Mining During Release of Coal Seam Hydrogen Sulphide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydrogen Sulphide (H2S) has been encountered within a number of Bowen Basin collieries, Central Queensland, Australia. High concentration occurrence during mining of a longwall panel raises a number of potential problems which demand greater understanding to allow efficient mining while maintaining safe and healthy environmental conditions. Mine ventilation approaches to allow safe working through control of the mine atmosphere and

ADS Gillies; HW Wu

308

Microbial ecology laboratory procedures manual NASA/MSFC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An essential part of the efficient operation of any microbiology laboratory involved in sample analysis is a standard procedures manual. The purpose of this manual is to provide concise and well defined instructions on routine technical procedures involving sample analysis and methods for monitoring and maintaining quality control within the laboratory. Of equal importance is the safe operation of the laboratory. This manual outlines detailed procedures to be followed in the microbial ecology laboratory to assure safety, analytical control, and validity of results.

Huff, Timothy L.

1990-01-01

309

23 CFR 630.1012 - Project-level procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Work Zone Safety and Mobility...630.1012 Project-level procedures. (a) This section provides guidance and establishes procedures for States to manage the...but are not limited to, demand management,...

2013-04-01

310

Safe Affordable Fission Engine-(SAFE-) 100a Heat Exchanger Thermal and Structural Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A potential fission power system for in-space missions is a heat pipe-cooled reactor coupled to a Brayton cycle. In this system, a heat exchanger (HX) transfers the heat of the reactor core to the Brayton gas. The Safe Affordable Fission Engine- (SAFE-) 100a is a test program designed to thermally and hydraulically simulate a 95 Btu/s prototypic heat pipe-cooled reactor using electrical resistance heaters on the ground. This Technical Memorandum documents the thermal and structural assessment of the HX used in the SAFE-100a program.

Steeve, B. E.

2005-01-01

311

Assessment of Present State of Knowledge for Unsafe Target Driving Behaviors and Safe Driving Conformance Countermeasures Approaches-Task 2 Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report assesses the state of present knowledge that relates to the development of a safe driving conformance program. Such a program requires information in two major areas: Target Driving Behaviors and Countermeasures. The procedure adhered to in the...

R. L. Hiett J. W. Worrall G. L. Brown D. L. Witten

1975-01-01

312

Effective, Safe, and Inexpensive Microscale Ultrasonic Setup for Teaching and Research Labs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ultrasound has been used as a source of energy in chemical reactions to increase both reaction rate and product yield. Ultrasonic horns can be used for this purpose on the laboratory scale. A homemade, safe, effective, and inexpensive reactor for ultrasonic horns with applications in microscale experiments in teaching and research laboratories is presented here. The vessel has two side necks for the insertion of either a flexible temperature probe, an inert-gas line adapter, or a septum to take samples from the reaction mixture. The reactor design allows work with small volumes (2-3 mL) optimal for microscale reactions. The tip of the sonication probe easily reaches the bottom of the vessel, producing vigorous agitation throughout the reaction medium. The design also facilitates temperature modulation with an external cooling bath, allowing reactions at low temperatures. This homemade reactor vessel for ultrasonic horns has only one-sixth the cost of the standard commercial reactors. The microscale sonication setup is safer than larger units because of its robust single-piece construction and easy placement in a protection shield cabinet, and the reduced hazards inherent in running reactions on a small scale. An experimental procedure is included to illustrate the applicability of the system.

Montaña, Angel M.; Grima, Pedro M.

2000-06-01

313

Emulsion polymerization of vinyl acetate: safe optimization of a hazardous complex process.  

PubMed

Fast and exothermic discontinuous emulsion polymerization processes are particularly difficult to optimize from both safety and productivity point of view because of the occurrence of side undesired reactions (e.g. chain transfer to monomer, backbiting, propagation of tertiary radicals, termination by disproportion, etc.) and the hazards of boiling phenomena and stable foam formation under atmospheric pressure. Moreover, the relevant number of loading, heating and cooling steps, required before starting the monomer addition (that is, the desired reaction), makes a strict product quality reproducibility very difficult to obtain. Under these operating conditions, it is necessary to employ a suitable combined theoretical and experimental procedure able to detect the optimum process dosing time at both the laboratory and the industrial scale. In this work, it is shown how to use the topological criterion theory together with proper adiabatic calorimeter and RC1 experimental data to safely optimize the synthesis of polyvinyl acetate through the radical emulsion polymerization of vinyl acetate by the means of an indirectly cooled isoperibolic semibatch reactor. PMID:21632179

Copelli, S; Derudi, M; Sempere, J; Serra, E; Lunghi, A; Pasturenzi, C; Rota, R

2011-08-15

314

Risk-analysis procedures ensure system safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conducting risk analysis and safety- engineering studies before construction of a sour-gas pipeline system will build redundancies into the system and ensure safe operation and maintenance. A recent analysis of a sour-gas pipeline built in Texas provides an example of procedures for safety engineering and risk assessment. This first of two articles presents the risk-analysis methodology and minimum safety systems

M. Mannan; D. B. Pfenning; C. D. Zinn

1991-01-01

315

Fail-safe WORM file system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most operating systems have no fail-safe features built into their file systems. They rely on recovery programs to repair the file systems after failures have occurred. These actions often result in loss of files, and sometimes the files are not recoverable. The loss of data in high capacity storage devices is extremely costly. We illustrate how robust file systems may be built for the WORM optical disks.

Ooi, B. C.

1991-03-01

316

Safe Handling of Take-Out Foods  

MedlinePLUS

... Administrative Forms Standard Forms Skip Navigation Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H1 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... / Topics / ... Safe Handling of Take-out Foods Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H3 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Z7_ ...

317

Big Thaw - Safe Defrosting Methods for Consumers  

MedlinePLUS

... Administrative Forms Standard Forms Skip Navigation Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H1 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... / Topics / ... Safe Food Handling / The Big Thaw Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H3 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Z7_ ...

318

CRITICALLY SAFE EQUIPMENT FOR AQUEOUS SEPARATIONS PROCESSES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The operating characteristics of critically-safe''slab'' mixer-settlers ; and continuous solvent washers are described. The effectiveness of some ; experimental units of each type was evaluated for a number of tributyl - ; phosphate-kerosene and uranyl nitrate-nitric acidaluminum nitrate systems. The ; units described are prototypes of equipment that could be used in a full scale he ; mixer-settlers are of

Colven

1958-01-01

319

Evaluation of efalizumab using safe psoriasis control  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Safe Psoriasis Control (SPC) is an important comprehensive measure that is validated for the assessment of benefit:risk of psoriasis treatments, combining efficacy, quality of life, and safety measures. The objective of this analysis was to assess the benefit:risk of efalizumab, a novel biologic agent indicated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, by applying the SPC to data from

Kim A Papp; Eric Henninger

2006-01-01

320

Type-safe multithreading in cyclone  

Microsoft Academic Search

We extend Cyclone, a type-safe polymorphic language at the C level of abstraction, with threads and locks. Data races can violate type safety in Cyclone. An extended type system statically guarantees their absence by enforcing that thread-shared data is protected via locking and that thread-local data does not escape the thread that creates it. The extensions interact smoothly with parametric

Dan Grossman

2003-01-01

321

Cyclone: A Safe Dialect of C  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: Cyclone is a safe dialect of C. It has been designedfrom the ground up to prevent the bu#er overflows,format string attacks, and memory management errorsthat are common in C programs, while retainingC's syntax and semantics. This paper examinessafety violations enabled by C's design, and showshow Cyclone avoids them, without giving up C'shallmark control over low-level details such as datarepresentation

Trevor Jim; J. Gregory Morrisett; Dan Grossman; Michael W. Hicks; James Cheney; Yanling Wang

2002-01-01

322

[Paracetamol. Efficacious and safe for all ages].  

PubMed

Paracetamol has become a focus of attention as being unsafe due to hepatic toxicity and market withdrawal or prescription status is presently under discussion in Germany. This drug is, however, effective and safe if notes of caution are applied. In Germany 38 fatal cases of analgesic poisoning were observed in 2010, only 4 of which were due to paracetamol and 16 were caused by diclofenac and ibuprofen. Alternative pain medications are obviously much less safe, in particular given the additional risk of sometimes fatal gastrointestinal bleeding and cardiovascular side effects. This review extensively analyzes the safety record of paracetamol and applies these findings to the treatment of elderly people. Even very elderly patients may be safely treated with this compound, although a dose limit of 3 g/day should be instituted. This renewed discussion was triggered by the uncontrolled availability of paracetamol in the USA but observations from this country should not be generalized and applied to the German situation and objective reasoning should be re-installed. PMID:23224263

Wehling, M

2013-02-01

323

Safe transport of radioactive materials in Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Egypt the national regulations for safe transport of radioactive materials (RAM) are based on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) regulations. In addition, regulations for the safe transport of these materials through the Suez Canal (SC) were laid down by the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority (EAEA) and the Suez Canal Authority (SCA). They are continuously updated to meet the increased knowledge and the gained experience. The technical and protective measures taken during transport of RAM through SC are mentioned. Assessment of the impact of transporting radioactive materials through the Suez Canal using the INTERTRAN computer code was carried out in cooperation with IAEA. The transported activities and empty containers, the number of vessels carrying RAM through the canal from 1963 to 1991 and their nationalities are also discussed. The protective measures are mentioned.A review of the present situation of the radioactive wastes storage facilities at the Atomic Energy site at Inshas is given along with the regulation for safe transportation and disposal of radioactive wastes

El-Shinawy, Rifaat M. K.

1994-07-01

324

Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery.  

SciTech Connect

Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

2009-05-01

325

ColorSafe 1.5: A Web Safe Color Plug-in for Photoshop  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

ColorSafe 1.5, a product of BoxTop Software, Inc. (discussed in the August 15, 1997 issue of the Scout Report), offers an excellent tool to create web safe graphics in Adobe Photoshop. ColorSafe 1.5 was released October 29, 1997 as a shareware ($49.95) for the Mac and will soon be released for Windows 95/NT. This Photoshop plug-in "extends the 216 color web safe palette to millions of non-dithering optical colors and patterns with fully interactive color pickers from CMYK to HSV to RGB." Although made for Photoshop, ColorSafe 1.5 is also compatible with Illustrator 6.0 - 7.0, PhotoDelux 1.0, Fractal Design Painter 2.0 - 5.0, Deneba Canvas 5.0, Macromedia xRes 2.0 - 3.0, Microfrontier ColorIt! 3.0 - 3.2, Equilibrium DeBabelizer 1.6.1 - 1.6.5, and others. The download comes with additional palettes and a free plug-in called WebClipper to ensure that colors (from the web safe palette) in a graphic will match exactly after an adaptive color reduction has been performed in Photoshop.

326

Spatial Calibration Procedure for Infrared Line Scanners  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thermographic devices which are able to acquire images, such as infrared line scanners, are becoming increasingly popular. One of the major issues when working with this kind of devices is accurate spatial calibration, necessary in order to extract metric information from images. In this work, a spatial calibration procedure for infrared line scanners is proposed. The proposed procedure is based

Rubén Usamentiaga; Daniel F. García; Diego González; Julio Molleda

2006-01-01

327

Human factors engineering of enhanced spaceport procedures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Because operational procedures provide a first line of defense against human error, human-centered design is key for streamlining work processes, standardizing work practices, and providing invaluable reminders and cautions during high risk, complex operations. In contrast, inaccurate or poorly designed operational procedures and documentation can impede the work process, encourage unsafe work practices, and confuse or mislead operators during safety critical steps. In response to several internal KSC studies that concluded that operational procedures (work instructions) were the leading contributors to Shuttle ground processing incidents and inefficiencies, the Shuttle Work Instruction Task Team (WITT) was chartered to develop a vision for a new work instruction system. This paper describes some of the original WITT recommendations and activities, as well as collaborative human factors engineering projects supporting the WITT efforts. Past achievements as well as ongoing and planned initiatives to provide continued support for the enhancement of spaceport procedures are described. .

Kanki, Barbara G.; Barth, Tim; Blankmann-Alexander, Donna; Parker, D. Blake; Coan, Hester

2001-02-01

328

Combined SAFE/SNAP approach to safeguards evaluation. [Safeguards Network Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Generally, the scope of a safeguards evaluation model can efficiently address one of two issues, (1) global safeguards effectiveness, or (2) vulnerability analysis for individual scenarios. The Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE) focuses on (1) while the Safeguards Network Analysis Procedure (SNAP) is directed at (2). SAFE addresses (1) in that it considers the entire facility, i.e., the composite system of hardware and human components, in one global analysis. SNAP addresses (2) by providing a safeguards modeling symbology sufficiently flexible to represent quite complex scenarios from the standpoint of hardware interfaces while also accounting for a rich variety of human decision making. A combined SAFE/SNAP approach to the problem of safeguards evaluation is described and illustrated through an example.

Engi, D.; Chapman, L.D.; Grant, F.H.; Polito, J.

1980-01-01

329

Scarf osteotomy - Is it the procedure of choice in hallux valgus surgery? A preliminary report  

PubMed Central

Many procedures are described in the literature for the surgical management of hallux valgus. There are over 130 surgical procedures described but the surgeon usually limits these to a few which he is comfortable with and which gives the best aesthetic and functional result to the patient. There is ever rising enthusiasm among orthopaedic surgeons regarding diaphyseal osteotomy ever since Burutaran described the procedure in 1973. Weil in United States and Barouk in Europe popularized the technique. Scarf is a double chevron diaphyseal osteotomy which is inherently more stable than other osteotomies on the first metatarsal and allows early return to work. The author reports his early experience with SCARF osteotomy, which is a comparatively new technique for hallux valgus correction which was done in Ibri Regional Hospital in the Sultanate of Oman. All patients who presented with symptomatic hallux valgus were taken up and there were three patients who required surgical intervention for hallux valgus. The purpose of this study was to find its effectiveness in terms of stability of the osteotomy and early return to work. Proximal phalangeal osteotomy was not found necessary in none of the three cases operated by us. Scarf osteotomy is safe and found to give better aesthetic and functional result and early return to work. All our three patients had good functional recovery and early return to work.

2007-01-01

330

ICU Devices and Procedures  

MedlinePLUS

... ICU Devices and Procedures | | More ICU Devices and Procedures Critical Care Clinical Education Critical Care Cases Ethics Links Journal Club Information for Patients Podcasts Procedures Research Refractory ARDS Statements & Guidelines Ventilator Waveform Analysis ...

331

Multivariate Quality Control Procedures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the design procedures and average run lengths of two multivariate cumulative sum (CUSUM) quality control procedures. The first CUSUM procedure reduces each multivariate observation to a scaler and then forms a CUSUM of the scalers. Th...

R. B. Crosier

1988-01-01

332

How NIF Works  

ScienceCinema

The National Ignition Facility, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is the world's largest laser system... 192 huge laser beams in a massive building, all focused down at the last moment at a 2 millimeter ball containing frozen hydrogen gas. The goal is to achieve fusion... getting more energy out than was used to create it. It's never been done before under controlled conditions, just in nuclear weapons and in stars. We expect to do it within the next 2-3 years. The purpose is threefold: to create an almost limitless supply of safe, carbon-free, proliferation-free electricity; examine new regimes of astrophysics as well as basic science; and study the inner-workings of the U.S. stockpile of nuclear weapons to ensure they remain safe, secure and reliable without the need for underground testing. More information about NIF can be found at:

None

2010-09-01

333

Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy is as safe and feasible as open procedure: A meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) compared with open distal pancreatectomy (ODP). METHODS: Meta-analysis was performed using the databases, including PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science and BIOSIS Previews. Articles should contain quantitative data of the comparison of LDP and ODP. Each article was reviewed by two authors. Indices of operative time, spleen-preserving rate, time to fluid intake, ratio of malignant tumors, postoperative hospital stay, incidence rate of pancreatic fistula and overall morbidity rate were analyzed. RESULTS: Nine articles with 1341 patients who underwent pancreatectomy met the inclusion criteria. LDP was performed in 501 (37.4%) patients, while ODP was performed in 840 (62.6%) patients. There were significant differences in the operative time, time to fluid intake, postoperative hospital stay and spleen-preserving rate between LDP and ODP. There was no difference between the two groups in pancreatic fistula rate [random effects model, risk ratio (RR) 0.996 (0.663, 1.494), P = 0.983, I2 = 28.4%] and overall morbidity rate [random effects model, RR 0.81 (0.596, 1.101), P = 0.178, I2 = 55.6%]. CONCLUSION: LDP has the advantages of shorter hospital stay and operative time, more rapid recovery and higher spleen-preserving rate as compared with ODP.

Xie, Kun; Zhu, Yi-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Wu; Chen, Ke; Yan, Jia-Fei; Mou, Yi-Ping

2012-01-01

334

Safe operating procedures for alternative fuel buses: A synthesis of transit practice  

SciTech Connect

The synthesis will be of interest to transit agency managers, maintenance managers, and other personnel concerned with the operation of bus fleets using alternative fuels to meet national and local requirements related to air quality and energy diversification. Information on the use of methanol, ethanol, compressed natural gas (CNG), liquified petroleum gas (LPG), liquified natural gas (LNG), and other alternatives is included.

Not Available

1993-01-01

335

21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...or reports shall be made publicly available at the time of publication of the proposed order. (3) A proposal to accept or reject...studies and labeling. (1) Within 60 days following publication of the final order, each licensed manufacturer...

2011-04-01

336

63 FR 20450 - Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP); Procedures for the Safe and Sanitary...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...processing operation sanitation controls, such as hand and equipment washing and sanitizing, are critical to the safety of...product to processed product; (4) Maintenance of hand washing, hand sanitizing, and toilet facilities; (5)...

1998-04-24

337

66 FR 6138 - Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HAACP); Procedures for the Safe and Sanitary...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...in question. FDA, on the other hand, typically announces a period of...sanitary operating conditions during washing, are a base for HACCP, they will...processed product; (4) Maintenance of hand washing, hand sanitizing, and toilet...

2001-01-19

338

Transduodenal ampullectomy for ampullary adenomas: a safe and effective procedure with long-term salutary outcomes.  

PubMed

With widespread use of endoscopy, ampullary adenomas are more frequently identified, many of which are not amenable to endoscopic resection. Pancreatoduodenctomy is curative for these lesions but carries high morbidity. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of transduodenal ampullectomy for these lesions. Data were collected on 32 patients who underwent transduodenal ampullectomy from 2002 to 2010. The median age of patients was 64 years. Adenomas were found because of abdominal pain in 34 per cent, jaundice in 22 per cent, and incidentally on endoscopic screening in 16 per cent and on computed tomography scan of the abdomen in 9 per cent. All patients had a preoperative diagnosis of premalignant disease; 6 per cent required intraoperative conversion to pancreaticoduodenectomy after frozen section evaluation documented carcinoma. Of ampullectomies, 97 per cent had clear margins. Follow-up was 28 months. Four (13%) patients developed recurrent disease at 4 years, 2 years, 1.5 years, and 4 months; all had clear margins at ampullectomy and underwent subsequent pancreaticoduodenectomy with invasive malignancy in a single patient. After preoperative biopsy documenting premalignant disease, malignancy at ampullectomy is unusual. Recurrence is uncommon but occurs even with clear margins necessitating diligent follow-up; even with diligent follow-up, recurrence can be malignant. PMID:24480221

Mathur, Abhishek; Paul, Harold; Ross, Sharona; Luberice, Kenneth; Hernandez, Jonathan; Vice, Michelle; Rosemurgy, Alexander S

2014-02-01

339

Procedural sedation and analgesia in children undergoing digestive endoscopic procedures - paediatrician or anaesthesiologist?  

PubMed Central

Endoscopic procedures of the gastrointestinal tract were successfully introduced into paediatric practice in the 1970s. Recent expansive development has become useful for improvement of both diagnosis and treatment in many children with gastrointestinal diseases. Most of these procedures are performed under procedural sedation (PSA) knowing anatomical, physiological and psychological differences and requiring good experience from the paediatrician and anaesthesiologist. These principles help to provide the procedure safely and minimise adverse events, which are greater the smaller the child is. Procedural sedation and analgesia in healthy children can be performed by a paediatrician, but children with congenital defects and serious coexisting diseases (ASA ? III) and also during the usage of anaesthetics (e.g. propofol), should be managed by an anaesthesiologist.

Rosada-Kurasinska, Jowita; Ignys, Iwona; Grzeskowiak, Malgorzata; Zielinska, Marzena; Bienert, Agnieszka

2014-01-01

340

Safe bending of boron/aluminum sheets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Low cost procedure utilizing aluminum backing sheets protects boron/aluminum sheet from cracking during bending. Process utilizes inexpensive universal-brake bending dies rather than special hydroforming dies.

Liskay, G. G.; Yoshino, S. Y.

1980-01-01

341

The procedure safety system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Telerobotic operations, whether under autonomous or teleoperated control, require a much more sophisticated safety system than that needed for most industrial applications. Industrial robots generally perform very repetitive tasks in a controlled, static environment. The safety system in that case can be as simple as shutting down the robot if a human enters the work area, or even simply building a cage around the work space. Telerobotic operations, however, will take place in a dynamic, sometimes unpredictable environment, and will involve complicated and perhaps unrehearsed manipulations. This creates a much greater potential for damage to the robot or objects in its vicinity. The Procedural Safety System (PSS) collects data from external sensors and the robot, then processes it through an expert system shell to determine whether an unsafe condition or potential unsafe condition exists. Unsafe conditions could include exceeding velocity, acceleration, torque, or joint limits, imminent collision, exceeding temperature limits, and robot or sensor component failure. If a threat to safety exists, the operator is warned. If the threat is serious enough, the robot is halted. The PSS, therefore, uses expert system technology to enhance safety thus reducing operator work load, allowing him/her to focus on performing the task at hand without the distraction of worrying about violating safety criteria.

Obrien, Maureen E.

1990-01-01

342

Fractal spacetime structure in asymptotically safe gravity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Four-dimensional Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG) is likely to be an asymptotically safe theory which is applicable at arbitrarily small distance scales. On sub-planckian distances it predicts that spacetime is a fractal with an effective dimensionality of 2. The original argument leading to this result was based upon the anomalous dimension of Newton's constant. In the present paper we demonstrate that also the spectral dimension equals 2 microscopically, while it is equal to 4 on macroscopic scales. This result is an exact consequence of asymptotic safety and does not rely on any truncation. Contact is made with recent Monte Carlo simulations.

Lauscher, Oliver; Reuter, Martin

2005-10-01

343

Safe handling: implementing hazardous drug precautions.  

PubMed

Occupational exposure to chemotherapy is a significant and ubiquitous danger to oncology nurses. The Oncology Clinical Nurse III/IV leadership group at the University of North Carolina Hospitals embarked on the challenge of a comprehensive standards review regarding personal protective equipment necessary when handling waste after hazardous drug administration. This review led to practice improvements in education, the use of chemotherapy-rated gloves when handling hazardous waste, and changes in the disposal options available to staff. A discharge teaching pamphlet on safe handling for the caregivers of patients receiving hazardous drugs was created and piloted. PMID:22641316

Walton, Ann Marie L; Mason, Susan; Busshart, Michele; Spruill, Angela D; Cheek, Summer; Lane, Ashley; Sabo, Kathy; Taylor, Amanda

2012-06-01

344

SAFE gas turbine cycle primary heat exchangers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Los Alamos National Laboratory and Marshall Space Flight Center are jointly developing two modular heat pipe heat exchangers, collectively named FIGMENT (Fission Inert Gas Metal Exchanger for Non-nuclear Testing). The FIGMENT heat exchangers are designed to transfer power from the SAFE nuclear reactor cores to gas turbine energy converters. A stainless steel prototype heat exchanger will be built during 2002 in preparation for the construction of a larger refractory metal version. Two promising FIGMENT stainless steel heat exchanger concepts are reviewed here. .

Reid, Robert S.; Kapernick, Richard J.

2002-01-01

345

Working Mothers  

MedlinePLUS

... Life > Work & Play > Working Mothers Family Life Listen Working Mothers Article Body ?In the United States today, more ... compared to about one third in the 1970s. Working mothers are now the rule rather than the exception. ...

346

Development of an ultra-safe, ultra-low emissions natural gas fueled school bus: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents work conducted under Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Project 03-6871, ``Development of an Ultra-Safe and Low-Emission Dedicated Alternative Fuel School Bus.`` The project was sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Subcontract No. ZCF-5-13519-01. This report documents Phase 3 -- Integration and Phase 4 -- Demonstration and serves as the final report for this project. Phase 1 -- Systems Design and Phase 2 -- Prototype Hardware Development were documented in NREL publications TP-425-7609 and TP-425-2 1081, respectively. Several significant areas of work are summarized in this report. Integration of the engine technologies developed under Phase 2 into a production Deere 8.1-L, spark-ignition compressed natural gas engine is detailed, including information on the engine and control system modifications that were made. Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions results verifying the ultra-low emissions output of this engine are also included. The informal project goal of producing oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions less than or equal to 1.0 g/bhp-hr over the FTP heavy-duty engine cycle was attained. In addition, a test run that resulted in less than one half of the Ultra-Low Emissions Vehicle limit for NO{sub x} plus non-methane hydrocarbons was obtained. These results were for engine-out (no catalyst) emissions. Results using a catalyst produced very low formaldehyde emissions and virtually zero carbon monoxide and particulate matter emissions. Following these excellent results, a duplicate engine was assembled and integrated into the prototype ultra-safe school bus, the Envirobus 2000. Many of the new and modified subsystems developed during this project for the engine are considered strong candidates for inclusion into the production Deere 8.1-L gas engine in the near future.

Kubesh, J.T. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1998-03-01

347

A modified “far-lateral” approach for safe resection of retroodontoid dural cysts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cystic mass lesions at the ventral craniocervical junction have been described only rarely in the past, however, they have\\u000a received more attention with improved imaging modalities in recent years. These lesions have been approached by various operative\\u000a procedures. A modified “far-lateral” approach combined with a C1 hemilaminectomy without fusion was used to safely remove\\u000a the cyst and decompress the cervical

Götz Lütjens; Christian B. Bärlocher; Joachim K. Krauss

2011-01-01

348

Safe sinus lift: use of acrylic stone trimmer to avoid sinus lining perforation.  

PubMed

Iatrogenic injury to the maxillary sinus membrane is a common complication during direct sinus lift procedures. The most common cause is perforation of the Schneiderian membrane using a tungsten-carbide round bur no.6. We propose a safe technique in which an acrylic stone trimmer is used to create a window in the maxillary antrum thereby minimizing the risk of injury to the delicate sinus membrane. PMID:24914914

Haribabu, Prashanth Konatham; Raja, Krishna Kumar; Iyer, Shankar

2014-06-01

349

SIGMA-SAFE: A phase diagram approach to the sigma phase problem in ni base superalloys  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new procedure for evaluating the sigma phase precipitation tendency of superalloys has been developed. It is called SIGMA-SAFE.\\u000a Phase diagrams are used to determine the degree of super saturation with respect to precipitation of the sigma phase as a\\u000a function of temperature and alloy compositions. It is found that this supersaturation number, ?, distinguishes between 24\\u000a superalloys according to

E. S. Machlin; Joey Shao

1978-01-01

350

Safe patient care - safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology  

PubMed Central

Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization’s vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture (“top-down process”). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization’s maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization’s general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed “informed culture”. An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. “Incident reporting systems” are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organization’s safe surgery checklist” is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality. Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate stimulation based team trainings into their curriculum.

St. Pierre, Michael

2013-01-01

351

[Safe patient care: safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology].  

PubMed

Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organisation's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organizations maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organisation's "safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality.Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate simulation based team trainings into their curriculum. PMID:23625714

St Pierre, M

2013-04-01

352

Safe patient care - safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology.  

PubMed

Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization's maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organization's safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality. Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate stimulation based team trainings into their curriculum. PMID:24403977

St Pierre, Michael

2013-01-01

353

Safe and Aesthetic Design of Urban Roadside Treatments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the findings of a research project to develop recommended design guidelines for safe and aesthetic roadside treatments in urban areas and a toolbox of effective roadside treatments that balance pedestrian, bicyclist, and motorist safe...

B. Mattox H. Zhu K. K. Dixon M. Liebler M. P. Hunter

2008-01-01

354

Intrinsically Safe Electrical Circuits: Their Application in Explosive Environments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The successful application of intrinsically safe electrical circuits depends upon a complete understanding of the concept of intrinsically safe; and the concept's utilization during design and evaluation. A discussion is presented reviewing the history of...

K. W. Proper

1984-01-01

355

33 CFR 62.27 - Safe water marks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

Safe water marks indicate that there is navigable water all around the mark. They are often used to indicate fairways or midchannels, or the seaward end of channels. Safe water marks are colored with red and white vertical...

2013-07-01

356

Check Your Medicines: Tips for Using Medicines Safely  

MedlinePLUS

... Your Guide to Using Them Safely Check Your Medicines Tips for Using Medicines Safely Use this checklist to help avoid medication ... a list or a bag with all your medicines when you go to your doctor's office, the ...

357

Medicines: Use Them Safely | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Taking Medicines Safely Medicines: Use Them Safely Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Questions To Ask Your Doctor About A New Medicine What is the name of the medicine, and ...

358

Teaching Young Children to Cross Roads Safely  

PubMed Central

Road safety education is considered essential to teach children to interact with traffic safely. Many programs, however, do not consider the separate component skills of the road-crossing task, the functional and behavioural factors that may put some children at increased risk, and the most beneficial methods to transfer knowledge to improved behaviour in real-world environments. A targeted and practical training program using a simulated road environment has been developed and evaluated amongst primary school children using a randomised controlled trial. Significant reductions in proportion of critically incorrect road-crossing responses were found immediately after training (56%) and one-month post-training (47%) by the case group compared with pre-training responses, and relative to any changes in responses of the control group. The beneficial effects were greater for younger children, females, children with less well developed perceptual, attentional and cogntive skills, and those with little traffic exposure. The effects of the training program on other outcome measures (proportion of missed opportunity responses, decision time and safety rating responses) were less clear but showed some beneficial effects. This paper discusses the use of the simulated training program, a novel and safe way, to improve road crossing decisions. It is suggested that improvements can be made to child pedestrian education by providing tailored and practical programs that target the component skills of road-crossing decisions and improve essential skills through intensive training and feedback on known risk factors.

Oxley, Jennifer; Congiu, Melinda; Whelan, Michelle; D'Elio, Angelo; Charlton, Judith

2008-01-01

359

Safe Processing of Metal Samples Onboard ISS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Under certain conditions processing of metal samples at elevated temperatures can lead to generation of fine metal dust which might be toxic. For experiment sample materials that shall be processed onboard the International Space Station (ISS), the toxicological evaluation is performed by NASA's Toxicologist team based on material data provided by scientists and payload teams. In case no detailed analysis on dust formation is available, simplified assumptions are taken to calculate the amount of evaporated metal, usually leading to over- conservative toxicity categorization. However, evaluation of the hazard potential by an analysis on the basis of the actual worst case processing environment is accepted as long as the assumed physical effects can be proven to be correct and the calculation is still conservative. This paper discusses the different aspects of dust generation/limitation and its safe containment dependent on the type of furnace and sample processing environment. Examples of hazard controls for safe processing of metal alloys in two different types of experiments and related furnace facilities are presented.

Kreimer, J.; Lenski, H.; Neuhaus, P.; Seidel, A.; Soellner, W.

2012-01-01

360

Making Human Spaceflight as Safe as Possible  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We articulated the safety hierarchy a little over two years ago, as part of our quest to be the nation s leader in safety and occupational health, and in the safety of the products and services we provide. The safety hierarchy stresses that we are all accountable for assuring that our programs, projects, and operations do not impact safety or health for the public, astronauts and pilots, employees on the ground, and high-value equipment and property. When people are thinking about doing things safely, they re also thinking about doing things right. And for the past couple of years, we ve had some pretty good results. In the time since the failures of the Mars 98 missions that occurred in late 1999, every NASA spacecraft launch has met the success objectives, and every Space Shuttle mission has safely and successfully met all mission objectives. Now I can t say that NASA s safety program is solely responsible for these achievements, but, as we like to say, "mission success starts with safety." In the future, looking forward, we will continue to make spaceflight even safer. That is NASA s vision. That is NASA s duty to both those who will travel into space and the American people who will make the journey possible.

Gregory, Frederick D.

2005-01-01

361

Eye safe laser based DIRCM systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To be effective a DIRCM must direct a Laser beam exceeding a certain power level towards the approaching missile. This power level inevitably leads to a potential laser hazard mainly regarding the eye safety of people potentially hit by the Laser beam. To evaluate this hazard the IEC 60825-1 is a well established international standard. This leads to the definition of a laser safety zone around the active DIRCM which can be as large as a few hundred meters. Therefore it cannot be excluded, that people are present within this zone. This Laser hazard is also a major topic for a civil or military DIRCM system certification. In this report we analyze the impact of various DIRCM designs on this safety zone as well as the resulting Laser hazard footprint at takeoff and landing. Also some technical means to make a DIRCM system inherently eye safe are discussed. As a result we come the conclusion that an eye safe DIRCM is possible, if appropriate measures are taken throughout the DIRCM system design.

Scherbarth, S.; Thum-Jäger, A.

2009-09-01

362

Results of 30 kWt Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE-30) primary heat transport testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of resistance heaters to simulate heat from fission allows extensive development of fission systems to be performed in non-nuclear test facilities, saving time and money. Resistance heated tests on the Safe Affordable Fission Engine-30 kilowatt (SAFE30) test article are being performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This paper discusses the results of these experiments to date, and describes the additional testing that will be performed. Recommendations related to the design of testable space fission power and propulsion systems are made. .

Pedersen, Kevin; van Dyke, Melissa; Houts, Mike; Godfroy, Tom; Martin, James; Dickens, Ricky; Williams, Eric; Harper, Roger; Salvil, Pat; Reid, Bob

2001-02-01

363

SAFE Journal. Volume 34, Number 1, Fall 2006.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The primary objective of the SAFE Association is to stimulate research and development in the fields of safety, survival, and life support. The SAFE Association publishes the SAFE Journal at least twice a year. Table of Contents for this issue: Degradatio...

J. Benton J. Darrah M. I. Darrah S. DeWald

2006-01-01

364

Practicing Safe Visual Rhetoric on the World Wide Web.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines when and why a "safe" approach to visual design for Web pages is attractive to writers and writing teachers. Considers typical reasons for choosing a "safe" approach to designing the visual dimensions of Web pages, traditional sources in print graphics and writing for safe advice about visual design, and design challenges posed by a Web…

Sullivan, Patricia

2001-01-01

365

Register or Search the Safe and Well Listings  

MedlinePLUS

... Search the Safe and Well Listings Register or Search the Safe and Well Listings Register or Search the Safe and Well Listings Disasters often make ... about a loved one in the U.S., click Search Registrants and enter the person’s name and pre- ...

366

33 CFR 83.06 - Safe speed (Rule 6).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Visibility § 83.06 Safe speed (Rule 6). Every vessel shall at all times proceed at a safe speed so that she can take proper...conditions. In determining a safe speed the following factors shall...night the presence of background light such as from shores lights...

2013-07-01

367

Invasive procedures for prenatal diagnosis: any future left?  

PubMed

Invasive diagnostic procedures (e.g chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis) remain essential to the complete prenatal genetic diagnosis armamentarium. Both procedures are relatively safe in experienced hands, carrying procedure-related losses of about 1 in 400. Sensitivity of aneuploidy detection with either invasive test is near 100%, 10-15% higher than non-invasive protocols that use maternal serum analyte and fetal nuchal translucency screening. Application of cell-free fetal DNA for aneuploidy screening may or may not narrow this difference. Irrespective, invasive procedures are currently required for application of array comparative genome hybridisation. PMID:22749621

Simpson, Joe Leigh

2012-10-01

368

Is totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass safe, feasible and effective?  

PubMed Central

A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass (TECAB) is safe, effective and feasible. A total of 171 papers were found, of which eight represented the best evidence. The authors, date, journal, study type, population, main outcome measures and results are tabulated. The da Vinci robotic system was utilized in seven retrospective studies and one multicentre prospective trial, comprising 724 patients undergoing TECAB. Patient-related outcomes, including the incidence of major adverse cardiac events, graft patency and survival, were investigated. From the studies evaluated, TECAB appears to be safe operation with low complication rates and excellent early- and mid-term graft patencies. The incidence of internal thoracic artery injury was documented in four studies and ranged from 0 to10%. Re-exploration for bleeding was necessary in 1–15% of patients. Conversion to open techniques was performed in 0–24% of cases. There was no in-hospital mortality in the majority of studies, but this reached 2.1% in a large series of 228 patients. Target-vessel reintervention rates varied between 0 and 12.1% according to the institutional experience. Pre- and post-discharge graft patencies were excellent at 93–100 and 92–100%, respectively. Intraoperative variables, such as time taken for internal thoracic artery harvest, anastomosis, cross-clamp, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and the overall operation were as follows: internal thoracic artery harvest time (range 5–187 min), anastomosis time (range 6–82 min), cross-clamp time (range 30–223 min), CPB time (range 41–268 min) and operative time (range 84–600 min). TECAB is a technically demanding and time-consuming procedure associated with a significant learning curve. Proctoring and structured training programmes are currently supported by European and international societies to encourage wider uptake of the procedure. In conclusion, TECAB represents a feasible alternative to conventional coronary artery bypass in selected patients. It is associated with low morbidity and excellent mid-term graft patency. Larger, prospective and multicentre trials are required to assess the long-term and patient-reported outcomes of TECAB.

Acharya, Metesh Nalin; Ashrafian, Hutan; Athanasiou, Thanos; Casula, Roberto

2012-01-01

369

PERCUTANEOUS RENAL BIOPSY: OUTPATIENT OBSERVATION WITHOUT HOSPITALIZATION IS SAFE  

PubMed Central

Backgroundy Percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) is a safe and valuable procedure in the diagnosis of renal disease. The optimal duration of observation after a PRB has not been established, and patients are frequently hospitalized for overnight observation. We evaluated prospectively the safety of an outpatient PRB protocol at our institution. Methods During a 20-month period 100 patients underwent PRB using a standardized outpatient protocol. The biopsy was performed by 8 am by Nephrology Fellows under direct faculty supervision. All biopsies were done under real-time ultrasound with a 16-gauge spring-loaded biopsy gun, and followed immediately by color Doppler ultrasound to exclude active bleeding. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored frequently. Hematocrit and hemoglobin were measured pre-biopsy, and 4, and 8 hours post-biopsy. If there were no complications, the patients were discharged 9 to 10 hours after the procedure. Results The patient demographics were as follow: 55% African Americans; 60% female; 17% diabetic; 65% hypertensive; mean BMI 29.8±7 (range, 17 to 51). The depth of the kidney from the skin was 6.8±2.3 cm (range, 3 to 13.5 cm). 53 patients required only 1 biopsy pass and 38 needed 2 passes, 5 needed 3 passes and 4 needed 4 passes, with 12.7±9.7 glomeruli obtained per patient. No major complications were encountered. A small perinephric hematoma (< 2×2 cm) was observed post-biopsy in 13 patients (13%). There was no need for vascular intervention or transfusion in any patient. Four patients (4%) were hospitalized for overnight observation due to a decrease in their hematocrit (> 4 from baseline), but none required a transfusion or intervention. No patient required subsequent hospitalization due to late biopsy-related complications. Conclusions Outpatient, real-time, ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy is safe and effective, and minimizes the need for post-biopsy hospitalization. Outpatient PRB can result in significant cost savings without exposing the patients to increased risk of complications.

Maya, Ivan D.; Allon, Michael

2014-01-01

370

75 FR 1734 - Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule Safe Harbor Proposed Self-Regulatory Guidelines; i-SAFE...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 312 Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Safe Harbor Proposed...safe harbor provision of the Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule. FOR FURTHER...Rule\\1\\ pursuant to the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act, 15...

2010-01-13

371

'Safe school travel is no accident!' - Applying the Haddon Matrix to school transport safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given the high value placed on a child's life, safe school travel remains a priority issue for the Australian public and Government. Research objectives. This paper specifically documents the six-month work plan and multifaceted inquiry process adopted by the School Transport Safety Task Force in an attempt to review and provide recommendations to improve school transport safety in Queensland. Methods

Colin J. Edmonston; Mary C. Sheehan

372

Mesh Efficiency of the Integrated Safe/Arm Device of the Pershing II Missile System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the results of an analytical study of the minimum point efficiencies of the gear meshes of the integrated safe/arm device (ISAD) of the Pershing II missile system. It expands earlier work on gear mesh efficiency by considering the po...

F. R. Tepper

1981-01-01

373

Reestablish Safe Access into Tributaries of the Yakima Subbasin, Progress Report 2002-2003.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Safe Access work has concentrated on the lower portions of five drainages in the Upper Yakima Basin. Streams in the Kittitas Valley include Wilson Creek, Naneum and Little Naneum Creeks, Reecer and Currier Creeks, and Manastash Creek. Tucker Creek is trib...

H. Fraser

2003-01-01

374

Procedures for computing site seismicity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report was prepared as part of the Navy's Seismic Hazard Mitigation Program. The Navy has numerous bases located in seismically active regions throughout the world. Safe effective design of waterfront structures requires determining expected earthquake ground motion. The Navy's problem is further complicated by the presence of soft saturated marginal soils that can significantly amplify the levels of seismic shaking as evidenced in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command's seismic design manual, NAVFAC P355.l, requires a probabilistic assessment of ground motion for design of essential structures. This report presents the basis for the Navy's Seismic Hazard Analysis procedure that was developed and is intended to be used with the Seismic Hazard Analysis computer program and user's manual. This report also presents data on geology and seismology to establish the background for the seismic hazard model developed. The procedure uses the historical epicenter data base and available geologic data, together with source models, recurrence models, and attenuation relationships to compute the probability distribution of site acceleration and an appropriate spectra. This report discusses the developed stochastic model for seismic hazard evaluation and the associated research.

Ferritto, John

1994-02-01

375

Flame Tests Performed Safely: A Safe and Effective Alternative to the Traditional Flame Test  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The trend toward inquiry-based learning is providing today's students with a more enriching education. When implementing inquiry it is important to recognize the great number of safety concerns that accompany this paradigm shift. Fortunately, with some consideration, teachers can shape students' laboratory experiments into safe and valuable…

Dogancay, Deborah

2005-01-01

376

Safe access to safe water in low income countries: Water fetching in current times  

Microsoft Academic Search

A substantial portion of the world’s population does not have ready access to safe water. Moreover, obtaining water may involve great expense of time and energy for those who have no water sources in or near home. From an historical perspective, with the invention of piped water, fetching water has only recently become largely irrelevant in many locales. In addition,

Susan B. Sorenson; Christiaan Morssink; Paola Abril Campos

2011-01-01

377

Hartmann's procedure or primary anastomosis?  

PubMed

Perforation following acute diverticulitis is a typical scenario during the first attack. Different classification systems exist to classify acute perforated diverticulitis. While the Hinchey classification, which is based on intraoperative findings, is internationally best known, the German Hansen-Stock classification which is based on CT scan is widely accepted within Germany. When surgery is necessary, sigmoid colectomy is the standard of care. An important question is whether patients should receive primary anastomosis or a Hartmann procedure subsequently. A priori there are several arguments for both procedures. Hartmann's operation is extremely safe and, therefore, represents the best option in severely ill patients and/or extensive peritonitis. However, this operation carries a high risk of stoma nonreversal, or, when reversal is attempted, a high risk in terms of morbidity and mortality. In contrast, primary anastomosis with or without loop ileostoma is a slightly more lengthy procedure as normally the splenic flexure needs to be mobilized and construction of the anastomosis may consume more time than the Hartmann operation. The big advantage of primary anastomosis, however, is that there is no need for the potentially risky stoma reversal operation. The most interesting question is when to do the Hartmann operation or primary anastomosis. Several comparative case series were published showing that primary anastomosis is feasible in many patients. However, no randomized trial is available to date. It is of note, that all non-randomized case series are biased, i.e. that patients in better condition received anastomosis and those with severe peritonitis underwent Hartmann's operation. This bias is undoubtedly likely to be present, even if not obvious, in the published papers! Our own data suggest that this decision should not be based on the extent of peritonitis but rather on patient condition and comorbidity. In conclusion, sigmoid colectomy and primary anastomosis is feasible and safe in many patients who need surgery for perforated diverticulitis, particularly when combined with loop ileostomy. Based on our own published analysis, however, we recommend performing Hartmann's operation in severely ill patients who carry substantial comorbidity, while the extent of peritonitis appears not to be of predominant importance. PMID:22572692

Kreis, Martin E; Mueller, Mario H; Thasler, Wolfgang H

2012-01-01

378

Computerized procedures system  

DOEpatents

An online data driven computerized procedures system that guides an operator through a complex process facility's operating procedures. The system monitors plant data, processes the data and then, based upon this processing, presents the status of the current procedure step and/or substep to the operator. The system supports multiple users and a single procedure definition supports several interface formats that can be tailored to the individual user. Layered security controls access privileges and revisions are version controlled. The procedures run on a server that is platform independent of the user workstations that the server interfaces with and the user interface supports diverse procedural views.

Lipner, Melvin H. (Monroeville, PA); Mundy, Roger A. (North Huntingdon, PA); Franusich, Michael D. (Upper St. Clair, PA)

2010-10-12

379

Nuclear criticality safety basics for personnel working with nuclear fissionable materials. Phase I  

SciTech Connect

DOE order 5480.1A, Chapter V, ''Safety of Nuclear Facilities,'' establishes safety procedures and requirements for DOE nuclear facilities. The ''Nuclear Criticality Safety Basic Program - Phase I'' is documented in this report. The revised program has been developed to clearly illustrate the concept of nuclear safety and to help the individual employee incorporate safe behavior in his daily work performance. Because of this, the subject of safety has been approached through its three fundamentals: scientific basis, engineering criteria, and administrative controls. Only basics of these three elements were presented. 5 refs.

Vausher, A.L.

1984-10-01

380

Microbes safely, effectively bioremediate oil field pits  

SciTech Connect

Natural and augmented bioremediation provides a safe, environmental, fast, and effective solution for removing hydrocarbon stains from soil. In 1992, Amoco sponsored a study with six bioremediation companies, which evaluated 14 different techniques. From this study, Amoco continued using Environmental Protection Co.'s (EPC) microbes for bioremediating more than 145 sites near Farmington, NM. EPC's microbes proved effective on various types of hydrocarbon molecules found in petroleum stained soils from heavy crude and paraffin to volatiles such as BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene) compounds. Controlled laboratory tests have shown that these microbes can digest the hydrocarbon molecules with or without free oxygen present. It is believed that this adaptation gives these microbes their resilience. The paper describes the bioremediation process, environmental advantages, in situ and ex situ bioremediation, goals of bioremediation, temperature effects, time, cost, and example sites that were treated.

Shaw, B. (Amoco Production Co., Farmington, NM (United States)); Block, C.S. (Environmental Protection Co., Farmington, NM (United States)); Mills, C.H. (Industrial Ecosystems Inc., Pacifica, CA (United States))

1995-01-30

381

Safe disposal of metal values in slag  

SciTech Connect

The method of safely disposing of sludge containing metal values capable of displaying toxic ecological properties includes the steps of deriving from an organic or inorganic sludge an intermediate product such as a dewatered sludge or an incinerated ash, and adding this intermediate product to a metal smelting step of a type producing a slag such that most of the metal values become encapsulated in the slag. Some precious metal values may be recovered with the metal being smelted, and may be subsequently separated therefrom by appropriate metal winning steps. The sludge product brings to the smelting process certain additives needed therein such as silica and phosphates for the slag, alumina and magnesium to lower the viscosity of the molten slag, and organic matter serving as reducing agents.

Halpin, P.T.; Zarur, G.L.

1982-10-26

382

Bacteriocins: safe, natural antimicrobials for food preservation.  

PubMed

Bacteriocins are antibacterial proteins produced by bacteria that kill or inhibit the growth of other bacteria. Many lactic acid bacteria (LAB) produce a high diversity of different bacteriocins. Though these bacteriocins are produced by LAB found in numerous fermented and non-fermented foods, nisin is currently the only bacteriocin widely used as a food preservative. Many bacteriocins have been characterized biochemically and genetically, and though there is a basic understanding of their structure-function, biosynthesis, and mode of action, many aspects of these compounds are still unknown. This article gives an overview of bacteriocin applications, and differentiates bacteriocins from antibiotics. A comparison of the synthesis. mode of action, resistance and safety of the two types of molecules is covered. Toxicity data exist for only a few bacteriocins, but research and their long-time intentional use strongly suggest that bacteriocins can be safely used. PMID:11764886

Cleveland, J; Montville, T J; Nes, I F; Chikindas, M L

2001-12-01

383

Matter matters in asymptotically safe quantum gravity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the compatibility of minimally coupled scalar, fermion and gauge fields with asymptotically safe quantum gravity, using nonperturbative functional renormalization group methods. We study d=4,5 and 6 dimensions and within certain approximations find that for a given number of gauge fields there is a maximal number of scalar and fermion degrees of freedom compatible with an interacting fixed point at positive Newton coupling. The bounds impose severe constraints on grand unification with fundamental Higgs scalars. Supersymmetry and universal extra dimensions are also generally disfavored. The standard model and its extensions accommodating right-handed neutrinos, the axion and dark-matter models with a single scalar are compatible with a fixed point.

Donà, Pietro; Eichhorn, Astrid; Percacci, Roberto

2014-04-01

384

NOVA Online: Search for a Safe Cigarette  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The NOVA documentary "Search for a Safe Cigarette" recounts the tobacco industry's decades-long attempt to engineer a safer cigarette. This companion Web site offers a number of interesting and informative features, as well as a lesson plan for grades 5-8 and 9-12. The interactive feature titled Anatomy of a Cigarette offers a fascinating tour of the conventional cigarette and two "safer" versions. The Web site also includes: a review of the safer cigarette's "checkered pedigree;" an animated introduction to physiological effect of nicotine on the brain; and a virtual laboratory where visitors can explore the basics of combustion. The lesson plan, which may be used independently of the NOVA program, has students examine government action on tobacco issues and consider the role of government in public health.

2001-01-01

385

The safe disposal of radioactive wastes  

PubMed Central

A comprehensive review is given of the principles and problems involved in the safe disposal of radioactive wastes. The first part is devoted to a study of the basic facts of radioactivity and of nuclear fission, the characteristics of radioisotopes, the effects of ionizing radiations, and the maximum permissible levels of radioactivity for workers and for the general public. In the second part, the author describes the different types of radioactive waste—reactor wastes and wastes arising from the use of radioisotopes in hospitals and in industry—and discusses the application of the maximum permissible levels of radioactivity to their disposal and treatment, illustrating his discussion with an account of the methods practised at the principal atomic energy establishments.

Kenny, A. W.

1956-01-01

386

A safe lithium mimetic for bipolar disorder.  

PubMed

Lithium is the most effective mood stabilizer for the treatment of bipolar disorder, but it is toxic at only twice the therapeutic dosage and has many undesirable side effects. It is likely that a small molecule could be found with lithium-like efficacy but without toxicity through target-based drug discovery; however, therapeutic target of lithium remains equivocal. Inositol monophosphatase is a possible target but no bioavailable inhibitors exist. Here we report that the antioxidant ebselen inhibits inositol monophosphatase and induces lithium-like effects on mouse behaviour, which are reversed with inositol, consistent with a mechanism involving inhibition of inositol recycling. Ebselen is part of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Collection, a chemical library of bioavailable drugs considered clinically safe but without proven use. Therefore, ebselen represents a lithium mimetic with the potential both to validate inositol monophosphatase inhibition as a treatment for bipolar disorder and to serve as a treatment itself. PMID:23299882

Singh, Nisha; Halliday, Amy C; Thomas, Justyn M; Kuznetsova, Olga V; Baldwin, Rhiannon; Woon, Esther C Y; Aley, Parvinder K; Antoniadou, Ivi; Sharp, Trevor; Vasudevan, Sridhar R; Churchill, Grant C

2013-01-01

387

Regional Review Procedures: Office Operating Procedures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this memorandum is to provide detailed and explicit information on office processing procedures. COG's review is to determine each project's consistency with the comprehensive planning process in the Metropolitan area. The policy review fun...

1969-01-01

388

Science at Work in CDRH: A Report on the Role of Science in the Regulatory Process.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The mission of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) is to promote and protect the health of the public by ensuring safe and effective medical devices and safe radiological products. The Center's public health mission requires working with...

2001-01-01

389

Moving beyond safe sex to women-controlled safe sex: A concept analysis  

PubMed Central

Aim This paper is a report of a conceptual analysis of women-controlled safe sex. Background Women bear disproportionate burdens from sexually-related health compromising outcomes. Imbalanced societal gender and power positions contribute to high morbidities. The expression, women-controlled safe sex, aims to empower women to gain control of their sexual lives. Few researchers focus on contextualized socio-cultural definitions of sexual safety among women. Data Sources The sample included scientific literature from Scopus, CINAHL, PubMed, PsychINFO, and Sociological Abstracts. Papers were published 2000–2010. Review Methods Critical analyses of literature about women-controlled safe sex were performed using Rodgers’ evolutionary concept analysis methods. The search focused on social and cultural influences on sexual practices aimed at increasing women’s control over their sexual safety. Results The analysis uncovered five attributes of women-controlled safe sex: technology; access to choices; women at-risk; “condom migration” panic; and communication. Three antecedents included: male partner influence; body awareness; and self-efficacy. Consequences were categorized as positive or negative. Nine surrogate terms included: empowerment; gender power; female-controlled sexual barrier method; microbicides; diaphragm; sexual negotiation and communication; female condom; women-initiated disease transmission prevention; and spermicides. Finally, a consensus definition was identified: a socio- culturally influenced multilevel process for initiating sexual safety by women deemed at-risk for sexually-related dangers, usually sexually transmitted infections and/or HIV/AIDS. Conclusion This concept analysis described current significance, uses, and applications of women-controlled safe sex in the scientific literature. The authors clarified its limited nature and conclude that additional conceptual refinement in nursing is necessary to influence women’s health.

Alexander, Kamila A.; Coleman, Christopher L.; Deatrick, Janet A.; Jemott, Loretta S.

2011-01-01

390

A Safe Lab on Nerve Gases.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experiment involving pineapples and gelatin that allows students to investigate the conditions that typically render an enzyme functionless, similar to the effect of nerve gasses. Discusses the materials, procedures, and results, drawing analogies to the effects of a nerve gas. (CW)

Tucker, David C.

1988-01-01

391

Evaluating the utility of 3D TRUS image information in guiding intra-procedure registration for motion compensation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In targeted 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy, patient and prostate movement during the procedure can cause target misalignments that hinder accurate sampling of pre-planned suspicious tissue locations. Multiple solutions have been proposed for motion compensation via registration of intra-procedural TRUS images to a baseline 3D TRUS image acquired at the beginning of the biopsy procedure. While 2D TRUS images are widely used for intra-procedural guidance, some solutions utilize richer intra-procedural images such as bi- or multi-planar TRUS or 3D TRUS, acquired by specialized probes. In this work, we measured the impact of such richer intra-procedural imaging on motion compensation accuracy, to evaluate the tradeoff between cost and complexity of intra-procedural imaging versus improved motion compensation. We acquired baseline and intra-procedural 3D TRUS images from 29 patients at standard sextant-template biopsy locations. We used the planes extracted from the 3D intra-procedural scans to simulate 2D and 3D information available in different clinically relevant scenarios for registration. The registration accuracy was evaluated by calculating the target registration error (TRE) using manually identified homologous fiducial markers (micro-calcifications). Our results indicate that TRE improves gradually when the number of intra-procedural imaging planes used in registration is increased. Full 3D TRUS information helps the registration algorithm to robustly converge to more accurate solutions. These results can also inform the design of a fail-safe workflow during motion compensation in a system using a tracked 2D TRUS probe, by prescribing rotational acquisitions that can be performed quickly and easily by the physician immediately prior to needle targeting.

De Silva, Tharindu; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

2014-03-01

392

DESIGN AND OPERATIONAL ASPECTS OF FLIGHT-DECK PROCEDURES  

Microsoft Academic Search

In complex human-machine systems, training, standardization, quality assurance, and actual operations depend on an elaborate set of procedures. These procedures indicate to the human operator the manner in which operational management intends to have various tasks performed. The objective is to provide guidance to the operators—in this case, pilots—to ensure a safe, logical, and efficient flight operations. However, all too

Asaf Degani; Earl L. Wiener

393

A simulation facility for testing Space Station assembly procedures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA plans to construct the Space Station Freedom (SSF) in one of the most hazardous environments known to mankind - space. It is of the utmost importance that the procedures to assemble and operate the SSF in orbit are both safe and effective. This paper describes a facility designed to test the integration of the telerobotic systems and to test assembly procedures using a real-world robotic arm grappling space hardware in a simulated microgravity environment.

Hajare, Ankur R.; Wick, Daniel T.; Shehad, Nagy M.

1994-11-01

394

Common Procedures during Childbirth  

MedlinePLUS

... t InteliHealth Medical Content 2011-08-14 Common Procedures During Childbirth Most often labor and delivery proceeds ... needs a helping hand. Here are some common procedures used during childbirth: Continuous fetal monitoring is a ...

395

Cardiac ablation procedures  

MedlinePLUS

Ablate means "to destroy." Cardiac ablation is a procedure that is used to destroy small areas in ... be causing your heart rhythm problems . During the procedure, small wires called electrodes are placed inside your ...

396

Prone position during ECMO is safe and improves oxygenation.  

PubMed

Purpose: Combination of prone positioning (PrP) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) might be beneficial in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), because both approaches are recommended. However, PrP during ECMO might be associated with complications such as dislocation of ECMO cannulae. We investigated complications and change of oxygenation effects of PrP during ECMO to identify "responders" and discuss our results considering different definitions of response in the literature.?Methods: Retrospective analysis of complications, gas exchange, and invasiveness of mechanical ventilation during first and second PrP on ECMO at specified time points (before, during, and after PrP). We used multivariate nonparametric analysis of longitudinal data (MANOVA) to compare changes of mechanical ventilation and hemodynamics associated with the first and second procedures.?Results: In 12 ECMO patients, 74 PrPs were performed (median ECMO duration: 10 days (IQR: 6.3-?15.5 days)). No dislocations of intravascular catheters/cannulae, endotracheal tubes or chest tubes were observed. Two PrPs had to be interrupted (endotracheal tube obstruction, acute pulmonary embolism). PaO2/FiO2-ratio increased associated with the first and second PrP (p = 0.002) and lasted after PrP in 58% of these turning procedures ("responders") without changes in ECMO blood flow, respiratory pressures, minute ventilation, portion of spontaneously triggered breathing, and compliance. Hemodynamics did not change with exception of increased mean pulmonary arterial pressure during PrP and decrease after PrP (p<0.001), while norepinephrine dosage decreased (p = 0.03) (MANOVA).?Conclusions: Prone position during ECMO is safe and improves oxygenation even after repositioning. This might ameliorate hypoxemia and reduce the harm from mechanical ventilation. PMID:24338657

Kipping, Valesca; Weber-Carstens, Steffen; Lojewski, Christian; Feldmann, Paul; Rydlewski, Antje; Boemke, Willehad; Spies, Claudia; Kastrup, Marc; Kaisers, Udo X; Wernecke, Klaus-D; Deja, Maria

2013-12-12

397

Promoting safe walking and biking to school: the Marin County success story.  

PubMed

Walking and biking to school can be an important part of a healthy lifestyle, yet most US children do not start their day with these activities. The Safe Routes to School Program in Marin County, California, is working to promote walking and biking to school. Using a multipronged approach, the program identifies and creates safe routes to schools and invites communitywide involvement. By its second year, the program was serving 4665 students in 15 schools. Participating public schools reported an increase in school trips made by walking (64%), biking (114%), and carpooling (91%) and a decrease in trips by private vehicles carrying only one student (39%). PMID:12948957

Staunton, Catherine E; Hubsmith, Deb; Kallins, Wendi

2003-09-01

398

Making Grading Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two teachers have developed a procedure for grading student compositions that seems fairer to both them and their students. The students are given a choice of which papers they wish to submit for grading, and when they do submit work, the papers are identified by a number only (chosen by the student and indexed in a class card file). Each teacher…

Lotto, Edward; Smith, Bruce

399

Safe affordable fission engine (SAFE 30) module conductivity test thermal model correlation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The SAFE 30 is a simple, robust space fission power system that is comprised of several independent modules. Each module contains 4 fuel tubes bonded to a central heatpipe. Fission energy is conducted from the fuel tubes to the heatpipe, which in turn transfers the energy to a power conversion system. This paper benchmarks a thermal model of the SAFE 30 with actual test data from simulated SAFE 30 module tests. Two ``dummy'' SAFE 30 modules were fabricated-each consisted of 4 1-inch dia. tubes (simulating the fuel tubes) bonded to a central 1'' dia. tube (simulating the heatpipe). In the first module the fuel tubes were simply brazed to the heatpipe along the line of contact (leaving void space in the interstices), and in the second module the tubes and heatpipe were brazed via tri-cusps that completely fill the interstices between the tubes. In these tests, fission energy is simulated by placing resistance heaters within each of the 4 fuel tubes. The tests were conducted in a vacuum chamber in 4 configurations: tri-cusps filled with and without an outer insulation wrap, and no tri-cusps with and without an outer insulation wrap. The baseline SAFE 30 configuration uses the brazed tri-cusps. During the tests, the power applied to the heaters was varied in a stepwise fashion, until a steady-state temperature profile was reached. These temperature levels varied between 773 K and 1073 K. To benchmark the thermal model, the input energy and chamber surface temperature were used as boundary conditions for the model. The analytical results from the nodes at the same location as the test thermocouples were plotted again test data to determinate the accuracy of the analysis. The unknown variables on the analysis are the radiation emissivity of the pipe and chamber and the radiation view factor between the module and the chamber. A correlation was determined using a parametric analysis by varying the surface emissivity and view factor until a good match was reached. This model and the corresponding data will later be used to evaluate the heat transfer characteristics of the SAFE 30 core, and perform various design trade-offs. Finally, the test data is evaluated to determine the effect of the tri-cusp insert on heat transfer. It is found that the tri-cusps cause a significant increase in module heat transfer. .

Roman, Jose

2001-02-01

400

Classification procedure in limited angle tomography system  

SciTech Connect

In this work we propose the use of limited angle reconstruction algorithms combined with a procedure for defect detection and feature evaluation in three dimensions. The procedure consists of the following steps: acquisition of the X-ray projections, approximated limited angle 3D image reconstruction, and image preprocessing and classification.

Chlewicki, W.; Baniukiewicz, P.; Chady, T.; Brykalski, A. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Westpomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin (Poland)

2011-06-23

401

30 CFR 48.32 - Appeals procedures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... EDUCATION AND TRAINING TRAINING AND RETRAINING OF MINERS Training and Retraining of Miners Working at Surface Mines and Surface Areas of Underground Mines § 48.32 Appeals procedures. The operator, miner, and miners'...

2013-07-01

402

Crew procedures development techniques  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The study developed requirements, designed, developed, checked out and demonstrated the Procedures Generation Program (PGP). The PGP is a digital computer program which provides a computerized means of developing flight crew procedures based on crew action in the shuttle procedures simulator. In addition, it provides a real time display of procedures, difference procedures, performance data and performance evaluation data. Reconstruction of displays is possible post-run. Data may be copied, stored on magnetic tape and transferred to the document processor for editing and documentation distribution.

Arbet, J. D.; Benbow, R. L.; Hawk, M. L.; Mangiaracina, A. A.; Mcgavern, J. L.; Spangler, M. C.

1975-01-01

403

How safe is diathermy in patients with cochlear implants?  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Cochlear implants are surgically inserted electrical devices that enable severely or profoundly deaf individuals to interpret sounds from their environment and communicate more effectively. As a result of their electrical nature, they are susceptible to electromagnetic interference and can be damaged by excessive electrical energy. Surgical diathermy is one source of such potentially damaging energy. The British Cochlear Implant Group guidelines advise that monopolar diathermy should not be used in the head and neck region in patients with cochlear implants and that bipolar diathermy should not be used within 2cm of the implant (http://www.bcig.org.uk/site/public/current/safety.htm). METHODS A questionnaire was provided to 36 surgeons working in different specialties in the head and neck region, inquiring as to their knowledge of the safety considerations when using diathermy in cochlear implant patients. Thirty-five surgeons provided responses. RESULTS Overall, 77% of the respondents were unaware of the existence of published guidelines. Even when given an option to seek advice, 11% erroneously felt it was safe to use monopolar diathermy above the clavicles with a cochlear implant in situ and 49% felt that there was no restriction on the use of bipolar diathermy. CONCLUSIONS There is a significant deficit in the knowledge of safe operating practice in the rapidly expanding population of patients with cochlear implants which threatens patient safety. Through this publication we aim to increase awareness of these guidelines among members of the surgical community and this paper is intended to act as a point of reference to link through to the published safety guidelines.

Frampton, SJ; Ismail-Koch, H; Mitchell, TE

2012-01-01

404

Safe Handling of Oral Chemotherapeutic Agents in Clinical Practice: Recommendations From an International Pharmacy Panel  

PubMed Central

Although there has been a significant increase in the availability and use of oral chemotherapeutic agents, the guidelines around their safe handling are still evolving. Although oral chemotherapy is associated with ease of administration, it has the same exposure risks to health care practitioners, patients, and their caregivers as intravenous formulations, and because it is administered in the home, to the families of patients. However, the general misconception appears to be that exposure risk is low and therefore oral chemotherapeutic agents present little risk and are safer to handle. In a series of three roundtable meetings, a team of international pharmacists from North America and Europe reviewed existing guidelines and identified gaps in recommendations that we believe are important for safe handling. The present article is a compilation of these gaps, especially applicable to manufacturers and distributors, storage and handling, and patient education regarding safe handling. These recommendations, on the basis of our experience and of best practices, provide an international perspective and can be adapted by institutions and practices for development of standardized procedures specific to their needs for the safe handling of oral chemotherapeutic agents.

Goodin, Susan; Griffith, Niesha; Chen, Beth; Chuk, Karen; Daouphars, Mikael; Doreau, Christian; Patel, Rinku A.; Schwartz, Rowena; Tames, Maria Jose; Terkola, Robert; Vadnais, Barbara; Wright, Debbie; Meier, Klaus

2011-01-01

405

Household's willingness to pay for arsenic safe drinking water in Bangladesh.  

PubMed

This study examines willingness to pay (WTP) in Bangladesh for arsenic (As) safe drinking water across different As-risk zones, applying a double bound discrete choice value elicitation approach. The study aims to provide a robust estimate of the benefits of As safe drinking water supply, which is compared to the results from a similar study published almost 10 years ago using a single bound estimation procedure. Tests show that the double bound valuation design does not suffer from anchoring or incentive incompatibility effects. Health risk awareness levels are high and households are willing to pay on average about 5 percent of their disposable average annual household income for As safe drinking water. Important factors influencing WTP include the bid amount to construct communal deep tubewell for As safe water supply, the risk zone where respondents live, household income, water consumption, awareness of water source contamination, whether household members are affected by As contamination, and whether they already take mitigation measures. PMID:24905645

Khan, Nasreen Islam; Brouwer, Roy; Yang, Hong

2014-10-01

406

Decision procedures for pipeline rehab  

SciTech Connect

Rehabilitating some of the world's old pipelines, rather than replacing or abandoning them, is feasible and economical. This work gives a rundown of decision procedures for pipeline rehabilitation based on recent projects which included 8-30 in. gas, oil, and products pipelines in North America and Asia. Problems included external corrosion in low swampy areas, internal corrosion in sag bends in hilly areas, poor coating, and lack of fusion in electric-resistance welded (ERW) pipe.

Wright, P.C.; Hodgdon, A.M. (Fluor Daniel Inc., Sugar Land, TX (US))

1989-08-07

407

New Urbanist developments in flood-prone areas: safe development, or safe development paradox?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Government policies intended to reduce flood losses can increase the potential for catastrophe by stimulating development\\u000a inside the floodplain, a phenomenon referred to as the “safe development paradox.” New Urbanist design has the potential to\\u000a both exacerbate and alleviate flood risks. Because they are built at relatively high densities, New Urbanist developments\\u000a can exacerbate risk by placing more people and

Mark R. Stevens; Yan Song; Philip R. Berke

2010-01-01

408

Implementation of lifting procedures to comply with US Department of Energy standards  

SciTech Connect

Compliance with and documentation of industry and national safety standards has become the preeminent challenge for America's nuclear-based work force in the past decade. With the inception of nuclear power in the 1940's, the recognition and concern for its control and safe handling has grown. Public concern for safety has created such a demand for knowledge and control of nuclear elements, materials, and operations that the search for procedures and oversight has become a primary endeavor of the government and its contractors. Safety and its documentation is now a primary function of the nuclear industry both when producing nuclear products and when providing nonnuclear support services for production. At the Hanford Site in Washington State (a US Department of Energy owned and operated site) hoisting and rigging procedures have been impacted by the same recognition and requirements. The role of the maintenance or support services manager in identifying and applying these procedures and controls is discussed, as well as the difficulties in compiling and standardizing them in a diverse work environment, one which is sometimes reluctant to change without strong justification.

Miller, G.P.

1991-04-01

409

Ultra Safe And Secure Blasting System  

SciTech Connect

The Ultra is a blasting system that is designed for special applications where the risk and consequences of unauthorized demolition or blasting are so great that the use of an extraordinarily safe and secure blasting system is justified. Such a blasting system would be connected and logically welded together through digital code-linking as part of the blasting system set-up and initialization process. The Ultra's security is so robust that it will defeat the people who designed and built the components in any attempt at unauthorized detonation. Anyone attempting to gain unauthorized control of the system by substituting components or tapping into communications lines will be thwarted in their inability to provide encrypted authentication. Authentication occurs through the use of codes that are generated by the system during initialization code-linking and the codes remain unknown to anyone, including the authorized operator. Once code-linked, a closed system has been created. The system requires all components connected as they were during initialization as well as a unique code entered by the operator for function and blasting.

Hart, M M

2009-07-27

410

Evaluation of efalizumab using safe psoriasis control  

PubMed Central

Background Safe Psoriasis Control (SPC) is an important comprehensive measure that is validated for the assessment of benefit:risk of psoriasis treatments, combining efficacy, quality of life, and safety measures. The objective of this analysis was to assess the benefit:risk of efalizumab, a novel biologic agent indicated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, by applying the SPC to data from randomized, placebo-controlled clinical studies of efalizumab. Methods SPC was applied to week 12 data from four placebo-controlled, Phase III studies: three retrospective and one prospective, the latter including a cohort of "high-need" patients for whom existing therapies were inadequate or unsuitable. Results In the retrospective analysis, 39.4% of patients achieved SPC after 12 weeks of treatment with efalizumab, compared with 10.4% for placebo. In the prospective analysis, 34.3% of patients achieved SPC after 12 weeks of treatment with efalizumab, compared with 7.3% on placebo. Among high-need patients, 33.0% achieved SPC, compared with 3.4% on placebo. Conclusion Efalizumab has a favorable benefit:risk profile using the comprehensive outcome measure SPC.

Papp, Kim A; Henninger, Eric

2006-01-01

411

Safe nuclear power for the Third World  

SciTech Connect

It is clear that using nuclear power for the generation of electricity is one way of reducing the emissions of CO{sub 2} and other gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect. Equally clear is the fact that the reduction can be magnified by converting domestic, commercial, and industrial power-consuming activities from the direct use of fossil fuel sources to electrical energy. A major area for future progress in limiting CO{sub 2} emissions is in the Third World, where population growth and expectations for a higher social and economic standard of living portend vast increases in future energy use. A number of problems come to mind as one contemplates the widespread expansion of nuclear energy use into the Third World. The authors propose a method involving the marriage of two currently evolving concepts by which nuclear electrical generation can be expanded throughout the world in a manner that will address these problems. The idea is to form multinational independent electric generating companies, or nuclear electric companies (NECs), that would design, build, operate, and service a standardized fleet of nuclear power plants. The plants would be of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) design, now under development at Argonne National Laboratory, and, in particular, a commercial conceptualization of the IFR sponsored by General Electric Company, the Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM).

Johnson, W.R.; Lyon, C.F.; Redick, J.R. (Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville (USA))

1989-11-01

412

Topological characterization of safe coordinated vehicle motions  

SciTech Connect

This paper characterizes the homotopy properties and the global topology of the space of positions of vehicles which are constrained to travel without intersecting on a network of paths. The space is determined by the number of vehicles and the network. Paths in the space correspond to simultaneous non-intersecting motions of all vehicles. The authors therefore focus on computing the homotopy type of the space, and show how to do so in the general case. Understanding the homotopy type of the space is the central issue in controlling the vehicles, as it gives a complete description of the distinct ways that vehicles may move safely on the network. The authors exhibit graphs, products of graphs, and amalgamations of products of graphs that are homotopy equivalent to the full configuration space, and are far simpler than might be expected. The results indicate how a control system for such a network of vehicles (such as a fleet of automatically guided vehicles guided by wires buried in a factory floor) may be implemented.

MILGRAM.R. JAMES; KAUFMAN,STEPHEN G.

2000-04-03

413

NASA Helps Industry Relieve Pressure Safely  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In many industrial applications, pressure relief valves (PRV) perform the critical function of safely releasing pressure before potentially damaging build-ups occur. Conventional relief valves, however, have proven unstable, leading to premature wear and devasting consequences. A high-performance pressure relief valve, the PRV95, now being manufactured my Marotta Scientific Controls, Inc., of Montville, NJ, provides the answer to premature wear and instability. Using an improved valve design developed under a NASA Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR) contract from John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC), Marotta's PRV95 pressure relief valve provides stability over the entire operational range, from fully closed to fully open. The valve employs upstream control for valve positioning, that makes the valve more stable and affords excellent repeatability with minimal lag time. 'It opens and closes softly, and does not oscillate or generate hard impacts; oscillation can result in a hard impact pressure release, which can lead to an explosion in the presence of oxygen,' says Bill St. Cyr, Chief of Test Technology Branch at Stennis Space Center. Marotta's PRV95 design is also unique in its ability to maintain a seal near the set point of the relief limit. Typically, relief valves seal tightly up to 90% of set point and then reseat when pressure is reduced to 85% of set point. The PRV95 technology maintains seal integrity until 98% of set point and will reseat a 95-97% of set point. This allows the operator to protect his system while not exceeding its limits.

2003-01-01

414

78 FR 46932 - Notice of Intent to Grant Exclusive Patent License; Safe Environment Engineering  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Patent License; Safe Environment Engineering AGENCY: Department of the Navy...to grant to Safe Environment Engineering a revocable, nonassignable...to practice Safe Environment Engineering's proprietary sensor...

2013-08-02

415

Is it safe not to drain the pneumonectomy space?  

PubMed

A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether it is safe not to position any chest drain into the pneumonectomy space at the conclusion of the procedure. Altogether 381 relevant studies were identified of which 11 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The author, journal, date, country of publication, alternative methods of postpneumonectomy space (PPS) management, complications and relevant outcomes are tabulated. The majority of studies are on the basis of expert opinion or small cohorts. Major cohorts, by which the pneumonectomy outcomes have been examined, demonstrated that the rates of complications related to pneumonectomy space management such as empyema, bronchopleural fistula, mediastinal shift and major bleeding requiring reopening are very low. In a large cohort where 408 patients underwent pneumonectomy the rate of relevant complications was low and also it was concluded that the PPS drainage is not necessary. Two separate expert opinions were in agreement that needle aspiration in the absence of a drainage system is adequate for the management of PPS and avoiding a mediastinal shift. One small cohort and one institutional audit directly examined the impact of a drainage versus no drainage approach in the management of PPS. Although neither study could show a significant superiority of one method over another, they recommended adopting a unified institutional protocol for current departmental practice. They also emphasized that larger cohorts are required to examine the superiority of different strategies for PPS management. In a cohort of 291 patients, it was demonstrated that patients with drainage with underwater seal are more at risk of postpneumonectomy oedema. A recent review published as a book chapter appraised the relevant literature in both humans and animals. The authors concluded that the simplicity of a no-drainage system is notable; however, a balanced drainage might be recommended for local protocols. We conclude that although the current evidence is not adequate to examine the different aforementioned approaches, not draining the pneumonectomy space can be performed safely. PMID:24480821

Morcos, Karim; Shaikhrezai, Kasra; Kirk, Alan J B

2014-05-01

416

SafeStore: A Durable and Practical Storage System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents SafeStore, a distributed storage system designed to maintain long-term data durabil- ity despite conventional hardware and software faults, environmental disruptions, and administrative failures caused by human error or malice. The architecture of SafeStore is based on fault isolation, which Safe- Store applies aggressively along administrative, physi- cal, and temporal dimensions by spreading data across autonomous storage service

Ramakrishna Kotla; Lorenzo Alvisi; Michael Dahlin

2007-01-01

417

ACR guidance document on MR safe practices: 2013.  

PubMed

Because there are many potential risks in the MR environment and reports of adverse incidents involving patients, equipment and personnel, the need for a guidance document on MR safe practices emerged. Initially published in 2002, the ACR MR Safe Practices Guidelines established de facto industry standards for safe and responsible practices in clinical and research MR environments. As the MR industry changes the document is reviewed, modified and updated. The most recent version will reflect these changes. PMID:23345200

Kanal, Emanuel; Barkovich, A James; Bell, Charlotte; Borgstede, James P; Bradley, William G; Froelich, Jerry W; Gimbel, J Rod; Gosbee, John W; Kuhni-Kaminski, Ellisa; Larson, Paul A; Lester, James W; Nyenhuis, John; Schaefer, Daniel Joe; Sebek, Elizabeth A; Weinreb, Jeffrey; Wilkoff, Bruce L; Woods, Terry O; Lucey, Leonard; Hernandez, Dina

2013-03-01

418

Inherently Safe Reactors and a Second Nuclear Era  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Swedish PIUS reactor and the German-American small modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor are inherently safe--that is, their safety relies not upon intervention of humans or of electromechanical devices but on immutable principles of physics and chemistry. A second nuclear era may require commercialization and deployment of such inherently safe reactors, even though existing light-water reactors appear to be as safe

Alvin M. Weinberg; Irving Spiewak

1984-01-01

419

Enhancing Student Engagement through Practice Experience in Social Work Education: The Social Work Studio  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It can sometimes be difficult to engage students in "real life experiences" within the classroom. In one Bachelor of Social Work program, the development of a Social Work Studio (the Studio) has provided students with opportunities to engage in simulated social work practice in a safe and supportive environment. This article reports on a small…

Campbell, Alan

2012-01-01

420

Evaluation of concepts for safe speed enforcement. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The final report evaluates the suitability of existing and developmental safe speed enforcement concepts/systems for application to a high-speed maglev control system in the U.S. Requirements, functions and needs are identified and discussed for two major aspects of safe speed enforcement: (1) generation of safe speed commands, and (2) enforcement of safe speed limits as defined by those commands or otherwise imposed upon vehicles. The features, functions and general implementations of selected safe speed concepts utilized in maglev, high-speed rail and conventional rail transit systems, rubber-tired transit systems, and railroad systems are described. Emphasis in the descriptions is given to the general concept used to ensure safe speed and more specific aspects such as vehicle location detection, actual speed detection, safety related communications and implementation/configuration. An assessment is then made as to the suitability of the concepts in meeting the requirements and functions of safe speed enforcement in both long and short stator maglev applications. It is shown that while many of the non-maglev existing safe speed enforcement concepts are not directly applicable as is or with minimal modifications, they do incorporate various aspects and equipment which could fulfill the basic needs of a maglev system relative to safe speed enforcement.

Luedeke, J.F.; Thompson, R.E.

1992-04-01

421

Simple and microbiologically safe portable transport unit for patients requiring protected isolation.  

PubMed Central

The removal of a patient from a laminar air flow room during protected isolation poses the risk of his microbial contamination and infection. Nonetheless, temporary removal from the laminar air flow room may be necessary for certain medical procedures or for psychological relief during prolonged periods of isolation or both. A means for protecting patients during temporary removal from the laminar air flow room is highly desirable. A previously described total body garment has been shown to be microbiologically safe and effective, but is expensive, cumbersome, and not very adaptable to patients of different ages and body sizes. We now present an alternative, microbiologically safe transportation system which delivers, high-efficiency particulate air-filtered air over the head and neck through a modified, lightweight, commercially available helmet and power supply and which can be comfortably and reliably used by isolated patients.

Talbot, T L; Pizzo, P A

1980-01-01

422

Ultrasonic Detectors Safely Identify Dangerous, Costly Leaks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1990, NASA grounded its space shuttle fleet. The reason: leaks detected in the hydrogen fuel systems of the Space Shuttles Atlantis and Columbia. Unless the sources of the leaks could be identified and fixed, the shuttles would not be safe to fly. To help locate the existing leaks and check for others, Kennedy Space Center engineers used portable ultrasonic detectors to scan the fuel systems. As a gas or liquid escapes from a leak, the resulting turbulence creates ultrasonic noise, explains Gary Mohr, president of Elmsford, New York-based UE Systems Inc., a long-time leader in ultrasonic detector technologies. "In lay terms, the leak is like a dog whistle, and the detector is like the dog ear." Because the ultrasound emissions from a leak are highly localized, they can be used not only to identify the presence of a leak but also to help pinpoint a leak s location. The NASA engineers employed UE s detectors to examine the shuttle fuel tanks and solid rocket boosters, but encountered difficulty with the devices limited range-certain areas of the shuttle proved difficult or unsafe to scan up close. To remedy the problem, the engineers created a long-range attachment for the detectors, similar to "a zoom lens on a camera," Mohr says. "If you are on the ground, and the leak is 50 feet away, the detector would now give you the same impression as if you were only 25 feet away." The enhancement also had the effect of reducing background noise, allowing for a clearer, more precise detection of a leak s location.

2013-01-01

423

How safe is motherhood in India?  

PubMed

Strategies for reducing maternal mortality in India are suggested for prioritizing maternal and child health (MCH) nationally, for including MCH within welfare services, and for integrating vertical programs into MCH. Attention should be directed to delivery practices and facilities, which account for most of maternal mortality. Clean and well-equipped labor huts which provide quality care should be available in each community. High-risk patients should be housed in maternity waiting homes located near hospitals. Improvements should be made in provision of quality prenatal care in villages, primary health care, and evaluation of services. A focus on family planning targets is not sufficient. Postpartum care programs should function as centers for family activities. A national blood transfusion network should be examined as a feasible plan. All government vehicles should be at the disposal of emergency situations. Home science books for prospective mothers should include chapters on pregnancy, childbirth, and care of the newborn. Television serials hold promise as useful tools for mass health education. Medical students in Departments of Gynecology and Obstetrics should spend 66% of their training time in obstetrics and practical skills in childbirth and newborn care. Regional centers for research and evaluation should be established by the Council on Medical Research. The right to safe motherhood should be assured. A nationwide study conducted in the late 1970s found that maternal mortality was 753/100,000 deliveries. A hospital-based study in 1982-83 found that there were 133 maternal deaths/32,812 deliveries, a maternal mortality rate of 405/100,000 live births. 58.8% of maternal deaths were attributed to obstetric causes: 12.8% to hemorrhage, 17.3% to infection, 12% to hypertensive disorders, 8.3% to ruptured uterus. An additional 15.8% of deaths were caused by hepatitis and 7.5% by anemia. Indian maternal mortality in one week equals the total maternal mortality in all of Europe in one year. PMID:12345924

Rajaram, P; Agarwal, A; Swain, S

1993-01-01

424

Candidate CDTI procedures study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A concept with potential for increasing airspace capacity by involving the pilot in the separation control loop is discussed. Some candidate options are presented. Both enroute and terminal area procedures are considered and, in many cases, a technologically advanced Air Traffic Control structure is assumed. Minimum display characteristics recommended for each of the described procedures are presented. Recommended sequencing of the operational testing of each of the candidate procedures is presented.

Ace, R. E.

1981-01-01

425

Complications with Outpatient Angiography and Interventional Procedures  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To prospectively identify the complications, and rates of complication, in outpatient angiography and interventional procedures. Methods: There were 1050 consecutive patients, 646 men and 404 women, aged 17-89 years, with a total of 1239 procedures studied in a 2-year period, 1997 to 1999. Results: There were 560 cases of aorto-femoral angiography,resulting in 124 complications (22%), with pain or hematoma in 110.There were 206 cases of neck and cerebral angiography, resulting in 51 complications (25%), with pain and hematoma in 34, transient ischemic attack in 2 and cerebrovascular accident in 1. There were 197 interfentional procedures, with 177 being balloon dilatations, resulting in 68 complications (35%), with 2 having hematomas and 1 having hematoma/abscess requiring active treatment. There were 276 cases having various 'other' procedures (e.g., renal angiography),resulting in 65 complications (24%), with pain and hematoma in 61. No procedure-related death occurred. Eighteen cases (1.5%) had significant complications, with contrast allergy in eight. Conclusion: Outpatient angiography and intervention are relatively safe, with low significant complication rates.

Young, Noel; Chi, Ka-Kit; Ajaka, Joe; McKay, Lesa; O'Neill, Diane; Wong, Kai Ping [Department of Radiology, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, Sydney, NWS, 2145 (Australia)

2002-03-15

426

Peripheral nerves: ultrasound-guided interventional procedures.  

PubMed

Specific ultrasound (US)-guided interventional procedures on peripheral nerves are reviewed in this article including regional anesthesia, biopsy of neural lesions, and some injection therapies. For these procedures, US is the best modality to provide a safe imaging guidance because of its excellent spatial resolution and real-time capabilities. With US guidance, the radiologist can visualize the needle tip continuously and ensure that the needle is placed precisely in the desired location, avoiding the risk of inadvertent nerve damage. Practical tips and tricks for US-guided needle placement, biopsy of neural lesions, and US-guided therapy are reviewed in this article. The use of US-guided injections in specific clinical settings, such as the percutaneous treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome, Morton's and saphenous neuromas, painful stump neuromas, piriformis syndrome, and meralgia paresthetica are also illustrated here. US allows the clinician to inject drugs with little or no patient discomfort. PMID:21072732

Tagliafico, Alberto; Bodner, Gerd; Rosenberg, Ilan; Palmieri, Federigo; Garello, Isabella; Altafini, Luisa; Martinoli, Carlo

2010-11-01

427

DOE handbook: Tritium handling and safe storage  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Handbook was developed as an educational supplement and reference for operations and maintenance personnel. Most of the tritium publications are written from a radiological protection perspective. This handbook provides more extensive guidance and advice on the null range of tritium operations. This handbook can be used by personnel involved in the full range of tritium handling from receipt to ultimate disposal. Compliance issues are addressed at each stage of handling. This handbook can also be used as a reference for those individuals involved in real time determination of bounding doses resulting from inadvertent tritium releases. This handbook provides useful information for establishing processes and procedures for the receipt, storage, assay, handling, packaging, and shipping of tritium and tritiated wastes. It includes discussions and advice on compliance-based issues and adds insight to those areas that currently possess unclear DOE guidance.

NONE

1999-03-01

428

Safe flying for an UAV helicopter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today small autonomous helicopters offer a low budget platform for aerial applications such as surveillance (both military and civil), land management and earth sciences. In this paper we introduce a prototype of autonomous aerial vehicle, the Helibot helicopter, specifically designed for applications in cooperative networks. Fundamental steps in the design process of an UAV are shown. We also present work

A. Mancini; F. Caponetti; A. Monteriu; E. Frontoni; P. Zingaretti; S. Longhi

2007-01-01

429

Preschooler test or procedure preparation  

MedlinePLUS

Preparing preschoolers for test/procedure; Test/procedure preparation - preschooler ... reduce distress in children who are undergoing medical tests, minimizing crying and resistance to the procedure. Research ...

430

Why HVAC commissioning procedures do not work in humid climates  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses ways to avoid moisture damage to buildings caused by improper commissioning of HVAC systems during periods of high humidity. The topics of the article include moisture control strategies, air leakage in hot, humid climates, commissioning HVAC systems, and case studies covering central exhaust systems, building chases being used as air distribution systems, and leakage at guest room fan coil units.

DuBose, G.H.; Odom, J.D. III [CH2M Hill, Orlando, FL (United States); Fairey, P.W. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (United States)

1993-12-01

431

Reduction-in-Force: Working Policies and Procedures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The reduction-in-force (RIF) policies presented here are intended to represent the variety of approaches currently being used throughout the nation. They were obtained through inquiries to personnel in more than 100 U.S. school districts. They are presented to give principals and assistant principals information to allow them to play an…

National Association of Secondary School Principals, Reston, VA.

432

Experiencing infertility--social work dilemmas in child adoption procedures.  

PubMed

The research deals with experiencing infertility and its consequences in the adoption of a child and focuses on infertile couples that have wished to adopt a child and joined a program preparing them to be foster parents. The results show that most of the infertile couples experience infertility very much as being different from couples with children as well as having to cope with the feelings of deep emotional loss resulting from the inability to reproduce biologically. There is therefore the question whether these facts should be taken into account by the profession (i.e. social workers) when dealing with child adoption as, according to most of the respondents of our survey, the process of coming to terms with infertility and its consequences is an important factor in establishing healthy family relationships and the child's identity within the adoptive family. We concluded from the results of the research that the infertile couples preparation program for adopting a child carried out by the Society of Adoptive Families "Deteljica", is a comprehensive autopoietic social workers' answer to the needs of participants for a successful adoption of a child, as it makes it possible to supply these future adoptive parents with the requisite information and experience and provides support to the entire family upon accepting a child in its midst, while its fundamental attribute is offering help to couples in overcoming the traumas resulting from their infertility. PMID:14746131

Bevc, Viktorija; Jerman, Janja; Ovsenik, Rok; Ovsenik, Marija

2003-12-01

433

Fire-safe polymers and polymer composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The intrinsic relationships between polymer structure, composition and fire behavior have been explored to develop new fire-safe polymeric materials. Different experimental techniques, especially three milligram-scale methods---pyrolysis-combustion flow calorimetry (PCFC), simultaneous thermal analysis (STA) and pyrolysis GC/MS---have been combined to fully characterize the thermal decomposition and flammability of polymers and polymer composites. Thermal stability, mass loss rate, char yield and properties of decomposition volatiles were found to be the most important parameters in determining polymer flammability. Most polymers decompose by either an unzipping or a random chain scission mechanism with an endothermic decomposition of 100--900 J/g. Aromatic or heteroaromatic rings, conjugated double or triple bonds and heteroatoms such as halogens, N, O, S, P and Si are the basic structural units for fire-resistant polymers. The flammability of polymers can also be successfully estimated by combining pyrolysis GC/MS results or chemical structures with TGA results. The thermal decomposition and flammability of two groups of inherently fire-resistant polymers---poly(hydroxyamide) (PHA) and its derivatives, and bisphenol C (BPC II) polyarylates---have been systematically studied. PHA and most of its derivatives have extremely low heat release rates and very high char yields upon combustion. PHA and its halogen derivatives can completely cyclize into quasi-polybenzoxazole (PBO) structures at low temperatures. However, the methoxy and phosphate derivatives show a very different behavior during decomposition and combustion. Molecular modeling shows that the formation of an enol intermediate is the rate-determining step in the thermal cyclization of PHA. BPC II-polyarylate is another extremely flame-resistant polymer. It can be used as an efficient flame-retardant agent in copolymers and blends. From PCFC results, the total heat of combustion of these copolymers or blends changes linearly with composition, but the change of maximum heat release rates also depends on the chemical structure of the components. The flammability of various polymers and polymer composites measured by PCFC, cone calorimeter ASTM E1354 and Ohio State University (OSU) calorimeter ASTM E906 were also compared. For pure polymers, there is a relatively good correlation between different methods. However, for polymer composites with inert fillers or flame-retardant additives, OSU and cone calorimetries are more suitable evaluation methods.

Zhang, Huiqing

434

Connectionist Learning Procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

A major goal of research on networks of neuron-like processing units is to discover efficient learning procedures that allow these networks to construct complex internal representations of their environ- ment. The learning procedures must be capable of modifying the connection strengths in such a way that internal units which are not part of the input or output come to represent

Geoffrey E. Hinton

1989-01-01

435

Useful Procedures of Inquiry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book discusses and analyzes the many different procedures of inquiry, both old and new, which have been used in an attempt to solve the problems men encounter. Section A examines some outmoded procedures of inquiry, describes scientific inquiry, and presents the Dewey-Bentley view of scientific method. Sections B and C, which comprise the…

Handy, Rollo; Harwood, E. C.

436

A Year Without Procedures  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Step-by-step instructions in the chemistry lab often eliminate opportunities for inquiry, higher levels of thinking, and the sense of accomplishment students find through independent discovery. However, removing procedures from chemistry labs creates opportunities for student inquiry. This article describes a chemistry-based experimental year without procedures, but the concept can be applied to any scientific discipline.

Backus, Lisa

2005-10-01

437

Safe School: A Planning Guide for Action. 1995 Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guidebook shows how schools can form partnerships with law-enforcement agencies and communities to develop a comprehensive safe-school plan. The planning guide is based on four principles: that safe schools are caring schools, are built through cooperative efforts of all stakeholders, communicate high standards, and stress prevention. This…

California State Office of the Attorney General, Sacramento. Crime Prevention Center.

438

Challenges of Safe Motherhood: Program and Policy Recommendations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article synthesizes the major findings from research and case studies on safe motherhood and focuses on best practices and changes in public policy. Many factors that negatively influence safe motherhood can be ameliorated—and have been in numerous societies through education, access to resources, public–private partnerships, and grassroots efforts. A model identifying the interrelationship of variable is provided. Policy recommendations

Suzanne K. Steinmetz

2008-01-01

439

Fast Scanning LIDAR For Safe Landing On Planets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Landing on the moon, Mars or other planets safely is of great significance for the success of space exploration. Compared with the previous cameras and human vision to look for a safe landing area, LIDAR can quickly detect the undesired zone with gravels, craters, scarps and other dangerous features. A type of laser scanner, which is designed by Shanghai Institute

Yinqiao Cai; Xiaohua Tong; Hongyi Bu; Feng Xie; Rong Shu

2009-01-01

440

State of the Science on Safe Medication Administration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the report is to develop research priorities and clinical care and policy recommendations addressing the state of the art and science of safe medication administration. The objectives were to: (1) describe the state of the science in safe m...

D. J. Mason J. H. Barnsteiner K. Burke M. C. Alexander V. Rich

2005-01-01

441

CCured: type-safe retrofitting of legacy code  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we propose a scheme that combines type inference and run-time checking to make existing C programs type safe. We describe the CCured type system, which extends that of C by separating pointer types according to their usage. This type system allows both pointers whose usage can be verified statically to be type safe, and pointers whose safety

George C. Necula; Scott McPeak; Westley Weimer

2002-01-01

442

"Safe Zone" Classrooms: The Individual Student versus the Community  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Independence Day School is a small college preparatory school serving grades 9-12, in rural Illinois. As part of its commitment to creating a safe school for all students, it adopted a "safe zone" classrooms policy. The policy states that classrooms where conversation about homosexuality is permitted are marked with inverted pink…

Kruk, Amber

2013-01-01

443

Safe Hardware Access with the Xen Virtual Machine Monitor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Xen virtual machine monitor allows multiple operating systems to execute concurrently on commodity x86 hard- ware, providing a solution for server consolidation and util- ity computing. In our initial design, Xen itself contained device-driver code and provided safe shared virtual device access. In this paper we present our new Safe Hardware Interface, an isolation architecture used within the latest

Keir Fraser; Steven Hand; Rolf Neugebauer; Ian Pratt; Andrew Wareld; Mark Williamson

2004-01-01

444

Lab Magic and Liability: Learning to 'Drive Safely' in Chemistry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides tips for stimulating interest in high school chemistry while imprinting safe laboratory practice. Suggests safe alternatives to potentially dangerous "magic show" and other chemical reactions. Also suggests that safety education be a prerequisite for certification of secondary school chemistry teachers. (Author/JN)

Nagel, Miriam C.

1982-01-01

445

Peacekeeper ICBM PBPS (Stage IV) Safing and Demilitarization Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Topics covered include: Overview of White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) and Capabilities. History of the Peacekeeper Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) Program. Introduction to Safing & Demilitarization Project. Requirements for Safing Project. Approach Constellation Program. Need for Qualified Flight Hardware to Support Constellation. Ability to Use Peacekeeper Hardware to Support Constellation. Additional Uses for the Peacekeeper Post-Boost Propulsion System (PBPS) Hardware.

Douglass, James L.

2014-01-01

446

What Does a Safe Sleep Environment Look Like?  

MedlinePLUS

... Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in collaboration with other organizations Home About SIDS/Safe Infant Sleep What Is SIDS? What Do We Know About Risk? What Is a Safe Sleep Environment? Babies Need Tummy Time! FAQs Myths and Facts ...

447

Student-Parent-Teacher Partnerships: Creating Safe Classrooms and Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author talks about "Safe Space," an after school program created by a parent-teacher advisory board which maintained that students needed a safe in-school environment where they could openly talk about their out-of-school lives. Being that the school's curriculum heavily focused on academic standards, students' affective…

Hall, Horace R.

2008-01-01

448

Dynamic range of safe electrical stimulation of the retina  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electronic retinal prostheses represent a potentially effective approach for restoring some degree of sight in blind patients with retinal degeneration. However, levels of safe electrical stimulation and the underlying mechanisms of cellular damage are largely unknown. We measured the threshold of cellular damage as a function of pulse duration, electrode size, and number of pulses to determine the safe range

Alexander F. Butterwick; Alexander Vankov; Phil Huie; Daniel V. Palanker

2006-01-01

449

The case for fire safe cigarettes made through industry documents  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To examine the extensive research undertaken by the tobacco industry over the past 25 years toward development of a fire safe cigarette. Methods: Research was conducted through a web based search of internal tobacco industry documents made publicly available through the 1998 Master Settlement Agreement. Results: The documents reveal that the tobacco industry produced a fire safe cigarette years ago, but failed to put it on the market. These findings contradict public industry claims that denied the technical feasibility and commercial acceptability of fire safe cigarettes. Internal documents also reveal a decades long, coordinated political strategy used to block proposed legislation and obfuscate the fire safe issue. Conclusions: Federal legislation mandating fire safe cigarettes is needed.

Gunja, M; Wayne, G; Landman, A; Connolly, G; McGuire, A

2002-01-01

450

Safe spaces: gay-straight alliances in high schools.  

PubMed

In activists' circles as in sociology, the concept "safe space" has been applied to all sorts of programs, organizations, and practices. Few studies have specified clearly what safe spaces are and how they support the people who occupy them. We examine one social location typically understood to be a safe space: gay-straight alliance groups in high schools. Using qualitative interviews with young adults in the United States and Canada who have participated in gay-straight alliances, we unpack this complex concept to consider some of the dimensions along which safe spaces might vary. Based on interviews with participants, we derive three interrelated dimensions of safe space: social context, membership, and activity. PMID:23035339

Fetner, Tina; Elafros, Athena; Bortolin, Sandra; Drechsler, Coralee

2012-05-01

451

78 First year experience of a dedicated “radial lounge” for patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionThe potential to achieve safe early mobilisation and same day discharge on a consistent basis after radial artery access has provided us with the opportunity to make a step change in the way we deliver elective care to patients undergoing percutaneous coronary procedures. We designed a dedicated “radial lounge” to accommodate patients before and after their procedure with the aim

S Brewster; R Weerackody; K Khimdas; A Little; N Cleary; A Penswick; M Rothman; A Archbold

2011-01-01

452

78 FR 24815 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Revenue Procedure 2012-25  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Comment Request for Revenue Procedure 2012- 25 AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS...comments concerning Revenue Procedure 2012-25, Average Area Purchase Price Safe Harbors...comments should be received on or before June 25, 2013 to be assured of...

2013-04-26

453

[Reflections on the meaning of nursing work loads and responsibility to establish safe staffing].  

PubMed

The methods for establishing nursing staff requirements , based on the caring needs of patients , take into consideration two parameters: the determination of the overall care requirements fundamental for programming nursing care; the quantification of the requirements as the time needed for care, classifying patients according to their degree of dependence, by the analysis of the pre-established parameters. Consequently, the approach to the evaluation of nursing staff requirements varies: in fact, when the focus is placed on the care necessary for different types of patients, the nursing practice is based on planning of care and the resulting criteria are more objective. On the other hand, when the approach focuses on an analysis of the division of available resources among the different types of patients, it is influenced by local factors and is less objective. The DRG system introduced in Italy in 1995 classifies patients on a medical basis and allocates resources accordingly. However, since this system does not take into account a nursing classification, it cannot extrapolate the true requirements of nursing resources: this means that financing does not adequately evaluate the costs of nursing care. The non-assessable aspects of nursing care and their significance are also taken into consideration. PMID:16945226

Cantarelli, Marisa

2006-01-01

454

SUNRAYCE 93: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring SUNRAYCE 93 to advance tile technology and use of photovoltaics and electric vehicles. Participants will use cars powered by photovoltaic modules and lead-acid storage batteries. This brochure, prepared for ...

M. P. DePhillips P. D. Moskowitz V. M. Fthenakis

1992-01-01

455

SUNRAYCE 1993: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring SUNRAYCE 93 to advance tile technology and use of photovoltaics and electric vehicles. Participants will use cars powered by photovoltaic modules and lead-acid storage batteries. This brochure, prepared for students and faculty participating in this race, outlines the health hazards presented by these electrical systems and gives guidance on strategies for their

M. P. Dephillips; P. D. Moskowitz; V. M. Fthenakis

1992-01-01

456

64 FR 55390 - Draft Revisions to the Voluntary Protection Programs To Provide Safe and Healthful Working...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

... If the hypothetical rate (based on two cases) gives the firm a rate equal to...in Washington, DC. Normally, at least two copies will be required, but the number...changes in ownership or organizational structure occur, or the authorized collective...

1999-10-12

457

Working Memory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The term working memory refers to a brain system that provides temporary storage and manipulation of the information necessary for such complex cognitive tasks as language comprehension, learning, and reasoning. This definition has evolved from the concept of a unitary short-term memory system. Working memory has been found to require the simultaneous storage and processing of information. It can be

Alan Baddeley

1992-01-01

458

Stylish or safe blue-block eyewear  

Microsoft Academic Search

The subject of modern, save and stylish eyewear is entertaining not only to people with unwell eyesight. Many people use glasses with anti-UV or blue-block coatings, glasses for driving or working with a computer. There were investigated the blue-block eyewear. There were analyzed reflected radiation at 300 - 400 nm wavelengths with cross- incidence. The traditional eyewear with classical or

Jerzy Ciosek

1998-01-01

459

Fracture mechanics. [review of fatigue crack propagation and technology of constructing safe structures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fracture mechanics is a rapidly emerging discipline for assessing the residual strength of structures containing flaws due to fatigue, corrosion or accidental damage and for anticipating the rate of which such flaws will propagate if not repaired. The discipline is also applicable in the design of structures with improved resistance to such flaws. The present state of the design art is reviewed using this technology to choose materials, to configure safe and efficient structures, to specify inspection procedures, to predict lives of flawed structures and to develop reliability of current and future airframes.

Hardrath, H. F.

1974-01-01

460

Transcatheter Arterial Embolization as a Safe and Effective Treatment for Focal Nodular Hyperplasia of the Liver  

SciTech Connect

When surgical treatment is being considered for focal nodular hyperplasia, the risk of liver surgery must be carefully balanced against the benefit of resection, especially in the case of a large or centrally located lesion. However, when resection is contraindicated or even impossible, transcatheter arterial embolization should be considered as a safe and less invasive alternative treatment.We describe two cases of young women who presented with abdominal pain and a hypervascular enhancing mass with the radiologic features of focal nodular hyperplasia. Arterial embolization was the therapy selected due to the risk of surgery. In both cases the procedure was successful, and the lesion showed shrinkage during follow-up.

Terkivatan, Tuerkan [Department of Surgery, ErasmusMedical Center of Rotterdam-Dijkzigt, Dr. Molewaterplein 40, 3015GD Rotterdam (Netherlands); Hussain, Shahid M.; Lameris, Johan S. [Department of Radiology, ErasmusMedical Center of Rotterdam-Dijkzigt, Dr. Molewaterplein 40, 3015GD Rotterdam (Netherlands); Ijzermans, Jan N.M. [Department of Surgery, ErasmusMedical Center of Rotterdam-Dijkzigt, Dr. Molewaterplein 40, 3015GD Rotterdam (Netherlands)

2002-10-15

461

47 CFR Procedures - Ship Stations  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship Stations Procedures Operating Procedures Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS...MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Procedures-Land Stations §...

2010-10-01

462

47 CFR Procedures - Ship Stations  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship Stations Procedures Special Procedures Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS...MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Special Procedures-Private Coast Stations...

2010-10-01

463

47 CFR Procedures - Land Stations  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Land Stations Procedures Operating Procedures Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS...MARITIME SERVICES Operating Requirements and Procedures Operating Procedures-General §...

2010-10-01

464

Environmentally Safe SRM Strategies Using Liquefied Air  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This presentation includes several SRM strategies to offset global warming using the large scale release of liquefied air (Lair). Lair could be used to cool large atmospheric volumes as it expands from a liquid below minus 300 degrees F (-184 degrees C) into ambient air, which could trigger new clouds or brighten existing clouds. It is hoped that the potential feasibility and benefits of this concept would be found to warrant further development through funded research. A key trait of Lair is its enormous expansion ratio in warming from a cold liquid into ambient air. At sea level, this expansion is about 900 times. At high altitudes such as 50,000 ft (15 km) the same amount of Lair would expand 5,000 times. One strategy for this concept would be to release Lair at 50,000 ft to super-cool existing water vapor into reflective droplets or ice particles. This could create very large clouds thick enough to be highly-reflective and high enough for long residence times. Another strategy to consider for this concept would be to release CCN’s (such as salt particulates) along with Lair. This might enable the formation of clouds where Lair alone is insufficient. Water vapor could also be added to assist in cloud development if necessary. The use of these elements would be non-polluting, enabling the concept to be safely scaled as large as necessary to achieve the desired results without harming the environment. This is extremely important, because it eliminates the risk of environmental damage that is a potential roadblock for most other SRM schemes. Further strategies of this concept would include formation of clouds near the equator to maximize reflected energy, creating clouds over ocean regions so as to minimize weather changes on land, and creating clouds over Arctic regions to minimize the melting of sea ice. Because this concept requires only existing technology to implement, research and implementation timelines could be minimized (unlike most proposed schemes that require new technologies). Energy required for this concept should be very reasonable. Each ton of Lair would require about 345 kW-hrs of energy or less to produce. Assuming power costs 0.1 per kW-hr, energy cost per ton of Lair would be about 34.50 US. Each 100-ton payload of Lair would then cost $3,450 US or just 12.4 cents per gallon (3.3 cents per liter). More extreme weather events are predicted as the planet warms. It should be noted that Lair might also be used to help limit the destructiveness of these events. The same aircraft and Lair tanks from this concept could be used to perform missions that cool the “heat engines” of severe weather, limiting hurricane strength, reducing the likelihood of tornado’s and limiting excessive rain that causes flooding. Also, by loading the Lair tanks with liquid nitrogen, it might be possible to help control large wildfires using wind to blanket fire lines with gaseous nitrogen. Therefore this concept could have multiple uses and solve several problems related to global warming, as well as help to limit global warming itself.

Massmann, M.; Layton, K.

2010-12-01

465

Safe Schools, Positive Behavior Supports, and Mental Health Supports: Lessons Learned from Three Safe Schools/Healthy Students Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article profiles selected Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) interventions in three Oregon communities that have completed Safe Schools/Healthy Students projects, representing a substantial investment in building school and community collaborations, expanding positive behavior supports in schools, and establishing school-based mental…

Sprague, Jeffrey; Nishioka, Vicki; Smith, Stephen G.

2007-01-01

466

Experimental Discussion on Eye-Safe 1.54 mum Photon Counting Lidar Using Avalanche Photodiode  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Mie hdar system with an eye-safe wavelength of 1.54 mum was developed and its performance characteristics were experimentally discussed. The wavelength was generated by a Nd:YAG based methane-shifted Raman laser. The collected backscattering light was detected by an InGaAs avalanche photodiode working in photon counting mode at that wavelength. Results of atmospheric observation showed clearly the dynamics of multi-layered

Yasunori Saito; Hidefumi Kurata; Hiroshi Kurushima; Fumitoshi Kobayashi; Takuya D. Kawahara; Akio Nomura; Tomoyuki Maruyama; Mitsuyoshi Tanaka

2004-01-01

467

Experimental Discussion on Eye-Safe 1.54 ?m Photon Counting Lidar Using Avalanche Photodiode  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Mie hdar system with an eye-safe wavelength of 1.54 m was developed and its performance characteristics were experimentally discussed. The wavelength was generated by a Nd:YAG based methane-shifted Raman laser. The collected backscattering light was detected by an InGaAs avalanche photodiode working in photon counting mode at that wavelength. Results of atmospheric observation showed clearly the dynamics of multi-layered

Yasunori Saito; Hidefumi Kurata; Hiroshi Kurushima; Fumitoshi Kobayashi; Takuya D. Kawahara; Akio Nomura; Tomoyuki Maruyama; Mitsuyoshi Tanaka

2004-01-01

468

Hanford Site River Protection Project High-Level Waste Safe Storage and Retrieval  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an update from last year and describes project successes and issues associated with the management and work required to safely store, enhance readiness for waste feed delivery, and prepare for treated waste receipts for the approximately 53 million gallons of mixed and high-level waste currently in aging tanks at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a 560 square-mile area in southeastern Washington State near Richland, Washington.

Aromi, E. S.; Raymond, R. E.; Allen, D. I.; Payne, M. A.; DeFigh-Price, C.; Kristofzski, J. G.; Wiegman, S. A.

2002-02-25

469

Optimal and safe bowel preparation for colonoscopy.  

PubMed

Effective colonoscopy requires an adequate level of cleansing as a basic component. This review will describe a compact review about general considerations in bowel preparation for colonoscopy and specific considerations for various patients. A low-fiber diet instead of a regular diet on the day before colonoscopy is an independent predictor of adequate bowel preparation. Improved bowel cleansing does not result from the routine use of enemas or prokinetics in addition to oral bowel preparation. For morning colonoscopy, a split method of 4 L polyethylene glycol on the day before and the day of colonoscopy is recommended, while patients scheduled for afternoon colonoscopy typically receive a full method of 4 L polyethylene glycol on the day of the procedure. Valid alternatives are 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid or 2 L sodium picosulphate plus magnesium citrate. Although there are no statistically significant differences between polyethylene glycol and oral sodium phosphate for colon cleansing, polyethylene glycol-based bowel preparation is advisable in most situations because of safety concerns. PMID:23767029

Moon, Won

2013-05-01

470

Optimal and Safe Bowel Preparation for Colonoscopy  

PubMed Central

Effective colonoscopy requires an adequate level of cleansing as a basic component. This review will describe a compact review about general considerations in bowel preparation for colonoscopy and specific considerations for various patients. A low-fiber diet instead of a regular diet on the day before colonoscopy is an independent predictor of adequate bowel preparation. Improved bowel cleansing does not result from the routine use of enemas or prokinetics in addition to oral bowel preparation. For morning colonoscopy, a split method of 4 L polyethylene glycol on the day before and the day of colonoscopy is recommended, while patients scheduled for afternoon colonoscopy typically receive a full method of 4 L polyethylene glycol on the day of the procedure. Valid alternatives are 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid or 2 L sodium picosulphate plus magnesium citrate. Although there are no statistically significant differences between polyethylene glycol and oral sodium phosphate for colon cleansing, polyethylene glycol-based bowel preparation is advisable in most situations because of safety concerns.

2013-01-01

471

From Safe Nanomanufacturing to Nanosafe-by-Design processes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Industrial needs in terms of multifunctional components are increasing. Many sectors are concerned, from the integrated direct nanoparticles production to the emerging combinations which include the metal matrix composites (MMC), ductile ceramics and ceramic matrix composites, polymer matrix composites (PMC) for bulk application and advanced surface coatings in the fields of automotive, aerospace, energy production and building applications. Moreover, domains with a planetary impact such as environmental issues, as well as aspects for instance health (toxicity) and hazard assessment (ignition and explosion severity) were also taken into account. Nanotechnologies play an important role in promoting innovation in design and realization of multifunctional products for the future, either by improving usual products or creating new functions and/or new products. Nevertheless, this huge evolution in terms of materials could only be promoted by increasing the social acceptance and by acting on the different main technological and economic challenges and developing safe oriented processes. Nowadays, a huge number of developments of nanoparticles are potentially industrial up-scalable. However, some doubts exist about the handling's safety of the current technologies. For these reasons, the main purpose was to develop a self-monitored automation in the production line coupling different techniques in order to simplify processes such as in-situ growth nanoparticles into a nanostructured matrix, over different substrates and/or the nanopowders synthesis, functionalization, dry or wet safe recovery system, granulation, consolidation in single-step, by monitoring at real time the processing parameters such as powder stoichiometry. With the aim of assuring the traceability of the product during the whole life, starting from the conception and including the R&D, the distribution and the use were also considered. The optimization in terms of processing, recovery and conditioning, permits to increase its versatility, thus leading to the increase of the added value to the production. This review put in evidence -by different examples- the progress achieved since the beginning of Nanosafe integrated initiative developed by CEA and its partners as well as promoting, firstly the safety at work place, and then extending to an integrated and controlled in-situ production by of Nanosafe-by-Design controlled processes.

Schuster, F.; Lomello, F.

2013-04-01

472

Working Today  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Working Today is a non-profit organization, based in New York City, that promotes independent workers including independent contractors, temps, part-timers, and contingent workers. Working Today strives to "provide access to group-rate health insurance for individuals, free legal and financial advice, tax information, referrals to useful resources for independent workers, and a voice in the political debate about issues of concern." This site contains a resource directory for independent workers, tax information, and information about Working Today's new and ongoing programs.

473

Terminal Area Procedures for Paired Runways  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Parallel Runway operations have been found to increase capacity within the National Airspace (NAS) however, poor visibility conditions reduce this capacity [1]. Much research has been conducted to examine the concepts and procedures related to parallel runways however, there has been no investigation of the procedures associated with the strategic and tactical pairing of aircraft for these operations. This study developed and examined the pilot and controller procedures and information requirements for creating aircraft pairs for parallel runway operations. The goal was to achieve aircraft pairing with a temporal separation of 15s(+/- 10s error) at a coupling point that is about 12 nmi from the runway threshold. Two variables were explored for the pilot participants: Two levels of flight deck automation (current-day flight deck automation, and a prototype future automation) as well as two flight deck displays that assisted in pilot conformance monitoring. The controllers were also provided with automation to help create and maintain aircraft pairs. Data showed that the operations in this study were found to be acceptable and safe. Workload when using the pairing procedures and tools was generally low for both controllers and pilots, and situation awareness (SA) was typically moderate to high. There were some differences based upon the display and automation conditions for the pilots. Future research should consider the refinement of the concepts and tools for pilot and controller displays and automation for parallel runway concepts.

Lozito, Sandy

2011-01-01

474

Terminal Area Procedures for Paired Runways  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Parallel runway operations have been found to increase capacity within the National Airspace but poor visibility conditions reduce the use of these operations. The NextGen and SESAR Programs have identified the capacity benefits from increased use of closely-space parallel runway. Previous research examined the concepts and procedures related to parallel runways however, there has been no investigation of the procedures associated with the strategic and tactical pairing of aircraft for these operations. This simulation study developed and examined the pilot and controller procedures and information requirements for creating aircraft pairs for parallel runway operations. The goal was to achieve aircraft pairing with a temporal separation of 15s (+/- 10s error) at a coupling point that was about 12 nmi from the runway threshold. Two variables were explored for the pilot participants: two levels of flight deck automation (current-day flight deck automation and auto speed control future automation) as well as two flight deck displays that assisted in pilot conformance monitoring. The controllers were also provided with automation to help create and maintain aircraft pairs. Results show the operations in this study were acceptable and safe. Subjective workload, when using the pairing procedures and tools, was generally low for both controllers and pilots, and situation awareness was typically moderate to high. Pilot workload was influenced by display type and automation condition. Further research on pairing and off-nominal conditions is required however, this investigation identified promising findings about the feasibility of closely-spaced parallel runway operations.

Lozito, Sandra; Verma, Savita Arora

2011-01-01

475

Percutaneous tracheostomy in patients with cervical spine fractures--feasible and safe.  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to evaluate the short and long-term results of percutaneous tracheostomy in patients with documented cervical spine fracture. Between June 2000 and September 2005, 38 consecutive percutaneous tracheostomy procedures were performed on multi-trauma patients with cervical spine fracture. Modified Griggs technique was employed at the bedside in the general intensive care department. Staff thoracic surgeons and anesthesiologists performed all procedures. Demographics, anatomical conditions, presence of co-morbidities and complication rates were recorded. The average operative time was 10 min (6-15). Two patients had minor complications. One patients had minor bleeding (50 cc) and one had mild cellulitis. Nine patients had severe paraparesis or paraplegia prior to the PCT procedure and 29 were without neurological damage. There was no PCT related neurological deterioration. Twenty-eight patients were discharged from the hospital, 21 were decannulated. The average follow-up period was 18 months (1-48). There was no delayed, procedure related, complication. These results demonstrate that percutaneous tracheostomy is feasible and safe in patients with cervical spine fracture with minimal short and long-term morbidity. We believe that percutaneous tracheostomy is the procedure of choice for patients with cervical spine fracture who need prolonged ventilatory support. PMID:17670607

Ben Nun, Alon; Orlovsky, Michael; Best, Lael Anson

2006-08-01

476

Inquiring Safely: A Guide for Middle School Teachers (e-Book)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Not your average safety guide, Inquiring Safely is a uniquely readable resource from experienced teachers who know both middle school science content and how middle school students behave. The authors go beyond the standard rules and regulations to discuss safety concepts in the context of real classrooms--and to help you make students your partners-in-safety within an inquiry-based science curriculum. New and veteran teachers alike can use Inquiring Safely to develop better approaches to equip labs, dispose of chemicals and other hazardous materials, maintain documentation, and organize field trips. Some chapters cover specific disciplines, such as physical science, chemistry, Earth science, and biology. Others deal with general topics such as supervising students' online activities, accommodating students with special needs, and working with volunteers. Special features include an unusually detailed index plus model student contracts and permission forms. Like Exploring Safely: A Guide for Elementary Teachers, this essential book emphasizes a preventive approach to an up-to-date range of potential hazards. Given increased scrutiny of teaching practices and growing concerns about liability, Inquiring Safely belongs on the reference shelf of every middle school science teacher.

Kwan, Terry; Texley, Juliana

2003-01-01

477

Does "Social Work Abstracts" Work?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The current study seeks to provide estimates of the adequacy of journal coverage in the Social Work Abstracts (SWA) database. Method: A total of 23 journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports social work category during the 1997 to 2005 period were selected for study. Issue-level coverage estimates were obtained for SWA and…

Holden, Gary; Barker, Kathleen; Covert-Vail, Lucinda; Rosenberg, Gary; Cohen, Stephanie A.

2008-01-01

478

Flaw Evaluation Procedures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Appendix A , ''Evaluation of Flaw Indications,'' of ASME Section XI, ''Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components,'' contains procedures acceptable to the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Committee for establishing the acceptability o...

T. U. Marston

1978-01-01

479

Procedure Writing Aid.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes a best practice for writing procedures for test operations of solid motors and liquid engines based on two decades worth of test experience. The Air Force Research Laboratory at Edwards AFB, California, recently completed an effort t...

D. C. Harbour J. N. Beasley

2011-01-01

480

Emergency Evacuation Procedures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The videotape and the booklet have been designed as a flexible supplement to nursing education classes that cover emergency evacuation procedures, policies, and regulations at each Veterans Administration Medical Center. The objective of the program is to...

1986-01-01