Science.gov

Sample records for safe work procedures

  1. Staying Healthy and Safe at Work

    MedlinePLUS

    ... possible. How can you keep a safe work environment? It's important that the environment around you is ... possible. How can you keep a safe work environment? It's important that the environment around you is ...

  2. Procedures for making gaseous industrial waste safe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matros, Yu Sh; Noskov, Aleksandr S.

    1990-10-01

    The application of various methods (adsorption, absorption, thermal afterburning, catalytic purification, and others) for the removal of sulphur and nitrogen oxides, toxic organic compounds, hydrogen sulphide, and carbon monoxide from industrial waste gases is described. Much attention is devoted to the catalytic procedure for making the gases safe using an energy collecting non-stationary method (reversible process). The advantages and limitations of various gas purification methods are considered. The bibliography includes 279 references.

  3. Safe Haven Laws and School Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopels, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    "Safe haven" laws are designed to protect infants from being killed or otherwise harmed. This article examines the safe haven laws from the states that comprise the Midwest School Social Work Council and the variations between these laws regarding the age of the infant, where the infant can be left, who is allowed to leave the infant, whether…

  4. Safe Haven Laws and School Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopels, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    "Safe haven" laws are designed to protect infants from being killed or otherwise harmed. This article examines the safe haven laws from the states that comprise the Midwest School Social Work Council and the variations between these laws regarding the age of the infant, where the infant can be left, who is allowed to leave the infant, whether…

  5. Working safely in gamma radiography. A training manual for industrial radiographers

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, S.A.; Peabody, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    This manual is designed for classroom training in working safely in industrial radiography using gamma sources. The purpose is to train radiographers' assistants to work safely as a qualified gamma radiographer. The contents cover the essentials of radiation, radiation protection, emergency procedures, gamma cameras, and biological effects of radiation. (ACR)

  6. A Safe and Healthful Work Environment

    PubMed Central

    McCullagh, Marjorie C.; Berry, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Occupational health nursing focuses on promotion and restoration of health, prevention of illness and injury, protection from work-related and environmental hazards, and corporate profitability. Quality education about the relationship between work and health is critical for nurses’ success regardless of work setting, and is consistent with Healthy People 2020 goals, but is lacking or limited in some programs. This report introduces an innovative occupational health nursing curriculum for students enrolled in baccalaureate nursing programs. The process of designing and pilot testing this novel curriculum, its alignment with nursing competencies, and its format and learning activities are described. Preparing professional nurses to understand the role of the occupational health nurse and the relationship between work and health is an essential curricular consideration for contemporary nursing education. PMID:26077879

  7. 29 CFR 1919.76 - Safe working load reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safe working load reduction. 1919.76 Section 1919.76 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.76 Safe...

  8. 29 CFR 1919.77 - Safe working load increase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safe working load increase. 1919.77 Section 1919.77 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.77 Safe...

  9. 29 CFR 1919.76 - Safe working load reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safe working load reduction. 1919.76 Section 1919.76 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.76 Safe...

  10. 29 CFR 1919.77 - Safe working load increase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safe working load increase. 1919.77 Section 1919.77 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.77 Safe...

  11. 29 CFR 1919.77 - Safe working load increase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safe working load increase. 1919.77 Section 1919.77 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.77 Safe...

  12. 29 CFR 1919.76 - Safe working load reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safe working load reduction. 1919.76 Section 1919.76 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.76 Safe...

  13. 29 CFR 1919.76 - Safe working load reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safe working load reduction. 1919.76 Section 1919.76 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.76 Safe...

  14. 29 CFR 1919.77 - Safe working load increase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safe working load increase. 1919.77 Section 1919.77 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.77 Safe...

  15. 29 CFR 1919.76 - Safe working load reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safe working load reduction. 1919.76 Section 1919.76 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.76 Safe...

  16. 29 CFR 1919.77 - Safe working load increase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safe working load increase. 1919.77 Section 1919.77 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.77 Safe...

  17. Introduction to working safely with large animals in containment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript examines biosafety challenges posed when conducting work with animals and zoonotic pathogens. It provides solutions for working with animals in a manner that promotes both safe and responsible research. Good safety and animal husbandry are essential for good science. Best practices w...

  18. Radiological Work Planning and Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    KURTZ, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In addition, there seems to be confusion as to what should be and what should not be included in the TWD.

  19. Pressures and procedures for the design of safe consumer products.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J R

    1983-06-01

    An assessment is provided of the current position regarding changes in UK or EEC civil law under which injured parties can obtain redress in respect of injuries caused by defective products. One effect of proposed systems of strict liability in tort will be to shift some of the burden of proof from the injured party on to the producer of the product claimed to have caused injury. It is argued that this is a just and logical change, given the unfairness and anomalies in present systems and the relative abilities of consumers and producers to avoid such incidents and to bear or to offset the cost of the consequences. Cases of apparent misuse of a product by a consumer may frequently be induced by the design of that product and could thus be prevented by more thoughtful design. In order that producers can ensure their own viability and satisfy the consumer market, their products must be safe, efficient, comfortable and satisfying to use, as well as durable, serviceable and realistically priced. One requirement for achieving this has been said to be the input of accident and ergonomics data early in the product development process; the present paper examines this proposition. Evidence is provided by research into the design and manufacture of consumer products for the UK market, carried out at Birmingham University. Examined in particular are the extent to which formal development processes and design safety review procedures are used, and the degree of utilisation of accident, ergonomics, user testing and market feedback data, identifying barriers to the widespread use of these. Safe and ergonomic design of products must aim to be seen as a positive business activity, rather than as a cost-centre. The benefits to a company of a comprehensive design safety programme will more than outweigh the costs given the pressures identified earlier. PMID:15676471

  20. Living and Working Safely Around High-Voltage Power Lines.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2001-06-01

    High-voltage transmission lines can be just as safe as the electrical wiring in the homes--or just as dangerous. The crucial factor is ourselves: they must learn to behave safely around them. This booklet is a basic safety guide for those who live and work around power lines. It deals primarily with nuisance shocks due to induced voltages, and with potential electric shock hazards from contact with high-voltage lines. References on possible long-term biological effects of transmission lines are shown. In preparing this booklet, the Bonneville Power Administration has drawn on more than 50 years of experience with high-voltage transmission. BPA operates one of the world`s largest networks of long-distance, high-voltage lines. This system has more than 400 substations and about 15,000 miles of transmission lines, almost 4,400 miles of which are operated at 500,000 volts.

  1. Sociotechnical attributes of safe and unsafe work systems

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Brian M.; Hettinger, Lawrence J.; DeJoy, David M.; Huang, Yuang-Hsiang; Love, Peter E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and practical approaches to safety based on sociotechnical systems principles place heavy emphasis on the intersections between social–organisational and technical–work process factors. Within this perspective, work system design emphasises factors such as the joint optimisation of social and technical processes, a focus on reliable human–system performance and safety metrics as design and analysis criteria, the maintenance of a realistic and consistent set of safety objectives and policies, and regular access to the expertise and input of workers. We discuss three current approaches to the analysis and design of complex sociotechnical systems: human–systems integration, macroergonomics and safety climate. Each approach emphasises key sociotechnical systems themes, and each prescribes a more holistic perspective on work systems than do traditional theories and methods. We contrast these perspectives with historical precedents such as system safety and traditional human factors and ergonomics, and describe potential future directions for their application in research and practice. Practitioner Summary: The identification of factors that can reliably distinguish between safe and unsafe work systems is an important concern for ergonomists and other safety professionals. This paper presents a variety of sociotechnical systems perspectives on intersections between social–organisational and technology–work process factors as they impact work system analysis, design and operation. PMID:25909756

  2. Adoption of Sun Safe Work Place Practices by Local Governments

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Allan; Andersen, Peter A.; Buller, David B.; Walkosz, Barbara; Lui, Lucia; Buller, Mary; Scott, Michael D.; Jenkins, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Context Outdoor workers are especially susceptible to skin cancer, the most common, but also one of the most preventable, forms of cancer. Colorado, the location of the study, has the second highest rate of skin cancer deaths in the nation. Objective Local government managers in Colorado—in municipalities, counties and special districts—were surveyed in order to ascertain the extent to which they engage in formal (written) and informal practices to protect their outdoor workers against excessive exposure to sun. Design The survey consisted of 51 question assessing awareness of formal or informal practices for sun protection of outdoor workers. An index of practices--the study's dependent variable--was created that was comprised or practices such as providing employees free or reduced-cost sunscreen, wide-brimmed hats, sunglasses, long-sleeved work shirts, long work pants, and temporary or permanent outdoor shade shelters. Proscriptive policies, such as restricting the use of broad brimmed hats, were subtracted from the index. Surveys were completed by 825 administrators representing 98 jurisdictions. Responses from administrators in the same jurisdiction were averaged. Results Over 40 percent of responding jurisdictions indicated that they engaged in informal sun safety practices. Tests conducted to determine what variables might account for the adoption of these sun protection practices found that the degree to which a community could be regarded as cosmopolite and as having an individualistic political culture were significant predictors. Type of government was also significant. Although, higher community income was a significant predictor, neither local government budget nor size was significant. Conclusions The adoption of sun safe practices bears low costs with potentially high returns. Findings from this study suggest that awareness campaigns might most effectively target cosmopolite communities, but that the greatest impact might be achieved by targeting localite communities. Government size and budget do not appear to be constraints in the adoption of sun safe practices. PMID:24231670

  3. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  4. 49 CFR 229.103 - Safe working pressure; factor of safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Generators § 229.103 Safe working pressure; factor of safety. The safe working pressure for each steam generator shall be fixed by the chief mechanical officer of the carrier. The minimum factor of safety...

  5. Orthodontic radiographic procedures--how safe are they?

    PubMed

    Buch, B; Fensham, R

    2003-02-01

    Parents of children subjected to radiographic procedures for orthodontic purposes occasionally express concern about possible radiation overdose to sensitive structures in the head and neck region. The following study was designed to determine this. Twenty Harshaw lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were irradiated using a calibrated RT 100 X-ray source. These were read in a Toledo 654 TLD reader. The readings of all dosimeters fell within 10% on either side of the mean reading for the dosimeters. Twelve were finally selected which fell closest to the mean. Six of the TLDs were randomly selected and placed in a Rando female phantom in a position corresponding to the lens of the eye-3 in the left and 3 in the right eye. A standard pantomogram was taken of the phantom using an Orthophos machine. The TLDs were then replaced by another two groups of 3 in the same positions in the phantom and a lateral cephalogram taken on the same machine. The TLDs were read in the Toledo reader. Six of the 12 TLDs were then randomly selected for re-use. Three were placed in the phantom in the region of the thyroid and a pantomogram again taken. The procedure was repeated for a cephalogram and the TLDs again read. In all cases the readings of each group of 3 TLDs did not vary by more than 10% on either side of the mean readings. The TLD readings were then converted by means of a conversion factor to actual dose measurements. The doses to left and right eyes and to the thyroid were respectively found to be 0,0151, 0,0222 & 0,0896 mSv for the pantomogram and 0,0351, 0,0183 & 0,0177 mSv for the cephalogram--an almost insignificant dose in terms of the "background equivalent" concept. PMID:12705098

  6. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Policy and procedures for work zone safety management. (a) Each agency's policy and processes, procedures... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road user... minimize work zone crashes; and the safe entry/exit of work vehicles onto/from the travel lanes. Each...

  7. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Policy and procedures for work zone safety management. (a) Each agency's policy and processes, procedures... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road user... minimize work zone crashes; and the safe entry/exit of work vehicles onto/from the travel lanes. Each...

  8. Working safely with robot workers: Recommendations for the new workplace.

    PubMed

    Murashov, Vladimir; Hearl, Frank; Howard, John

    2016-03-01

    The increasing use of robots in performing tasks alongside or together with human co-workers raises novel occupational safety and health issues. The new 21st century workplace will be one in which occupational robotics plays an increasing role. This article describes the increasing complexity of robots and proposes a number of recommendations for the practice of safe occupational robotics. PMID:26554511

  9. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road user... the officers, consistent with the training requirements in 23 CFR 630.1008(d); (6) Procedures for... minimize work zone crashes; and the safe entry/exit of work vehicles onto/from the travel lanes. Each...

  10. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road user... the officers, consistent with the training requirements in 23 CFR 630.1008(d); (6) Procedures for... minimize work zone crashes; and the safe entry/exit of work vehicles onto/from the travel lanes. Each...

  11. 23 CFR 630.1106 - Policy and procedures for work zone safety management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... established in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006, shall include the consideration and management of road user... the officers, consistent with the training requirements in 23 CFR 630.1008(d); (6) Procedures for... minimize work zone crashes; and the safe entry/exit of work vehicles onto/from the travel lanes. Each...

  12. 49 CFR 230.23 - Responsibility for general construction and safe working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... working pressure. 230.23 Section 230.23 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... working pressure. The steam locomotive owner and operator are responsible for the general design and... the safe working pressure for each steam locomotive boiler, after giving full consideration to...

  13. 49 CFR 230.23 - Responsibility for general construction and safe working pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... working pressure. 230.23 Section 230.23 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... working pressure. The steam locomotive owner and operator are responsible for the general design and... the safe working pressure for each steam locomotive boiler, after giving full consideration to...

  14. Appropriate procedures for the safe handling and pathologic examination of technetium-99m–labelled specimens

    PubMed Central

    Colgan, Terence J.; Booth, Diana; Hendler, Aaron; McCready, David

    2001-01-01

    TECHNETIUM 99M MAY NOW BE USED TO IDENTIFY sentinel nodes for surgical excision in a growing number of cancer sites. The pathology specimens of these sentinel nodes and of any injected tumoural sites are radioactive. Consequently, specific clinical and laboratory procedures must be developed to handle these specimens safely. It is recommended that specimens containing the injection site should be quarantined for a period to permit decay of radioactivity. This quarantine does delay the reporting of pathology results to surgeons, oncologists and other clinicians, but it does not adversely affect final patient management. PMID:11450287

  15. No matter how large or how small, oilwell servicing firms work safely

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle, D.

    1995-07-01

    In working safely, the size of the company doesn`t matter as much as the dedication of the people in maintaining a safe workplace. Poe Servicing Inc. of Oberlin, Kan., earned the 1994 Association of Oilwell Servicing Contractors (AOSC) gold safety award for smaller companies that put in 10,000 to 50,000 man-hours of work. AOSC`s group one. The employees watch out for each other, and they use common sense. The common sense part of the program means the company knows new people are most susceptible to accidents, so they send them out to observe before putting them to work.

  16. Authentication Procedures - The Procedures and Integration Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Bratcher, Leigh; Gosnell, Tom; Langner, Diana; MacArthur, D.; Mihalczo, John T.; Pura, Carolyn; Riedy, Alex; Rexroth, Paul; Scott, Mary; Springarn, Jay

    2001-05-31

    Authentication is how we establish trust in monitoring systems and measurements to verify compliance with, for example, the storage of nuclear weapons material. Authentication helps assure the monitoring party that accurate and reliable information is provided by any measurement system and that any irregularities are detected. The U.S. is developing its point of view on the procedures for authentication of monitoring systems now planned or contemplated for arms reduction and control applications. The authentication of a system utilizes a set of approaches, including: functional testing using trusted calibration sources, evaluation of documentation, evaluation of software, evaluation of hardware, random selection of hardware and software, tamper-indicating devices, and operational procedures. Authentication of measurement systems should occur throughout their lifecycles, starting with the elements of design, and moving to off-site authentication, on-siste authentication, and continuing with authentication following repair. The most important of these is the initial design of systems. Hardware and software design criteria and procurement decisions can make future authentication relatively straightforward or conversely very difficult. Facility decisions can likewise ease the procedures for authentication since reliable and effective monitoring systems and tampering indicating devices can help provide the assurance needed in the integrity of such items as measurement systems, spare equipment, and reference sources. This paper will summarize the results of the U.S. Authentication Task Force discussion on the role of procedures in authentication.

  17. Rapid and Efficient Filtration-Based Procedure for Separation and Safe Analysis of CBRN Mixed Samples

    PubMed Central

    Bentahir, Mostafa; Laduron, Frederic; Irenge, Leonid; Ambroise, Jérôme; Gala, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Separating CBRN mixed samples that contain both chemical and biological warfare agents (CB mixed sample) in liquid and solid matrices remains a very challenging issue. Parameters were set up to assess the performance of a simple filtration-based method first optimized on separate C- and B-agents, and then assessed on a model of CB mixed sample. In this model, MS2 bacteriophage, Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis baculovirus (AcNPV), Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores were used as biological agent simulants whereas ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and pinacolyl methylphophonic acid (PMPA) were used as VX and soman (GD) nerve agent surrogates, respectively. Nanoseparation centrifugal devices with various pore size cut-off (30 kD up to 0.45 µm) and three RNA extraction methods (Invisorb, EZ1 and Nuclisens) were compared. RNA (MS2) and DNA (AcNPV) quantification was carried out by means of specific and sensitive quantitative real-time PCRs (qPCR). Liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) methods was used for quantifying EMPA and PMPA. Culture methods and qPCR demonstrated that membranes with a 30 kD cut-off retain more than 99.99% of biological agents (MS2, AcNPV, Bacillus Atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores) tested separately. A rapid and reliable separation of CB mixed sample models (MS2/PEG-400 and MS2/EMPA/PMPA) contained in simple liquid or complex matrices such as sand and soil was also successfully achieved on a 30 kD filter with more than 99.99% retention of MS2 on the filter membrane, and up to 99% of PEG-400, EMPA and PMPA recovery in the filtrate. The whole separation process turnaround-time (TAT) was less than 10 minutes. The filtration method appears to be rapid, versatile and extremely efficient. The separation method developed in this work constitutes therefore a useful model for further evaluating and comparing additional separation alternative procedures for a safe handling and preparation of CB mixed samples. PMID:24505375

  18. Rapid and efficient filtration-based procedure for separation and safe analysis of CBRN mixed samples.

    PubMed

    Bentahir, Mostafa; Laduron, Frederic; Irenge, Leonid; Ambroise, Jérôme; Gala, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Separating CBRN mixed samples that contain both chemical and biological warfare agents (CB mixed sample) in liquid and solid matrices remains a very challenging issue. Parameters were set up to assess the performance of a simple filtration-based method first optimized on separate C- and B-agents, and then assessed on a model of CB mixed sample. In this model, MS2 bacteriophage, Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis baculovirus (AcNPV), Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores were used as biological agent simulants whereas ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and pinacolyl methylphophonic acid (PMPA) were used as VX and soman (GD) nerve agent surrogates, respectively. Nanoseparation centrifugal devices with various pore size cut-off (30 kD up to 0.45 µm) and three RNA extraction methods (Invisorb, EZ1 and Nuclisens) were compared. RNA (MS2) and DNA (AcNPV) quantification was carried out by means of specific and sensitive quantitative real-time PCRs (qPCR). Liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) methods was used for quantifying EMPA and PMPA. Culture methods and qPCR demonstrated that membranes with a 30 kD cut-off retain more than 99.99% of biological agents (MS2, AcNPV, Bacillus Atrophaeus and Bacillus subtilis spores) tested separately. A rapid and reliable separation of CB mixed sample models (MS2/PEG-400 and MS2/EMPA/PMPA) contained in simple liquid or complex matrices such as sand and soil was also successfully achieved on a 30 kD filter with more than 99.99% retention of MS2 on the filter membrane, and up to 99% of PEG-400, EMPA and PMPA recovery in the filtrate. The whole separation process turnaround-time (TAT) was less than 10 minutes. The filtration method appears to be rapid, versatile and extremely efficient. The separation method developed in this work constitutes therefore a useful model for further evaluating and comparing additional separation alternative procedures for a safe handling and preparation of CB mixed samples. PMID:24505375

  19. 33 CFR 150.607 - What are the general safe working requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the general safe working requirements? 150.607 Section 150.607 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Workplace Safety and Health...

  20. 33 CFR 150.607 - What are the general safe working requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the general safe working requirements? 150.607 Section 150.607 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Workplace Safety and Health...

  1. 33 CFR 150.607 - What are the general safe working requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the general safe working requirements? 150.607 Section 150.607 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Workplace Safety and Health...

  2. 33 CFR 150.607 - What are the general safe working requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the general safe working requirements? 150.607 Section 150.607 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Workplace Safety and Health...

  3. 33 CFR 150.607 - What are the general safe working requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the general safe working requirements? 150.607 Section 150.607 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Workplace Safety and Health General Workplace Conditions § 150.607 What...

  4. Exploring varieties of knowledge in safe work practices - an ethnographic study of surgical teams

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Within existing research in health and medicine, the nature of knowledge on how teams conduct safe work practices has yet to be properly explored. Methods We address this concern by exploring the varieties in which knowledge is expressed during interdisciplinary surgical operations. Specifically, the study was conducted in a surgical section of a Norwegian regional general hospital, between January and April of 2010, by means of an ethnographic design combining detailed non-participant observations, conversations and semi-structured interviews. Results Based on an analysis of the gathered data, we identify three particular themes in how knowledge is expressed by operating room personnel: (i) the ability and variety individuals demonstrate in handling multiple sources of information, before reaching a particular decision, (ii) the variety of ways awareness or anticipation of future events is expressed, and (iii) the different ways sudden and unexpected situations are handled by the individual team members. Conclusions We conclude that these facets of knowledge bring different insights into how safe work practices are achieved at an individual and team level in surgical operations, thus adding to the existing understanding of the nature of knowledge in safe work practices in surgical operations. Future research should focus on exploring and documenting the relationships between various elements of knowledge and safe work practices, in different surgical settings and countries. PMID:21914183

  5. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  6. Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection: Recent technical advances for safe and successful procedures

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Katsumi; Michida, Tomoki; Nishida, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Shiro; Naito, Masafumi; Ito, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is very useful in en bloc resection of large superficial colorectal tumors but is a technically difficult procedure because the colonic wall is thin and endoscopic maneuverability is poor because of colonic flexure and extensibility. A high risk of perforation has been reported in colorectal ESD. To prevent complications such as perforation and unexpected bleeding, it is crucial to ensure good visualization of the submucosal layer by creating a mucosal flap, which is an exfoliated mucosa for inserting the tip of the endoscope under it. The creation of a mucosal flap is often technically difficult; however, various types of equipment, appropriate strategy, and novel procedures including our clip-flap method, appear to facilitate mucosal flap creation, improving the safety and success rate of ESD. Favorable treatment outcomes with colorectal ESD have already been reported in many advanced institutions, and appropriate understanding of techniques and development of training systems are required for world-wide standardization of colorectal ESD. Here, we describe recent technical advances for safe and successful colorectal ESD. PMID:26468335

  7. SUNRAYCE 1993: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dephillips, M. P.; Moskowitz, P. D.; Fthenakis, V. M.

    1992-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring SUNRAYCE 93 to advance tile technology and use of photovoltaics and electric vehicles. Participants will use cars powered by photovoltaic modules and lead-acid storage batteries. This brochure, prepared for students and faculty participating in this race, outlines the health hazards presented by these electrical systems and gives guidance on strategies for their safe usage. At the outset, it should be noted that working with photovoltaic systems and batteries requires electric vehicle drivers and technicians to have 'hands-on' contact with the car on a daily basis. It is important that no one work near a photovoltaic energy system or battery, either in a vehicle or on the bench, unless they familiarize themselves with the components in use and know and observe safe work practices including the safety precautions described in the manuals provided by the various equipment vendors and this document.

  8. SUNRAYCE 93: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems

    SciTech Connect

    DePhillips, M.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-11-03

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring SUNRAYCE 93 to advance tile technology and use of photovoltaics and electric vehicles. Participants will use cars powered by photovoltaic modules and lead-acid storage batteries. This brochure, prepared for students and faculty participating in this race, outlines the health hazards presented by these electrical systems, and gives guidance on strategies for their safe usage. At the outset, it should be noted that working with photovoltaic systems and batteries requires electric vehicle drivers and technicians to have {open_quotes}hands-on{close_quotes} contact with the car on a daily basis. It is important that no one work near a photovoltaic energy system or battery, either in a vehicle or on the bench, unless they familiarize themselves with the components in use, and know and observe safe work practices including the safety precautions described in the manuals provided by the various equipment vendors and this document.

  9. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION... nor design data on safe working loads (including any applicable limitations) are obtainable, the...

  10. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION... nor design data on safe working loads (including any applicable limitations) are obtainable, the...

  11. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION... nor design data on safe working loads (including any applicable limitations) are obtainable, the...

  12. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION... nor design data on safe working loads (including any applicable limitations) are obtainable, the...

  13. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION... nor design data on safe working loads (including any applicable limitations) are obtainable, the...

  14. Planned Cardiac Reexploration in the Intensive Care Unit Is a Safe Procedure

    PubMed Central

    LaPar, Damien J.; Isbell, James M.; Mulloy, Daniel P.; Stone, Matthew L.; Kern, John A.; Ailawadi, Gorav; Kron, Irving L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac surgical reexploration is necessary in approximately 5% of all patients. However, the impact of routine, planned reexploration performed in the intensive care unit (ICU) remains poorly defined. This study evaluated postoperative outcomes after cardiac reexplorations to determine the safety and efficacy of a planned approach in the ICU. Methods All patients undergoing ICU cardiac reexplorations (2000 to 2011) at a single institution were stratified according to a routine, planned ICU approach to reexploration (planned) versus unplanned ICU or operating room reexploration. Patient risk and outcomes were compared by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results 8,151 total patients underwent cardiac operations, including 267 (3.2%) reexplorations (planned ICU = 75% and unplanned ICU = 18%). Among planned ICU reexplorations, 38% of patients had an identifiable surgical bleeding source, and 60% underwent reexploration less than 12 hours after the index procedure. Unplanned ICU reexplorations had a higher Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) predicted mortality (5% vs 3%, p < 0.001) and incurred higher observed mortality (37% vs 6%, p < 0.001) and morbidity. Sternal wound infections were rare and were similar between groups (p = 0.81). Furthermore, upon STS mortality risk adjustment, unplanned ICU reexplorations were associated with significantly increased odds of mortality (OR = 26.6 [7.1, 99.7], p < 0.001) compared with planned ICU reexplorations. Conclusions Planned reexploration in the ICU is a safe procedure with acceptable mortality and morbidity and low infection rates. Unplanned reexplorations, however, increase postoperative risk and are associated with high mortality and morbidity. These data argue for coordinated, routine approaches to planned ICU reexploration to avoid delay in treatment for postoperative hemorrhage. PMID:25173720

  15. 76 FR 37014 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... expedited methods approval action for determining dalapon in drinking water (75 FR 32295, June 8, 2010... the Safe Drinking Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures. 75 FR 32295. June 8, 2010. List of... and Alkaline Earth Cations and Ammonium in Water and Wastewater by Ion Chromatography....

  16. Working, declarative and procedural memory in specific language impairment

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Jarrad A.G.; Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Page, Debra; Ullman, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    According to the Procedural Deficit Hypothesis (PDH), abnormalities of brain structures underlying procedural memory largely explain the language deficits in children with specific language impairment (SLI). These abnormalities are posited to result in core deficits of procedural memory, which in turn explain the grammar problems in the disorder. The abnormalities are also likely to lead to problems with other, non-procedural functions, such as working memory, that rely at least partly on the affected brain structures. In contrast, declarative memory is expected to remain largely intact, and should play an important compensatory role for grammar. These claims were tested by examining measures of working, declarative and procedural memory in 51 children with SLI and 51 matched typically-developing (TD) children (mean age 10). Working memory was assessed with the Working Memory Test Battery for Children, declarative memory with the Children’s Memory Scale, and procedural memory with a visuo-spatial Serial Reaction Time task. As compared to the TD children, the children with SLI were impaired at procedural memory, even when holding working memory constant. In contrast, they were spared at declarative memory for visual information, and at declarative memory in the verbal domain after controlling for working memory and language. Visuo-spatial short-term memory was intact, whereas verbal working memory was impaired, even when language deficits were held constant. Correlation analyses showed neither visuo-spatial nor verbal working memory was associated with either lexical or grammatical abilities in either the SLI or TD children. Declarative memory correlated with lexical abilities in both groups of children. Finally, grammatical abilities were associated with procedural memory in the TD children, but with declarative memory in the children with SLI. These findings replicate and extend previous studies of working, declarative and procedural memory in SLI. Overall, we suggest that the evidence largely supports the predictions of the PDH. PMID:21774923

  17. Field Work in Geography: Procedures, Perils and Pleasures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballas, Donald J.

    1978-01-01

    Presenting brief accounts and comments re: a field experience on the Rosebud Sioux Reservation (South Dakota), this article emphasizes policies, problems, and procedures pertinent to field work in geography. (JC)

  18. Operational and Medical Procedures for a Declared Contingency Shuttle (CSCS) Shuttle Mission Due to a Failure that Precludes a Safe Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Adrien; Patlach, Bob; Duchense, Ted; Chandler, Mike; Stepaniak, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    This poster paper outlines the operational and medical procedures for a shuttle mission that has a failure that precludes a safe return to Earth. Information about the assumptions, procedures and limiting consumables is included.

  19. Safe working practices and HIV infection: knowledge, attitudes, perception of risk, and policy in hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, G; Gillies, P

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess the knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of risk of occupational HIV transmission in hospital in relation to existing guidelines. DESIGN--Cross sectional anonymous questionnaire survey of all occupational groups. SETTING--One large inner city teaching hospital. SUBJECTS--All 1530 staff working in the hospital in October 1991 and 22 managers. MAIN MEASURES--Knowledge of safe working practices and hospital guidelines; attitudes towards patients with AIDS; perception of risk of occupational transmission of HIV; availability of guidelines. RESULTS--The response rate in the questionnaire survey was 63% (958/1530). Although staff across all occupational groups knew of the potential risk of infection from needlestick injury (98%, 904/922), significantly more non-clinical staff (ambulance, catering, and domestic staff) than clinical staff (doctors, nurses, and paramedics) thought HIV could be transmitted by giving blood (38%, 153/404 v 12%, 40/346; chi 2 = 66.1 p < 0.001); one in ten clinical staff believed this. Except for midwives, half of staff in most occupational groups and 19% (17/91) of doctors and 22% (28/125) of nurses thought gloves should be worn in all contacts with people with AIDS. Most staff (62%, 593/958), including 38% (36/94) of doctors and 52% (67/128) of nurses thought patients should be routinely tested on admission, 17% of doctors and 19% of nurses thought they should be isolated in hospital. One in three staff perceived themselves at risk of HIV. Midwives, nurses, and theatre technicians were most aware of guidelines for safe working compared with only half of doctors, ambulance, and paramedical staff and no incinerator staff. CONCLUSIONS--Policy guidelines for safe working practices for patients with HIV infection and AIDS need to be disseminated across all occupational groups to reduce negative staff attitudes, improve knowledge of occupational transmission, establish an appropriate perception of risk, and create a supportive and caring hospital environment for people with HIV. IMPLICATIONS--Managers need to disseminate policy guidelines and information to all staff on an ongoing basis. PMID:10132073

  20. Safe Schools, Safe Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Julie E.; Pickett, Dean; Pulliam, Janet L.; Schwartz, Richard A.; St. Germaine, Anne-Marie; Underwood, Julie; Worona, Jay

    Schools must work together with agencies, groups, and individuals to eliminate the forces leading children to violence. Chapter 1, "School Safety: Working Together to Keep Schools Safe," stresses the importance of community collaboration in violence prevention. Effective prevention requires sharing information about students, consistent with…

  1. 21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... existing data, the effectiveness of the product can eventually be established by further testing and new... alternative therapeutic, prophylactic, or diagnostic agent for the product that is available in sufficient... licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended,...

  2. 78 FR 35909 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Final Policies and Procedures for Screening Safe Drinking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... Water Act Chemicals AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... 1457 of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) and section 408(p) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic... found in sources of drinking water; if you manufacture or import chemicals that degrade to...

  3. CEL Working procedures for WRAP 2A formulation development test

    SciTech Connect

    Duchsherer, M.J.

    1994-08-02

    The WRAP 2A facility will encapsulate retrieved, stored, and newly generated contact-handled mixed low level waste (MLLW) into 55-500 gal cementitous forms. Standardized test procedures will be required to facilitate this process. Cementitous specimens will be prepared from simulated drum wastes and will be tested in the Chemical Engineering Laboratory using the laboratory operating/working procedures encorporated into this document.

  4. NASA Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu; Corbin, Barbara J.; Sulzman, Frank M.; Krenek, Sam

    2007-01-01

    In space, astronauts are constantly bombarded with energetic particles. The goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Agency and the NASA Space Radiation Project is to ensure that astronauts can safely live and work in the space radiation environment. The space radiation environment poses both acute and chronic risks to crew health and safety, but unlike some other aspects of space travel, space radiation exposure has clinically relevant implications for the lifetime of the crew. Among the identified radiation risks are cancer, acute and late CNS damage, chronic and degenerative tissue decease, and acute radiation syndrome. The term "safely" means that risks are sufficiently understood such that acceptable limits on mission, post-mission and multi-mission consequences can be defined. The NASA Space Radiation Project strategy has several elements. The first element is to use a peer-reviewed research program to increase our mechanistic knowledge and genetic capabilities to develop tools for individual risk projection, thereby reducing our dependency on epidemiological data and population-based risk assessment. The second element is to use the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory to provide a ground-based facility to study the health effects/mechanisms of damage from space radiation exposure and the development and validation of biological models of risk, as well as methods for extrapolation to human risk. The third element is a risk modeling effort that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting the identified radiation risks. To understand the biological basis for risk, we must also understand the physical aspects of the crew environment. Thus, the fourth element develops computer algorithms to predict radiation transport properties, evaluate integrated shielding technologies and provide design optimization recommendations for the design of human space systems. Understanding the risks and determining methods to mitigate the risks are keys to a successful radiation protection strategy.

  5. A Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbin, Barbara J.; Sulzman, Frank M.; Krenek, Sam

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Agency and the Space Radiation Project is to ensure that astronauts can safely live and work in the space radiation environment. The space radiation environment poses both acute and chronic risks to crew health and safety, but unlike some other aspects of space travel, space radiation exposure has clinically relevant implications for the lifetime of the crew. The term safely means that risks are sufficiently understood such that acceptable limits on mission, post-mission and multi-mission consequences (for example, excess lifetime fatal cancer risk) can be defined. The Space Radiation Project strategy has several elements. The first element is to use a peer-reviewed research program to increase our mechanistic knowledge and genetic capabilities to develop tools for individual risk projection, thereby reducing our dependency on epidemiological data and population-based risk assessment. The second element is to use the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory to provide a ground-based facility to study the understanding of health effects/mechanisms of damage from space radiation exposure and the development and validation of biological models of risk, as well as methods for extrapolation to human risk. The third element is a risk modeling effort that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system damage, degenerative tissue disease, and acute radiation effects. To understand the biological basis for risk, we must also understand the physical aspects of the crew environment. Thus the fourth element develops computer codes to predict radiation transport properties, evaluate integrated shielding technologies and provide design optimization recommendations for the design of human space systems. Understanding the risks and determining methods to mitigate the risks are keys to a successful radiation protection strategy.

  6. 75 FR 70557 - Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program; Draft Policies and Procedures for Screening Safe Drinking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... published in the Federal Register on April 15, 2009 (74 FR 17560); however, this document was drafted with... procedures that were published in the Federal Register on April 15, 2009 (74 FR 17560) (FRL-8399-9) (FIFRA... to human health or the environment due to disruption of the endocrine system. The determination...

  7. Reducing patient discomfort during digital blockade: The subcutaneous single injection digital block – A simple, safe and fast procedure

    PubMed Central

    Brutus, JP; Nikolis, A; Baeten, Y; Chahidi, N; Kinnen, L; Ledoux, P; Moermans, JP

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Regional anesthesia of a single finger is commonly achieved by the traditional ring block, which requires at least two painful injections in the digit. Single injection digital block techniques have been described to avoid this problem. Among these, the subcutaneous technique described by Harbison appears to be safe and to allow most procedures to be carried out with good tolerance. OBJECTIVES: A prospective study was designed to evaluate the results of the subcutaneous technique in terms of patient tolerance, distribution of anesthesia and efficiency. METHODS: All blocks were performed by a single investigator. A visual analog scale was used to evaluate pain associated with the injection. Prick testing was used to evaluate the quality of anesthesia at the volar and dorsal aspects of the phalanxes. Tolerance to the surgical procedure and the need for additional injections were also recorded. RESULTS: This technique allowed surgery to be performed without complementary injection most of the time and was very well tolerated. The dorsum of the proximal phalanx, however, was unpredictably included in the anesthetized territory. CONCLUSION: The subcutaneous single injection digital block is safe, efficient and easy to perform. It allows the treatment of all conditions on the volar aspect of the finger and on the dorsal aspect of the distal and middle phalanxes. For surgery on the dorsal aspect of the proximal phalanx, a combined single injection technique or a supplementary dorsal block should be used. PMID:24115847

  8. Video-assisted thoracic surgery for pulmonary sequestration: a safe alternative procedure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu-Ming; Cao, Jin-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary sequestration (PS), a rare congenital anatomic anomaly of the lung, is usually treated through resection by a conventional thoracotomy procedure. The efficacy and safety of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) in PS treatment has seldom been evaluated. To address this research gap, we assessed the efficacy and safety of VATS in the treatment of PS in a large Chinese cohort. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 58 patients with PS who had undergone surgical resection in our department between January 2003 and April 2014. Of these patients, 42 (72.4%) underwent thoracotomy, and 16 (27.6%) underwent attempted VATS resection. Clinical and demographic data, including patients’ age, sex, complaints, sequestration characteristics, approach and procedures, operative time, resection range, blood loss, drainage volume, chest tube duration, hospital stay, and complications were collected, in addition to short-term follow-up data. Results Of the 58 participating patients, 55 accepted anatomic lobectomy, 2 accepted wedge resection, and 1 accepted left lower lobectomy combined with lingular segmentectomy. All lesions were located in the lower lobe, with 1–4 aberrant arteries, except one right upper lobe sequestration. Three cases (18.8%) in the VATS group were converted to thoracotomy because of dense adhesion (n=1), hilar fusion (n=1), or bleeding (n=1). No significant differences in operative time, postoperative hospital stay, or perioperative complications were observed between the VATS and thoracotomy groups, although the VATS patients had less blood loss (P=0.032), a greater drainage volume (P=0.001), and a longer chest tube duration (P=0.001) than their thoracotomy counterparts. Conclusions VATS is a viable alternative procedure for PS in some patients. Simple sequestration without a thoracic cavity or hilum adhesion is a good indication for VATS resection, particularly for VATS anatomic lobectomy. Thoracic cavity and hilum adhesion remain a challenge for VATS. PMID:26904209

  9. Are urological procedures in tetraplegic patients safely performed without anesthesia? a report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Some tetraplegic patients may wish to undergo urological procedures without anaesthesia, but these patients can develop autonomic dysreflexia if cystoscopy and vesical lithotripsy are performed without anaesthesia. Case presentation We describe three tetraplegic patients, who developed autonomic dysreflexia when cystoscopy and laser lithotripsy were carried out without anesthesia. In two patients, who declined anaesthesia, blood pressure increased to more than 200/110 mmHg during cystoscopy. One of these patients developed severe bleeding from bladder mucosa and lithotripsy was abandoned. Laser lithotripsy was carried out under subarachnoid block a week later in this patient, and this patient did not develop autonomic dysreflexia. The third patient with C-3 tetraplegia had undergone correction of kyphoscoliotic deformity of spine with spinal rods and pedicular screws from the level of T-2 to S-2. Pulmonary function test revealed moderate to severe restricted curve. This patient developed vesical calculus and did not wish to have general anaesthesia because of possible need for respiratory support post-operatively. Subarachnoid block was not considered in view of previous spinal fixation. When cystoscopy and laser lithotripsy were carried out under sedation, blood pressure increased from 110/50 mmHg to 160/80 mmHg. Conclusion These cases show that tetraplegic patients are likely to develop autonomic dysreflexia during cystoscopy and vesical lithotripsy, performed without anaesthesia. Health professionals should educate spinal cord injury patients regarding risks of autonomic dysreflexia, when urological procedures are carried out without anaesthesia. If spinal cord injury patients are made aware of potentially life-threatening complications of autonomic dysreflexia, they are less likely to decline anaesthesia for urological procedures. Subrachnoid block or epidural meperidine blocks nociceptive impulses from urinary bladder and prevents occurrence of autonomic dysreflexia. If spinal cord injury patients with lesions above T-6 decline anaesthesia, nifedipine 10 mg should be given sublingually prior to cystoscopy to prevent increase in blood pressure due to autonomic dysreflexia. PMID:22348226

  10. Potential Health Risks Associated to ICSI: Insights from Animal Models and Strategies for a Safe Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Calabuig, María Jesús; López-Cardona, Angela Patricia; Fernández-González, Raúl; Ramos-Ibeas, Priscila; Fonseca Balvís, Noelia; Laguna-Barraza, Ricardo; Pericuesta, Eva; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Bermejo-Álvarez, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Artificial reproductive techniques are currently responsible for 1.7–4% of the births in developed countries and intracytoplasmatic sperm injection (ICSI) is the most commonly used, accounting for 70–80% of the cycles performed. Despite being an invaluable tool for infertile couples, the technique bypasses several biological barriers that naturally select the gametes to achieve an optimal embryonic and fetal development. In this perspective, ICSI has been associated with an increased risk for diverse health problems, ranging from premature births and diverse metabolic disorders in the offspring to more severe complications such as abortions, congenital malformations, and imprinting disorders. In this review, we discuss the possible implications of the technique per se on these adverse outcomes and highlight the importance of several experiments using mammalian models to truthfully test these implications and to uncover the molecular base that origins these health problems. We also dissect the specific hazards associated to ICSI and describe some strategies that have been developed to mimic the gamete selection occurring in natural conception in order to improve the safety of the procedure. PMID:25478554

  11. The laparoscopic hiatoplasty with antireflux surgery is a safe and effective procedure to repair giant hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although minimally invasive repair of giant hiatal hernias is a very surgical challenge which requires advanced laparoscopic learning curve, several reports showed that is a safe and effective procedure, with lower morbidity than open approach. In the present study we show the outcomes of 13 patients who underwent a laparoscopic repair of giant hiatal hernia. Methods A total of 13 patients underwent laparoscopic posterior hiatoplasty and Nissen fundoplication. Follow-up evaluation was done clinically at intervals of 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery using the Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Health-Related Quality of Life scale, a barium swallow study, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, an oesophageal manometry, a combined ambulatory 24-h multichannel impedance pH and bilirubin monitoring. Anatomic recurrence was defined as any evidence of gastric herniation above the diaphragmatic edge. Results There were no intraoperative complications and no conversions to open technique. Symptomatic GORD-HQL outcomes demonstrated a statistical significant decrease of mean value equal to 3.2 compare to 37.4 of preoperative assessment (p?procedure and no hernia recurrence was recorded in the study group, treated respecting several crucial surgical principles, e.g., complete sac excision, appropriate crural closure, also with direct hiatal defect where possible, and routine use of antireflux procedure. PMID:24401085

  12. Safe Spaces, Support, Social Capital: A Critical Analysis of Artists Working with Vulnerable Young People in Educational Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellman, Edward

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a critical and thematic analysis of three research projects involving artists working with vulnerable young people in educational contexts. It argues that artists create safe spaces in contrast to traditional educational activities but it will also raise questions about what constitutes such a space for participants. It will…

  13. Working from the Inside Out: A Case Study of Mackay Safe Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Dale; Gunning, Colleen; Rose, Judy; McFarlane, Kathryn; Franklin, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Mackay Whitsunday Safe Community (MWSC) was established in 2000 in response to high rates of injury observed in the region. MWSC assumed an ecological perspective, incorporating targeted safety promotion campaigns reinforced by supportive environments and policy. By involving the community in finding its own solutions, MWSC attempted to catalyze…

  14. Working from the Inside Out: A Case Study of Mackay Safe Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Dale; Gunning, Colleen; Rose, Judy; McFarlane, Kathryn; Franklin, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Mackay Whitsunday Safe Community (MWSC) was established in 2000 in response to high rates of injury observed in the region. MWSC assumed an ecological perspective, incorporating targeted safety promotion campaigns reinforced by supportive environments and policy. By involving the community in finding its own solutions, MWSC attempted to catalyze…

  15. A safe, effective, and facility compatible cleaning in place procedure for affinity resin in large-scale monoclonal antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Dembecki, Jill; Jaffe, Neil E; O'Mara, Brian W; Cai, Hui; Sparks, Colleen N; Zhang, Jian; Laino, Sarah G; Russell, Reb J; Wang, Michelle

    2013-09-20

    Cleaning-in-place (CIP) for column chromatography plays an important role in therapeutic protein production. A robust and efficient CIP procedure ensures product quality, improves column life time and reduces the cost of the purification processes, particularly for those using expensive affinity resins, such as MabSelect protein A resin. Cleaning efficiency, resin compatibility, and facility compatibility are the three major aspects to consider in CIP process design. Cleaning MabSelect resin with 50mM sodium hydroxide (NaOH) along with 1M sodium chloride is one of the most popular cleaning procedures used in biopharmaceutical industries. However, high concentration sodium chloride is a leading cause of corrosion in the stainless steel containers used in large scale manufacture. Corroded containers may potentially introduce metal contaminants into purified drug products. Therefore, it is challenging to apply this cleaning procedure into commercial manufacturing due to facility compatibility and drug safety concerns. This paper reports a safe, effective and environmental and facility-friendly cleaning procedure that is suitable for large scale affinity chromatography. An alternative salt (sodium sulfate) is used to prevent the stainless steel corrosion caused by sodium chloride. Sodium hydroxide and salt concentrations were optimized using a high throughput screening approach to achieve the best combination of facility compatibility, cleaning efficiency and resin stability. Additionally, benzyl alcohol is applied to achieve more effective microbial control. Based on the findings, the recommended optimum cleaning strategy is cleaning MabSelect resin with 25 mM NaOH, 0.25 M Na2SO4 and 1% benzyl alcohol solution every cycle, followed by a more stringent cleaning using 50 mM NaOH with 0.25 M Na2SO4 and 1% benzyl alcohol at the end of each manufacturing campaign. A resin life cycle study using the MabSelect affinity resin demonstrates that the new cleaning strategy prolongs resin life time and consistently delivers high purity drug products. PMID:23953712

  16. 21 CFR 330.10 - Procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... recognized as safe and effective and not misbranded, and for establishing monographs. 330.10 Section 330.10... FOR HUMAN USE OVER-THE-COUNTER (OTC) HUMAN DRUGS WHICH ARE GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE... generally recognized as safe and effective and not misbranded, and for establishing monographs. For...

  17. Better Safe Than Sorry. Youth Training Scheme. Core Exemplar Work Based Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Staff Coll., Blagdon (England).

    This trainer's guide is intended to assist supervisors of work-based career training projects in teaching students to analyze and categorize work accidents, to look for potential hazards, to find out about safety training, and to organize a work safety campaign. The guide is one in a series of core curriculum modules that is intended for use in…

  18. Better Safe Than Sorry. Youth Training Scheme. Core Exemplar Work Based Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Staff Coll., Blagdon (England).

    This trainer's guide is intended to assist supervisors of work-based career training projects in teaching students to analyze and categorize work accidents, to look for potential hazards, to find out about safety training, and to organize a work safety campaign. The guide is one in a series of core curriculum modules that is intended for use in…

  19. Is Stapled Hemorrhoidectomy a Safe Procedure for Third and Fourth Grade Hemorrhoids? An Experience at Civil Hospital Karachi.

    PubMed

    Bota, Rafaqat; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Aziz, Adnan

    2015-12-01

    Hemorrhoids are amongst the most frequent anorectal conditions affecting approximately 4-36 % of the general population. The study was carried out to assess the clinical consequences of stapled hemorrhoidectomy comparing results with other published literature regarding postoperative pain, bleeding, incontinence, and other complications. A total of 120 patients were included in this study with symptomatic grade 3 or 4 prolapsed hemorrhoids, who underwent stapled hemorrhoidectomy from January 2006 to January 2012 at the Civil Hospital Karachi, Pakistan. In 92 patients (76.6 %), proctological examination showed grade 3 hemorrhoids. Fourth degree hemorrhoids were found in 28 cases (23.4 %). Hospitalization time ranged between 1 and 3 days (median time was 34 h). Seventy-eight patients were discharged on the first postoperative day, without severe pain, and the remaining 42 patients were discharge on the third day. Two cases of postoperative pain and thrombosis were found as postoperative complications. Stapled hemorrhoidectomy is a safe and quick procedure associated with less pain, better outcome, and early recovery with shorter hospital stay. PMID:27011510

  20. Safe Handling Practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    In 1977 Compugraphic Corporation was experiencing an unacceptable failure rate on microelectronic chips. Company engineers suspected that static electricity was causing the trouble because some electronic components are highly susceptible to damage by electrostatic charge. From a NASA Tech Brief, they learned that Rockwell International had prepared a report on safe handling practices for electronic components. NASA provided a Technical Support Package detailing 50 safe handling procedures affecting workers, work areas, equipment and packaging materials. Where poor practices were discovered, re-education of employees and other corrective measures were undertaken.

  1. Working from the inside out: a case study of Mackay Safe Community.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Dale; Gunning, Colleen; Rose, Judy; McFarlane, Kathryn; Franklin, Richard C

    2015-04-01

    Mackay Whitsunday Safe Community (MWSC) was established in 2000 in response to high rates of injury observed in the region. MWSC assumed an ecological perspective, incorporating targeted safety promotion campaigns reinforced by supportive environments and policy. By involving the community in finding its own solutions, MWSC attempted to catalyze structural, social, and political changes that empowered the community and, ultimately, individuals within the community, to modify their environment and their behavior to reduce the risk of injury. A community network consisting of 118 members and an external support network of 50 members was established. A social network analysis conducted in 2000 and 2004 indicated that the network doubled its cohesiveness, thereby strengthening its ability to collaborate for mutual benefit. However, while MWSC was rich in social resources, human and financial resources were largely controlled by external agencies. The bridging and linking relationships that connected MWSC to its external support network were the social mechanism MWSC used to access the resources it required to run programs. These boundary-spanning relationships accessed an estimated 6.5 full-time equivalents of human resources and US$750,000 in 2004 that it used to deliver a suite of injury control and safety promotion activities, associated with a 33% reduction in injury deaths over the period 2002 to 2010. MWSC can only be understood in its ecological context. The productivity of MWSC was vulnerable to the changing policy priorities of external sponsoring agents and critically dependent on the advocacy skills of its leaders. PMID:25829116

  2. A Safe and Healthful Work Environment: Development and Testing of an Undergraduate Occupational Health Nursing Curriculum.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Marjorie C; Berry, Peggy

    2015-08-01

    Occupational health nursing focuses on promotion and restoration of health, prevention of illness and injury, protection from work-related and environmental hazards, and corporate profitability. Quality education about the relationship between work and health is critical for nurses' success regardless of work setting, and is consistent with Healthy People 2020 goals, but is lacking or limited in some programs. This report introduces an innovative occupational health nursing curriculum for students enrolled in baccalaureate nursing programs. The process of designing and pilot testing this novel curriculum, its alignment with nursing competencies, and its format and learning activities are described. Preparing professional nurses to understand the role of the occupational health nurse and the relationship between work and health is an essential curricular consideration for contemporary nursing education. PMID:26077879

  3. Working together to keep children safe and well when parents have learning difficulties.

    PubMed

    Selbie, Jean

    2012-05-01

    A serious case review, where parental learning difficulties were a factor in the serious injury of a child, prompted review and strengthening of the collaborative work between universal children's services and specialist adult learning disability services. Focus groups enabled wider knowledge of the factors that were barriers to good partnership work, and those factors that required strengthening. Consideration of research findings and literature review has informed the development of a local protocol that focuses on the safety and wellbeing of children. PMID:22792843

  4. NASA Strategy to Safely Live and Work in the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu; Corbin, Barbara; Sulzman, Frank; Kreneck, Sam

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the radiation environment that is a significant potential hazard to NASA's goals for space exploration, of living and working in space. NASA has initiated a Peer reviewed research program that is charged with arriving at an understanding of the space radiation problem. To this end NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed to simulate the harsh cosmic and solar radiation found in space. Another piece of the work was to develop a risk modeling tool that integrates the results from research efforts into models of human risk to reduce uncertainties in predicting risk of carcinogenesis, central nervous system damage, degenerative tissue disease, and acute radiation effects acute radiation effects.

  5. How Safe Are You at Work? Occupational Health and Safety Issues for School Counsellors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, John A.

    Schools are becoming increasingly violent places. This workshop presentation examines ways to improve counselor facilities and to enhance work safety. Client populations for school counselors have changed significantly in recent times as school administrators refer more welfare related problems for help. Although violent attacks on counselors may…

  6. Service station requirements for safe use of hydrogen based fuels: NHA work group update

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the results of the meeting of the working group on safety standards. A standard for an odorant for hydrogen leak detection is set forth. Recent activities with the National Fire Protection Association and the International Standard Organization are enumerated. The path forward is also summarized.

  7. Safety and the Supervisor. A Safe System of Work. Members' Occasional Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corfield, Tony

    In 1981 four supervisors at a chemical company in Great Britain were each fined 100 pounds under the country's 1974 Health and Safety at Work Act after a fifth supervisor was injured because of a faulty interlock guard. The supervisors were convicted because they had all known about but had done nothing to rectify the potential safety hazard. The…

  8. SUNRAYCE 95: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems

    SciTech Connect

    DePhillips, M.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1994-05-27

    This document is a power system and battery safety handbook for participants in the SUNRAYCE 95 solar powered electric vehicle program. The topics of the handbook include batteries, photovoltaic modules, safety equipment needed for working with sulfuric acid electrolyte and batteries, battery transport, accident response, battery recharging and ventilation, electrical risks on-board vehicle, external electrical risks, electrical risk management strategies, and general maintenance including troubleshooting, hydrometer check and voltmeter check.

  9. SUNRAYCE 1995: Working safely with lead-acid batteries and photovoltaic power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dephillips, M. P.; Moskowitz, P. D.; Fthenakis, V. M.

    1994-05-01

    This document is a power system and battery safety handbook for participants in the SUNRAYCE 95 solar powered electric vehicle program. The topics of the handbook include batteries, photovoltaic modules, safety equipment needed for working with sulfuric acid electrolyte and batteries, battery transport, accident response, battery recharging and ventilation, electrical risks on-board vehicle, external electrical risks, electrical risk management strategies, and general maintenance including troubleshooting, hydrometer check and voltmeter check.

  10. Human-rating Automated and Robotic Systems - (How HAL Can Work Safely with Astronauts)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baroff, Lynn; Dischinger, Charlie; Fitts, David

    2009-01-01

    Long duration human space missions, as planned in the Vision for Space Exploration, will not be possible without applying unprecedented levels of automation to support the human endeavors. The automated and robotic systems must carry the load of routine housekeeping for the new generation of explorers, as well as assist their exploration science and engineering work with new precision. Fortunately, the state of automated and robotic systems is sophisticated and sturdy enough to do this work - but the systems themselves have never been human-rated as all other NASA physical systems used in human space flight have. Our intent in this paper is to provide perspective on requirements and architecture for the interfaces and interactions between human beings and the astonishing array of automated systems; and the approach we believe necessary to create human-rated systems and implement them in the space program. We will explain our proposed standard structure for automation and robotic systems, and the process by which we will develop and implement that standard as an addition to NASA s Human Rating requirements. Our work here is based on real experience with both human system and robotic system designs; for surface operations as well as for in-flight monitoring and control; and on the necessities we have discovered for human-systems integration in NASA's Constellation program. We hope this will be an invitation to dialog and to consideration of a new issue facing new generations of explorers and their outfitters.

  11. 21 CFR 330.14 - Additional criteria and procedures for classifying OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OTC drugs as generally recognized as safe and effective and not misbranded. (a) Introduction. This.... marketing experience can be considered in the OTC drug monograph system. This section also addresses... involvement of a pharmacist, it must be established that this marketing restriction does not indicate...

  12. Stay Safe at Work

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Archive Find Services Near You National Health Observances Health Care Reform Adults Women and Pregnant Women Children Related Resources En español Find us on: Get Email Updates Home > Health Topics A to Z > Everyday Healthy Living > Safety > ...

  13. 21 CFR 601.25 - Review procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Review procedures to determine that licensed... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS LICENSING Biologics Licensing § 601.25 Review procedures to... category of products. (a) Advisory review panels. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs shall appoint...

  14. Procedures and Standards Handbook. Version 3.0. What Works Clearinghouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This "What Works Clearinghouse Procedures and Standards Handbook (Version 3.0)" provides a detailed description of the standards and procedures of the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC). The remaining chapters of this Handbook are organized to take the reader through the basic steps that the WWC uses to develop a review protocol, identify…

  15. 45 CFR 261.64 - How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work participation measurement? 261.64 Section 261.64 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES,...

  16. 45 CFR 261.64 - How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work participation measurement? 261.64 Section 261.64 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES,...

  17. 48 CFR 8.405-2 - Ordering procedures for services requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... services requiring a statement of work. 8.405-2 Section 8.405-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Supply Schedules 8.405-2 Ordering procedures for services requiring a statement of work. (a) General... under BPAs see 8.405-3. (b) Statements of Work (SOWs). All Statements of Work shall include...

  18. 48 CFR 8.405-2 - Ordering procedures for services requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... services requiring a statement of work. 8.405-2 Section 8.405-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Supply Schedules 8.405-2 Ordering procedures for services requiring a statement of work. (a) General... under BPAs see 8.405-3. (b) Statements of Work (SOWs). All Statements of Work shall include...

  19. 78 FR 32558 - Expedited Approval of Alternative Test Procedures for the Analysis of Contaminants Under the Safe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... earlier expedited methods approval action (74 FR 38348, August 3, 2009) (USEPA 2009b). Both EPA Methods... Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures. 74 FR 38348. August 3, 2009. USEPA. 2013. EPA Method 524.4... Chromatography GC/MS: Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry GWR: Ground Water Rule NAICS: North American...

  20. Safe Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Edward T.; Stewart, Helen; Korsmeyer, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The biggest users of GRID technologies came from the science and technology communities. These consist of government, industry and academia (national and international). The NASA GRID is moving into a higher technology readiness level (TRL) today; and as a joint effort among these leaders within government, academia, and industry, the NASA GRID plans to extend availability to enable scientists and engineers across these geographical boundaries collaborate to solve important problems facing the world in the 21 st century. In order to enable NASA programs and missions to use IPG resources for program and mission design, the IPG capabilities needs to be accessible from inside the NASA center networks. However, because different NASA centers maintain different security domains, the GRID penetration across different firewalls is a concern for center security people. This is the reason why some IPG resources are been separated from the NASA center network. Also, because of the center network security and ITAR concerns, the NASA IPG resource owner may not have full control over who can access remotely from outside the NASA center. In order to obtain organizational approval for secured remote access, the IPG infrastructure needs to be adapted to work with the NASA business process. Improvements need to be made before the IPG can be used for NASA program and mission development. The Secured Advanced Federated Environment (SAFE) technology is designed to provide federated security across NASA center and NASA partner's security domains. Instead of one giant center firewall which can be difficult to modify for different GRID applications, the SAFE "micro security domain" provide large number of professionally managed "micro firewalls" that can allow NASA centers to accept remote IPG access without the worry of damaging other center resources. The SAFE policy-driven capability-based federated security mechanism can enable joint organizational and resource owner approved remote access from outside of NASA centers. A SAFE enabled IPG can enable IPG capabilities to be available to NASA mission design teams across different NASA center and partner company firewalls. This paper will first discuss some of the potential security issues for IPG to work across NASA center firewalls. We will then present the SAFE federated security model. Finally we will present the concept of the architecture of a SAFE enabled IPG and how it can benefit NASA mission development.

  1. Driving Safely

    MedlinePLUS

    ... safely. These problems can make it hard to drive safely. Exercise can improve older drivers’ strength and ... braking Here are some tips to help you drive safely: l Talk with your doctor if you ...

  2. Is total hip arthroplasty a successful and safe procedure in Jehovah's Witnesses? Mean five-year results.

    PubMed

    Harwin, Steven F; Pivec, Robert; Naziri, Qais; Issa, Kimona; Mont, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) can be challenging in Jehovah's Witnesses because of the potential for blood loss. Because these patients will not accept blood transfusions, multiple strategies to prevent blood loss have been developed. The purpose of this study was to report implant survivorship, clinical outcomes, radiographic outcomes, morbidity, and mortality of Jehovah's Witnesses undergoing primary THA. Databases from two institutions were reviewed to identify 53 patients (55 hips) who were Jehovah's Witnesses and had a primary total hip arthroplasty. There were 27 women and 26 men who had a mean age of 63 years (range 35-94 years), and a mean follow-up of 63 months (range 24-120 months). All Jehovah's Witnesses had a comprehensive perioperative blood management strategy employed by a coordinated medical and surgical team. Mean post-operative Harris Hip Scores were 86 points, and implant survivorship was 97%. There were two aseptic revisions for osteolysis and component loosening. There were no mortalities, and three minor surgical and two minor medical complications occurred during the study. Excellent clinical outcomes were found for Jehovah's Witness undergoing total hip arthroplasty using a comprehensive blood management protocol. We believe that the use of a specialised blood management protocol involving a team approach to preoperative evaluation, appropriate anaesthesia, and surgical and postoperative management was responsible for minimising complications. Total hip arthroplasty is safe and efficacious in this patient group if proper preoperative safeguards are utilised. PMID:24318363

  3. Total hepatectomy and liver transplantation as a two-stage procedure for fulminant hepatic failure: A safe procedure in exceptional circumstances

    PubMed Central

    Sanabria Mateos, Rebeca; Hogan, Niamh M; Dorcaratto, Dimitri; Heneghan, Helen; Udupa, Venkatesh; Maguire, Donal; Geoghegan, Justin; Hoti, Emir

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the outcomes of two-stage liver transplant at a single institution, between 1993 and March 2015. METHODS: We reviewed our institutional experience with emergency hepatectomy followed by transplantation for fulminant liver failure over a twenty-year period. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained liver transplant database was undertaken at a national liver transplant centre. Demographic data, clinical presentation, preoperative investigations, cardiocirculatory parameters, operative and postoperative data were recorded. RESULTS: In the study period, six two-stage liver transplants were undertaken. Indications for transplantation included acute paracetamol poisoning (n = 3), fulminant hepatitis A (n = 1), trauma (n = 1) and exertional heat stroke (n = 1). Anhepatic time ranged from 330 to 2640 min. All patients demonstrated systemic inflammatory response syndrome in the first post-operative week and the incidence of sepsis was high at 50%. There was one mortality, secondary to cardiac arrest 12 h following re-perfusion. Two patients required re-transplantation secondary to arterial thrombosis. At a median follow-up of 112 mo, 5 of 6 patients are alive and without evidence of graft dysfunciton. CONCLUSION: Two-stage liver transplantation represents a safe and potentially life-saving treatment for carefully selected exceptional cases of fulminant hepatic failure. PMID:26855693

  4. Differences between Presentation Methods in Working Memory Procedures: A Matter of Working Memory Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricker, Timothy J.; Cowan, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Understanding forgetting from working memory, the memory used in ongoing cognitive processing, is critical to understanding human cognition. In the past decade, a number of conflicting findings have been reported regarding the role of time in forgetting from working memory. This has led to a debate concerning whether longer retention intervals…

  5. Differences between Presentation Methods in Working Memory Procedures: A Matter of Working Memory Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricker, Timothy J.; Cowan, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Understanding forgetting from working memory, the memory used in ongoing cognitive processing, is critical to understanding human cognition. In the past decade, a number of conflicting findings have been reported regarding the role of time in forgetting from working memory. This has led to a debate concerning whether longer retention intervals…

  6. Subxiphoid and subcostal arch thoracoscopic extended thymectomy: a safe and feasible minimally invasive procedure for selective stage III thymomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinbo; Wang, Juzheng; Zhao, Zhengwei; Han, Yong; Huang, Lijun; Li, Xiaofei

    2016-01-01

    Background Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) has been applied to resection of small and well-encapsulated thymomas. However, few data are available regarding to the application of VATS in stage III thymomas. Methods A novel subxiphoid and subcostal arch approach for thoracoscopic extended thymectomy was developed by us. From January 2014 to August 2015, 14 patients with stage III thymoma were treated by using this new technique in the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Tangdu hospital, Xi’an, China. These patients were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Results Among the 14 patients, 1 patient was converted to transsternal approach owning to invasion of the superior vena cava. The other 13 patients with thymomas invading the pericardium, lung tissues and left innominate vein (LIV), were successfully operated on by using this new technique. The average operation time was 120.0±32.7 min (80–170 min), the average volume of estimated blood loss was 51.5±44.8 min (10–150 mL) and the average postoperative hospital stay was 4.8±1.5 days (3-9 days). There was no perioperative death. Two patients suffered postoperative complications including one patient with atrial fibrillation (AF) and the other one with myasthenic crisis (MC). The postoperative pain score decreased dramatically from 3.8±1.0 [3–6] at 24 hours to 1.5±0.9 [0–6] at 48 hours, and finally to 0 at 3 months after surgery (P=0.000). The patients reported a higher cosmetic score of 92.6±2.7 [90–96]. There was no tumor recurrence and the five patients with myasthenia gravis had improvement and did not need any medication until follow-up. Conclusions Based on our limited experience, the subxiphoid and subcostal arch thoracoscopic extended thymectomy is safe and feasible for selective stage III thymoma, and might reduce the postoperative pain and provide satisfied cosmetic effect. PMID:27014472

  7. Procedures for safe handling of off-gases from electric vehicle lead-acid batteries during overcharge

    SciTech Connect

    LaBelle, S.J.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Loutfy, R.O.; Varma, R.

    1980-01-25

    The potential for generation of toxic gases from lead-acid batteries has long been recognized. Prior to the current interest in electric vehicles, there were no studies specificaly oriented to toxic gas release from traction batteries, however. As the Department of Energy Demonstration Project (in the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program) progresses, available data from past studies and parallel health effects programs must be digested into guidance to the drivers and maintenance personnel, tailored to their contact with electric vehicles. The basic aspects of lead-acid battery operation, vehicle use, and health effects of stibine and arsine to provide electric vehicle users with the information behind the judgment that vehicle operation and testing may proceed are presented. Specifically, it is concluded that stibine generation or arsine generation at rapid enough rates to induce acute toxic response is not at all likely. Procedures to guard against low-level exposure until more definitive data on ambient concentrations of the gases are collected are presented for both charging the batteries and driving the vehicles. A research plan to collect additional quantitative data from electric traction batteries is presented.

  8. Differential effects of socioeconomic status on working and procedural memory systems

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Julia A.; Mackey, Allyson P.; Finn, Amy S.; Gabrieli, John D. E.

    2015-01-01

    While prior research has shown a strong relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and working memory performance, the relation between SES and procedural (implicit) memory remains unknown. Convergent research in both animals and humans has revealed a fundamental dissociation, both behaviorally and neurally, between a working memory system that depends on medial temporal-lobe structures and the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) vs. a procedural memory system that depends on the basal ganglia. Here, we measured performance in adolescents from lower- and higher-SES backgrounds on tests of working memory capacity (complex working memory span) and procedural memory (probabilistic classification) and their hippocampal, DLPFC, and caudate volumes. Lower-SES adolescents had worse working memory performance and smaller hippocampal and DLPFC volumes than their higher-SES peers, but there was no significant difference between the lower- and higher-SES groups on the procedural memory task or in caudate volumes. These findings suggest that SES may have a selective influence on hippocampal-prefrontal-dependent working memory and little influence on striatal-dependent procedural memory. PMID:26500525

  9. When the science fails and the ethics works: 'Fail-safe' ethics in the FEM-PrEP study.

    PubMed

    Kingori, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    This paper will explore the concept of 'fail safe' ethics in the FEM PrEP trial, and the practice of research and ethics on the ground. FEM-PrEP examined the efficacy of PrEP in African women after promising outcomes in research conducted with MSM. This was a hugely optimistic time and FEM-PrEP was mobilised using rights-based ethical arguments that women should have access to PrEP. This paper will present data collected during an ethnographic study of frontline research workers involved in FEM-PrEP. During our discussions, 'fail-safe' ethics emerged as concept that encapsulated their confidence that their ethics could not fail. However, in 2011, FEM-PrEP was halted and deemed a failure. The women involved in the study were held responsible because contrary to researcher's expectations they were not taking the oral PrEP being researched. This examination of FEM-PrEP will show that ethical arguments are increasingly deployed to mobilise, maintain and in some cases stop trials in ways which, at times, are superseded or co-opted by other interests. While promoting the interests of women, rights-based approaches are argued to indirectly justify the continuation of individualised, biomedical interventions which have been problematic in other women-centred trials. In this examination of FEM-PrEP, the rights-based approach obscured: ethical concerns beyond access to PrEP; the complexities of power relationships between donor and host countries; the operations of the HIV industry in research-saturated areas and the cumulative effect of unfilled expectations in HIV research and how this has shaped ideas of research and ethics. PMID:26484946

  10. 49 CFR 214.335 - On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups, general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups, general. 214.335 Section 214.335 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway...

  11. 49 CFR 214.335 - On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups. 214.335 Section 214.335 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway...

  12. 49 CFR 214.335 - On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups. 214.335 Section 214.335 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway...

  13. 49 CFR 214.335 - On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups. 214.335 Section 214.335 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway...

  14. 49 CFR 214.335 - On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups. 214.335 Section 214.335 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway...

  15. Fail safe logic design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shield, I.

    1983-03-01

    Ideally, a circuit is said to be fail safe, if for every possible failure configuration, the circuit results in a safe side output. In order to guarantee safe side failures, it is imperative that the circuit detects any faults within it. A suitable procedure for doing this can be based on an error detecting code, such as the K out of N code. A number of circuit types are considered, taking into account a fault tolerant circuit, a fault secure circuit, a self testing circuit, a self checking circuit, a self checking checker, and a fail safe circuit. Attention is given to the realization of combinational circuits, aspects of safety and reliability, sequential circuits, the realization of sequential circuits, the occurrence of clock failure, and the design procedure.

  16. The relation between receptive grammar and procedural, declarative, and working memory in specific language impairment

    PubMed Central

    Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Ullman, Michael T.; Lum, Jarrad A. G.

    2015-01-01

    What memory systems underlie grammar in children, and do these differ between typically developing (TD) children and children with specific language impairment (SLI)? Whilst there is substantial evidence linking certain memory deficits to the language problems in children with SLI, few studies have investigated multiple memory systems simultaneously, examining not only possible memory deficits but also memory abilities that may play a compensatory role. This study examined the extent to which procedural, declarative, and working memory abilities predict receptive grammar in 45 primary school aged children with SLI (30 males, 15 females) and 46 TD children (30 males, 16 females), both on average 9;10 years of age. Regression analyses probed measures of all three memory systems simultaneously as potential predictors of receptive grammar. The model was significant, explaining 51.6% of the variance. There was a significant main effect of learning in procedural memory and a significant group × procedural learning interaction. Further investigation of the interaction revealed that procedural learning predicted grammar in TD but not in children with SLI. Indeed, procedural learning was the only predictor of grammar in TD. In contrast, only learning in declarative memory significantly predicted grammar in SLI. Thus, different memory systems are associated with receptive grammar abilities in children with SLI and their TD peers. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to demonstrate a significant group by memory system interaction in predicting grammar in children with SLI and their TD peers. In line with Ullman’s Declarative/Procedural model of language and procedural deficit hypothesis of SLI, variability in understanding sentences of varying grammatical complexity appears to be associated with variability in procedural memory abilities in TD children, but with declarative memory, as an apparent compensatory mechanism, in children with SLI. PMID:26284013

  17. Pain and nurses' emotion work in a paediatric clinic: treatment procedures and nurse-child alignments.

    PubMed

    Rindstedt, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    In the treatment of cancer in children, treatment procedures have been reported to be one of the most feared elements, as more painful than the illness as such. This study draws on a video ethnography of routine needle procedure events, as part of fieldwork at a paediatric oncology clinic documenting everyday treatment negotiations between nurses and young children. On the basis of detailed transcriptions of verbal and nonverbal staff-child interaction, the analyses focus on ways in which pain and anxiety can be seen as phenomena that are partly contingent on nurses' emotion work. The school-age children did not display fear. In the preschool group, though, pain and fear seemed to be phenomena that were greatly reduced through nurses' emotion work. This study focuses on three preschoolers facing potentially painful treatment, showing how the nurses engaged in massive emotion work with the children, through online commentaries, interactive formats (delegation of tasks, consent sequences, collaborative 'we'-formats), as well as solidarity-oriented moves (such as praise and endearment terms). Even a young toddler would handle the distress of needle procedures, when interacting with an inventive nurse who mobilized child participation through skilful emotion work. PMID:24851517

  18. Cross-national research on contractor evaluation procedures in public works procurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Seiya; Sato, Naoyoshi; Matsumoto, Naoya

    Contractor evaluation methods in Japan's public works procurement, beginning with construction business licensure, going through biennial preliminary firm rating, up to project-by-project prequalification and comprehensive point rating, were developed during the period when public works were mostly procured through designated competitive bidding. It is essential to focus attention on contractor evaluation methods for introducing different types of procurement procedures which enhance the use of technological capabilities held by private businesses. An overall review of contractor evaluation procedures should be conducted in view of the present situation, where the open competitive bidding has become mainly used in combination with comprehensive evaluation, as well as to allow for further diversification of procurement methods. In Western countries, improvements have been made for the past several years in contractor evaluation procedures with more emphasis on "Value for Money." Advanced efforts made by these countries will be useful as a reference for overhauling Japan's contractor evaluation system. This study conducts a comparative review of contractor evaluation procedures for public procurement in Western countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom and France by identifying similarities and differences between those of Japan and the above mentioned countries. This reveals that a contractor's technical or professional ability is looked at separately from its economic and financial standing in those countries studied, and there is no case like Japan in which those two factors are integrated into one for evaluation.

  19. An empirical test of the independence between declarative and procedural working memory in Oberauer's (2009) theory.

    PubMed

    Barrouillet, Pierre; Corbin, Lucie; Dagry, Isabelle; Camos, Valérie

    2015-08-01

    It has recently been suggested that working memory could be conceived as two symmetrical subsystems with analogous structure and processing principles: a declarative working memory storing objects of thought available for cognitive operations, and a procedural working memory holding representations of what to do with these objects (Oberauer, Psychology of learning and motivation 51: 45-100, 2009). Within this theoretical framework, the two subsystems are thought to be independent and fueled by their own capacity. The present study tested this hypothesis through two experiments using a complex span task in which participants were asked to maintain consonants for further recall while performing response selection tasks. In line with Oberauer's conception, the load of the procedural working memory was varied by manipulating the number of stimulus-response mappings of the response selection task. Increasing the number of these mappings had a strong detrimental effect on recall performance. Besides contradicting Oberauer's proposal, this finding supports models that assume a resource-sharing between processing and storage in working memory. PMID:25504458

  20. 49 CFR 214.336 - On-track safety procedures for certain roadway work groups and adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway Worker Protection § 214.336 On-track safety procedures for certain roadway work groups...

  1. Safe sex

    MedlinePLUS

    Safe sex means taking steps before and during sex that can prevent you from getting an infection, or from ... the skin around the genital area. Before having sex: Get to know your partner and discuss your ...

  2. The MERSADE (European Union) project: testing procedures and environmental impact for the safe storage of liquid mercury in the Almadén district, Spain.

    PubMed

    Llanos, W; Higueras, P; Oyarzun, R; Esbrí, J M; López-Berdonces, M A; García-Noguero, E M; Martínez-Coronado, A

    2010-09-15

    The MERSADE Project (LIFE--European Union) tested the Las Cuevas decommissioned mining complex (Almadén mercury district, Spain) as a potential site for the installation of a future European prototype safe deposit of surplus mercury from industrial activities. We here present the results of a baseline study on the distribution of mercury in soils and air in the Las Cuevas complex and surrounding areas, and show the results of a plume contamination model using the ISC-AERMOD software. Despite restoration works carried out in 2004, the Las Cuevas complex can still be regarded as hotspot of mercury contamination, with large anomalies above 800 microg g(-1) Hg (soils) and 300 ng Hg m(-3) (air). In the case of soils, high, and persistent concentrations above 26 microg g(-1) Hg extend well beyond the complex perimeter for more than 2 km. These concentrations are about three orders of magnitude above world baselines. The same applies to mercury in air, with high concentrations above 300 ng Hg m(-3) inside the perimeter, which nonetheless fade away in a few hundred meters. Air contamination modelling (Hg gas) predicts formation of a NW-SE oriented narrow plume extending for a few hundred meters from the complex perimeter. The geographic isolation of Las Cuevas and its mining past make the complex an ideal site for mercury stocking. The only potential environmental hazards are the raising of livestock only a few hundred meters away from the complex and flash floods. PMID:20598346

  3. Safe Haven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Gail

    2003-01-01

    Discusses school libraries as safe havens for teenagers and considers elements that foster that atmosphere, including the physical environment, lack of judgments, familiarity, leisure, and a welcoming nature. Focuses on the importance of relationships, and taking the time to listen to teens and encourage them. (LRW)

  4. A Safe and Welcoming Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zingher, Gary

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the theme of safe and comforting places for children, and how libraries can help provide safe havens for children. Presents a survey of safe places in selected works of children's literature. Includes a sampler of creative activities focusing on the theme, and a list of resources (books and videotapes). (AEF)

  5. Working Safe and Feeling Fine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milshtein, Amy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the problem of repetitive stress disorders in the administrative workplace and shares some quick fixes to aid ergonomics. Some thoughts on the ergonomics of office chairs are provided as is the use of professional guidance in furniture purchasing. (GR)

  6. Safe Kids Worldwide

    MedlinePLUS

    ... We Are What We Do Find Your Safe Kids Safe Kids Day Keeping All Kids Safe Safety Tips Get Involved 4 Star Charity ... We Are What We Do Find Your Safe Kids Safe Kids Day Keeping All Kids Safe Safety ...

  7. 48 CFR 8.405-1 - Ordering procedures for supplies, and services not requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... supplies, and services not requiring a statement of work. 8.405-1 Section 8.405-1 Federal Acquisition... statement of work. (a) Ordering activities shall use the procedures of this subsection when ordering... specific task, where a statement of work is not required (e.g., installation, maintenance, and repair)....

  8. 48 CFR 8.405-1 - Ordering procedures for supplies, and services not requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... supplies, and services not requiring a statement of work. 8.405-1 Section 8.405-1 Federal Acquisition... statement of work. (a) Ordering activities shall use the procedures of this subsection when ordering... specific task, where a statement of work is not required (e.g., installation, maintenance, and repair)....

  9. Analogous Mechanisms of Selection and Updating in Declarative and Procedural Working Memory: Experiments and a Computational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberauer, Klaus; Souza, Alessandra S.; Druey, Michel D.; Gade, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    The article investigates the mechanisms of selecting and updating representations in declarative and procedural working memory (WM). Declarative WM holds the objects of thought available, whereas procedural WM holds representations of what to do with these objects. Both systems consist of three embedded components: activated long-term memory, a…

  10. Safe Lock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Model 1150 electronic spring latch, which provides controlled and timed access to a safe, was developed by Burnett Electronics Lab, Inc., San Diego, CA, and is marketed by KeyOne, Inc. also of San Diego. The Model 1150 is a spinoff from a spinoff. The original spinoff, the acoustic pinger, is an underwater transmitting device developed by Langley Research Center and the Navy for location and recovery of sounding rocket research payloads from the ocean. Long functioning life is a vital requirement for both the acoustic pinger and the Model 1150. The electronic spring latch employs the pinger power management technology to get long life out of the battery power source.

  11. TANK OPERATIONS CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGY UTILIZING THE AGENCY METHOD OF CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT TO SAFELY AND EFFECTIVELY COMPLETE NUCLEAR CONSTRUCTION WORK

    SciTech Connect

    LESO KF; HAMILTON HM; FARNER M; HEATH T

    2010-01-14

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has faced significant project management challenges in managing Davis-Bacon construction work that meets contractually required small business goals. The unique challenge is to provide contracting opportunities to multiple small business construction subcontractors while performing high hazard work in a safe and productive manner. Previous to the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC contract, Construction work at the Hanford Tank Farms was contracted to large companies, while current Department of Energy (DOE) Contracts typically emphasize small business awards. As an integral part of Nuclear Project Management at Hanford Tank Farms, construction involves removal of old equipment and structures and installation of new infrastructure to support waste retrieval and waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment Plant. Utilizing the optimum construction approach ensures that the contractors responsible for this work are successful in meeting safety, quality, cost and schedule objectives while working in a very hazardous environment. This paper describes the successful transition from a traditional project delivery method that utilized a large business general contractor and subcontractors to a new project construction management model that is more oriented to small businesses. Construction has selected the Agency Construction Management Method. This method was implemented in the first quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2009, where Construction Management is performed by substantially home office resources from the URS Northwest Office in Richland, Washington. The Agency Method has allowed WRPS to provide proven Construction Managers and Field Leads to mentor and direct small business contractors, thus providing expertise and assurance of a successful project. Construction execution contracts are subcontracted directly by WRPS to small or disadvantaged contractors that are mentored and supported by DRS personnel. Each small contractor is mentored and supported utilizing the principles of the Construction Industry Institute (CII) Partnering process. Some of the key mentoring and partnering areas that are explored in this paper are, internal and external safety professional support, subcontractor safety teams and the interface with project and site safety teams, quality assurance program support to facilitate compliance with NQA-1, construction, team roles and responsibilities, work definition for successful fixed price contracts, scheduling and interface with project schedules and cost projection/accruals. The practical application of the CII Partnering principles, with the Construction Management expertise of URS, has led to a highly successful construction model that also meets small business contracting goals.

  12. 45 CFR 261.64 - How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Ensure the Accuracy of Work Participation Information? § 261.64 How will we determine whether a State's... assess the accuracy of the data filed by States for use in calculating the work participation rates....

  13. 45 CFR 261.64 - How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Ensure the Accuracy of Work Participation Information? § 261.64 How will we determine whether a State's... assess the accuracy of the data filed by States for use in calculating the work participation rates....

  14. 45 CFR 261.64 - How will we determine whether a State's work verification procedures ensure an accurate work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Ensure the Accuracy of Work Participation Information? § 261.64 How will we determine whether a State's... assess the accuracy of the data filed by States for use in calculating the work participation rates....

  15. When Is Safe, Safe Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neil, Kirk

    2002-01-01

    Discusses events affecting parental school-safety concerns and what school districts can do to alleviate those concerns. Addresses post-September 11 crisis-management procedures, preventing sports-related student deaths, maintaining healthy indoor air quality. (PKP)

  16. Arthroscopic Bankart-Bristow-Latarjet (2B3) Procedure: How to Do It and Tricks To Make it Easier and Safe.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Pascal; Mercier, Numa; Old, Jason

    2010-07-01

    The all-arthroscopic technique that the authors propose combines a Bristow-Latarjet procedure with a Bankart repair. This combined procedure provides a triple blocking of the shoulder (the so-called 2B3 procedure): (1) the labral repair recreates the anterior bumper and protects the humeral head from direct contact with the coracoid bone graft (Bumper effect); (2) the transferred coracoid bone block compensates for anterior glenoid bone loss (Bony effect); and (3) the transferred conjoined tendon creates a dynamic sling that reinforces the weak anteroinferior capsule by lowering the inferior part of the subscapularis when the arm is abducted and externally rotated (Belt or sling effect). The procedure combines the theoretic advantages of the Bristow-Latarjet procedure and the arthroscopic Bankart repair, eliminating the potential disadvantages of each. The extra-articular positioning of the bone block together with the labral repair and capsule retensioning allows the surgeon to perform a nearly anatomic shoulder repair. This novel procedure allows the surgeon to extend the indications of arthroscopic shoulder reconstruction to the subset of patients with recurrent anteroinferior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss and capsular deficiency. It is an attractive surgical option to treat patients with a previous failed capsulolabral repair for which the surgical solutions are limited. PMID:20497813

  17. Safe handling of large animals.

    PubMed

    Grandin, T

    1999-01-01

    The major causes of accidents with cattle, horses, and other grazing animals are: panic due to fear, male dominance aggression, or the maternal aggression of a mother protecting her newborn. Danger is inherent when handling large animals. Understanding their behavior patterns improves safety, but working with animals will never be completely safe. Calm, quiet handling and non-slip flooring are beneficial. Rough handling and excessive use of electric prods increase chances of injury to both people and animals, because fearful animals may jump, kick, or rear. Training animals to voluntarily cooperate with veterinary procedures reduces stress and improves safety. Grazing animals have a herd instinct, and a lone, isolated animal can become agitated. Providing a companion animal helps keep an animal calm. PMID:10329901

  18. Safe handling of large animals.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Grandin T

    1999-04-01

    The major causes of accidents with cattle, horses, and other grazing animals are: panic due to fear, male dominance aggression, or the maternal aggression of a mother protecting her newborn. Danger is inherent when handling large animals. Understanding their behavior patterns improves safety, but working with animals will never be completely safe. Calm, quiet handling and non-slip flooring are beneficial. Rough handling and excessive use of electric prods increase chances of injury to both people and animals, because fearful animals may jump, kick, or rear. Training animals to voluntarily cooperate with veterinary procedures reduces stress and improves safety. Grazing animals have a herd instinct, and a lone, isolated animal can become agitated. Providing a companion animal helps keep an animal calm.

  19. Safe Manual Jettison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Jay

    2008-01-01

    In space, the controlled release of certain cargoes is no less useful than the maritime jettisons from which they take their name but is also much more dangerous. Experience has shown that jettisons can be performed safely, but the process is complicated with the path to performing a jettison taking months or even years. In the background, time is also required to write procedures, train the crew, configure the vehicle, and many other activities. This paper outlines the current process used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for manual jettisons, detailing the methods used to assure that the jettisons and the jettisoned objects are as safe as achievable and that the crew is adequately trained to be able to affect the safe jettison. The goal of this paper is not only to capture what it takes to perform safe jettisons in the near Earth environment but to extrapolate this knowledge to future space exploration scenarios that will likely have Extravehicular Activity (EVA) and International Partner (IP) interfaces.

  20. Aerosols and Particulates Workshop Sampling Procedures and Venues Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pachlhofer, Peter; Howard, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The Sampling Procedures and Venues Workgroup discussed the potential venues available and issues associated with obtaining measurements. Some of the issues included Incoming Air Quality, Sampling Locations, Probes and Sample Systems. The following is a summary of the discussion of the issues and venues. The influence of inlet air to the measurement of exhaust species, especially trace chemical species, must be considered. Analysis procedures for current engine exhaust emissions regulatory measurements require adjustments for air inlet humidity. As a matter of course in scientific investigations, it is recommended that "background" measurements for any species, particulate or chemical, be performed during inlet air flow before initiation of combustion, if possible, and during the engine test period as feasible and practical. For current regulatory measurements, this would be equivalent to setting the "zero" level for conventional gas analyzers. As a minimum, it is recommended that measurements of the humidity and particulates in the incoming air be taken at the start and end of each test run. Additional measurement points taken during the run are desirable if they can be practically obtained. It was felt that the presence of trace gases in the incoming air is not a significant problem. However, investigators should consider the ambient levels and influences of local air pollution for species of interest. Desired measurement locations depend upon the investigation requirements. A complete investigation of phenomenology of particulate formation and growth requires measurements at a number of locations both within the engine and in the exhaust field downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Desirable locations for both extractive and in situ measurements include: (1) Combustion Zone (Multiple axial locations); (2) Combustor Exit (Multiple radial locations for annular combustors); (3) Turbine Stage (Inlet and exit of the stage); (4) Exit Nozzle (Multiple axial locations downstream of the nozzle). Actual locations with potential for extractive or non-intrusive measurements depend upon the test article and test configuration. Committee members expressed the importance of making investigators aware of various ports that could allow access to various stages of the existing engines. Port locations are engine si)ecific and might allow extractive sampling or innovative hybrid optical-probe access. The turbine stage region was one the most desirable locations for obtaining samples and might be accessed through boroscope ports available in some engine designs. Discussions of probes and sampling systems quickly identified issues dependent on particular measurement quantities. With general consensus, the group recommends SAE procedures for measurements and data analyses of currently regulated exhaust species (CO2, CO, THC, NO(x),) using conventional gas sampling techniques. Special procedures following sound scientific practices must be developed as required for species and/or measurement conditions not covered by SAE standards. Several issues arose concerning short lived radicals and highly reactive species. For conventional sampling, there are concerns of perturbing the sample during extraction, line losses, line-wall reactions, and chemical reactions during the sample transport to the analyzers. Sample lines coated with quartz.or other materials should be investigated for minimization of such effects. The group advocates the development of innovative probe techniques and non-intrusive optical techniques for measurement of short lived radicals and highly reactive species that cannot be sampled accurately otherwise. Two innovative probe concepts were discussed. One concept uses specially designed probes to transfer optical beams to and from a region of flow inaccessible by traditional ports or windows. The probe can perturb the flow field but must have a negligible impact on the region to be optically sampled. Such probes are referred to as hybrid probes and are under development at AEDC for measurement in the high pressure, high temperature of a combustor under development for power generation. The other concept consists of coupling an instrument directly to the probe. The probe would isolate a representative sample stream, freeze chemical reactions and direct the sample into the analyzer portion of the probe. Thus, the measurement would be performed in situ without sample line losses due either to reactions or binding at the wall surfaces. This concept was used to develop a fast, in situ, time-of-flight mass spectrometer measurement system for temporal quantification of NO in the IMPULSE facility at AEDC. Additional work is required in this area to determine the best probe and sampling technique for each species measurement requirement identified by the Trace Chemistry Working Group. A partial list of Venues was used as a baseline for discussion. Additional venues were added to the list and the list was broken out into the following categories: (1)Engines (a) Sea Level Test Stands (b) Altitude Chambers; (2) Annular Combustor Test Stands, (3) Sector Flametube Test Stands, (4) Fundamentals Rigs/Experiments.

  1. Scaling the Acceptability of Behavior Decelerative Procedures: Perceptions of Staff Working with Persons with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, David B.; Silverstein, Jay M.

    This study sought to examine the structure and consistency of perceptions of behavior deceleration procedures within populations, provide a preliminary "index" of acceptability, determine if these procedures can be categorized into meaningful groups, and examine the consistency of perceptions across populations. Subjects were 20 professional-level…

  2. Teaching Common Errors in Applying a Procedure. IDD&E Working Paper No. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentti, Fredy E.; And Others

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that students who are given common errors matched with correct performance as part of their instruction in carrying out a procedure will perform better than students who are given only the correct performance. The task was the procedure for correcting color imbalances in color slides, and 56 college…

  3. Safe Passage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razwick, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Many schools are almost entirely reliant on alarms and sprinklers for their fire protection. As these devices need to be triggered and supplied with power or water to work properly, they are vulnerable to errors. To provide adequate safety, a good fire-protection program must have three primary elements: fire protection and suppression, and…

  4. Radon Testing for Safe Schools Act. Report (To Accompany S. 1697) from the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.

    This report was written to accompany the Radon Testing for Safe Schools Act (S.1697), a bill that provides for radon testing of schools located in high risk radon areas and provides limited financial assistance to schools for mitigation of high levels of radon. A description of radon, its harmful effects, and the radon levels detected in schools…

  5. Prenatal Diagnosis: Current Procedures and Implications for Early Interventionists Working with Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasco, Patricia M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This article provides an overview of procedures commonly used in prenatal screening and diagnosis including ultrasound, amniocentesis, chorionic villus biopsy, maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis. Emphasis is on the role of the early interventionist in supporting families during prenatal diagnosis. (Author/DB)

  6. Working Memory, Task Switching, and Executive Control in the Task Span Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Four experiments explored the task span procedure: Subjects received lists of 1-10 task names to remember and then lists of 1-10 stimuli on which to perform the tasks. Task span is the number of tasks performed in order perfectly. Experiment 1 compared the task span with the traditional memory span in 6 practiced subjects and found little…

  7. [Minimally invasive procedures in heart surgery. How does it work and who profits?].

    PubMed

    Schütz, A; Mair, H; Wildhirt, S M; Reichart, B

    2001-03-01

    The leading minimally invasive procedures employed in coronary surgery are minimally invasive direct coronary arterial bypass surgery (MIDCAB) and the Octopus system. These interventions are performed on the beating heart and require no extracorporeal circulation (ECC), thus avoiding the side effects, such as pulmonary or neurological complications, associated with ECC. In surgery on the mitral or aortic valve, the procedures are carried out via small incisions in the non-beating heart, and endovascular bypass systems (e.g. Port-Access) are sometimes needed for EEC. The advantages of small incisions are a reduction in the risk of infection, shorter hospital stay and, in particular, improved cosmesis. A disadvantage is the longer operating time. Only careful patients selection guarantees successful surgery. PMID:11268737

  8. How Safe Are Kid-Safe Search Engines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masterson-Krum, Hope

    2001-01-01

    Examines search tools available to elementary and secondary school students, both human-compiled and crawler-based, to help direct them to age-appropriate Web sites; analyzes the procedures of search engines labeled family-friendly or kid safe that use filters; and tests the effectiveness of these services to students in school libraries. (LRW)

  9. Buying & Using Medicine Safely

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Consumers (Drugs) Buying & Using Medicine Safely Buying & Using Medicine Safely Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... with your health professionals to make the best medicine choices, buy safely, and use medicine so it's ...

  10. Mesothelioma in a wine cellar man: detailed description of working procedures and past asbestos exposure estimation.

    PubMed

    Nemo, Alessandro; Silvestri, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    A pleural mesothelioma arose in an employee of a wine farm whose work history shows an unusual occupational exposure to asbestos. The information, gathered directly from the case and from a work colleague, clarifies some aspects of the use of asbestos in the process of winemaking which has not been previously reported in such details. The man had worked as a winemaker from 1960 to 1988 in a farm, which in those years produced around 2500 hectoliters of wine per year, mostly white. The wine was filtered to remove impurities; the filter was created by dispersing in the wine asbestos fibers followed by diatomite while the wine was circulating several times and clogging a prefilter made of a dense stainless steel net. Chrysotile asbestos was the sole asbestos mineralogical variety used in these filters and exposure could occur during the phase of mixing dry fibers in the wine and during the filter replacement. A daily and annual time weighted average level of exposure and cumulative dose have been estimated in the absence of airborne asbestos fiber monitoring performed in that workplace. Since 1993, the Italian National Mesothelioma Register, an epidemiological surveillance system, has recorded eight cases with at least one work period spent as winemaker. Four of them never used asbestos filters and presented exposures during other work periods, the other four used asbestos filters but had also other exposures in other industrial divisions. For the information hitherto available, this is the first mesothelioma case with exclusive exposure in the job of winemaking. PMID:25296690

  11. Aerosols and Particulates Workshop Sampling Procedures and Venues Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pachlhofer, Peter; Howard, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The Sampling Procedures and Venues Workgroup discussed the potential venues available and issues associated with obtaining measurements. Some of the issues included Incoming Air Quality, Sampling Locations, Probes and Sample Systems. The following is a summary of the discussion of the issues and venues. The influence of inlet air to the measurement of exhaust species, especially trace chemical species, must be considered. Analysis procedures for current engine exhaust emissions regulatory measurements require adjustments for air inlet humidity. As a matter of course in scientific investigations, it is recommended that "background" measurements for any species, particulate or chemical, be performed during inlet air flow before initiation of combustion, if possible, and during the engine test period as feasible and practical. For current regulatory measurements, this would be equivalent to setting the "zero" level for conventional gas analyzers. As a minimum, it is recommended that measurements of the humidity and particulates in the incoming air be taken at the start and end of each test run. Additional measurement points taken during the run are desirable if they can be practically obtained. It was felt that the presence of trace gases in the incoming air is not a significant problem. However, investigators should consider the ambient levels and influences of local air pollution for species of interest. Desired measurement locations depend upon the investigation requirements. A complete investigation of phenomenology of particulate formation and growth requires measurements at a number of locations both within the engine and in the exhaust field downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Desirable locations for both extractive and in situ measurements include: (1) Combustion Zone (Multiple axial locations); (2) Combustor Exit (Multiple radial locations for annular combustors); (3) Turbine Stage (Inlet and exit of the stage); (4) Exit Nozzle (Multiple axial locations downstream of the nozzle). Actual locations with potential for extractive or non-intrusive measurements depend upon the test article and test configuration. Committee members expressed the importance of making investigators aware of various ports that could allow access to various stages of the existing engines. Port locations are engine si)ecific and might allow extractive sampling or innovative hybrid optical-probe access. The turbine stage region was one the most desirable locations for obtaining samples and might be accessed through boroscope ports available in some engine designs. Discussions of probes and sampling systems quickly identified issues dependent on particular measurement quantities. With general consensus, the group recommends SAE procedures for measurements and data analyses of currently regulated exhaust species (CO2, CO, THC, NO(x),) using conventional gas sampling techniques. Special procedures following sound scientific practices must be developed as required for species and/or measurement conditions not covered by SAE standards. Several issues arose concerning short lived radicals and highly reactive species. For conventional sampling, there are concerns of perturbing the sample during extraction, line losses, line-wall reactions, and chemical reactions during the sample transport to the analyzers. Sample lines coated with quartz.or other materials should be investigated for minimization of such effects. The group advocates the development of innovative probe techniques and non-intrusive optical techniques for measurement of short lived radicals and highly reactive species that cannot be sampled accurately otherwise. Two innovative probe concepts were discussed. One concept uses specially designed probes to transfer optical beams to and from a region of flow inaccessible by traditional ports or windows. The probe can perturb the flow field but must have a negligible impact on the region to be optically sampled. Such probes are referred to as hybrid probes and are under development at AEDC for measurement in the high press

  12. 30 CFR 56.11001 - Safe access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safe access. 56.11001 Section 56.11001 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Travelways § 56.11001 Safe access. Safe means of access shall be provided and maintained to all working places....

  13. 30 CFR 56.11001 - Safe access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safe access. 56.11001 Section 56.11001 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Travelways § 56.11001 Safe access. Safe means of access shall be provided and maintained to all working places....

  14. Operating thermal incinerators safely

    SciTech Connect

    Leite, O.C.

    1998-06-01

    Thermal incinerators (also called thermal oxidizers) have recently won widespread acceptance for treating liquid and gaseous wastes at CPI plants worldwide. However, as several recent accidents at US plants attest, safe operation is not a given. These systems are chemical reactors that convert unwanted organic compounds into carbon dioxide and water. A typical system includes a high-temperature oxidizing chamber, a quench section, an array of air-pollution-control devices, and various instrumentation and controls. Safety considerations must be implemented to reduce explosion risk and prevent flashback and detonation into and out of the incinerator and upstream vapor-feed ducts. Control system configuration, flammability monitoring and operating procedures must be established to ensure personnel, equipment and environmental safety.

  15. Safe handling practices for electrostatic-sensitive devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    Review is detailed compilation of safe handling practices for Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) circuit elements and other devices that are susceptible to damage by electrostatic discharge. Article lists safety procedures for all aspects of handling and use of these components. Included are guidelines for setting up static-free work station and list of materials and equipment needed to maintain antistatic protection. Appendix gives vendors of these items.

  16. The Effect of Principle-Procedure and Procedure-Principle Sequencing on Learning Outcomes. IDD&E Working Paper No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim-Quek, Muriel; And Others

    This study tested the effects of two instructional sequences--principle-procedure and procedure-principle--on the application and transfer of learning. It was hypothesized that a principle-procedure sequence would result in better near-transfer and far-transfer and that students would prefer this sequence. The 38 freshmen enrolled in a business…

  17. Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Annette M.

    2003-01-01

    Draws upon Maria Montessori's writings to examine work as a universal human tendency throughout life. Discusses the work of adaptation of the infant, work of "psycho-muscular organism" for the preschooler, work of the imagination for the elementary child, community work of the adolescent, and work of the adult. Asserts that Montessorians' role is…

  18. Simultaneous determination of pesticides, biopesticides and mycotoxins in organic products applying a quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe extraction procedure and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Romero-González, R; Garrido Frenich, A; Martínez Vidal, J L; Prestes, O D; Grio, S L

    2011-03-18

    A method for the simultaneous determination of pesticides, biopesticides and mycotoxins from organic products was developed. Extraction of more than 90 compounds was evaluated and performed by using a modified QuEChERS-based (acronym of Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe) sample preparation procedure. The method was based on a single extraction with acidified acetonitrile, followed by partitioning with salts, avoiding any clean-up step prior the determination by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Validation studies were carried out in wheat, cucumber and red wine as representative matrixes. Recoveries of the spiked samples were in the range between 70 and 120% (with intra-day precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, lower than 20%) for most of the analysed compounds, except picloram and quinmerac. Inter-day precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, was lower than 24%. Limits of quantification were lower than 10μg kg⁻¹ and the developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of organic food products, detecting analytes belonging to the three types of compounds. PMID:21292276

  19. Safe Finger Tourniquet-Ideas.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lin-Gwei; Chen, Chieh-Feng; Hwang, Chun-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Chiu, Wen-Kuan; Li, Chun-Chang; Wang, Hsian-Jenn

    2016-03-01

    Tourniquets are often needed for optimized phalangeal surgeries. However, few surgeons forget to remove them and caused ischemic injuries. We have a modified method to create a safe finger tourniquet for short duration finger surgeries, which can avoid such tragedy. It is done by donning a glove, cutting the tip of the glove over the finger of interest, and rolling the glove finger to the base. From 2010 to 2013, approximately 54 patients underwent digital surgical procedures with our safe finger tourniquet. Because the glove cannot be forgotten to be removed, the tourniquet must be released and removed. This is a simple and efficient way to apply a safe finger tourniquet by using hand rubber glove for a short-term bloodless finger surgery and can achieve an excellent surgical result. PMID:26855166

  20. Promoting Safe Work for Young Workers: A Community-Based Approach. A Resource Guide Documenting the Experiences of Three Young Worker Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Diane; Gonzalez-Arroyo, Michele; Stock, Laura; Delp, Linda; Miara, Christine; Dewey, Robin; Sinclair, Raymond C.; Ortega, Maria J.

    This guide presents the lessons learned from three health education projects that focused on young worker issues and were funded by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. In these projects, occupational health educators worked for 3 years, in three different communities, to raise the awareness of young worker issues, including…

  1. Technologies for safe births.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    The basic elements of a safe birth are proper prenatal care, adequate preparation of the mother, health worker, and site, awareness of the progress of labor and safe delivery, recognition of danger signs, and appropriate follow-up care. Technologies are differentiated by determining 1) the needs of rural birth attendants, 2) the nature of delivery kits, 3) proper cleanliness of the hands and equipment, and appropriate use of 5) disinfecting equipment, 6) drugs and medications, 7) the vertical position, 8) specialized instruments, and 9) records and support materials. Alternatives for measuring time are indicated. Customized kits available from UNICEF are described; some of the problems with these kits are reported. The logistics, referral procedures, and training and supervision needed for appropriate program managements are discussed. Adapting technologies to the local environment requires assessing the practices of traditional birth attendants (TBAs), the provision of kits (cost, ease of use and maintenance, replacement, durability, availability), the training required for proper use of equipment, the logistics of kit use, side effects of technologies, community attitudes, and evaluation. The advantages and disadvantages of including or not including particular supplies in the kit are discussed, i.e., the container for boiling water would either be a local pot or the aluminum carrying case. In lieu of a fingernail brush, a twig may be used for nail cleaning. Hand washing where water shortages exist might entail using a tin with a hole plugged with a stick to let water trickle as needed. Antiseptic solutions such a Dettol or Savlon can be used where a severe shortage exists. Basic equipment includes: soap and water, a container for boiling, other sterile containers, a protective cover of delivery area, towels, swabs, an optional apron, cord ties, a cutting instrument, gauze, a receiving blanket, records, and a carrying case. PMID:12317767

  2. Safe driving for teens

    MedlinePLUS

    Driving and teenagers; Teens and safe driving; Automobile safety - teenage drivers ... Make a Commitment to Safety Teens also need to commit to being safe and responsible drivers in order to improve the odds in their favor. Reckless driving ...

  3. Medicines: Use Them Safely

    MedlinePLUS

    ... raquo Medicines: Use Them Safely Heath and Aging Medicines: Use Them Safely What Are Medicines? What Are ... they’re taking many different drugs. What Are Medicines? What Are Drugs? Some people refer to the ...

  4. Safe medication administration.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Lora J; Courey, Tamra J

    2007-01-01

    Safe medication administration continues to be challenging for healthcare providers as evidenced by the escalating occurrences of actual and potential errors. Creating a safe medication environment requires an interdisciplinary approach and use of evidence-based practice recommendations for safe medication administration. PMID:17149084

  5. Safe Disposal of Highly Reactive Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunn, George; Sansone, Eric B.

    1994-01-01

    Provides specific procedures for the disposal of a variety of highly reactive chemicals and reports the results of a study of their safe disposal. Disposal of some problematic sulfur-containing compounds are included. Procedures are based on a combination of literature review and author development. (LZ)

  6. Procedure-Authoring Tool Improves Safety on Oil Rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Dark, cold, and dangerous environments are plentiful in space and on Earth. To ensure safe operations in difficult surroundings, NASA relies heavily on procedures written well ahead of time. Houston-based TRACLabs Inc. worked with Ames Research Center through the SBIR program to create an electronic procedure authoring tool, now used by NASA and companies in the oil and gas industry.

  7. Effect of clozapine on interval timing and working memory for time in the peak-interval procedure with gaps.

    PubMed

    Buhusi, Catalin V; Meck, Warren H

    2007-02-22

    Previous research indicates that dopamine controls both the speed of an internal clock [Maricq, A.V., Church, R.M., 1983. The differential effects of haloperidol and methamphetamine on time estimation in the rat. Psychopharmacology 79, 10-15] and sharing of resources between the timer and other cognitive processes [Buhusi, C.V., 2003. Dopaminergic mechanisms of interval timing and attention. In: Meck, W.H. (Ed.), Functional and Neural Mechanisms of Interval Timing. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, pp. 317-338]. For example, dopamine agonist methamphetamine increases the speed of an internal clock and resets timing after a gap, while dopamine antagonist haloperidol decreases the speed of an internal clock and stops timing during a gap [Buhusi, C.V., Meck, W.H., 2002. Differential effects of methamphetamine and haloperidol on the control of an internal clock. Behav. Neurosci. 116, 291-297]. Using a 20-s peak-interval procedure with gaps we examined the acute effects of clozapine (2.0mg/kg i.p.), which exerts differential effects on dopamine and serotonin in the cortex and striatum, two brain areas involved in interval timing and working memory. Relative to saline, clozapine injections shifted the response functions leftward both in trials with and without gaps, suggesting that clozapine increased the speed of an internal clock and facilitated the maintenance of the pre-gap interval in working memory. These results suggest that clozapine exerts effects in different brain areas in a manner that allows for the pharmacological separation of clock speed and working memory as a function of peak trials without and with gaps. PMID:17141425

  8. Organizing Safe Transitions from Intensive Care

    PubMed Central

    Häggström, Marie; Bäckström, Britt

    2014-01-01

    Background. Organizing and performing patient transfers in the continuum of care is part of the work of nurses and other staff of a multiprofessional healthcare team. An understanding of discharge practices is needed in order to ultimate patients' transfers from high technological intensive care units (ICU) to general wards. Aim. To describe, as experienced by intensive care and general ward staff, what strategies could be used when organizing patient's care before, during, and after transfer from intensive care. Method. Interviews of 15 participants were conducted, audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results. The results showed that the categories secure, encourage, and collaborate are strategies used in the three phases of the ICU transitional care process. The main category; a safe, interactive rehabilitation process, illustrated how all strategies were characterized by an intention to create and maintain safety during the process. A three-way interaction was described: between staff and patient/families, between team members and involved units, and between patient/family and environment. Discussion/Conclusions. The findings highlight that ICU transitional care implies critical care rehabilitation. Discharge procedures need to be safe and structured and involve collaboration, encouraging support, optimal timing, early mobilization, and a multidiscipline approach. PMID:24782924

  9. Choosing Safe Baby Products

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Q&A Recipes En Español Teachers - ... to Know Choosing Safe Baby Products KidsHealth > Parents > First Aid & Safety > Home Sweet Home > Choosing Safe Baby Products Print ...

  10. Beth Reis and the Safe Schools Coalition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaught, Sabina E.

    2007-01-01

    This article chronicles the formation and organization of the Safe Schools Coalition (SCC) through the experiences of Beth Reis, co-founder and co-Chair. The article suggests ways in which the SCC can serve as a model for both collective and individual work in promoting safe schools.

  11. Aflatoxins and safe storage

    PubMed Central

    Villers, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The paper examines both field experience and research on the prevention of the exponential growth of aflatoxins during multi-month post-harvest storage in hot, humid countries. The approach described is the application of modern safe storage methods using flexible, Ultra Hermetic™ structures that create an unbreatheable atmosphere through insect and microorganism respiration alone, without use of chemicals, fumigants, or pumps. Laboratory and field data are cited and specific examples are given describing the uses of Ultra Hermetic storage to prevent the growth of aflatoxins with their significant public health consequences. Also discussed is the presently limited quantitative information on the relative occurrence of excessive levels of aflatoxin (>20 ppb) before vs. after multi-month storage of such crops as maize, rice, and peanuts when under high humidity, high temperature conditions and, consequently, the need for further research to determine the frequency at which excessive aflatoxin levels are reached in the field vs. after months of post-harvest storage. The significant work being done to reduce aflatoxin levels in the field is mentioned, as well as its probable implications on post-harvest storage. Also described is why, with some crops such as peanuts, using Ultra Hermetic storage may require injection of carbon dioxide, or use of an oxygen absorber as an accelerant. The case of peanuts is discussed and experimental data is described. PMID:24782846

  12. 30 CFR 250.1913 - What criteria for operating procedures must my SEMS program meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SEMS program meet? 250.1913 Section 250.1913 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT... procedures that provide instructions for conducting safe and environmentally sound activities involved in... must develop and implement safe and environmentally sound work practices for identified hazards...

  13. Development of a systems theoretical procedure for evaluation of the work organization of the cockpit crew of a civil transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fricke, M.; Vees, C.

    1983-01-01

    To achieve optimum design for the man machine interface with aircraft, a description of the interaction and work organization of the cockpit crew is needed. The development of system procedure to evaluate the work organization of pilots while structuring the work process is examined. Statistical data are needed to simulate sequences of pilot actions on the computer. Investigations of computer simulation and applicability for evaluation of crew concepts are discussed.

  14. Safe Use of Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medicines Heath and Aging Safe Use of Medicines Introduction Read this booklet for practical tips to make ... 59 MB) Order Share this: ​ Table of Contents Introduction Neighbors Gail and Alice talk about medicine safety ...

  15. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F. (Orland Park, IL)

    1993-01-01

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  16. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-07-06

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  17. Are Detox Diets Safe?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a good bet? Not really. Like many other fad diets, detox diets can have harmful side effects, especially ... Lose Weight Safely? 5 Ways to Spot a Fad Diet Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  18. Karate: Keep It Safe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, David

    1981-01-01

    Safety guidelines for each phase of a karate practice session are presented to provide an accident-free and safe environment for teaching karate in a physical education or traditional karate training program. (JMF)

  19. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  20. Work.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2002-01-01

    The very nature of work is changing because of rapid social change, a culture of abundance, and the ability to substitute information for equipment, inventory, and other material aspects of value creation. In America, we are experiencing an erosion of the concept of a "job," a dramatic shift to service and information as the basis for value added, market commercialism, and the importance of the self-managed career. In some of these areas, dentistry has been consistent with the patterns of innovation--even being a model in some cases. There are also areas where dentistry is moving in contrary directions. PMID:12602221

  1. Improved water does not mean safe water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, L. H.; Guo, Y.; Schwab, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    This work presents a model for estimating global access to drinking water that meets World Health Organization (WHO) water quality guidelines. The currently accepted international estimate of global access to safe water, the WHO and United Nations Children's Fund's (UNICEF) Joint Monitoring Program (JMP) report, estimates the population with access to water service infrastructure that is classified as improved and unimproved. The JMP report uses access to improved water sources as a proxy for access to safe water, but improved water sources do not always meet drinking water quality guidelines. Therefore, this report likely overestimates the number of people with access to safe water. Based on the JMP estimate, the United Nations has recently announced that the world has reached the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target for access to safe water. Our new framework employs a statistical model that incorporates source water quality, water supply interruptions, water storage practices, and point of use water treatment to estimate access to safe water, resulting in a figure that is lower than the JMP estimate of global access to safe water. We estimate that at least 28% of the world does not have access to safe water today, as compared to the JMP estimate of 12%. These findings indicate that much more work is needed on the international scale to meet the MDG target for access to safe water.

  2. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR DEFINING WORKING DATABASES AND DATA ENTRY FORMS (HAND ENTRY) (UA-D-3.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to outline a standard approach to naming and defining variables, data types, and data entry forms. This procedure applies to all working databases created during the NHEXAS project and the "Border" study. Keywords: databases; standards.

    The National...

  3. 41 CFR 102-5.65 - What procedures apply when the need for home-to-work transportation exceeds the initial period?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What procedures apply when the need for home-to-work transportation exceeds the initial period? 102-5.65 Section 102-5.65 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL...

  4. 41 CFR 102-5.65 - What procedures apply when the need for home-to-work transportation exceeds the initial period?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What procedures apply when the need for home-to-work transportation exceeds the initial period? 102-5.65 Section 102-5.65 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL...

  5. The Food-Safe Schools Action Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "The Food-Safe School Needs Assessment and Planning Guide" is a tool that can help schools assess their food safety policies, procedures, and programs and develop plans for improvement. This tool includes a simple, straightforward questionnaire, score card, and planning guide that give administrators, school staff, families, and students a chance…

  6. Strategies for safe injections.

    PubMed Central

    Battersby, A.; Feilden, R.; Stoeckel, P.; Da Silva, A.; Nelson, C.; Bass, A.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, faced with growing international concern, WHO set out an approach for achieving injection safety that encompassed all elements from patients' expectations and doctors' prescribing habits to waste disposal. This article follows that lead and describes the implications of the approach for two injection technologies: sterilizable and disposable. It argues that focusing on any single technology diverts attention from the more fundamental need for health services to develop their own comprehensive strategies for safe injections. National health authorities will only be able to ensure that injections are administered safely if they take an approach that encompasses the whole system, and choose injection technologies that fit their circumstances. PMID:10680247

  7. Strategies for selecting optimal sampling and work-up procedures for analysing alkylphenol polyethoxylates in effluents from non-activated sludge biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Stenholm, Ake; Holmström, Sara; Hjärthag, Sandra; Lind, Ola

    2012-01-01

    Trace-level analysis of alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APEOs) in wastewater containing sludge requires the prior removal of contaminants and preconcentration. In this study, the effects on optimal work-up procedures of the types of alkylphenols present, their degree of ethoxylation, the biofilm wastewater treatment and the sample matrix were investigated for these purposes. The sampling spot for APEO-containing specimens from an industrial wastewater treatment plant was optimized, including a box that surrounded the tubing outlet carrying the wastewater, to prevent sedimented sludge contaminating the collected samples. Following these changes, the sampling precision (in terms of dry matter content) at a point just under the tubing leading from the biofilm reactors was 0.7% RSD. The findings were applied to develop a work-up procedure for use prior to a high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection analysis method capable of quantifying nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPEOs) and poorly investigated dinonylphenol polyethoxylates (DNPEOs) at low microg L(-1) concentrations in effluents from non-activated sludge biofilm reactors. The selected multi-step work-up procedure includes lyophilization and pressurized fluid extraction (PFE) followed by strong ion exchange solid phase extraction (SPE). The yields of the combined procedure, according to tests with NP10EO-spiked effluent from a wastewater treatment plant, were in the 62-78% range. PMID:22519096

  8. Keeping Campuses Safe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Describes how colleges and universities are using technology, as well as traditional methods, to keep campuses safe and reduce crime. Topics include using free pizza in a successful contest to teach students about campus safety, installing security cameras, using access-control cards, providing adequate lighting, and creating a bicycle patrol…

  9. Safe Entry, Easy Exit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2008-01-01

    After violent episodes too numerous to list and too terrible to forget, schools and universities have been focused for several years on enhancing security in their facilities. Doors are among the most critical points of concern for school personnel responsible for keeping buildings safe. Education institutions want doors that let the right people…

  10. Keeping Campuses Safe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Describes how colleges and universities are using technology, as well as traditional methods, to keep campuses safe and reduce crime. Topics include using free pizza in a successful contest to teach students about campus safety, installing security cameras, using access-control cards, providing adequate lighting, and creating a bicycle patrol…

  11. Safe Passage: Making It through Adolescence in a Risky Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dryfoos, Joy G.

    The primary job of parents is to ensure safe passage for their children from infancy through adolescence to adulthood. Research has indicated many things schools can do to turn the privilege of safe passage into a right. Three research-based programs that work to achieve safe passage are described. The first is Caring Connection, a "one-stop-shop"…

  12. STANDARD PRACTICE INSTRUCTIONS, PROCEDURES AND RECORD KEEPING AT THE VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOLS RELATIVE TO PRODUCTION WORK ACTIVITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford.

    TRAINING ON "REAL JOBS" HAS LONG BEEN AN ESTABLISHED POLICY OF THE CONNECTICUT VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOLS. JUSTIFICATION FOR SCHOOL PARTICIPATION IN THE FIELD OF ACTUAL COMMERCIAL WORK IS THAT SUCH WORK IS NECESSARY FOR VALID AND COMPLETE TRAINING OF THE STUDENT. REAL JOBS MUST BE RECOGNIZED FOR WHAT THEY ARE, IMPORTANT MEDIA OF TRAINING, NOT…

  13. Experience with fluorine and its safe use as a propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, D. L.; Guenther, M. E.; Stimpson, L. D.; Toth, L. R.; Young, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The industrial and the propulsion experience with fluorine and its derivatives is surveyed. The hazardous qualities of fluorine and safe handling procedures for the substance are emphasized. Procedures which fulfill the safety requirements during ground operations for handling fluorinated propulsion systems are discussed. Procedures to be implemented for use onboard the Space Transportation System are included.

  14. How Safe Are Your Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubel, Robert J.; Blauvelt, Peter D.

    1994-01-01

    As violence in school increases, administrators need to assess school security and take steps to make it effective. School employers must have an understanding of student discipline policies for any security system to work. A security assessment should examine such issues as policies and procedure, school sites, school security staff, and…

  15. An adsorptive stripping voltammetry procedure for ultra-trace determination of U(VI) using double accumulation step on two lead-film working electrodes.

    PubMed

    Korolczuk, Mieczyslaw; Grabarczyk, Malgorzata; Rutyna, Iwona

    2014-12-01

    We report a very sensitive stripping voltammetric procedure for determination of ultra-trace quantity of U(VI) in water samples. A very low detection limit was achieved owing to the application of a new construction of the voltammetric electrode cell with two built-in working electrodes that differed significantly in their surface area. The procedure was based on the double adsorptive accumulation of the U(VI)-cupferron complex onto two lead film working electrodes. Under optimal conditions the detection limit for accumulation time of 120 s for the big electrode and 120 s for the small electrode was about 3.1 × 10(-11) mol L(-1), whereas for accumulation time of 480 s for the big electrode and 240 s for the small electrode it was about 1.1 × 10(-11) mol L(-1). The proposed method was successfully validated using certified reference material seawater NASS-5. PMID:25159419

  16. Approaching Suspicious Substances Safely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    A mineral identification tool that was developed for NASA's Mars Rover Technology Development program is now serving as a powerful tool for U.S. law enforcement agencies and military personnel to identify suspicious liquid and solid substances. The tool can measure unknown substances through glass and plastic packaging materials with the RamanProbe(TradeMark) focused fiber-optic probe. The probe length can be extended up to 200 meters to enable users to analyze potentially dangerous substances at a safe distance. In many cases, the spectrometer and personnel are kept in a safe zone while the probe is positioned next to the sample being analyzed. Being able to identify chemicals in remote locations also saves users time and labor, since otherwise the samples would need to be collected, transported, and prepared prior to measurement in the laboratory.

  17. Microelectromechanical safe arm device

    SciTech Connect

    Roesler, Alexander W.

    2012-06-05

    Microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus and methods for operating, for preventing unintentional detonation of energetic components comprising pyrotechnic and explosive materials, such as air bag deployment systems, munitions and pyrotechnics. The MEM apparatus comprises an interrupting member that can be moved to block (interrupt) or complete (uninterrupt) an explosive train that is part of an energetic component. One or more latching members are provided that engage and prevent the movement of the interrupting member, until the one or more latching members are disengaged from the interrupting member. The MEM apparatus can be utilized as a safe and arm device (SAD) and electronic safe and arm device (ESAD) in preventing unintentional detonations. Methods for operating the MEM apparatus include independently applying drive signals to the actuators coupled to the latching members, and an actuator coupled to the interrupting member.

  18. Ultimate Safe (US) Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, U.; Daugherty, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Ultimate Safe (US) Reactor is a reactor that eliminates the traditional safety concerns of nuclear fission reactors. The US reactor has an insignificant source term and no reasonable criticality accident. Furthermore, the negligible residual after-heat in the reactor renders its shutdown capability comparable or superior to conventional power sources. Fission products are continuously removed at the rate they are produced. The reactor is operated with no excess criticality, hence no criticality accident is reasonably possible. The reactor is controlled safely by its negative temperature coeffiient. The reactor maintains criticality by an internal breeding ratio that is trimmed to be exactly one. The US reactor requires a fluid fuel and on-line, continuous fuel processing. Molten salt fuel was selected for its low vapor pressure at high temperature; adequate solubility of uranium and thorium as fluorides; good compatibility with structural materials; absence of irradiation damage; high negative temperature coefficient and amply developed technology and experience.

  19. 32 CFR 105.12 - SAFE Kit collection and preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false SAFE Kit collection and preservation. 105.12 Section 105.12 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION AND RESPONSE PROGRAM PROCEDURES § 105.12 SAFE Kit collection and preservation. For the purposes of...

  20. 29 CFR 1910.420 - Safe practices manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safe practices manual. 1910.420 Section 1910.420 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations General Operations Procedures § 1910.420 Safe practices manual. (a)...

  1. Addressing Lead-Based Paint Hazards During Renovation, Remodeling, and Rehabilitation in Federally Owned and Assisted Housing. Instructor Manual for Use in HUD-Sponsored Lead-Safe Work Practices Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics.

    This document is the instructor's manual for a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) training course that reflects the requirements of HUD's Lead Safe Housing Rule and is designed to provide training contractors with information regarding containment, minimization, and cleanup of lead hazards during activities that disturb…

  2. Asymptotically safe Higgs inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi; He, Hong-Jian E-mail: hjhe@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2014-10-01

    We construct a new inflation model in which the standard model Higgs boson couples minimally to gravity and acts as the inflaton. Our construction of Higgs inflation incorporates the standard model with Einstein gravity which exhibits asymptotic safety in the ultraviolet region. The slow roll condition is satisfied at large field value due to the asymptotically safe behavior of Higgs self-coupling at high energies. We find that this minimal construction is highly predictive, and is consistent with both cosmological observations and collider experiments.

  3. Safe venting of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.F.; Dewart, J.M.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The disposal of hydrogen is often required in the operation of an experimental facility that contains hydrogen. Whether the vented hydrogen can be discharged to the atmosphere safely depends upon a number of factors such as the flow rate and atmospheric conditions. Calculations have been made that predict the distance a combustible mixture can extend from the point of release under some specified atmospheric conditions. Also the quantity of hydrogen in the combustible cloud is estimated. These results can be helpful in deciding of the hydrogen can be released directly to the atmosphere, or if it must be intentionally ignited. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Quality and operations of portable X-ray examination procedures in the emergency room: queuing theory at work.

    PubMed

    Abujudeh, Hani; Vuong, Bill; Baker, Stephen R

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the operation of the portable X-ray machine in relation to examinations ordered by the Emergency Department at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, as well as to identify any bottlenecks hindering the performance of the aforementioned system. To do so, the activity of the portable X-ray was monitored in the period from 8 June 2004 to 24 June 2004, as well as from 6 July 2004 to 12 July 2004, yielding 11 days of data and 116 individual X-ray examinations. During observation times was noted for various checkpoints in the procedure. Using the data gathered, the average input, output, processing times, and variance were calculated. In turn, these values were used to calculate the response times for the Ordering Phase (5.502 min), traveling (2.483 min), Examination Phase (4.453 min), returning (3.855 min), Order Processing Phase (2.962 min), and the Development Phase (3.437 min). These phases were combined for a total of 22.721 min from the time the examination was placed to the time the X-ray films were uploaded to the PACS computer network. Based on these calculations, the Ordering Phase was determined to be the single largest bottleneck in the portable X-ray system. The Examination Phase also represented the second largest bottleneck for a combined total of 44% of the total response time. PMID:16133619

  5. Cool and Safe: Multiplicity in Safe Innovation at Unilever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penders, Bart

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the making of a safe innovation: the application of ice structuring protein (ISP) in edible ices. It argues that safety is not the absence of risk but is an active accomplishment; innovations are not "made safe afterward" but "safe innovations are made". Furthermore, there are multiple safeties to be accomplished in the…

  6. Cool and Safe: Multiplicity in Safe Innovation at Unilever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penders, Bart

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the making of a safe innovation: the application of ice structuring protein (ISP) in edible ices. It argues that safety is not the absence of risk but is an active accomplishment; innovations are not "made safe afterward" but "safe innovations are made". Furthermore, there are multiple safeties to be accomplished in the…

  7. Health and Safety Procedures Manual for hazardous waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Thate, J.E.

    1992-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Chemical Assessments Team (ORNL/CAT) has developed this Health and Safety Procedures Manual for the guidance, instruction, and protection of ORNL/CAT personnel expected to be involved in hazardous waste site assessments and remedial actions. This manual addresses general and site-specific concerns for protecting personnel, the general public, and the environment from any possible hazardous exposures. The components of this manual include: medical surveillance, guidance for determination and monitoring of hazards, personnel and training requirements, protective clothing and equipment requirements, procedures for controlling work functions, procedures for handling emergency response situations, decontamination procedures for personnel and equipment, associated legal requirements, and safe drilling practices.

  8. Decommissioning procedures for an 11 MeV self-shielded medical cyclotron after 16 years of working time.

    PubMed

    Calandrino, R; del Vecchio, A; Savi, A; Todde, S; Griffoni, V; Brambilla, S; Parisi, R; Simone, G; Fazio, F

    2006-06-01

    The present article describes the decommissioning of a compact, self-shielded, 11 MeV medical cyclotron. A Monte Carlo simulation of the possible nuclear reactions was performed in order to plan the decommissioning activities. In the course of the cyclotron dismantling, cyclotron components, shields, and floor concrete samples were measured. Residual activities were analyzed with a Ge(Li) detector and compared with simulation data. Doses to staff involved in the decommissioning procedure were monitored by individual TL dosimeters. The simulations identified five radioactive nuclides in shields and floor concrete: 55Fe and 45Ca (beta emitters, total specific activity: 2.29 x 10(4) Bq kg) and 152Eu, 154Eu, 60Co (gamma emitters, total specific activity: 1.62 x 10(3) Bq kg-1). Gamma-ray spectrometry confirmed the presence of gamma emitters, corresponding to a total specific activity of 3.40 x 10(2) Bq kg-1. The presence of the radioisotope 124Sb in the lead contained in the shield structure, corresponding to a simulated specific activity of 9.38 x 10(3) Bq kg-1, was experimentally confirmed. The measured dose from external exposure of the involved staff was <20 muSv, in accordance with the expected range of values between 10 and 20 muSv. The measured dose from intake was negligible. Finally, the decommissioning of the 11 MeV cyclotron does not represent a risk for the involved staff, but due to the presence of long-lived radioisotopes, the cyclotron components are to be treated as low level radioactive waste and stored in an authorized storage area. PMID:16691108

  9. Type Safe Extensible Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Wonseok

    2009-10-01

    Software products evolve over time. Sometimes they evolve by adding new features, and sometimes by either fixing bugs or replacing outdated implementations with new ones. When software engineers fail to anticipate such evolution during development, they will eventually be forced to re-architect or re-build from scratch. Therefore, it has been common practice to prepare for changes so that software products are extensible over their lifetimes. However, making software extensible is challenging because it is difficult to anticipate successive changes and to provide adequate abstraction mechanisms over potential changes. Such extensibility mechanisms, furthermore, should not compromise any existing functionality during extension. Software engineers would benefit from a tool that provides a way to add extensions in a reliable way. It is natural to expect programming languages to serve this role. Extensible programming is one effort to address these issues. In this thesis, we present type safe extensible programming using the MLPolyR language. MLPolyR is an ML-like functional language whose type system provides type-safe extensibility mechanisms at several levels. After presenting the language, we will show how these extensibility mechanisms can be put to good use in the context of product line engineering. Product line engineering is an emerging software engineering paradigm that aims to manage variations, which originate from successive changes in software.

  10. Safe abortion: WHO technical and policy guidance.

    PubMed

    Cook, R J; Dickens, B M; Horga, M

    2004-07-01

    In 2003, the World Health Organization published its well referenced handbook Safe Abortion: Technical and Policy Guidance for Health Systems to address the estimated almost 20 million induced abortions each year that are unsafe, imposing a burden of approximately 67 thousand deaths annually. It is a global injustice that 95% of unsafe abortions occur in developing countries. The focus of guidance is on abortion procedures that are lawful within the countries in which they occur, noting that in almost all countries, the law permits abortion to save a woman's life. The guidance treats unsafe abortion as a public health challenge, and responds to the problem through strategies concerning improved clinical care for women undergoing procedures, and the appropriate placement of necessary services. Legal and policy considerations are explored, and annexes present guidance to further reading, international consensus documents on safe abortion, and on manual vacuum aspiration and post-abortion contraception. PMID:15207687

  11. Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart

    MedlinePLUS

    ... JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart Safe steps in food handling, cooking, and ... from other foods. Cook —Cook to the right temperature. Chill —Refrigerate food promptly. Cook all food to ...

  12. How to Safely Give Acetaminophen

    MedlinePLUS

    ... All About Food Allergies How to Safely Give Acetaminophen KidsHealth > For Parents > How to Safely Give Acetaminophen ... without getting a doctor's OK first. What Is Acetaminophen Also Called? Acetaminophen is the generic name of ...

  13. Safe sedation in modern cardiological practice.

    PubMed

    Furniss, Stephen S; Sneyd, J Robert

    2015-10-01

    Safe sedation is fundamental to many modern cardiological procedures, and following the publication of the report on safe sedation by the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, this report discusses sedation specifically in cardiological practice. The major areas within cardiology that use sedation are cardioversion, catheter ablation particularly of atrial fibrillation, transoesophageal echocardiography, implantable device (cardiovascular implantable electronic device) procedures and other procedures such as transcatheter aortic valve replacement. There is increasing demand for cardiological sedation but there is wide geographical variation in its use and there are also growing data to support non-anaesthetists giving sedation. The use of benzodiazepines, particularly for short procedures, is common, but even here good record-keeping and audit together with an understanding of the continuum of sedation and having appropriately trained staff and the necessary facilities are vital. Nurse administration of propofol may be appropriate for some procedures in cardiology that require at least moderate sedation. Appropriate training is essential and the use of capnography and target controlled infusion pumps for propofol administration is recommended. PMID:26085525

  14. The environmentally safe battery

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, S.C.; Brown, N.E.

    1991-01-01

    There are three aspects to an environmentally safe battery. The first deals with the manufacturing process, the second with the use of environmentally friendly materials, and the third with the disposal and/or recycling of spent units. In this paper, several ongoing programs at Sandia National Laboratories that relate to the environmentally conscious manufacturing of batteries, are discussed. The solvent substitution/elimination program is a two-pronged effort, aimed at identifying new solvents which are compatible with the environment, while at the same time developing dry process cleaning technology. The joining program is evaluating new solvents for flux removal as well as the development of fluxless soldering processes. In the area of welding, new cleaning processes are under study. Chemical microsensors are under development that are capable of identifying and quantifying single chemical species. These sensors have been used to monitor and improve processes using toxic/hazardous solvents. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  15. Safe pill-dispensing.

    PubMed

    Testa, Massimiliano; Pollard, John

    2007-01-01

    Each patient is supplied with a smart-card containing a Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) chip storing a unique identification code. The patient places the Smart-card on a pill-dispenser unit containing an RFID reader. The RFID chip is read and the code sent to a Base-station via a wireless Bluetooth link. A database containing both patient details and treatment information is queried at the Base-station using the RFID as the search key. The patient's treatment data (i.e., drug names, quantities, time, etc.) are retrieved and sent back to the pill-dispenser unit via Bluetooth. Appropriate quantities of the required medications are automatically dispensed, unless the patient has already taken his/her daily dose. Safe, confidential communication and operation is ensured. PMID:17901607

  16. Asymptotically safe cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Litim, Daniel; Rahmede, Christoph

    2011-07-01

    We study quantum modifications to cosmology in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe with and without scalar fields by taking the renormalisation group running of gravitational and matter couplings into account. We exploit the Bianchi identity to relate the renormalisation group scale with scale factor and derive the improved cosmological evolution equations. We find two types of cosmological fixed points where the renormalisation group scale either freezes in, or continues to evolve with scale factor. We discuss the implications of each of these, and classify the different cosmological fixed points with and without gravity displaying an asymptotically safe renormalisation group fixed point. We state conditions of existence for an inflating ultraviolet cosmological fixed point for Einstein gravity coupled to a scalar field. We also discuss other fixed point solutions such as "scaling" solutions, or fixed points with equipartition between kinetic and potential energies.

  17. Poor neighborhoods: safe playgrounds.

    PubMed

    Powell, Elizabeth C; Ambardekar, Erin J; Sheehan, Karen M

    2005-09-01

    Although unstructured physical play is helpful to child development and physical activity is important to obesity prevention, up-to-date information about playgrounds and playground hazards in urban areas is limited. Local data are needed to identify problems and target interventions. The aim of this study was to describe the hazards in playgrounds located in low-income (median dollars 28,728-38,915) and very low-income (median dollars 18,266-18,955) Chicago neighborhoods. Using a standardized on-site survey (National Program for Playground Safety), two investigators reviewed seventy-eight public playgrounds for hazards related to playground design, safe surfaces, supervision, and equipment design and maintenance. The design of 56 playgrounds (72%) posed no hazards. One playground lacked protection from motor vehicles, and 21 had minor flaws. One playground had an asphalt surface; all others had protective surfaces, usually wood chips. The chips were too thin in many places, and in 15 playgrounds (19%), at least one concrete footing was exposed. Trash was a common surface hazard (68%). Although most equipment was safe (swings of soft materials and appropriate platform barriers), many pieces needed repairs. Equipment maintenance hazards included gaps (44%) and missing (38%) or broken parts (35%). In 13 of 39 playgrounds (33%) where children were observed playing, one or more were unsupervised. Playgrounds in very low-income neighborhoods more often had trash in the fall zone and exposed footings (P<.01 for each); there were no differences between low and very low-income neighborhoods in playground design or equipment maintenance. We conclude that playgrounds in low-income Chicago neighborhoods are of good design and have appropriate surfaces. Needed improvements include attention to wood chip depth, the removal of trash from the fall zone, and equipment repairs. Greater adult supervision is warranted. PMID:16033929

  18. SUPRAPUR®: Safe and convenient percutaneous suprapubic catheterisation in high-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Philipp; Ritter, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound-guided percutaneous placement of a suprapubic cystostomy is a common and generally safe procedure in everyday surgery. In case of adverse patient characteristics such as small bladder capacity or high body mass index, however, the procedure carries an increased risk of severe complications, including bowel perforation. The Suprapur® cystostomy set is supposed to enable a safer procedure. The aim of our work was to evaluate the safety and ease of use of the Suprapur® cystostomy set. Material and methods We prospectively evaluated the Suprapur® set in high-risk patients, having either a small bladder capacity below 250 ml or a BMI above 30 kg/m2. Complications and surgical outcome were monitored. In addition, patients’ contentment and pain during the procedure was assessed with a visual analogue scale (VAS). Possible drawbacks and ease of use were evaluated by customized questionnaires for the operating physician. Results In total, 26 cystostomies were performed by 15 different physicians, 40% (n = 6) of whom were inexperienced first or second year residents. No complications occurred. Mild gross haematuria occurred in 11.5% (n = 4) of cases. Average VAS for pain during and two hours after the procedure was 2.1 (±1.2) and 0.3 (±0.5) respectively. In 91%, (n = 20) of the procedures, the physicians claimed to have felt safe using SUPRAPUR® and more comfortable (82%, n = 18) than with a conventional cystostomy set. Conclusions SUPRAPUR® allows a safe and simple placement of a suprapubic cystostomy even in high-risk patients or in inexperienced hands. It might help to reduce the complications of a common and frequent surgical procedure.

  19. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge.

    PubMed

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-10-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective 'titanic'. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the 'Seven C's'. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm. PMID:22738396

  20. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-01-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective ‘titanic’. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the ‘Seven C's’. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm. PMID:22738396

  1. Safe Spaces, Nurturing Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrell, Linda; Littlefield, Melissa; Washington, Earlie M.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the limited yet important literature on the contributions of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) to students and the profession of social work. The vital role of HBCUs in social work education and their mission to advocate for social and economic justice for disenfranchised populations is also discussed. A…

  2. On safe motherhood.

    PubMed

    Mahler, H

    1988-05-01

    After a general discussion of the factors contributing to maternal mortality and morbidity, a solution to both of these problems is suggested for India: an initiative at the district level to improve support, supervision, training, essential midwifery and obstetric care. The general causes of the 200 or more times higher maternal morality risks in developing countries act throughout the woman's lifetime: powerlessness, illiteracy, malnutrition, deficiency of calcium, vitamin D and iron, heavy physical labor, unchecked fertility, lack of prenatal and obstetric care and illegal abortion. The most common causes of maternal morality and morbidity, eclampsia, obstructed labor, hemorrhage and sepsis, have been prevented in developed countries and in China. We know how to prevent them, by technical support and management at the district level. 4 elements are required: 1) adequate primary health care, food and universal family planning; 2) prenatal care and nutrition with referral if needed; 3) assistance of a trained person at every childbirth; 4) access to obstetric care for those at high risk. Rather than spend money or urban specialized hospital centers, half to 2/3 of all fatal complications of childbirth can be eliminated by local hospitals with the ability to do basic obstetrics such as caesareans and blood transfusions. There is a need for further health systems research in the given locale, but what we need now is an initiative on making pregnancy and childbirth safe for all women. PMID:3420000

  3. OPINION: Safe exponential manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoenix, Chris; Drexler, Eric

    2004-08-01

    In 1959, Richard Feynman pointed out that nanometre-scale machines could be built and operated, and that the precision inherent in molecular construction would make it easy to build multiple identical copies. This raised the possibility of exponential manufacturing, in which production systems could rapidly and cheaply increase their productive capacity, which in turn suggested the possibility of destructive runaway self-replication. Early proposals for artificial nanomachinery focused on small self-replicating machines, discussing their potential productivity and their potential destructiveness if abused. In the light of controversy regarding scenarios based on runaway replication (so-called 'grey goo'), a review of current thinking regarding nanotechnology-based manufacturing is in order. Nanotechnology-based fabrication can be thoroughly non-biological and inherently safe: such systems need have no ability to move about, use natural resources, or undergo incremental mutation. Moreover, self-replication is unnecessary: the development and use of highly productive systems of nanomachinery (nanofactories) need not involve the construction of autonomous self-replicating nanomachines. Accordingly, the construction of anything resembling a dangerous self-replicating nanomachine can and should be prohibited. Although advanced nanotechnologies could (with great difficulty and little incentive) be used to build such devices, other concerns present greater problems. Since weapon systems will be both easier to build and more likely to draw investment, the potential for dangerous systems is best considered in the context of military competition and arms control.

  4. Medications: Using Them Safely

    MedlinePLUS

    ... empty stomach or that food may improve its absorption. In this case, your child should eat a ... working properly or may delay or reduce its absorption. Some medicines interact only with certain foods or ...

  5. A safe transmission line for MRI.

    PubMed

    Vernickel, Peter; Schulz, Volkmar; Weiss, Steffen; Gleich, Bernhard

    2005-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been established as a reliable and safe imaging method for the human body. However, electric conductors, such as cables situated near or in the human body, should be avoided because induced currents in the cables can cause hazardous heating in the surrounding tissue. In this paper, a new principle for the design of a transmission line is introduced and demonstrated, which is capable of avoiding dangerous heating of cables. The principle is based on transformers placed along the line, splitting the long line into several short not resonant and thus safe sections. A transformer design is introduced along with the theoretical aspects for both the avoidance of the undesired induced currents and the reduction of signal attenuation. Furthermore, the design fulfills the geometrical requirements of the side lumen of a standard catheter. Matching networks, whose elements are determined by power matching, are used to reduce signal attenuation by the transformers. A prototype was built to validate both theory and the simulations. As demonstrated in this work, it is possible to build safe transmission lines for MRI, making applications such as active catheter tracking possible. We expect that even new applications, such as safe intravascular imaging will be possible in a safe manner in the future. PMID:15977738

  6. Safe Zones: Creating LGBT Safe Space Ally Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poynter, Kerry John; Tubbs, Nancy Jean

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses model LGBT Safe Space Ally programs. These programs, often called "Safe Zones," include self selected students, faculty, and employees who publicly show support by displaying stickers, signs, and other identifiable items. Issues covered in the article include history, development, training, membership, assessment, and…

  7. Safe Zones: Creating LGBT Safe Space Ally Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poynter, Kerry John; Tubbs, Nancy Jean

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses model LGBT Safe Space Ally programs. These programs, often called "Safe Zones," include self selected students, faculty, and employees who publicly show support by displaying stickers, signs, and other identifiable items. Issues covered in the article include history, development, training, membership, assessment, and…

  8. Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 2, Risk evaluation work procedure for the retired Hanford Site facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

    1993-04-01

    Risk from retired surplus facilities has always been assumed to be low at the Hanford Site as the facilities are inactive and have few potentials for causing an offsite hazardous material release. However,the fatal accident that occurred in the spring of 1992 in which an employee fell through a deteriorated roof at the 105-F Reactor Building has raised the possibility that retired facilities represent a greater risk than was originally assumed. Therefore, Westinghouse Hanford Company and the US Department of Energy management have determined that facility risk management strategies and programmatic plans should be reevaluated to assure risks are identified and appropriate corrective action plans are developed. To evaluate risk management strategies, accurate risk information about the current and projected condition of the facilities must be developed. This work procedure has been created to address the development of accurate and timely risk information. By using the evaluation results in this procedure, it will be possible to create a prioritized baseline for managing facility risk until all retired surplus facilities are demolished.

  9. A Very Simple Safe-Bayesian Random Forest.

    PubMed

    Quadrianto, Novi; Ghahramani, Zoubin

    2015-06-01

    Random forests works by averaging several predictions of de-correlated trees. We show a conceptually radical approach to generate a random forest: random sampling of many trees from a prior distribution, and subsequently performing a weighted ensemble of predictive probabilities. Our approach uses priors that allow sampling of decision trees even before looking at the data, and a power likelihood that explores the space spanned by combination of decision trees. While each tree performs Bayesian inference to compute its predictions, our aggregation procedure uses the power likelihood rather than the likelihood and is therefore strictly speaking not Bayesian. Nonetheless, we refer to it as a Bayesian random forest but with a built-in safety. The safeness comes as it has good predictive performance even if the underlying probabilistic model is wrong. We demonstrate empirically that our Safe-Bayesian random forest outperforms MCMC or SMC based Bayesian decision trees in term of speed and accuracy, and achieves competitive performance to entropy or Gini optimised random forest, yet is very simple to construct. PMID:26357350

  10. Protection from Potential Exposure for the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, Dillard B.; Rudko, Vladimir; Batiy, Valeriy; Timmins, Douglas C.; Brothers, Alan J.; Schmidt, John P.; Swearingen, Gary L.; Schmieman, Eric A.

    2004-03-24

    The Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium has recently completed developing the conceptual design for the Chernobyl New Safe Confinement (NSC). Battelle has the scope of work related to environment and safety of the design. As part of the safety analysis, an analysis was performed to determine the degree of protection to be provided during the construction and 100-year operation period for expected upsets and lower-probability events that would occur from errors, procedures, other human factors, and equipment failures, i.e., ''potential exposures'' other than normal operations. The analysis was based on results of the Preliminary Hazards Analysis. The potential exposure analysis was performed in accordance with existing Ukranian regulations and working processes and procedures in place at the Shelter Object. KSK (a Ukranian Consortium), a subcontractor to the Bechtel/EDF/Battelle Consortium, performed much of the dose analysis. The analysis concluded that potential exposures, outside of those expected during normal operations, would be acceptable and that design criteria and features, and preventative and mitigative measures currently in place at the Shelter would be sufficient to meet operating exposure limits.

  11. Young Children Can Be Key to Fire-Safe Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kourofsky, Carolyn E.; Cole, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    For more than 15 years, preschool programs nationwide have worked with Fireproof Children/Prevention First, an international center for injury prevention research and education, to bring fire safety education to young children and their families. The "play safe! be safe!"[R] curriculum includes lessons that young children can learn and understand,…

  12. Creating Safe and Drug-Free Schools: An Action Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

    It is essential that communities, businesses, parents, and students work together to develop a disciplined environment for children which includes safe and drug-free schools. Emphasizing the need for commitment and community will, this guide outlines steps each of these groups can take to create safe schools. Communities must place school safety…

  13. Implementing AORN recommended practices for a safe environment of care.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Antonia B

    2013-08-01

    Providing a safe environment for every patient undergoing a surgical or other invasive procedure is imperative. AORN's "Recommended practices for a safe environment of care" provides guidance on a wide range of topics related to the safety of perioperative patients and health care personnel. The recommendations are intended to provide guidance for establishing best practices and implementing safety measures in all perioperative practice settings. Perioperative nurses should be aware of risks related to musculoskeletal injuries, fire, equipment, latex, and chemicals, among others, and understand strategies for reducing the risks. Evidence-based recommendations can give practitioners the tools to guide safe practice. PMID:23890564

  14. A safe protocol for amalgam removal.

    PubMed

    Colson, Dana G

    2012-01-01

    Today's environment has different impacts on our body than previous generations. Heavy metals are a growing concern in medicine. Doctors and individuals request the removal of their amalgam (silver mercury) restorations due to the high mercury content. A safe protocol to replace the silver mercury filling will ensure that there is minimal if any absorption of materials while being removed. Strong alternative white composite and lab-processed materials are available today to create a healthy and functioning mouth. Preparation of the patient prior to the procedure and after treatment is vital to establish the excretion of the mercury from the body. PMID:22315627

  15. Implantable medical devices MRI safe.

    PubMed

    Dal Molin, Renzo; Hecker, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Pacemakers, ICDs, neurostimulators like deep brain stimulator electrodes, spiral cord stimulators, insulin pumps, cochlear implants, retinal implants, hearing aids, electro cardio gram (ECG) leads, or devices in interventional MRI such as vascular guide wires or catheters are affected by MRI magnetic and electromagnetic fields. Design of MRI Safe medical devices requires computer modeling, bench testing, phantom testing, and animal studies. Implanted medical devices can be MRI unsafe, MRI conditional or MRI safe (see glossary). In the following paragraphs we will investigate how to design implanted medical devices MRI safe. PMID:23739365

  16. Production Line Materials. Youth Training Scheme. Core Exemplar Work Based Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Staff Coll., Blagdon (England).

    This trainer's guide is intended to assist supervisors of work-based career training projects in helping students understand the operation of an assembly line, including safe working procedures. The guide is one in a series of core curriculum modules that is intended for use in combination on- and off-the-job programs to familiarize youth with the…

  17. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  18. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  19. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  20. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  1. 29 CFR 1915.15 - Maintenance of safe conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.15 Maintenance of safe... within a tested confined or enclosed space or other dangerous atmosphere occurs, work in the...

  2. Safe genetically engineered plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosellini, D.; Veronesi, F.

    2007-10-01

    The application of genetic engineering to plants has provided genetically modified plants (GMPs, or transgenic plants) that are cultivated worldwide on increasing areas. The most widespread GMPs are herbicide-resistant soybean and canola and insect-resistant corn and cotton. New GMPs that produce vaccines, pharmaceutical or industrial proteins, and fortified food are approaching the market. The techniques employed to introduce foreign genes into plants allow a quite good degree of predictability of the results, and their genome is minimally modified. However, some aspects of GMPs have raised concern: (a) control of the insertion site of the introduced DNA sequences into the plant genome and of its mutagenic effect; (b) presence of selectable marker genes conferring resistance to an antibiotic or an herbicide, linked to the useful gene; (c) insertion of undesired bacterial plasmid sequences; and (d) gene flow from transgenic plants to non-transgenic crops or wild plants. In response to public concerns, genetic engineering techniques are continuously being improved. Techniques to direct foreign gene integration into chosen genomic sites, to avoid the use of selectable genes or to remove them from the cultivated plants, to reduce the transfer of undesired bacterial sequences, and make use of alternative, safer selectable genes, are all fields of active research. In our laboratory, some of these new techniques are applied to alfalfa, an important forage plant. These emerging methods for plant genetic engineering are briefly reviewed in this work.

  3. Keep Kids Safe This Halloween

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155402.html Keep Kids Safe This Halloween Doctors' group offers tips for ... Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Don't let kids' Halloween fun be spoiled by real-life injury ...

  4. How to Safely Give Ibuprofen

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kids Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect How to Safely Give Ibuprofen KidsHealth > Parents > Doctors & Hospitals > ... of ibuprofen are available in similar forms. Continue How to Give When giving ibuprofen, refer to the ...

  5. Indoor Tanning Is Not Safe

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Badges Stay Informed Cancer Home Indoor Tanning Is Not Safe Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... not used. Facts About Indoor Tanning Tanning indoors is not safer than tanning in the sun. Indoor ...

  6. Barred from safe sex.

    PubMed

    Linehan, T

    In many respects, the AIDS campaign in the UK has been remarkably successful despite the difficulty of deciding how to handle the issue and the decision of successive governments to stress personal responsibility in the face of a global epidemic. However, 6.4% of men recently surveyed reported using prostitutes, and men and women can expect to have about 8 sex partners during the course of their lives. Heterosexual transmission rates have dropped, however, perhaps because the government no longer targets homosexual men. However, this means that as young homosexual men reach sexual maturity, educational resources are scant. Despite the government's helpful willingness to fund locally-based projects, young men aged 16-21 are not permitted by law to engage in homosexual activity, so they are often reluctant to seek help. In addition, male prostitutes and men working in escort agencies have been difficult to poll. The government has failed most abjectly, however, in special hospitals and prisons where there is a great deal of homosexual activity in a totally secure environment. Residents of special hospitals have a right to protection against sexual assault by other residents and to information on safer sex. In prisons, since buggery and public acts of homosexuality are illegal, the Home Office has not been able to face the fact that the men need condoms. Providing condoms might be construed as encouraging illegal behavior. Likewise, although it is acknowledged that IV drug abuse occurs in prisons, officials have been reluctant to take steps to stop the spread of HIV infections through the use of shared needles. One approach to that problem may be to issue bleach to the prisoners so that they can sterilize their equipment. The government public information campaign has become more up-beat in recent years. Although most young people aged 16-24 years old (the most sexually active group) claim not to be concerned about AIDS, they are also the group most likely to use condoms. The AIDS prevention messages may only be reaching those most equipped to hear them, however. One of the best predictors of safer sex is how happy a person is with his or her identity. Thus, those who exist in marginalized groups are at greatest risk, and these groups are the least likely to be monitored. PMID:8247843

  7. A Study of Modified-Guttman and IRT-Based Level Scoring Procedures for Work Keys Assessments. ACT Research Report Series 97-7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, E. Matthew; Kolen, Michael J.; Nicewander, W. Alan

    This paper compares modified Guttman and item response theory (IRT) based procedures for classifying examinees in ordered levels when each level is represented by several multiple choice test items. In the modified Guttman procedure, within-level number correct scores are mapped to binary level mastery scores. Examinees are then assigned to levels…

  8. DOPS (Direct Observation of Procedural Skills) in undergraduate skills-lab: Does it work? Analysis of skills-performance and curricular side effects

    PubMed Central

    Profanter, Christoph; Perathoner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Sufficient teaching and assessing clinical skills in the undergraduate setting becomes more and more important. In a surgical skills-lab course at the Medical University of Innsbruck fourth year students were teached with DOPS (direct observation of procedural skills). We analyzed whether DOPS worked or not in this setting, which performance levels could be reached compared to tutor teaching (one tutor, 5 students) and which curricular side effects could be observed. Methods: In a prospective randomized trial in summer 2013 (April – June) four competence-level-based skills were teached in small groups during one week: surgical abdominal examination, urethral catheterization (phantom), rectal-digital examination (phantom), handling of central venous catheters. Group A was teached with DOPS, group B with a classical tutor system. Both groups underwent an OSCE (objective structured clinical examination) for assessment. 193 students were included in the study. Altogether 756 OSCE´s were carried out, 209 (27,6%) in the DOPS- and 547 (72,3%) in the tutor-group. Results: Both groups reached high performance levels. In the first month there was a statistically significant difference (p<0,05) in performance of 95% positive OSCE items in the DOPS-group versus 88% in the tutor group. In the following months the performance rates showed no difference anymore and came to 90% in both groups. In practical skills the analysis revealed a high correspondence between positive DOPS (92,4%) and OSCE (90,8%) results. Discussion: As shown by our data DOPS furnish high performance of clinical skills and work well in the undergraduate setting. Due to the high correspondence of DOPS and OSCE results DOPS should be considered as preferred assessment tool in a students skills-lab. The approximation of performance-rates within the months after initial superiority of DOPS could be explained by an interaction between DOPS and tutor system: DOPS elements seem to have improved tutoring and performance rates as well. DOPS in students ‘skills-lab afford structured feedback and assessment without increased personnel and financial resources compared to classic small group training. Conclusion: In summary, this study shows that DOPS represent an efficient method in teaching clinical skills. Their effects on didactic culture reach beyond the positive influence of performance rates. PMID:26483858

  9. Inexpensive and Safe DNA Gel Electrophoresis Using Household Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ens, S.; Olson, A. B.; Dudley, C.; Ross, N. D., III; Siddiqi, A. A.; Umoh, K. M.; Schneegurt, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis is the single most important molecular biology technique and it is central to life sciences research, but it is often too expensive for the secondary science classroom or homeschoolers. A simple safe low-cost procedure is described here that uses household materials to construct and run DNA gel electrophoresis. Plastic…

  10. Is Your Waterfront Safe? Creating an Emergency Action Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Susan F.

    1996-01-01

    Lists eight steps to a safe waterfront, one of which is creating an emergency action plan. American Camping Association standards call for a written, rehearsed emergency action plan for aquatics programs. In creating a plan, one should consider one's resources, the camp layout, types of emergencies, and basic procedures. Staff training and plan…

  11. 29 CFR 1926.1080 - Safe practices manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safe practices manual. 1926.1080 Section 1926.1080 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving General Operations Procedures §...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1080 - Safe practices manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safe practices manual. 1926.1080 Section 1926.1080 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving General Operations Procedures §...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.1080 - Safe practices manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safe practices manual. 1926.1080 Section 1926.1080 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving General Operations Procedures §...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.1080 - Safe practices manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safe practices manual. 1926.1080 Section 1926.1080 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving General Operations Procedures §...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.1080 - Safe practices manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safe practices manual. 1926.1080 Section 1926.1080 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving General Operations Procedures §...

  16. SAFE DRINKING WATER FROM SMALL SYSTEMS: TREATMENT OPTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bringing small water systems into compliance with the ever-increasing number of regulations will require flexibility in terms of technology application and institional procedures. his article looks at the means by which small systems can provide safe drinking water, focusing on t...

  17. Inexpensive and Safe DNA Gel Electrophoresis Using Household Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ens, S.; Olson, A. B.; Dudley, C.; Ross, N. D., III; Siddiqi, A. A.; Umoh, K. M.; Schneegurt, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis is the single most important molecular biology technique and it is central to life sciences research, but it is often too expensive for the secondary science classroom or homeschoolers. A simple safe low-cost procedure is described here that uses household materials to construct and run DNA gel electrophoresis. Plastic…

  18. NASA trend analysis procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This publication is primarily intended for use by NASA personnel engaged in managing or implementing trend analysis programs. 'Trend analysis' refers to the observation of current activity in the context of the past in order to infer the expected level of future activity. NASA trend analysis was divided into 5 categories: problem, performance, supportability, programmatic, and reliability. Problem trend analysis uncovers multiple occurrences of historical hardware or software problems or failures in order to focus future corrective action. Performance trend analysis observes changing levels of real-time or historical flight vehicle performance parameters such as temperatures, pressures, and flow rates as compared to specification or 'safe' limits. Supportability trend analysis assesses the adequacy of the spaceflight logistics system; example indicators are repair-turn-around time and parts stockage levels. Programmatic trend analysis uses quantitative indicators to evaluate the 'health' of NASA programs of all types. Finally, reliability trend analysis attempts to evaluate the growth of system reliability based on a decreasing rate of occurrence of hardware problems over time. Procedures for conducting all five types of trend analysis are provided in this publication, prepared through the joint efforts of the NASA Trend Analysis Working Group.

  19. Exercising in a Safe Environment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in the early morning or evening. l Put lights on the front and back of your bike. Walk safely in rural areas. l Be sure drivers can see you. l Always walk facing oncoming traffic. l Look for a smooth, stable surface alongside ...

  20. Safe Schools Programs & Resources Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of School Improvement.

    The first version of this guide was developed in response to the 1993 Safe Schools Act that required the State Board of Education to develop materials, models, and curricula addressing school safety. It recommended the development of conflict resolution and mediation materials to address responsible decision-making among students; the causes and…

  1. Safe Sex Tips for Seniors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A Print Share Glossary previous page Related Topics Sexual Health Related Documents PDF Safe Sex Tips for Seniors ... or she can also recommend treatments for common sexual problems such as vaginal dryness and erectile dysfunction (ED). There are effective treatments for vaginal dryness, ...

  2. Legal Issues Surrounding Safe Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Reed B.

    This handbook provides an overview of legal issues pertaining to the safety of public schools. Following the introduction, chapter 2 describes the governance model and philosophy on which American education is based. Court decisions and federal and state legislation that mandate the right to a safe school are discussed in chapter 3. The fourth…

  3. Making Cyberspace Safe for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Joyce; McLaughlin, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Despite the 1998 Children's Online Privacy Act's supposed protections, most web sites still collect personal information and post no privacy statements. Internet-filtering software packages are described and suggestions given for creating a safe environment, dismantling "cookies," informing parents and teachers, and checking "history" submenus on…

  4. How Safe Are Our Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younghusband, Lynda

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses a study she conducted in Newfoundland to determine the level of abuse and/or violence experienced by teachers, the nature of that abuse/violence, its personal impact, and whether Newfoundland teachers feel safe in their workplaces. The experiences presented are those of a focus group of eight teachers,…

  5. Planning Safe Routes to School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleyard, Bruce S.

    2003-01-01

    Describes "Safe Routes to School" efforts in the United States and other countries to make walking and biking to school the transportation of choice. Offers a plan of action for formulating and carrying out such a program and information on funding sources. (EV)

  6. Finding a Safe Way Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Steven M.; Derby, Joel

    1996-01-01

    Building designers, owners, and managers are morally responsible for providing persons with disabilities with a safe way out of multistory buildings. Although codes, standards, and elevator features may make the job more complicated, all of the difficulties can be overcome. Four figures illustrate elevator egress. (MLF)

  7. Planning and Designing Safe Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidler, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Those who manage physical education, athletic, and recreation programs have a number of legal duties that they are expected to carry out. Among these are an obligation to take reasonable precautions to ensure safe programs and facilities for all participants, spectators, and staff. Physical education and sports facilities that are poorly planned,…

  8. Is Rinsing Your Sinuses Safe?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are safe to use in nasal rinsing devices? Distilled or sterile water, which you can buy in stores. The label will state “distilled” or “sterile.” Boiled and cooled tap water—boiled for 3-5 minutes, then cooled until ...

  9. Asymptotically safe inflation from quadratic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, Alfio; Platania, Alessia

    2015-11-01

    Asymptotically Safe theories of gravity have recently received much attention. In this work we discuss a class of inflationary models derived from quantum-gravity modification of quadratic gravity according to the induced scaling around the non-Gaussian fixed point at very high energies. It is argued that the presence of a three dimensional ultraviolet critical surface generates operators of non-integer power of the type R 2 - ? / 2 in the effective Lagrangian, where ? > 0 is a critical exponent. The requirement of a successful inflationary model in agreement with the recent Planck 2015 data puts important constraints on the strength of this new type of couplings.

  10. Flywheel Rotor Safe-Life Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratner, J. K. H.; Chang, J. B.; Christopher, D. A.; McLallin, Kerry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since the 1960s, research has been conducted into the use of flywheels as energy storage systems. The-proposed applications include energy storage for hybrid and electric automobiles, attitude control and energy storage for satellites, and uninterruptible power supplies for hospitals and computer centers. For many years, however, the use of flywheels for space applications was restricted by the total weight of a system employing a metal rotor. With recent technological advances in the manufacturing of composite materials, however, lightweight composite rotors have begun to be proposed for such applications. Flywheels with composite rotors provide much higher power and energy storage capabilities than conventional chemical batteries. However, the failure of a high speed flywheel rotor could be a catastrophic event. For this reason, flywheel rotors are classified by the NASA Fracture Control Requirements Standard as fracture critical parts. Currently, there is no industry standard to certify a composite rotor for safe and reliable operation forth( required lifetime of the flywheel. Technical problems hindering the development of this standard include composite manufacturing inconsistencies, insufficient nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for detecting defects and/or impact damage, lack of standard material test methods for characterizing composite rotor design allowables, and no unified proof (over-spin) test for flight rotors. As part of a flywheel rotor safe-life certification pro-ram funded b the government, a review of the state of the art in composite rotors is in progress. The goal of the review is to provide a clear picture of composite flywheel rotor technologies. The literature review has concentrated on the following topics concerning composites and composite rotors: durability (fatigue) and damage tolerance (safe-life) analysis/test methods, in-service NDE and health monitoring techniques, spin test methods/ procedures, and containment options. This report presents the papers selected for their relevance to this topic and summarizes them.

  11. 105-H Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    E.G. Ison

    2008-11-08

    The following information documents the decontamination and decommissioning of the 105-H Reactor facility, and placement of the reactor core into interim safe storage. The D&D of the facility included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and restoration of the site. The ISS work also included construction of the safe storage enclosure, which required the installation of a new roofing system, power and lighting, a remote monitoring system, and ventilation components.

  12. Laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure.

    PubMed

    Fiscon, Valentino; Portale, Giuseppe; Mazzeo, Antonio; Migliorini, Giovanni; Frigo, Flavio

    2014-12-01

    Reestablishing continuity after a Hartmann's procedure is considered a major surgical procedure with high morbidity/mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the short-/long-term outcome of laparoscopic restoration of bowel continuity after HP. A prospectively collected database of colorectal laparoscopic procedures (>800) performed between June 2005 and June 2013 was used to identify 20 consecutive patients who had undergone laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure (LHR). Median age was 65.4. Ten patients (50 %) had undergone surgery for perforated diverticulitis, 3 (15 %) for cancer, and 7 (35 %) for other reasons (volvulus, posttraumatic perforation, and sigmoid perforation from foreign body). Previous HP had been performed laparoscopically in only 3 patients. Median operative time was 162.5 min. All the procedures were completed laparoscopically. Intraoperative complication rate was nil. Post-operative mortality and morbidity were respectively 0 and 10 % (1 pneumonia, 1 bowel obstruction from post-anastomotic stenosis which required resection and redo of the anastomosis). Median time to first flatus was 3 days, to normal diet 5 days. Median hospital stay was 9 days without readmissions. We followed up the patients for a median of 44 months: when asked, all 20 (100 %) said they would undergo the operation (LHR) again; 3 (15 %) had been re-operated of laparoscopic mesh repair for incisional hernia. When performed by experienced surgeons, LHR is a feasible, safe, reproducible operation, which allows early return of bowel function, early discharge and fast return to work for the patient. It has a low morbidity rate. PMID:25262377

  13. Development of Safe Food Handling Guidelines for Korean Consumers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hee-Jin; Lee, Min-Woo; Hwang, In-Kyeong; Kim, Jeong-Weon

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop guidelines for Korean consumers with regard to safe food handling practices at home by identifying current food handling issues. Korean consumers' behaviors regarding their safe food handling were identified via survey questionnaires that included items on individual hygiene practices, prepreparation steps when cooking, the cooking process, and the storage of leftover foods. The subjects were 417 Korean parents with elementary school children living in Seoul and Gyeonggi Province in the central area of Korea. The survey results revealed gaps between the knowledge or practices of Korean consumers and scientific evidence pertaining to safe food handling practices. Based on these findings, a leaflet on safe food handling guidelines was developed in accordance with Korean food culture. These guidelines suggest personal hygiene practices as well as fundamental principles and procedures for safe food handling from the stage of food purchase to that of keeping leftover dishes. A pilot application study with 50 consumers revealed that the guidelines effectively improved Korean consumers' safe food handling practices, suggesting that they can serve as practical educational material suitable for Korean consumers. PMID:26219368

  14. Characterisation of beeswax in works of art by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry procedures.

    PubMed

    Bonaduce, Ilaria; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2004-03-01

    Pyrolysis (Py) with in situ derivatisation with hexamethyldisilazane-gas chroma-break tography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry procedure based on microwave-assisted saponification were used to identify the organic components in small sized beeswax samples. With the latter procedure quantitative recoveries can be made and hydrocarbons, alcohols and omega-1-diols in the neutral fraction, and fatty acids and omega-1-hydroxy acids in the acidic fraction can be efficiently separated and detected. Both procedures were used to characterise a wax anatomic sculpture "The Plague" (1691-1694) by Gaetano Zumbo, resulting in the identification of beeswax and a Pinaceae resin. The GC-MS analysis brought to light some essential differences in beeswax composition between the raw material and the old modelled wax thus giving some clear indications about the recipe used by the sculptor. PMID:14989483

  15. Outpatient Thyroidectomy: Is it Safe?

    PubMed

    Balentine, Courtney J; Sippel, Rebecca S

    2016-01-01

    Outpatient thyroid surgery is controversial because of concerns over life-threatening cervical hematoma. Despite this concern, outpatient thyroidectomy is becoming increasingly common, especially among high-volume endocrine surgeons. Multiple studies have now demonstrated that careful patient selection combined with surgeon experience can result in successful and safe surgery without a full inpatient admission. This article reviews the data on safety and outcomes for outpatient thyroidectomy and discusses several techniques used to minimize risk to patients. PMID:26610774

  16. Safe-haven locking device

    DOEpatents

    Williams, J.V.

    1984-04-26

    Disclosed is a locking device for eliminating external control of a secured space formed by fixed and movable barriers. The locking device uses externally and internally controlled locksets and a movable strike, operable from the secured side of the movable barrier, to selectively engage either lockset. A disengagement device, for preventing forces from being applied to the lock bolts is also disclosed. In this manner, a secured space can be controlled from the secured side as a safe-haven. 4 figures.

  17. Data Collection and Reduction Procedures Used for the System for the Analysis of Classroom Communication (SACC). Center for the Study of Evaluation Working Paper No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivier, Kenneth S., Jr.

    Data Collection and reduction procedures used in the system for the Analysis of Classroom Communication (SACC) are presented. The SACC is a system devised for the systematic observation of verbal and non-verbal classroom behavior. Coders employ data sheets which contain numbered cells for recording behavior at five second intervals. Each sheet…

  18. Creating a Safe Zone: LGBTQ Work in NCTE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkin, Roxanne

    2011-01-01

    Reading through her files, the author takes a journey back in time to 1991 when a few lesbians and gay men met in a conference room at the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Annual Convention in Seattle to discuss issues relating to their lives and their teaching. It was at this meeting that NCTE first discussed forming a new group…

  19. Creating a Safe Zone: LGBTQ Work in NCTE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkin, Roxanne

    2011-01-01

    Reading through her files, the author takes a journey back in time to 1991 when a few lesbians and gay men met in a conference room at the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Annual Convention in Seattle to discuss issues relating to their lives and their teaching. It was at this meeting that NCTE first discussed forming a new group…

  20. Organizing delivery care: what works for safe motherhood?

    PubMed Central

    Koblinsky, M. A.; Campbell, O.; Heichelheim, J.

    1999-01-01

    The various means of delivering essential obstetric services are described for settings in which the maternal mortality ratio is relatively low. This review yields four basic models of care, which are best described by organizational characteristics relating to where women give birth and who performs deliveries. In Model 1, deliveries are conducted at home by a community member who has received brief training. In Model 2, delivery takes place at home but is performed by a professional. In Model 3, delivery is performed by a professional in a basic essential obstetric care facility, and in Model 4 all women give birth in a comprehensive essential obstetric care facility with the help of professionals. In each of these models it is assumed that providers do not increase the risk to women, either iatrogenically or through traditional practices. Although there have been some successes with Model 1, there is no evidence that it can provide a maternal mortality ratio under 100 per 100,000 live births. If strong referral mechanisms are in place the introduction of a professional attendant can lead to a marked reduction in the maternal mortality ratio. Countries using Models 2-4, involving the use of professional attendants at delivery, have reduced maternal mortality ratios to 50 or less per 100,000. However, Model 4, although arguably the most advanced, does not necessarily reduce the maternal mortality ratio to less than 100 per 100,000. It appears that not all countries are ready to adopt Model 4, and its affordability by many developing countries is doubtful. There are few data making it possible to determine which configuration with professional attendance is the most cost-effective, and what the constraints are with respect to training, skill maintenance, supervision, regulation, acceptability to women, and other criteria. A successful transition to Models 2-4 requires strong links with the community through either traditional providers or popular demand. PMID:10361757

  1. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... hazards, such as a HEPA vacuum or other method of equivalent efficacy, and lead-specific detergents or... exterior surfaces; (2) 2 square feet (0.2 square meters) in any one interior room or space; or (3)...

  2. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... hazards, such as a HEPA vacuum or other method of equivalent efficacy, and lead-specific detergents or... exterior surfaces; (2) 2 square feet (0.2 square meters) in any one interior room or space; or (3)...

  3. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... hazards, such as a HEPA vacuum or other method of equivalent efficacy, and lead-specific detergents or... exterior surfaces; (2) 2 square feet (0.2 square meters) in any one interior room or space; or (3)...

  4. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... hazards, such as a HEPA vacuum or other method of equivalent efficacy, and lead-specific detergents or... exterior surfaces; (2) 2 square feet (0.2 square meters) in any one interior room or space; or (3)...

  5. 24 CFR 35.1350 - Safe work practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... hazards, such as a HEPA vacuum or other method of equivalent efficacy, and lead-specific detergents or... exterior surfaces; (2) 2 square feet (0.2 square meters) in any one interior room or space; or (3)...

  6. From Barrier Free to Safe Environments: The New Zealand Experience. Monograph #44.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrightson, William; Pope, Campbell

    Intrinsically safe design is presented as a logical extension of the principles of barrier free design, and as a higher level design strategy for effecting widespread implementation of the basic accessibility requirements for people with disabilities. Two fundamental planning procedures are proposed: including principles of safe and accessible…

  7. The path to safe and reliable healthcare.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Michael W; Frankel, Allan

    2010-09-01

    The ability to deliver safe and reliable healthcare is the goal of all healthcare delivery systems. To bridge the current performance gaps in quality and safety, organizations need to apply a systematic model that effectively addresses both culture and reliable processes of care. The model described in this article provides a comprehensive approach to improving the quality of care in any clinical domain. It also provides a roadmap for people working in clinical improvement to assess the strengths and current needs within their care systems, so they can be strategic and systematic in their work, essential elements for success. The concepts and tools provided can be readily applied to improve the quality and safety of care delivered. PMID:20688455

  8. 23 CFR 630.1108 - Work zone safety management measures and strategies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006 should also address safe means for work vehicles and equipment to... requirements of 23 CFR 630.1012, Project-level Procedures, project plans, specifications and estimates (PS&Es... enforcement; (16) Automated speed enforcement (where permitted by State/local laws); (17) Drone radar;...

  9. 23 CFR 630.1108 - Work zone safety management measures and strategies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006 should also address safe means for work vehicles and equipment to... requirements of 23 CFR 630.1012, Project-level Procedures, project plans, specifications and estimates (PS&Es... enforcement; (16) Automated speed enforcement (where permitted by State/local laws); (17) Drone radar;...

  10. 23 CFR 630.1108 - Work zone safety management measures and strategies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006 should also address safe means for work vehicles and equipment to... requirements of 23 CFR 630.1012, Project-level Procedures, project plans, specifications and estimates (PS&Es... enforcement; (16) Automated speed enforcement (where permitted by State/local laws); (17) Drone radar;...

  11. 23 CFR 630.1108 - Work zone safety management measures and strategies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006 should also address safe means for work vehicles and equipment to... requirements of 23 CFR 630.1012, Project-level Procedures, project plans, specifications and estimates (PS&Es... enforcement; (16) Automated speed enforcement (where permitted by State/local laws); (17) Drone radar;...

  12. 23 CFR 630.1108 - Work zone safety management measures and strategies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... in accordance with 23 CFR 630.1006 should also address safe means for work vehicles and equipment to... requirements of 23 CFR 630.1012, Project-level Procedures, project plans, specifications and estimates (PS&Es... enforcement; (16) Automated speed enforcement (where permitted by State/local laws); (17) Drone radar;...

  13. Practical Tips for the Safe Handling of Micro-organisms in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, G.

    1974-01-01

    Outlines safe laboratory procedures for the handling of micro-organisms including aseptic technique, manipulation of cultures, and treatment of contaminated equipment. Identifies the principal hazard as the microbial aerosol, explains its possible effects, and describes the appropriate precautions. (GS)

  14. How safe are nuclear plants. How safe should they be

    SciTech Connect

    Kouts, H.

    1988-01-01

    It has become customary to think about safety of nuclear plants in terms of risk as defined by the WASH-1400 study that some of the implications for the non-specialist escape our attention. Yet it is known that a rational program to understand safety, to identify unsafe events, and to use this kind of information or analysis to improve safety, requires us to use the methods of quantitative risk assessment. How this process can be made more understandable to a broader group of nontechnical people and how can a wider acceptance of the results of the process be developed have been questions under study and are addressed in this report. These are questions that have been struggled with for some time in the world of nuclear plant safety. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission examined them for several years as it moved toward developing a position on safety goals for nuclear plants, a requirement that had been assigned it by Congress. Opinion was sought from a broad spectrum of individuals, within the field of nuclear power and outside it, on the topic that was popularly called, ''How safe is safe enough.'' Views were solicited on the answer to the question and also on the way the answer should be framed when it was adopted. This report discusses the public policy and its implementation.

  15. Simple & Safe Genomic DNA Isolation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for purifying DNA using either bacteria or rat liver is presented. Directions for doing a qualitative DNA assay using diphenylamine and a quantitative DNA assay using spectroscopy are included. (KR)

  16. Essential elements of national Safe Motherhood programmes.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    The Safe Motherhood Programme has developed a diagram explaining the necessary components of maternal health care at local centers and district hospitals. It helps countries identify gaps in local and district services. Communities need to organize efforts geared to preventing maternal deaths and health authorities need to provide local services to achieve suitable community care for women during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period. These efforts and services must include available, accessible, appropriate, and affordable family planning information and services. Health centers and district hospitals must provide the essential elements of obstetric care to handle complications of pregnancy and delivery and to guarantee the health and survival of infants. Reliable transportation and communication plans are essential so women can be referred to the district hospital or a first level referral center with emergency capabilities. Countries need to develop safe motherhood programs in the context of primary health care (PHC): equity, community participation, and intersectoral coordination. Centralized support and political commitment at the highest levels of government, redistribution of resources, and preferential help for the most disadvantaged groups are needed to achieve equity in health care for women. Community leaders and women's groups should work together to solve social, cultural, and economic problems that restrict access to health services. They also should mobilize resources and support and create demand for services. Collaboration among all sectors involved in development, both inside and outside the health system, is needed to achieve successful integration of safe motherhood programs into PHC. Some factors which contribute to effective functioning of health services and which reach those in greatest need include literacy, water and sanitation, and transport and communications. PMID:12318985

  17. The ethics of safe sex.

    PubMed

    Broom, N D; Rickett, C E

    1988-12-14

    Western society has undergone a vast sociological change during the 20th century in terms of the value of sexuality. Sexual choice has gained a new legitimacy never before experienced. There is less guilt surrounding issues of sexuality and it is now common place to hear and see explicit discussions about sex in the mass media. This acceptance has undoubtedly encouraged many people to be more daring and promiscuous in their sexual activities. Proof of this can be seen in the increase is the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Presently there are more than 20 epidemiologically significant diseases that are sexually transmitted. Beyond the 5 old standards of gonorrhea, syphilis, chancroid, lyphogranuloma venereum, and granuloma inguinala STDs now include: chlamydia trachomatis, genital herpes, human papillomavirus, human immunodeficiency virus, genital mycoplasms, cytomegalovirus, hepatitis, vaginitis, enteric infections, and ectoparasitic diseases. Keeping all this in mind, the question of the ethics of safe sex must be addressed. In many countries, the governments have undertaken large public education programs to encourage safe sex practices. All these programs a founded upon two ideas: that safe sex should be promoted free of any ethical discussions or considerations, and that technology alone, the condom, will protect the public from the problem of STDs. However these campaigns will fail to protect the public unless they try to intervene at some level other than the mechanical aspect of the sex act itself. Condoms have failure rates too high to be relied upon as the sole means of protecting the public. Sex education for children and an inclusion of the ethical aspects of sex, now that the consequences can mean death, must be included in these government programs if they are to be successful. PMID:3060771

  18. Varying influences of motivation factors on employees' likelihood to perform safe food handling practices because of demographic differences.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jason D; Arendt, Susan W; Strohbehn, Catherine H; Meyer, Janell; Paez, Paola

    2010-11-01

    Food safety training has been the primary avenue for ensuring food workers are performing proper food handling practices and thus, serving safe food. Yet, knowledge of safe food handling practices does not necessarily result in actual performance of these practices. This research identified participating food service employees' level of agreement with four factors of motivation (internal motivations, communication, reward-punishment, and resources) and determined if respondents with different demographic characteristics reported different motivating factors. Data were collected from 311 food service employees who did not have any supervisory responsibilities. Intrinsic motivation agreement scores were consistently the highest of all four motivational factors evaluated and did not differ across any of the demographic characteristics considered. In contrast, motivation agreement scores for communication, reward-punishment, and resources did differ based on respondents' gender, age, place of employment, job status, food service experience, completion of food handler course, or possession of a food safety certification. In general, respondents agreed that these motivation factors influenced their likelihood to perform various safe food handling procedures. This research begins to illustrate how employees' demographic characteristics influence their responses to various motivators, helping to clarify the complex situation of ensuring safe food in retail establishments. Future research into why employee willingness to perform varies more for extrinsic motivation than for intrinsic motivation could assist food service managers in structuring employee development programs and the work environment, in a manner that aids in improving external motivation (communication, reward-punishment, and resources) and capitalizing on internal motivation. PMID:21219719

  19. Exercise Appears Safe, Helpful for Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 154487.html Exercise Appears Safe, Helpful for Pulmonary Hypertension Research review might reassure concerned cardiologists To use ... be beneficial and safe for people with pulmonary hypertension, researchers report. Pulmonary hypertension is a type of ...

  20. Guidance on the severity classification of scientific procedures involving fish: report of a Working Group appointed by the Norwegian Consensus-Platform for the Replacement, Reduction and Refinement of animal experiments (Norecopa)

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, P; Dennison, N; Goodman, G; Hetherington, S; Llywelyn-Jones, S; Ryder, K; Smith, A J

    2011-01-01

    The severity classification of procedures using animals is an important tool to help focus the implementation of refinement and to assist in reporting the application of the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). The recently revised Directive that regulates animal research and testing within the European Union requires Member States to ensure that all procedures are classified as ‘non-recovery’, ‘mild’, ‘moderate’ or ‘severe’, using assignment criteria set out by the European Commission (EC). However, these are focused upon terrestrial species, so are of limited relevance to fish users. A Working Group set up by the Norwegian Consensus-Platform for the 3Rs (Norecopa) has produced guidance on the classification of severity in scientific procedures involving fish, including examples of ‘subthreshold’, ‘mild’, ‘moderate’, ‘severe’ and ‘upper threshold’ procedures. The aims are to complement the EC guidelines and help to ensure that suffering in fish is effectively predicted and minimized. Norecopa has established a website (www.norecopa.no/categories) where more information on severity classification for procedures using fish, including field research, will be made available. PMID:21558168

  1. 30 CFR 57.11001 - Safe access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safe access. 57.11001 Section 57.11001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Travelways-Surface and Underground § 57.11001 Safe access. Safe means of access shall be provided...

  2. 30 CFR 57.11001 - Safe access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safe access. 57.11001 Section 57.11001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Travelways-Surface and Underground § 57.11001 Safe access. Safe means of access shall be provided...

  3. Developing Safe Schools Partnerships with Law Enforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosiak, John

    2009-01-01

    Safe schools are the concern of communities throughout the world. If a school is safe, and if children feel safe, students "are better able to learn. But what are the steps to make" this happen? First, it is important to understand the problem: What are the threats to school safety? These include crime-related behaviors that find their way to…

  4. Primer on tritium safe handling practices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This Primer is designed for use by operations and maintenance personnel to improve their knowledge of tritium safe handling practices. It is applicable to many job classifications and can be used as a reference for classroom work or for self-study. It is presented in general terms for use throughout the DOE Complex. After reading it, one should be able to: describe methods of measuring airborne tritium concentration; list types of protective clothing effective against tritium uptake from surface and airborne contamination; name two methods of reducing the body dose after a tritium uptake; describe the most common method for determining amount of tritium uptake in the body; describe steps to take following an accidental release of airborne tritium; describe the damage to metals that results from absorption of tritium; explain how washing hands or showering in cold water helps reduce tritium uptake; and describe how tritium exchanges with normal hydrogen in water and hydrocarbons.

  5. Development of safe infrared gas lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainuddin; Singhal, Gaurav; Tyagi, R. K.; Maini, A. K.

    2013-04-01

    Infrared gas lasers find application in numerous civil and military areas. Such lasers are therefore being developed at different institutions around the world. However, the development of chemical infrared gas lasers such as chemical oxygen iodine lasers (COIL) involves the use of several hazardous chemicals. In order to exploit full potential of these lasers, one must take diligent care of the safety issues associated with the handling of these chemicals and the involved processes. The present paper discusses the safety aspects to be taken into account in the development of these infrared gas lasers including various detection sensors working in conjunction with a customized data acquisition system loaded with safety interlocks for safe operation. The developed safety schemes may also be implemented for CO2 gas dynamic laser (GDL) and hydrogen fluoride-deuterium fluoride (HF-DF) Laser.

  6. Safe new reactor for radionuclide production

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.L.

    1995-02-15

    In late 1995, DOE is schedule to announce a new tritium production unit. Near the end of the last NPR (New Production Reactors) program, work was directed towards eliminating risks in current designs and reducing effects of accidents. In the Heavy Water Reactor Program at Savannah River, the coolant was changed from heavy to light water. An alternative, passively safe concept uses a heavy-water-filled, zircaloy reactor calandria near the bottom of a swimming pool; the calandria is supported on a light-water-coolant inlet plenum and has upflow through assemblies in the calandria tubes. The reactor concept eliminates or reduces significantly most design basis and severe accidents that plague other deigns. The proven, current SRS tritium cycle remains intact; production within the US of medical isotopes such as Mo-99 would also be possible.

  7. Is periconceptional opioid use safe?

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Felix; Koren, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Question A patient in my practice who takes buprenorphine for chronic pain would like to conceive. Is it safe for her to continue taking her medication? Answer The literature regarding periconceptional opioid use is conflicted as to whether opioids pose an elevated risk of birth defects. Confounding factors such as socioeconomic status, stress, and alcohol consumption might play a role. The first trimester of pregnancy is the critical period of development for many organ systems in the embryo. A chemical or environmental insult is more likely to produce major congenital malformations such as neural tube defects or mental retardation if it occurs within this window. Medical practitioners should judiciously consider a risk-benefit analysis before making their decisions. PMID:26167561

  8. How safe is Seattle's water?

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    According to Seattle Public Utilities, the cysts that can cause cryptosporidiosis (crypto) have been found in the city water supply periodically. Crypto can cause symptoms including diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and a low-grade fever, and can be fatal in people with CD4 counts below 200. It is very difficult to rid water of these cysts. To make sure drinking water is safe, people should boil the water for 1 to 3 minutes, depending on what altitude they are at. Also, the Centers for Disease Control suggests three methods for filtering water: microstraining with filters that remove particles smaller than one micron; reverse osmosis; and filtration with equipment that meets National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) Standard 53 for "cyst reduction". Washing hands before eating, avoiding raw or undercooked food, and wearing gloves when gardening are also ways to avoid contact with cysts. Contact information is provided. PMID:11366754

  9. Safe motherhood: the FIGO initiative.

    PubMed

    Benagiano, G; Thomas, B

    2003-09-01

    Over the last twenty years the international community-realizing that the tragedy of women dying during pregnancy and in childbirth could no longer be tolerated-launched a series of initiatives aimed at making safe motherhood a cornerstone of health services in all countries. Making pregnancy and delivery safe events is particularly complex, as it involves infrastructural and logistic, as well as technical, issues. Women die because they have no access to skilled personnel during pregnancy and at the time of delivery and because--if an emergency situation arises--they cannot reach a facility where emergency obstetric services are available. FIGO, the International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology-as the only global organization representing the Obstetricians of the world-decided some time ago that it could not limit its activities to proposing technical guidelines and debating scientific issues. It had to move into the field and, through its affiliated societies, help change the ability of the multitude of women in the developing world to obtain skilled attendance at birth. In 1997, plans were made to launch activities in five areas where maternal mortality was particularly high: Central America (Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and El Salvador), Ethiopia, Mozambique, Pakistan, and Uganda. Five member societies from the developed world (the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada, the Italian Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of the United Kingdom; and the Swedish Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology) agreed to provide support to their counterparts in these five selected areas. The project is now in its final stage. Results are, by and large, positive, demonstrating that, by motivating health professionals in the field and for a relatively modest financial outlay, more efficient use of existing services could be made in a sustainable fashion to save lives. PMID:14499973

  10. National Quality Forum 30 safe practices: priority and progress in Iowa hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ward, Marcia M; Evans, Thomas C; Spies, Arthur J; Roberts, Lance L; Wakefield, Douglas S

    2006-01-01

    The National Quality Forum (NQF) recently released a list of "30 Safe Practices" that were identified as relevant for all hospitals. The purpose of the present analysis was to assess hospitals' perceptions of each of the NQF 30 Safe Practices in terms of priority and progress. One hundred of Iowa's hospitals (86%) completed a survey. The highest progress ratings were for items involving hand washing, unit-dose medication dispensing, influenza vaccinations, implementing protocols to prevent wrong-site procedures, and standardized methods for labeling and storing medications. The lowest progress ratings were for intensive care units staffed by intensivists and implementing a computerized provider order entry system. Overall, safe practices that have been recommended for some time had higher priority and progress ratings. Most safe practices were equally endorsed by large and small hospitals, suggesting that the NQF goal of identifying safe hospital practices may be attainable for most of the safe practices. PMID:16533901

  11. The Development of a Procedure for Placing Education Students in Public Schools for Field Work Activities. Emergence of Higher Education in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceaser, Lisbeth; West, John

    This developmental project was designed to solve the conflict between the Center for Teacher Education at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo and the local public school districts regarding the placement of education students in public school classrooms for field work activities. The conflict arose when one major school…

  12. Students and School Adults: Partners in Keeping Schools Safe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gastic, Billie

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the important roles that students, school staff and teachers play in keeping the school safe particularly from weapons. The author believes that one way that they do this is by working together to reduce the problem of weapons in school. The role of school staff and teachers extends beyond prevention and…

  13. Students and School Adults: Partners in Keeping Schools Safe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gastic, Billie

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the important roles that students, school staff and teachers play in keeping the school safe particularly from weapons. The author believes that one way that they do this is by working together to reduce the problem of weapons in school. The role of school staff and teachers extends beyond prevention and…

  14. Is There a Safe Level of Exposure to a Carcinogen?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrudey, Steve E.; Krewski, Daniel

    1995-01-01

    Presents an approach to estimating the "safe" levels of low-dose exposure to carcinogens that involves working upward from the smallest conceivable chronic dose instead of extrapolating downward from high exposures. Discusses expert and public opinion and other issues related to quantitative cancer risk assessment. (LZ)

  15. Exercising for Two. What's Safe for the Active Pregnant Woman?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Jacqueline

    1992-01-01

    Clinical experience and recent research challenge the current standards of exercise duration and intensity for pregnant women. By carefully assessing patients' self-monitoring techniques, physicians can work with active women to create safe exercise programs during pregnancy. Safety guidelines for developing home exercise programs are included.…

  16. When Stakeholders Rebel: Lessons from a Safe Schools Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gastic, Billie; Irby, Decoteau J.; Zdanis, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    In this essay, we describe our experiences working with a rebellious primary stakeholder, Sylvia, as evaluators of a district-wide safe schools program. Given the breadth of the program and its multiple target constituencies, we were confronted with the challenges of managing a large number of stakeholders, or those individuals and groups that…

  17. Lithium metatungstate a safe alternative for washability

    SciTech Connect

    Rademacher, M.J.

    1995-08-01

    Lithium metatungstate (LMT), originally developed for the separation of heavy mineral sands, has been determined to be a safe and effective alternative to the traditional organic liquids used in determining the washability characteristics of coal. LMT is a non-flammable, very soluble inorganic salt which, when dissolved in water, can be used to replace organic liquids traditionally utilized for the gravity separation procedure. The concentrated LMT solution is commonly produced at a specific gravity of 3.0 g/cc. Solutions with lower specific gravities can be prepared by dilution with distilled water. Solutions with higher specific gravities can be prepared by concentrating the solutions through a reverse osmosis (RO) technique or an evaporation process. LMT was originally developed for the separation of heavy mineral sands, however, due to the similarities between the uses and from positive results of experimental data. It was found that this technology has applications for the gravity separation of coal and other minerals. The LMT technology is discussed.

  18. Registered nurse-administered sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedure

    PubMed Central

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2015-01-01

    The rising use of nonanesthesiologist-administered sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy has clinical significances. Most endoscopic patients require some forms of sedation and/or anesthesia. The goals of this sedation are to guard the patient’s safety, minimize physical discomfort, to control behavior and to diminish psychological responses. Generally, moderate sedation for these procedures has been offered by the non-anesthesiologist by using benzodiazepines and/or opioids. Anesthesiologists and non-anesthesiologist personnel will need to work together for these challenges and for safety of the patients. The sedation training courses including clinical skills and knowledge are necessary for the registered nurses to facilitate the patient safety and the successful procedure. However, appropriate patient selection and preparation, adequate monitoring and regular training will ensure that the use of nurse-administered sedation is a feasible and safe technique for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. PMID:26191341

  19. Safe disposal of prescribed medicines.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Phillip J; Hussainy, Safeera Y; George, Johnson; Kong, David Cm; Kirkpatrick, Carl Mj

    2015-06-01

    The National Return and Disposal of Unwanted Medicines Program provides a free and safe method for the disposal of unwanted and expired medicines. This stops drugs being dumped in landfill and waterways. An audit showed that over 600 tonnes of medicines are returned through the program. A substantial proportion of these medicines were still within their expiry dates. Salbutamol, insulin and frusemide are the most commonly discarded medicines. More than $2 million of public money is wasted each year. Hoarding and non-adherence to treatment contribute to waste. Health professionals may be able to help minimise waste by informing patients about the importance of completing prescribed courses of treatment, and discouraging them from hoarding medicines after reaching the safety net threshold on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. Prescribe no more than the required quantity of medicines. When starting a new therapy, prescribe a minimal quantity in case the drug is unsuitable for the patient. Advise patients to return all unwanted medicines to a pharmacy for disposal. PMID:26648628

  20. What is a safe lift?

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Kathy

    2013-09-01

    In a perfect world, a "safe" lift would be 51 pounds if the object is within 7 inches from the front of the body, if it is at waist height, if it is directly in front of the person, if there is a handle on the object, and if the load inside the box/bucket doesn't shift once lifted. If the load to be lifted does not meet all of these criteria, then it is an unsafe lift, and modifications must be made. Modifications would include lightening the load, getting help, or using a mechanical lifting device. There is always a way to turn an unsafe lift into a safer lift. An excellent resource for anyone interested in eliminating some of the hazards associated with lifting is the "Easy Ergonomics" publication from Cal/OSHA. This booklet offers practical advice on how to improve the workplace using engineering and administrative controls, problem-solving strategies and solutions, and a vast amount of ergonomics information and resources. "Easy Ergonomics" can be obtained by calling Cal/OSHA's education and training unit in Sacramento at 800-963-9424. A free copy can be obtained via www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/puborder.asp. PMID:24260936

  1. Retention of safe diving skills.

    PubMed

    Blitvich, J D; McElroy, G K; Blanksby, B A; Parler, H E

    2003-06-01

    This study investigated diving skill maintenance over an eight-month retention period following an intervention program. Thirty-four recreational swimmers with poor diving skills were measured before and immediately after a diving skills intervention program. Twenty-two returned for follow-up evaluation. Treadwater, Deck and Block dives were video-recorded, and maximum depth, distance, velocity, entry angle and flight distance were compared. Underwater hand and arm positions were examined. Pre-intervention, a breaststroke arm action before maximum depth occurred in 18% of all dives and 38% of Treadwater dives. This was eliminated post-intervention, improving head protection. The Treadwater dive elicited the greatest mean maximum depth, and ANOVA showed depth for this entry decreased (improved) following intervention and remained shallower at follow-up. Deck and Block dives also became shallower following intervention. As seven 10-minute skills sessions resulted in shallower dives with safer hand and arm positions, including safe diving skills in learn-to-swim programs can provide a diving spinal cord injury prevention strategy. PMID:12945622

  2. Safe disposal of prescribed medicines

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Phillip J; Hussainy, Safeera Y; George, Johnson; Kong, David CM; Kirkpatrick, Carl MJ

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The National Return and Disposal of Unwanted Medicines Program provides a free and safe method for the disposal of unwanted and expired medicines. This stops drugs being dumped in landfill and waterways. An audit showed that over 600 tonnes of medicines are returned through the program. A substantial proportion of these medicines were still within their expiry dates. Salbutamol, insulin and frusemide are the most commonly discarded medicines. More than $2 million of public money is wasted each year. Hoarding and non-adherence to treatment contribute to waste. Health professionals may be able to help minimise waste by informing patients about the importance of completing prescribed courses of treatment, and discouraging them from hoarding medicines after reaching the safety net threshold on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. Prescribe no more than the required quantity of medicines. When starting a new therapy, prescribe a minimal quantity in case the drug is unsuitable for the patient. Advise patients to return all unwanted medicines to a pharmacy for disposal. PMID:26648628

  3. Are nuclear shipments really safe?

    PubMed

    Brobst, W A

    1975-01-01

    The transportation of nuclear materials is on the increase. Although nuclear shipments are only a very small fraction of the Nation's hazardous materials shipments, they attract a great deal of public attention. Shipments of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear wastes are a particular concern. One of the many fears that people have about nuclear energy is the possibility that a nuclear shipment might somehow go awry and cause a serious public hazard. Primarily, they are worried that a shipment of spent reactor fuel or highly radioactive waste could be involved in serious rail or highway accident and dump its contents all over the countryside. Is that really possible? How safe are those shipments? How many are there? What do they look like? Are the packages tested? These and other questions are answered in this paper. Since public risk is the product of the consequences of an accident and its probability, both aspects are presented so that each of us can make up his own mind whether the risk from nuclear shipments is acceptable. PMID:1193025

  4. Safe testing nuclear rockets economically

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S. D.; Travis, B. J.; Zerkle, D. K.

    2002-01-01

    Several studies over the past few decades have recognized the need for advanced propulsion to explore the solar system. As early as the 1960s, Werner Von Braun and others recognized the need for a nuclear rocket for sending humans to Mars. The great distances, the intense radiation levels, and the physiological response to zero-gravity all supported the concept of using a nuclear rocket to decrease mission time. These same needs have been recognized in later studies, especially in the Space Exploration Initiative in 1989. One of the key questions that has arisen in later studies, however, is the ability to test a nuclear rocket engine in the current societal environment. Unlike the RoverMERVA programs in the 1960s, the rocket exhaust can no longer be vented to the open atmosphere. As a consequence, previous studies have examined the feasibility of building a large-scale version of the Nuclear Furnace Scrubber that was demonstrated in 1971. We have investigated an alternative that would deposit the rocket exhaust along with any entrained fission products directly into the ground. The Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust, or SAFE, concept would allow variable sized engines to be tested for long times at a modest expense. A system overview, results of preliminary calculations, and cost estimates of proof of concept demonstrations are presented. The results indicate that a nuclear rocket could be tested at the Nevada Test Site for under $20 M.

  5. Reactive, Safe Navigation for Lunar and Planetary Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utz, Hans; Ruland, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    When humans return to the moon, Astronauts will be accompanied by robotic helpers. Enabling robots to safely operate near astronauts on the lunar surface has the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of crew surface operations. Safely operating robots in close proximity to astronauts on the lunar surface requires reactive obstacle avoidance capabilities not available on existing planetary robots. In this paper we present work on safe, reactive navigation using a stereo based high-speed terrain analysis and obstacle avoidance system. Advances in the design of the algorithms allow it to run terrain analysis and obstacle avoidance algorithms at full frame rate (30Hz) on off the shelf hardware. The results of this analysis are fed into a fast, reactive path selection module, enforcing the safety of the chosen actions. The key components of the system are discussed and test results are presented.

  6. How safe is diagnostic ultrasonography?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, B S

    1984-01-01

    Health care workers and patients alike are concerned about the safety of diagnostic ultrasonography in clinical practice. Evidence published to date on the immediate and possible long-term biologic effects of exposure to ultrasound in diagnostic procedures is reviewed in this paper. No harmful effect in the human fetus, child or adult following the diagnostic use of pulsed ultrasound has been reported. However, the question of long-term biologic effects cannot yet be answered. Continued vigilance and further research are required. PMID:6378349

  7. [Work addiction].

    PubMed

    Mentzel, G

    1979-01-01

    The symptomatology of workaholism (work addiction) was presented in the form of a questionnaire and compared with other forms of addiction, especially alcoholism. Then a case was used as example to illustrate the development of the illness and its psychodynamics. The therapy procedure was also briefly explained. Moreover the psychodynamics of workaholism (work addiction) are described, once again in comparison to other addictions. Finally the author gives general guidelines for therapy. PMID:452731

  8. Writer`s guide for technical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    A primary objective of operations conducted in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex is safety. Procedures are a critical element of maintaining a safety envelope to ensure safe facility operation. This DOE Writer`s Guide for Technical Procedures addresses the content, format, and style of technical procedures that prescribe production, operation of equipment and facilities, and maintenance activities. The DOE Writer`s Guide for Management Control Procedures and DOE Writer`s Guide for Emergency and Alarm Response Procedures are being developed to assist writers in developing nontechnical procedures. DOE is providing this guide to assist writers across the DOE complex in producing accurate, complete, and usable procedures that promote safe and efficient operations that comply with DOE orders, including DOE Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations for DOE Facilities, and 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors.

  9. Evaluation of Revised Computer-Based Procedure System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Katya Le Blanc; Johanna Oxstrand; Cheradan Fikstad

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear power industry is very procedure driven, i.e. almost all activities that take place at a nuclear power plant are conducted by following procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by the industry do a good job at keeping the industry safe. However, these procedures are most often paired with methods and tools put in place to anticipate, prevent, and catch errors related to hands-on work. These tools are commonly called human performance tools. The drawback with the current implementation of these tools is that the task of performing one procedure becomes time and labor intensive. For example, concurrent and independent verification of procedure steps are required at times, which essentially means that at least two people have to be actively involved in the task. Even though the current use of PBPs and human performance tools are keeping the industry safe, there is room for improvement. The industry could potentially increase their efficiency and safety by replacing their existing PBPs with CBPs. If implemented correctly, the CBP system could reduce the time and focus spent on using the human performance tools. Some of the tools can be completely incorporated in the CBP system in a manner that the performer does not think about the fact that these tools are being used. Examples of these tools are procedure use and adherence, placekeeping, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduce the time and labor they require, such as concurrent and independent verification. The incorporation of advanced technology, such as CBP systems, may help to manage the effects of aging systems, structures, and components. The introduction of advanced technology may also make the existing LWR fleet more attractive to the future workforce, which will be of importance when the future workforce will chose between existing fleet and the newly built nuclear power plants.

  10. Mobile Energy Laboratory Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, P.R.; Batishko, C.R.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Stoops, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked to plan and implement a framework for measuring and analyzing the efficiency of on-site energy conversion, distribution, and end-use application on federal facilities as part of its overall technical support to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) Procedures establish guidelines for specific activities performed by PNL staff. PNL provided sophisticated energy monitoring, auditing, and analysis equipment for on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. Specially trained engineers and technicians were provided to conduct tests in a safe and efficient manner with the assistance of host facility staff and contractors. Reports were produced to describe test procedures, results, and suggested courses of action. These reports may be used to justify changes in operating procedures, maintenance efforts, system designs, or energy-using equipment. The MEL capabilities can subsequently be used to assess the results of energy conservation projects. These procedures recognize the need for centralized NM administration, test procedure development, operator training, and technical oversight. This need is evidenced by increasing requests fbr MEL use and the economies available by having trained, full-time MEL operators and near continuous MEL operation. DOE will assign new equipment and upgrade existing equipment as new capabilities are developed. The equipment and trained technicians will be made available to federal agencies that provide funding for the direct costs associated with MEL use.

  11. Outpatient pediatric urologic procedures.

    PubMed

    Howards, S S; Siegel, A L; Snyder, H M; Duckett, J W

    1987-02-01

    Outpatient pediatric urologic surgery is not a new concept. However, it has recently become extremely popular. The general experience nationwide and particularly the experience at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Virginia Hospital indicate that outpatient surgery can be very safe and satisfactory for patients. The outpatient approach requires close cooperation among anesthesiologists, surgeons, and outpatient personnel. Excellent communication with the patient and family is essential. This includes extensive educational printed material and 24-hour availability by telephone. Once the infrastructure is in place, outpatient pediatric urologic surgery results in efficient use of facilities and a more pleasant surgical experience for the patient. The psychological, social, and economic benefits of outpatient surgery make it imperative that a large percentage of pediatric procedures be done on an ambulatory basis. We do not, however, intend to suggest that all minor procedures can be done on an outpatient basis, as certain special situations will mandate hospitalization. PMID:3811053

  12. Virus Alert: Ten Steps to Safe Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Glenda A.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses computer viruses and explains how to detect them; discusses virus protection and the need to update antivirus software; and offers 10 safe computing tips, including scanning floppy disks and commercial software, how to safely download files from the Internet, avoiding pirated software copies, and backing up files. (LRW)

  13. 16 CFR 312.10 - Safe harbors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safe harbors. 312.10 Section 312.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S ONLINE PRIVACY PROTECTION RULE § 312.10 Safe harbors. (a) In general. An operator will be deemed to be in compliance with the requirements of this part...

  14. Creating Safe Spaces for Music Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendricks, Karin S.; Smith, Tawnya D.; Stanuch, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a practical model for fostering emotionally safe learning environments that instill in music students a positive sense of self-belief, freedom, and purpose. The authors examine the implications for music educators of creating effective learning environments and present recommendations for creating a safe space for learning,…

  15. Creating Safe Spaces for Music Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendricks, Karin S.; Smith, Tawnya D.; Stanuch, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a practical model for fostering emotionally safe learning environments that instill in music students a positive sense of self-belief, freedom, and purpose. The authors examine the implications for music educators of creating effective learning environments and present recommendations for creating a safe space for learning,…

  16. Safe Haven Laws as "Crime Control Theater"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Michelle; Miller, Monica K.; Griffin, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This article examines safe haven laws, which allow parents to legally abandon their infants. The main objective is to determine whether safe haven laws fit the criteria of "crime control theater", a term used to describe public policies that produce the appearance, but not the effect, of crime control, and as such are essentially…

  17. Evaluating a Safe Space Training for School Counselors and Trainees Using a Randomized Control Group Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Rebekah; Hays, Danica G.

    2014-01-01

    School counselors need to advocate and act as an ally for all students. Safe Space, a training designed to facilitate competency for working with and serving LGBTQ youth (i.e., LGBTQ competency), has received increased attention in the field of school counseling. However, limited empirical support exists for training interventions such as Safe…

  18. Embracing Safe Ground Test Facility Operations and Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Steven C.; Green, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting integrated operations and maintenance in wind tunnel ground test facilities requires a balance of meeting due dates, efficient operation, responsiveness to the test customer, data quality, effective maintenance (relating to readiness and reliability), and personnel and facility safety. Safety is non-negotiable, so the balance must be an "and" with other requirements and needs. Pressure to deliver services faster at increasing levels of quality in under-maintained facilities is typical. A challenge for management is to balance the "need for speed" with safety and quality. It s especially important to communicate this balance across the organization - workers, with a desire to perform, can be tempted to cut corners on defined processes to increase speed. Having a lean staff can extend the time required for pre-test preparations, so providing a safe work environment for facility personnel and providing good stewardship for expensive National capabilities can be put at risk by one well-intending person using at-risk behavior. This paper documents a specific, though typical, operational environment and cites management and worker safety initiatives and tools used to provide a safe work environment. Results are presented and clearly show that the work environment is a relatively safe one, though still not good enough to keep from preventing injury. So, the journey to a zero injury work environment - both in measured reality and in the minds of each employee - continues. The intent of this paper is to provide a benchmark for others with operational environments and stimulate additional sharing and discussion on having and keeping a safe work environment.

  19. Safe syringe disposal is related to safe syringe access among HIV-positive injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Coffin, Phillip O; Latka, Mary H; Latkin, Carl; Wu, Yingfeng; Purcell, David W; Metsch, Lisa; Gomez, Cynthia; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2007-09-01

    We evaluated the effect of syringe acquisition on syringe disposal among HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs) in Baltimore, New York City, and San Francisco (N = 680; mean age 42 years, 62% male, 59% African-American, 21% Hispanic, 12% White). Independent predictors of safe disposal were acquiring syringes through a safe source and ever visiting a syringe exchange program. Weaker predictors included living in San Francisco, living in the area longer, less frequent binge drinking, injecting with an HIV+ partner, peer norms supporting safe injection, and self-empowerment. Independent predictors of safe "handling"-both acquiring and disposing of syringes safely-also included being from New York and being older. HIV-positive IDUs who obtain syringes from a safe source are more likely to safely dispose; peer norms contribute to both acquisition and disposal. Interventions to improve disposal should include expanding sites of safe syringe acquisition while enhancing disposal messages, alternatives, and convenience. PMID:17053854

  20. Writer's Guide for technical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    A primary objective throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex is that operations be conducted in a deliberate and controlled manner with emphasis upon recognition and maintenance of the facility-specific safety envelope. One critical element of maintaining the safety envelope is procedures. DOE is providing guidance through this and other writer's guides to assist procedure writers across the DOE complex in producing accurate, complete, and usable procedures that promote safe and efficient operations in keeping with such DOE Orders as 5480.19, Conduct of Operations for DOE Facilities'', 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear facilities'', and 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors''. This Writer's Guide addresses the content, format, and style of technical procedures (procedures that prescribe production, operation of equipment and facilities, and maintenance activities) and is intended to be applied in a manner appropriate to the individual facility, 15 refs.

  1. Civil Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byer, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Briefly reviews the historical development of civil procedure (the rules that dictate how a civil case can proceed through the courts) and identifies some of its main components. Discusses procedures such as subject matter jurisdiction, personal jurisdiction, venue, discovery, motions practice, pleadings, pretrial conference, and trials. (MJP)

  2. SafeNet: a methodology for integrating general-purpose unsafe devices in safe-robot rehabilitation systems.

    PubMed

    Vicentini, Federico; Pedrocchi, Nicola; Malosio, Matteo; Molinari Tosatti, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    Robot-assisted neurorehabilitation often involves networked systems of sensors ("sensory rooms") and powerful devices in physical interaction with weak users. Safety is unquestionably a primary concern. Some lightweight robot platforms and devices designed on purpose include safety properties using redundant sensors or intrinsic safety design (e.g. compliance and backdrivability, limited exchange of energy). Nonetheless, the entire "sensory room" shall be required to be fail-safe and safely monitored as a system at large. Yet, sensor capabilities and control algorithms used in functional therapies require, in general, frequent updates or re-configurations, making a safety-grade release of such devices hardly sustainable in cost-effectiveness and development time. As such, promising integrated platforms for human-in-the-loop therapies could not find clinical application and manufacturing support because of lacking in the maintenance of global fail-safe properties. Under the general context of cross-machinery safety standards, the paper presents a methodology called SafeNet for helping in extending the safety rate of Human Robot Interaction (HRI) systems using unsafe components, including sensors and controllers. SafeNet considers, in fact, the robotic system as a device at large and applies the principles of functional safety (as in ISO 13489-1) through a set of architectural procedures and implementation rules. The enabled capability of monitoring a network of unsafe devices through redundant computational nodes, allows the usage of any custom sensors and algorithms, usually planned and assembled at therapy planning-time rather than at platform design-time. A case study is presented with an actual implementation of the proposed methodology. A specific architectural solution is applied to an example of robot-assisted upper-limb rehabilitation with online motion tracking. PMID:24750989

  3. Improved Quick Disconnect (QD) Interface Through Fail Safe Parts Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanch-Payne, Evelyn

    2001-01-01

    An extensive review of existing Quick Disconnects (QDs) mating and demating operations was performed to determine which shuttle part interface identifications and procedures contribute to human factor errors. The research methods used consisted of interviews with engineers and technicians, examination of incident reports, critiques of video and audio tapes of QD operations, and attendance of a Hyper QD operational course. The data strongly suggests that there are inherit human factor errors involved in QD operations. To promote fail-safe operations, QD interface problem areas and recommendations were outlined and reviewed. It is suggested that dialogue, investigations and recommendations continue.

  4. A comparison of reliability and conventional estimation of safe fatigue life and safe inspection intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, F. H.

    1972-01-01

    Both the conventional and reliability analyses for determining safe fatigue life are predicted on a population having a specified (usually log normal) distribution of life to collapse under a fatigue test load. Under a random service load spectrum, random occurrences of load larger than the fatigue test load may confront and cause collapse of structures which are weakened, though not yet to the fatigue test load. These collapses are included in reliability but excluded in conventional analysis. The theory of risk determination by each method is given, and several reasonably typical examples have been worked out, in which it transpires that if one excludes collapse through exceedance of the uncracked strength, the reliability and conventional analyses gave virtually identical probabilities of failure or survival.

  5. Capacity building in safe nanotechnologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Markus; Gommel, Udo

    2011-07-01

    In all places where engineered Nanoparticles (ENPs) are produced, used or handled, adequate workplace safety precautions should be implemented due to the protection of workers and the surrounding environment. Any possible accidental release of ENPs should be evaluated. Thereby detected potential risks have to be eliminated as far as possible. An implemented reasonable safety culture in each ENP-related company will help to meet this challenge. Different infrastructures and workplace design can help to reduce the risk of an accidentally contact of the workers with ENPs: Transferable examples will be shown from the semiconductor and life-science Industry. These systems like clean rooms, glove boxes, fume cupboards, filter and suction systems and other restricted area barrier access systems (RABS) are mainly being developed to protect sensitive products, but they can also be used to protect working personnel. Clean environments regarding airborne particulate contaminations can be classified according to ISO 14644-1. A short insight into this ISO-classification will be given. But overall, a simple and reasonable workplace and workflow organization will reduce the risk of an accidental release of ENPs largely. This may lead to a therefore necessary adaption of existing workflow patterns. The workers have to get aware about the potential risks! This can be done with appropriate education materials, leaflets, posters and brochures. These are some of the later outcomes from the NanoDevice dissemination and handbook work package.

  6. InaSAFE applications in disaster preparedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranantyo, Ignatius Ryan; Fadmastuti, Mahardika; Chandra, Fredy

    2015-04-01

    Disaster preparedness activities aim to reduce the impact of disasters by being better prepared to respond when a disaster occurs. In order to better anticipate requirements during a disaster, contingency planning activities can be undertaken prior to a disaster based on a realistic disaster scenario. InaSAFE is a tool that can inform this process. InaSAFE is a free and open source software that estimates the impact to people and infrastructure from potential hazard scenarios. By using InaSAFE, disaster managers can develop scenarios of disaster impacts (people and infrastructures affected) to inform their contingency plan and emergency response operation plan. While InaSAFE provides the software framework exposure data and hazard data are needed as inputs to run this software. Then InaSAFE can be used to forecast the impact of the hazard scenario to the exposure data. InaSAFE outputs include estimates of the number of people, buildings and roads are affected, list of minimum needs (rice and clean water), and response checklist. InaSAFE is developed by Indonesia's National Disaster Management Agency (BNPB) and the Australian Government, through the Australia-Indonesia Facility for Disaster Reduction (AIFDR), in partnership with the World Bank - Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR). This software has been used in many parts of Indonesia, including Padang, Maumere, Jakarta, and Slamet Mountain for emergency response and contingency planning.

  7. Interactive eLearning - a safe place to practice.

    PubMed

    Einarson, Elisabeth; Moen, Anne; Kolberg, Ragnhild; Flingtorp, Gry; Linnerud, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Interactive web-based learning environment offers refreshing opportunities to create innovative solutions to explore and exploit informatics support on-the-job training. We report from a study where a hospital is created a interactive eLearning resource. The modules are creating a safe place to practice - to be used for introduction to the work and preparation for certification or re-certification of competencies. PMID:19593010

  8. Safe Use of Hydrogen and Hydrogen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maes, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    This is a viewgraph presentation that is a course for teaching the safe use of hydrogen. The objectives of the course are 1. To familiarize the student with H2 safety properties 2. To enable the identification, evaluations and addressing of H2 system hazards 3. To teach: a. Safe practices for, b. Design, c. Materials selection, d. H2 system operation, e. Physical principles and empirical observations on which these safe practices are based, f. How to respond to emergency situations involving H2, g How to visualize safety concepts through in-class exercises, h. Identify numerous parameters important to H2 safety.

  9. Safe actinide disposition in molten salt reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, U.

    1997-03-01

    Safe molten salt reactors (MSR) can readily accommodate the burning of all fissile actinides. Only minor compromises associated with plutonium are required. The MSRs can dispose safely of actinides and long lived isotopes to result in safer and simpler waste. Disposing of actinides in MSRs does increase the source term of a safety optimized MSR. It is concluded that the burning and transmutation of actinides in MSRs can be done in a safe manner. Development is needed for the processing to handle and separate the actinides. Calculations are needed to establish the neutron economy and the fuel management. 9 refs.

  10. Methods, setup and safe handling for anhydrous hydrogen fluoride cleavage in Boc solid-phase peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Muttenthaler, Markus; Albericio, Fernando; Dawson, Philip E

    2015-07-01

    Solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) using tert-butyloxycarbonyl (Boc)/benzyl (Bzl) chemistry is an indispensable technique in many laboratories around the globe, and it provides peptides to the pharmaceutical industry and to thousands of scientists working in basic research. The Boc/Bzl strategy has several advantages, including reliability in the synthesis of long and difficult polypeptides, alternative orthogonality regarding protecting groups and ease of producing C-terminal thioesters for native chemical ligation applications. In this process, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (HF) is used to remove the side chain protecting groups of the assembled peptide and to release the peptide from the resin, a process typically described as 'HF cleavage'. This protocol describes the general methodology, apparatus setup and safe handling of HF, with the aim of providing comprehensive information on the safe use of this valuable, well-studied and validated cleavage technique. We explain the cleavage mechanism, the physicochemical properties and risks of HF, first aid measures and the correct use of the apparatus. In addition, we provide advice on scavenger selection, as well as a troubleshooting section and video material illustrating key steps of the procedure. The protocol comprises precleavage sample preparation (30 min-2.5 h), complete HF cleavage procedure (2 h) and reaction workup (30 min). PMID:26086408

  11. Safe Use of Pesticides, Guidelines. Occupational Safety and Health Series No. 38.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Labour Office, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This document provides guidance on the safe use of pesticides in agricultural work. General principles are given and followed by more detailed safety requirements for the various pesticide application techniques. Finally, the medical aspects of pesticides are considered. (BB)

  12. Dermatology Procedures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rights Job Postings Sections of the JAOCD JAOCD Archive Published Members Online Dermatology Journals Edit This Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Dermatology Procedures Share | SHAVE BIOPSY (or "tangential excision") ...

  13. Patient Safety: Guide to Safe Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Consumer Information > Patient Safety Guide to Safe Plastic Surgery Patient Safety More Resources Choose a surgeon ... Important facts about the safety and risks of plastic surgery Questions to ask my plastic surgeon Choose ...

  14. Child Care Provider's Guide to Safe Sleep

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share A Child Care Provider's Guide to Safe Sleep Page Content ... Caused By: Immunizations Vomiting or choking What can child care providers do? Follow these guidelines to help ...

  15. Summer Safety Tips - Staying Safe Outdoors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... News Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Summer Safety Tips: Staying Safe Outdoors Page Content Article ... eye wear at all times. ​ Healthy Children Radio: Summer Safety Tips (Audio) Summer is full of fun ...

  16. Keeping Food Safe during an Emergency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as much as possible to maintain the cold temperature. The refrigerator will keep food safely cold for ... is unopened. A full freezer will hold the temperature for approximately 48 hours (24 hours if it ...

  17. Ensuring Safe Use of Contact Lens Solution

    MedlinePLUS

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates Ensuring Safe Use of Contact Lens Solution Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... back to top Dos and Don'ts for Contact Lens Wearers DO: Always wash your hands before ...

  18. Bottled Water Everywhere: Keeping it Safe

    MedlinePLUS

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Bottled Water Everywhere: Keeping it Safe Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... sanitary conditions back to top Types of Bottled Water FDA describes bottled water as water that’s intended ...

  19. Safe surgical technique for associated acetabular fractures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Associated acetabular fractures are challenging injuries to manage. The complex surgical approaches and the technical difficulty in achieving anatomical reduction imply that the learning curve to achieve high-quality care of patients with such challenging injuries is extremely steep. This first article in the Journal’s “Safe Surgical Technique” section presents the standard surgical care, in conjunction with intraoperative tips and tricks, for the safe management of all subgroups of associated acetabular fractures. PMID:23414782

  20. Curiosity's Autonomous Surface Safing Behavior Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilson, Tracy A.; Manning, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The safing routines on all robotic deep-space vehicles are designed to put the vehicle in a power and thermally safe configuration, enabling communication with the mission operators on Earth. Achieving this goal is made a little more difficult on Curiosity because the power requirements for the core avionics and the telecommunication equipment exceed the capability of the single power source, the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator. This drove the system design to create an operational mode, called "sleep mode", where the vehicle turns off most of the loads in order to charge the two Li-ion batteries. The system must keep the vehicle safe from over-heat and under-heat conditions, battery cell failures, under-voltage conditions, and clock failures, both while the computer is running and while the system is sleeping. The other goal of a safing routine is to communicate. On most spacecraft, this simply involves turning on the receiver and transmitter continuously. For Curiosity, Earth is above the horizon only a part of the day for direct communication to the Earth, and the orbiter overpass opportunities only occur a few times a day. The design must robustly place the Rover in a communicable condition at the correct time. This paper discusses Curiosity's autonomous safing behavior and describes how the vehicle remains power and thermally safe while sleeping, as well as a description of how the Rover communicates with the orbiters and Earth at specific times.

  1. Managing Cassini Safe Mode Attitude at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft was launched on October 15, 1997 and arrived at Saturn on June 30, 2004. It has performed detailed observations and remote sensing of Saturn, its rings, and its satellites since that time. In the event safe mode interrupts normal orbital operations, Cassini has flight software fault protection algorithms to detect, isolate, and recover to a thermally safe and commandable attitude and then wait for further instructions from the ground. But the Saturn environment is complex, and safety hazards change depending on where Cassini is in its orbital trajectory around Saturn. Selecting an appropriate safe mode attitude that insures safe operation in the Saturn environment, including keeping the star tracker field of view clear of bright bodies, while maintaining a quiescent, commandable attitude, is a significant challenge. This paper discusses the Cassini safe table management strategy and the key criteria that must be considered, especially during low altitude flybys of Titan, in deciding what spacecraft attitude should be used in the event of safe mode.

  2. A ‘Simple Anterior Fish Excluder’ (SAFE) for Mitigating Penaeid-Trawl Bycatch

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew J.; Broadhurst, Matt K.; Sterling, David J.; Millar, Russell B.

    2015-01-01

    Various plastic strips and sheets (termed ‘simple anterior fish excluders’−SAFEs) were positioned across the openings of penaeid trawls in attempts at reducing the unwanted bycatches of small teleosts. Initially, three SAFEs (a single wire without, and with small and large plastic panels) were compared against a control (no SAFE) on paired beam trawls. All SAFEs maintained targeted Metapenaeus macleayi catches, while the largest plastic SAFE significantly reduced total bycatch by 51% and the numbers of Pomatomus saltatrix, Mugil cephalus and Herklotsichthys castelnaui by up to 58%. A redesigned SAFE (‘continuous plastic’) was subsequently tested (against a control) on paired otter trawls, significantly reducing total bycatch by 28% and P. saltatrix and H. castelnaui by up to 42%. The continuous-plastic SAFE also significantly reduced M. macleayi catches by ~7%, but this was explained by ~5% less wing-end spread, and could be simply negated through otter-board refinement. Further work is required to refine the tested SAFEs, and to quantify species-specific escape mechanisms. Nevertheless, the SAFE concept might represent an effective approach for improving penaeid-trawl selectivity. PMID:25837892

  3. Safe teleradiology: information assurance as project planning methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collmann, Jeff R.; Alaoui, Adil; Nguyen, Dan; Lindisch, David

    2003-05-01

    This project demonstrates use of OCTAVE, an information security risk assessment method, as an approach to the safe design and planning of a teleradiology system. By adopting this approach to project planning, we intended to provide evidence that including information security as an intrinsic component of project planning improves information assurance and that using information assurance as a planning tool produces and improves the general system management plan. Several considerations justify this approach to planning a safe teleradiology system. First, because OCTAVE was designed as a method for retrospectively assessing and proposing enhancements for the security of existing information management systems, it should function well as a guide to prospectively designing and deploying a secure information system such as teleradiology. Second, because OCTAVE provides assessment and planning tools for use primarily by interdisciplinary teams from user organizations, not consultants, it should enhance the ability of such teams at the local level to plan safe information systems. Third, from the perspective of sociological theory, OCTAVE explicitly attempts to enhance organizational conditions identified as necessary to safely manage complex technologies. Approaching information system design from the perspective of information security risk management proactively integrates health information assurance into a project"s core. This contrasts with typical approaches that perceive "security" as a secondary attribute to be "added" after designing the system and with approaches that identify information assurance only with security devices and user training. The perspective of health information assurance embraces so many dimensions of a computerized health information system"s design that one may successfully deploy a method for retrospectively assessing information security risk as a prospective planning tool. From a sociological perspective, this approach enhances the general conditions as well as establishes specific policies and procedures for reliable performance of health information assurance.

  4. Safe anticoagulation when heart and lungs are “on vacation”

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Circulation and oxygenation of blood outside the body is commonly required during complex surgical interventions involving coronary pulmonary bypass (CPB) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Both CPB and ECMO are life-supporting procedures utilizing a heart-lung machine, which subjects the blood to unphysiological conditions, potentially promoting undesirable blood coagulation. Traditionally, thrombotic complications from CPB and ECMO are resolved by heparin, an inexpensive broad spectrum anticoagulant that prevents blood clotting, but often results in bleeding. Despite hemostatic support therapy and constant monitoring, the lives of patients undergoing CPB and ECMO are often threatened by uncontrolled bleeding. There is an urgent need for novel strategies which provide safe anti-coagulation alternatives during CPB and ECMO procedures. Several non-traditional approaches, including nitric oxide donors as well as various protease and contact activation inhibitors, have been investigated and shown some success. More recently, Larsson et al. isolated a recombinant fully human (3F7) antibody inhibiting Factor XIIa. The antibody was shown to be both an efficacious and safe alternative to heparin. Below we will examine this study in more detail and offer considerations for translation of this novel concept to the clinic. PMID:26046056

  5. Investigation of safe-life fail-safe criteria for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the effects of a safe-life design approach and a fail-safe design approach on the space shuttle booster vehicle structure, and to recommend any changes to the structural design criteria. Two configurations of the booster vehicle were considered, one incorporating a delta wing (B-9U configuration) and the other a swept wing (B-16B configuration). Several major structural components of the booster were studied to determine the fatigue life, safe-life, and fail-safe capabilities of the baseline design. Each component was investigated to determine the practicability of applying a safe-life or fail-safe design philosophy, the changes such design approaches might require, and the impact of these changes on weight, cost, development plans, and performance.

  6. Can Naturoptics for Safe Recovery of Vision Fund Brazilians' Educations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flávia Ribiero, Silvia; Carmem Ribeiro Duarte, Célia; Mc Leod, Roger David

    2008-10-01

    Directors of Naturoptics for Safe Recovery of Vision, Inc., US Patent Office, April 8, 2008, trademark issued, grants ``The David Matthew Mc Leod Memorial Award,'' to individuals like Sylvia Flavia Ribeiro. Instructions at American locations enhance patenting, trade-marking, and propagation to individuals, and youth through parents. Naturoptics' earnings go by agreed percentages to named academic entities and awardees who sign non-disclosure agreements. These say the US Government trademarked the processes as safe, and that diagnostic or treatment techniques are not used, necessary, or allowed for Naturoptic Methods. These educationally explain how the inventor, Roger David Mc Leod, recovered his vision. Taught processes are released to awardees signing agreements this is an educational service, providing teaching services for clients. Non-disclosure agreements are required from clients. Work-study grants, ``The Kaan Balam Matagamon Memorial Award,'' in memory of DMM, may be awarded through the American Indians in Science and Engineering Society, AISES, and to other women and minorities.

  7. Grievance Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenhower, R. Warren

    Because grievances are unavoidable, it is essential for organizations, such as the schools, to utilize an efficient, effective procedure to handle friction between employers and employees. Through successive steps, representatives of labor and management attempt to resolve the grievance, first with meetings of lower level representatives (such as…

  8. Technique of laser in-line ignition all electronic safe and arming device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ze-rong; Zhou, Guang-wei

    2009-07-01

    In modern warfare the performance of weapon system safe and arming device has been put forward higher requirements because the battlefield environment has become increasingly sophisticated. The safe and arming device should have good safety of mechanical, electrical, thermal and other aspects and reliable initiation. This paper analyses the laser initiation of three ways, the laser could initiate the insensitive acceptable charge for the in-line ignition system, so that the laser in-line ignition can be realized and the laser in-line ignition all electronic safe and arming device is built. Then, studies the composition and working principle of the laser in-line ignition all electronic safe and arming device and the various subsystems in-depth. The laser in-line ignition all electronic safe and arming device can be applied to fixed-point, directional and multi-point initiation and has laid an important foundation of the theory and engineering in the future weapon system.

  9. Costing imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Bretland, P M

    1988-01-01

    The existing National Health Service financial system makes comprehensive costing of any service very difficult. A method of costing using modern commercial methods has been devised, classifying costs into variable, semi-variable and fixed and using the principle of overhead absorption for expenditure not readily allocated to individual procedures. It proved possible to establish a cost spectrum over the financial year 1984-85. The cheapest examinations were plain radiographs outside normal working hours, followed by plain radiographs, ultrasound, special procedures, fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, angiography and angiographic interventional procedures in normal working hours. This differs from some published figures, particularly those in the Körner report. There was some overlap between fluoroscopic interventional and the cheaper nuclear medicine procedures, and between some of the more expensive nuclear medicine procedures and the cheaper angiographic ones. Only angiographic and the few more expensive nuclear medicine procedures exceed the cost of the inpatient day. The total cost of the imaging service to the district was about 4% of total hospital expenditure. It is shown that where more procedures are undertaken, the semi-variable and fixed (including capital) elements of the cost decrease (and vice versa) so that careful study is required to assess the value of proposed economies. The method is initially time-consuming and requires a computer system with 512 Kb of memory, but once the basic costing system is established in a department, detailed financial monitoring should become practicable. The necessity for a standard comprehensive costing procedure of this nature, based on sound cost accounting principles, appears inescapable, particularly in view of its potential application to management budgeting. PMID:3349241

  10. What Does a Safe Sleep Environment Look Like?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... social media links What Does a Safe Sleep Environment Look Like? Page Content You can reduce your ... following ways. Printable versions of this safe sleep environment information are available below: What does a safe ...

  11. Culturally safe research with vulnerable populations.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Denise; Neville, Stephen

    2009-08-01

    Culturally safe research processes, methodologies, and mutually aligned research endeavours are a fundamental right of those being researched. Vulnerable populations are at risk of experiencing inequalities in health experiences and health outcomes, and research beneficial to those being researched is crucial to address disparities. Often vulnerable populations are exposed to research that is driven by dominant epistemologies, research methodologies, and socio-cultural lenses that can exacerbate their vulnerability, negating their socio-cultural reality. In this paper it is contended that researchers should review the way in which research is constructed and developed by creating a culturally safe space for research to occur with those who are vulnerable. A framework based on partnership, participation, protection, and power is presented as a way of creating culturally safe research. PMID:19715497

  12. Sun Safe Mode Controller Design for LADEE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusco, Jesse C.; Swei, Sean S. M.; Nakamura, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of sun safe controllers which are designed to keep the spacecraft power positive and thermally balanced in the event an anomaly is detected. Employed by NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), the controllers utilize the measured sun vector and the spacecraft body rates for feedback control. To improve the accuracy of sun vector estimation, the least square minimization approach is applied to process the sensor data, which is proven to be effective and accurate. To validate the controllers, the LADEE spacecraft model engaging the sun safe mode was first simulated and then compared with the actual LADEE orbital fight data. The results demonstrated the applicability of the proposed sun safe controllers.

  13. Evaluation of Computer-Based Procedure System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Johanna Oxstrand; Katya Le Blanc; Seth Hays

    2012-09-01

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs, to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The introduction of advanced technology in existing nuclear power plants may help to manage the effects of aging systems, structures, and components. In addition, the incorporation of advanced technology in the existing LWR fleet may entice the future workforce, who will be familiar with advanced technology, to work for these utilities rather than more newly built nuclear power plants. Advantages are being sought by developing and deploying technologies that will increase safety and efficiency. One significant opportunity for existing plants to increase efficiency is to phase out the paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used at most nuclear power plants and replace them, where feasible, with computer-based procedures (CBPs). PBPs have ensured safe operation of plants for decades, but limitations in paper-based systems do not allow them to reach the full potential for procedures to prevent human errors. The environment in a nuclear power plant is constantly changing depending on current plant status and operating mode. PBPs, which are static by nature, are being applied to a constantly changing context. This constraint often results in PBPs that are written in a manner that is intended to cover many potential operating scenarios. Hence, the procedure layout forces the operator to search through a large amount of irrelevant information to locate the pieces of information relevant for the task and situation at hand, which has potential consequences of taking up valuable time when operators must be responding to the situation, and potentially leading operators down an incorrect response path. Other challenges related to PBPs are the management of multiple procedures, place-keeping, finding the correct procedure for the task at hand, and relying on other sources of additional information to ensure a functional and accurate understanding of the current plant status (Converse, 1995; Fink, Killian, Hanes, & Naser, 2009; Le Blanc & Oxstrand, 2012). The main focus of this report is to describe the research activities conducted to address the remaining two objectives; Develop a prototype CBP system based on requirements identified and Evaluate the CBP prototype. The emphasis will be on the evaluation of an initial CBP prototype in at a Nuclear Power Plant.

  14. 21 CFR 570.30 - Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Additive Safety § 570.30 Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS). (a) General... obtain approval of a food additive regulation for the ingredient. General recognition of safety through... scientific procedures required for approval of a food additive regulation. General recognition of...

  15. 21 CFR 570.30 - Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Additive Safety § 570.30 Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS). (a) General... obtain approval of a food additive regulation for the ingredient. General recognition of safety through... scientific procedures required for approval of a food additive regulation. General recognition of...

  16. 21 CFR 570.30 - Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Additive Safety § 570.30 Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS). (a) General... obtain approval of a food additive regulation for the ingredient. General recognition of safety through... scientific procedures required for approval of a food additive regulation. General recognition of...

  17. 21 CFR 570.30 - Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Additive Safety § 570.30 Eligibility for classification as generally recognized as safe (GRAS). (a) General... obtain approval of a food additive regulation for the ingredient. General recognition of safety through... scientific procedures required for approval of a food additive regulation. General recognition of...

  18. Police Juvenile Procedures Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Champaign. Community Research Center.

    This manual provides an overview of the law relating to juvenile proceedings, focusing primarily on arrest and detention procedures, which are a major concern of police officers who work with juveniles. The manual does not provide specific instruction in state law but does describe federal Constitutional rulings that affect treatment of juveniles.…

  19. Police Juvenile Procedures Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Champaign. Community Research Center.

    This manual provides an overview of the law relating to juvenile proceedings, focusing primarily on arrest and detention procedures, which are a major concern of police officers who work with juveniles. The manual does not provide specific instruction in state law but does describe federal Constitutional rulings that affect treatment of juveniles.…

  20. Toward standardising gamma camera quality control procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhorayef, M. A.; Alnaaimi, M. A.; Alduaij, M. A.; Mohamed, M. O.; Ibahim, S. Y.; Alkandari, F. A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    Attaining high standards of efficiency and reliability in the practice of nuclear medicine requires appropriate quality control (QC) programs. For instance, the regular evaluation and comparison of extrinsic and intrinsic flood-field uniformity enables the quick correction of many gamma camera problems. Whereas QC tests for uniformity are usually performed by exposing the gamma camera crystal to a uniform flux of gamma radiation from a source of known activity, such protocols can vary significantly. Thus, there is a need for optimization and standardization, in part to allow direct comparison between gamma cameras from different vendors. In the present study, intrinsic uniformity was examined as a function of source distance, source activity, source volume and number of counts. The extrinsic uniformity and spatial resolution were also examined. Proper standard QC procedures need to be implemented because of the continual development of nuclear medicine imaging technology and the rapid expansion and increasing complexity of hybrid imaging system data. The present work seeks to promote a set of standard testing procedures to contribute to the delivery of safe and effective nuclear medicine services.

  1. Change through Group Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllan, Les; Friedman, Amy; Spears, Evans

    Perhaps the most well known treatment modalities in the field of prevention and treatment of addiction are groups. Group settings serve to bring individuals with addictions together at one time in one place to work on relevant issues together. Groups may serve as a safe environment for learning new social and relationship skills, gaining…

  2. Endoscopic cochlear implant procedure.

    PubMed

    Marchioni, Daniele; Grammatica, Alberto; Alicandri-Ciufelli, Matteo; Genovese, Elisabetta; Presutti, Livio

    2014-05-01

    The objective was to asses the feasibility of the endoscopic technique for cochlear implant (CI) positioning avoiding mastoidectomy and to discuss the benefits and drawbacks of the technique. The study design is a surgical procedure description and prospective case series report. From December 2011 to October 2012, six patients underwent endoscopic CI. All cases were selected based on CT and MRI studies. All surgical steps were analyzed; intra-and post-operative complications were noted. The length of time for each surgical procedure was recorded. The surgical procedure was described step by step focusing on the anatomy of the round window (RW) niche, analyzing the critical point during the dissection. The timing of the surgical procedures was 120 ± 21 (mean ± SD) min. In 1/6 patients, intra-operative injury of the chorda tympani occurred. In all cases, an endoscopic identification was performed and the anatomical details of the RW niche were noted. In 6/6 cases, a RW niche magnification was performed endoscopically. 5/6 cases showed a normal conformation of the RW. In 1/6 patients, obliteration of the RW niche was found. In 4/6 patients, an endoscopic cochleostomy through the RW was performed. In 1/6 patients, a difficult insertion of the array was observed. The current follow-up is 7.3 months (SD ± 3.7). No post-operative short- or long-term complications were noted in this series. Endoscopic CI is a safe and viable technique with a low rate of complications and with good outcomes. PMID:23595616

  3. 21 CFR 310.200 - Prescription-exemption procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... safe and effective for use in self-medication as directed in proposed labeling. A proposal to exempt a...) Prescription-exemption procedure of OTC drug review. A drug limited to prescription use under section...

  4. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Sun Safe Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrick, Joseph; Roger, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), a spacecraft designed and built at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, MD, was launched on June 18, 2009 from Cape Canaveral. It is currently in orbit about the Moon taking detailed science measurements and providing a highly accurate mapping of the suface in preparation for the future return of astronauts to a permanent moon base. Onboard the spacecraft is a complex set of algorithms designed by the attitude control engineers at GSFC to control the pointig for all operational events, including anomalies that require the spacecraft to be put into a well known attitude configuration for a sufficiently long duration to allow for the investigation and correction of the anomaly. GSFC level requirements state that each spacecraft s control system design must include a configuration for this pointing and lso be able to maintain a thermally safe and power positive attitude. This stable control algorithm for anomalous events is commonly referred to as the safe mode and consists of control logic thatwill put the spacecraft in this safe configuration defined by the spacecraft s hardware, power and environment capabilities and limitations. The LRO Sun Safe mode consists of a coarse sun-pointing set of algorithms that puts the spacecraft into this thermally safe and power positive attitude and can be achieved wihin a required amount of time from any initial attitude, provided that the system momentum is within the momentum capability of the reaction wheels. On LRO the Sun Safe mode makes use of coarse sun sensors (CSS), an inertial reference unit (IRU) and reaction wheels (RW) to slew the spacecraft to a solar inertial pointing. The CSS and reaction wheels have some level of redundancy because of their numbers. However, the IRU is a single-point-failure piece of hardware. Without the rate information provided by the IRU, the Sun Safe control algorithms could not maintain the required pointing, so a sub-mode of the Sun Safe mode that does not use the IRU was designed. This submode, referred to as the Sun Safe Gyroless control mode, consists of an algorithm that estimates rate information from the CSS and the RW measurements. RW momentum information is used to estimate the body rate parallel to the target sunline, which CSS alone would not be able to observe. Sun Safe can be autonomously, or via ground command, entered from any other control mode and in the event the IRU is not providing rate information, the control mode is switched to the gyroless submode. This paper looks at the design of the Sun Safe modes and discusses the constraints placed on the algorithm and how the mode wored around these constraints. Items of particular interest include CSS placement on the Solar Array (SA) and its implications to design, estimation of body rate information for the Sun Safe Gyroless control mode, and the effect of solar eclipse on each of the Sun Safe modes. Placing CSS on the SA was necessary for the means to put the Sun along the targeted sun-line, nominally normal to the SA panels, for all operational considerations. This had design implications for determining a sun vector during normal SA operations, if one or both gimbals become inoperable and when the SA is in a stowed configuration. The ability of body rate estimation in Sun Safe Gyroless not only uses CSS sun vector data but requires RW momentum measuremens to estimate rates parallel to the sun-line. LRO encounters solar eclipses of some length for most of its orbits about the Moon. With the lack of CSS measurement data a design was implemented in both Sun Safe and Sun Safe Gyroless, they differ because of having or not having IRU measurement data, to carry the spacecraft through these eclipse periods. This paper also includes some discussion of sun avoidance and how it affected design decisions during nominal and eclipse perids for each of the Sun Safe modes.

  5. Peritonectomy procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Sugarbaker, P H

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: New surgical procedures designed to assist in the treatment of peritoneal surface malignancy were sought. BACKGROUND: Decisions regarding the treatment of cancer depend on the anatomic location of the malignancy and the biologic aggressiveness of the disease. Some patients may have isolated intra-abdominal seeding of malignancy of limited extent or of low biologic grade. In the past, these clinical situations have been regarded as lethal. METHODS: The cytoreductive approach may require six peritonectomy procedures to resect or strip cancer from all intra-abdominal surfaces. RESULTS: These are greater omentectomy-splenectomy; left upper quadrant peritonectomy; right upper quadrant peritonectomy; lesser omentectomy-cholecystectomy with stripping of the omental bursa; pelvic peritonectomy with sleeve resection of the sigmoid colon; and antrectomy. CONCLUSIONS: Peritonectomy procedures and preparation of the abdomen for early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy were described. The author has used the cytoreductive approach to achieve long-term, disease-free survival in selected patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis, peritoneal sarcomatosis or mesothelioma. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. Figure 10. Figure 11. Figure 12. Figure 13. PMID:7826158

  6. Transient Approximation of SAFE-100 Heat Pipe Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Reid, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    Engineers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have designed several heat pipe cooled reactor concepts, ranging in power from 15 kWt to 800 kWt, for both surface power systems and nuclear electric propulsion systems. The Safe, Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) is now being developed in a collaborative effort between LANL and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC). NASA is responsible for fabrication and testing of non-nuclear, electrically heated modules in the Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at MSFC. In-core heat pipes must be properly thawed as the reactor power starts. Computational models have been developed to assess the expected operation of a specific heat pipe design during start-up, steady state operation, and shutdown. While computationally intensive codes provide complete, detailed analyses of heat pipe thaw, a relatively simple. concise routine can also be applied to approximate the response of a heat pipe to changes in the evaporator heat transfer rate during start-up and power transients (e.g., modification of reactor power level) with reasonably accurate results. This paper describes a simplified model of heat pipe start-up that extends previous work and compares the results to experimental measurements for a SAFE-100 type heat pipe design.

  7. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.

    1991-12-31

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  8. Campaign Safe & Sober. Youth & Generation X Planner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This packet contains information on safe and sober driving for members of Generation X. The packet includes information on "Buckle Up America! Week 1998," which was designed to encourage everyone on the road to use seat belts and child safety seats and to use them properly. It also offers a safety city brochure and multiple program materials…

  9. Bike Maintenance Makes for a Safe Ride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PTA Today, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Parents and children need to learn about bicycle maintenance and safety to keep bicycles fit and safe. The article presents a checklist of important bicycle equipment safety items and makes suggestions about how parents and children can learn more about bicycle safety and maintenance. (SM)

  10. Witnessing a Natural, Safe, and Healthy Birth

    PubMed Central

    Budin, Wendy C.

    2009-01-01

    In this column, the editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education discusses her experience witnessing a natural, safe, and healthy home birth. The editor also describes the contents of this issue, which offer a broad range of resources, research, and inspiration for childbirth educators in their efforts to promote normal birth. PMID:19750213

  11. DEVELOPING A SAFE SOURCE OF CASTOR OIL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) is an important oilseed crop with significant industrial value. However, the production of castor oil is hampered by the presence of the toxin ricin and hyper-allergenic 2S albumins in its seed. We are thus investigating the possibility of developing a safe source...

  12. Submarine 'safe to escape' studies in man.

    PubMed

    Jurd, K M; Seddon, F M; Thacker, J C; Blogg, S L; Stansfield, M R D; White, M G; Loveman, G A M

    2014-01-01

    The Royal Navy requires reliable advice on the safe limits of escape from a distressed submarine (DISSUB). Flooding in a DISSUB may cause a rise in ambient pressure, increasing the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) and decreasing the maximum depth from which it is safe to escape. The aim of this study was to investigate the pressure/depth limits to escape following saturation at raised ambient pressure. Exposure to saturation pressures up to 1.6 bar (a) (160 kPa) (n = 38); escapes from depths down to 120 meters of sea water (msw) (n = 254) and a combination of saturation followed by escape (n = 90) was carried out in the QinetiQ Submarine Escape Simulator, Alverstoke, United Kingdom. Doppler ultrasound monitoring was used to judge the severity of decompression stress. The trials confirmed the previously untested advice, in the Guardbook, that if a DISSUB was lying at a depth of 90 msw, then it was safe to escape when the pressure in the DISSUB was 1.5 bar (a), but also indicated that this advice may be overly conservative. This study demonstrated that the upper DISSUB saturation pressure limit to safe escape from 90 msw was 1.6 bar (a), resulting in two cases of DCS. PMID:25109084

  13. Travelling Safely on Ice: Algonquin Park.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Craig

    1994-01-01

    Provides safety considerations for snowshoe travel on iced waterways such as those of Algonquin Park (Ontario). Addresses what season is safe for waterway travel, how to determine the strength of the ice, reasonable travel time per day, what to do if you fall through the ice, and appropriate sites for winter camping. (LP)

  14. Exploring Safely: A Guide for Elementary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Terry; Texley, Juliana

    It is very important to provide a safe learning environment for students while engaging them in investigative and observational hands-on science activities. This teacher's guide provides information on safety rules and regulations in a narrative style while discussing both self-contained classroom teachers and science specialists in the elementary…

  15. Safe Schools: A Best Practices Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Educational Facility Planners International, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Every day in America more than 50 million children go to neighborhood public schools. Parents send them off with every hope they will be safe while there. And yet, as has been the case in too many cities, violence shatters that hope. The Council of Educational Facilities Planners International (CEFPI) seeks to lead in the effort to bolster schools…

  16. Birth kits for safe motherhood in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Nessa, S; Arco, E S; Kabir, I A

    1992-01-01

    Tetanus infection remains the leading cause of high neonatal mortality in Bangladesh. Birth kits which instruct and assist in a clean, safe birth are seen as a key measure in reducing the high incidence of neonatal deaths. A multisectoral programme has developed a simple kit and tested its potential for distribution to pregnant women. Initial results are positive and development is continuing. PMID:1637478

  17. Safe Schools: What the Southeast Is Doing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SERVE Policy Brief, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Virtually no school is safe from violence. FBI statistics, which show that juvenile crimes actually peaked during the mid-1970s, are at odds with the public perception that crime rates among young people are at an all-time high. The FBI acknowledges, however, that the crimes committed by young people tend to be more serious than in the past, and…

  18. Classrooms as Safe Places To Be Wrong.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sankey, Derek

    This paper contends that classrooms should be safe places for students and their teachers to be wrong, suggesting that this concept should provide the mainspring for educational reform in Hong Kong and in other places in the world. It notes that education in Hong Kong is harsh and has a tendency to label students; for the majority of students,…

  19. Hitting the Road: Safe Student Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labriola, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights the importance of school administrators' taking an active role in selecting motor coach carriers for their school trips. School administrators must be able to prove due diligence in selecting safe motor carriers. If not, they risk significant liability exposure for neglecting this critical responsibility. The article…

  20. Safe Schools Overview. NSSC Resource Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National School Safety Center, Sacramento, CA.

    U.S. schools must today address problems of crime, violence, drugs, suicide, child abuse, and lack of discipline. Academic issues have recently been in the public spotlight, but the quality of a child's education can be severely affected if the child is not in a safe environment. Crime and violence are a pervasive problem in schools, affecting…

  1. SAFE DRINKING WATER INFORMATION SYSTEM (STATE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:The Safe Drinking Water Information System (STATE) (SDWIS/STATE) is an information system OGWDW is developing for states and EPA regions to manage their water industry. SDWIS/STATE is not an information system for which EPA HQ is using to store or retrie...

  2. Going Online to Save Data Safely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsbourough, Reid

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of saving data safely. Suggestions include making backup copies of all important computer documents; frequently hitting the Ctrl-S keys to save current documents to the hard disk; periodically save a backup copy to a floppy disk; periodically saving a copy through the Internet to an offsite backup disk; and…

  3. Disabled Children: The Right to Feel Safe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mepham, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the fundamental right of disabled children to feel safe and be free from bullying, harassment and abuse. The article proposes that, 20 years since the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, disabled children are still facing barriers to securing this right. The article focuses on recent Mencap research that…

  4. SAFE FOOD MULTI-YEAR PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Safe Food Research Program, developed in response to the passage of the Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA), builds on earlier research to reduce scientific uncertainty in risk assessment. Research results will provide data needed to develop refined aggregate and cumulative ri...

  5. Challenges and Suggestions for Safe Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucher, Katherine T.; Manning, M. Lee

    2003-01-01

    Looks at challenges to safe schools and offers eight suggestions for ensuring the safety of students and educators. Notes that school violence includes unacceptable social behavior ranging from aggression that threatens or harms others to bullying, threats, sexual harassment, gang violence, extortion, and other forms of intimidation. (SG)

  6. Fail-safe bidirectional valve driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimoto, H.

    1974-01-01

    Cross-coupled diodes are added to commonly used bidirectional valve driver circuit to protect circuit and power supply. Circuit may be used in systems requiring fail-safe bidirectional valve operation, particularly in chemical- and petroleum-processing control systems and computer-controlled hydraulic or pneumatic systems.

  7. Exploring Safely: A Guide for Elementary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Terry; Texley, Juliana

    It is very important to provide a safe learning environment for students while engaging them in investigative and observational hands-on science activities. This teacher's guide provides information on safety rules and regulations in a narrative style while discussing both self-contained classroom teachers and science specialists in the elementary…

  8. The Pesticide Problem: Is Any Amount Safe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the use of integrated pest management to foster a safe school environment free from pesticides. This effective, environmentally sound system minimizes human exposure and reduces the toxicity of materials used to control pests. Parents, teachers, and students can educate themselves to improve school pest control practices. (SM)

  9. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J. Stephen

    1993-01-01

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  10. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J.S.

    1993-09-21

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process. 8 figures.

  11. Hitting the Road: Safe Student Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labriola, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights the importance of school administrators' taking an active role in selecting motor coach carriers for their school trips. School administrators must be able to prove due diligence in selecting safe motor carriers. If not, they risk significant liability exposure for neglecting this critical responsibility. The article…

  12. Safe Schools for the Roller Coaster Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inlay, Linda

    2005-01-01

    The dramatic ups and downs so often witnessed in adolescents are the result of changes in their brain activity. It is vital that the emotional and psychological needs that arise from such intense brain development are acknowledged and addressed so that middle school becomes a safe environment for the budding adults.

  13. The use of collaboration to implement evidence-based safe practices.

    PubMed

    Clarke, John R

    2013-12-01

    The Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority receives over 235,000 reports of medical error per year. Near miss and serious event reports of common and interesting problems are analysed to identify best practices for preventing harmful errors. Dissemination of this evidence-based information in the peer-reviewed Pennsylvania Patient Safety Advisory and presentations to medical staffs are not sufficient for adoption of best practices. Adoption of best practices has required working with institutions to identify local barriers to and incentives for adopting best practices and redesigning the delivery system to make desired behaviour easy and undesirable behaviour more difficult. Collaborations, where institutions can learn from the experiences of others, have show decreases in harmful events. The Pennsylvania Program to Prevent Wrong-Site Surgery is used as an example. Two collaborations to prevent wrong-site surgery have been completed, one with 30 institutions in eastern Pennsylvania and one with 19 in western Pennsylvania. The first collaboration achieved a 73% decrease in the rolling average of wrong-site events over 18 months. The second collaboration experienced no wrong-site operating room procedures over more than one year. Significance for public healthSince the Institute of Medicine's To Err is Human identified medical errors as a major cause of death, the public has been interested in the recommendations for reporting of medical errors and implementing safe systems for the delivery of healthcare. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has followed those recommendations and found that an essential intermediate step between analysing reports and implementing safe systems is collaborative learning among healthcare institutions. The experience in Pennsylvania should be useful to other public organizations wishing to improve safety. PMID:25170497

  14. Towards Analytic Solutions of Step-Wise Safe Switching for Known Affine-Linear Models

    SciTech Connect

    Koumboulis, Fotis N.; Tzamtzi, Maria P.

    2008-09-17

    In the present work we establish conditions which guarantee safe transitions for the closed-loop system produced by the application of the Step-Wise Safe Switching control approach to an affine linear system when the nonlinear description of the plant is known. These conditions are based on the local Input to State Stability (ISS) properties of the nonlinear system around the plant's nominal operating points.

  15. Undiagnosed myopathy before surgery and safe anaesthesia table.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Carlo P; Accorsi, Alma; Morandi, Lucia O; Mongini, Tiziana; Savoia, Gennaro; Gravino, Elvira; Angelini, Corrado; Tegazzin, Vincenzo

    2013-10-01

    Patients with muscle pathology are a challenge for anaesthesiologists because of possible life-threatening general anaesthesia complications. A review of the current medical literature on the issue clearly indicates that increasing awareness by anaesthesiologists in recent years has led to a reduction in the occurrence of adverse events in patients with diagnostically well-defined muscle disease. On the other hand, the current emerging aspect is that the great majority of complications concern subjects with clinically non-overt (silent to mildly symptomatic) and thus undiagnosed myopathy. With a view to improving prevention of possible critical anaesthesia complications in such patients, we present a "Safe Anaesthesia Table", listing both the anaesthetic drugs to be avoided and those considered harmless for myopathic patients, irrespective of age and type of pathology. In addition, a brief outline about the clinical aspects suggestive of a possible muscle pathology is also provided. Using "safe drugs" during routine surgical procedures in subjects with suspected undiagnosed myopathy will enable the anaesthesiologist to avoid delaying surgery, while protecting them from anaesthesia complications. By following this approach the presumed myopathy can be properly investigated after surgery. PMID:24399867

  16. Standardization work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavallon, Olivier

    1995-04-01

    For several years now, the main civil aircraft manufacturers (Airbus and its partners, Boeing, Fokker, McDonnell Douglas) have been working jointly on the writing of technical recommendations and the drawing up of an international standard. This work concerns the evaluation of the processes and products used to strip aeronautical paint systems. This procedure was initiated on request from the main airlines. In effect, the airlines are faced with situations in which the financial and operational objectives are becoming increasingly important. The need was felt to rationalize and, if possible, harmonize the criteria and technical requirements of the various civil aircraft manufacturers in order to facilitate in-service maintenance of the fleets of airlines operating Airbus, Boeing, Douglas aircraft, etc.

  17. Human round trip to Mars: Six months and radiation safe

    SciTech Connect

    Lazareth, O.W.; Schmidt, E.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a different type of round trip to Mars, using a combination of spacecraft. Compared to typical proposals, this flight is relatively fast and relatively safe from biological radiation dosage. Our study is concerned with the trip from Earth orbit to Mars orbit. Four spacecraft are required for the round trip. The crew spends most of their time on board a comparatively large, well shielded spacecraft (LC) which is in free (non-powered) orbit about the sun. The crew travels from Earth orbit to the LC while on board a comparatively small, powered spacecraft (SC). At Mars, the procedure is reversed and the crew returns on a second LC. In addition, a cargo craft, with no crew, is sent to Mars prior to the crew leaving Earth orbit. The trip time is about six months and the radiation dose equivalent is within guidelines recommended by the National Commission on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  18. Inexpensive and safe DNA gel electrophoresis using household materials.

    PubMed

    Ens, S; Olson, A B; Dudley, C; Ross, N D; Siddiqi, A A; Umoh, K M; Schneegurt, M A

    2012-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis is the single most important molecular biology technique and it is central to life sciences research, but it is often too expensive for the secondary science classroom or homeschoolers. A simple safe low-cost procedure is described here that uses household materials to construct and run DNA gel electrophoresis. Plastic containers are fitted with aluminum foil electrodes and 9-V batteries to run food-grade agar-agar gels using aquarium pH buffers and then stained with gentian violet. This activity was tested in a high school biology classroom with significantly positive responses on postactivity reflective surveys. The electrophoresis activity addresses several Life Science Content Standard C criteria, including aspects of cell biology, genetics, and evolution. It also can be used to teach aspects of motion and force in the physical science classroom. PMID:22615228

  19. Computerized navigation surgery for the safe placement of palatal implants.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Alon; Tzadok, Sasi; Casap, Nardy

    2007-04-01

    Palatal endosseous implants are increasingly recognized as an important alternative for achieving maximal intraoral orthodontic anchorage; however, their safe surgical placement is a matter of concern. Available palatal bone is frequently limited, and erroneous drilling can damage adjacent structures. Computerized navigation surgery is an advanced surgical modality in which the surgical drill is accurately tracked and animated in real time on the radiological image of the surgical site. In implant dentistry, this surgical modality allows accurate navigation of the implant drilling procedure and increases safety and accuracy, compared with conventional dental implant surgery. This article outlines the principles of computerized navigation surgery and describes its application for the placement of palatal orthodontic implants. The merits of this approach are particularly important for patients with limited palatal bone when implant placement requires high surgical precision. PMID:17448382

  20. Realistic Testing of the Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE-100) Thermal Simulator Using Fiber Bragg Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.; Fielder, Robert S.; van Dyke, Melissa K.; Wong, Wayne A.

    2004-02-01

    The motivation for the reported research was to support NASA space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber optic sensors for space-based nuclear power applications. Distributed high temperature measurements were made with 20 FBG temperature sensors installed in the SAFE-100 thermal simulator at the NASA Marshal Space Flight Center. Experiments were performed at temperatures approaching 800°C and 1150°C for characterization studies of the SAFE-100 core. Temperature profiles were successfully generated for the core during temperature increases and decreases. Related tests in the SAFE-100 successfully provided strain measurement data.

  1. Safe Affordable Fission Engine-(SAFE-) 100a Heat Exchanger Thermal and Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steeve, B. E.

    2005-01-01

    A potential fission power system for in-space missions is a heat pipe-cooled reactor coupled to a Brayton cycle. In this system, a heat exchanger (HX) transfers the heat of the reactor core to the Brayton gas. The Safe Affordable Fission Engine- (SAFE-) 100a is a test program designed to thermally and hydraulically simulate a 95 Btu/s prototypic heat pipe-cooled reactor using electrical resistance heaters on the ground. This Technical Memorandum documents the thermal and structural assessment of the HX used in the SAFE-100a program.

  2. Realistic Testing of the Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE-100) Thermal Simulator Using Fiber Bragg Gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.; Fielder, Robert S.; Van Dyke, Melissa K.; Wong, Wayne A.

    2004-02-04

    The motivation for the reported research was to support NASA space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber optic sensors for space-based nuclear power applications. Distributed high temperature measurements were made with 20 FBG temperature sensors installed in the SAFE-100 thermal simulator at the NASA Marshal Space Flight Center. Experiments were performed at temperatures approaching 800 deg. C and 1150 deg. C for characterization studies of the SAFE-100 core. Temperature profiles were successfully generated for the core during temperature increases and decreases. Related tests in the SAFE-100 successfully provided strain measurement data.

  3. Safe use of subdermal needles for intraoperative monitoring with MRI.

    PubMed

    Darcey, Terrance M; Kobylarz, Erik J; Pearl, Michael A; Krauss, Patricia J; Ferri, Stephanie A; Roberts, David W; Bauer, David F

    2016-03-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to develop safe, site-specific procedures for placing and leaving subdermal needle leads for intraoperative monitoring (IOM) during intraoperative MRI procedures. METHODS The authors tested a variety of standard subdermal needle electrodes designed and FDA-approved for IOM in the conventional operating room. Testing was used to determine the conditions necessary to avoid thermal injury and significant image artifacts with minimal disruption of IOM and MRI procedures. Phantom testing was performed with a fiber optic (lead) temperature monitoring system and was followed by testing of leads placed in a healthy volunteer. The volunteer testing used electrode placements typical of standard IOM cases, together with radiofrequency (RF) coil placement and imaging sequences routinely employed for these case types. Lead length was investigated to assess heating effects for electrodes placed within the RF coil. RESULTS The authors found that conventional stainless steel (SS) and platinum/iridium (Pt/Ir) subdermal needles can be used safely without significant heating when placed outside the RF coil, and this accounts for the majority or entirety of electrode placements. When placed within the RF coil, Pt/Ir leads produced minimal image artifacts, while SS leads produced potentially significant artifacts. In phantom testing, significant heating was demonstrated in both SS and Pt/Ir leads placed within the RF coil, but only during high-resolution T2-weighted scanning. This problem was largely, but not completely, eliminated when leads were shortened to 25 cm. Human testing was unremarkable except for nonpainful heating detected in a few electrodes during thin-slice (1.5 mm) FLAIR scanning. Transient irritation (skin reddening along the needle tract) was noted at 2 of the electrodes with detectable heating. CONCLUSIONS The authors were satisfied with the safety of their site-specific procedures and have begun with off-label use (following institutional review board approval and obtaining patient informed consent) of tested monitoring leads in cases that combine IOM and MRI. The authors recommend that all facilities perform their own site-specific testing of monitoring leads before proceeding with their routine use. PMID:26926059

  4. Safe endobag morcellation in a single-port laparoscopy subtotal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Angioni, Stefano; Pontis, Alessandro; Multinu, Angelo; Melis, Gianbenedetto

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published an alert about the risks of uterine tissue morcellation during laparoscopic procedures. In particular, the possible risk of spreading an undiagnosed malignant tumor was emphasized. From then on, a fervent debate in the media has led major scientific societies to express their position on the matter. We present a safe endobag abdominal morcellation in a single port-access laparoscopy subtotal hysterectomy. The endobag abdominal morcellation is feasible and safe; consequently, the development of devices dedicated to intracavitary morcellation in a closed system has been encouraged. PMID:26902985

  5. Easy and Safe Total Debranching of Arch Aneurysms Using Axilloaxillary Arterial Bypass.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Tomohiro; Hachimaru, Tsuyoshi; Oi, Keiji; Watanabe, Taiju; Kuroki, Hidehito; Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Sakurai, Shogo; Takeshita, Masashi; Kinoshita, Ryoji; Arai, Hirokuni

    2015-10-01

    Techniques used in hybrid repair of proximal aortic arch diseases are associated with perioperative complications such as cerebrovascular emboli. We present an easy and safe technique of total debranching thoracic endovascular aortic repair for arch diseases using axilloaxillary arterial bypass. The placement of the axilloaxillary arterial bypass enables perfusion of the brachiocephalic artery even when the artery is clamped. After reconstruction of the brachiocephalic artery and the left common carotid artery, the left subclavian artery is proximally ligated, and it is perfused through the bypass. This procedure is simple, safe, and useful for the prevention of neurologic complications. PMID:26434457

  6. Promoting safe IV management in practice using H.A.N.D.S.

    PubMed

    Frimpong, Angela; Caguioa, Jennifer; Octavo, Genevi

    The aim of this article is to promote best practice for the insertion and care of intravascular (IV) devices. The H.A.N.D.S. acronym was created to serve as an aide memoire to general and specialist nurses regarding the 5 key interventions to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs). In order to promote safe and evidence-based practice in IV therapy a practical guide with clinical information about common IV procedures has been developed. This article provides back-to-basics guidance on how to deliver IV therapy safely and effectively. PMID:25616127

  7. Perioperative Care of Prisoners: Providing Safe Care.

    PubMed

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2016-03-01

    Correctional nurses are trained to care for prisoners in a controlled security environment; however, when a convict is transferred to a noncorrectional health care facility, the nurses there are often unfamiliar with custody requirements or how to safely care for these patients. The care of prisoners outside of prison has not been adequately investigated, and a gap exists between research and nursing education and practice. Nurses rarely have to consider how providing care for a prisoner in custody affects their practice, the potential dissonance between routine nursing care and the requirements to maintain security, or that care of prisoners in unsecured clinical areas places the nurse and other personnel at risk for physical assault or prisoner escape. Educating perioperative nurses in the care of prisoners in a public hospital environment is important for the provision of safe care and prevention of physical and emotional repercussions to personnel. PMID:26924366

  8. Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure (LEEP)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that acts like a scalpel (surgical knife). An electric current is passed through the loop, which cuts away ... A procedure in which an instrument works with electric current to destroy tissue. Local Anesthesia: The use of ...

  9. Safe and efficient use of the Internet.

    PubMed

    Downes, P K

    2007-07-14

    A minority of people abuse the freedom of the Internet to the detriment of the vast majority. Many people feel that the Internet requires more regulation to reduce the burden of hackers, viruses, hoaxes, adverts and spam that continue to proliferate unabated. Until this ever happens, it is down to the individual person or business to protect themselves against malicious attacks and to use the Internet in a safe and efficient manner. PMID:17632481

  10. Human cloning: can it be made safe?

    PubMed

    Rhind, Susan M; Taylor, Jane E; De Sousa, Paul A; King, Tim J; McGarry, Michelle; Wilmut, Ian

    2003-11-01

    There are continued claims of attempts to clone humans using nuclear transfer, despite the serious problems that have been encountered in cloning other mammals. It is known that epigenetic and genetic mechanisms are involved in clone failure, but we still do not know exactly how. Human reproductive cloning is unethical, but the production of cells from cloned embryos could offer many potential benefits. So, can human cloning be made safe? PMID:14634633

  11. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery.

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  12. Safe delivery practices: experience from cross-sectional data of Bangladeshi women.

    PubMed

    Kabir, M A; Goh, Kim-Leng; Khan, M M H; Al-Amin, Abul Quasem; Azam, Mohammad Nurul

    2015-03-01

    This study examines the safe delivery practices of Bangladeshi women using data on 4905 ever-married women aged 15 to 49 years from the 2007 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey. Variables that included age, region of origin, education level of respondent and spouse, residence, working status, religion, involvement in NGOs, mass media exposure, and wealth index were analyzed to find correlates of safe delivery practices. More than 80% of the deliveries took place at home, and only 18% were under safe and hygienic conditions. The likelihood of safe deliveries was significantly lower among younger and older mothers than middle-aged mothers and higher among educated mothers and those living in urban areas. Economically better-off mothers and those with greater exposure to mass media had a significantly higher incidence of safe delivery practices. A significant association with religion and safe delivery practices was revealed. Demographic, socioeconomic, cultural, and programmatic factors that are strongly associated with safe delivery practices should be considered in the formulation of reproductive health policy. PMID:22426560

  13. Directors of Naturoptics for Safe Recovery of Vision, Inc. Release Patented Process to Awardees for their Personal Use and Mentored Teaching of the Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Paul J.; D., N.; C., D.; McLeod, Roger David

    2008-05-01

    The Board of Directors of Naturoptics for Safe Recovery of Vision, Inc., US Patent Office, trademark issued, patent issue date April 8, 2008, has granted ``The David Matthew Mc Leod Memorial Award,'' to named individuals. Naturoptics teaching earnings by recipients are to be disbursed according to agreed percentages to named academic entities and to the awardees. When awardees sign non-disclosure agreements, they are shown why the process is safe. They are also taught that no diagnostic or treatment techniques are used, necessary or allowed for the processes. This is an educational consultation that explains how Naturoptics inventor, Roger David Mc Leod, safely and rapidly recovered his vision. The now patented processes as taught is released for the use of those awardees that sign agreements that they were merely provided a teaching service, and will only be doing educational consulting for their clients. Such clients must follow similar procedures. Other equivalent work-study grants are named ``The Kaan Balam Matagamon Memorial Award,'' also in memory of DMM. The American Indians in Science and Engineering Society may also be participating.

  14. Emulsion polymerization of vinyl acetate: safe optimization of a hazardous complex process.

    PubMed

    Copelli, S; Derudi, M; Sempere, J; Serra, E; Lunghi, A; Pasturenzi, C; Rota, R

    2011-08-15

    Fast and exothermic discontinuous emulsion polymerization processes are particularly difficult to optimize from both safety and productivity point of view because of the occurrence of side undesired reactions (e.g. chain transfer to monomer, backbiting, propagation of tertiary radicals, termination by disproportion, etc.) and the hazards of boiling phenomena and stable foam formation under atmospheric pressure. Moreover, the relevant number of loading, heating and cooling steps, required before starting the monomer addition (that is, the desired reaction), makes a strict product quality reproducibility very difficult to obtain. Under these operating conditions, it is necessary to employ a suitable combined theoretical and experimental procedure able to detect the optimum process dosing time at both the laboratory and the industrial scale. In this work, it is shown how to use the topological criterion theory together with proper adiabatic calorimeter and RC1 experimental data to safely optimize the synthesis of polyvinyl acetate through the radical emulsion polymerization of vinyl acetate by the means of an indirectly cooled isoperibolic semibatch reactor. PMID:21632179

  15. Working for Cairo Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Harold L.

    This paper reports the personal experiences of a Fulbright scholar working in the Egyptian government's Cairo broadcast facility, offering an inside understanding of some of the broadcasting procedures used by Egyptian mass media. Besides descriptions of the broadcasting procedures at Cairo Radio, the paper contains notes on announcers' training…

  16. Combined SAFE/SNAP approach to safeguards evaluation. [Safeguards Network Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Engi, D.; Chapman, L.D.; Grant, F.H.; Polito, J.

    1980-01-01

    Generally, the scope of a safeguards evaluation model can efficiently address one of two issues, (1) global safeguards effectiveness, or (2) vulnerability analysis for individual scenarios. The Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE) focuses on (1) while the Safeguards Network Analysis Procedure (SNAP) is directed at (2). SAFE addresses (1) in that it considers the entire facility, i.e., the composite system of hardware and human components, in one global analysis. SNAP addresses (2) by providing a safeguards modeling symbology sufficiently flexible to represent quite complex scenarios from the standpoint of hardware interfaces while also accounting for a rich variety of human decision making. A combined SAFE/SNAP approach to the problem of safeguards evaluation is described and illustrated through an example.

  17. Safe handling of potential peroxide forming compounds and their corresponding peroxide yielded derivatives.

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Boyle, Timothy J.; Dean, Christopher J.

    2013-06-01

    This report addresses recent developments concerning the identification and handling of potential peroxide forming (PPF) and peroxide yielded derivative (PYD) chemicals. PPF chemicals are described in terms of labeling, shelf lives, and safe handling requirements as required at SNL. The general peroxide chemistry concerning formation, prevention, and identification is cursorily presented to give some perspective to the generation of peroxides. The procedure for determining peroxide concentrations and the proper disposal methods established by the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility are also provided. Techniques such as neutralization and dilution are provided for the safe handling of any PYD chemicals to allow for safe handling. The appendices are a collection of all available SNL documentation pertaining to PPF/PYD chemicals to serve as a single reference.

  18. Revised Unfilling Procedure for Solid Lithium Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Leveling, A.

    2003-06-03

    A procedure for unfilling used lithium lenses to has been described in Pbar Note 664. To date, the procedure has been used to disassemble lenses 20, 21, 17, 18, and 16. As a result of this work, some parts of the original procedure were found to be time consuming and ineffective. Modifications to the original procedure have been made to streamline the process and are discussed in this note. The revised procedure is included in this note.

  19. Safe bending of boron/aluminum sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liskay, G. G.; Yoshino, S. Y.

    1980-01-01

    Low cost procedure utilizing aluminum backing sheets protects boron/aluminum sheet from cracking during bending. Process utilizes inexpensive universal-brake bending dies rather than special hydroforming dies.

  20. Laser patterning of platinum electrodes for safe neurostimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. A.; Matteucci, P. B.; Dodds, C. W. D.; Palmer, J.; Dueck, W. F.; Hassarati, R. T.; Byrnes-Preston, P. J.; Lovell, N. H.; Suaning, G. J.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Laser surface modification of platinum (Pt) electrodes was investigated for use in neuroprosthetics. Surface modification was applied to increase the surface area of the electrode and improve its ability to transfer charge within safe electrochemical stimulation limits. Approach. Electrode arrays were laser micromachined to produce Pt electrodes with smooth surfaces, which were then modified with four laser patterning techniques to produce surface structures which were nanosecond patterned, square profile, triangular profile and roughened on the micron scale through structured laser interference patterning (SLIP). Improvements in charge transfer were shown through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and biphasic stimulation at clinically relevant levels. A new method was investigated and validated which enabled the assessment of in vivo electrochemically safe charge injection limits. Main results. All of the modified surfaces provided electrical advantage over the smooth Pt. The SLIP surface provided the greatest benefit both in vitro and in vivo, and this surface was the only type which had injection limits above the threshold for neural stimulation, at a level shown to produce a response in the feline visual cortex when using an electrode array implanted in the suprachoroidal space of the eye. This surface was found to be stable when stimulated with more than 150 million clinically relevant pulses in physiological saline. Significance. Critical to the assessment of implant devices is accurate determination of safe usage limits in an in vivo environment. Laser patterning, in particular SLIP, is a superior technique for improving the performance of implant electrodes without altering the interfacial electrode chemistry through coating. Future work will require chronic in vivo assessment of these electrode patterns.

  1. Driving Procedures. A Resource Guide for Driver Education Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Dept. of Public Safety, Austin.

    Designed to provide instructors with resource materials for driver education, this book contains mainly materials on established safe driving procedures. An introduction defines a procedure as describing ways in which a driver can comply with the law to do something extra that will increase his/her safety and prevent congestion and collision.…

  2. Driving Procedures. A Resource Guide for Driver Education Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Dept. of Public Safety, Austin.

    Designed to provide instructors with resource materials for driver education, this book contains mainly materials on established safe driving procedures. An introduction defines a procedure as describing ways in which a driver can comply with the law to do something extra that will increase his/her safety and prevent congestion and collision.…

  3. Gender and development: a SAFE recipe.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, S

    1996-05-01

    It is argued that an alternative strategy to women's involvement in development is the development of a whole "new dish, prepared, baked, and distributed equally" rather than acquisition of a "bigger piece of the pie." The issues of gender and development (GAD) involve women gaining power and control of the decision making processes. Past development has been too much of a "fixed menu" approach. Feminist development involves the satisfaction of the strategic needs of women, an agenda-setting direction, flexibility, and empowerment (SAFE). Strategic gender needs were conceptualized first by Maxine Malyneaux. Within women's defined roles, there are needs for access to adequate and clean water supplies, nutrition, health care, and income. Women in development (WID) approaches are strong in serving practical needs. The SAFE approach combines both the strategic and practical needs of women. Some argue that a focus on strategic and/or practical needs should be conceptualized in terms of changing women's position within a structurally unequal set of social relations. Some emphasize autonomy. The basic concepts of strategic needs is viewed as including the change in women's status and movement toward autonomy. Aid agencies and development groups have been mainstreaming WID and GAD over the past decade by integrating women and women's needs into administration, decision making, and the project cycle. Gender issues could be built into existing development paradigms or could change the existing development agenda with a gender perspective. It is argued that an agenda-setting approach is needed in order to assure that the strategic needs of women are incorporated. Flexibility and adaptation of approaches means that WID and GAD can be adjusted to all cultures. It is cited by Buvinic and Moser that welfare, equity, anti-poverty, efficiency, and empowerment are five ethical policy approaches. The policy approach of SAFE is that of empowerment or the knowledge and exercise of influence, power, and leadership in some or all social relations. PMID:12347265

  4. Promoting safe motherhood in rural India.

    PubMed

    Maclean, G

    1997-01-01

    This article identifies some activities performed to promote safe motherhood in rural India. Nurses from a voluntary organization in Hyderabad, India, trained women's groups from 32 villages in rural Andhra Pradesh state over 3 days in 1996 in maternal and child care, health and family welfare, gender issues, sanitation, leadership, literacy, negotiating skills, and health monitoring. The women were encouraged to perform health activities in their villages. In October 1996, a Conference of Women celebrated the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi, with women's groups reporting on health activities in specific villages. Each women's group had its own banner. Every woman wore a conference delegate badge. One woman's group was rewarded for making the most significant progress. Participants included women from 29 villages and auxiliary nurse-midwives. For some women, this was the first time away from home. Conference delegates toured the primary health center facilities at Shamirpet and met with staff. The aim was to reduce fear and reluctance to use the services and to promote awareness of available health care. Most villages in India rely on auxiliary nurse-midwives for maternal and child health care. Promotion of safe motherhood requires close cooperation between the auxiliary nurse-midwifes and women's groups. The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare of India is introducing in-service training to improve the clinical skills of auxiliary nurse-midwives in eight states. The nurse-midwives use adapted and new educational material from WHO's safe motherhood midwifery training modules. A workshop was used to introduce the new modules and to propose teaching methods for senior project staff. The five modules include a trainers' manual of educational methods. PMID:12321357

  5. Safe motherhood: priority in S Asia.

    PubMed

    Saxena, D

    1994-03-30

    In March, 1994, at Chandigarh, India, delegates of the conference on Safe Motherhood in South Asia: Challenges Ahead addressed maternal mortality. Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka have around 27% of the world's live births and 43% of the maternal deaths. Maternal mortality in south Asia ranges from 60 to 618/100,000 live births. Delegates to the conference debated over the future of using traditional births attendants (TBAs). Some advocated that, since TBAs are an accepted part of villagers, the health care system should encourage them to undergo training to provide safe reproductive health practices. Other delegates believed that trained physicians should provide maternal health services in areas where trained health personnel do not now serve. The Regional Health Officer for UNICEF advocated the training of general practitioners in specialized obstetric services (e.g., cesarean section), since there are few obstetricians. Another UNICEF delegate suggested more expansive measures to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity, such as including traditional practitioners in the health system, since they now provide 70-80% of health care to rural dwellers. The system should involve India's gram panchayats more often into the Safe Motherhood program because they are in a position to immunize and educate children, monitor the village water pump and wells, warn villagers not to defecate in open areas, and arrange transportation for mothers in an emergency. Widespread education in the community and broad-based use of existing health services contribute to high maternal health in Kerala State, India. Other topics discussed were strategic management based on local conditions, cost-effectiveness of various interventional steps, use of quinacrine pellets for sterilization, and a holistic view of maternal mortality. PMID:12179171

  6. Safe handling: implementing hazardous drug precautions.

    PubMed

    Walton, Ann Marie L; Mason, Susan; Busshart, Michele; Spruill, Angela D; Cheek, Summer; Lane, Ashley; Sabo, Kathy; Taylor, Amanda

    2012-06-01

    Occupational exposure to chemotherapy is a significant and ubiquitous danger to oncology nurses. The Oncology Clinical Nurse III/IV leadership group at the University of North Carolina Hospitals embarked on the challenge of a comprehensive standards review regarding personal protective equipment necessary when handling waste after hazardous drug administration. This review led to practice improvements in education, the use of chemotherapy-rated gloves when handling hazardous waste, and changes in the disposal options available to staff. A discharge teaching pamphlet on safe handling for the caregivers of patients receiving hazardous drugs was created and piloted. PMID:22641316

  7. Implementing safe obstetric anesthesia in Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Kuczkowski, Krzysztof M; Kuczkowski, Krzysztof M

    2009-08-01

    The position of woman in any civilization is an index of the advancement of that civilization; the position of woman is gauged best by the care given her at the birth of her child. Obstetric anesthesia, by definition, is a subspecialty of anesthesia devoted to peripartum, perioperative, pain and anesthetic management of women during pregnancy and the puerperium. Today, obstetric anesthesia has become a recognized subspecialty of anesthesiology and an integral part of practice of most anesthesiologists. Perhaps, no other subspecialty of anesthesiology provides more personal gratification than the practice of obstetric anesthesia. This article reviews the challenges associated with implementing safe obstetric anesthesia practice in Eastern Europe. PMID:19488944

  8. The Journey from Safe Yield to Sustainability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alley, W.M.; Leake, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    Safe-yield concepts historically focused attention on the economic and legal aspects of ground water development. Sustainability concerns have brought environmental aspects more to the forefront and have resulted in a more integrated outlook. Water resources sustainability is not a purely scientific concept, but rather a perspective that can frame scientific analysis. The evolving concept of sustainability presents a challenge to hydrologists to translate complex, and sometimes vague, socioeconomic and political questions into technical questions that can be quantified systematically. Hydrologists can contribute to sustainable water resources management by presenting the longer-term implications of ground water development as an integral part of their analyses.

  9. Safely Enabling Civilian Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Operations in Low-Altitude Airspace by Unmanned Aerial System Traffic Management (UTM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopardekar, Parimal Hemchandra

    2015-01-01

    Many UAS will operate at lower altitude (Class G, below 2000 feet). There is an urgent need for a system for civilian low-altitude airspace and UAS operations. Stakeholders want to work with NASA to enable safe operations. XXXX

  10. Safely Enabling Civilian Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Operations In Low-Altitude Airspace By Unmanned Aerial System Traffic Management (UTM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopardekar, Parimal H.

    2015-01-01

    Many UAS will operate at lower altitude (Class G, below 2000 feet)There is urgent need for a system for civilian low-altitude airspace and UAS operations. Stakeholders want to work with NASA to enable safe operations.

  11. Is ondansetron safe for use during pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Gideon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Question While I usually prescribe doxylamine-pyridoxine for morning sickness, some of my patients with severe nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP) receive ondansetron in hospital. I have read some new precautions recommended by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Is ondansetron safe to use during pregnancy? Answer During the past decade ondansetron has been increasingly used in the United States for NVP, owing to the lack of an FDA-approved drug for this condition. While fetal safety data for doxylamine-pyridoxine are based on more than a quarter of a million pregnancies, the fetal safety data for ondansetron are based on fewer than 200 births. Moreover, a recent case-control study suggested there was an increased risk of cleft palate associated with ondansetron. Recently, the FDA issued a warning about potentially serious QT prolongation and torsade de pointes associated with ondansetron use; the warning included a list of precautions and tests that must be followed. The drug is not labeled for use in NVP in either the United States or Canada. Based on the data available today, ondansetron use cannot be assumed to be safe during pregnancy. PMID:23064917

  12. Long term retention of safe diving skills.

    PubMed

    Blitvich, J D; McElroy, G K; Blanksby, B A; Parker, H E

    2003-09-01

    This short report describes a 20-month follow-up of safe diving skills, extending the 8-month retention period previously published in this journal. Thirty-four recreational swimmers with poor diving skills were evaluated before and immediately after a diving skills intervention program. Twenty-two returned for the eight-month follow-up evaluation and 16 returned 20 months post. As with the earlier study, Treadwater, Deck, Block and Running dives were video-recorded, and maximum depth, distance, velocity, entry angle and flight distance were compared. Underwater hand and arm positions were examined. Pre-intervention, a breaststroke arm action before maximum depth occurred in 18% of all dives and 38% of Treadwater dives. This was eliminated post-intervention, improving head protection. The Treadwater dive elicited the greatest mean maximum depth, and ANOVA showed depth for this entry decreased (improved) following intervention and remained shallower at the eight-month and 20-month post follow-ups. The Block dive also became shallower following intervention while the Deck dive remained unchanged. As seven 10-minute skills sessions resulted in shallower dives with safer hand and arm positions, and these skills were retained over a 600 day non-practice period, it is reliable to consider that the inclusion of safe diving skills in learn-to-swim programs can provide a diving spinal cord injury prevention strategy. PMID:14609152

  13. Eye safe laser based DIRCM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherbarth, S.; Thum-Jäger, A.

    2009-09-01

    To be effective a DIRCM must direct a Laser beam exceeding a certain power level towards the approaching missile. This power level inevitably leads to a potential laser hazard mainly regarding the eye safety of people potentially hit by the Laser beam. To evaluate this hazard the IEC 60825-1 is a well established international standard. This leads to the definition of a laser safety zone around the active DIRCM which can be as large as a few hundred meters. Therefore it cannot be excluded, that people are present within this zone. This Laser hazard is also a major topic for a civil or military DIRCM system certification. In this report we analyze the impact of various DIRCM designs on this safety zone as well as the resulting Laser hazard footprint at takeoff and landing. Also some technical means to make a DIRCM system inherently eye safe are discussed. As a result we come the conclusion that an eye safe DIRCM is possible, if appropriate measures are taken throughout the DIRCM system design.

  14. Risk management for assuring safe drinking water.

    PubMed

    Hrudey, Steve E; Hrudey, Elizabeth J; Pollard, Simon J T

    2006-12-01

    Millions of people die every year around the world from diarrheal diseases much of which is caused by contaminated drinking water. By contrast, drinking water safety is largely taken for granted by many citizens of affluent nations. The ability to drink water that is delivered into households without fear of becoming ill may be one of the key defining characteristics of developed nations in relation to the majority of the world. Yet there is well-documented evidence that disease outbreaks remain a risk that could be better managed and prevented even in affluent nations. A detailed retrospective analysis of more than 70 case studies of disease outbreaks in 15 affluent nations over the past 30 years provides the basis for much of our discussion [Hrudey, S.E. and Hrudey, E.J. Safe Drinking Water--Lessons from Recent Outbreaks in Affluent Nations. London, UK: IWA Publishing; 2004.]. The insights provided can assist in developing a better understanding within the water industry of the causes of drinking water disease outbreaks, so that more effective preventive measures can be adopted by water systems that are vulnerable. This preventive feature lies at the core of risk management for the provision of safe drinking water. PMID:16839605

  15. Unsafe and potentially safe herbal therapies.

    PubMed

    Klepser, T B; Klepser, M E

    1999-01-15

    Unsafe and potentially safe herbal therapies are discussed. The use of herbal therapies is on the rise in the United States, but most pharmacists are not adequately prepared educationally to meet patients' requests for information on herbal products. Pharmacists must also cope with an environment in which there is relatively little regulation of herbal therapies by FDA. Many herbs have been identified as unsafe, including borage, calamus, coltsfoot, comfrey, life root, sassafras, chaparral, germander, licorice, and ma huang. Potentially safe herbs include feverfew, garlic, ginkgo, Asian ginseng, saw palmetto, St. John's wort, and valerian. Clinical trials have been used to evaluate feverfew for migraine prevention and rheumatoid arthritis; garlic for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and infections; ginkgo for circulatory disturbances and dementia; ginseng for fatigue and cancer prevention; and saw palmetto for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Also studied in formal trials have been St. John's wort for depression and valerian for insomnia. The clinical trial results are suggestive of efficacy of some herbal therapies for some conditions. German Commission E, a regulatory body that evaluates the safety and efficacy of herbs on the basis of clinical trials, cases, and other scientific literature, has established indications and dosage recommendations for many herbal therapies. Pharmacists have a responsibility to educate themselves about herbal therapies in order to help patients discern the facts from the fiction, avoid harm, and gain what benefits may be available. PMID:10030529

  16. Making Human Spaceflight as Safe as Possible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Frederick D.

    2005-01-01

    We articulated the safety hierarchy a little over two years ago, as part of our quest to be the nation s leader in safety and occupational health, and in the safety of the products and services we provide. The safety hierarchy stresses that we are all accountable for assuring that our programs, projects, and operations do not impact safety or health for the public, astronauts and pilots, employees on the ground, and high-value equipment and property. When people are thinking about doing things safely, they re also thinking about doing things right. And for the past couple of years, we ve had some pretty good results. In the time since the failures of the Mars 98 missions that occurred in late 1999, every NASA spacecraft launch has met the success objectives, and every Space Shuttle mission has safely and successfully met all mission objectives. Now I can t say that NASA s safety program is solely responsible for these achievements, but, as we like to say, "mission success starts with safety." In the future, looking forward, we will continue to make spaceflight even safer. That is NASA s vision. That is NASA s duty to both those who will travel into space and the American people who will make the journey possible.

  17. Safe patient care – safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    St. Pierre, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization’s vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture (“top-down process”). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization’s maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization’s general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed “informed culture”. An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. “Incident reporting systems” are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organization’s safe surgery checklist” is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality. Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate stimulation based team trainings into their curriculum. PMID:24403977

  18. Global cancer surgery: delivering safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Richard; Alatise, Olusegun Isaac; Anderson, Benjamin O; Audisio, Riccardo; Autier, Philippe; Aggarwal, Ajay; Balch, Charles; Brennan, Murray F; Dare, Anna; D'Cruz, Anil; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Fleming, Kenneth; Gueye, Serigne Magueye; Hagander, Lars; Herrera, Cristian A; Holmer, Hampus; Ilbawi, André M; Jarnheimer, Anton; Ji, Jia-Fu; Kingham, T Peter; Liberman, Jonathan; Leather, Andrew J M; Meara, John G; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Murthy, Shilpa S; Omar, Sherif; Parham, Groesbeck P; Pramesh, C S; Riviello, Robert; Rodin, Danielle; Santini, Luiz; Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Shrime, Mark; Thomas, Robert; Tsunoda, Audrey T; van de Velde, Cornelis; Veronesi, Umberto; Vijaykumar, Dehannathparambil Kottarathil; Watters, David; Wang, Shan; Wu, Yi-Long; Zeiton, Moez; Purushotham, Arnie

    2015-09-01

    Surgery is essential for global cancer care in all resource settings. Of the 15.2 million new cases of cancer in 2015, over 80% of cases will need surgery, some several times. By 2030, we estimate that annually 45 million surgical procedures will be needed worldwide. Yet, less than 25% of patients with cancer worldwide actually get safe, affordable, or timely surgery. This Commission on global cancer surgery, building on Global Surgery 2030, has examined the state of global cancer surgery through an analysis of the burden of surgical disease and breadth of cancer surgery, economics and financing, factors for strengthening surgical systems for cancer with multiple-country studies, the research agenda, and the political factors that frame policy making in this area. We found wide equity and economic gaps in global cancer surgery. Many patients throughout the world do not have access to cancer surgery, and the failure to train more cancer surgeons and strengthen systems could result in as much as US $6.2 trillion in lost cumulative gross domestic product by 2030. Many of the key adjunct treatment modalities for cancer surgery--e.g., pathology and imaging--are also inadequate. Our analysis identified substantial issues, but also highlights solutions and innovations. Issues of access, a paucity of investment in public surgical systems, low investment in research, and training and education gaps are remarkably widespread. Solutions include better regulated public systems, international partnerships, super-centralisation of surgical services, novel surgical clinical trials, and new approaches to improve quality and scale up cancer surgical systems through education and training. Our key messages are directed at many global stakeholders, but the central message is that to deliver safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery to all, surgery must be at the heart of global and national cancer control planning. PMID:26427363

  19. Automatic Data Processing to Achieve a Safe Telemedical Artificial Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Hernando, M. Elena; García-Sáez, Gema; Martínez-Sarriegui, Iñaki; Rodríguez-Herrero, Agustín; Pérez-Gandía, Carmen; Rigla, Mercedes; de Leiva, Alberto; Capel, Ismael; Pons, Belén; Gómez, Enrique J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The use of telemedicine for diabetes care has evolved over time, proving that it contributes to patient self-monitoring, improves glycemic control, and provides analysis tools for decision support. The timely development of a safe and robust ambulatory artificial pancreas should rely on a telemedicine architecture complemented with automatic data analysis tools able to manage all the possible high-risk situations and to guarantee the patient's safety. Methods The Intelligent Control Assistant system (INCA) telemedical artificial pancreas architecture is based on a mobile personal assistant integrated into a telemedicine system. The INCA supports four control strategies and implements an automatic data processing system for risk management (ADP-RM) providing short-term and medium-term risk analyses. The system validation comprises data from 10 type 1 pump-treated diabetic patients who participated in two randomized crossover studies, and it also includes in silico simulation and retrospective data analysis. Results The ADP-RM short-term risk analysis prevents hypoglycemic events by interrupting insulin infusion. The pump interruption has been implemented in silico and tested for a closed-loop simulation over 30 hours. For medium-term risk management, analysis of capillary blood glucose notified the physician with a total of 62 alarms during a clinical experiment (56% for hyperglycemic events). The ADP-RM system is able to filter anomalous continuous glucose records and to detect abnormal administration of insulin doses with the pump. Conclusions Automatic data analysis procedures have been tested as an essential tool to achieve a safe ambulatory telemedical artificial pancreas, showing their ability to manage short-term and medium-term risk situations. PMID:20144417

  20. Results of 30 kWt Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE-30) primary heat transport testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Kevin; van Dyke, Melissa; Houts, Mike; Godfroy, Tom; Martin, James; Dickens, Ricky; Williams, Eric; Harper, Roger; Salvil, Pat; Reid, Bob

    2001-02-01

    The use of resistance heaters to simulate heat from fission allows extensive development of fission systems to be performed in non-nuclear test facilities, saving time and money. Resistance heated tests on the Safe Affordable Fission Engine-30 kilowatt (SAFE30) test article are being performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This paper discusses the results of these experiments to date, and describes the additional testing that will be performed. Recommendations related to the design of testable space fission power and propulsion systems are made. .

  1. Interventional MSK procedures: the hip.

    PubMed

    Dodré, Emilie; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Cockenpot, Eric; Chastanet, Patrick; Cotten, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous musculoskeletal procedures are widely accepted as low invasive, highly effective, efficient and safe methods in a vast amount of hip pathologies either in diagnostic or in therapeutic management. Hip intra-articular injections are used for the symptomatic treatment of osteoarthritis. Peritendinous or intrabursal corticosteroid injections can be used for the symptomatic treatment of greater trochanteric pain syndrome and anterior iliopsoas impingement. In past decades, the role of interventional radiology has rapidly increased in metastatic disease, thanks to the development of many ablative techniques. Image-guided percutaneous ablation of skeletal metastases provides a minimally invasive treatment option that appears to be a safe and effective palliative treatment for localized painful lytic lesion. Methods of tumour destruction based on temperature, such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and cryotherapy, are performed for the management of musculoskeletal metastases. MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery provides a non-invasive alternative to these ablative methods. Cementoplasty is now widely used for pain management and consolidation of acetabular metastases and can be combined with RFA. RFA is also used to treat benign tumours, namely osteoid osteomas. New interventional procedures such as percutaneous screw fixation are also proposed to treat non-displaced or minimally displaced acetabular roof fractures. PMID:26317896

  2. Medicines: Use Them Safely | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Taking Medicines Safely Medicines: Use Them Safely Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Questions To Ask Your Doctor About A New Medicine What is the name of the medicine, and ...

  3. Total laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure.

    PubMed

    Masoni, Luigi; Mari, Francesco Saverio; Nigri, Giuseppe; Favi, Francesco; Pindozzi, Fioralba; Dall'Oglio, Anna; Pancaldi, Alessandra; Brescia, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Hartmann's procedure is still performed in those cases in which colorectal anastomosis might be unsafe. Reversal of Hartmann's procedure (HR) is considered a major surgical procedure with a high morbidity (55 to 60%) and mortality rate (0 to 4%). To decrease these rates, laparoscopic Hartmann's reversal procedure was successfully experienced. We report our totally laparoscopic Hartmann's reversal technique. Between 2004 and 2010 we performed 27 HRs with a totally laparoscopic approach. The efficacy and safety of this technique were demonstrated evaluating the operative data, postoperative complications, and the outcome of the patients. There were no open conversions or major intraoperative complications. Anastomotic leaking occurred in one patient requiring an ileostomy; one patient needed a blood transfusion and one had a nosocomial pneumonia. The mean postoperative hospitalization was 5.7 days. Laparoscopic HR is a feasible and safe procedure and can be considered a valid alternative to open HR. PMID:23317614

  4. Safe sinus lift: use of acrylic stone trimmer to avoid sinus lining perforation.

    PubMed

    Haribabu, Prashanth Konatham; Raja, Krishna Kumar; Iyer, Shankar

    2014-06-01

    Iatrogenic injury to the maxillary sinus membrane is a common complication during direct sinus lift procedures. The most common cause is perforation of the Schneiderian membrane using a tungsten-carbide round bur no.6. We propose a safe technique in which an acrylic stone trimmer is used to create a window in the maxillary antrum thereby minimizing the risk of injury to the delicate sinus membrane. PMID:24914914

  5. Procedures in complex systems: the airline cockpit.

    PubMed

    Degani, A; Wiener, E L

    1997-05-01

    In complex human-machine systems, successful operations depend on an elaborate set of procedures which are specified by the operational management of the organization. These procedures indicate to the human operator (in this case the pilot) the manner in which operational management intends to have various tasks done. The intent is to provide guidance to the pilots and to ensure a safe, logical, efficient, and predictable (standardized) means of carrying out the objectives of the job. However, procedures can become a hodge-podge. Inconsistent or illogical procedures may lead to noncompliance by operators. Based on a field study with three major airlines, the authors propose a model for procedure development called the "Four P's": philosophy, policies, procedures, and practices. Using this model as a framework, the authors discuss the intricate issue of designing flight-deck procedures, and propose a conceptual approach for designing any set of procedures. The various factors, both external and internal to the cockpit, that must be considered for procedure design are presented. In particular, the paper addresses the development of procedures for automated cockpits--a decade-long, and highly controversial issue in commercial aviation. Although this paper is based on airline operations, we assume that the principles discussed here are also applicable to other high-risk supervisory control systems, such as space flight, manufacturing process control, nuclear power production, and military operations. PMID:11541101

  6. Development of an ultra-safe, ultra-low emissions natural gas fueled school bus: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kubesh, J.T.

    1998-03-01

    This report documents work conducted under Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Project 03-6871, ``Development of an Ultra-Safe and Low-Emission Dedicated Alternative Fuel School Bus.`` The project was sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Subcontract No. ZCF-5-13519-01. This report documents Phase 3 -- Integration and Phase 4 -- Demonstration and serves as the final report for this project. Phase 1 -- Systems Design and Phase 2 -- Prototype Hardware Development were documented in NREL publications TP-425-7609 and TP-425-2 1081, respectively. Several significant areas of work are summarized in this report. Integration of the engine technologies developed under Phase 2 into a production Deere 8.1-L, spark-ignition compressed natural gas engine is detailed, including information on the engine and control system modifications that were made. Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions results verifying the ultra-low emissions output of this engine are also included. The informal project goal of producing oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions less than or equal to 1.0 g/bhp-hr over the FTP heavy-duty engine cycle was attained. In addition, a test run that resulted in less than one half of the Ultra-Low Emissions Vehicle limit for NO{sub x} plus non-methane hydrocarbons was obtained. These results were for engine-out (no catalyst) emissions. Results using a catalyst produced very low formaldehyde emissions and virtually zero carbon monoxide and particulate matter emissions. Following these excellent results, a duplicate engine was assembled and integrated into the prototype ultra-safe school bus, the Envirobus 2000. Many of the new and modified subsystems developed during this project for the engine are considered strong candidates for inclusion into the production Deere 8.1-L gas engine in the near future.

  7. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-3 - Safe harbor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Safe harbor requirements. 1.401(k)-3 Section 1.401(k)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(k)-3 Safe harbor requirements. (a) ADP test safe...

  8. 75 FR 29391 - National Safe Boating Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8524 of May 20, 2010 National Safe Boating Week, 2010 By the President of the... spend time on the water, let us recommit during National Safe Boating Week to practicing safe...

  9. 77 FR 31147 - National Safe Boating Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-12877 Filed 5-23-12; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8825 of May 21, 2012 National Safe Boating Week, 2012 By the President of the.... During National Safe Boating Week, we renew our commitment to safe, responsible practices on our...

  10. 50 CFR 216.91 - Dolphin-safe labeling standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dolphin-safe labeling standards. 216.91... MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.91 Dolphin-safe labeling standards. (a) It is a violation of... include on the label of those products the term “dolphin-safe” or any other term or symbol that claims...

  11. 50 CFR 216.91 - Dolphin-safe labeling standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dolphin-safe labeling standards. 216.91... MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.91 Dolphin-safe labeling standards. (a) It is a violation of... include on the label of those products the term “dolphin-safe” or any other term or symbol that claims...

  12. 50 CFR 216.91 - Dolphin-safe labeling standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dolphin-safe labeling standards. 216.91... MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.91 Dolphin-safe labeling standards. (a) It is a violation of... include on the label of those products the term “dolphin-safe” or any other term or symbol that claims...

  13. 50 CFR 216.91 - Dolphin-safe labeling standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dolphin-safe labeling standards. 216.91... MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.91 Dolphin-safe labeling standards. (a) It is a violation of... include on the label of those products the term “dolphin-safe” or any other term or symbol that claims...

  14. 50 CFR 216.91 - Dolphin-safe labeling standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dolphin-safe labeling standards. 216.91... MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.91 Dolphin-safe labeling standards. (a) It is a violation of... include on the label of those products the term “dolphin-safe” or any other term or symbol that claims...

  15. 33 CFR 62.27 - Safe water marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safe water marks. 62.27 Section... UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.27 Safe water marks. Safe water marks indicate that there is navigable water all around the mark. They are often used to...

  16. 33 CFR 62.27 - Safe water marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safe water marks. 62.27 Section... UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.27 Safe water marks. Safe water marks indicate that there is navigable water all around the mark. They are often used to...

  17. 33 CFR 62.27 - Safe water marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safe water marks. 62.27 Section... UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.27 Safe water marks. Safe water marks indicate that there is navigable water all around the mark. They are often used to...

  18. Distributed strain and temperature mapping in the Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE-100) thermal simulator using fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.; Fielder, Robert S.

    2004-07-01

    The motivation for the reported research was to support NASA space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors for the SAFE-100 non-nuclear core simulator. The purpose of the combined temperature and strain mapping was to obtain a correlation between power distribution and core shape within the simulator. In a nuclear reactor, core dimension affects local reactivity and therefore power distribution. 20 FBG temperature sensors were installed in the SAFE-100 thermal simulator at the NASA Marshal Space Flight Center in an interstitial location approximately 2.3mm in diameter. The simulator was heated during two separate experiments using graphite resistive heating elements. The first experiment reached a maximum temperature of approximately 800°C, while the second experiment reached 1150°C. A detailed profile of temperature vs. time and location within the simulator was generated. During a second test, highly distributed fiber Bragg grating strain sensors were arrayed about the circumference and along the length of the heated core region. The maximum temperature during this test was approximately 300°C. A radial and longitudinal strain distribution was obtained that correlated well with known power distribution. Work continues to increase the strain sensor operating temperature and sensor multiplexing to allow high-resolution mapping.

  19. Periodontal Treatments and Procedures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Augmentation Ridge Modification Periodontal Pocket Reduction Procedures Periodontal Plastic Surgery Procedures Love the Gums You're With ... Augmentation Ridge Modification Periodontal Pocket Reduction Procedures Periodontal Plastic Surgery Procedures Love the Gums You're With ...

  20. Laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann procedure

    PubMed Central

    Golash, Vishwanath

    2006-01-01

    Background: The Hartmann procedure is a standard life-saving operation for acute left colonic complications. It is usually performed as a temporary procedure with the intent to reverse it later on. This reversal is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality by open method. The laparoscopic reestablishment of intestinal continuity after Hartmann procedure has shown better results in terms of decrease in morbidity and mortality. Materials and Methods: The laparoscopic technique was used consecutively in 12 patients for the reversal of Hartmann procedure in the last 3 years. The adhesiolysis and mobilization of the colon was done under laparoscopic guidance. The colostomy was mobilized and returned to abdominal cavity after tying the anvil in the proximal end. An end-to-end intracorporeal anastomosis was performed between the proximal colon and the rectum using the circular stapler. Results: Mean age of the patients was 40 years and the mean time of restoration of intestinal continuity was 130 days. Two patients were converted to open. The mean time of operation was 90 min. There were no postoperative complications and mortality. The mean hospital stay was 5 days. Conclusion: Laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann is technically safe and feasible. PMID:21234148

  1. Mount Rainier: living safely with a volcano in your backyard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driedger, Carolyn L.; Scott, William E.

    2008-01-01

    Majestic Mount Rainier soars almost 3 miles (14,410 feet) above sea level and looms over the expanding suburbs of Seattle and Tacoma, Washington. Each year almost two million visitors come to Mount Rainier National Park to admire the volcano and its glaciers, alpine meadows, and forested ridges. However, the volcano's beauty is deceptive - U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research shows that Mount Rainier is one of our Nation's most dangerous volcanoes. It has been the source of countless eruptions and volcanic mudflows (lahars) that have surged down valleys on its flanks and buried broad areas now densely populated. To help people live more safely with the volcano, USGS scientists are working closely with local communities, emergency managers, and the National Park Service.

  2. Safe and efficient operation of multistage cold compressor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kauschke, M.; Haberstroh, C.; Quack, H.

    1996-12-31

    Large refrigeration rates in the temperature range of super fluid helium can only be obtained with the help of centrifugal cold compressors. For the large 2 K systems, four compression stages are necessary to reach atmospheric pressure. Centrifugal cold compressors are quite sensitive to mass flow and suction temperature variations; but these have to be expected in a real system. The first step in the systems design is to find safe and efficient quasi-stationary modes of operation. The system which is being proposed for the TESLA refrigerators relies on two features. The first is to allow the room temperature screw compressor, downstream of the cold compressors to work occasionally with a subatmospheric suction pressure. The second is to stabilize the suction temperature of the third stage of compression at about 10 K. With these features it is possible, that in all modes of operation all four compressor stages operate exactly at their design point.

  3. Safe high quality health care: investing in tomorrow's leaders.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, L J

    2001-12-01

    The agenda for health care in developed countries in the 21st century will be dominated by a vision of quality which seeks to address the deep seated problems of the past. The ability to deliver safe, effective, high quality care within organisations with the right cultures, the best systems, and the most highly skilled and motivated work forces will be the key to meeting this challenge. This is an issue which should be a priority for education and training bodies. The need for health services to give priority to developing health professionals equipped to practise in a new way and thrive in new organisational environments requires a rapid response to reshape curricula and training programmes. Developing leadership and management skills will be essential in achieving this transformation in the quality of care delivered to patients. PMID:11700373

  4. Microbial ecology laboratory procedures manual NASA/MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Timothy L.

    1990-01-01

    An essential part of the efficient operation of any microbiology laboratory involved in sample analysis is a standard procedures manual. The purpose of this manual is to provide concise and well defined instructions on routine technical procedures involving sample analysis and methods for monitoring and maintaining quality control within the laboratory. Of equal importance is the safe operation of the laboratory. This manual outlines detailed procedures to be followed in the microbial ecology laboratory to assure safety, analytical control, and validity of results.

  5. [Radical reduction for developmental dislocation of the hip (Cakirgil's procedure)].

    PubMed

    Kinik, Hakan; Mergen, Ertan

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the so called "radical reduction of the hip" (Cakirgil's) procedure for children above four years of age, with high developmental dislocation of the hip. The procedure is a combined one-stage operation including adductor tenotomy, open reduction, femoral shortening, proximal femoral varus-derotation osteotomy and Dega's osteotomy. Radical reduction is a safe and effective procedure for high dislocations with shallow acetabulum. PMID:17483623

  6. Flame Tests Performed Safely: A Safe and Effective Alternative to the Traditional Flame Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogancay, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    The trend toward inquiry-based learning is providing today's students with a more enriching education. When implementing inquiry it is important to recognize the great number of safety concerns that accompany this paradigm shift. Fortunately, with some consideration, teachers can shape students' laboratory experiments into safe and valuable…

  7. Safe Schools for LGBTQI Students: How Do Teachers View Their Role in Promoting Safe Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, Stephanie; Crawford, Heather Glynn; Van Pelt, J-Lynn

    2012-01-01

    This literature review presents insights from existing research on how teachers view their role in creating safe schools for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, and intersex (LGBTQI) students. Analysis of the literature shows that there are concerns for LGBTQI students' safety in schools, that educational settings operate from…

  8. Flame Tests Performed Safely: A Safe and Effective Alternative to the Traditional Flame Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogancay, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    The trend toward inquiry-based learning is providing today's students with a more enriching education. When implementing inquiry it is important to recognize the great number of safety concerns that accompany this paradigm shift. Fortunately, with some consideration, teachers can shape students' laboratory experiments into safe and valuable…

  9. Safe Schools for LGBTQI Students: How Do Teachers View Their Role in Promoting Safe Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, Stephanie; Crawford, Heather Glynn; Van Pelt, J-Lynn

    2012-01-01

    This literature review presents insights from existing research on how teachers view their role in creating safe schools for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, and intersex (LGBTQI) students. Analysis of the literature shows that there are concerns for LGBTQI students' safety in schools, that educational settings operate from…

  10. Safe operating procedures for alternative fuel buses: A synthesis of transit practice

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The synthesis will be of interest to transit agency managers, maintenance managers, and other personnel concerned with the operation of bus fleets using alternative fuels to meet national and local requirements related to air quality and energy diversification. Information on the use of methanol, ethanol, compressed natural gas (CNG), liquified petroleum gas (LPG), liquified natural gas (LNG), and other alternatives is included.

  11. 21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... suggested conditions of use. 601.26 Section 601.26 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... presumptively effective and should remain on the market pending completion of further testing because there is a... and presumptively effective under § 601.26(c)(2) and should be permitted to remain on the...

  12. Safe Laser Beam Propagation for Interplanetary Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Keith E.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-to-space laser uplinks to Earth–orbiting satellites and deep space probes serve both as a beacon and an uplink command channel for deep space probes and Earth-orbiting satellites. An acquisition and tracking point design to support a high bandwidth downlink from a 20-cm optical terminal on an orbiting Mars spacecraft typically calls for 2.5 kW of 1030-nm uplink optical power in 40 micro-radians divergent beams.2 The NOHD (nominal ocular hazard distance) of the 1030nm uplink is in excess of 2E5 km, approximately half the distance to the moon. Recognizing the possible threat of high power laser uplinks to the flying public and to sensitive Earth-orbiting satellites, JPL developed a three-tiered system at its Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) to ensure safe laser beam propagation through navigational and near-Earth space.

  13. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  14. Safe Laser Beam Propagation for Interplanetary Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Keith E.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-to-space laser uplinks to Earth–orbiting satellites and deep space probes serve both as a beacon and an uplink command channel for deep space probes and Earth-orbiting satellites. An acquisition and tracking point design to support a high bandwidth downlink from a 20-cm optical terminal on an orbiting Mars spacecraft typically calls for 2.5 kW of 1030-nm uplink optical power in 40 micro-radians divergent beams.2 The NOHD (nominal ocular hazard distance) of the 1030nm uplink is in excess of 2E5 km, approximately half the distance to the moon. Recognizing the possible threat of high power laser uplinks to the flying public and to sensitive Earth-orbiting satellites, JPL developed a three-tiered system at its Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) to ensure safe laser beam propagation through navigational and near-Earth space.

  15. Microbes safely, effectively bioremediate oil field pits

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, B. ); Block, C.S. ); Mills, C.H. )

    1995-01-30

    Natural and augmented bioremediation provides a safe, environmental, fast, and effective solution for removing hydrocarbon stains from soil. In 1992, Amoco sponsored a study with six bioremediation companies, which evaluated 14 different techniques. From this study, Amoco continued using Environmental Protection Co.'s (EPC) microbes for bioremediating more than 145 sites near Farmington, NM. EPC's microbes proved effective on various types of hydrocarbon molecules found in petroleum stained soils from heavy crude and paraffin to volatiles such as BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene) compounds. Controlled laboratory tests have shown that these microbes can digest the hydrocarbon molecules with or without free oxygen present. It is believed that this adaptation gives these microbes their resilience. The paper describes the bioremediation process, environmental advantages, in situ and ex situ bioremediation, goals of bioremediation, temperature effects, time, cost, and example sites that were treated.

  16. A safe lithium mimetic for bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nisha; Halliday, Amy C.; Thomas, Justyn M.; Kuznetsova, Olga; Baldwin, Rhiannon; Woon, Esther C. Y.; Aley, Parvinder K.; Antoniadou, Ivi; Sharp, Trevor; Vasudevan, Sridhar R.; Churchill, Grant C.

    2012-01-01

    Lithium is the most effective mood stabilizer for the treatment of bipolar disorder, but it is toxic at only twice the therapeutic dosage and has many undesirable side effects. It is likely that a small molecule could be found with lithium-like efficacy but without toxicity through target-based drug discovery; however, lithium’s therapeutic target remains equivocal. Inositol monophosphatase is a possible target but no bioavailable inhibitors exist. Here we report that the antioxidant ebselen inhibits inositol monophosphatase and induces lithium-like effects on mouse behaviour, which are reversed with inositol, consistent with a mechanism involving inhibition of inositol recycling. Ebselen is part of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Collection, a chemical library of bioavailable drugs considered clinically safe but without proven use. Therefore, ebselen represents a lithium mimetic with the potential both to validate inositol monophosphatase inhibition as a treatment for bipolar disorder and to serve as a treatment itself. PMID:23299882

  17. The safe disposal of radioactive wastes

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, A. W.

    1956-01-01

    A comprehensive review is given of the principles and problems involved in the safe disposal of radioactive wastes. The first part is devoted to a study of the basic facts of radioactivity and of nuclear fission, the characteristics of radioisotopes, the effects of ionizing radiations, and the maximum permissible levels of radioactivity for workers and for the general public. In the second part, the author describes the different types of radioactive waste—reactor wastes and wastes arising from the use of radioisotopes in hospitals and in industry—and discusses the application of the maximum permissible levels of radioactivity to their disposal and treatment, illustrating his discussion with an account of the methods practised at the principal atomic energy establishments. PMID:13374534

  18. A Safe Lab on Nerve Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, David C.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an experiment involving pineapples and gelatin that allows students to investigate the conditions that typically render an enzyme functionless, similar to the effect of nerve gasses. Discusses the materials, procedures, and results, drawing analogies to the effects of a nerve gas. (CW)

  19. Sustaining safe practice: twenty years on.

    PubMed

    Kippax, Susan; Race, Kane

    2003-07-01

    This paper examines the ways in which populations at risk of HIV in the developed world have enculturated the knowledges and technologies of both the medical and the social sciences. By revisiting a number of review papers and by reviewing findings from a range of studies, we argue that gay men have appropriated information that has enabled them to sustain safe practices while they have eschewed information that has made maintenance difficult. The paper describes a range of risk reduction strategies and compares the responses of populations at risk of HIV in the years before the advent of highly active antiviral therapy (HAART) with their responses after the introduction of HAART in 1996. We concentrate our argument on the changing responses to HIV risk of gay men, although occasionally illustrate our argument with reference to the responses of injecting drug users. The responses of gay men to risk post-HAART--particularly those who reside in Australia--speak to the adoption of a range of considered strategies, not altogether safe, to reduce harm. We argue that such strategies need to be understood and addressed within a 'new' social public health, that is, a public health that takes what social analysis has to say seriously. The paper examines the differences between the traditional, the 'modern' epidemiological/clinical and the 'new' social or socio-cultural public healths and describes the tensions between the medical and the social science disciplines in their efforts to inform public health. Key concepts provided by social science such as agency (including individual and collective agency), alongside its methodological reflexivity are key to effective public health. The risk avoidance strategies adopted by gay men suggest a way forward by turning our attention to the ways in which medicine is taken in(to) their practice. PMID:12753812

  20. Safe motherhood -- from advocacy to action.

    PubMed

    Tinker, A

    1991-12-01

    Every minute a woman dies from complications related to pregnancy or childbirth. That translates to 500,000 annually, of which, 99% live in developing countries. A woman in Africa has a 1:18 lifetime chance of dying from pregnancy-related causes, compared with a northern European woman who has a 1:10,000 chance. Thus, in 1987 international and regional agencies and national governments started a global program titled the Safe Motherhood Initiative. Its goal is to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality 50% by 2000. The death of a woman during pregnancy or child birth means that her surviving children are much more likely to die. In a bangladesh study it was found that the death of the mother was associated with a 200% increase in mortality for her sons and 350% for her daughters for children up to 10. Family planning is the key, since it is the single best tool of preventing these deaths, by reducing the number of times a woman gets pregnant. Family planning also reduces the number of abortions which are estimated to kill 200,000 women annually in developing countries. Trained midwives who can provide obstetrical emergency assistance will also make a large impact. Risk assessment was once considered very important, but studies have shown that the majority of pregnancy complications develop without being detected. Further, the number of women with risk factors that develop complications is much lower than the number of women who develop complications during pregnancy. So monitoring women with risk factors misses most complications. Regular monitoring and medical examinations are much more effective for preventing complications. Safe motherhood can only be achieved if each program is tailored to the needs of the community. Donor nations are necessary for this program to succeed, but ultimate success rests in the hands of each country. National priorities must be set, resources must be allocated, and programs must be designed to be effective. PMID:12343425