Science.gov

Sample records for safety attitudes questionnaire

  1. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire: psychometric properties, benchmarking data, and emerging research

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, John B; Helmreich, Robert L; Neilands, Torsten B; Rowan, Kathy; Vella, Keryn; Boyden, James; Roberts, Peter R; Thomas, Eric J

    2006-01-01

    Background There is widespread interest in measuring healthcare provider attitudes about issues relevant to patient safety (often called safety climate or safety culture). Here we report the psychometric properties, establish benchmarking data, and discuss emerging areas of research with the University of Texas Safety Attitudes Questionnaire. Methods Six cross-sectional surveys of health care providers (n = 10,843) in 203 clinical areas (including critical care units, operating rooms, inpatient settings, and ambulatory clinics) in three countries (USA, UK, New Zealand). Multilevel factor analyses yielded results at the clinical area level and the respondent nested within clinical area level. We report scale reliability, floor/ceiling effects, item factor loadings, inter-factor correlations, and percentage of respondents who agree with each item and scale. Results A six factor model of provider attitudes fit to the data at both the clinical area and respondent nested within clinical area levels. The factors were: Teamwork Climate, Safety Climate, Perceptions of Management, Job Satisfaction, Working Conditions, and Stress Recognition. Scale reliability was 0.9. Provider attitudes varied greatly both within and among organizations. Results are presented to allow benchmarking among organizations and emerging research is discussed. Conclusion The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire demonstrated good psychometric properties. Healthcare organizations can use the survey to measure caregiver attitudes about six patient safety-related domains, to compare themselves with other organizations, to prompt interventions to improve safety attitudes and to measure the effectiveness of these interventions. PMID:16584553

  2. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire as a Tool for Benchmarking Safety Culture in the NICU

    PubMed Central

    Profit, Jochen; Etchegaray, Jason; Petersen, Laura A; Sexton, J Bryan; Hysong, Sylvia J; Mei, Minghua; Thomas, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    background NICU safety culture, as measured by the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ), varies widely. Associations with clinical outcomes in the adult ICU setting make the SAQ an attractive tool for comparing clinical performance between hospitals. Little information is available on the use of the SAQ for this purpose in the NICU setting. objectives To determine whether the dimensions of safety culture measured by the SAQ give consistent results when used as a NICU performance measure. methods Cross-sectional survey of caregivers in twelve NICUs, using the six scales of the SAQ: teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction, stress recognition, perceptions of management, and working conditions. NICUs were ranked by quantifying their contribution to overall risk-adjusted variation across the scales. Spearman Rank Correlation coefficients were used to test for consistency in scale performance. We then examined whether performance in the top four NICUs in one scale predicted top four performance in others. results There were 547 respondents in twelve NICUs. Of fifteen NICU-level correlations in performance ranking, two were greater than 0.7, seven were between 0.4 and 0.69, the six remaining were less than 0.4. We found a trend towards significance in comparing the distribution of performance in the top four NICUs across domains with a binomial distribution p = .051, indicating generally consistent performance across dimensions of safety culture. conclusion A culture of safety permeates many aspects of patient care and organizational functioning. The SAQ may be a useful tool for comparative performance assessments among NICUs. PMID:22337935

  3. Application of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) in Albanian hospitals: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Gabrani, Adriatik; Hoxha, Adrian; Simaku, Artan; Gabrani, Jonila (Cyco)

    2015-01-01

    Objective To establish the reliability and validity of the translated version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) by evaluating its psychometric properties and to determine possible differences among nurses and physicians regarding safety attitudes. Design A cross-sectional study utilising the Albanian version of the SAQ and a demographic questionnaire. Setting Four regional hospitals in Albania. Participants 341 healthcare providers, including 132 nurses and 209 doctors. Main outcome measure(s) The translation, construct validity and internal validity of the SAQ. The SAQ includes six scales and 30 items. Results A total of 341 valid questionnaires were returned, for a response rate of 70%. The confirmatory factor analysis and its goodness-of-fit indices (standardised root mean square residual 0.075, root mean square error of approximation 0.044 and comparative fit index 0.97) showed good model fit. The Cronbach's α values for each of the scales of the SAQ ranged from 0.64 to 0.82. The percentage of hospital healthcare workers who had a positive attitude was 60.3% for the teamwork climate, 57.2% for the safety climate, 58.4% for job satisfaction, 37.4% for stress recognition, 59.3% for the perception of management and 49.5% for working conditions. Intercorrelations showed that the subscales had moderate-to-high correlations with one another. Nurses were more hesitant to admit and report errors; only 55% of physicians and 44% of nurses endorsed this statement (χ2=4.9, p=0.02). Moreover, nurses received lower scores on team work compared with doctors (N 45.7 vs D 52.3, p=0.01). Doctors denied the effects of stress and fatigue on their performance (N 46.7 vs D 39.5, p<0.01), neglecting the workload. Conclusions The SAQ is a useful tool for evaluating safety attitudes in Albanian hospitals. In light of the health workforce's poor recognition of stress, establishing patient safety programmes should be a priority among policymakers in Albania. PMID:25877270

  4. Safety culture perceptions of pharmacists in Malaysian hospitals and health clinics: a multicentre assessment using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Samsuri, Srima Elina; Pei Lin, Lua; Fahrni, Mathumalar Loganathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety attitudes of pharmacists, provide a profile of their domains of safety attitude and correlate their attitudes with self-reported rates of medication errors. Design A cross-sectional study utilising the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). Setting 3 public hospitals and 27 health clinics. Participants 117 pharmacists. Main outcome measure(s) Safety culture mean scores, variation in scores across working units and between hospitals versus health clinics, predictors of safety culture, and medication errors and their correlation. Results Response rate was 83.6% (117 valid questionnaires returned). Stress recognition (73.0±20.4) and working condition (54.8±17.4) received the highest and lowest mean scores, respectively. Pharmacists exhibited positive attitudes towards: stress recognition (58.1%), job satisfaction (46.2%), teamwork climate (38.5%), safety climate (33.3%), perception of management (29.9%) and working condition (15.4%). With the exception of stress recognition, those who worked in health clinics scored higher than those in hospitals (p<0.05) and higher scores (overall score as well as score for each domain except for stress recognition) correlated negatively with reported number of medication errors. Conversely, those working in hospital (versus health clinic) were 8.9 times more likely (p<0.01) to report a medication error (OR 8.9, CI 3.08 to 25.7). As stress recognition increased, the number of medication errors reported increased (p=0.023). Years of work experience (p=0.017) influenced the number of medication errors reported. For every additional year of work experience, pharmacists were 0.87 times less likely to report a medication error (OR 0.87, CI 0.78 to 0.98). Conclusions A minority (20.5%) of the pharmacists working in hospitals and health clinics was in agreement with the overall SAQ questions and scales. Pharmacists in outpatient and ambulatory units and those in health clinics had better perceptions of safety

  5. Adaption and validation of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire for the Danish hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Solvejg; Sabroe, Svend; Bartels, Paul; Mainz, Jan; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Measuring and developing a safe culture in health care is a focus point in creating highly reliable organizations being successful in avoiding patient safety incidents where these could normally be expected. Questionnaires can be used to capture a snapshot of an employee’s perceptions of patient safety culture. A commonly used instrument to measure safety climate is the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). The purpose of this study was to adapt the SAQ for use in Danish hospitals, assess its construct validity and reliability, and present benchmark data. Materials and methods The SAQ was translated and adapted for the Danish setting (SAQ-DK). The SAQ-DK was distributed to 1,263 staff members from 31 in- and outpatient units (clinical areas) across five somatic and one psychiatric hospitals through meeting administration, hand delivery, and mailing. Construct validity and reliability were tested in a cross-sectional study. Goodness-of-fit indices from confirmatory factor analysis were reported along with inter-item correlations, Cronbach’s alpha (α), and item and subscale scores. Results Participation was 73.2% (N=925) of invited health care workers. Goodness-of-fit indices from the confirmatory factor analysis showed: c2=1496.76, P<0.001, CFI 0.901, RMSEA (90% CI) 0.053 (0.050–0056), Probability RMSEA (p close)=0.057. Inter-scale correlations between the factors showed moderate-to-high correlations. The scale stress recognition had significant negative correlations with each of the other scales. Questionnaire reliability was high, (α=0.89), and scale reliability ranged from α=0.70 to α=0.86 for the six scales. Proportions of participants with a positive attitude to each of the six SAQ scales did not differ between the somatic and psychiatric health care staff. Substantial variability at the unit level in all six scale mean scores was found within the somatic and the psychiatric samples. Conclusion SAQ-DK showed good construct validity and

  6. A questionnaire survey exploring healthcare professionals’ attitudes towards teamwork and safety in acute care areas in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Chan Woong; Lee, Sang Jin; Oh, Je Hyeok; Lee, Dong Hoon; Lim, Tae Ho; Choi, Hyuk Joong; Chung, Hyun Soo; Ryu, Ji Yeong; Jang, Hye Young; Choi, Yoon Hee; Kim, Su Jin; Jung, Jin Hee

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although human factors are important in terms of patient safety, there have been very few reports on the attitudes of healthcare professionals working in acute care settings in South Korea. In the present study, we investigated the attitudes of such professionals, their cultures and their management systems. Design A questionnaire survey with 65 items covering nine themes affecting patient safety. Nine themes were compared via a three-or-more-way analysis of variance, with interaction, followed by multiple comparisons among several groups. Setting Intensive care units, emergency departments and surgical units of nine urban hospitals. Participants 592 nurses and 160 physicians. Intervention None. Outcome measures Mean scores using a five-point scale and combined response scores for each of the nine themes. Results The mean score for information-sharing was the highest (3.78±0.49) and that for confidence/assertion was the lowest (2.97±0.34). The mean scores for teamwork, error management, work value, organisational climate, leadership, stress and fatigue level, and error/procedural compliance were intermediate. Physicians showed lower scores in leadership and higher scores in information-sharing than nurses. Respondents with 24 months or less of a clinical career showed higher scores in leadership, stress and fatigue, and error scores and lower scores in work value than more experienced respondents. Conclusions Our results suggest that medical personnel in Korea are relatively reluctant to disclose error or assert their different opinions with others. Many did not adequately recognise the negative effects of fatigue and stress, attributed errors to personal incompetence, and error-management systems were inadequate. Discrepancies in leadership and information-sharing were evident between professional groups, and leadership, stress, fatigue level, work value and error scores varied with the length of work experience. These can be used as baseline data

  7. Assessing Safety Culture in Pharmacies: The psychometric validation of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) in a national sample of community pharmacies in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Safety culture assessment is increasingly recognized as an important component in healthcare quality improvement, also in pharmacies. One of the most commonly used and rigorously validated tools to measure safety culture is the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire; SAQ. This study presents the validation of the SAQ for use in Swedish pharmacies. The psychometric properties of the translated questionnaire are presented Methods The original English language version of the SAQ was translated and adapted to the Swedish context and distributed by e-mail. The survey was carried out on a national basis, covering all 870 Swedish community pharmacies. In total, 7,244 questionnaires were distributed. Scale psychometrics were analysed using Cronbach alphas and intercorrelations among the scales. Multiple group confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted. Results SAQ data from 828 community pharmacies in Sweden, including 4,090 (60.22%) pharmacy personnel out of 6,683 eligible respondents, were received. There were 252 (28.97%) pharmacies that met the inclusion criteria of having at least 5 respondents and a minimum response rate of 60% within that pharmacy. The coefficient alpha value for each of the SAQ scales ranged from .72 to .89. The internal consistency results, in conjunction with the confirmatory factor analysis results, demonstrate that the Swedish translation of the SAQ has acceptable to good psychometric properties. Perceptions of the pharmacy (Teamwork Climate, Job Satisfaction, Perceptions of Management, Safety Climate, and Working Conditions) were moderately to highly correlated with one another whereas attitudes about stress (Stress Recognition) had only low correlations with other factors. Perceptions of management showed the most variability across pharmacies (SD = 26.66), whereas Stress Recognition showed the least (SD = 18.58). There was substantial variability ranging from 0% to 100% in the percent of positive scores for each of the factors

  8. Safety: An Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Harry T.

    1978-01-01

    Describes eight safety concepts developed by the author to teach safety and accident prevention in industrial arts shops and to promote more positive student attitudes toward shop safety. Stressing several general safety concepts instead of requiring dozens of rules has been found to work. (MF)

  9. Anaesthetists' attitudes to teamwork and safety.

    PubMed

    Flin, R; Fletcher, G; McGeorge, P; Sutherland, A; Patey, R

    2003-03-01

    A questionnaire survey was conducted with 222 anaesthetists from 11 Scottish hospitals to measure their attitudes towards human and organisational factors that can have an impact on effective team performance and consequently on patient safety. A customised version of the Operating Room Management Attitude Questionnaire (ORMAQ) was used. This measures attitudes to leadership, communication, teamwork, stress and fatigue, work values, human error and organisational climate. The respondents generally demonstrated positive attitudes towards the interpersonal aspects of their work, such as team behaviours and they recognised the importance of communication skills, such as assertiveness. However, the results suggest that some anaesthetists do not fully appreciate the debilitating effects of stress and fatigue on performance. Their responses were comparable with (and slightly more favourable than) those reported in previous ORMAQ surveys of anaesthetists and surgeons in other countries. PMID:12603453

  10. Development of a School Attitude Questionnaire for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, Guy

    This report summarizes the findings of Jackson and Lahadern who used a revised form of the Student Opinion Poll (SOP) and a questionnaire to study the intercorrelations of attitudes and achievement. The study found that: (1) first graders have attitudes toward school work but these attitudes were not differentiated toward specific school subjects;…

  11. Michigan High School Student Drug Attitudes and Behavior Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogg, Richard A.; And Others

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices and attitudes toward drugs in high school students. The instrument has 59 items (multiple choice or completion), some with several parts. The question pertain to aspirations for the future, general attitudes and opinions, biographic and demographic data, family background and relationships, alcohol…

  12. The Motherhood Inventory: A Questionnaire for Studying Attitudes Toward Motherhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare-Mustin, Rachel T.; Broderick, Patricia C.

    The Motherhood Inventory (MI) is a 40-item questionnaire developed to study attitudes toward motherhood and the motherhood myth. It includes items related to the control of reproduction, abortion, adoption, single motherhood, male-female relationships, and idealized and punitive attitudes toward mothers. The MI was investigated using 301 subjects…

  13. Development of the Hearing Attitudes in Rehabilitation Questionnaire (HARQ).

    PubMed

    Hallam, R S; Brooks, D N

    1996-06-01

    A questionnaire devised by Brooks to measure attitudes towards hearing impairment and provision of a hearing aid in older people was factor analysed and subsequently enlarged and modified into a new 40 item self-report scale. The Hearing Attitudes in Rehabilitation Questionnaire (HARQ) assesses three attitudes towards hearing impairment (personal distress/inadequacy, hearing loss stigma and minimization of loss) and four attitudes towards provision of a hearing aid (hearing aid stigma, aid-not-wanted, pressure to be assessed and positive expectation). Scale development, reliability and other psychometric properties are reported. Potential uses of the scale include identification of patients who may require counselling, evaluation of audiological rehabilitation and further empirical investigations of attitudes in this area. PMID:8818247

  14. Development of A Questionnaire to Measure Attitude toward Oocyte Donation

    PubMed Central

    Omani Samani, Reza; Mounesan, Leila; Ezabadi, Zahra; Vesali, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Background To our knowledge, there is no valid and comprehensive questionnaire that considers attitude toward oocyte donation (OD). Therefore this study has aimed to design and develop a tool entitled attitude toward donation-oocyte (ATOD-O) to measure attitude toward OD. Materials and Methods This methodological, qualitative research was undertaken on 15 infertile cases. In addition, we performed a literature review and search of various databases. Validity of this questionnaire was conducted by knowledgeable experts who determined indices such as relevancy, clarity, and comprehensiveness. Reliability of the questionnaire was assessed based on the opinions of experts and infertile couples referred to Royan Institute. Results ATOD-O was designed in 52 statements that covered various issues such as the OD process, donor and recipient characteristics, as well as family, emotional, psychological, legal, religious, and socio-economic dimensions. Results were scored as five points: 1 (strongly disagree), 2 (disagree), 3 (somewhat), 4 (agree), and 5 (strongly agree). The overall relevancy of the questionnaire was 97% and clarity was 96%. Overall comprehensiveness was 100%. Conclusion The findings from this preliminary validation study have indicated that ATOD-O is a valid measure for measuring and assessing attitude toward donated oocytes. This questionnaire can be used in studies regarding different groups of a society. PMID:26644863

  15. A Decade with the Course Attitude Questionnaire: A Factorial Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Maurice W.; Rosenstock, Edward H.

    The Course Attitude Questionnaire (CAQ) has been administered 100,000 times in 3,500 classes at the Pennsylvania State University since 1964 with extensive use in modified form at other institutions. The purpose of this research was to investigate the reliability and internal validity of the CAQ and the temporal stability of its original factor…

  16. The development of a questionnaire to assess sleep-related practices, beliefs, and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Grandner, Michael A; Jackson, Nicholas; Gooneratne, Nalaka S; Patel, Nirav P

    2014-03-01

    There are no established questionnaires that evaluate habitual sleep practices in the context of beliefs and attitudes about sleep. This study describes an effort to develop and evaluate a questionnaire that assesses habitual sleep; behaviors associated with sleep and potential sleep problems; sleep hygiene; social and environmental determinants of sleep; beliefs and attitudes about sleep as it relates to health, safety, and functioning; and knowledge about sleep. A total of 124 participants completed the final questionnaire. Overall, the questionnaire and subscales demonstrated moderate internal consistency, and concurrent and divergent validity were demonstrated by comparing various subscales to existing measures. Future studies may utilize the descriptive data to determine the role of behavioral, social, and environmental determinants of healthy sleep. PMID:23514261

  17. Patient Safety in Medical Education: Students’ Perceptions, Knowledge and Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Nabilou, Bahram; Feizi, Aram; Seyedin, Hesam

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety is a new and challenging discipline in the Iranian health care industry. Among the challenges for patient safety improvement, education of medical and paramedical students is intimidating. The present study was designed to assess students’ perceptions of patient safety, and their knowledge and attitudes to patient safety education. This cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in 2012 at Urmia University of Medical Sciences, West Azerbaijan province, Iran. 134 students studying medicine, nursing, and midwifery were recruited through census for the study. A questionnaire was used for collecting data, which were then analyzed through SPSS statistical software (version 16.0), using Chi-square test, Spearman correlation coefficient, F and LSD tests. A total of 121 questionnaires were completed, and 50% of the students demonstrated good knowledge about patient safety. The relationships between students’ attitudes to patient safety and years of study, sex and course were significant (0.003, 0.001 and 0.017, respectively). F and LSD tests indicated that regarding the difference between the mean scores of perceptions of patient safety and attitudes to patient safety education, there was a significant difference among medical and nursing/midwifery students. Little knowledge of students regarding patient safety indicates the inefficiency of informal education to fill the gap; therefore, it is recommended to consider patient safety in the curriculums of all medical and paramedical sciences and formulate better policies for patient safety. PMID:26322897

  18. Malaysian consumers’ awareness, perception, and attitude toward cosmetic products: Questionnaire development and pilot testing

    PubMed Central

    Ayob, Ain; Awadh, Ammar Ihsan; Hadi, Hazrina; Jaffri, Juliana; Jamshed, Shazia; Ahmad, Hawa Mas Azmar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased usage of cosmetic products has caused a growing concern about the safety of these products, and yet little is known about cosmetics from the consumers’ perspective. Hence, this study's aim is to develop a valid and reliable tool for assessing consumers’ awareness, perceptions, and attitudes toward cosmetic products. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was developed in the English language based on information collected from a literature search, in-depth interviews conducted with consumers prior to this study and consultations with experts. Subsequently, the questionnaire was subjected to translation, validation, and test-retest reliability. A final version of the questionnaire was piloted among 66 consumers via convenient sampling. A descriptive analysis was performed, and the internal consistency and the differences between variables in the questionnaire were analyzed. Results: The developed and translated questionnaire produced repeatable data for each of the domains (Spearman's correlation ≥ 0.7, P < 0.001). The internal consistency for awareness, perceptions and attitudes indicates good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha value of more than 0.7 for each domain). Significant differences were found between the perception scores for the race, religion, and monthly expenses for cosmetic products, respectively, and the same pattern was found for the attitude scores, but monthly expenses for cosmetic products was replaced by monthly income. Conclusion: The results achieved via the Bahasa Malaysia questionnaire indicated that the developed and translated questionnaire can be used as a valid and reliable tool for assessing consumers’ awareness, perceptions, and attitudes toward cosmetic products in Malaysia in future studies. PMID:27413348

  19. Normative data for the Attitudes towards Loss of Hearing Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Gabrielle H; Cienkowski, Kathleen M; Forsline, Anna; Fausti, Stephen

    2005-10-01

    Investigations have shown that patient attitudes toward hearing loss and hearing aids impact self-reported handicap and disability, hearing aid benefit, and hearing aid use. The Attitudes towards Loss of Hearing Questionnaire (ALHQ) was developed by Saunders and Cienkowski (1996) to examine some of the psychosocial factors underlying the use and acquisition of hearing aids. Here we report data from a new version of questionnaire (ALHQ v2.1), which examines attitudes towards hearing loss and hearing aids on five scales: Denial of Hearing Loss, Negative Associations, Negative Coping Strategies, Manual Dexterity and Vision, and Hearing-Related Esteem. Reliability values, internal consistency values, and cut points for typical and atypical scores are provided, along with comparison of the scores of women, men, current hearing aid users, non-hearing aid users, and paying versus nonpaying individuals. The ALHQ takes about ten minutes to complete and identifies for the clinician some of the issues that might jeopardize successful hearing aid outcome. PMID:16515136

  20. Safety climate and attitude as evaluation measures of organizational safety.

    PubMed

    Isla Díaz, R; Díaz Cabrera, D

    1997-09-01

    The main aim of this research is to develop a set of evaluation measures for safety attitudes and safety climate. Specifically it is intended: (a) to test the instruments; (b) to identify the essential dimensions of the safety climate in the airport ground handling companies; (c) to assess the quality of the differences in the safety climate for each company and its relation to the accident rate; (d) to analyse the relationship between attitudes and safety climate; and (e) to evaluate the influences of situational and personal factors on both safety climate and attitude. The study sample consisted of 166 subjects from three airport companies. Specifically, this research was centered on ground handling departments. The factor analysis of the safety climate instrument resulted in six factors which explained 69.8% of the total variance. We found significant differences in safety attitudes and climate in relation to type of enterprise. PMID:9316712

  1. Development of the Treatment Attitudes Questionnaire in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sheri L.; Fulford, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Despite the success of pharmacotherapy in the management of bipolar disorder, as many as one-half of those in treatment discontinue their medication over time. Currently, no self-report measure is available that predicts treatment engagement in bipolar disorder. The goal of the current study was to develop a measure of awareness of symptoms and attitudes toward treatment among those with bipolar disorder. Sixty-six participants diagnosed with bipolar I disorder on the SCID completed the Treatment Attitudes Questionnaire (TAQ) and were then followed for up to 2 years to assess symptom levels. Medication data were available for 37 participants. Analyses of the TAQ were conducted to examine reliability, predictors of subscales, and how well scores predicted medication and symptom levels over time. Results indicate that previous episodes of depression, but not episodes of mania, correlated with increased scores on the Insight and the Enjoyment of Mania subscales. Scores on the Nonbiological Attributions subscale predicted lower levels of lithium as well as increased depressive symptoms over time. Although the current study includes limited measurement of treatment engagement and a small sample size, this easily administered scale may help treatment planning for those with bipolar disorder. PMID:18357575

  2. Professional attitudes toward patient safety culture in a bone marrow transplant unit.

    PubMed

    Fermo, Vivian Costa; Radünz, Vera; Rosa, Luciana Martins da; Marinho, Monique Mendes

    2016-03-01

    Objective To identify the attitude of health professionals toward the patient safety culture at a bone marrow transplant unit. Methods Quantitative research approach, cross-sectional survey conducted at a bone marrow transplant unit in Santa Catarina, Brazil. Data were collected using a Safety Attitudes Questionnaire with 33 health professionals in August and September of 2013. A total of 37 attitudes were assessed according to six safety dimensions of patient safety culture. Data were analysed by applying descriptive and inferential statistics, ANOVA and the Kruskal-Wallis test with a p value equal to or under 0.05. Results Attitudes regarding the dimension "job satisfaction" were positive for the patient safety culture, and there was a significant difference between the professionals in this dimension (p-value 0.05). The other dimensions were not assessed positively. Conclusion The attitudes of health professionals toward patient safety must be strengthened. PMID:26934614

  3. Developing a Questionnaire to Measure Students' Attitudes toward the Course Blog?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahsavar, Zahra; Tan, Bee Hoon

    2012-01-01

    The rapid growth of using Web 2.0 tools such as blogs has increased online courses in education. Questionnaires are the most commonly used instruments to assess students' attitudes toward the online courses. This study provides a set of specific guidelines that the researchers used to develop a questionnaire to measure students' attitudes toward…

  4. The Menstrual Joy Questionnaire Items Alone Can Positively Prime Reporting of Menstrual Attitudes and Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aubeeluck, Aimee; Maguire, Moira

    2002-01-01

    Chrisler, Johnston, Champagne, and Preston (1994) reported that the title of the Menstrual Joy Questionnaire (MJQ) could prime participants to report positive changes on the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ) and greater endorsement of "menstruation as a natural event" on the Menstrual Attitudes Questionnaire (MAQ). This study is a partial…

  5. Farm Parents' Attitudes Towards Farm Safety Experts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, Steven J.; Cinnamon, Jennifer L.

    2004-01-01

    Using both qualitative and quantitative data, this article analyzes farm parent's attitudes towards the trustworthiness, usefulness, and use of advice from farm safety experts. The article evaluates four different perspectives on trust in expert: the Validity of Knowledge perspective, the Salient Values Similarity perspective, the Diffusion of…

  6. Development and Initial Psychometric Assessment of the Plant Attitude Questionnaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fančovičová, Jana; Prokop, Pavol

    2010-10-01

    Plants are integral parts of ecosystems which determine life on Earth. People's attitudes toward them are however, largely overlooked. Here we present initial psychometric assessment of self-constructed Plant Attitude Scale (PAS) that was administered to a sample of 310 Slovakian students living in rural areas aged 10-15 years. The final version of PAS consists from 29 Likert-scale items that were loaded to four distinct dimensions (Interest, Importance, Urban trees and Utilization). Mean scores revealed that Slovakian students lack positive attitudes toward plants and that gender had no effect on their mean attitude scores. Living in a family with a garden was associated with a more positive attitude toward plants. Further correlative research on diverse samples containing urban children and experimental research examining the impact of gardening in schools on student attitudes toward plants is required.

  7. Development and Initial Psychometric Assessment of the Plant Attitude Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fancovicova, Jana; Prokop, Pavol

    2010-01-01

    Plants are integral parts of ecosystems which determine life on Earth. People's attitudes toward them are however, largely overlooked. Here we present initial psychometric assessment of self-constructed Plant Attitude Scale (PAS) that was administered to a sample of 310 Slovakian students living in rural areas aged 10-15 years. The final version…

  8. Introducing Psychometrical Validation of Questionnaires in CALL Research: The Case of Measuring Attitude towards CALL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandewaetere, M.; Desmet, P.

    2009-01-01

    The great majority of questionnaires measuring non-observable constructs such as attitude towards CALL are often developed from a specific point of view and are seldom followed by psychometrical validation. Psychometrical properties of the questionnaire, such as construct validity and reliability, then remain unanswered too often, laying a heavy…

  9. Validation of the Attitudes toward Intellectual Disability--ATTID Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, D.; Crocker, A. G.; Beaulieu-Bergeron, R.; Caron, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Individuals with an intellectual disability (ID) continue to experience major obstacles towards social, educational and vocational integration. Negative attitudes toward persons with ID has remained relevant over time and has led to discrimination and stigma. Objective: The present study describes the development of a new questionnaire…

  10. The Frankfurt Patient Safety Climate Questionnaire for General Practices (FraSiK): analysis of psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Barbara; Domanska, Olga Maria; Albay, Zeycan; Mueller, Vera; Guethlin, Corina; Thomas, Eric J; Gerlach, Ferdinand M

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND Safety culture has been identified as having a major impact on how safety is managed in healthcare. However, it has not received much attention in general practices. Hence, no instrument yet exists to assess safety climate-the measurable artefact of safety culture-in this setting. This study aims to evaluate psychometric properties of a newly developed safety climate questionnaire for use in German general practices. METHODS The existing Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, Ambulatory Version, was considerably modified and enhanced in order to be applicable in general practice. After pilot tests and its application in a random sample of 400 German practices, a first psychometric analysis led to modifications in several items. A further psychometric analysis was conducted with an additional sample of 60 practices and a response rate of 97.08%. Exploratory factor analysis with orthogonal varimax rotation was carried out and the internal consistency of the identified factors was calculated. RESULTS Nine factors emerged, representing a wide range of dimensions associated with safety culture: teamwork climate, error management, safety of clinical processes, perception of causes of errors, job satisfaction, safety of office structure, receptiveness to healthcare assistants and patients, staff perception of management, and quality and safety of medical care. Internal consistency of factors is moderate to good. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates the development of a patient safety climate instrument. The questionnaire displays established features of safety climate and additionally contains features that might be specific to small-scale general practices. PMID:21571753

  11. Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the Attitude Towards Deliberate Self-Harm Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Kool, Nienke; van Meijel, Berno; van der Bijl, Jaap; Koekkoek, Bauke; Kerkhof, Ad

    2015-08-01

    The attitude of nurses and treatment staff is crucial in the treatment of patients who self-harm. However, many patients experience that attitude as negative. The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the Attitude Towards Deliberate Self-Harm Questionnaire. A total of 261 questionnaires were used to measure validity and reliability. Sensitivity to change was measured using a post-test measurement (n = 171) and a subgroup of 78 participants were given the questionnaire twice for test-retest measurement. Factor analysis revealed four factors explaining 33% of the variance. Cronbach's alpha values ranged 0.585-0.809, with 0.637 for the total scale. Intraclass correlation coefficient was assessed in order to estimate test-retest reliability, revealing the questionnaire was stable over time; the exception was factor 3, which had a value of 0.63. Sensitivity to change was found for the total score, factor one and two, and for three of the five items of factor three. We conclude that the Dutch version of the Attitude Towards Deliberate Self-Harm Questionnaire possesses adequate psychometric properties and is potentially an acceptable instrument for measuring the attitude of nurses and health-care staff towards patients who self-harm in Dutch-speaking countries. PMID:25970576

  12. Attitudes towards mental illness of nursing students in a Baccalaureate programme in Jamaica: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J; Stennett, R

    2015-10-01

    There is longstanding evidence of nurses demonstrating negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Student nurses' fear or discomfort with mentally ill patients results in poorer outcomes for patients and students' dissatisfaction with their experience of mental health nursing. There is evidence of negative attitudes towards mental illness in the Jamaican society; however, no studies have explored whether these attitudes are held by nursing students. The aim of the study was to examine the attitudes of nursing students towards mental illness. A questionnaire survey was conducted with a convenience sample of 143 third-year nursing students who were enrolled in a baccalaureate programme. Data were collected using the Attitudes Towards Acute Mental Health Scale (ATAMHS). A response rate of 71% was achieved for the survey. The findings indicated that the student nurses held an overall negative attitude towards mental illness, with a general perception that mentally ill people are dangerous. The student nurses were divided in their opinions in a number of areas, suggesting a possible conflict of opinions. Negative attitudes towards mental illness impact client outcomes and the career choices made by nurses. This study provides baseline data within the Jamaican context that adds to the evidence on nursing students' attitude to mental illness. Further research is needed to explore whether nursing education and clinical experience enables student nurses in Jamaica to develop a more positive attitude towards mental illness and mental health nursing and whether cultural factors contribute to negative attitudes. PMID:26036468

  13. How Do People Conceptualize and Use Forgiveness? The Forgiveness Attitudes Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanz, Jason E.

    2000-01-01

    Study explores how people use and conceptualize interpersonal forgiveness and introduces the Forgiveness Attitudes Questionnaire (FAQ), an instrument designed to explore forgiveness. The instrument was administered to 155 students from two Midwestern colleges. Results suggest that the FAQ shows early promise as an instrument for exploring…

  14. Reliability of the Attitudes Toward Women Scale (AWS) and the Personal Attributes Questionnaire (PAQ).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Jan D.; And Others

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the volume of empirical research directed toward the issue of sex-roles, including the development of evaluative instruments such as the Attitudes Toward Women Scale (AWS) and the Personal Attributes Questionnaire (PAQ). The United States Military Academy's Project Athena, designed to examine…

  15. The Munroe Multicultural Attitude Scale Questionnaire: A New Instrument for Multicultural Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munroe, Arnold; Pearson, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    Institutions of higher education want to diversify their learning climates, and many offer courses in multiculturalism, yet these courses still do not meet the needs of attitudinal change. A new instrument was developed, the Munroe Multicultural Attitude Scale Questionnaire (MASQUE), that was theoretically based in Banks's transformative approach,…

  16. Finding Pearls: Psychometric Reevaluation of the Simpson-Troost Attitude Questionnaire (STAQ)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Steven V.; Toepperwein, Mary Anne; Marshall, Carolyn E.; Lichtenstein, Michael J.; Blalock, Cheryl L.; Liu, Yan; Pruski, Linda A.; Grimes, Kandi

    2008-01-01

    The Simpson-Troost Attitude Questionnaire (STAQ) was developed as part of a study to assess adolescent commitment to and achievement in science. For this psychometric reappraisal of the 57-item STAQ, data were analyzed from a convenience sample of 1,754 secondary students. Confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses were applied, and results…

  17. Perception and attitude of general practitioners regarding generic medicines in Karachi, Pakistan: A questionnaire based study

    PubMed Central

    Jamshed, Shazia Qasim; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad; Masood, Imran; Low, Bee Yean; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Babar, Zaheer-ud-din

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: In developing countries out-of-pocket payments (OOP) are as high as 80% of healthcare spending. Generic medicines can be instrumental in reducing this expenditure. The current study is aimed to explore the knowledge, perception, and attitude of general practitioners towards generic medicines in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods: This exploratory, descriptive study was conducted on a sample of 289 randomly selected general practitioners who were dispensing at their private clinics in Karachi, Pakistan. The questionnaires were distributed and collected by hand. Data was entered to SPSS version 17. Fischer’s exact test was applied to see the association between variables. Results: A total of 206 questionnaires were included in the study. A response rate of 71.3% was achieved. Out of 206 respondents, 139 (67.5%) were male while 67 (32.5%) respondents were female. Close to three quaters of the respondents (n= 148; 71.8%) showed correct knowledge about generic medicines being a ‘copy of the brand name medicines’ and ‘interchangeable with brand name medicines’ (n= 148; 71.8%). In terms of safety, the majority of respondents (n=85; 41.26%) incorrectly understood that the generic medicines are less safe than brand name medicines. The total percentage of correct responses was seen in 53% of the respondents. More than half of the respondents agreed that locally manufactured medicines are of the same effectiveness as brand name medicines (n=114; 55.4%). Male practitioners with practice experience of 11-15 years showed positive perception towards the quality of multinational products. The Majority of respondents believed that their prescribing decision is influenced by medical representatives (n=117; 56.8%). More than three-quarters of the respondents expressed their wish to prescribe low cost medicines in their practice (n=157; 76.2%). More than one third of the respondents expressed their uneasiness to prescribe products from all local manufacturers (n=72; 35

  18. Validity and Reliability of “Parental Attitudes of Various Aspects of Cochlear Implantation” Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanifar, Simin; Jafari, Zahra; Motasaddi Zarandy, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Parents are such important members of the cochlear-implant team that analysis of their views is essential in order to improve services and outcomes. The authors developed a tool to assess parental attitudes towards various aspects of cochlear implantation in children who had passed aural rehabilitation sessions. The authors then went on to determine the validity and reliability of this questionnaire. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire entitled, “Parental attitudes towards various aspects of cochlear implantation”, was prepared and assessed for content validity by experts in the field. The questionnaire comprised six subgroups, each scored using a five-point Likert scale. Parents of children with severe-to-profound congenital hearing loss who had undergone an aural rehabilitation program between 2007 and 2012 were eligible to take part in the questionnaire validation study (n=92, mean age of cochlear implantation 3.97 years). Test-retest reliability was subsequently assessed in 17 patients within 1 month. Results: The content validity index of the questionnaire was 98.68%.The external and internal reliability of the questionnaire was assessed using Cronbach’s alpha (0.844 and 0.892, respectively). Mean scores of the six subgroups of the questionnaire, including communication skills, academic skills, social skills, cochlear-implant center services, costs of surgery and rehabilitation programs and decision-making process and total were 84.6%, 75.0%, 84.0%, 78.8%, 83.4%, 67.0% and 79.2%, respectively. Conclusion: Overall, the results supported the validity, reliability and sensitivity of the questionnaire for use both in centers for cochlear implantation or aural rehabilitation clinics. The questionnaire would provide a valuable means of assessing the impact of cochlear implantation on children’s lives. PMID:26788490

  19. Development of a Chinese childbearing attitude questionnaire for infertile women receiving in vitro fertilization treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shu-Hsin; Kuo, Ching-Pyng; Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh; Lu, Yen-Chiao; Hsu, Ming-Yi; Kuo, Pi-Chao; Lee, Maw-Shen; Lee, Meng-Chih

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the second phase of instrument development, a culturally sensitive questionnaire of childbearing attitudes to assess the psychosocial responses of infertile women. Using a nonexperimental quantitative design, we investigated 238 women who are undergoing in vitro fertilization treatment. Data collection and relevant planning occurred in two phases: in-depth interviews of women to generate items for the questionnaire and establishing the questionnaire's content and construct validity. Through factor analysis, five factors were extracted from the "attitude toward childbearing questionnaire": gender identification with self and society, insurance of marriage and inheritance, happy family life, spiritual investment, and continuing the family line and procreation. The total variance of these five factors was 64.31%. Cronbach's α and test-retest reliability were between .72 and .87 and between .60 and .76, respectively, demonstrating acceptable internal consistency and stability. The information obtained through the questionnaire could be used to provide infertile women with personal counseling and appropriate psychological support during and after assisted reproductive technology. PMID:23460456

  20. Attitudes of commercial motor vehicle drivers towards safety belts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Karl; Yamashita, Eric Y

    2007-11-01

    Despite the fact that Hawaii has one of the highest seat belt use rates for passenger vehicles in the United States, and has had a mandatory seat belt use law since the 1980s, studies have shown that commercial motor vehicles (CMV) seat belt use rates are low. To better understand this phenomenon, a comprehensive survey of commercial vehicle drivers was conducted in Hawaii to ascertain attitudes and self-reported behaviors regarding seat belt use. A total of 791 drivers responded to a written questionnaire implemented at weigh stations and distributed to various trucking firms and transport centers. Approximately 67% reported that they use seat belts "always" when driving a CMV (commercial motor vehicle), yet when asked how often do other CMV drivers use seat belts, only 31% responded "always." Interestingly, 86% of these same drivers reported that they use seat belts "always" when driving a personal vehicle. The major reason cited for non-use of belts was "frequent stops/inconvenience" (29%), and "not safety conscious" (23%). Notably, the self-reported use of safety belts is highest among operators of vans (88% said "always"), followed by buses (87% said "always") and lowest among truck drivers (only 60% said "always"). In this paper, some of the differences between self-reported users and non-users are explored and a multivariate logit model was developed to predict the odds of belt use as a function of various factors. PMID:17920831

  1. Development of the Attitudes to Domestic Violence Questionnaire for Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fox, Claire L; Gadd, David; Sim, Julius

    2015-09-01

    To provide a more robust assessment of the effectiveness of a domestic abuse prevention education program, a questionnaire was developed to measure children's attitudes to domestic violence. The aim was to develop a short questionnaire that would be easy to use for practitioners but, at the same time, sensitive enough to pick up on subtle changes in young people's attitudes. We therefore chose to ask children about different situations in which they might be willing to condone domestic violence. In Study 1, we tested a set of 20 items, which we reduced by half to a set of 10 items. The factor structure of the scale was explored and its internal consistency was calculated. In Study 2, we tested the factor structure of the 10-item Attitudes to Domestic Violence (ADV) Scale in a separate calibration sample. Finally, in Study 3, we then assessed the test-retest reliability of the 10-item scale. The ADV Questionnaire is a promising tool to evaluate the effectiveness of domestic abuse education prevention programs. However, further development work is necessary. PMID:25324228

  2. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice toward Infant Oral Healthcare among the Pediatricians of Mysore: A Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Indira, MD; Nandlal, B

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The aim of this study was to study the knowledge, attitude and practice of the pediatricians toward infant oral healthcare and the objective was to determine what can improve the knowledge, attitude and practice toward infant oral healthcare. Materials and methods: A systematic random survey of pediatricians in Mysore received a questionnaire pertaining to individual details, knowledge level and approach toward infant oral healthcare. Results: Most of pediatricians acknowledged the importance of pediatric dentistry. Pediatricians agree that it is important to do dental examination before 1 year. The importance of initiating oral hygiene practice before the eruption of first tooth was not seen to be prevalent among the pediatricians. Most of them were less aware of the first dental visit including early childhood caries (ECC). All pediatricians agree that both medical and dental professionals together are responsible for infant oral healthcare. They should work together to appropriately educate and train themselves to be able to provide risk assessment and to provide preventive oral health services. How to cite this article: Indira MD, Dhull KS, Nandlal B. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice toward Infant Oral Healthcare among the Pediatricians of Mysore: A Questionnaire Survey. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):211-214. PMID:26604540

  3. Developing a Questionnaire for Iranian Women’s Attitude on Medical Ethics in Vaginal Childbirth

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaee Rabor, Firoozeh; Taghipour, Ali; Mirzaee, Moghaddameh; Mirzaii Najmabadi, Khadigeh; Fazilat Pour, Masoud; Fattahi Masoum, Seyed Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vaginal delivery is one of the challenging issues in medical ethics. It is important to use an appropriate instrument to assess medical ethics attitudes in normal delivery, but the lack of tool for this purpose is clear. Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop and validate a questionnaire for the assessment of women’s attitude on medical ethics application in normal vaginal delivery. Patients and Methods: This methodological study was carried out in Iran in 2013 - 2014. Medical ethics attitude in vaginal delivery questionnaire (MEAVDQ) was developed using the findings of a qualitative data obtained from a grounded theory research conducted on 20 women who had vaginal childbirth, in the first phase. Then, the validation criteria of this tool were tested by content and face validity in the second phase. Exploratory factor analysis was used for construct validity and reliability was also tested by Cronbach’s alpha coefficient in the third phase of this study. SPSS version 13 was used in this study. The sample size for construct validity was 250 females who had normal vaginal childbirth. Results: In the first phase of this study (tool development), by the use of four obtained categories and nine subcategories from grounded theory and literature review, three parts (98-items) of this tool were obtained (A, B and J). Part A explained the first principle of medical ethics, part B pointed to the second and third principles of medical ethics, and part J explained the fourth principle of medical ethics. After evaluating and confirming its face and content validity, 75 items remained in the questionnaire. In construct validity, by the employment of exploratory factor analysis, in parts A, B and J, 3, 7 and 3 factors were formed, respectively; and 62.8%, 64% and 51% of the total variances were explained by the obtained factors in parts A, B and J, respectively. The names of these factors in the three parts were achieved by consideration of the loading

  4. Response Patterns on the Questionnaire on Attitudes Consistent with Sexual Offending in Groups of Sex Offenders with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, William R.; Michie, Amanda M.; Whitefield, Elaine; Martin, Victoria; Grieve, Alan; Carson, Derek

    2006-01-01

    Background: This report employs a recently developed assessment on attitudes consistent with sexual offending [Questionnaire on Attitudes Consistent with Sexual Offences (QACSO)] to compare different groups of sex offenders with intellectual disability. Method: Two studies are reported each from a different region and each conducted by different…

  5. Attitude of Indian dental professionals toward scientific publications: A questionnaire based study

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Pradhuman; Sachdeva, Suresh K.; Verma, Kanika Gupta; Khosa, Rameen; Basavraju, Suman; Dutta, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background: Due to competitiveness and academic benefits, most dental professionals feel an urgent need to increase their publications. Hence, we explored the attitude of students and faculty members toward scientific publications through a questionnaire. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire consisting of 13 questions was sent by e-mails and posting the printed copies to dental postgraduate (PG) students (second and third year) and faculty members (n = 500 each). The returned completed questionnaires were analyzed. Results: About 37% of dental PG faculty and 35.6% PG students responded to the questionnaire, with overall response of 72.6%. Among the PG faculty, professors (P) had more scientific publications, followed by senior lecturers (SL) and readers (R). The publications as first or corresponding author were less among both faculty and PG students while co-authorship was more among PG students compared to faculty members. Awareness about the term “plagiarism” was overall high and relatively highest among R, followed by SL, P and PG students. The percentage of publications in fee charging journals was more among PG students than faculty members and self-funding for publication was observed in 86.4% of PG students and 94-100% among faculty members. Conclusion: About 72.6% of dental professionals were involved in publishing of their research work and the number of publications increased steadily with an increase in their academic experience. All the dental professionals concurred publications as the criteria for academic excellence. PMID:26604598

  6. The Attitudes to Chocolate Questionnaire. Psychometric properties and relationship with consumption, dieting, disinhibition and thought suppression.

    PubMed

    Van Gucht, Dinska; Soetens, Barbara; Raes, Filip; Griffith, James W

    2014-05-01

    We examined the psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the Attitudes to Chocolate Questionnaire (ACQ), comparing the original three-factor model to a later-suggested two-factor model. We evaluated the construct validity of the ACQ by investigating the associations between the resulting factors and other eating-related questionnaires such as the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire and the Food Thought Suppression Inventory. Finally, we compared the scores on several scales regarding eating behavior between different groups (men versus women, dieters versus non-dieters and cravers versus non-cravers). A confirmatory factor analysis of the Dutch ACQ indicated the best global fit indices for the two-factor model, with the resulting factors being "Negative consequences and Guilt" and "Craving and emotional eating". Both factors were associated with other eating-related dimensions. However, craving seemed to be uniquely associated with the amount of chocolate consumed per week, whereas guilt correlated strongly with restraint. Finally, women scored higher on nearly all scales, but there was no significant gender difference with regard to chocolate consumption. Dieters reported more disinhibition, restraint, food-thought suppression and guilt, but they did not significantly differ from non-dieters with regards to their levels of craving, hunger nor consumption. PMID:24530692

  7. Development of Food Safety Psychosocial Questionnaires for Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd-Bredbenner, C.; Wheatley, V.; Schaffner, D.; Bruhn, C.; Blalock, L.; Maurer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Food mishandling is thought to be more acute among young adults; yet little is known about why they may engage in risky food handling behaviors. The purpose of this study was to create valid, reliable instruments for assessing key food safety psychosocial measures. Development of the measures began by examining published studies and behavior…

  8. Measuring safety culture in Dutch primary care: psychometric characteristics of the SCOPE-PC questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient safety has been a priority in primary healthcare in the last years. The prevailing culture is seen as an important condition for patient safety in practice and several tools to measure patient safety culture have therefore been developed. Although Dutch primary care consists of different professions, such as general practice, dental care, dietetics, physiotherapy and midwifery, a safety culture questionnaire was only available for general practices. The purpose of this study was to modify and validate this existing questionnaire to a generic questionnaire for all professions in Dutch primary care. Methods A validated Dutch questionnaire for general practices was modified to make it usable for all Dutch primary care professions. Subsequently, this questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 2400 practices from eleven primary care professions. The instrument’s factor structure, reliability and validity were examined using confirmatory and explorative factor analyses. Results 921 questionnaires were returned. Of these, 615 were eligible for factor analysis. The resulting SCOPE-PC questionnaire consisted of seven dimensions: ‘open communication and learning from errors’, ‘handover and teamwork’, ‘adequate procedures and working conditions’, ‘patient safety management’, ‘support and fellowship’, ‘intention to report events’ and ‘organisational learning’ with a total of 41 items. All dimensions had good reliability with Cronbach’s alphas ranging from 0.70 – 0.90, and the questionnaire had a good construct validity. Conclusions The SCOPE-PC questionnaire has sound psychometric characteristics for use by the different professions in Dutch primary care to gain insight in their safety culture. PMID:24044750

  9. An examination of the factor structure of the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3 in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren

    2009-03-01

    The present study examined the factor structure of a Malay translation of the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3 among a community sample of 554 Malaysian women. Results of an exploratory factor analysis revealed the existence of four factors, two of which (Information and Internalization-Athlete) mirrored those found among Western samples. An additional factor was an amalgamation of two factors reported in the West, namely Pressure and Internalization-General. A fourth factor consisted of six items, four of which cross-loaded onto previous factors, and was consequently dropped from analyses. Cronbach's alpha coefficients for the three retained factors were all above .82, and the three factors were significantly correlated with each other and with participants' body mass index. The results of this study stress the need for locally developed scales in the study of body image and a shift away from reliance on scales developed in the West. PMID:19249260

  10. [Knowledge about amd attitude to postoperative pain therapy of health personnel. A questionnaire survey].

    PubMed

    Højsted, J; Hellum, K L

    1999-12-01

    From research results published over the last years it appears that many surgical patients are still undertreated for their postoperative pain. The study was performed in order to reveal the attitudes and knowledge of physicians and nurses towards postoperative pain therapy. Questionnaires were sent to physicians and nurses at the surgical and anaesthesiological wards at the hospital. The study revealed that the real purpose of postoperative pain management, to ensure early mobilization and nutrition of the patients, did not receive proper attention. Too many of the house staff accepted that the patients should have moderate or severe pain, especially the younger physicians. The house staff is still concerned about the risk of inducing dependency when using opioids. The knowledge of the analgesics used in the ward is not sufficient and inappropriate methods of administration of opioids are still used. Educational intervention to improve the staff's knowledge about pain management in postoperative care is strongly needed. PMID:10643361

  11. Validation of a home safety questionnaire used in a series of case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Michael; Benford, Penny; Coupland, Carol; Clacy, Rose; Hindmarch, Paul; Majsak-Newman, Gosia; Deave, Toity; Kendrick, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Objective To measure the validity of safety behaviours, safety equipment use and hazards reported on a questionnaire by parents/carers with children aged under 5 years participating in a series of home safety case-control studies. Methods The questionnaire measured safety behaviours, safety equipment use and hazards being used as exposures in five case-control studies. Responses to questions were compared with observations made during a home visit. The researchers making observations were blind to questionnaire responses. Results In total, 162 families participated in the study. Overall agreement between reported and observed values of the safety practices ranged from 48.5% to 97.3%. Only 3 safety practices (stair gate at the top of stairs, stair gate at the bottom of stairs, stairs are carpeted) had substantial agreement based on the κ statistic (k=0.65, 0.72, 0.74, respectively). Sensitivity was high (≥70%) for 19 of the 30 safety practices, and specificity was high (≥70%) for 20 of the 30 practices. Overall for 24 safety practices, a higher proportion of respondents over-reported than under-reported safe practice (negative predictive value>positive predictive value). For six safety practices, a higher proportion of respondents under-reported than over-reported safe practice (negative predictive valuesafety practice. Questions with a high specificity will be useful for practitioners for identifying households who may benefit from home safety interventions and will be useful for researchers as measures of exposures or outcomes. PMID:24591447

  12. Participation in and attitude towards the national immunization program in the Netherlands: data from population-based questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Knowledge about the determinants of participation and attitude towards the National Immunisation Program (NIP) may be helpful in tailoring information campaigns for this program. Our aim was to determine which factors were associated with nonparticipation in the NIP and which ones were associated with parents' intention to accept remaining vaccinations. Further, we analyzed possible changes in opinion on vaccination over a 10 year period. Methods We used questionnaire data from two independent, population-based, cross-sectional surveys performed in 1995-96 and 2006-07. For the 2006-07 survey, logistic regression modelling was used to evaluate what factors were associated with nonparticipation and with parents' intention to accept remaining vaccinations. We used multivariate multinomial logistic regression modelling to compare the results between the two surveys. Results Ninety-five percent of parents reported that they or their child (had) participated in the NIP. Similarly, 95% reported they intended to accept remaining vaccinations. Ethnicity, religion, income, educational level and anthroposophic beliefs were important determinants of nonparticipation in the NIP. Parental concerns that played a role in whether or not they would accept remaining vaccinations included safety of vaccinations, maximum number of injections, whether vaccinations protect the health of one's child and whether vaccinating healthy children is necessary. Although about 90% reported their opinion towards vaccination had not changed, a larger proportion of participants reported to be less inclined to accept vaccination in 2006-07 than in 1995-96. Conclusion Most participants had a positive attitude towards vaccination, although some had doubts. Groups with a lower income or educational level or of non-Western descent participated less in the NIP than those with a high income or educational level or indigenous Dutch and have been less well identified previously. Particular

  13. A questionnaire examining attitudes of collegiate athletes toward doping and pharmacists as information providers

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Scott; Taylor, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Background: Doping in sport has become an increasingly prominent topic. The decision to take part in doping practices is multifactorial and often based on many different information sources of varying reliability. This study sought to determine the attitudes of athletes at a Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) university toward doping and to discover if pharmacists are perceived to be a valid information source on medication usage for these athletes. Methods: CIS athletes competing in at least 1 of 8 sports were asked to complete a questionnaire. Participants were asked various questions regarding their perceptions of doping, medication use, information available to them regarding doping and the role of pharmacists in providing advice on medication usage. Results: In total, 92.7% (307/331) of questionnaires were at least partially completed. Generally, these athletes did not feel pressured to dope or that it was prevalent or necessary. The fear of doping violations largely did not alter the use of medications and supplements. The online doping education program administered by the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport was the most used information source (74.5%); pharmacists were used 37.7% of the time. Pharmacists were perceived to be a good source of information about banned substances by 75.6% (223/295) of participants, although only 35% (104/297) consulted a pharmacist each time they purchased a nonprescription medication. Conclusions: It appears that doping is neither prevalent nor worth the risk for these CIS athletes. There also appears to be an opportunity for pharmacists to play a more prominent role in providing advice on medication use to high-performance athletes. PMID:25364352

  14. Crash risk and aberrant driving behaviors among bus drivers: the role of personality and attitudes towards traffic safety.

    PubMed

    Mallia, Luca; Lazuras, Lambros; Violani, Cristiano; Lucidi, Fabio

    2015-06-01

    Several studies have shown that personality traits and attitudes toward traffic safety predict aberrant driving behaviors and crash involvement. However, this process has not been adequately investigated in professional drivers, such as bus drivers. The present study used a personality-attitudes model to assess whether personality traits predicted aberrant self-reported driving behaviors (driving violations, lapses, and errors) both directly and indirectly, through the effects of attitudes towards traffic safety in a large sample of bus drivers. Additionally, the relationship between aberrant self-reported driving behaviors and crash risk was also assessed. Three hundred and one bus drivers (mean age=39.1, SD=10.7 years) completed a structured and anonymous questionnaire measuring personality traits, attitudes toward traffic safety, self-reported aberrant driving behaviors (i.e., errors, lapses, and traffic violations), and accident risk in the last 12 months. Structural equation modeling analysis revealed that personality traits were associated to aberrant driving behaviors both directly and indirectly. In particular altruism, excitement seeking, and normlessness directly predicted bus drivers' attitudes toward traffic safety which, in turn, were negatively associated with the three types of self-reported aberrant driving behaviors. Personality traits relevant to emotionality directly predicted bus drivers' aberrant driving behaviors, without any mediation of attitudes. Finally, only self-reported violations were related to bus drivers' accident risk. The present findings suggest that the hypothesized personality-attitudes model accounts for aberrant driving behaviors in bus drivers, and provide the empirical basis for evidence-based road safety interventions in the context of public transport. PMID:25823904

  15. Assessing Safety Attitudes among Healthcare Providers after a Hospital-Wide High-Risk Patient Care Program

    PubMed Central

    Je, Sang Mo; Kim, Hyun Jong; You, Je Sung; Chung, Sung Phil; Cho, Junho; Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Hahn Shick

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is commonly performed in high-risk, high intensity situations and is therefore a good procedure around which to develop and implement safety culture strategies in the hospital. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a hospital-wide quality improvement program on the management of sudden cardiac arrests by assessing healthcare providers' attitudes towards patient safety. Materials and Methods This study was designed as a prospective cohort study at a single academic medical center. The comprehensive hospital-based safety program included steps to identify areas of hazard, partner units with the Resuscitation Committee, and to conduct a Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). The SAQ evaluated 35 questions in seven domains to assess changes in patient safety culture by comparing the results before and after the hospital-wide high risk patient care improvement program. Results The response rates of the pre- and post-SAQ survey were 489 out of 1121 (43.6%) and 575 out of 1270 (45.3%), respectively. SAQ survey responses revealed significant improvement in all seven domains of the questionnaire (p-values of 0.006 and lower). In a subgroup analysis, doctors and nurses showed improvement in five domains. Both doctors and nurses did not show improvement in the "sharing information" domain. Conclusion A hospital-wide quality improvement program for high-risk, high reliability patient care involving CPR care was shown to be associated with a change in healthcare providers' attitudes towards patient safety. Through an immersive and active program on CPR care, change in healthcare providers' attitudes towards patient safety was initiated. PMID:24532527

  16. Physician Attitudes towards Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement: Safety Concerns Are Paramount

    PubMed Central

    Banjo, Opeyemi C.; Nadler, Roland; Reiner, Peter B.

    2010-01-01

    The ethical dimensions of pharmacological cognitive enhancement have been widely discussed in academic circles and the popular media, but missing from the conversation have been the perspectives of physicians - key decision makers in the adoption of new technologies into medical practice. We queried primary care physicians in major urban centers in Canada and the United States with the aim of understanding their attitudes towards cognitive enhancement. Our primary hypothesis was that physicians would be more comfortable prescribing cognitive enhancers to older patients than to young adults. Physicians were presented with a hypothetical pharmaceutical cognitive enhancer that had been approved by the regulatory authorities for use in healthy adults, and was characterized as being safe, effective, and without significant adverse side effects. Respondents overwhelmingly reported increasing comfort with prescribing cognitive enhancers as the patient age increased from 25 to 65. When asked about their comfort with prescribing extant drugs that might be considered enhancements (sildenafil, modafinil, and methylphenidate) or our hypothetical cognitive enhancer to a normal, healthy 40 year old, physicians were more comfortable prescribing sildenafil than any of the other three agents. When queried as to the reasons they answered as they did, the most prominent concerns physicians expressed were issues of safety that were not offset by the benefit afforded the individual, even in the face of explicit safety claims. Moreover, many physicians indicated that they viewed safety claims with considerable skepticism. It has become routine for safety to be raised and summarily dismissed as an issue in the debate over pharmacological cognitive enhancement; the observation that physicians were so skeptical in the face of explicit safety claims suggests that such a conclusion may be premature. Thus, physician attitudes suggest that greater weight be placed upon the balance between

  17. Physician attitudes towards pharmacological cognitive enhancement: safety concerns are paramount.

    PubMed

    Banjo, Opeyemi C; Nadler, Roland; Reiner, Peter B

    2010-01-01

    The ethical dimensions of pharmacological cognitive enhancement have been widely discussed in academic circles and the popular media, but missing from the conversation have been the perspectives of physicians - key decision makers in the adoption of new technologies into medical practice. We queried primary care physicians in major urban centers in Canada and the United States with the aim of understanding their attitudes towards cognitive enhancement. Our primary hypothesis was that physicians would be more comfortable prescribing cognitive enhancers to older patients than to young adults. Physicians were presented with a hypothetical pharmaceutical cognitive enhancer that had been approved by the regulatory authorities for use in healthy adults, and was characterized as being safe, effective, and without significant adverse side effects. Respondents overwhelmingly reported increasing comfort with prescribing cognitive enhancers as the patient age increased from 25 to 65. When asked about their comfort with prescribing extant drugs that might be considered enhancements (sildenafil, modafinil, and methylphenidate) or our hypothetical cognitive enhancer to a normal, healthy 40 year old, physicians were more comfortable prescribing sildenafil than any of the other three agents. When queried as to the reasons they answered as they did, the most prominent concerns physicians expressed were issues of safety that were not offset by the benefit afforded the individual, even in the face of explicit safety claims. Moreover, many physicians indicated that they viewed safety claims with considerable skepticism. It has become routine for safety to be raised and summarily dismissed as an issue in the debate over pharmacological cognitive enhancement; the observation that physicians were so skeptical in the face of explicit safety claims suggests that such a conclusion may be premature. Thus, physician attitudes suggest that greater weight be placed upon the balance between

  18. The development and exploratory analysis of the Back Pain Attitudes Questionnaire (Back-PAQ)

    PubMed Central

    Darlow, Ben; Perry, Meredith; Mathieson, Fiona; Stanley, James; Melloh, Markus; Marsh, Reginald; Baxter, G David; Dowell, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To develop an instrument to assess attitudes and underlying beliefs about back pain, and subsequently investigate its internal consistency and underlying structures. Design The instrument was developed by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and researchers based on analysis of qualitative interviews with people experiencing acute and chronic back pain. Exploratory analysis was conducted using data from a population-based cross-sectional survey. Setting Qualitative interviews with community-based participants and subsequent postal survey. Participants Instrument development informed by interviews with 12 participants with acute back pain and 11 participants with chronic back pain. Data for exploratory analysis collected from New Zealand residents and citizens aged 18 years and above. 1000 participants were randomly selected from the New Zealand Electoral Roll. 602 valid responses were received. Measures The 34-item Back Pain Attitudes Questionnaire (Back-PAQ) was developed. Internal consistency was evaluated by the Cronbach α coefficient. Exploratory analysis investigated the structure of the data using Principal Component Analysis. Results The 34-item long form of the scale had acceptable internal consistency (α=0.70; 95% CI 0.66 to 0.73). Exploratory analysis identified five two-item principal components which accounted for 74% of the variance in the reduced data set: ‘vulnerability of the back’; ‘relationship between back pain and injury’; ‘activity participation while experiencing back pain’; ‘prognosis of back pain’ and ‘psychological influences on recovery’. Internal consistency was acceptable for the reduced 10-item scale (α=0.61; 95% CI 0.56 to 0.66) and the identified components (α between 0.50 and 0.78). Conclusions The 34-item long form of the scale may be appropriate for use in future cross-sectional studies. The 10-item short form may be appropriate for use as a screening tool, or an outcome assessment instrument

  19. Development and validation of the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-4 (SATAQ-4).

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Lauren M; Burke, Natasha L; Thompson, J Kevin; Dedrick, Robert F; Heinberg, Leslie J; Calogero, Rachel M; Bardone-Cone, Anna M; Higgins, Mary K; Frederick, David A; Kelly, Mackenzie; Anderson, Drew A; Schaumberg, Katherine; Nerini, Amanda; Stefanile, Cristina; Dittmar, Helga; Clark, Elizabeth; Adams, Zoe; Macwana, Susan; Klump, Kelly L; Vercellone, Allison C; Paxton, Susan J; Swami, Viren

    2015-03-01

    The Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3 (SATAQ-3) and its earlier versions are measures designed to assess societal and interpersonal aspects of appearance ideals. Correlational, structural equation modeling, and prospective studies of the SATAQ-3 have shown consistent and significant associations with measures of body image disturbance and eating pathology. In the current investigation, the SATAQ-3 was revised to improve upon some conceptual limitations and was evaluated in 4 U.S. and 3 international female samples, as well as a U.S. male sample. In Study 1, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses for a sample of women from the Southeastern United States (N = 859) indicated a 22-item scale with 5 factors: Internalization: Thin/Low Body Fat, Internalization: Muscular/Athletic, Pressures: Family, Pressures: Media, Pressures: Peers. This scale structure was confirmed in 3 independent and geographically diverse samples of women from the United States (East Coast N = 440, West Coast N = 304, and North/Midwest N = 349). SATAQ-4 scale scores demonstrated excellent reliability and good convergent validity with measures of body image, eating disturbance, and self-esteem. Study 2 replicated the factorial validity, reliability, and convergent validity of the SATAQ-4 in an international sample of women drawn from Italy, England, and Australia (N = 362). Study 3 examined a sample of college males from the United States (N = 271); the 5-factor solution was largely replicated, yet there was some evidence of an underlying structure unique to men. Future research avenues include additional item testing and modification of the scale for men, as well as adaptation of the measure for children and adolescents. PMID:25285718

  20. Developing the changes in attitude about the relevance of science (CARS) questionnaire and assessing two high school science classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Marcelle A.; Ranney, Michael A.

    2003-10-01

    This study has two purposes: (a) methodological - to design and test a new instrument able to reflect changes in attitudes toward science over time, and (b) investigative - to find out the effect of two similar curricular treatments on the attitudes of two classes. Items about the relevance of science to students' lives were developed, pilot-tested, and analyzed using Rasch modeling. We then divided reliable items into three equivalent questionnaire forms. The final three forms of the questionnaire were used to assess high school students' attitudes. Over 18 weeks, one class used a core curriculum (Science and Sustainability) to learn science in the context of making decisions about societal issues. A second class used the same core curriculum, but with parts replaced by computer-based activities (Convince Me) designed to enhance the coherence of students' arguments. Using traditional and Rasch modeling techniques, we assessed the degrees to which such instructional activities promoted students' beliefs that science is relevant to them. Both classes tended to agree more, over time, that science is relevant to their lives, and the increases were statistically equivalent between classes. This study suggests that, by using innovative, issue-based activities, it is possible to enhance students' attitudes about the relevance of science.

  1. Bearing Multilingual Parameters in Mind when Designing a Questionnaire on Attitudes: Does This Affect the Results?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasagabaster, David

    2005-01-01

    Although the presence of three (or even more) languages in the curriculum is an expanding phenomenon in Europe, brought about by the concurrence of regionalisation and internationalisation, the number of research studies tackling the analysis of attitudes towards multilingualism is very limited. By examining the attitudes towards Basque, Spanish…

  2. Attitudes to Sexuality Questionnaire (Individuals with an Intellectual Disability): Scale Development and Community Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuskelly, Monica; Gilmore, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Background: Attitudes to the sexual expression of adults with an intellectual disability (ID) are one reflection of the inclusiveness of a community. Our capacity to measure attitudes towards this important aspect of adult life is limited by the lack of an appropriate instrument. The aim of this study was to continue the development of a recently…

  3. The Diabetes Intention, Attitude, and Behavior Questionnaire: evaluation of a brief questionnaire to measure physical activity, dietary control, maintenance of a healthy weight, and psychological antecedents

    PubMed Central

    Traina, Shana B; Mathias, Susan D; Colwell, Hilary H; Crosby, Ross D; Abraham, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed measurement properties of the 17-item Diabetes Intention, Attitude, and Behavior Questionnaire (DIAB-Q), which measures intention to engage in self-care behaviors, including following a diabetes diet and engaging in appropriate physical activity. Methods The DIAB-Q includes questions based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. Items were developed using published literature, input from health care professionals, and qualitative research findings in patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In Stage I of the study, 23 adults with T2DM were interviewed to evaluate the content and clarity of the DIAB-Q. In Stage II 1,015 individuals with T2DM completed the DIAB-Q and supplemental questionnaires, including the Short Form-36 acute (SF-36), section III of the Multidimensional Diabetes Questionnaire, the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities questionnaire, and self-administered items relevant to the treatment and management of T2DM (eg, blood pressure and glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c]) at baseline and 3–7 days later. Once the DIAB-Q scale structure was determined, its test–retest reliability, construct validity, and known-groups validity were evaluated, and minimal clinically important change was estimated. Results In Stage I, the 23 respondents surveyed generally reported that the DIAB-Q was clear and comprehensive and endorsed questions as relevant to their intentions to engage in diabetes-related self-care activities. Most subjects in Stage II were male, Caucasian, and married. Mean age was 63 years. Factor analysis revealed six psychological constructs (Behavior, Planning, Intention, Perceived Behavioral Control, Attitude, and Subjective Norm). Test–retest reliability was acceptable (≥0.70) for all scales, except Perceived Behavioral Control. Construct validity was demonstrated based on correlations with diabetes-specific items/scales and the SF-36. Known-groups validity was confirmed for Behavior, Planning, and

  4. The Reading Habits and Literacy Attitudes of Inservice and Prospective Teachers: Results of a Questionnaire Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Steven; Pruslow, John; Levitt, Roberta

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a questionnaire survey of 747 students enrolled in a graduate school of education, who are currently teachers or prospective teachers. The Literacy Habits Questionnaire, developed by Applegate and Applegate, was administered in September 2006. Findings suggest a high prevalence of aliteracy, the ability to read but a…

  5. Motivational Attitudes of American College Students of German in the Eighties: A Questionnaire Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosbab, F. Paul

    A survey of German language students at all levels at Oklahoma State University sought information on the students' motivation for learning the language, previous exposure to it, attitudes toward the language and its structures, preferred language learning strategies, difficulties with aspects of the language, and actual or anticipated uses of…

  6. Construct and Concurrent Validity of a Prototype Questionnaire to Survey Public Attitudes toward Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Louis, Kenneth O.; Reichel, Isabella K.; Yaruss, J. Scott; Lubker, Bobbie Boyd

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Construct validity and concurrent validity were investigated in a prototype survey instrument, the "Public Opinion Survey of Human Attributes-Experimental Edition" (POSHA-E). The POSHA-E was designed to measure public attitudes toward stuttering within the context of eight other attributes, or "anchors," assumed to range from negative…

  7. Development and Validation of a Preschool Teachers' Attitudes and Beliefs toward Science Teaching Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Michelle F.; Greenfield, Daryl B.; Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about preschool teachers' attitudes and beliefs toward science teaching, in part, because the field lacks valid and reliable measures of these teacher-related factors. To address this need, the current study developed and validated a rating scale (P-TABS) using a statewide sample of Head Start teachers (N = 507). A series of…

  8. Knowledge, attitudes and behavior of Italian mothers towards oral health: questionnaire validation and results of a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Nardi, Gianna Maria; Giraldi, Guglielmo; Lastella, Paola; La Torre, Giuseppe; Saugo, Emilia; Ferri, Francesca; Pacifici, Luciano; Ottolenghi, Livia; Guerra, Fabrizio; Polimeni, Antonella

    2012-01-01

    Summary Aims The study is focused on the analysis of knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of Italian mothers in regards to their oral health, deepening the understanding of how the initiation of habits and behaviors for a healthy lifestyle may influence the empowerment process of their children. Methods The questionnaire was composed by 14 sections and has been conducted using an online questionnaire on the mothers association’s website. Reliability analysis was tested and content validity was evaluated using Cronbach’s alpha to check internal consistency with the intention to obtain no misunderstanding results. Statistical analysis was performed through SPSS 19.0. Results The total number of the compiled questionnaires was 192. The highest value of the Cronbach’s alpha is obtainable in Section 13 (Quality of Life in relation to dental health between 8–17 years old kids) with a value of 0.998 (on 5 items). The total value of the Cronbach’s alpha considering the part of questionnaire dedicated only to the mothers that have more than 18 years old children is 0.490 on 116 items. Considering all the sections of the questionnaire on 134 items and 127 questions, we get an alpha value of 0.784. Conclusions The questionnaire for the mothers showed a good reliability in the pilot study and it seems it made good results in terms of internal coherence and validity. The online administration allowed the opportunity to optimize the data collection avoiding complications with papers and it offers potentially, a tool able to rapidly gather a vast sample in which to perfect other studies. PMID:23087789

  9. Designing and standardizing a questionnaire for evaluating knowledge, attitude, and practice of Iranian adults with cardiovascular diseases about oral health

    PubMed Central

    Rasouli-Ghahroudi, Amir Alireza; Rokn, Amir Reza; Khorsand, Afshin; Aghajani, Hasan; Amini, Afshin; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza; Rahimi, Hamed; Kabir, Ali

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in Iran. Moreover, periodontal diseases are very common in our country. In this study, we have designed a standardized questionnaire for evaluating knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of Iranian adult patients with cardiovascular diseases about oral health. METHODS For designing and standardizing a self-administered questionnaire, we performed a cross-sectional pilot study on 51 cases with periodontal complaints. A dentist carried out the physical examination to determine oral health indicators. Twelve experts and ten lay people of the target population answered questions about validity. Cronbach’s alpha, factor analysis, and Pearson correlation coefficients were used in the analysis. RESULTS The cases of this pilot study were middle aged, with moderate financial and health status, but low oral health and educational level. Debris score was correlated with all other physical exam findings except decay, missing, and filled (DMF). Reliability was 0.826 according to Cronbach’s alpha score. Face validity was higher than 80%. Content validities of the whole of the questionnaire were 85.98% for clarity, 78.05% for relevancy, 85.16% for simplicity, and 82.32% for consistency of each question with the question set. Factor analysis showed that 15 components explain 74% of the total variance. CONCLUSION This questionnaire is culturally adjusted and appropriate for our community, valid and reliable, and sufficiently estimates the variance of the oral health status. It can be used as a standard tool in further studies in adult population of the Iranian middle aged patients with low level of education and moderate socioeconomic status. PMID:24575138

  10. Psychometric properties of the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-4 (SATAQ-4) in French women and men.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Rachel F; Schaefer, Lauren M; Thompson, J Kevin; Girard, Marilou; Bertrand, Mélanie; Chabrol, Henri

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-4 (SATAQ-4), a measure of internalization of societal appearance ideals, in French men and women. French college students completed a translation of the 22-item SATAQ-4 and measures of body image and eating concerns. Exploratory analyses among women (N=207) indicated a 20-item scale with the original five factors: Internalization: Thin/Low Body Fat, Internalization: Muscular/Athletic, Pressures: Family, Pressures: Media, Pressures: Peers. This structure was confirmed among a second sample of women (N=227). The SATAQ-4 scores revealed excellent reliability and convergent validity with body image and eating concern scores. A slightly modified factor structure emerged in men, with excellent reliability. Among men, the SATAQ-4 subscales were consistently associated with eating, and shape and weight concerns, although less consistently with general measures of body image. The French SATAQ-4 is a useful measure of internalization of appearance ideals. PMID:27081747

  11. Factor structure of the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3 (SATAQ-3) among adolescent boys in China.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Todd; Chen, Hong

    2010-09-01

    There is considerable evidence that mass media portrayals of body image contribute to body dissatisfaction, yet the assessment of perceived media influences has been examined fleetingly in highly populated, non-Western cultures, particularly among young males. This research examined the factor structure of the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3 (SATAQ-3) among adolescent boys in China. In an initial exploratory factor analysis (N=719), a four factor solution emerged with components reflecting General Pressure-Internalization, Sources of Appearance Information, Pressure-Internalization of an Athletic Ideal, and Pressure to be Thin. Subsequently, confirmatory factor analyses in a new sample (n=749) assessed fits of the derived four factor model, a three factor variant, and alternatives reflecting "Western" and "Malay" SATAQ-3 solutions. The derived four factor solution had the most acceptable structure across several fit indices. Patterns of correlation with other self-report measures also provided preliminary support for the validity of the derived solution. PMID:20800561

  12. Online questionnaire development: using film to engage participants and then gather attitudes towards the sharing of genomic data.

    PubMed

    Middleton, A; Bragin, E; Morley, K I; Parker, M

    2014-03-01

    How can a researcher engage a participant in a survey, when the subject matter may be perceived as 'challenging' or even be totally unfamiliar to the participant? The Genomethics study addressed this via the creation and delivery of a novel online questionnaire containing 10 integrated films. The films documented various ethical dilemmas raised by genomic technologies and the survey ascertained attitudes towards these. Participants were recruited into the research using social media, traditional media and email invitation. The film-survey strategy was successful: 11,336 initial hits on the survey website led to 6944 completed surveys. Participants included from those who knew nothing of the subject matter through to experts in the field of genomics (61% compliance rate), 72% of participants answered every single question. This paper summarises the survey design process and validation methods applied. The recruitment strategy and results from the survey are presented elsewhere. PMID:24468445

  13. Measuring the impact of an interprofessional multimedia learning resource on Japanese nurses and nursing students using the Theory of Planned Behavior Medication Safety Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Omura, Mieko; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Stone, Teresa Elizabeth; Maguire, Jane; Lapkin, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Interprofessional communication and teamwork are essential for medication safety; however, limited educational opportunities for health professionals and students to develop these skills exist in Japan. This study evaluated the impact of an interprofessional multimedia learning resource on registered nurses' and nursing students' intention to practice in a manner promoting medication safety. Using a quasi-experimental design, Japanese registered nurses and nursing students (n = 203) were allocated to an experimental (n = 109) or control group (n = 94). Behavioral intentions of medication safety and the predictor variables of attitudes, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norms were measured using a Japanese version of the Theory of Planned Behavior Medication Safety Questionnaire. Registered nurses in the experimental group demonstrated a greater intention to collaborate and practice in a manner that enhanced medication safety, evidenced by higher scores than the control group on all predictor variables. The results demonstrate the potential for interprofessional multimedia learning resources to positively impact the behaviors of Japanese registered nurses in relation to safe medication practices. Further research in other contexts and with other cohorts is warranted. PMID:26138636

  14. [A questionnaire about radiation safety management of the draining-water system at nuclear medicine facilities].

    PubMed

    Shizukuishi, Kazuya; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Narita, Hiroto; Kanaya, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Tsukada, Masaru; Iwanaga, Tetsuo; Ikebuchi, Shuji; Kusama, Keiji; Tanaka, Mamoru; Namiki, Norio; Fuiimura, Youko; Horikoshi, Akiko; Inoue, Tomio; Kusakabe, Kiyoko

    2004-05-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey about radiation-safety management condition in Japanese nuclear medicine facilities to make materials of proposition for more reasonable management of medical radioactive waste. We distributed a questionnaire to institutions equipped with Nuclear Medicine facilities. Of 1,125 institutions, 642 institutes (52.8%) returned effective answers. The questionnaire covered the following areas: 1) scale of an institution, 2) presence of enforcement of radiotherapy, 3) system of a tank, 4) size and number of each tank, 5) a form of draining-water system, 6) a displacement in a radioactive rays management area, 7) a measurement method of the concentration of medical radioactive waste in draining water system, 8) planned and used quantity of radioisotopes for medical examination and treatment, 9) an average displacement of hospital for one month. In most institutions, a ratio of dose limitation of radioisotope in draining-water system was less than 1.0, defined as an upper limitation in ordinance. In 499 hospitals without facilities of hospitalization for unsealed radioisotope therapy, 473 hospitals reported that sum of ratios of dose limits in a draining-water system was less than 1.0. It was calculated by used dose of radioisotope and monthly displacement from hospital, on the premise that all used radioisotope entered in the general draining-water system. When a drainage including radioactivity from a controlled area join with that from other area before it flows out of a institution, it may be diluted and its radioactive concentration should be less than its upper limitation defined in the rule. Especially, in all institutions with a monthly displacement of more than 25,000 m3, the sum of ratio of the concentration of each radionuclide to the concentration limit dose calculated by used dose of radioisotope, indicated less than 1.0. PMID:15354724

  15. Knowledge and attitude of final - year medical students in Germany towards palliative care - an interinstitutional questionnaire-based study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To care for terminally ill and dying patients requires a thorough medical education, encompassing skills, knowledge, and attitudes in the field of palliative care. Undergraduate medical students in Germany will receive mandatory teaching in palliative care in the near future driven by recent changes in the Medical Licensure Act. Before new curricula can be implemented, the knowledge of medical students with respect to palliative care, their confidence to handle palliative care situations correctly, their therapeutic attitude, and their subjective assessment about previous teaching practices have to be better understood. Method We designed a composite, three-step questionnaire (self estimation of confidence, knowledge questions, and opinion on the actual and future medical curriculum) conducted online of final - year medical students at two universities in Germany. Results From a total of 318 enrolled students, 101 responded and described limited confidence in dealing with specific palliative care issues, except for pain therapy. With regard to questions examining their knowledge base in palliative care, only one third of the students (33%) answered more than half of the questions correctly. Only a small percentage of students stated they had gained sufficient knowledge and experience in palliative care during their studies, and the vast majority supported the introduction of palliative care as a mandatory part of the undergraduate curriculum. Conclusion This study identifies medical students' limited confidence and knowledge base in palliative care in 2 German universities, and underlines the importance of providing a mandatory palliative care curriculum. PMID:22112146

  16. Score reliability and factor similarity of the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3 (SATAQ-3) among four ethnic groups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the score reliability and equivalence of factor structure of the Sociocultural Attitudes towards Appearance Questionnaire-3 (SATAQ-3) [1] in a sample of female college students from the four largest ethnic groups in the USA. Methods Participants were 1245 women who self-identified as European American/White (n = 543), African American/Black (n = 137), Asian American (n = 317), or Latina/Hispanic (n = 248). All completed the SATAQ-3 and a demographic questionnaire. To test the factor similarity and score reliability across groups, we used exploratory factor analysis and calculated Cronbach’s alphas (respectively). Results Score reliability was high for all groups. Tests of factor equivalence suggested that the four pre-established factors of the SATAQ-3 (i.e., knowledge, perceived pressure, thin-ideal internalization, athletic-ideal internalization) were similar for women of all ethnic groups. Only two items (20 and 27) did not consistently load on the previously identified scale across all four groups. When scored, African Americans reported significantly less perceived pressure and internalization than all other groups. Conclusions Results support the use of the SATAQ-3 in female college students of these four ethnicities. PMID:24999395

  17. Validation of the Portuguese version of the Lithium Attitudes Questionnaire (LAQ) in bipolar patients treated with lithium: cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to lithium is very common in bipolar patients and it is a frequent cause of recurrence during prophylactic treatment. Several reports suggest that attitudes of bipolar patients interfere with adherence to lithium. The Lithium Attitudes Questionnaire (LAQ) is a brief questionnaire developed as a means of identifying and grouping the problems patients commonly have with taking lithium regularly. The original version is validated in patients, but a validated version in Portuguese is not yet available. Methods One-hundred six patients with bipolar disorder (DSM-IV criteria) criteria under lithium treatment for at least one month were assessed using LAQ. LAQ is a brief questionnaire administered under interview conditions, which includes 19 items rating attitudes towards prophylactic lithium treatment. We analysed the internal consistency, concurrent validity, sensitivity and specificity of the Portuguese version of LAQ. Results The internal consistency, evaluated by Cronbach's alpha was 0.78. The mean total LAQ score was 4.1. Concurrent validity was confirmed by a negative correlation between plasma lithium concentration and total LAQ score (r = -0,198; p = 0.048). We analysed the scale's discriminative capacity revealing a sensitivity of 69% and a specificity of 71% in the identification of negative attitudes of bipolar patients. Conclusion The psychometric assessment of the Portuguese version of LAQ showed good internal consistency, sensitivity and specificity. The results were similar to the original version in relation to attitudes of bipolar patients towards lithium therapy. PMID:17121674

  18. A questionnaire study on attitudes toward birth and child-rearing of university students in Japan, China, and South Korea.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liling; Kato, Yutaka; Shishido, Keisuke; Doi, Hideko; Jin, Haeng mi; Wang, Jin gang; Ikezawa, Junko; Awaya, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the attitudes of young Japanese, Chinese, and South Koreans toward birth and child-rearing. The survey targeted four-year university students (n=1,668) who responded to an anonymous survey using self-report questionnaires between December 2012 and April 2013. The collection rates were 72.5%, 94.7%, and 96.5% for the Japanese, Chinese, and South Korean students, respectively. Correlations among the respondents' attributes, medical and scientific literacy levels, and views of preferred qualities of children were analyzed using chi-square test, supplemented by residual analysis (significance level set at p<0.05). Participants were asked whether they were willing to use the following methods for obtaining preferred qualities in their children:(1) choosing a spouse (43.2%, 72.6%, and 85.1% of the Japanese, Chinese, and South Koreans, respectively, agreed);(2) using a sperm bank (cryobank) (5.8%, 60.1%, and 81.7% of the Japanese, Chines, and South Koreans, respectively, agreed);and (3) using an egg cell bank (ova bank or cryobank) (5.3%, 47.2%, and 70.3% of the Japanese, Chinese, and South Koreans, respectively, agreed). The proportion of affirmative responses (indicating "eugenic inclination") to these statements was significantly higher among the Chinese and South Korean participants than their Japanese counterparts (p<0.001). Significant differences were also found in the attitudes of the 3 groups toward methods for obtaining the preferred qualities for their children:prenatal diagnosis, pre-implantation diagnosis, the environment during pregnancy, and child-rearing. PMID:25145407

  19. Attitudes and beliefs on the establishment of a national food safety authority in Cyprus. A population-based survey.

    PubMed

    Hadjigeorgiou, Andreas; Talias, Michael A; Soteriades, Elpidoforos S; Philalithis, Anastasios; Psaroulaki, Anna; Gikas, Achilleas; Tselentis, Yiannis

    2014-04-01

    Cyprus does not have a National Food Safety Authority (NFSA), but a multi-level, fragmented system with responsibilities divided among different ministries and governmental agencies, frequently impeding efforts to effectively manage food risks by duplication and overlapping of responsibilities. A population-based survey was carried out to determine the beliefs and attitudes of interested parties concerning the establishment of a NFSA in Cyprus. Information was collected using a random stratified sampling design and a structured questionnaire. A total of 868 questionnaires were collected (704 from regular consumers, 154 from food businesses' representatives, and 10 from public services' directors or acting head officers). About 11% of food businesses' representatives and 45% of consumers reported that they did not know which public authorities are responsible for food control. Moreover, 2 out of 10 (17%) of responders from public agencies, 70% from food businesses and 91% from consumers, although not aware of ongoing efforts to establish a food safety authority in Cyprus (currently under consideration), were supportive of the idea [8 out of 10 (83%) of responders from public services, 93% from food businesses, and 89% of consumers]. Finally, 7 out of 10 (67%) from the public agencies and 84% of representatives from food businesses agreed with the separation of risk assessment from risk management activities. Public opinion in Cyprus as well as public agencies and food businesses' representatives support the establishment of a single independent national food safety authority in Cyprus based on the European paradigm including the division of risk activities. PMID:24378621

  20. Validation of the factor structure of the Greek adaptation of the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire (SATAQ-3).

    PubMed

    Argyrides, Marios; Kkeli, Natalie; Kendeou, Panayiota

    2014-06-01

    The current study aimed to confirm the factor structure and reliability of the newly translated Greek version of the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3 (SATAQ-3) among 1753 Greek-Cypriot high school students. Results of the structural equation modeling indicated a very good fit with the original four-factor structure of the SATAQ-3 for both males and females. The Cronbach's alpha coefficients for the four subscales were .92 for 'Internalization-General', .82 for 'Internalization-Athlete', .94 for 'Pressure' and .88 for 'Information'. Further analyses showed no significant differences between BMI categories with respect to the Internalization-General, Internalization-Athlete and Information factors but there were significant differences on the Pressure factor. The findings of the current study support the existence of the original four-factor structure of the SATAQ-3. The validity and reliability results of the Greek version of the SATAQ-3 support its use in Greek-speaking countries or populations. PMID:24958653

  1. Sun Safety Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors among Beachgoing Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merten, Julie Williams; Higgins, Sue; Rowan, Alan; Pragle, Aimee

    2014-01-01

    Background: Skin cancer rates are rising and could be reduced with better sun protection behaviors. Adolescent exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is damaging because it can lead to skin cancer. This descriptive study extends understanding of adolescent sun exposure attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors. Methods: A sample of 423 beachgoing…

  2. Knowledge, attitude and practices for design for safety: A study on civil & structural engineers.

    PubMed

    Goh, Yang Miang; Chua, Sijie

    2016-08-01

    Design for safety (DfS) (also known as prevention through design, safe design and Construction (Design and Management)) promotes early consideration of safety and health hazards during the design phase of a construction project. With early intervention, hazards can be more effectively eliminated or controlled leading to safer worksites and construction processes. DfS is practiced in many countries, including Australia, the UK, and Singapore. In Singapore, the Manpower Ministry enacted the DfS Regulations in July 2015, which will be enforced from August 2016 onwards. Due to the critical role of civil and structural (C&S) engineers during design and construction, the DfS knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) of C&S engineers have significant impact on the successful implementation of DfS. Thus, this study aims to explore the DfS KAP of C&S engineers so as to guide further research in measuring and improving DfS KAP of designers. During the study, it was found that there is a lack of KAP studies in construction management. Therefore, this study also aims to provide useful lessons for future applications of the KAP framework in construction management research. A questionnaire was developed to assess the DfS KAP of C&S engineers. The responses provided by 43 C&S engineers were analyzed. In addition, interviews with experienced construction professionals were carried out to further understand perceptions of DfS and related issues. The results suggest that C&S engineers are supportive of DfS, but the level of DfS knowledge and practices need to be improved. More DfS guidelines and training should be made available to the engineers. To ensure that DfS can be implemented successfully, there is a need to study the contractual arrangements between clients and designers and the effectiveness of different implementation approaches for the DfS process. The questionnaire and findings in this study provided the foundation for a baseline survey with larger sample size, which is

  3. Validation of a survey tool to assess the patient safety attitudes of pharmacy students

    PubMed Central

    Walpola, Ramesh L; Fois, Romano A; Carter, Stephen R; McLachlan, Andrew J; Chen, Timothy F

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patient safety education is a key strategy to minimise harm, and is increasingly being introduced into junior pharmacy curricula. However, currently there is no valid and reliable survey tool to measure the patient safety attitudes of pharmacy students. This study aimed to validate a modified survey tool, originally developed by Madigosky et al, to evaluate patient safety attitudes of junior pharmacy students. Design A 23-item cross-sectional patient safety survey tool was utilised to evaluate first and second year pharmacy students’ attitudes during May 2013 with both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses performed to understand the psychometric properties of the survey tool and to establish construct validity. Setting Undergraduate university students in Sydney, Australia Participants 245 first year and 201 second year students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy Programme at The University of Sydney, Australia in May 2013. Results After exploratory factor analysis on first year student responses (55.76% variance explained) and confirmatory factor analysis on second year responses, a 5-factor model consisting of 14 items was obtained with satisfactory model fit (χ2 (66)=112.83, p<0.001, RMSEA=0.06, CFI=0.91) and nesting between year groups (Δχ2(7)=3.079, p=0.878). The five factors measured students’ attitudes towards: (1) being quality improvement focused, (2) internalising errors regardless of harm, (3) value of contextual learning, (4) acceptability of questioning more senior healthcare professionals’ behaviour and (5) attitude towards open disclosure. Conclusions This study has established the reliability and validity of a modified survey tool to evaluate patient safety attitudes of pharmacy students, with the potential for use in course development and evaluation. PMID:26359285

  4. Parental attitudes and experiences of dental care in children and adolescents with ADHD--a questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Staberg, Marie; Norén, Jörgen G; Johnson, Mats; Kopp, Svenny; Robertson, Agneta

    2014-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common psychiatric condition characterized by age-inappropriate levels of inattention, hyperactivity-impulsiveness or a combination of these. The aim of this study was to analyze parental attitudes to and experience of dental care, oral hygiene and dietary habits in children/adolescents with ADHD. Twenty- six parents of 31 subjects, 20 boys and 11 girls, aged 5-19 years with ADHD registered at the Gothenburg Child Neuropsychiatric Clinic, were invited. The parents answered a questionnaire regarding different oral problems when visiting the Clinic of Pediatric Dentistry, Gothenburg, for an oral examination of their child. The parents felt the dental care at the Public Dental Service was good, but noted a lack of knowledge regarding child neuropsychiatry among the dental staff which may influence the dental treatment. Fifteen parents reported their children had experienced mouth pain and 15 reported their child had suffered from both discomfort and pain from local anesthesia. Thirteen of the children had a dental trauma and 12 parents reported pain in connection to the dental treatment. Pain related to filling therapy was stated by 11 parents. According to the parents, five children suffered from dental fear but 15 reported the child had a general fear. Pursuant to the parents, the beverage for dinner was mainly milk or water, while sweet drinks were more frequent when thirsty. Seventeen parents reported their children had poor oral hygiene or could not manage to brush their teeth and 14 of the 31 children only brushed once a day or less. The results show that the parents experience a lack of child neuropsychiatric knowledge, care and patience from the dental staff, which may influence the treatment. Oral hygiene/tooth brushing is neglected and the frequent consumption of sugar is difficult for the parents to handle. PMID:25102720

  5. Examination of the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3 in a mixed-gender young-adolescent sample.

    PubMed

    Wilksch, Simon M; Wade, Tracey D

    2012-06-01

    Thin-ideal (or media) internalization is an important eating disorder risk factor that has become a central target of many prevention programs. However, evidence for its valid assessment in young, mixed-gender, adolescent samples is limited, and the current study is the first to explore the psychometric properties of the 30-item Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3 (SATAQ-3; J. Thompson, P. van den Berg, M. Roehrig, A. S. Guarda, & L. J. Heinberg, 2004) in a nonadult community sample. Two samples of Grade 8 students (M age = 13.68 years), totaling 680 girls (N = 332) and boys (N = 348) completed the SATAQ-3 and other measures, whereas a smaller sample (N = 123) of Grade 10 girls (M age = 15.01 years) served as a comparison group for supplementary analyses. Principal component analyses (PCA) with data from Sample 1 (N = 201) revealed 4 factors with eigenvalues > 1.0, similar to the original authors' structure but with some cross-loading occurring between the Pressures and Internalization-General scales. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were conducted with data from Sample 2 (N = 479) on the factor solution found in the PCA. The model did not fit well, leading to further revisions based on removal of cross-loading items and CFA modification indices, resulting in a 19-item, 4-factor solution with acceptable fit. Examinations of validity and reliability were generally acceptable. The overall findings suggest that an abbreviated version of the SATAQ-3 might be more appropriate than the original version with young-adolescent, mixed-gender audiences. Further examinations of the psychometric properties of the SATAQ-3 with this demographic are indicated. PMID:21928909

  6. Assessing the status of airline safety culture and its relationship to key employee attitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Edward L.

    The need to identify the factors that influence the overall safety environment and compliance with safety procedures within airline operations is substantial. This study examines the relationships between job satisfaction, the overall perception of the safety culture, and compliance with safety rules and regulations of airline employees working in flight operations. A survey questionnaire administered via the internet gathered responses which were converted to numerical values for quantitative analysis. The results were grouped to provide indications of overall average levels in each of the three categories, satisfaction, perceptions, and compliance. Correlations between data in the three sets were tested for statistical significance using two-sample t-tests assuming equal variances. Strong statistical significance was found between job satisfaction and compliance with safety rules and between perceptions of the safety environment and safety compliance. The relationship between job satisfaction and safety perceptions did not show strong statistical significance.

  7. The Attitude of Civil Engineering Students towards Health and Safety Risk Management: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, A. K.; Reynolds, J. H.; Ng, L. W. T.

    2008-01-01

    The highest rate of accidents and injuries in British industries has been reported by the construction industry during the past decade. Since then stakeholders have recognised that a possible solution would be to inculcate a good attitude towards health and safety risk management in undergraduate civil engineering students and construction…

  8. Health science students’ attitude towards research training programs in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: Reliability and validity of the questionnaire instrument

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kuwaiti, Ahmed A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this paper was to determine the validity and reliability of a questionnaire tool for measuring students' attitudes toward components relevant to research training programs in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: The paper reports the responses of 564 Saudi Arabian students from seven government universities to the questionnaire comprising 16 items on 3 conceptual subscales, which measured students' attitude to research activities in the college; students' opinion of faculty involvement in research; and infrastructural facilities in the college. The results of this study provide the final scale, with all the 16 items of the initial Likert scale, for which strong evidence was obtained. Results: Results indicated that the students' attitude toward the research (SAR) scale had three latent factors, which explained 62% of the variance: The three subscales measured includes: (i) Research activities offered in the college, (ii) students' opinion of faculty involvement in research, and (iii) infrastructural facilities offered in the college for research. The full scale including three subscales had good internal consistency (rs = 0.72 and α = 0.77 for full scale; and α between 0.71 and 0.79 for three subscales). Conclusion: This study provides evidence of reliability and validity of the SAR scale for the measurement of students' attitudes toward research training programs in Saudi Arabian Universities. The research findings will provide the basis for further research on health science students. PMID:24987284

  9. Food safety knowledge, attitude, and practice toward compliance with abattoir laws among the abattoir workers in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Abdullahi, Auwalu; Hassan, Azmi; Kadarman, Norizhar; Saleh, Ahmadu; Baraya, Yusha’u Shu’aibu; Lua, Pei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Foodborne diseases are common in the developing countries due to the predominant poor food handling and sanitation practices, particularly as a result of inadequate food safety laws, weak regulatory structures, and inadequate funding as well as a lack of appropriate education for food-handlers. The most frequently involved foods in disease outbreaks are of animal origin. However, in spite of the adequate legislation and laws governing the abattoir operation in Malaysia, compliance with food safety requirements during meat processing and waste disposal is inadequate. Therefore, the present study was designed to assess the food safety knowledge, attitude, and practice toward compliance with abattoir laws among the workers in Terengganu, Malaysia. Materials and methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted using simple random sampling technique in the six districts of Terengganu: two districts were used for the pilot study and the remaining four were used for the main study. One hundred sixty-five abattoir workers from the selected districts were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Results The mean and standard deviation of knowledge, attitude, and practice scores of the workers were 6.02 and 1.954, 45.16 and 4.496, and 18.03 and 3.186, respectively. The majority of the workers (38.8%) had a low level of knowledge and 91.7% had a positive attitude, while 77.7% had a good practice of compliance. Sex had a significant association with the level of knowledge (P<0.001) and practice (P=0.044) among the workers. The females had a higher level of knowledge than the males, while the males had a better practice of compliance than females. Similarly, knowledge also had a significant (P=0.009) association with the level of practice toward compliance with abattoir laws among the workers. Conclusion The abattoir workers had a positive attitude and good practice, but a low level of knowledge toward compliance with the abattoir laws. Therefore, public awareness

  10. Developing the Changes in Attitude about the Relevance of Science (CARS) Questionnaire and Assessing Two High School Science Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Marcelle A.; Ranney, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    This study has two purposes: (a) methodological--to design and test a new instrument able to reflect changes in attitudes toward science over time, and (b) investigative--to find out the effect of two similar curricular treatments on the attitudes of two classes. Items about the relevance of science to students' lives were developed,…

  11. Development and assessment of a questionnaire for a descriptive cross – sectional study concerning parents' knowledge, attitudes and practises in antibiotic use in Greece

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Upper Respiratory Infections (URIs) are common in children. The cause is usually viral, but parents' attitude often contributes to inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, promoting antibiotic resistance. The objective is to describe the process of developing a questionnaire to assess parents' Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) concerning the role of antibiotics when children suffer from URIs, as well as to evaluate the response rates, the completeness and the reliability (Cronbach) of the questionnaires. Finally, to note any limitations of the study. Methods Literature review, along with pre – testing yielded a questionnaire designed to assess the parents' KAP – level. A postal survey was set, in a national sample of 200 schools stratified by geographical region. The participants consist of a multistage geographical cluster sample of 8000 parents. The influence of demographic characteristics (i.e. sex, age, education) was analyzed. Cronbach index test and factor analysis were used to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. Results The response rate of the parents was 69%. Islands presented the lowest response rate while in Northern Greece the response rate was the highest. Sixty – eight point nine percent of the sample returned questionnaires fully completed, while 91.5% completed 95% of the questions. Three questions out of 70 were answered in a very low rate which was associated mostly with immigrant respondents. The section describing parents' attitude toward antibiotic use was not completed as much as the sections of knowledge or practices. The questions were factor analyzed and 10 out of the 21 extracted factors were finally evaluated, reducing the number of independent variables to 46. The reliability of the questionnaire was 0.55. However, only items that increased the Cronbach when added were eventually included in the final scales raising the internal consistency to 0.68. Limitations of the study, such as the vocabulary and form of

  12. Twenty-four-hour recall, knowledge-attitude-practice questionnaires, and direct observations of sanitary practices: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, B. F.; Clemens, J. D.; Aziz, K. M. A.; Rahman, M.

    1987-01-01

    Although responses to 24-hour recall and knowledge—attitude—practice questionnaires are commonly used in water—sanitation studies as surrogates for direct observation of behaviour, the validity of this approach is questionable. We therefore compared questionnaire data with those obtained by direct observation of practices related to water storage, handwashing, and defecation among 247 families in urban Dhaka, Bangladesh. Analysis of the results indicates that accord between the replies to the questionnaires and the data collected by direct observation was poor and that the responses to the two questionnaires were often contradictory. Significant disagreements between the results of questionnaires and observations arose usually because desirable practices were over-reported by the respondents. The results of the study suggest that in urban Bangladesh 24-hour recall and knowledge—attitude—practice questionnaires should not be used as proxies for direct observation of hygiene practices. PMID:3496987

  13. Factors Influencing the Safety Behavior of German Equestrians: Attitudes towards Protective Equipment and Peer Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Ikinger, Christina-Maria; Baldamus, Jana; Spiller, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary The handling and riding of horses can be quite dangerous. Although the use of protective gear among equestrians is increasing, a high number of incidents occur and the voluntary use of safety equipment is described as inconsistent to low. Therefore, this study looks at the safety behavior of German equestrians and at factors influencing this behavior to decrease the high number of horse-related injuries. The results reveal that attitudes towards safety products as well as the protective behavior of other horse owners and riding pupils from the stable are key factors that might alter the safety behavior of equestrians. Abstract Human interactions with horses entail certain risks. Although the acceptance and use of protective gear is increasing, a high number of incidents and very low or inconsistent voluntary use of safety equipment are reported. While past studies have examined factors influencing the use of safety gear, they have explored neither their influence on the overall safety behavior, nor their relative influence in relation to each other. The aim of the present study is to fill this gap. We conducted an online survey with 2572 participants. By means of a subsequent multiple regression analysis, we explored 23 different variables in view of their influence on the protective behavior of equestrians. In total, we found 17 variables that exerted a significant influence. The results show that both having positive or negative attitudes towards safety products as well as the protective behavior of other horse owners or riding pupils from the stable have the strongest influence on the safety behavior of German equestrians. We consider such knowledge to be important for both scientists and practitioners, such as producers of protective gear or horse sport associations who might alter safety behavior in such a way that the number of horse-related injuries decreases in the long term. PMID:26901229

  14. Creation and usability testing of a web-based pre-scanning radiology patient safety and history questionnaire set.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Tracy J; DuVall, Scott; Wiggins, Richard

    2009-12-01

    Recent advances in technology have significantly changed radiology workflow. The main focus of these changes has been the transition from hard copy film to digital imaging. The next transition will be a "paperless" transformation. Web-based versions of the current paper-based patient safety and history questionnaires were created using PHP and MySQL. Two rounds of usability testing using volunteers were completed using tablet PCs. Volunteers were comprised of ten individuals. Ages of volunteers ranged from 27 to 60 years, and there were eight males and two females. The majority of users had at least a Master's degree and was considered to have a computer experience level of a programmer. Eighty percent of the users agreed that the web-based questionnaires and tablet PCs were easy to use. Text input through the writing recognition window and scrolling proved to be the least usable sections of the questionnaires. The new web-based system was found to be a very usable system by our participants. The questionnaires were easy to use, easy to navigate, and easy to read. Individual elements such as radio buttons and checkboxes did not fair as well but were due to their small size. Difficulty with the writing recognition interface is an inherent issue with the Windows XP Tablet Edition operating system. PMID:18716839

  15. Implicit attitudes and road safety behaviors. The helmet-use case.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, Rubén D; Tosi, Jeremías; Poó, Fernando M; Montes, Silvana A; López, Soledad S

    2015-06-01

    We studied the role of implicit attitudes on road safety behaviors. We also explored the methodological benefits of using implicit measures to complement conventional self-reporting instruments. The results suggest that: (a) implicit attitudes are capable of predicting observed differences in the use of protective devices (helmet use); (b) implicit attitudes correlate with the emotional component of the explicit attitudes (e.g., perception of comfort-discomfort), but appear to be independent of the more cognitive components (e.g., perceived benefits); (c) the emotional component of the explicit attitudes appears to be the major predictor of behavior; and (d) implicit measures seem to be more robust against social desirability biases, while explicit measure are more sensitive to such bias. We conclude that indirect and automatic measures serve as an important complement to conventional direct measures (self-reports) because they provide information on psychological processes that are qualitatively different (implicit) and can also be more robust when it comes to response bias. PMID:25838193

  16. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Self-Administered Questionnaire to Assess Parental Attitudes Toward Firearms and Related Parenting Decisions.

    PubMed

    Davis, Amy B; White, Marney A

    2016-01-01

    The study sought to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Parental Attitudes Toward Firearms Survey (PATFS), a self-report measure of parental attitudes about firearms and parenting behavior. The initial item pool was generated based on a literature review and discussion with experts in violence reduction, psychometrics, and public health. Data were collected online from 362 volunteers and subjected to exploratory factor analysis which revealed a 13-item, 3-factor solution accounting for 59.7% of the variance. The 3 conceptual factors (subscales) were interpreted as Firearms Exposure, Parental Control, and Violent Play. The PATFS demonstrated good internal consistency and content and construct validity. The PATFS can be used to investigate parenting attitudes and behaviors specific to firearms and violent play. PMID:27075751

  17. Exploratory and confirmatory factory analysis of the Willingness to Eat Whole Grains Questionnaire: A measure of young adults' attitudes toward consuming whole grain foods.

    PubMed

    Tuuri, Georgianna; Cater, Melissa; Craft, Brittany; Bailey, Ariana; Miketinas, Derek

    2016-10-01

    Whole grains are recommended by dietary guidelines because of their health-promoting properties, yet attitudes toward consuming these foods have not been examined. This study developed and validated a questionnaire to estimate willingness to consume whole grain foods. Focus group interviews with high school students and input from nutrition educators produced a list of 10 whole grain items that were included in the "Willingness to Eat Whole Grains Questionnaire". Young adult university students 18-29 years of age indicated their willingness to consume each of the whole grain foods using a 4-point, Likert-type scale with responses ranging from "always unwilling" to "always willing" and a fifth option of "never eaten". Participants' age, race/ethnicity, and gender were collected. Data were examined using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and test-retest reliability. The EFA test (n = 266; 65% female; 69% white) using principal axis factoring returned a single factor that included all survey items and explained 58.3% of the variance. The CFA (n = 252; 62% female, 74% white) supported a single-factor solution: χ(2) = 80.57 (35); RMSEA = 0.07; Comparative Fit Index = 0.92; Tucker-Lewis Index = 0.90; and SRMR = 0.05. The questionnaire, administered on two occasions separated by two weeks to 36 university students, demonstrated good testretest reliability (r = 0.87, p < 0.0001). The "Willingness to Eat Whole Grains Questionnaire" had good face validity when used with a young adult population and will be a useful tool to help nutrition educators examine attitudes toward consuming nutrient-rich whole grain foods. PMID:27328099

  18. The Affective Elements of Science Learning: A Questionnaire to Assess--and Improve--Student Attitudes toward Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kiesha; Kurtek, Katrina; Sampson, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Student attitudes can have a positive or negative effect on learning. According to Duschl, Schweingruber, and Shouse, "[students'] goals for science learning, their beliefs about their ability to do science, and the value they assign to science learning are likely to influence their cognitive engagement in science tasks" (2007, p. 195). Therefore,…

  19. Safety in numbers? Investigating Australian driver behaviour, knowledge and attitudes towards cyclists.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Marilyn; Oxley, Jennie; Newstead, Stuart; Charlton, Judith

    2014-09-01

    A key tenet of the safety in numbers theory is that as the number of people cycling increases, more drivers will also be cyclists and therefore will give greater consideration to cyclists when driving. We tested this theory in relation to self-reported behaviour, attitudes and knowledge in relation to cycling. An online survey was conducted of Australian drivers (n=1984) who were also cyclists (cyclist-drivers) and drivers who did not cycle (drivers). Cyclist-drivers were 1.5 times more likely than drivers to report safe driving behaviours related to sharing the roads with cyclists (95% CI: 1.1-1.9, p<0.01). Cyclist-drivers had better knowledge of the road rules related to cycling infrastructure than drivers; however knowledge of road rules related to bike lanes was low for both groups. Drivers were more likely than cyclist-drivers to have negative attitudes (e.g. cyclists are unpredictable and repeatedly overtaking cyclists is frustrating). Findings from this study highlight the need for increased education and awareness in relation to safe driving behaviour, road rules and attitudes towards cyclists. Specific recommendations are made for approaches to improve safety for cyclists. PMID:24769133

  20. Food safety knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among Puerto Rican caretakers living in Hartford, Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Millán, Angela; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Damio, Grace; González, Anir; Segura-Pérez, Sofia

    2004-03-01

    Household food safety education is needed to minimize the risk of exposure to foodborne pathogens. The Latino population in the United States is growing at a fast rate and has become the largest minority group in this country. However, little research has been done to identify the food safety behavioral risks faced by Puerto Ricans. Ten in-depth household observations and a quantitative survey on food safety knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors (n = 100) were conducted to understand food-handling techniques among Puerto Rican caretakers of young children. This was followed by two focus groups (n = 12) to further characterize food safety knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors and the proper media channels for the delivery of food safety education. Even though 97% of survey participants reported washing their hands with soap and water before preparing foods, only 1 of the 10 participants in the household observations actually did it. About 60% of the household participants washed the cutting boards with soap and water compared with 89% of survey participants who claimed to do it. In the survey, 5% reported to know the meaning of cross-contamination, and 71% (n = 80) to use the same cutting board for meats and vegetables. Overall, 96% of survey participants did not use a thermometer to check if meats were cooked properly and only 10% defrosted their meats in the refrigerator. Statistically significant relationships (P < 0.05) were found between speaking English and knowing the meaning of cross-contamination and how to use a meat thermometer. Employed individuals and those with higher education were also more likely to be familiar with the term pasteurization. These results fully justify the delivery of culturally appropriate food safety education in this community. PMID:15035366

  1. The Persuasive Power of Virtual Reality: Effects of Simulated Human Distress on Attitudes towards Fire Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chittaro, Luca; Zangrando, Nicola

    Although virtual reality (VR) is a powerful simulation tool that can allow users to experience the effects of their actions in vivid and memorable ways, explorations of VR as a persuasive technology are rare. In this paper, we focus on different ways of providing negative feedback for persuasive purposes through simulated experiences in VR. The persuasive goal we consider concerns awareness of personal fire safety issues and the experiment we describe focuses on attitudes towards smoke in evacuating buildings. We test two techniques: the first technique simulates the damaging effects of smoke on the user through a visualization that should not evoke strong emotions, while the second is aimed at partially reproducing the anxiety of an emergency situation. The results of the study show that the second technique is able to increase user's anxiety as well as producing better results in attitude change.

  2. Factors Influencing the Safety Behavior of German Equestrians: Attitudes towards Protective Equipment and Peer Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ikinger, Christina-Maria; Baldamus, Jana; Spiller, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Human interactions with horses entail certain risks. Although the acceptance and use of protective gear is increasing, a high number of incidents and very low or inconsistent voluntary use of safety equipment are reported. While past studies have examined factors influencing the use of safety gear, they have explored neither their influence on the overall safety behavior, nor their relative influence in relation to each other. The aim of the present study is to fill this gap. We conducted an online survey with 2572 participants. By means of a subsequent multiple regression analysis, we explored 23 different variables in view of their influence on the protective behavior of equestrians. In total, we found 17 variables that exerted a significant influence. The results show that both having positive or negative attitudes towards safety products as well as the protective behavior of other horse owners or riding pupils from the stable have the strongest influence on the safety behavior of German equestrians. We consider such knowledge to be important for both scientists and practitioners, such as producers of protective gear or horse sport associations who might alter safety behavior in such a way that the number of horse-related injuries decreases in the long term. PMID:26901229

  3. Characteristics and Attitudes of Frequent Participants in the Urban Mathematics Collaboratives: Results of the Secondary Mathematics Teacher Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, James A.; And Others

    This technical report examines the results of a teacher background questionnaire administered to 430 frequent participants in 11 Urban Mathematics Collaboratives (UMCs). The goal of the UMC is to improve mathematics education in urban schools and to identify new models for meeting the professional needs of high school teachers by exposing them to…

  4. A questionnaire study on the knowledge, attitude, and the practice of pharmacovigilance among the healthcare professionals in a teaching hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sandeep Kumar; Nayak, Roopa P.; Shivaranjani, R.; Vidyarthi, Surendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP) of the healthcare professionals about pharmacovigilance in Dhanalakshmi Srinivasan Medical College and Hospital (DSMCH), Perambalur (Tamil Nadu), a tertiary care teaching hospital. The second primary objective was to assess the causation of underreporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) as it needs to be well-assessed in India. The secondary objective was to compare the findings of this study with the results of the published studies from India on evaluation of the KAP of pharmacovigilance among healthcare professional. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out using a pretested questionnaire. The questionnaire was designed to assess the KAP regarding pharmacovigilance. The healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses, and pharmacists) working in the DSMCH, Perambalur (Tamil Nadu) during the study period were included. Only those who gave their consent to participate were included in the study. The data was analyzed by using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) statistical software, version 16. Results: One hundred and fifty pretested questionnaires were distributed among the healthcare professionals and 101 responded. 62.4% healthcare workers gave correct response regarding the definition of pharmacovigilance. 75.2% of healthcare workers were aware regarding the existence of a National Pharmacovigilance Program of India. 69.3% healthcare professional agreed that ADR reporting is a professional obligation for them. Among the participants, 64.4% have experienced ADRs in patients, but only 22.8% have ever reported ADR to pharmacovigilance center. Unfortunately only 53.5% healthcare workers have been trained for reporting adverse reactions. But, 97% healthcare professionals agreed that reporting of ADR is necessary and 92.1% were of the view that pharmacovigilance should be taught in detail to healthcare professional. Conclusion

  5. Knowledge and attitudes of parents and professionals to neonatal BCG vaccination in light of recent UK policy changes: A questionnaire study

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Morris; Roberts, Hannah; Odeka, Egware

    2007-01-01

    Background Universal BCG vaccination in the UK ended in 2005. The new vaccination policy instead offers a number of different forms of selective vaccination to newborns based on risk of acquiring TB. We set out to assess the attitudes and knowledge of both parents and professionals to the new policy for neonatal BCG vaccination. Methods A short questionnaire was designed, made up of demographic and attitude questions, as well as very basic knowledge questions. The researchers handed out the questionnaire to all parents and professionals in the antenatal and postnatal areas, as well as the paediatric and neonatal units during a 6-week period. The site was the Royal Oldham hospital, a district general hospital with 3250 deliveries per year and multi-ethnic in its population mix. Results A total of 253 completed questionnaires were collected. The ethnic origin of responders was 50.6% White British, 18.2% Bangladeshi, 8.7% Indian, 4% White/Asian, the remaining 18.5% of other origins. 71.5% of responders said they had heard of BCG vaccine. When asked if they knew the new policy for its use, 33.2% answered yes. 24.5% gave the most accurate response when asked who now receives BCG. Conclusion We have found that amongst parents and professionals alike there is a lack of knowledge of the new policy. This has lead to confusion and as knowledge amongst the professionals who identify neonates for vaccination is low, uptake may be sub-optimal. We suggest that units investigate the issue and ensure that the new policy is understood and implemented correctly. PMID:17650337

  6. Older Driver Safety: A Survey of Psychologists' Attitudes, Knowledge, and Practices.

    PubMed

    Love, Janet; Tuokko, Holly

    2016-09-01

    Using an online survey, we examined the knowledge, attitudes, and practices with respect to older driver safety concerns of clinical psychologists from across Canada who self-identified as working with at least some drivers over 60 years of age. Eighty-four psychologists completed the survey, and many were aware of the issues relevant to older driver safety, although only about half reported that assessing fitness to drive was an important issue in their practice. The majority (75%) reported that they would benefit from education concerning evaluation of fitness to drive. The primary recommendation emerging from this investigation is to increase efforts to inform and educate psychologists about driving-related assessment and regulatory issues in general, and specifically with respect to older adults. As the population ages, it is of growing importance for all health care providers to understand the influence of mental health conditions-including cognitive impairment and dementia-on driving skills. PMID:27476964

  7. Would You Let Your Child Play Football? Attitudes Toward Football Safety.

    PubMed

    Fedor, Andrew; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 1.6 million to 3.8 million sports-related concussions occur each year in the United States, and many are related to football. This has generated much discussion in the media on the perceived safety of the sport. In the current study, researchers asked 230 individuals various questions about attitudes toward safety in football. Approximately 92.6% of participants indicated they would allow their child to play football; these participants were more likely to be female (χ(2) = 5.23, p > .05), were slightly younger (t= -2.52, p < .05), and believed an athlete could suffer a higher number of concussions before becoming excessive (t = 2.06, p < .05). Findings suggest most individuals are comfortable with their children playing football, and future studies are needed to clarify factors that inform this opinion. PMID:25671347

  8. Perception and attitude of physicians toward local generic medicines in Saudi Arabia: A questionnaire-based study

    PubMed Central

    Salhia, Huda O.; Ali, Anna; Rezk, Naser L.; El Metwally, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current study aimed to explore the knowledge, perception, and attitude of physicians toward generic medicines in Saudi Arabia. Background: The local market of generic medicine share in Saudi Arabia is low compared to global and regional statistics. The reason for this low market share and the role of physicians has not previously been investigated. The purpose of this study was to assess health practitioner level of perceived knowledge, opinions and attitudes about local generic medication, and identify factors that influence infrequency of generic prescriptions. Methods: A random sample of 231 physicians was recruited from two hospitals in Riyadh (one government one private) and 178 (77%) responded. Information on the physicians’ perceived knowledge, opinions and attitude toward local generic medication was extracted, analyzed and interpreted. Factors that influence infrequent prescription of local generic drugs were identified. Results: Among the 178 participants in the physicians’ survey, 76% and 47% reported that they are knowledgeable about the terms “generic” and “bioequivalence” respectively, while 44% reported that they are able to explain bioequivalence to their patients. Approximately 52% of physicians reported that local generics should be substituted for brands if suitable for the case, and 21.9% reported that they believe SFDA approved local generics are therapeutically equivalent to their brands. Clinical effectiveness was reported by 71.9% of physicians as the most influential factor effecting prescription of brand over local generic medication. The three independent significant predictors for infrequent prescription of local generics among physicians: Government sector employment (OR = 3.74, [95%CI 1.50–9.43]), consultant level (OR = 3.94, [95%CI 1.50–10.31]) and low level of knowledge about local generics (OR = 4.11, [95%CI 1.56–10.84]). Conclusion: The low market share of local generics medicines attributed

  9. Validation and predictive utility of the Sociocultural Attitudes Toward Appearance Questionnaire for Eating Disorders (SATAQ-ED): internalization of sociocultural ideals predicts weight gain.

    PubMed

    Heinberg, Leslie J; Coughlin, Janelle Wilder; Pinto, Angela Marinilli; Haug, Nancy; Brode, Cassie; Guarda, Angela S

    2008-09-01

    A widely used measure of societal influences on body image and eating disturbances--the Sociocultural Attitudes Toward Appearance Questionnaire (SATAQ) was validated in women with eating disorders. The original SATAQ and measures of convergence and divergence were administered to 165 eating disordered inpatients. Factor analyses were conducted to determine the underlying structure of the SATAQ. Convergent validity, diagnostic category norms and the predictive utility of the revised SATAQ were examined. Factor analyses indicated three factors: Internalization, Awareness, and Success. Internalization significantly predicted treatment success after controlling for admission BMI and drive for thinness. The revised SATAQ-ED measures multiple aspects of societal influence, predicts short-term outcome, and can be a useful tool for evaluating potential outcome and treatment efficacy. PMID:18640081

  10. [Dimensions of parental rearing styles in alcohol dependent patients: first results of the questionnaire on parental attitudes and rearing practices (FEPS)].

    PubMed

    Lotzin, Annett; Kriston, Levente; Richter-Appelt, Hertha; Leichsenring, Irina; Ramsauer, Brigitte; Schäfer, Ingo

    2013-07-01

    To date no instrument for the assessment of parenting styles is available in the German -language area that has been validated in patients with addictive disorders. Therefore the aim of this study was the confirmatory evaluation of the factor structure of the Questionnaire on Parental Attitudes and Rearing Practices (FEPS) in 186 alcohol dependent patients. The model as proposed by the test developers with the 4 factors Care, Autonomy, Low Punishment, and Low Material Reinforcement showed acceptable fit when residual correlations were allowed (mother: χ(2)/df=1,92, RMSEA=0,07, TLI=0,79; father: χ(2)/df=1,75, RMSEA=0,07, TLI=0,82). All factors showed sufficient factor reliabilities as well as good to very good internal consistencies. Factor loadings, discriminations and difficulties of the indicators could be regarded as good, with the exception of 2 items. These results indicate the factorial validity of the FEPS in patients with alcohol dependence. PMID:23446826

  11. Food safety knowledge, attitudes and practices of mothers: findings from focus group studies in South India.

    PubMed

    Subba Rao, G M; Sudershan, R V; Rao, Pratima; Vishnu Vardhana Rao, M; Polasa, Kalpagam

    2007-09-01

    In India, most of the diarrhoeal deaths among children (<5 years) are attributed to food and water contamination. Mothers are usually the final line of defence against food borne illnesses. Thus, the role of mothers in ensuring food safety at homes is well accepted. There are hardly any studies in India to understand their knowledge, attitudes and practices on food safety. The present study was an attempt in this direction. A total of 32 Focus Group Discussions were carried out with mothers of children <5 years in 16 districts from all the four South Indian states. The findings reveal that food safety awareness and practices are good among mothers perhaps due to the Indian food ethos passed on to them through generations. Home cooked foods are considered to be safer than prepared foods bought from outside. Many mothers were aware of the common food adulterants but do not bother to complain or take action. There is a need to create enabling environment with improved access to potable water, sanitation and cooking fuel. Spreading awareness about checking food labels and reporting to the health authorities in case of food poisoning or adulteration is also the need of the hour. The Anganwadi Centres can be the focal points for imparting food safety education to the mothers. PMID:17448570

  12. Practices, Attitudes and Perceptions Toward Road Safety in Yerevan, Republic of Armenia

    PubMed Central

    Chekijian, Sharon Anoush; Truzyan, Nune

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine knowledge and attitudes regarding traffic safety devices, measures, and legislation in the general population in Yerevan, Republic of Armenia. Methods: We conducted a baseline random digit dial fixed line telephone verbal survey of Yerevan households in April 2009 with a follow-up survey in May 2010. Survey domains included restraint use, motor vehicle crash experiences, and attitudes regarding traffic safety. Results: In the initial survey, of 2137 numbers dialed, 436 persons were reached and 390 (90%) agreed to participate. Of survey respondents, 90% percent of household cars had seatbelts, while 47% had airbags. Twenty-four percent always or usually wore a seatbelt when driving, 21% wore a belt as a passenger. 39% were unaware of child restraints. Of the 61% who were aware of child restraints, only 32% had ever used one. A follow-up survey was conducted one year later after enforcement efforts were increased. In the follow-up survey, 81% percent always or usually wore a seatbelt when driving, and 69% wore a belt as a passenger. There was no significant increase of awareness or use of child restraints in the follow-up survey. Conclusions: Although cars in Yerevan have seat belts, the majority of drivers and passengers prior to the intervention did not use them. Knowledge and use of child restraints was poor. The follow-up survey conducted after an enforcement campaign was underway in Yerevan showed that improved enforcement greatly increased awareness and compliance with current legislation. This study provides vital baseline information for the formulation of future policy. It also highlights the need for a multi-dimensional road traffic safety initiative through public educational campaigns, enforcement of current laws, and development of novel prevention policies and regulations. PMID:23169129

  13. Attitude of patients with HIV infection towards organ transplant between HIV patients. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Taha, Huda; Newby, Katie; Das, Archik; Das, Satyajit

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the HIV patients' attitudes towards the practice of organ transplant between HIV patients using a cross-sectional survey design. In total, 206 patients participated with a mean age of 42 (±8.8) years. The majority (70%) were black African and women (54%), and 83% described themselves as heterosexual. Most participants (n = 171, 83%) were on treatment, and 159 (93%) had viral load less than 40 copies/ml. Mean duration of illness and mean duration of treatment were 77 (±42.7) and 68 (±41) months, respectively. Of all participants, 128 (62%) reported that they would consider donating either any organ or a specific organ/s to an HIV patient, 33 (16%) would not consider it and 45 (22%) were unsure about donating their organs. Furthermore, 113 (55%) participants would consider receiving an organ from an HIV patient, 37 (18%) would not consider it, and 56 (27%) were unsure. Ninety-eight participants (42%) reported that they would consider both donating and receiving an organ. Multinomial logistic regression analysis found that significantly more Black African than Caucasian participants were unsure about organ donation (p = 0.011, OR = 3.887). Participants with longer duration of infection were significantly less likely to consider receiving an organ from an HIV patient (p = 0.036, OR = 1.297). Overall, the study findings indicated that the majority of participants were in favour of organ transplant between HIV patients. Use of HIV-infected donors could potentially reduce current organ waiting list among HIV patients. PMID:25614524

  14. Knowledge and Attitudes of GPs in Saxony-Anhalt concerning the Psychological Aspects of Bronchial Asthma: A Questionnaire Study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Bronchial Asthma is a worldwide condition with particularly high prevalence in first world countries. The reasons are multifactorial but a neglected area is the psychological domain. It is well known that heavy emotions can trigger attacks and that depression negatively affects treatment outcomes. It is also known that personality type has a greater effect on disease prevalence than in many other conditions. However, many potential psychological treatments are hardly considered, neither in treatment guidelines nor in reviews by asthma specialists. Moreover, there is very little research concerning the beliefs and practices of doctors regarding psychological treatments. Using a questionnaire survey we ascertained that local GPs in Saxony-Anhalt have reasonably good knowledge about the psychological elements of asthma; a third consider it to be some of the influence (20-40% aetiology) and a further third consider it to be even more important than that (at least 40% total aetiology). Our GPs use psychosomatic counseling sometimes or usually in the areas of sport and smoking (circa 85% GPs), although less so regarding breathing techniques and relaxation (c40% usually or sometimes do this) However despite this knowledge they refer to the relevant clinicians very rarely (98% sometimes, usually or always refer to a respiratory physician compared with only 11% referring for psychological help). PMID:21171975

  15. Wesleyan University Student Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haagen, C. Hess

    This questionnaire assesses marijuana use practices in college students. The 30 items (multiple choice or free response) are concerned with personal and demographic data, marijuana smoking practices, use history, effects from smoking marijuana, present attitude toward the substance, and use of other drugs. The Questionnaire is untimed and…

  16. Implications of case managers' perceptions and attitude on safety of home-delivered care.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sarahjane

    2015-12-01

    Perceptions on safety in community care have been relatively unexplored. A project that sought to understand the multiple perspectives on safety in the NHS case-management programme was carried out in relation to the structure, process, and outcome of care. This article presents a component of the nursing perspective that highlights an important element in the structure of nursing care that could potentially impede the nurses' ability to be fully effective and safe. A single case study of the case-management programme was undertaken. Three primary care organisations from three strategic health authorities participated, and three focus groups were conducted (one within each organisation). In total, 17 case management nurses participated. Data were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim and subjected to framework analysis. Nursing staff attitudes were identified as a structure of care that influence safety outcomes, particularly their perceptions of the care setting and the implications it has on their role and patient behaviour. Greater understanding of the expected role of the community nurse is necessary, and relevant training is required for nurses to be successful in empowering patients to perform more safely. In addition, efforts need to be made to improve patients' trust in the health-care system to prevent harm and promote more effective utilisation of resources. PMID:26636894

  17. Pediatricians’ Self-Reported Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices about Child Passenger Safety

    PubMed Central

    Zonfrillo, Mark R.; Sauber-Schatz, Erin K.; Hoffman, Benjamin D.; Durbin, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate pediatricians’ self-reported knowledge, attitudes, and dissemination practices regarding the new American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) child passenger safety (CPS) policy recommendations. Study design A cross-sectional survey was distributed to pediatric primary care physicians via AAP e-mail distribution lists. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to current AAP CPS recommendations and the revised policy statement were ascertained. Results There were 718 respondents from 3497 physicians with active e-mail addresses, resulting in a 20.5% response rate, of which 533 were eligible based on the initial survey question. All 6 CPS knowledge and scenario-based items were answered correctly by 52.9% of the sample; these respondents were identified as the “high knowledge” group. Pediatricians with high knowledge were more likely to be female (P < .001), to have completed a pediatrics residency (vs medicine-pediatrics) (P = .03), and have a child between 4 and 7 years of age (P = .001). CPS information was distributed more frequently at routine health visits for patients 0-2 years of age vs those 4-12 years of age. Those with high knowledge were less likely to report several specific barriers to dissemination of CPS information, more likely to allot adequate time and discuss CPS with parents, and had greater confidence for topics related to all CPS topics. Conclusions Although CPS knowledge is generally high among respondents, gaps in knowledge still exist. Knowledge is associated with attitudes, practices, barriers, and facilitators of CPS guideline dissemination. These results identify opportunities to increase knowledge and implement strategies to routinely disseminate CPS information in the primary care setting. PMID:25195160

  18. Impact of risk attitudes and perception on game theoretic driving interactions and safety.

    PubMed

    Arbis, David; Dixit, Vinayak V; Rashidi, Taha Hossein

    2016-09-01

    This study employs game theory to investigate behavioural norms of interaction between drivers at a signalised intersection. The choice framework incorporates drivers' risk perception as well as their risk attitudes. A laboratory experiment is conducted to study the impact of risk attitudes and perception in crossing behaviour at a signalised intersection. The laboratory experiment uses methods from experimental economics to induce incentives and study revealed behaviour. Conflicting drivers are considered to have symmetric disincentives for crashing, to represent a no-fault car insurance environment. The study is novel as it uses experimental data collection methods to investigate perceived risk. Further, it directly integrates perceived risk of crashing with other active drivers into the modelling structure. A theoretical model of intersection crossing behaviour is also developed in this paper. This study shows that right-of-way entitlements assigned without authoritative penalties to at-fault drivers may still improve perceptions of safety. Further, risk aversion amongst drivers attributes to manoeuvring strategies at or below Nash mixed strategy equilibrium. These findings offer a theoretical explanation for interactive manoeuvres that lead to crashes, as opposed to purely statistical methods which provide correlation but not necessarily explanation. PMID:27289391

  19. Food Safety Knowledge, Behavior, and Attitudes of Vendors of Poultry Products Sold at Pennsylvania Farmers' Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheinberg, Joshua; Radhakrishna, Rama; Cutter, Catherine N.

    2013-01-01

    A needs assessment survey was developed to assess the knowledge and attitudes of poultry vendors at farmers' markets in Pennsylvania, on food safety, regulation, and poultry production. Vendors were administered a 32-question paper survey, in person, during market hours. The results revealed critical vendor practices and identified important…

  20. Examining Variation in Attitudes toward Aggressive Retaliation and Perceptions of Safety among Bullies, Victims, and Bully/Victims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Catherine P.; O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Sawyer, Anne L.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the link between involvement in bullying, as either a bully, victim, or bully/victim, and attitudes toward violence and perceptions of safety among 16,012 middle and high school students. Analyses indicated that 37.6% were frequently involved in bullying. Bully/victims were the most likely to report feeling unsafe and…

  1. I like it when my partner holds my hand: development of the Responses and Attitudes to Support during Pain questionnaire (RASP).

    PubMed

    Krahé, Charlotte; Paloyelis, Yannis; Sambo, Chiara F; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini

    2014-01-01

    Social support can have beneficial effects on psychological and physiological well-being. During acute bodily pain, however, the effects of social support on pain are mixed. This variability may be due to the multifaceted nature of both pain and social support, as well as individual differences. In this paper, we present the development, psychometric assessment, and initial validation of the first self-report measure designed to address this variability in the general population; the Responses and Attitudes to Support during Pain questionnaire (RASP). The RASP includes questions on social support from the romantic partner as well as healthcare professionals (HCPs) and addresses different types of social support and pain responses. The development and validation of the RASP comprised four studies. In Study 1, a preliminary RASP version was completed by 179 healthy individuals regarding any type of acute pain. In Study 2, the reduced RASP was completed by 256 women with experiences of menstrual pain. Principal component analysis indicated a 22-item solution with five underlying dimensions reflecting General Partner Support, Emotional Support from HCPs, Anxiety in the Context of HCPs, Pain Behaviors during Partner Support, and Distraction by the Partner. Construct validity was assessed using a measure of adult attachment style. The RASP showed good validity and test-retest reliability. In Study 3, the 5-factor model received initial support through confirmatory factor analysis in a new sample of 120 individuals with recent musculoskeletal pain. Study 4 provided additional validation of the RASP in a sample of 180 individuals responding in reference to acute back pain. Overall, the RASP is a valid and reliable measure for assessing individual differences in attitudes and responses to social support in relation to acute pain. PMID:25285083

  2. I like it when my partner holds my hand: development of the Responses and Attitudes to Support during Pain questionnaire (RASP)

    PubMed Central

    Krahé, Charlotte; Paloyelis, Yannis; Sambo, Chiara F.; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini

    2014-01-01

    Social support can have beneficial effects on psychological and physiological well-being. During acute bodily pain, however, the effects of social support on pain are mixed. This variability may be due to the multifaceted nature of both pain and social support, as well as individual differences. In this paper, we present the development, psychometric assessment, and initial validation of the first self-report measure designed to address this variability in the general population; the Responses and Attitudes to Support during Pain questionnaire (RASP). The RASP includes questions on social support from the romantic partner as well as healthcare professionals (HCPs) and addresses different types of social support and pain responses. The development and validation of the RASP comprised four studies. In Study 1, a preliminary RASP version was completed by 179 healthy individuals regarding any type of acute pain. In Study 2, the reduced RASP was completed by 256 women with experiences of menstrual pain. Principal component analysis indicated a 22-item solution with five underlying dimensions reflecting General Partner Support, Emotional Support from HCPs, Anxiety in the Context of HCPs, Pain Behaviors during Partner Support, and Distraction by the Partner. Construct validity was assessed using a measure of adult attachment style. The RASP showed good validity and test-retest reliability. In Study 3, the 5-factor model received initial support through confirmatory factor analysis in a new sample of 120 individuals with recent musculoskeletal pain. Study 4 provided additional validation of the RASP in a sample of 180 individuals responding in reference to acute back pain. Overall, the RASP is a valid and reliable measure for assessing individual differences in attitudes and responses to social support in relation to acute pain. PMID:25285083

  3. Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors on Child Passenger Safety among Expectant Mothers and Parents of Newborns: A Qualitative and Quantitative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiangxiang; Yang, Jingzhen; Chen, Xiaojun; Li, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the knowledge, attitudes, and intended behaviors about use of child safety seats among parents of newborns and explore expectant mothers’ views and decisions regarding child safety seats use. Methods A cross-sectional survey and semi-structured interview were conducted in the maternity departments of two hospitals in China. Parents of newborns were recruited after delivery and surveyed on their knowledge, attitudes and behaviors regarding child safety seats use. Pregnant women were also interviewed to learn about their views and decisions regarding child safety seats use. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used to analyze the data collected. Results Of a total of 242 parents of newborns recruited in the quantitative survey, 202 (83.5%) parents had heard of child safety seats and 149 (61.6%) parents reported they would use child safety seats for their babies. Parents’ knowledge, car ownership, occupation, and income were significantly associated with their decision regarding use of child safety seats. Three themes were identified from the qualitative interview of 30 pregnant women: (1) the pregnant women perceived child passenger safety as important; (2) the car ownership and price and quality of child safety seats were major influencing factors of their decisions on use of child safety seats; and (3) lack of awareness and lack of laws requiring use were perceived to contribute to low use of child safety seats in China. Conclusion Lack of knowledge and awareness on child passenger safety were found to be two most important factors associated with low use of child safety seats. Effective interventions are urgently needed to improve parents’ knowledge before laws are enacted and implemented. PMID:26735974

  4. Oral health-related knowledge, attitude and practices among eunuchs (hijras) residing in Bhopal City, Madhya Pradesh, India: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Hongal, Sudhir; Torwane, Nilesh Arjun; Goel, Pankaj; Byarakele, Chandrashekar; Mishra, Priyesh; Jain, Shubham

    2014-01-01

    Background: The current cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted to assess the oral health-related knowledge, attitude and practices among eunuchs (hijras) residing in Bhopal city, Madhya Pradesh, India. Materials and Methods: Based on a convenient non-probability snow ball sampling technique, all the self-identified eunuchs residing in the city of Bhopal who were present at the time of study and who fulfilled the selection criteria were approached. A cross section of the general population was also surveyed. An interviewer-based, predesigned, structured, close-ended 18-item questionnaire that had been designed based on the primary objective of the study was used. All the obtained data were analyzed using software, Statistical Package for Social Science version 20. Results: According to 188 (86.2%) males, 187 (87.4%) females and 168 (81.2%) eunuchs, good oral health can improve the general health. Most of the study participants including 211 (98.6%) females, 210 (96.3%) males and 205 (99%) eunuchs use either tooth paste or tooth powder to clean their teeth. While, a majority of eunuchs, i.e., 113 (54.6%), were having habit of chewing smokeless tobacco containing products such as betel nut, betel quid, gutkha, etc., The difference in use of tobacco products was statistically significant. Conclusion: The information presented in this study adds to our understanding of the common oral hygiene practices which are performed among eunuch population. Efforts to increase the awareness of oral effects of tobacco use and to eliminate the habit are needed to improve oral and general health of this population. PMID:25425825

  5. Exploring the safety implications of young drivers' behavior, attitudes and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hany M; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed A

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims at identifying and quantifying significant factors (i.e., demographic, aberrant driving behavior) associated with young drivers' involvement in at-fault crashes or traffic citations at the ages of 16-17 (while having the Operational License) and 18-24 years old (while having the Full License). A second objective was to investigate the main reason(s) for involvement in risky driving behavior by young drivers. The data used for the analyses were obtained from a self-reported questionnaire survey carried out among 680 young drivers in Central Florida. To achieve these goals, the structural equation modeling approach was adopted. The results revealed that aggressive violations, in-vehicle distractions and demographic characteristics were the significant factors affecting young drivers' involvement in at-fault crashes or traffic violations at the age of 16-17. However, in-vehicle distractions, attitudes toward speeding and demographic characteristics were the significant factors affecting young drivers' crash risk at 18-24. Additionally, the majority of participants reported that "running late" is the main reason for taking risk while driving (i.e., speeding, accept short gaps, or drive so close to the car in front) followed by "racing other cars". Additionally, "exceed speed limits" was the main reason for receiving traffic citations at 16-17 and 18-24 age groups. Practical suggestions on how to reduce crash risk and promote safe driving among young drivers are also discussed. PMID:22658949

  6. Attitude, perception and feedback of second year medical students on teaching–learning methodology and evaluation methods in pharmacology: A questionnaire-based study

    PubMed Central

    Bhosale, Uma A.; Yegnanarayan, Radha; Yadav, Gauri E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: To assess the student's attitude, perception and feedback on teaching–learning methodology and evaluation methods in pharmacology. Materials and Methods: One hundred and forty second year medical students studying at Smt. Kashibai Navale Medical College, Pune, were selected. They were administered a pre-validated questionnaire containing 22 questions. Suggestions were also asked regarding the qualities of good pharmacology teachers and modification in pharmacology teaching methods. Descriptive statistics were used and results were expressed as percentage. Results: Majority of the students found cardiovascular system (49.25%) as the most interesting topic in pharmacology, whereas most of the students opined that cardiovascular system (60.10%), chemotherapy (54.06%) and central nervous system (44.15%) are going to be the most useful topics in internship. 48.53% students preferred clinical/patient-related pharmacology and 39.13% suggested use of audiovisual-aided lectures. Prescription writing and criticism of prescription were amongst the most useful and interesting in practical pharmacology. Students expressed interest in microteaching and problem-based learning, whereas seminars, demonstrations on manikin and museum studies were mentioned as good adjuvants to routine teaching. Multiple Choice Question (MCQ) practice tests and theory viva at the end of a particular system and periodical written tests were mentioned as effective evaluation methods. Students were found to have lot of interest in gathering information on recent advances in pharmacology and suggested to include new drug information along with prototype drugs in a comparative manner. Conclusion: There is a need of conducting few microteaching sessions and more of clinical-oriented problem-based learning with MCQ-based revisions at the end of each class in the pharmacology teaching at undergraduate level. PMID:23661897

  7. Attitudes and beliefs about the surgical safety checklist: Just another tick box?

    PubMed Central

    Dharampal, Navjit; Cameron, Christopher; Dixon, Elijah; Ghali, William; Quan, May Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Background Following a landmark study showing decreased morbidity and mortality after implementation of the surgical safety checklist (SSC), it has been widely adopted into perioperative policy. We explored the impact of attitudes and beliefs surrounding the SSC on its uptake in Calgary. Methods We used qualitative methodology to examine factors influencing SSC use. We performed semistructured interviews based on Rogers’ theory of diffusion of innovation. Purposive and snowball sampling were used to identify surgeons, anesthesiologists and operating room nurses from hospitals in Calgary. Data collection and analysis were based on grounded theory. Two individuals jointly analyzed data and achieved consensus on emerging themes. Results Generated themes included 1) the SSC has brought organization to previous informal perioperative checks, 2) the SSC is most helpful when it is simple, and 3) the 3 current components of the checklist are redundant. The briefing was considered the most important aspect and the debriefing the least important. Initially the SSC was difficult to implement owing to a shift in time management and perioperative culture; however, it has now assimilated into perioperative routine. Finally, though most participants agreed that the SSC might avoid some delays and complications, only a few believe there have been observable improvements to morbidity and mortality. Conclusion Although the SSC has been integrated into perioperative practice in Calgary, participants believe that previous informal checkpoints were able to circumvent most perioperative issues. Although the SSC may help with flow and equipment, participants believe it fails to show a subjective, clinically important improvement. PMID:27454839

  8. Changes in Skiing and Snowboarding Injury Epidemiology and Attitudes to Safety in Big Sky, Montana, USA

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Edward; Cooper, Jamie G.; Daniels, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite a risk of harm, the past 20 years have seen dramatically increased participation in snow sports such as skiing, and particularly, snowboarding. This period has also seen revolutions in piste maintenance and paradigm developments in the use of safety equipment. Consequently, the numbers and characteristics of injury may be very different from those traditionally quoted. Purpose To compare and evaluate the injury patterns among skiers and snowboarders in a North American ski resort in 1996 and 2013. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods Questionnaire-based cross-sectional studies were carried out independently in a North American ski resort between the dates of March 6 and April 11 in both 1996 and 2013. Demographic data and information about incident circumstances were collected from injured patients who visited the local on-site clinic. Data were compared statistically to assess for significant changes in injury characteristics between the 2 time periods. Results The 1996 report consisted of 148 injured participants, and the 2013 study included 156 participants. Results from 2013 demonstrated significant increases in helmet use, the number of snowboarders injured, and shoulder injuries. Injury was also more likely in those aged 46 to 55 years, those never having had professional instruction, or those with rented equipment. Significant reductions were seen in those injured with other people close by and in the 36- to 45-year age group. Overall, the knee was the most commonly injured body part in both periods (1996: 31%, n = 38; 2013: 33%, n = 36), although upper limb injuries were predominant in snowboarders. Conclusion Snow sports injury characteristics of patients presenting to a ski resort medical clinic have changed between 1996 and 2013. These findings can be used to further inform safety recommendations and areas to target with further research. PMID:26665097

  9. Measures of Implicit and Explicit Attitudes toward Mainstream and BDSM Sexual Terms Using the IRAP and Questionnaire with BDSM/Fetish and Student Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockwell, Fawna M. J.; Walker, Diana J.; Eshleman, John W.

    2010-01-01

    The Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) examines implicit attitudes through the measurement of response latencies. In this study, the IRAP was used to assess implicit attitudes toward "mainstream" sexual terms (e.g., Kissing) and "BDSM" terms (e.g., Bondage) among individuals reporting BDSM interests and among students who did not…

  10. Making the invisible visible: a qualitative study of the values, attitudes and norms of radiologists relating to radiation safety.

    PubMed

    Fridell, Kent; Ekberg, Jessica

    2016-06-01

    Some shortcomings regarding safety have emerged in inspections by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority of Swedish radiology departments which perform 5.4 million radiological examinations and 100 000 nuclear scans annually. To ensure safety in the healthcare system and to build a strong environment of radiation protection for patients (and for employees) there must be a strong culture of safety. To understand an organization's behaviour, decisions and actions it is important to study its cultural values. The aims of this study were to discuss how values, attitudes and norms affect radiologists' decisions as well as how they influence the implementation of various radiation protection measures. To investigate this, focus group interviews and in-depth individual interviews were performed in a sample from a number of radiology departments at hospitals in Sweden. The results show that the core value was derived from the patients' perspective with the focus on the knowledge that he or she has come to the healthcare system for a particular reason: to discover disease or, in the best case, to be declared healthy. The majority attitudes were based on experiences associated with aspects that the radiologist could not influence. This often concerns increased pressure on radiology investigations from clinics in the various operational units. Under the concept of norms, the radiologists in the study requested that the development of regulations and guidelines should be connected to issues of justification for various radiological queries. PMID:26947913

  11. Safety Is 99 Percent Attitude: Strategies to Contain Workers' Compensation Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parnell, Janet

    1993-01-01

    The University of Denver (Colorado) reduced workers' compensation losses 97 percent in 1990-91 by developing a master safety plan, sponsoring safety training, managing medical costs, providing modified duty for injured employees, screening applicants, orienting new employees, investigating claims thoroughly, performing life-safety audits, and…

  12. Reliability and validity of a scale to measure consumer attitudes regarding the private food safety certification of restaurants.

    PubMed

    Uggioni, Paula Lazzarin; Salay, Elisabete

    2012-04-01

    Validated and reliable instruments for measuring consumer attitudes regarding food quality certifications are lacking, but the measurement of consumer attitude could be an important tool for understanding consumer behavior. Thus the objective of this study was to develop an instrument for measuring consumer attitudes regarding private food safety certifications for commercial restaurants. To this end, the following steps were carried out: development of the interview items; complete pilot testing; item analyses (influence of social desirability and total-item correlation); reliability test (internal consistency and test-retest); and validity assessment (content and discriminative validity and exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis). The subjects, all over the age of 18 and drawn from six non-probabilistic samples (n=7-350) in the city of Campinas, Brazil, were all subjected to an interview. The final scale included 24 items and had a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.79 and a content validation coefficient of 0.99, both within acceptable limits. The confirmatory factor analysis validated a model with five factors and the final instrument discriminated reasonably well between the groups and showed satisfactory reproducibility (r=0.955). Furthermore, the scale validity and reliability were satisfactory, suggesting it could also be applied to future studies. PMID:22185787

  13. Use of a self-assessment questionnaire for food safety education in the home kitchen --- Los Angeles County, California, 2006-2008.

    PubMed

    2010-09-01

    Foodborne diseases remain an important cause of morbidity in the United States among all age groups. A potentially important contributor to this morbidity is improper food handling and preparation practices in kitchens at restaurants and in private homes. In 1998, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (LACDPH) established numeric scores for restaurant inspections and posted grades for these inspections publicly; by the end of 1998 this initiative was credited with helping to reduce by 13.1% (compared with 1997) the number of hospitalizations for foodborne infections from nontyphoidal Salmonella, Campylobacter, and Escherichia coli in the region. In the spring of 2006, the LACDPH Environmental Health Program launched the Home Kitchen Self-Inspection Program, a voluntary self-inspection and education program, to promote safer food hygiene practices at home. This report describes the implementation of this program and the results from its web-based self-assessment questionnaire, the Food Safety Quiz, for the initial program period of 2006--2008. Overall, approximately 13,000 adults completed the quiz; 34% received an A rating, 27% a B, 25% a C, and 14% received a numeric score because they scored lower than 70% on the self-assessment. Use of interactive, online learning tools such as the Food Safety Quiz can be used to promote home food safety in the community. Further research is needed to evaluate and improve the program content and to assess its effect on changing food handling and preparation practices in the home kitchen. PMID:20814405

  14. EFFECTS OF EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAMS IN MATHEMATICS ON RELEVANT ATTITUDES AND INTERESTS OF NINTH GRADE PUPILS AS MEASURED BY QUESTIONNAIRE INDICES. INTERIM REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RYAN, JAMES J.

    THIS INTERIM REPORT COVERS ONE PHASE OF A BROADER PROGRAM AIMED AT STUDYING THE EFFECTS OF THREE EXPERIMENTAL MATHEMATICS PROGRAMS IN NINTH-GRADE ALGEBRA--BALL STATE, THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL MATHEMATICS (UICSM), AND SCHOOL MATHEMATICS STUDY GROUP (SMSG)--ON THE ATTITUDES AND INTERESTS PUPILS DEVELOP TOWARD MATHEMATICS. THE…

  15. Preliminary Examination of Safety Issues on a University Campus: Personal Safety Practices, Beliefs & Attitudes of Female Faculty & Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Paula C.; Bryden, Pamela J.

    2007-01-01

    University and college campuses are not immune to acts of violence. Unfortunately there is limited information regarding violence in the academic setting among women employees. As such, the purpose of this exploratory research was to examine issues that female faculty and staff members have about safety on and around campus, including concerns…

  16. Developing and establishing the validity and reliability of the perceptions toward Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP) and Line Operations Safety Audit (LOSA) questionnaires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckel, Richard J.

    Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP) and Line Operations Safety Audits (LOSA) are voluntary safety reporting programs developed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to assist air carriers in discovering and fixing threats, errors and undesired aircraft states during normal flights that could result in a serious or fatal accident. These programs depend on voluntary participation of and reporting by air carrier pilots to be successful. The purpose of the study was to develop and validate a measurement scale to measure U.S. air carrier pilots' perceived benefits and/or barriers to participating in ASAP and LOSA programs. Data from these surveys could be used to make changes to or correct pilot misperceptions of these programs to improve participation and the flow of data. ASAP and LOSA a priori models were developed based on previous research in aviation and healthcare. Sixty thousand ASAP and LOSA paper surveys were sent to 60,000 current U.S. air carrier pilots selected at random from an FAA database of pilot certificates. Two thousand usable ASAP and 1,970 usable LOSA surveys were returned and analyzed using Confirmatory Factor Analysis. Analysis of the data using confirmatory actor analysis and model generation resulted in a five factor ASAP model (Ease of use, Value, Improve, Trust and Risk) and a five factor LOSA model (Value, Improve, Program Trust, Risk and Management Trust). ASAP and LOSA data were not normally distributed, so bootstrapping was used. While both final models exhibited acceptable fit with approximate fit indices, the exact fit hypothesis and the Bollen-Stine p value indicated possible model mis-specification for both ASAP and LOSA models.

  17. Assessing Student Attitudes toward Animal Welfare, Resource Use, and Food Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordstrom, Patricia A.; Richards, Martha J.; Wilson, Lowell L.; Coe, Brenda L.; Fivek, Marianne L.; Brown, Michele B.

    2000-01-01

    Students participating in the Pennsylvania Governor's School for Agricultural Sciences (n=192) studied animal welfare, resource use, and food safety. They ranked food safety as a primary concern. Students with and without agricultural backgrounds showed positive changes in knowledge and perception of issues after the course. (SK)

  18. Food Safety Attitude of Culinary Arts Based Students in Public and Private Higher Learning Institutions (IPT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patah, Mohd Onn Rashdi Abd; Issa, Zuraini Mat; Nor, Khamis Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Food safety issue is not new in Malaysia as problems such as unsafe food handling, doubtful food preparation, food poisoning outbreaks in schools and education institutions and spreading of infectious food borne illness has been discussed by the public more often than before. The purpose of this study is to examine the food safety knowledge and…

  19. Riding a bus while seated in a wheelchair: A pilot study of attitudes and behavior regarding safety practices.

    PubMed

    Buning, Mary Ellen; Getchell, C A; Bertocci, Gina E; Fitzgerald, Shirley G

    2007-01-01

    A total of 283 wheelchair-seated bus riders responded to a 35-item Web-based survey investigating their experiences on public, fixed-route buses. The survey addressed the use of wheelchair tiedowns and occupant restraint systems (WTORS), the attitudes and behaviors of wheelchair users toward the use of this equipment, and the transit experience. Results indicate that consistent use of four-point tiedown and occupant restraint systems is fairly low. Only 33.2% of the participants reported always securing their wheelchair, and 62.2% reported using occupant restraints consistently. A preference for fixed-route over para-transit was related to larger city size. Implementation of transit agency policy regarding WTORS was found to be inconsistent. Easier-to-use WTORS and improved operator training in larger transit agencies would likely increase the correct use of safety equipment and improve wheelchair users' bus-riding experiences. PMID:18335706

  20. The effect of data collection mode on smoking attitudes and behavior in young African American and Latina women. Face-to-face interview versus self-administered questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, C P; Hilton, J F; Park-Tanjasiri, S; Pérez-Stable, E J

    2001-08-01

    Evaluating smoking prevention and cessation programs requires valid data collection. This study examined two survey modes--face-to-face (FTF) interview and self-administered questionnaire (SAQ)--comparing response rates, sample characteristics, data quality, and response effects. From two family planning clinics, 601 female Latina and African American clients ages 12 to 21 were recruited and randomized to either group. Results reveal that neither mode is superior to the other. The SAQ may therefore be preferable for this population, despite its higher rate of incompletes, because it yields results similar to the FTF yet is more cost effective and less disruptive to clinic routines. PMID:11480308

  1. Attitudes of university precalculus students toward mathematics.

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, Haitham M; Mji, Andile

    2005-04-01

    To investigate the attitudes of 200 university students (83% freshmen) toward mathematics, a questionnaire was administered to report on their attitudes toward mathematics. Analysis indicated that students studying precalculus had a somewhat positive attitude toward mathematics. PMID:15941096

  2. Food safety-related refrigeration and freezer practices and attitudes of consumers in Peoria and surrounding counties.

    PubMed

    Towns, Ruth E; Cullen, Robert W; Memken, Jean A; Nnakwe, Nweze E

    2006-07-01

    Government agencies have recently emphasized the importance of food safety. Reducing the risk of foodborne illnesses within the home requires American consumers to put government refrigeration and freezer recommendations into practice; however, little research has been conducted regarding the use of proper refrigeration and freezer storage practices by consumers. A random sample survey was conducted to examine attitudes and practices of proper refrigeration and storage techniques of consumers in Peoria County, Illinois, and to determine whether gender, age, education, and income level have an effect on these variables. Eighty-one of 500 random sample surveys mailed were returned between 10 January and 15 February 2005. The majority of the participants were female (56, 69.1%), were 50 to 59 years old (18, 22.2%), had a bachelor's degree (33, 40.7%), and had a reported total household income of 60,000 dollars or greater (39, 91.4%). Average attitudinal scores indicated that participants thought it was important to take proper steps to prevent foodborne illnesses in the home; however, 68.8% of participants scored poorly on the practice portion of the survey. Only 12.3% of participants stated that they had a thermometer in their freezer, and 24.7% had one in their refrigerator. Eighty-four percent of respondents did not store eggs correctly in the refrigerator. No significant relationships (P < 0.05) were found within this sample population. These results suggest that further evaluation of consumer practices and attitudes is needed to better understand consumers so that they can be effectively educated about the prevention of foodborne illnesses at home. PMID:16865898

  3. Patient safety attitude among health care providers in family health care centers in Cairo governorate.

    PubMed

    Gadallah, Mohsen Abdalhamed; Abouseif, Hasnaa Abdalaal; Boulos, Dina Nabih Kamel; Elharoni, Hanaa Hassan Abdallah

    2014-08-01

    Two hundred and eighty Health care; physicians, nurses and technicians were included in the study, 133 (47.5) from 6th discrete HCF, 54 (19.3%) from Duwaiqa and 93 (33.2%) from Al Haggana. Ages ranged between 22 and 59 years (35.14 ± 10.13), years of experience in the study group ranged between 1 and 35 years (8.72 ± 8.18) and years of work in group ranged between 1 & 40 years (10.43 ± 8.33). Doctors and nurses were males (72.55%) & females (86%) respectively while technicians were mostly males (60%). The teamwork climate score was 3.98 ± 0.87, 64.0% answered high or very high, 16.4% answered inadequate and 18% had answered few or very few. Safety climate score was 3.61 ± 0.63, 49.28% had high or very high score, 17.14% answered inadequate and 32.15% had answered few or very few. Job satisfaction score was 3.91 ± 0.80, 32.15% had answered few or very few, 17.14% answered inadequate and 49.28% answered high or very high. Stress recognition score was 3.61 ± 0.79, 25% had answered few or very few, 28.6% answered inadequate and 45.7% answered high or very high. Perception of management score was 3.48 ± 0.80, 23.2% had answered few or very few, 17.8% answered inadequate and 57.6% answered high or very high. Working condition score was 3.51 ± 0.84, 46.8% had answered few or very few, 17.1% answered inadequate and 35.7% answered high or very high. A significant difference regarding team work score, safety climate score, perception of management score, working condition score with highest value in doctors and lowest in technicians. On the other hand no significant difference was detected regarding job satisfaction score and stress recognition score. A significant difference regarding team work score, safety climate score and perception of management score with high values among older groups. No significant difference was detected regarding job satisfaction score, stress recognition score and working condition score. Also, a significant difference regarding team

  4. Personal Safety Practices, Beliefs and Attitudes of Academic Faculty on a Small University Campus: Comparison of Males and Females (Part 1)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryden, Pamela J.; Fletcher, Paula C.

    2007-01-01

    The current study reports on a study examining the safety concerns of male and female faculty members on a small university campus. A 160-item questionnaire was distributed to 100 faculty members (58 males and 42 females; response rate was approximately 30%), which asked individuals questions pertaining to socio-demographic information, daily…

  5. Personal Safety Practices, Beliefs and Attitudes of Academic Staff on a Small University Campus: Comparison of Males and Females (Part 2)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryden, Pamela J.; Fletcher, Paula C.

    2007-01-01

    The current study reports on a study examining the safety concerns of male and female staff members on a small university campus. A 160-item questionnaire was distributed to 231 staff employees (49 males and 182 females), which asked individuals questions pertaining to socio-demographic information, daily routines and campus activities, awareness…

  6. The Socio-Demographic Characteristics of the Clients of Female Sex Workers and their Perspectives, Behaviours and Attitude on HIV and AIDS: A Questionnaire Based Survey from Pokhara, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Manu S; Nepali, Bobin; Sathian, Brijesh; Aryal, Ram Prasad; Thapalia, Madav; Bhatta, Dharm R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The clients of Female Sex Workers (FSWs) have been represented from different socio-demographic backgrounds and their risk behaviour depends upon their learning skills and attitudes and its impacts on practice. Objective: The general objective of this study was to find the socio-demographic characteristics, background, knowledge, behaviour, and the attitude on STIs, HIV and AIDS of the clients of female sex workers. Material and Methods: This questionnaire based, cross sectional study was conducted on 109 clients of FSWs during the time period from January 2010 to July 2010 in Pokhara (submetropolitan city of the Kaski district), Nepal. The locations were the Baglung Bus Park, Lakeside and Mahendrapool. Result: Among the 109 respondents, the mininum and the maximum age were 18 and 50 years. According to the religion-wise distribution, 77.1% of the respondents were Hindus, 10.1% were Buddhists, 8.3% were Christians, 1% were Muslims and 3.7% were from other religions. 67.9% of the respondents were tested for HIV at least once, whereas nearly one third (32.1%) of the respondents were never tested for HIV. 49.5% of the respondents answered that there was no difference between HIV and AIDS. Among the respondents, 89.9% respondents knew how to be safe from STIs and the HIV infections and 99.1% knew about HIV and AIDS. Conclusion: HIV and AIDS is a cross cutting issue in the present situation rather than a health issue. One of the most at risk groups is the clients of female workers who frequently have risk behaviours like having sex with female sex workers. The sexual behaviour among these clients depends upon their attitude, knowledge and perception, which also influence several internal and external factors. In our study, the clients of the female sex workers had some extent of knowledge about the condom, sexually transmitted infections and HIV/AIDS. They were made aware on these by different organizations who were working in the field of HIV and AIDS, but

  7. Attitudes towards the surgical safety checklist and factors associated with its use: A global survey of frontline medical professionals☆

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Ravinder S.; Cowley, Jonathan B.; Bhasin, Neeraj; Barakat, Hashem M.; Gough, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) has been shown to reduce perioperative errors and complications and its implementation is recommended by the World Health Organisation (WHO). However, it is unknown how widely this intervention is used. We investigated attitudes and factors associated with use of WHO SSC in frontline medical professionals across the globe using a survey distributed through social networks. Methods A survey of usage and opinions regarding the SSC was posted on the Facebook and Twitter pages of a not-for-profit surgical news website for one month (March 2013). Respondents were grouped into four groups based on their country's Gross National Income: high, upper middle, lower middle and low income. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to investigate how different factors were associated with the use of the SSC. Results 6269 medical professionals from 69 countries responded to the survey: most respondents were from lower middle (47.4%) countries, followed by: high (35.0%), upper middle (14.6%), and low (3.0%) income countries. In total, 57.5% reported that they used the WHO SSC perioperatively. Fewer respondents used the WHO SSC in upper middle, lower middle and low income countries (LMICs) compared to high income countries (43.5% vs. 83.5%, p < 0.001). Female (61.3% vs. 56.4% males, p = 0.001), consultant surgeons (59.6% vs. 53.2% interns, p < 0.001) and working in university hospitals (61.4% vs. 53.7% non-university hospitals, p < 0.001) were more likely to use the SSC. Believing the SSC was useful, did not work or caused delays was independently associated with the respondents reported use of the SSC (OR 1.22 95% CI 1.07–1.39; OR 0.47 95% CI 0.36–0.60; OR 0.64 95% CI 0.53–0.77, respectively). Conclusion This study suggests the use of the WHO SSC is variable across countries, especially in LMICs where it has the most potential to improve patient safety. Critical appraisal of the documented benefits of the WHO

  8. Cockpit management attitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Distinctions are drawn between personality traits and attitudes. The stability of the personality and the malleability of attitudes are stressed. These concepts are related to pilot performance, especially in the areas of crew coordination and cockpit resource management. Airline pilots were administered a Cockpit Management Attitudes questionnaire; empirical data from that survey are reported and implications of the data for training in crew coordination are discussed.

  9. A Changing Healthcare System Model: The Effectiveness of Knowledge, Attitude, and Skill of Nursing Assistants Who Attend Senile Dementia Patients in Nursing Homes in Xi'an, China - A Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yan; Fan, Rong; Wang, Yue-Min; Kaye, Aaron Joshua; Kaye, Alan David; Bueno, Franklin Rivera; Pei, Jian-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010, China had an elderly population of 1.78 billion people. As in other societies around the world, China is facing a growing challenge in providing care for its elderly citizens. Ensuring the highest quality of care for elderly patients, many of whom have senile dementia, is directly related to the performance of nursing assistants. Methods With the goal of investigating the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of nursing assistants who care for senile dementia patients in nursing homes in Xi'an, China, we distributed a survey and analyzed the responses. Results Nursing assistants showed dedication and sincerity in their care for senile dementia patients. However, their performances in the categories of life nursing and mental nursing reveal room for improvement. Further, the nursing assistants did not display adequate knowledge about senile dementia. Based on survey results, the knowledge of the nursing assistants concerning nursing safety was comparatively adequate. Conclusion Nursing assistants who care for senile dementia patients in nursing homes in Xi'an, China, require further training that expands their knowledge and increases their capabilities. We recommend that nursing homes in Xi'an offer a standardized professional nurse/nurse assistant training course that focuses on care for elderly patients with senile dementia. PMID:25249797

  10. Promoting Individual Learning for Trainees with Perceived High Helplessness: Experiences of a Safety Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Fariba; Khodabakhsh, Mohamad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The article arises from a research project investigating the effectiveness of safety training on changing attitudes toward safety issues. Followed by the training intervention was observed that employees’ helplessness decreased. The researchers have come to the idea of investigating how safety training can reduce perceived helplessness. Thus, this research examined the effectiveness of safety training on reducing employees’ helplessness with attention to the mediating role of attitude toward safety issues. Methods: The current study was an experimental study with the control group. A total of 204 (101 experimental group and 103 control group) completed safety attitude questionnaire and perceived helplessness before a safety training course including four 90-min sessions over 4 consecutive days in Esfahan Steel Company in 2012 between October and December. Only members of the experimental group participated in this course. These questionnaires, approximately 30 days later, again were run on members of both groups. Data were analyzed using descriptive indexes, t-, and F-test. Results: Results by comparing the two groups showed that safety training was effective only on individuals with perceived low helplessness (p = 0.02). Conclusion: In individuals with perceived high helplessness, safety training only with changing safety attitudes can reduce the perceived helplessness. PMID:25798170

  11. Attitudes and attitude change.

    PubMed

    Bohner, Gerd; Dickel, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Attitudes and attitude change remain core topics of contemporary social psychology. This selective review emphasizes work published from 2005 to 2009. It addresses constructionist and stable-entity conceptualizations of attitude, the distinction between implicit and explicit measures of attitude, and implications of the foregoing for attitude change. Associative and propositional processes in attitude change are considered at a general level and in relation to evaluative conditioning. The role of bodily states and physical perceptions in attitude change is reviewed. This is followed by an integrative perspective on processing models of persuasion and the consideration of meta-cognitions in persuasion. Finally, effects of attitudes on information processing, social memory, and behavior are highlighted. Core themes cutting across the areas reviewed are attempts at integrative theorizing bringing together formerly disparate phenomena and viewpoints. PMID:20809791

  12. Safety Challenges and Oversight in the Motorcoach Industry: Attitudes and Perceptions of Drivers, Roadside Inspectors, and Federal Investigators

    PubMed Central

    Braver, Elisa R.; Dodd, Robert S.; Cheung, Ivan; Long, Lindsay O.

    2012-01-01

    Interstate motorcoach travel has been the fastest-growing transportation mode in recent years. To identify challenges to monitoring compliance with motorcoach safety regulations and to examine factors affecting safety, four focus groups with a total of 32 participants were conducted during 2011, one with federal safety investigators, one with state motor carrier inspectors, and two with motorcoach drivers. Investigators and inspectors expressed concern about falsified logbooks, inadequate sleep among motorcoach drivers, hazards from speeding motorcoaches, practices by motorcoach carriers to mask ownership and avoid oversight, and difficulties keeping up with rapid motorcoach industry growth. Drivers described problems with getting sufficient sleep, pressure to drive longer than permitted, and fears of motor carriers giving them less work if they turned down driving jobs. Drivers said that driving 72–74 mph was acceptable in light traffic. To help assess workload among personnel performing safety oversight, data on numbers of motor carriers, commercial motor vehicles, federal investigators, and state inspectors were obtained from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). The data suggested a heavy workload (2.13 inspectors per 1,000 commercial motor vehicles). The focus groups of inspectors, investigators, and drivers indicated the existence of serious motorcoach safety problems, provided insight about the multiple factors contributing to them, and described major obstacles to effective safety oversight. The qualitative nature of focus group research means that these notable findings will need to be measured using other methods such as surveys and observational studies. PMID:23169117

  13. Attitudes towards euthanasia.

    PubMed Central

    Winget, C; Kapp, F T; Yeaworth, R C

    1977-01-01

    There are an infinite variety of attitudes to euthanasia, each individual response to the concept being influenced by many factors. Consequently there is a literature on the subject ranging from the popular article to papers in specialized journals. This study, however, has taken a well defined sample of people, inviting them to answer a questionnaire which was designed to elicit their attitudes to euthanasia in a way which could be analysed statistically. Nor surprisingly attitudes appeared to 'harden' as those answering the questionnaire grew more experienced in dealing with patients and also more professionally established. Thus it was found that of the seven groups questioned practising physicians showed more positive attitudes to euthanasia and their responses did not differ significantly from those of senior medical students. It is these groups which actually or potentially have to resolve the clinical dilemma posed by the dying patient. PMID:859163

  14. Testing Parameter Invariance for Questionnaire Indices Using Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Wolfram

    2006-01-01

    International studies like PISA use context student or school questionnaires to collect data on student family background, attitudes and learning context. Questionnaire constructs are typically measured using dichotomous or Likert-type items. Scaling of questionnaire items in order to obtain measures of family background, student attitudes or…

  15. TEAM ATTITUDE EVALUATION: AN EVALUATION IN HOSPITAL COMMITTEES

    PubMed Central

    Hekmat, Somayeh Noori; Dehnavieh, Reza; Rahimisadegh, Rohaneh; Kohpeima, Vahid; Jahromi, Jahromi Kohpeima

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Patients’ health and safety is not only a function of complex treatments and advanced therapeutic technologies but also a function of a degree based on which health care professionals fulfill their duties effectively as a team. The aim of this study was to determine the attitude of hospital committee members about teamwork in Kerman hospitals. Methodology: This study was conducted in 2014 on 171 members of clinical teams and committees of four educational hospitals in Kerman University of Medical Sciences. To collect data, the standard “team attitude evaluation” questionnaire was used. This questionnaire consisted of five domains which evaluated the team attitude in areas related to the team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, mutual support, and communication in the form of a 5-point Likert type scale. To analyze data, descriptive statistical tests, T-test, ANOVA, and linear regression were used. Results: The average score of team attitude for hospital committee members was 3.9 out of 5. The findings showed that leadership had the highest score among the subscales of team work attitude, while mutual support had the lowest score. We could also observe that responsibility was an important factor in participants’ team work attitude (β = -0.184, p = 0.024). Comparing data in different subgroups revealed that employment, marital status, and responsibility were the variables affecting the participants’ attitudes in the team structure domain. Marital status played a role in leadership; responsibility had a role in situation monitoring; and work experience played a role in domains of communication and mutual support. Conclusions: Hospital committee members had a positive attitude towards teamwork. Training hospital staff and paying particular attention to key elements of effectiveness in a health care team can have a pivotal role in promoting the team culture. PMID:26889105

  16. Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses safety issues in science, including: allergic reactions to peanuts used in experiments; explosions in lead/acid batteries; and inspection of pressure vessels, such as pressure cookers or model steam engines. (MKR)

  17. College Student Attitudes Toward Marijuana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amo, Michael F.; Bittner, John R.

    1970-01-01

    Questionnaire attempts to determine attitudes in effort to learn how students perceive danger, or lack of it, in the use of marihuana. Tabulated responses are presented, and while no conclusions are drawn several interpretations are suggested. (Author/CJ)

  18. Utah Drop-Out Drug Use Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in high school drop-outs. The 79 items (multiple choice or apply/not apply) are concerned with demographic data and use, use history, reasons for use/nonuse, attitudes toward drugs, availability of drugs, and drug information with respect to narcotics, amphetamines, LSD, Marijuana, and barbiturates.…

  19. Development and Validation of a Concerns Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Archie

    The Stages of Concern (SoC) Questionnaire was developed in order to measure the attitudes of individuals toward innovation. The Concerns Based Adoption Model provided the theoretical basis for the instrument. According to this model, individuals are first concerned with themselves, later with the details of the task, and finally with the impact of…

  20. The Survey Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A. Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Internet-based surveys are still relatively new, and researchers are just beginning to articulate best practices for questionnaire design. Online questionnaire design has generally been guided by the principles applying to other self-administered instruments, such as paper-based questionnaires. Web-based questionnaires, however, have the potential…

  1. Serbian Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyva, Efrosini; Gojkovic, Dina; Tsakiris, Vlastaris

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the attitudes of 72 Serbian teachers towards the inclusion of children with Special Educational Needs (SEN) in mainstream schools; they were asked to complete "My Thinking About Inclusion Questionnaire" (Stoiber, Goettinger, & Goetz, 1998). It was found that Serbian teachers held overall slightly negative attitudes towards…

  2. Creativity, Religiosity, and Political Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zysberg, Leehu; Schenk, Tal

    2013-01-01

    Although theoretically proposed in the literature, the direct associations between political attitudes, religion, and creativity have been scarcely explored. A convenience sample of 123 adults working in Israel filled out questionnaires assessing political-social attitudes, religiosity, and background factors (e.g., age, gender, education, and…

  3. Environmental Attitude and Ecological Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Florian G.; And Others

    This paper establishes environmental attitude, a construct in environmental psychology, as a powerful predictor of ecological behavior. Based on Ajzen's theory of planned behavior, this study uses a unified concept of attitude and a probabilistic measurement approach. Questionnaire data from members of two ideologically different Swiss…

  4. Employers' perceptions and attitudes toward the Canadian national standard on psychological health and safety in the workplace: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Kunyk, Diane; Craig-Broadwith, Morgan; Morris, Heather; Diaz, Ruth; Reisdorfer, Emilene; Wang, JianLi

    2016-01-01

    The estimated societal and economic costs of mental illness and psychological injury in the workplace is staggering. Governments, employers and other stakeholders have been searching for policy solutions. This qualitative, exploratory study sought to uncover organizational receptivity to a voluntary comprehensive standard for dealing with psychological health and safety in the workplace. A series of five focus groups were conducted in a large Western Canadian city in November 2013. The seventeen participants were from the fields of healthcare, construction/utilities, manufacturing industries, business services, and finance. They worked in positions of management, consulting, human resources, health promotion, health and safety, mediation, and occupational health and represented organizations ranging in size from 20 to 100,000 employees. The findings confirm and illustrate the critical role that psychological health and safety plays across workplaces and occupations. This standard resonated across the represented organizations and fit with their values. This alignment posed challenges with articulating its added value. There appears to be a need for simplified engagement and implementation strategies of the standard that can be tailored to the nuanced differences between types and sizes of industries. It appears that organizations in the most need of improving psychological health and safety may be the least receptive. PMID:26303900

  5. Keeping our children safe in motor vehicles: knowledge, attitudes and practice among parents in Kuwait regarding child car safety.

    PubMed

    Raman, Sudha R; Landry, Michel D; Ottensmeyer, C Andrea; Jacob, Susan; Hamdan, Elham; Bouhaimed, Manal

    2013-01-01

    Child safety restraints can reduce risk of death and decrease injury severity from road traffic crashes; however, knowledge about restraints and their use in Kuwait is limited. A cross-sectional, self-administered survey about child car safety was used among a convenience sample of parents of children aged 18 years or younger at five Kuwaiti university campuses. Of 552 respondents, over 44% have seated a child in the front seat and 41.5% have seated a child in their lap while driving. Few parents are aware of and fewer report using the appropriate child restraint; e.g., 36% of parents of infants recognised an infant seat and 26% reported using one. Over 70% reported wearing seat belts either "all of the time" (33%) or "most of the time" (41%). This new information about parents' knowledge and practice regarding child car seat use in Kuwait can inform interventions to prevent child occupant injury and death. PMID:23230995

  6. Factors Influencing Attitude, Safety Behavior, and Knowledge regarding Household Waste Management in Guinea: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Mamady, Keita

    2016-01-01

    Waste indiscriminate disposal is recognized as an important cause of environmental pollution and is associated with health problems. Safe management and disposal of household waste are an important problem to the capital city of Guinea (Conakry). The objective of this study was to identify socioeconomic and demographic factors associated with practice, knowledge, and safety behavior of family members regarding household waste management and to produce a remedial action plan. I found that no education background, income, and female individuals were independently associated with indiscriminate waste disposal. Unplanned residential area was an additional factor associated with indiscriminate waste disposal. I also found that the community residents had poor knowledge and unsafe behavior in relation to waste management. The promotion of environmental information and public education and implementation of community action programs on disease prevention and health promotion will enhance environmental friendliness and safety of the community. PMID:27092183

  7. Factors Influencing Attitude, Safety Behavior, and Knowledge regarding Household Waste Management in Guinea: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mamady, Keita

    2016-01-01

    Waste indiscriminate disposal is recognized as an important cause of environmental pollution and is associated with health problems. Safe management and disposal of household waste are an important problem to the capital city of Guinea (Conakry). The objective of this study was to identify socioeconomic and demographic factors associated with practice, knowledge, and safety behavior of family members regarding household waste management and to produce a remedial action plan. I found that no education background, income, and female individuals were independently associated with indiscriminate waste disposal. Unplanned residential area was an additional factor associated with indiscriminate waste disposal. I also found that the community residents had poor knowledge and unsafe behavior in relation to waste management. The promotion of environmental information and public education and implementation of community action programs on disease prevention and health promotion will enhance environmental friendliness and safety of the community. PMID:27092183

  8. Attitude Surveys Document Sampler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Albert, Comp.

    This packet presents results of a series of attitude surveys representing a variety of purposes, methods and defined publics. They range from a simple questionnaire prepared and mailed to a small group of key individuals by a public relations staff to scientifically derived surveys purchased from Louis Harris and Associates and other research…

  9. Senior Attitudes on Current Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryba, Gary

    In the spring of 1969, questionnaires were sent to a random sample of all 1969 seniors at the State University of New York at Buffalo to gather information of student attitudes concerning civil rights, Vietnam, poverty, selective service, and East-West differences. Of the 106 men and 90 women that responded to the questionnaire, a majority of…

  10. Is road safety management linked to road safety performance?

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Eleonora; Yannis, George

    2013-10-01

    This research aims to explore the relationship between road safety management and road safety performance at country level. For that purpose, an appropriate theoretical framework is selected, namely the 'SUNflower' pyramid, which describes road safety management systems in terms of a five-level hierarchy: (i) structure and culture, (ii) programmes and measures, (iii) 'intermediate' outcomes'--safety performance indicators (SPIs), (iv) final outcomes--fatalities and injuries, and (v) social costs. For each layer of the pyramid, a composite indicator is implemented, on the basis of data for 30 European countries. Especially as regards road safety management indicators, these are estimated on the basis of Categorical Principal Component Analysis upon the responses of a dedicated road safety management questionnaire, jointly created and dispatched by the ETSC/PIN group and the 'DaCoTA' research project. Then, quasi-Poisson models and Beta regression models are developed for linking road safety management indicators and other indicators (i.e. background characteristics, SPIs) with road safety performance. In this context, different indicators of road safety performance are explored: mortality and fatality rates, percentage reduction in fatalities over a given period, a composite indicator of road safety final outcomes, and a composite indicator of 'intermediate' outcomes (SPIs). The results of the analyses suggest that road safety management can be described on the basis of three composite indicators: "vision and strategy", "budget, evaluation and reporting", and "measurement of road user attitudes and behaviours". Moreover, no direct statistical relationship could be established between road safety management indicators and final outcomes. However, a statistical relationship was found between road safety management and 'intermediate' outcomes, which were in turn found to affect 'final' outcomes, confirming the SUNflower approach on the consecutive effect of each layer

  11. Patients’ attitudes and perceptions of two health-related quality-of-life questionnaires used to collect patient-reported outcome measures in the English National Health Service: A qualitative study of patients undergoing cardiac interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hinder, Susan; Steele, Sharon; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Jackson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To explore patients’ views on the EuroQol-5D and Coronary Revascularisation Outcome Questionnaire, tools currently used for collecting patient-reported outcome measures in the English National Health Service. The key questions were as follows: (1) whether patients consider them sensitive enough to detect change in their health after cardiovascular disease interventions and (2) whether they consider the health-related quality-of-life questions as meaningful. Methods: Data were collected on patients’ views using focus groups. We held four focus groups selecting participants on the basis of their baseline and follow-up EuroQol-5D scores. Data were analysed using framework analysis and grounded theory. Results: Focus group participants confirmed that they had derived substantial health benefits from their cardiac interventions despite the lack of measurable effects on the EuroQol-5D scores. Participants felt that the EuroQol-5D questionnaire was limited because of the following reasons: Their health fluctuates from day to day. They had difficulty assessing their general health status on the visual analogue scale. They felt that the Coronary Revascularisation Outcome Questionnaire was limited because of the following reasons: They did not understand the clinical terms used. The impact of tiredness on their quality of life was not captured. They were unable to distinguish between the effects of their heart condition and other health issues. Additionally, neither questionnaire considers the adjustments people have made to their domestic arrangements to improve their health-related quality of life. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that the two questionnaires do not capture some aspects of health that patients consider important. Furthermore, the presence of co-morbidities masks the symptoms relating to the heart disease and the effect of their cardiac interventions. Future work on patient-reported outcome measures should consider developing new

  12. An evaluation of an airline cabin safety education program for elementary school children.

    PubMed

    Liao, Meng-Yuan

    2014-04-01

    The knowledge, attitude, and behavior intentions of elementary school students about airline cabin safety before and after they took a specially designed safety education course were examined. A safety education program was designed for school-age children based on the cabin safety briefings airlines given to their passengers, as well as on lessons learned from emergency evacuations. The course is presented in three modes: a lecture, a demonstration, and then a film. A two-step survey was used for this empirical study: an illustrated multiple-choice questionnaire before the program, and, upon completion, the same questionnaire to assess its effectiveness. Before the program, there were significant differences in knowledge and attitude based on school locations and the frequency that students had traveled by air. After the course, students showed significant improvement in safety knowledge, attitude, and their behavior intention toward safety. Demographic factors, such as gender and grade, also affected the effectiveness of safety education. The study also showed that having the instructor directly interact with students by lecturing is far more effective than presenting the information using only video media. A long-term evaluation, the effectiveness of the program, using TV or video accessible on the Internet to deliver a cabin safety program, and a control group to eliminate potential extraneous factors are suggested for future studies. PMID:24286820

  13. The structure of cockpit management attitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregorich, S. E.; Helmreich, R. L.; Wilhelm, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A revised version of the Cockpit Management Attitudes Questionnaire (CMAQ) is introduced. Factor analyses of responses from 3 different samples reveal comparable factor structure (previous attempts to factor analyze this measure had produced equivocal results). Implications for the measurement of attitudes and the assessment of attitude change are discussed. It is argued that the CMAQ will benefit both special training programs and efforts to explore attitude-performance linkages in air-transport operations.

  14. Assessment of Safety Culture in Isfahan Hospitals (2010)

    PubMed Central

    Raeisi, Ahmed Reza; Nazari, Maryam; Bahmanziari, Najme

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Many internal and external risk factors in health care organizations make safety important and it has caused the management to consider safety in their mission statement. One of the most important tools is to establish the appropriate organizational structure and safety culture. The goal: The goal of this research is to inform managers and staff about current safety culture status in hospitals in order to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of health services. Methods: This is a descriptive-survey research. The research population was selected hospitals of Isfahan, Iran. Research tool was a questionnaire (Cronbach alpha 0.75). The questionnaire including 93 questions (Likert scale) classified in 12 categories: Demographic questions, Individual attitude, management attitude, Safety Training, Induced stress, pressure and emotional conditions during work, Consultation and participation, Communications, Monitoring and control, work environment, Reporting, safety Rules, procedures and work instructions that distributed among 45 technicians, 208 Nurses and 62 Physicians. All data collected from the serve was analysis with statistical package of social science (SPSS). In this survey Friedman test, Spearman correlation, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and factor analysis have been used for data analyzing. Results: The score of safety culture dimensions was 2.90 for Individual attitude, 3.12 for management attitude, 3.32 for Safety Training, 3.14 for Induced stress, pressure and emotional conditions during work, 3.31 for Consultation and participation, 2.93 for Communications, 3.28 for Monitoring and control, 3.19 for work environment, 3.36 for Reporting, 3.59 safety Rules, procedures and work instructions that Communication and individual attitude were in bad condition. Safety culture among different hospitals: governmental and educational, governmental and non-educational and non-governmental and different functional groups (physicians, nurses, diagnostic

  15. Evaluating the effectiveness of a peer-led education intervention to improve the patient safety attitudes of junior pharmacy students: a cross-sectional study using a latent growth curve modelling approach

    PubMed Central

    Walpola, Ramesh L; Fois, Romano A; McLachlan, Andrew J; Chen, Timothy F

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite the recognition that educating healthcare students in patient safety is essential, changing already full curricula can be challenging. Furthermore, institutions may lack the capacity and capability to deliver patient safety education, particularly from the start of professional practice studies. Using senior students as peer educators to deliver practice-based education can potentially overcome some of the contextual barriers in training junior students. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a peer-led patient safety education programme for junior pharmacy students. Design A repeat cross-sectional design utilising a previously validated patient safety attitudinal survey was used to evaluate attitudes prior to, immediately after and 1 month after the delivery of a patient safety education programme. Latent growth curve (LGC) modelling was used to evaluate the change in attitudes of first-year students using second-year students as a comparator group. Setting Undergraduate university students in Sydney, Australia. Participants 175 first-year and 140 second-year students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy programme at the University of Sydney. Intervention An introductory patient safety programme was implemented into the first-year Bachelor of Pharmacy curriculum at the University of Sydney. The programme covered introductory patient safety topics including teamwork, communication skills, systems thinking and open disclosure. The programme consisted of 2 lectures, delivered by a senior academic, and a workshop delivered by trained final-year pharmacy students. Results A full LGC model was constructed including the intervention as a non-time-dependent predictor of change (χ2 (51)=164.070, root mean square error of approximation=0.084, comparative fit index=0.913, standardised root mean square=0.056). First-year students’ attitudes significantly improved as a result of the intervention, particularly in relation to

  16. Henry County School Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goolsby, Thomas M., Jr.; Frary, Robert B.

    This 14-item questionnaire was designed to measure parent opinion regarding the effect of integration on third grade pupils in Henry County Schools. The questionnaire is not standardized, and field testing has been on a small scale. (See also TM 000 940 for a description of the study, and 942, 943 for the desegregation and school integration…

  17. Questionnaire for Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN. Educational Research Center.

    The 116-item parent questionnaire is designed for parents of elementary school children. It is intended to be used with the child's mother, or the person acting as the child's mother. The questionnaire consists of a section devoted to demographic variables and scales measuring 14 parent variables: (1) parent's achievement aspirations for the…

  18. Write Your Own Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, David I.

    1975-01-01

    Contends that student evaluative questionnaires should be designed by instructors themselves to help improve their classroom performance and therefore should contain only questions that students are capable of answering objectively and not, for instance, questions about the relevancy of the course. Contains a sample questionnaire. (GH)

  19. Utah Drug Use Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in junior and senior high school students. The 21 multiple choice items pertain to drug use practices, use history, available of drugs, main reason for drug use, and demographic data. The questionnaire is untimed, group administered, and may be given by the classroom teacher in about 10 minutes. Item…

  20. Police Attitudes toward Domestic Violence Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, T. K.; Shannon, Lisa; Walker, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Police attitudes are important in facilitating a sense of safety and comfort in women seeking justice-system support for protection from partner violence. This study examined police attitudes toward sanctions and treatment for domestic violence offenders compared with other violent and nonviolent offenders. In addition, police attitudes toward…

  1. Patient safety: helping medical students understand error in healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Patey, Rona; Flin, Rhona; Cuthbertson, Brian H; MacDonald, Louise; Mearns, Kathryn; Cleland, Jennifer; Williams, David

    2007-01-01

    Objective To change the culture of healthcare organisations and improve patient safety, new professionals need to be taught about adverse events and how to trap and mitigate against errors. A literature review did not reveal any patient safety courses in the core undergraduate medical curriculum. Therefore a new module was designed and piloted. Design A 5‐h evidence‐based module on understanding error in healthcare was designed with a preliminary evaluation using self‐report questionnaires. Setting A UK medical school. Participants 110 final year students. Measurements and main results Participants completed two questionnaires: the first questionnaire was designed to measure students' self‐ratings of knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in relation to patient safety and medical error, and was administered before and approximately 1 year after the module; the second formative questionnaire on the teaching process and how it could be improved was administered after completion of the module. Conclusions Before attending the module, the students reported they had little understanding of patient safety matters. One year later, only knowledge and the perceived personal control over safety had improved. The students rated the teaching process highly and found the module valuable. Longitudinal follow‐up is required to provide more information on the lasting impact of the module. PMID:17693671

  2. Drinking Attitudes and Behavior of Incoming Freshmen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Deborah H.; Sedlacek, William E.

    An anonymous questionnaire on demographic characteristics, alcohol usage and drinking attitudes, and college-related attitudes was administered to 466 incoming freshmen (236 males, 230 females) at the University of Maryland, College Park. Fifty-five percent of all freshmen reported having taken their first drink with friends by age 15; 10 percent…

  3. Teenagers' Attitudes Toward the Hometown Daily Newspaper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Laurence R.

    To determine the attitudes of teenagers toward their hometown newspapers was the purpose of this study. A four-page questionnaire in which students compared the local newspaper with other news media and expressed their attitudes on statements about this newspaper was answered by 887 teenagers. Tentative conclusions indicated that the students felt…

  4. English in Argentina: Attitudes of MBA Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrich, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Addresses the issue of English in South America through the investigation of attitudes toward English by a group of MBA students in Argentina. A survey questionnaire was administered and its analysis and the relationship between attitudes and the sociopolitical environment are explored. Concludes with a cal for more conscientious inclusion of…

  5. Measuring Intergroup Attitudes in Community Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Ronald J.

    Contemporary social psychology takes a simplistic approach to the conceptualization and measurement of intergroup attitudes. Most definitions involve only the affective component of attitudes, and most measurement devices are restricted self-report, paper and pencil questionnaires. A broader and more flexible approach is required to adequately…

  6. Slovak High School Students' Attitudes toward Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubiatko, Milan; Halakova, Zuzana; Nagyova, Sona; Nagy, Tibor

    2011-01-01

    The pervasive involvement of information and communication technologies and computers in our daily lives influences changes of attitude toward computers. We focused on finding these ecological effects in the differences in computer attitudes as a function of gender and age. A questionnaire with 34 Likert-type items was used in our research. The…

  7. Patient Deception: Nursing Students' Beliefs and Attitudes.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Drew A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined nursing students' beliefs about indicators of deception and their attitudes toward patient deception. Fifty-eight participants from various nursing programs at a southwestern university completed a Detection of Deception Questionnaire and Attitudes Toward Patient Deception Scale. Findings indicated that nursing students have a number of inaccurate beliefs about deception and possess a number of negative attitudes toward patients who lie. Implications for nursing education are discussed. PMID:25783815

  8. Jordanian School Counselors' Knowledge about and Attitudes toward Diabetes Mellitus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannous, Adel G.; Khateeb, Jamal M.; Khamra, Hatem A.; Hadidi, Muna S.; Natour, Mayada M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the knowledge and attitudes of Jordanian school counselors toward diabetes mellitus. A sample of 295 counselors completed a questionnaire consisting of two parts concerning knowledge and attitudes. The face validity of the questionnaire was assessed using an informed panel of judges, and its reliability was established…

  9. The Measurement of Nuclear War Attitudes: Methods and Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayton, Daniel M., II

    Measures of adults' attitudes toward nuclear war are briefly discussed, and Mayton's Modified World Affairs Questionnaire (MWAQ) is described. The 23-item MWAQ was developed from Novak and Lerner's World Affairs Questionnaire, a nuclear war attitude measure by Mayton and Delamater, and related interview items by Jeffries. When the MWAQ was…

  10. Examining the effects of an interprofessional crew resource management training intervention on perceptions of patient safety.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wan-Ting; Wu, Yung-Lung; Hou, Shaw-Min; Kang, Chun-Mei; Huang, Chi-Hung; Huang, Yu-Ju; Wang, Victoria Yue An; Wang, Pa-Chun

    2016-07-01

    This article reports the results from a study that employed an interprofessional crew resource management (CRM) education programme in the emergency and critical care departments. The study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of this intervention of participants' satisfaction and safety attitude changes using a satisfaction questionnaire and the Human Factors Attitude Survey (HFAS). Overall, participants responded positively to the CRM training-93.4% were satisfied, 93.1% agreed that it enhanced patient safety and care quality, 85.7% agreed that it increased their confidence, 86.4% agreed that it reduced practice errors, and 90.8% agreed that it would change their behaviours. Overall, the participants reported positive changes in their attitudes regarding 22 of the 23 HFAS questions. PMID:27332501

  11. Classroom Climate, Global Knowledge, Global Attitudes, Political Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Glen

    1990-01-01

    Examines how an open classroom climate relates to effective global education. Looks at gender and race differences, and identifies attributes of open classrooms. Administers questionnaires to 202 students enrolled in an international studies program. Finds a moderate positive correlation between classroom climate and student political attitudes.…

  12. Determinants of Students' Attitudes towards Peers with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vignes, Celine; Godeau, Emmanuelle; Sentenac, Mariane; Coley, Nicola; Navarro, Felix; Grandjean, Helene; Arnaud, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To explore factors associated with students' attitudes towards their peers with disabilities. Method: All 7th grade students (aged 12-13y) from 12 schools in the Toulouse area were invited to participate (n = 1509). Attitudes were measured using the Chedoke-McMaster Attitudes Towards Children with Handicaps (CATCH) questionnaire (affective,…

  13. Attitudes toward Life and Death and Suicidality in Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Brenda J.; Range, Lillian M.

    1995-01-01

    Examines attitudes toward life and death, alone and in combination with life events, to determine suicide risk for young adults. Used the Multi-Attitude Suicide Tendency Scale for Adolescents, Life and Death Attitudes Scale, Suicidal Behaviors Questionnaire, Death Anxiety Scale, and Life Experiences Survey to measure responses of 140 young adults…

  14. An Assessment of College Students' Attitudes and Empathy toward Rape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chng, Chwee Lye; Burke, Sloane

    1999-01-01

    College students (n=387) completed the "attitudes toward rape" questionnaire and the rape empathy scale. Analysis found that prior experience as a rape survivor and gender were significantly related to rape intolerant attitudes and empathy toward rape survivors. Rape tolerant attitudes and lower levels of empathy were more commonly found among men…

  15. Development and Validation of an Internet Use Attitude Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yixin

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of a new 40-item Internet Attitude Scale (IAS), a one-dimensional inventory for measuring the Internet attitudes. The first experiment initiated a generic Internet attitude questionnaire, ensured construct validity, and examined factorial validity and reliability. The second experiment further…

  16. Teacher-Trainees Attitudes towards Physical Education in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gitonga, E. R.; Andanje, M.; Wanderi, P. M.; Bailasha, N.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the attitudes of teacher trainees towards physical education (PE). It was hypothesised that teacher-trainees have negative attitudes towards PE. A total of 132 teacher trainees were randomly selected from a teacher Training College in Kenya completed a questionnaire adapted from Wear's attitude scale with equivalent forms.…

  17. Software safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy

    1987-01-01

    Software safety and its relationship to other qualities are discussed. It is shown that standard reliability and fault tolerance techniques will not solve the safety problem for the present. A new attitude requires: looking at what you do NOT want software to do along with what you want it to do; and assuming things will go wrong. New procedures and changes to entire software development process are necessary: special software safety analysis techniques are needed; and design techniques, especially eliminating complexity, can be very helpful.

  18. Satisfaction With Teaching Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merwin, J. C.; DiVesta , F. J.

    As part of the instrumentation to assess the effectiveness of the Schools Without Failure (SEF) program in 10 elementary schools in the New Castle, Pa. School District, the Satisfaction with Teaching Questionnaire was used. In a study by its developers this scale discriminated between students choosing to be teachers and those choosing other…

  19. The Depression Coping Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinke, Chris L.

    College students (N=396), chronic pain patients (N=319), and schizophrenic veterans (N=43) completed the Depression Coping Questionnaire (DCQ) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Factor analysis of the DCQ identified eleven coping responses: social support, problem solving, self-blame/escape, aggression, indulgence, activities, medication,…

  20. The Relationship between Gender, Sexual Attitudes, Attitudes towards Gender and High School Counselors' Ethical Decision-Making regarding Adolescent Sexuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-Donald, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated relationships between high school counselors' ethical decision-making, gender, attitudes towards gender, and sexual attitudes. Of the 161 respondents, only 157 participants' data sets were included in the data set. Participants completed the Ethical Decision-Making Questionnaire, The Brief Sexual Attitudes Scale (Hendrick,…

  1. Undergraduate Students' Attitudes toward Biodiversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Hui-Ju; Lin, Yu-Teh Kirk

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated American and Taiwan undergraduate students' attitudes toward biodiversity. The survey questionnaire consisted of statements prompted by the question "To what extent do you agree with the following statements about problems with the biodiversity issues." Students indicated strongly disagree, disagree, agree,…

  2. An Elderly Leisure Attitude Schedule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaff, Joseph E.; And Others

    This study, using the Neulinger and Breit (1971) leisure attitude questionnaire, surveyed 129 community-based persons having a mean age of 71. Ninety-three of these persons were employed by and assumed responsibilities in the Foster Grandparent program at the local state school for the mentally retarded, while the other 36 respondents were members…

  3. Job attitudes.

    PubMed

    Judge, Timothy A; Kammeyer-Mueller, John D

    2012-01-01

    Job attitudes research is arguably the most venerable and popular topic in organizational psychology. This article surveys the field as it has been constituted in the past several years. Definitional issues are addressed first, in an attempt to clarify the nature, scope, and structure of job attitudes. The distinction between cognitive and affective bases of job attitudes has been an issue of debate, and recent research using within-persons designs has done much to inform this discussion. Recent research has also begun to reformulate the question of dispositional or situational influences on employee attitudes by addressing how these factors might work together to influence attitudes. Finally, there has also been a continual growth in research investigating how employee attitudes are related to a variety of behaviors at both the individual and aggregated level of analysis. PMID:22129457

  4. Dynamics of attitudes and genetic processes.

    PubMed

    Guastello, Stephen J; Guastello, Denise D

    2008-01-01

    Relatively new discoveries of a genetic component to attitudes have challenged the traditional viewpoint that attitudes are primarily learned ideas and behaviors. Attitudes that are regarded by respondents as "more important" tend to have greater genetic components to them, and tend to be more closely associated with authoritarianism. Nonlinear theories, nonetheless, have also been introduced to study attitude change. The objective of this study was to determine whether change in authoritarian attitudes across two generations would be more aptly described by a linear or a nonlinear model. Participants were 372 college students, their mothers, and their fathers who completed an attitude questionnaire. Results indicated that the nonlinear model (R2 = .09) was slightly better than the linear model (R2 = .08), but the two models offered very different forecasts for future generations of US society. The linear model projected a gradual and continuing bifurcation between authoritarians and non-authoritarians. The nonlinear model projected a stabilization of authoritarian attitudes. PMID:18157928

  5. Patients’ attitude towards bedside teaching in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    El Mhamdi, Sana; Bouanene, Ines; Sriha, Asma; Soltani, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess patient' reaction towards bedside teaching at the University Hospital of Monastir (Tunisia) and to identify the factors that may influence it. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted during December 2012 at the University Hospital of Monastir. Each department, except the psychiatric department and the intensive care units, was visited in one day. All inpatients present on the day of the study were interviewed by four trained female nurses using a structured questionnaire. Results Of the 401 patients approached, 356 (88.8%) agreed to participate. In general, the results demonstrate that patients were positive toward medical students’ participation. The highest acceptance rates were found in situations where there is no direct contact between the patient and the student (e.g. when reading their medical file, attending ward rounds and observing doctor examining them). As the degree of students’ involvement increased, the refusal rate increased. Gender, age, educational level, marital status and the extent of students’ involvement in patient’s care were identified as the main factors affecting patients’ attitude. Conclusion: Taking advantage of this attitude, valorizing patient role as educator and using further learning methods in situations where patient’s consent for student involvement was not obtained should be considered to guarantee optimal care and safety to patients and good medical education to future physicians. PMID:26706313

  6. Pass-Fail Evaluation: Phase II: Questionnaire Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle. Educational Assessment Center.

    This report presents the results of a study that was undertaken to identify student attitudes toward the Pass-Fail (P-F) option at the University of Washington. A questionnaire designed to assess student opinions toward and possible behavioral changes resulting from P-F courses was sent to a random sample of sophomores, juniors and seniors…

  7. Cultural Learning Environment: Validity and Application of a Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldrip, Bruce G.; Fisher, Darrell L.

    A study was conducted to develop and validate an instrument to assess students' culturally sensitive environments, and to examine associations between these factors and students' attitudes. A measure of students' environment, namely the Cultural Learning Environment Questionnaire (CLEQ), was developed. The instrument was influenced by the four…

  8. Nonresponse Bias to Mail Survey Questionnaires within a Professional Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovland, Eric J.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The possible bias resulting from excluding nonresponders in tabulating data from mail survey questionnaires in a dentist population was investigated. The differences between the responders and the nonresponders were analyzed with respect to the dentists' demographic data, attitudes, and knowledge. Nonresponse bias did not affect the results of…

  9. Caregiver’s feeding styles questionnaire - new factors and correlates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Study objectives were to conduct exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of Caregiver’s Feeding Styles Questionnaire (CFSQ) and evaluate correlations between factors and maternal feeding practices, attitudes, and perceptions. Mothers (N = 144) were 43% minority race/ethnicity, 24% full-time employed, 54% ...

  10. Students' attitudes towards learning statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghulami, Hassan Rahnaward; Hamid, Mohd Rashid Ab; Zakaria, Roslinazairimah

    2015-05-01

    Positive attitude towards learning is vital in order to master the core content of the subject matters under study. This is unexceptional in learning statistics course especially at the university level. Therefore, this study investigates the students' attitude towards learning statistics. Six variables or constructs have been identified such as affect, cognitive competence, value, difficulty, interest, and effort. The instrument used for the study is questionnaire that was adopted and adapted from the reliable instrument of Survey of Attitudes towards Statistics(SATS©). This study is conducted to engineering undergraduate students in one of the university in the East Coast of Malaysia. The respondents consist of students who were taking the applied statistics course from different faculties. The results are analysed in terms of descriptive analysis and it contributes to the descriptive understanding of students' attitude towards the teaching and learning process of statistics.

  11. Attitudes towards Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Norman; Skryabina, Elena A.

    2002-01-01

    Unlike in many other countries, physics in secondary education in Scotland is highly popular, with large numbers opting for study at the Higher Grade from which entry to higher education is possible. This paper reports a project which explored attitudes towards physics in Scotland, looking at students aged from about 10 to 20 years old. Overall, over 850 school pupils were surveyed along with 208 level 1 and 2 university physics students. The work was carried out mainly by use of questionnaires and interviewing. The approach allowed the development of 'snap shots' of attitudes held by pupils simultaneously at various stages of education. These attitudes can be compared at the different stages, although care must be taken in such comparison to allow for varying degrees of self-selection. The main factors attracting school pupils into a study of physics are described, together with the pattern of attitude changes which take place with age. From the picture obtained, it is possible to determine areas of the curriculum where there are difficulties. The enormous success of the applications-led course for Standard Grade is apparent in attracting and retaining pupils within physics, including girls. The outcomes suggest some ways by which physics curriculum planners can develop courses in physics which will prove attractive and robust.

  12. [Parental attitudes towards childhood immunisations in Poland].

    PubMed

    Rogalska, Justyna; Augustynowicz, Ewa; Gzyl, Anna; Stefanoff, Paweł

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to obtain information on parents' attitudes towards vaccinations included in the childhood immunisation schedule. Computer-assisted telephone interviews (CATI) method was used. The interviews were collected from parents who had children aged three years old. Two-stage sampling was used: firstly, a list of 3,000 households with children < 3 years old was quota-selected from a consumer database collecting contact information from 95% mothers during deliveries. Random digit dialling was used to attempt the interview with parents. The 40-item questionnaire was based on the questionnaire developed by UK Department of Health. Overall, the perception of routine, mandatory immunization of children was positive. Only 17 parents (1.6%) refused the vaccination which had been offered, and 398 parents (38.0%) paid for a vaccine recommended for their child. In general, parents believed that immunisations were important for protecting the society against infectious diseases, although they found some problems in the way vaccines were delivered. Approximately half of respondents thought that vaccination against many diseases was harmful. In terms of perception of the risk related to vaccines parents were less confident in the currently introduced vaccines and those which protect against diseases rarely seen in the population. Pneumococcal vaccine was considered as risky by 27 persons (2.6%), and polio vaccine by 17 (1.6%). Greater concern about the safety of vaccines was expressed by older parents, residents of towns and highly educated individuals. Systematic monitoring of parents' attitudes towards vaccination would help to address public health actions more adequately. PMID:20499667

  13. The Impact of Patient Safety Training on Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residents' Attitudes and Knowledge: A Mixed Method Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buhrow, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that in the United States, more than 40,000 patients are injured each day because of preventable medical errors. Patient safety experts and graduate medical education accreditation leaders recognize that medical education reform must include the integration of safety training focused on error causation, system engineering, and…

  14. Attitudes associated with behavioral predictors of serious road traffic crashes: results from the GAZEL cohort

    PubMed Central

    Nabi, Hermann; Salmi, Louis Rachid; Lafont, Sylviane; Chiron, Mireille; Zins, Marie; Lagarde, Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that behavioral predictors of serious road traffic crashes (RTC) are correlated with unfavorable attitudes towards traffic safety. Design Prospective and cross‐sectional cohort study. Setting France Participants 13 447 of the 19 894 living members of the GAZEL cohort, workers and recent retirees of a French national utility company followed up since 1989. Main outcomes measures Driving behavior and attitudes towards traffic safety in 2001 by questionnaire. Serious RTCs were recorded over the subsequent 3 years using the cohort annual questionnaire. Behavioral predictors of serious RTCs were assessed using generalized linear Poisson regression models with time‐dependent covariates. Factor scores extracted from the first four attitudinal factors of principal component analysis were saved and then regressed on behavioral predictors as independent variables. Results After controlling for potential confounders, the best predictors of serious RTCs were: “exceeding speed limits on rural roads”, “risky use of cellular phone”, and “sleepy driving”. The adjusted rate ratio ranged from 1.47 to 2.16. Predictors of contravention of the highway code (the first two predictors) were found to be strongly associated with negative attitudes towards “enforcement” and “speed limitations” with an adjusted odds ratio ranging from 1.31 to 2.02. Conclusion Our study supports the view that individuals with a high propensity for driving behaviors associated with an increased risk of RTCs were more likely to have negative attitudes towards traffic safety. Changing drivers' negative or distorted opinions of traffic “enforcement” as well as “speed limitations” and “alcohol prohibition on roads” could improve their compliance with road traffic rules. PMID:17296685

  15. Conversion of Questionnaire Data

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    During the survey, respondents are asked to provide qualitative answers (well, adequate, needs improvement) on how well material control and accountability (MC&A) functions are being performed. These responses can be used to develop failure probabilities for basic events performed during routine operation of the MC&A systems. The failure frequencies for individual events may be used to estimate total system effectiveness using a fault tree in a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA). Numeric risk values are required for the PRA fault tree calculations that are performed to evaluate system effectiveness. So, the performance ratings in the questionnaire must be converted to relative risk values for all of the basic MC&A tasks performed in the facility. If a specific material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) task is being performed at the 'perfect' level, the task is considered to have a near zero risk of failure. If the task is performed at a less than perfect level, the deficiency in performance represents some risk of failure for the event. As the degree of deficiency in performance increases, the risk of failure increases. If a task that should be performed is not being performed, that task is in a state of failure. The failure probabilities of all basic events contribute to the total system risk. Conversion of questionnaire MPC&A system performance data to numeric values is a separate function from the process of completing the questionnaire. When specific questions in the questionnaire are answered, the focus is on correctly assessing and reporting, in an adjectival manner, the actual performance of the related MC&A function. Prior to conversion, consideration should not be given to the numeric value that will be assigned during the conversion process. In the conversion process, adjectival responses to questions on system performance are quantified based on a log normal scale typically used in human error analysis (see A.D. Swain and H.E. Guttmann

  16. Personality and attitudes as predictors of risky driving among older drivers.

    PubMed

    Lucidi, Fabio; Mallia, Luca; Lazuras, Lambros; Violani, Cristiano

    2014-11-01

    Although there are several studies on the effects of personality and attitudes on risky driving among young drivers, related research in older drivers is scarce. The present study assessed a model of personality-attitudes-risky driving in a large sample of active older drivers. A cross-sectional design was used, and structured and anonymous questionnaires were completed by 485 older Italian drivers (Mean age=68.1, SD=6.2, 61.2% males). The measures included personality traits, attitudes toward traffic safety, risky driving (errors, lapses, and traffic violations), and self-reported crash involvement and number of issued traffic tickets in the last 12 months. Structural equation modeling showed that personality traits predicted both directly and indirectly traffic violations, errors, and lapses. More positive attitudes toward traffic safety negatively predicted risky driving. In turn, risky driving was positively related to self-reported crash involvement and higher number of issued traffic tickets. Our findings suggest that theoretical models developed to account for risky driving of younger drivers may also apply in the older drivers, and accordingly be used to inform safe driving interventions for this age group. PMID:25108900

  17. A hybrid qualitative method for pretesting questionnaires: the example of a questionnaire to caregivers of Alzheimer disease patients.

    PubMed

    Oremus, Mark; Cosby, Jarold L; Wolfson, Christina

    2005-10-01

    A hybrid method based on cognitive interviewing and consensus panels was developed to pretest a questionnaire for caregivers of persons with Alzheimer disease (AD). The objective of the questionnaire was to elicit caregivers' attitudes and opinions on the use of medications to treat the disease. Thirty-one caregivers were divided into five pretest groups, within which each participant was asked to comment on questionnaire wording and design. The comments from participants in the first three groups were used to revise the questionnaire, and the revised version was given to participants in the remaining two groups. Overall, 81% (118/146) of the participants' comments were implemented. The number of comments made in the last two groups decreased relative to the number of comments made in the first three groups. The hybrid method enhanced the user-friendliness of the questionnaire and can serve as an alternative to common ad hoc pretest approaches that have little basis in theory. PMID:16163677

  18. Sun protection among Spanish beachgoers: knowledge, attitude and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Cercato, M C; Ramazzotti, V; Sperduti, I; Asensio-Pascual, A; Ribes, I; Guillén, C; Nagore, E

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the level of awareness on the risks related to sun exposure, attitude towards sun protection and sun protection behaviour in Spanish beachgoers. During the summer of 2009, trained assistants conducted a structured interview with 630 sunbathers at the beaches of Valencia, Spain, via administrating a questionnaire including the following: (a) general data (age, gender, education, profession), (b) "knowledge" and "attitude" items and (c) self-assessed sun sensitivity, sun exposure and sun protection characteristics. The health belief model was used to evaluate factors that may influence on engaging healthy behaviour. The median age was 30 (2-82) years; the M/F ratio was 0.60. Despite the widespread regular ("often" or "always", 80%) use of high (>15) sun-protective factor sunscreens, current recommendations on sun protection were not regularly followed, and a history of sunburns is very common (70%). At multivariate analysis, female gender, age, fair hair, freckles, all-day use of sunscreens and wearing sunglasses were independent factors associated with having sunburn history. A high knowledge and a fairly good attitude emerged (median scores, 6/7 and 22/30, respectively). Age class (p = 0.032), educational level (p < 0.0001), sunscreen use (p = 0.048) and adequate timing of the first application of sunscreens (p = 0.015) were predictors of awareness, while factors associated with a more favourable attitude were educational level (p < 0.0001) and regular use of hats (p = 0.001). Wrong beliefs mainly concern sunscreens (false safety); the attractiveness of a tanned look is the main unfavourable attitude. Physical and motivational barriers are common (80%). The findings by highlighting constitutional and psychosocial factors involved in unhealthy behaviour provide useful information to promote sun-safe interventions in this population. PMID:24890922

  19. Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N = 181, n = 146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p = 0.021), support for innovation (p = 0.042) and task orientation (p = 0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing. PMID:24393065

  20. Knowledge, attitude and practices toward pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reactions in postgraduate students of Tertiary Care Hospital in Gujarat.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Het B; Vora, Mukeshkumar B; Nagar, Jatin G; Patel, Pruthvish B

    2015-01-01

    Being key health care professional, physicians, pharmacist and nurses have immense responsibility in reporting adverse drug reaction (ADR). Therefore, the study objective was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) toward pharmacovigilance and ADRs of postgraduate students of our institute. A cross-sectional questionnaires based study was carried out in postgraduate students of the clinical department at tertiary care hospital attached with Govt. Medical College, Vadodara, Gujarat (India). A total of 22 questionnaires about KAP toward ADRs and pharmacovigilance were developed and peer viewed of all questionnaires by expert faculties from our institute. We were contacted directly to postgraduate students of respective clinical department; questionnaires were distributed and taken back after 30 min. The filled KAP questionnaires were analyzed in question wise and their percentage value was calculated by using Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. Postgraduate residents (n = 101) from different clinical departments were enrolled in the study. Average 34.83% correct and 64.08% incorrect knowledge about ADRs and pharmacovigilance and an average 90.76% students were agreed to reporting ADRs is necessary, mandatory and increased patient's safety. Only 7.92% of postgraduate doctors were reported ADR at institute or ADR reporting center. We concluded that postgraduate students have a better attitude toward reporting ADRs, but have lack of knowledge and poor practices of ADRs. The majority of postgraduate students were felt ADR reporting and monitoring is very important, but few had ever reported ADRs because of lack of sensitization and knowledge of pharmacovigilance and ADR. PMID:25709967

  1. Questionnaire Translation and Questionnaire Validation: Are They the Same?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffee, Dale T.

    The purpose of this paper is to give evidence for the thesis that if teachers using a questionnaire as a data collection instrument have the questionnaire items translated from one language into another, they cannot assume that the translated items are valid simply because they were translated. Even if the original questionnaire items were…

  2. Accident involvement and attitudes towards hazards and countermeasures in a Swedish rural population.

    PubMed

    Jansson, B; Eriksson, C G

    1990-06-01

    Research on the resistance to implementation of effective injury control measures is needed. An important task is to identity factors or circumstances that influence the possibilities of taking active safety measures, and also factors that may limit or hinder such efforts. The objective of this study was to describe the farmers' own attitudes towards farm accident hazards and their interest in participating in preventive measures. The study is part of a project to develop systems for injury surveillance and control in Swedish emergency care. A standardised questionnaire for telephone interviews was used. All patients who had consulted an emergency department during a one-year period for injuries caused by accidents on 2,454 farms in two Swedish rural municipalities were interviewed. The results demonstrated that adults, especially young adults with small children, seem to be most conscious of accident risks and best motivated for participation in active safety measures, e.g. safety education. PMID:2367824

  3. Diet History Questionnaire: Suggested Citations

    Cancer.gov

    Use of the Diet History Questionnaire and Diet*Calc Analysis Software for publication purposes should contain a citation which includes version information for the software, questionnaire, and nutrient database.

  4. Diet History Questionnaire: International Applications

    Cancer.gov

    ARP staff adapted the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) for use by Canadian populations in collaboration with the Alberta Cancer Board. This questionnaire takes into account the different food fortification polices of the U.S. and Canada.

  5. The Development of a Questionnaire for an Organizational Development Program at Los Angeles Southwest College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Ollie B.; Andrews, James

    An Organizational Development (OD) questionnaire was designed at Los Angeles Southwest College to enhance planned change in that educational organization. The questionnaire measures attitudes in seven organizational development concept areas: (1) institutional climate indices--opportunity for advancement, general institutional conditions, concern…

  6. Validating the Food Behavior Questions from the Elementary School SPAN Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiagarajah, Krisha; Fly, Alyce D.; Hoelscher, Deanna M.; Bai, Yeon; Lo, Kaman; Leone, Angela; Shertzer, Julie A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The School Physical Activity and Nutrition (SPAN) questionnaire was developed as a surveillance instrument to measure physical activity, nutrition attitudes, and dietary and physical activity behaviors in children and adolescents. The SPAN questionnaire has 2 versions. Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the validity of…

  7. Use of a Surgical Safety Checklist to Improve Team Communication.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Richard A; Eggenberger, Terry; Keller, Kathryn; Gallison, Barry S; Newman, David

    2016-09-01

    To improve surgical team communication, a team at Broward Health Imperial Point Hospital, Ft Lauderdale, Florida, implemented a program for process improvement using a locally adapted World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist. This program included a standardized, comprehensive time out and a briefing/debriefing process. Postimplementation responses to the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire revealed a significant increase in the surgical team's perception of communication compared with that reported on the pretest (6% improvement resulting in t79 = -1.72, P < .05, d = 0.39). Perceptions of communication increased significantly for nurses (12% increase, P = .002), although the increase for surgeons and surgical technologists was lower (4% for surgeons, P = .15 and 2.3% for surgical technologists, P = .06). As a result of this program, we have observed improved surgical teamwork behaviors and an enhanced culture of safety in the OR. PMID:27568533

  8. The Perceived Deficits Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Allison; Nikelshpur, Olga M.; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; DeLuca, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cognitive dysfunction affects approximately 43% to 70% of individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) and is an important determinant of several functional outcomes in MS and quality of life. Brief neuropsychological test batteries have been developed specifically for use in MS and are widely used to aid clinicians in assessing levels of cognitive impairment in MS. Neuropsychologists and neurologists also frequently use briefer screening measures, such as the Perceived Deficits Questionnaire (PDQ), to assist in determining whether a more extensive neuropsychological evaluation is warranted. However, despite the ease of such measures, the relationship between self-report and objective cognitive impairment has been inconsistent, at best. Moreover, factors such as depression, fatigue, anxiety, and personality have been found to be more related to reports of cognitive difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the relationship between subjective cognitive concerns and objective cognitive impairment while accounting for related symptoms. Methods: We examined the association of self-reported cognitive concerns on the PDQ with objective cognitive measures, as well as depression, anxiety, fatigue, and self-efficacy. Results: There was no relationship between self-reported cognitive concerns and objective performance. Rather, reports on the PDQ were more correlated with reports of depression, anxiety, fatigue, and self-efficacy. Conclusions: Depression and poor self-efficacy can contribute to reports of cognitive difficulties. Effective treatment to improve these factors seems warranted given the impact of perceived cognitive impairment on outcomes in MS and the potential for more accurate self-reports. PMID:27551243

  9. The quest for better questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, A J

    1999-12-15

    The development of questionnaires is a neglected enterprise in epidemiology. It has recently been proposed that a prestigious health authority such as the World Health Organization establish a committee to tackle issues of questionnaire quality, moving eventually toward standardized instruments. However, standardization may not be the best way to invigorate this enterprise. As an alternative, the author suggests that the first step in improving questionnaires would be to make them more accessible. Ideally, questionnaires should be as easily scrutinized as a study's methods or results. To this end, the author suggests that when a research paper is published, the entire questionnaire be made available on the worldwide web. Electronic access to questionnaires could stimulate a new era of awareness about the importance of questionnaire design. PMID:10604766

  10. The Relationship of Science Knowledge, Attitude and Decision Making on Socio-scientific Issues: The Case Study of Students' Debates on a Nuclear Power Plant in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jho, Hunkoog; Yoon, Hye-Gyoung; Kim, Mijung

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of students' understanding of science knowledge, attitude and decision making on socio-scientific issues (SSI), especially on the issues of nuclear energy in Korea. SSI-focused instructions were developed to encourage students to understand and reflect on knowledge, attitude and decision making on nuclear energy in the current society. Eighty-nine students attended the instruction and participated in pre and post questionnaires to understand their understandings of nuclear energy. In this study, science knowledge was categorized into content and contextual knowledge, attitude consisted of images, safety, risk, potential, benefits and future roles, and decision making section included preference and alternative about lifetime extension of nuclear power plant. The results of questionnaires were analyzed by correlation, cross-tabulation and regression. As a result, while students' understandings of science knowledge were significantly improved throughout the instruction, they maintained similar attitude and decision making on the issue. Regarding the relationship of the three domains, attitude showed some degree of connection to decision making whereas science knowledge did not show a significant relationship to decision making. This finding challenges SSI teaching in content-based science curriculum and classroom. Reflection and implications on the way of teaching SSI in the classroom were discussed further in this paper.

  11. Older Adult Consumer Knowledge, Attitudes, and Self-Reported Storage Practices of Ready-to-Eat Food Products and Risks Associated with Listeriosis.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ellen W; Redmond, Elizabeth C

    2016-02-01

    Consumer implementation of recommended food safety practices, specifically relating to time and temperature control of ready-to-eat (RTE) food products associated with listeriosis are crucial. This is particularly the case for at-risk consumers such as older adults, given the increased listeriosis incidence reported internationally among adults aged ≥60 years. However, data detailing older adults' cognitive risk factors associated with listeriosis are lacking. Combining data about knowledge, self-reported practices, and attitudes can achieve a cumulative multilayered in-depth understanding of consumer food safety behavior and cognition. This study aims to ascertain older adults' cognition and behavior in relation to domestic food handling and storage practices that may increase the risks associated with L. monocytogenes. Older adults (≥60 years) (n = 100) participated in an interview and questionnaire to determine knowledge, self-reported practices, and attitudes toward recommended practices. Although the majority (79%) had positive attitudes toward refrigeration, 84% were unaware of recommended temperatures (5°C) and 65% self-reported "never" checking their refrigerator temperature. Although most (72%) knew that "use-by" dates indicate food safety and 62% reported "always" taking note, neutral attitudes were held, with 67% believing it was safe to eat food beyond use-by dates and 57% reporting doing so. Attitudes toward consuming foods within the recommended 2 days of opening were neutral, with 55% aware of recommendations and , 84% reporting that they consume RTE foods beyond recommendations. Although knowledgeable of some key practices, older adults self-reported potentially unsafe practices when storing RTE foods at home, which may increase risks associated with L. monocytogenes. This study has determined that older adults' food safety cognition may affect their behaviors; understanding consumer food safety cognition is essential for developing targeted

  12. Attitudes Toward Death Across the Life Span.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiden, Robert; Walker, Gail

    To understand the change and development of people's attitudes toward death over the life span, a 62-item attitude questionnaire on death and dying was administered to 90 adults. Participants included five females and five males in each of nine age categories: 18-20, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-64, and 65 or older. Participants…

  13. Faculty attitudes about interprofessional education

    PubMed Central

    Beck Dallaghan, Gary L.; Hoffman, Erin; Lyden, Elizabeth; Bevil, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Background Interprofessional education (IPE) is an important component to training health care professionals. Research is limited in exploring the attitudes that faculty hold regarding IPE and what barriers they perceive to participating in IPE. The purpose of this study was to identify faculty attitudes about IPE and to identify barriers to participating in campus-wide IPE activities. Methods A locally used questionnaire called the Nebraska Interprofessional Education Attitudes Scale (NIPEAS) was used to assess attitudes related to interprofessional collaboration. Questions regarding perceived barriers were included at the end of the questionnaire. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were used to analyze the results in aggregate as well as by college. In addition, open-ended questions were analyzed using an immersion/crystallization framework to identify themes. Results The results showed that faculty had positive attitudes of IPE, indicating that is not a barrier to participating in IPE activities. Most common barriers to participation were scheduling conflicts (χ4,2852=19.17, p=0.001), lack of department support (χ4,2852=10.09, p=0.039), and lack of awareness of events (χ4,2852=26.38, p=0.000). Narrative comments corroborated that scheduling conflicts are an issue because of other priorities. Those who commented also added to the list of barriers, including relevance of the activities, location, and prior negative experiences. Discussion With faculty attitudes being positive, the exploration of faculty's perceived barriers to IPE was considered even more important. Identifying these barriers will allow us to modify our IPE activities from large, campus-wide events to smaller activities that are longitudinal in nature, embedded within current curriculum and involving more authentic experiences. PMID:27357910

  14. [Development and use of a questionnaire for evaluating teacher continuing education on the sex abuse topic].

    PubMed

    Bretz, E; Richter, N; Petermann, F; Waldmann, H C

    1997-01-01

    The authors constructed a questionnaire to evaluate a ten-day-training curriculum for educators concerning the topic of sexual abuse of children. This questionnaire measures learning outcomes as well as behavioral change at work. It consists of three parts: a knowledge test, an attitude questionnaire and a self-report questionnaire. The contents correspond to the training goals. As part of the evaluation study the questionnaire was completed by a sample of 129 educators. The inspection of item-difficulty and reliability yielded positive results-further amelioration can be achieved by minor changes. First analyses confirm the hypothesis that the self-report questionnaire is also a valid instrument for training evaluation. The questionnaire was highly accepted by the trainees, and the costs of evaluation were relatively low. Thus the questionnaire can be recommended as an evaluation instrument for trainings with similar goals and trainees. PMID:9312771

  15. Nuclear power attitude trends

    SciTech Connect

    Nealey, S.M.

    1981-11-01

    The increasing vulnerability of nuclear power to political pressures fueled by public concerns, particularly about nuclear plant safety and radioactive waste disposal, has become obvious. Since Eisenhower's Atoms-for-Peace program, utility and government plans have centered on expansion of nuclear power generating capability. While supporters have outnumbered opponents of nuclear power expansion for many years, in the wake of the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident the margin of support has narrowed. The purpose of this paper is to report and put in perspective these long-term attitude trends.

  16. Safety Teams: An Approach to Engage Students in Laboratory Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaimo, Peter J.; Langenhan, Joseph M.; Tanner, Martha J.; Ferrenberg, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    We developed and implemented a yearlong safety program into our organic chemistry lab courses that aims to enhance student attitudes toward safety and to ensure students learn to recognize, demonstrate, and assess safe laboratory practices. This active, collaborative program involves the use of student "safety teams" and includes hands-on safety…

  17. A study to assess the influence of interprofessional point of care simulation training on safety culture in the operating theatre environment of a university teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Hinde, Theresa; Gale, Thomas; Anderson, Ian; Roberts, Martin; Sice, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Interprofessional point of care or in situ simulation is used as a training tool in our operating theatre directorate with the aim of improving crisis behaviours. This study aimed to assess the impact of interprofessional point of care simulation on the safety culture of operating theatres. A validated Safety Attitude Questionnaire was administered to staff members before each simulation scenario and then re-administered to the same staff members after 6-12 months. Pre- and post-training Safety Attitude Questionnaire-Operating Room (SAQ-OR) scores were compared using paired sample t-tests. Analysis revealed a statistically significant perceived improvement in both safety (p < 0.001) and teamwork (p = 0.013) climate scores (components of safety culture) 6-12 months after interprofessional simulation training. A growing body of literature suggests that a positive safety culture is associated with improved patient outcomes. Our study supports the implementation of point of care simulation as a useful intervention to improve safety culture in theatres. PMID:26854195

  18. Paper to Electronic Questionnaires: Effects on Structured Questionnaire Forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.

    2009-01-01

    With the use of computers, paper questionnaires are being replaced by electronic questionnaires. The formats of traditional paper questionnaires have been found to effect a subject's rating. Consequently, the transition from paper to electronic format can subtly change results. The research presented begins to determine how electronic questionnaire formats change subjective ratings. For formats where subjects used a flow chart to arrive at their rating, starting at the worst and middle ratings of the flow charts were the most accurate but subjects took slightly more time to arrive at their answers. Except for the electronic paper format, starting at the worst rating was the most preferred. The paper and electronic paper versions had the worst accuracy. Therefore, for flowchart type of questionnaires, flowcharts should start at the worst rating and work their way up to better ratings.

  19. Disentangling Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients' Implicit and Explicit Attitudes toward Methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Linn, Annemiek J; Vandeberg, Lisa; Wennekers, Annemarie M; Vervloet, Marcia; van Dijk, Liset; van den Bemt, Bart J F

    2016-01-01

    Medication non-adherence is a major public health problem that has been termed an 'invisible epidemic.' Non-adherence is not only associated with negative clinical consequences but can also result in substantial healthcare costs. Up to now, effective adherence interventions are scarce and a more comprehensive model of adherence determinants is required to target the determinants for not taking the medication as prescribed. Current approaches only included explicit attitudes such as self-reported evaluations of medication as determinants, neglecting the role of associative processes that shape implicit attitudes. Implicit processes can predict daily behavior more accurately than explicit attitudes. Our aim is to assess explicit and implicit attitudes toward medication and explore the relation with beliefs, adherence and clinical (laboratory) outcomes in chronically ill patients. Fifty two Rheumatic Arthritis (RA) patients' attitudes toward Methotrexate (MTX) were explicitly (self-reported) and implicitly (Single-Category Implicit Association Test) assessed and related to the Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire, the Compliance Questionnaire on Rheumatology and laboratory parameters [Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), C-Reactive Protein (CRP)]. Results show that explicit attitudes were positive and health-related. Implicit attitudes were, however, negative and sickness-related. Half of the patients displayed explicitly positive but implicitly negative attitudes. Explicit attitudes were positively related to ESR. A positive relationship between implicit attitudes and disease duration was observed. In this study, we have obtained evidence suggesting that the measurement of implicit attitudes and associations provides different information than explicit, self-reported attitudes toward medication. Since patients' implicit attitudes deviated from explicit attitudes, we can conclude that the relationship between implicit attitudes and medication adherence is worthwhile

  20. Disentangling Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients’ Implicit and Explicit Attitudes toward Methotrexate

    PubMed Central

    Linn, Annemiek J.; Vandeberg, Lisa; Wennekers, Annemarie M.; Vervloet, Marcia; van Dijk, Liset; van den Bemt, Bart J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Medication non-adherence is a major public health problem that has been termed an ‘invisible epidemic.’ Non-adherence is not only associated with negative clinical consequences but can also result in substantial healthcare costs. Up to now, effective adherence interventions are scarce and a more comprehensive model of adherence determinants is required to target the determinants for not taking the medication as prescribed. Current approaches only included explicit attitudes such as self-reported evaluations of medication as determinants, neglecting the role of associative processes that shape implicit attitudes. Implicit processes can predict daily behavior more accurately than explicit attitudes. Our aim is to assess explicit and implicit attitudes toward medication and explore the relation with beliefs, adherence and clinical (laboratory) outcomes in chronically ill patients. Fifty two Rheumatic Arthritis (RA) patients’ attitudes toward Methotrexate (MTX) were explicitly (self-reported) and implicitly (Single-Category Implicit Association Test) assessed and related to the Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire, the Compliance Questionnaire on Rheumatology and laboratory parameters [Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), C-Reactive Protein (CRP)]. Results show that explicit attitudes were positive and health-related. Implicit attitudes were, however, negative and sickness-related. Half of the patients displayed explicitly positive but implicitly negative attitudes. Explicit attitudes were positively related to ESR. A positive relationship between implicit attitudes and disease duration was observed. In this study, we have obtained evidence suggesting that the measurement of implicit attitudes and associations provides different information than explicit, self-reported attitudes toward medication. Since patients’ implicit attitudes deviated from explicit attitudes, we can conclude that the relationship between implicit attitudes and medication adherence is

  1. The impact of initial and recurrent cockpit resource management training on attitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, Cheryl M.

    1991-01-01

    It is noted that previous analyses of the boomerang effect (attitude change as a result of training in the direction opposite of that intended) in aviation training environments were limited in that each subscale of the cockpit management attitudes questionnaire (CMAQ) was examined independently. This study develops and utilizes a new algorithm for grouping subjects such that a global attitude change score is derived from the attitude change scores on each CMAQ subscale. By evaluating global attitude change in addition to the more specific attitude change on each subscale, it might be possible to better comprehend the effects of crew resource management training on pilot attitudes.

  2. Attitudes of Graduating Pharmacy Students and Practicing Pharmacists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Daniel U.

    Attitudes of pharmacists and pharmacy students were measured by a 73-item questionnaire. Responses were obtained from 56 graduating seniors and 112 recent graduates of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Missouri at Kansas City. The two sets of responses enable comparison of the attitudes of graduating seniors after completion of a…

  3. Investigation of Students' Epistemological Beliefs and Attitudes towards Studying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onen, Aysem Seda

    2011-01-01

    This study consists of the analysis on the relationship between the epistemological beliefs of secondary level students and their attitudes towards studying. The sampling of the study was formed by 440 students studying at Grade 10, 11 and 12 in secondary schools. The Epistemological Belief Questionnaire and the Attitudes towards Studying Scale,…

  4. Student Attitudes to Whole Body Donation Are Influenced by Dissection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Kevin C.; Ettarh, Raj R.

    2008-01-01

    Given the important role that anatomical dissection plays in the shaping of medical student attitudes to life and death, these attitudes have not been evaluated in the context of whole body donation for medical science. First year students of anatomy in an Irish university medical school were surveyed by questionnaire before and after the initial…

  5. High School Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Biotechnology Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozel, Murat; Erdogan, Mehmet; Usak, Muhammet; Prokop, Pavol

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate high school students' knowledge and attitudes regarding biotechnology and its various applications. In addition, whether students' knowledge and attitudes differed according to age and gender were also explored. The Biotechnology Knowledge Questionnaire (BKQ) with 16 items and the Biotechnology Attitude…

  6. International Year of Disabled Persons in Australia: Attitudes and Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gething, Lindsay

    1986-01-01

    The article assesses the effects of the International Year of Disabled Persons (IYDP) on attitudes and integration in Australia and compares the effects of direct close contact with disabled people. Questionnaires administered before and after IYDP suggest the Year provided increased awareness but little attitude or increased integration.…

  7. Gender Influences on Children's Computer Attitudes and Cognitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, Alice S.; Noyes, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    This study considers whether technophobia is a transitory phenomenon by assessing computer attitudes and cognition of 11- and 12-year-old children in an English secondary school via self-reporting questionnaires. Results showed a low prevalence of technophobia and that gender did not significantly influence attitudes or cognition towards…

  8. Affective Aspects of Language Learning: Beliefs, Attitudes, Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Rhonda; Purdie, Nola; Rochecouste, Judith

    2005-01-01

    The focus of this study is the relationship between language attitude, beliefs, efficacy, English language competence, and language achievement. Two hundred and eighty-five students from five metropolitan primary schools in Western Australia completed a specially designed questionnaire based on the Attitude/Motivation Test Battery (Gardner,…

  9. Perceptions and Attitudes of Mothers about Child Neglect in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polat, Selda; Tasar, Aysin; Ozkan, Secil; Yeltekin, Sevinc; Cakir, Bahar Cuhac; Akbaba, Sevil; Sahin, Figen; Camurdan, Aysu Duyan; Beyazova, Ufuk

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the perceptions and attitudes about child neglect of a group of mothers, in Ankara, Turkey, and to determine the factors affecting perception and attitudes of these mothers about child neglect. A questionnaire consisting of 15 scenarios about perception of child neglect and 12 behavioral descriptions about…

  10. Urban Early Childhood Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Wu-Ying; Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between urban early childhood teachers' attitudes towards inclusive education and personal characteristics, professional background, and programme context. Questionnaires were completed by teachers (n = 130) who taught preschool children in primarily low-income, urban neighbourhoods. Attitude ratings were…