Science.gov

Sample records for safety equipment considerations

  1. Bicycle safety equipment.

    PubMed

    Ellis, T H; Streight, D; Mellion, M B

    1994-01-01

    It is important for the physician to understand bicycle safety equipment in order to prevent and treat bicycle-related injuries effectively. The physician should understand (1) the basic design and function of bicycles, (2) the relationship of improper bicycle fit to injuries, (3) the potential of the various forms of serious riding and racing for injury, and (4) bicycle safety equipment and the standards involved in its fit, manufacture, and care. A decision to use bicycle safety equipment is a decision to control the risk of injury. Physicians should accept a share of the responsibility for decreasing bicycling-related injuries, because they are viewed by the public as credible sources of information regarding the prevention of accidents and injuries. PMID:8111858

  2. Safety Equipment in the Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Willard A.S.

    1964-01-01

    Findings of two recent surveys on safety equipment in laboratory facilities are presented. The first survey was a pilot study of emergency shower and eye wash equipment. This study was followed by a more comprehensive random survey of safety equipment in 2,820 labs. Among other findings, the surveys indicate that many plants are underequipped, or…

  3. Microbiology--Safety Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Sheryl K.

    This paper discusses the risk assessment associated with microbiology instruction based on grade level, general control measures, appropriate activities for middle school and high school students, the preparation and sterilization of equipment, and safe handling techniques. Appended are instructions and figures on making wire loops and the…

  4. 14 CFR 23.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety equipment. 23.1561 Section 23.1561... Markings and Placards § 23.1561 Safety equipment. (a) Safety equipment must be plainly marked as to method of operation. (b) Stowage provisions for required safety equipment must be marked for the benefit...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety equipment. 23.1561 Section 23.1561... Markings and Placards § 23.1561 Safety equipment. (a) Safety equipment must be plainly marked as to method of operation. (b) Stowage provisions for required safety equipment must be marked for the benefit...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety equipment. 23.1561 Section 23.1561... Markings and Placards § 23.1561 Safety equipment. (a) Safety equipment must be plainly marked as to method of operation. (b) Stowage provisions for required safety equipment must be marked for the benefit...

  7. 14 CFR 23.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety equipment. 23.1561 Section 23.1561... Markings and Placards § 23.1561 Safety equipment. (a) Safety equipment must be plainly marked as to method of operation. (b) Stowage provisions for required safety equipment must be marked for the benefit...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety equipment. 23.1561 Section 23.1561... Markings and Placards § 23.1561 Safety equipment. (a) Safety equipment must be plainly marked as to method of operation. (b) Stowage provisions for required safety equipment must be marked for the benefit...

  9. LABORATORY DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR SAFETY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Safety Council, Chicago, IL. Campus Safety Association.

    THIS SET OF CONSIDERATIONS HAS BEEN PREPARED TO PROVIDE PERSONS WORKING ON THE DESIGN OF NEW OR REMODELED LABORATORY FACILITIES WITH A SUITABLE REFERENCE GUIDE TO DESIGN SAFETY. THERE IS NO DISTINCTION BETWEEN TYPES OF LABORATORY AND THE EMPHASIS IS ON GIVING GUIDES AND ALTERNATIVES RATHER THAN DETAILED SPECIFICATIONS. AREAS COVERED INCLUDE--(1)…

  10. 14 CFR 27.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety equipment. 27.1561 Section 27.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency, such...

  11. 14 CFR 29.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety equipment. 29.1561 Section 29.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety equipment. 25.1561 Section 25.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  13. 14 CFR 27.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety equipment. 27.1561 Section 27.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency, such...

  14. 14 CFR 29.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety equipment. 29.1561 Section 29.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  15. 14 CFR 27.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety equipment. 27.1561 Section 27.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency, such...

  16. 14 CFR 25.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety equipment. 25.1561 Section 25.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  17. 14 CFR 25.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety equipment. 25.1561 Section 25.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  18. 14 CFR 29.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety equipment. 29.1561 Section 29.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  19. 14 CFR 27.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety equipment. 27.1561 Section 27.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency, such...

  20. 14 CFR 27.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety equipment. 27.1561 Section 27.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency, such...

  1. 14 CFR 29.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety equipment. 29.1561 Section 29.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  2. 14 CFR 29.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety equipment. 29.1561 Section 29.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety equipment. 25.1561 Section 25.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  4. 14 CFR 25.1561 - Safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety equipment. 25.1561 Section 25.1561 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1561 Safety equipment. (a) Each safety equipment control to be operated by the crew in emergency,...

  5. Flywheel containment and safety considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coppa, A. P.

    1984-01-01

    Flywheel safety and containment design technology are discussed. The effects of axial loading resulting from composite rotor burst tests are considered. Analysis of the radial burst problem is also included.

  6. Seeding materials: Health and safety considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    The choice of a proper seeding material for laser velocimeters must include health and safety considerations. Failure to do so can lead to catastrophic results. All materials are toxic, and laser velocimeter seeding materials are no exception. Toxicity may be considered an inherent property of a given material. The manifestation of that property or the physiological response to the material is dependent on dose and exposure conditions. An approximate physiological classification of toxicity is given in tablular form. Toxicity in some situations is not necessarily the most restrictive factor in selection of materials. It is also very important to consider how the material is used so that actual exposure to the material in a damaging form can result. For example, nickel and cadmium are both extremely toxic as systemic poisons and in the case of nickel as a carcinogen. Seeding materials are dispersed in air under conditions that favor personnel exposure. Dispersal equipment is frequently if not normally manned, and personnel are often required to make frequent adjustments to assure proper operations.

  7. 46 CFR 153.215 - Safety equipment lockers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Safety equipment lockers. 153.215 Section 153.215... Vessel Requirements § 153.215 Safety equipment lockers. Each self-propelled ship must have the following: (a) Each tankship must have at least two safety equipment lockers. (b) One safety equipment...

  8. [Safety analysis for astronaut and the personal protective equipment].

    PubMed

    Chen, J D; Sun, J B; Shi, H P; Sun, H L

    1999-12-01

    Objective. To analyze and study astronaut and his personal equipment safety. Method. Three of the most widely used approaches, failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), fault tree analysis (FTA) and system hazards analysis (SHA) were used. Result. It was demonstrated that astronaut and the personal equipment are subjected to various potential hazards, such as human errors, astronaut illness, fire or space suit emergency decompression, etc. Their causes, mechanisms, possible effects and criticality of some critical potential hazards were analyzed and identified in more details with considerations of the historic accidents of manned spaceflight. And the compensating provisions and preventive measures for each hazard were discussed. Conclusion. The analysis study may be helpful in enhancing the safety of the astronaut and its personal protective equipment. PMID:12434807

  9. Safety Considerations in Design of Spacecraft Hatches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciancone, Michael L.; Johnson, Gary W.

    2010-09-01

    Human spaceflight missions have grown longer and more complex as international spaceflight programs have evolved. This has presented additional safety considerations in the design of hatches for habitable spacecraft. One important decision in the design of spacecraft is whether to use pressure-sealing hatches that open inward(i.e., internal cabin pressure keeps the hatch sealed on orbit) or hatches that open outward(i.e., facilitates crew egress during pre-launch and post-landing events). This paper will explore safety considerations that influence that decision, as well as hazards associated with hatches. Safety considerations include mission duration, mission profile(relatively short sorties to ISS versus extended journeys to the Moon or planets), intended usage(e.g., flight and ground crew ingress/egress during ground phases, flight crew ingress/egress during EVA, or inter-spacecraft access during docked operations), reliability/complexity(usually involving mechanisms and/or pyrotechnics), and off-nominal ground ingress/egress(how many crew members must egress within a specified length of time under what circumstances). In addition, this paper will provide a historical survey of hatch designs for manned spacecraft, including a brief list of incidents involving hatches.

  10. 46 CFR 107.405 - Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Safety Equipment Certificate. 107.405 Section 107.405... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 107.405 Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) A self-propelled unit of at least 500 gross tons...

  11. Plutonium finishing plant safety systems and equipment list

    SciTech Connect

    Bergquist, G.G.

    1995-01-06

    The Safety Equipment List (SEL) supports Analysis Report (FSAR), WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021 and the Plutonium Finishing Plant Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs), WHC-SD-CP-OSR-010. The SEL is a breakdown and classification of all Safety Class 1, 2, and 3 equipment, components, or system at the Plutonium Finishing Plant complex.

  12. Safety Considerations in the Ground Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, Paul D.; Palo, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    In the history of humankind, every great space adventure has begun on the ground. While this seems to be stating the obvious, mission and spacecraft designers who have overlooked this fact have paid a high price, either in loss or damage to the spacecraft pre-launch, or in mission failure or reduction. Spacecraft personnel may risk not only their flight hardware, but they may also risk their lives, their co-workers lives and even the general public by not heeding safety on the ground. Their eyes may be on the stars but their feet are on the ground! One additional comment: Although the design requirements are very different for human rated and nonhuman rated flight hardware, while on the ground that flight hardware (and its ground support equipment) doesn't care about what it is flying on. On the ground, additional requirements are often levied to protect the work force and general public. (Authors' Note: The source material for this chapter is primarily taken from the Kennedy Space Center Handbook (KHB) 1700.7/45 SW Handbook S-100 Space Shuttle Payload Ground Safety Handbook and the authors' personal experiences.

  13. 49 CFR 192.171 - Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment... Pipeline Components § 192.171 Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment. (a) Each compressor station... operation may not be affected by the emergency shutdown system. (b) Each compressor station prime...

  14. 48 CFR 50.205-1 - SAFETY Act Considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Fostering Effective Technologies Act of 2002 50.205-1 SAFETY Act Considerations. (a) SAFETY Act applicability. Requiring activities should review requirements to identify potential technologies that prevent... acquisitions involving such technologies, the requiring activity should ascertain through discussions with...

  15. Safety Considerations in the Chemical Process Industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englund, Stanley M.

    There is an increased emphasis on chemical process safety as a result of highly publicized accidents. Public awareness of these accidents has provided a driving force for industry to improve its safety record. There has been an increasing amount of government regulation.

  16. Food safety considerations for innovative nutrition solutions.

    PubMed

    Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol; Cohn, Marjorie Nolan; Farber, Jeffrey M; Harris, Linda J; Roberts, Tanya; Salin, Victoria; Singh, Manpreet; Jaferi, Azra; Sperber, William H

    2015-07-01

    Failure to secure safe and affordable food to the growing global population leads far too often to disastrous consequences. Among specialists and other individuals, food scientists have a key responsibility to improve and use science-based tools to address risk and advise food handlers and manufacturers with best-practice recommendations. With collaboration from production agriculture, food processors, state and federal agencies, and consumers, it is critical to implement science-based strategies that address food safety and that have been evaluated for effectiveness in controlling and/or eliminating hazards. It is an open question whether future food safety concerns will shift in priority given the imperatives to supply sufficient food. This report brings together leading food safety experts to address these issues with a focus on three areas: economic, social, and policy aspects of food safety; production and postharvest technology for safe food; and innovative public communication for food safety and nutrition. PMID:25943305

  17. How Stereochemistry Considerations can Improve Pesticide Safety

    EPA Science Inventory

    About 30% of pesticides are chiral molecules and therefore exist as two or more stereoisomers, which can differ significantly in their toxicity, biodegradation, and persistence. Such differences can impact their relative safety to humans and environmental species. Enantiomers, mi...

  18. Design review report for modifications to RMCS safety class equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.E.

    1997-05-30

    This report documents the completion of the formal design review for modifications to the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) safety class equipment. These modifications are intended to support core sampling operations in waste tanks requiring flammable gas controls. The objective of this review was to approve the Engineering Change Notices affecting safety class equipment used in the RMCS system. The conclusion reached by the review committee was that these changes are acceptable.

  19. 46 CFR 153.214 - Personnel emergency and safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Personnel emergency and safety equipment. 153.214 Section 153.214 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment General Vessel Requirements §...

  20. 46 CFR 153.214 - Personnel emergency and safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Personnel emergency and safety equipment. 153.214 Section 153.214 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment General Vessel Requirements §...

  1. Combustion Equipment Safety; BTS Technology Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Southface Energy Institute; Tromly, K.

    2000-11-07

    Combustion appliances that use fuels like natural gas, propane, oil, kerosene, or wood can be more efficient and effective at heating than electricity. However, careful installation is required to ensure safe and efficient operation. This fact sheet addresses problems posed by combustion equipment and provides suggestions for furnaces and water heaters, unvented space heaters and fireplaces, and stoves and ovens. Installation, combustion closet design, causes of and prevention of backdrafting are also covered.

  2. Performance and Safety Characteristics in Ice-Climbing Equipment Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, W. Tom

    This study sought to determine whether Alaskan ice climbers place more emphasis on performance characteristics or on safety characteristics when selecting their various ice-climbing equipment. A survey distributed to members of the Alaska Alpine Club and the Alaska Alpine Rescue Group was developed to contain responses related to both safety and…

  3. Biosimilar safety considerations in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Choy, Edwin; Jacobs, Ira Allen

    2014-02-01

    Biologics are important treatments for a number of cancers. Patents for several biologics will expire over the next decade, removing a barrier to the development and commercialization of biosimilars. As biologics differ from small-molecule drugs due to their size and complexity, multifaceted manufacturing process, and their potential for immunogenicity, biosimilars cannot be considered "generic versions" of currently approved biologics. In highly regulated markets, biosimilars can be authorized only if they are demonstrated to be highly similar to the original drug from an analytical and clinical perspective. Any differences must be justified and shown to have no clinically meaningful effect on the safety and efficacy of the biosimilar. The European Medicines Agency has approved a number of biosimilars and the recent approval of the biosimilar infliximab monoclonal antibody is another regulatory milestone. This article will provide context regarding key safety issues addressed in biosimilar development, approval, and delivery, as well as inform oncologists on matters of safety to consider when prescribing biosimilars. Pertinent issues about safety from countries or regions where biosimilars are currently in use also will be reviewed. PMID:24560025

  4. Safety assessment of adjuvanted vaccines: Methodological considerations

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Fernanda Tavares; Di Pasquale, Alberta; Yarzabal, Juan P; Garçon, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvants mainly interact with the innate immune response and are used to enhance the quantity and quality of the downstream adaptive immune response to vaccine antigens. Establishing the safety of a new adjuvant-antigen combination is achieved through rigorous evaluation that begins in the laboratory, and that continues throughout the vaccine life-cycle. The strategy for the evaluation of safety pre-licensure is guided by the disease profile, vaccine indication, and target population, and it is also influenced by available regulatory guidelines. In order to allow meaningful interpretation of clinical data, clinical program methodology should be optimized and standardized, making best use of all available data sources. Post-licensure safety activities are directed by field experience accumulated pre- and post-licensure clinical trial data and spontaneous adverse event reports. Continued evolution of safety evaluation processes that keep pace with advances in vaccine technology and updated communication of the benefit-risk profile is necessary to maintain public confidence in vaccines. PMID:26029975

  5. Safety assessment of adjuvanted vaccines: Methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Fernanda Tavares; Di Pasquale, Alberta; Yarzabal, Juan P; Garçon, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvants mainly interact with the innate immune response and are used to enhance the quantity and quality of the downstream adaptive immune response to vaccine antigens. Establishing the safety of a new adjuvant-antigen combination is achieved through rigorous evaluation that begins in the laboratory, and that continues throughout the vaccine life-cycle. The strategy for the evaluation of safety pre-licensure is guided by the disease profile, vaccine indication, and target population, and it is also influenced by available regulatory guidelines. In order to allow meaningful interpretation of clinical data, clinical program methodology should be optimized and standardized, making best use of all available data sources. Post-licensure safety activities are directed by field experience accumulated pre- and post-licensure clinical trial data and spontaneous adverse event reports. Continued evolution of safety evaluation processes that keep pace with advances in vaccine technology and updated communication of the benefit-risk profile is necessary to maintain public confidence in vaccines. PMID:26029975

  6. Public Playground Equipment: Suggested Safety Guidelines and Supporting Rationale for Public Playground Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahajan, Bal M.; And Others

    The purpose of these Federal safety guidelines is to reduce the severity and frequency of injury associated with public playground equipment under conditions of normal use and reasonably foreseeable misuse. Safety guidelines regarding: (1) assembly, installation, maintenance instructions and identification; (2) materials of manufacture and…

  7. Considerations for safety pharmacogenetics in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Frueh, Felix W

    2011-10-01

    The focus of treating an individual patient is the identification of the individual's specific needs. The measurement of the patient's characteristics, such as blood pressure or body temperature, and also the measurement of biomarkers, such as cholesterol or hemoglobin A1C is part of the patient's health assessment. The deeper the insights into the phenotypic and molecular characteristics of the patient, the better we are positioned to treat a patient. Increasingly, this assessment includes testing for certain pharmacologically relevant genetic variations (pharmacogenetics). Evaluating how the patient's genetic makeup combined with the patient's exposure to environmental influences could impact disease and treatment decisions is becoming the cornerstone of personalized medicine. However, we often use such assessments for finding the most 'effective' treatment, but we might not always be as rigorous in our assessment of potential safety risks. This is particularly apparent when looking at how safety risks are communicated. Often this information is only available as general, population-based statements and a small amount of information is available to evaluate whether or not an individual patient is at risk. Although pharmacogenetic tests that can help to assess whether an individual patient's personal risk exist (safety pharmacogenetics), they are not always performed. PMID:21888988

  8. Radiation Safety Considerations for LHD Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uda, T.; Yamanishi, H.; Miyake, H.; Kodaira, J.; Sakuma, Y.; Hirabayashi, H.; Obayashi, H.; Yamada, H.; Motojima, O.

    1997-06-01

    For experiments with the Large Helical Device (LHD) which is now under construction at the Toki site in Japan, radiation safety issues were discussed. In the course of plasma experiments, radiations such as X-rays, induced γ-rays, and neutrons increase. From a safety point of view, these radiation exposures to the environment should be controlled to limit the annual dose to less than 50 μSv at the site boundary. In order to meet this, an area monitoring system named RMSAFE (Radiation Monitoring System Applicable to Fusion Experiments) has been developed and partly installed. This can discriminate and measure radiations including burst-like emissions due to plasma shots from natural radiations. For the present period, this system is operating to monitor the natural radiation levels before the LHD operation. It was observed that the radiation levels strongly depend on rain levels and ground state. An indoor area monitoring system has already been implemented on site, to measure radiations from NBI and ECH test shots, and it shows good monitoring ability. Also, thermoluminescence dosimetry has been applied. The importance of investigating the radiological behavior under natural conditions with continuous monitoring is shown.

  9. Safety considerations of DNA in food.

    PubMed

    Jonas, D A; Elmadfa, I; Engel, K H; Heller, K J; Kozianowski, G; König, A; Müller, D; Narbonne, J F; Wackernagel, W; Kleiner, J

    2001-01-01

    Recombinant DNA techniques are capable of introducing genetic changes into food organisms that are more predictable than those introduced through conventional breeding techniques. This review discusses whether the consumption of DNA in approved novel foods and novel food ingredients derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) can be regarded as being as safe as the consumption of DNA in existing foods. It concludes that DNA from GMOs is equivalent to DNA from existing food organisms that has always been consumed with human diets. Any risks associated with the consumption of DNA will remain, irrespective of its origin, because the body handles all DNA in the same way. The breakdown of DNA during food processing and passage through the gastrointestinal tract reduces the likelihood that intact genes capable of encoding foreign proteins will be transferred to gut microflora. The review does not specifically address food safety issues arising from the consumption of viable genetically modified microorganisms but it shows that the likelihood of transfer and functional integration of DNA from ingested food by gut microflora and/or human cells is minimal. Information reviewed does not indicate any safety concerns associated with the ingestion of DNA per se from GMOs resulting from the use of currently available recombinant DNA techniques in the food chain. PMID:11786646

  10. Safety considerations for new vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Ellenberg, S S

    2001-01-01

    Vaccines are highly effective and extremely safe. Although most known vaccine reactions are minor (e.g. fever, injection site pain or swelling), rare but serious reactions such as vaccine-associated paralytic polio do occur. When large populations are vaccinated, some adverse health events may occur by chance shortly after vaccination. It is difficult to determine whether these are truly coincidental or attributable to the vaccine. The most reliable way to assess causality is in a controlled study, but clinical trials of new vaccines are typically too small to detect rare but serious effects. If the size of these trials were increased, much more could be learned about the safety of a vaccine prior to its exposure to entire populations. This information would increase confidence in the safety of vaccines, would be a valuable resource for assessing spontaneous reports of adverse events after licensure, and would reduce the risk of licensing a new vaccine that had the potential to cause severe injury to a small proportion of vaccinees. PMID:11802587

  11. Safety considerations for fabricating lithium battery packs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciesla, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Lithium cell safety is a major issue with both manufacturers and end users. Most manufacturers have taken great strides to develop the safest cells possible while still maintaining performance characteristics. The combining of lithium cells for higher voltages, currents, and capacities requires the fabricator of lithium battery packs to be knowledgable about the specific electrochemical system being used. Relatively high rate, spirally wound (large surface area) sulfur oxychloride cells systems, such as Li/Thionyl or Sulfuryl chloride are considered. Prior to the start of a design of a battery pack, a review of the characterization studies for the cells should be conducted. The approach for fabricating a battery pack might vary with cell size.

  12. Online pharmacies: safety and regulatory considerations.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Isaac D; Jano, Elda

    2007-01-01

    Sales of consumer products over the Internet have grown rapidly, including sales of pharmaceutical products. Online pharmacies mimic mail order pharmacies. To operate legally online, pharmacies must be licensed in every state in which sales occur. Although online pharmacies provide benefits to consumers, when compared with traditional pharmacies patients' safety may be compromised. Purchasing prescription drugs online may pose a risk to consumers because they cannot tell whether the site is offering drugs of the same quality offered by a retail pharmacy. There is also a possibility that prescription drugs purchased online may be counterfeit, illegal, or unapproved. A U.S. General Accounting Office study conducted in June 2004 showed that most counterfeit and unapproved drugs sold online are from non-U.S. pharmacies. The Food and Drug Administration and other government agencies have worked to enforce laws on drug sales over the Internet. The biggest challenge in regulating non-U.S. pharmacies is due to their off-shore location. Unfortunately, given the widespread anonymous and ever-changing nature of the Internet, it is very difficult to close down illegal websites. PMID:17665724

  13. Radiation safety considerations in proton aperture disposal.

    PubMed

    Walker, Priscilla K; Edwards, Andrew C; Das, Indra J; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2014-04-01

    Beam shaping in scattered and uniform scanned proton beam therapy (PBT) is made commonly by brass apertures. Due to proton interactions, these devices become radioactive and could pose safety issues and radiation hazards. Nearly 2,000 patient-specific devices per year are used at Indiana University Cyclotron Operations (IUCO) and IU Health Proton Therapy Center (IUHPTC); these devices require proper guidelines for disposal. IUCO practice has been to store these apertures for at least 4 mo to allow for safe transfer to recycling contractors. The devices require decay in two staged secure locations, including at least 4 mo in a separate building, at which point half are ready for disposal. At 6 mo, 20-30% of apertures require further storage. This process requires significant space and manpower and should be considered in the design process for new clinical facilities. More widespread adoption of pencil beam or spot scanning nozzles may obviate this issue, as apertures then will no longer be necessary. PMID:24562073

  14. Mobile mine equipment maintenance safety: A review of US Bureau of Mines research. Information circular/1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kuenzi, J.K.; Nelson, B.C.

    1995-04-01

    This information circular (IC) brings together for consideration recommendations from U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) safety research in the area of surface mine mobile equipment maintenance for the period 1982 through 1991. It updates the 1982 contract report by Baker and Alves which formed the basis for much of the work described in the present report. Recommendations for hazard abatement during work on mobile mine equipment are presented stemming from the results and recommendations of the research in two areas; (1) equipment and workplace hazard reduction, and (2) management of maintenance information. Recommendations included in this report apply to both the operators and maintainers of mobile mining equipment as well as to the manufacturers of that equipment.

  15. 46 CFR 154.1400 - Safety equipment: All vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... chapter, a vessel of less than 25,000 m3 cargo capacity must have the following personnel safety equipment... (NIOSH), each having at least a 30 minute capacity. (2) Nine spare bottles of air for the self-contained air-breathing apparatus, each having at least a 30 minute capacity. (3) Six steel-cored lifelines....

  16. Rig safety depends on equipment, regulations, and personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, T.R. Jr.; Tait, S. ); Mumford, G. )

    1990-03-05

    The authors discuss how improvements that can increase rig safety can be made in equipment, regulations, and stabilized personnel levels. With regard to equipment, exposure to material handling must be reduced through automation, and well-control technology must be improved by enhanced use of computers and better systems to handle gas. According to this analysis, regulations are needed that are global in scope and have had their costs-to-benefits fully and fairly assessed. Self regulation must be used effectively throughout the industry. Job security and wages should be made adequate to maintain an experienced, motivated, and safe work force.

  17. [Technical consideration of setting up a specification for human centrifuge evaluation of anti-G equipment].

    PubMed

    Zhang, C L; Geng, X C; Zhang, W X; Yan, G D; Chu, X

    1999-12-01

    Anti-G equipment needs to be evaluated using human centrifuge before further developed. However, there isn't a general specification for human centrifuge evaluation of anti-G equipment. From related literature and from our over thirty years experience in this area, we sum up to five aspect technical consideration below: human centrifuge, medical specification for using human in +Gz stress experiment, anti-G equipment experimental assembly, principle should be abided by during human centrifuge evaluation of anti-G equipment. We hope that the technical considerations mentioned in the paper should be helpful to the work of setting up a specification for human centrifuge evaluation anti-G equipment. After we have a specification, the research will be conducted orderly and the anti-G [correction of an-G] equipment will be developed sequentially. PMID:12434812

  18. 30 CFR 250.806 - Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety and pollution prevention equipment... CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.806 Safety and pollution prevention equipment... this section, you may install only certified safety and pollution prevention equipment (SPPE) in...

  19. 30 CFR 250.806 - Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety and pollution prevention equipment... CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.806 Safety and pollution prevention equipment... this section, you may install only certified safety and pollution prevention equipment (SPPE) in...

  20. 30 CFR 250.806 - Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety and pollution prevention equipment... CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.806 Safety and pollution prevention equipment... this section, you may install only certified safety and pollution prevention equipment (SPPE) in...

  1. 30 CFR 250.806 - Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety and pollution prevention equipment... Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.806 Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance... install only certified safety and pollution prevention equipment (SPPE) in wells located on the OCS....

  2. Clinical pharmacology: special safety considerations in drug development and pharmacovigilance.

    PubMed

    Atuah, Kwame N; Hughes, Dyfrig; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2004-01-01

    The dose of a drug is a major determinant of its safety, and establishing a safe dose of a novel drug is a prime objective during clinical development. The design of pre-marketing clinical trials precludes the representation of important subpopulations such as children, the elderly and people with co-morbidities. Therefore, postmarketing surveillance (PMS) activities are required to monitor the safety profile of drugs in real clinical practice. Furthermore, individual variations in pharmacogenetic profiles, the immune system, drug metabolic pathways and drug-drug interactions are also important factors in the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. Thus, the safety of a drug is a major clinical consideration before and after it is marketed. A multidisciplinary approach is required to enhance the safety profile of drugs at all stages of development, including PMS activities. Clinical pharmacology encompasses a range of disciplines and forms the backbone of drug safety consideration during clinical drug development. In this review we give an overview of the clinical drug development process and consider its limitations. We present a discussion of several aspects of clinical pharmacology and their application to enhancing drug safety. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling provides a method of predicting a clinically safe dose; consideration of drug pharmacokinetics in special populations may enhance safe therapeutics in a wider spectrum of patients, while pharmacogenetics provides the possibility of genotype-specific therapeutics. Pharmacovigilance activities are also discussed. Given the complex nature and unpredictability of type B reactions, PMS activities are crucial in managing the risks drugs pose to the general population. The various aspects of clinical pharmacology discussed make a strong case for this field as the backbone of optimising and promoting safe development and use of drugs. PMID:15154826

  3. 46 CFR 189.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 189.60-10..., 1974 § 189.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet...

  4. 46 CFR 189.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 189.60-10..., 1974 § 189.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet...

  5. 46 CFR 91.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 91.60-10..., 1974 § 91.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet the...

  6. 46 CFR 91.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 91.60-10..., 1974 § 91.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet the...

  7. 46 CFR 189.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 189.60-10..., 1974 § 189.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet...

  8. 46 CFR 189.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 189.60-10..., 1974 § 189.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet...

  9. 46 CFR 91.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 91.60-10..., 1974 § 91.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet the...

  10. 46 CFR 91.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 91.60-10..., 1974 § 91.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet the...

  11. 46 CFR 91.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 91.60-10..., 1974 § 91.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet the...

  12. 46 CFR 189.60-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. 189.60-10..., 1974 § 189.60-10 Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (a) All vessels on an international voyage are required to have a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such vessels shall meet...

  13. 19 CFR 12.85 - Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety... Associated Equipment § 12.85 Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards. (a) Applicability of standards or regulations prescribed by the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard. Boats and associated equipment...

  14. 19 CFR 12.85 - Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety... Associated Equipment § 12.85 Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards. (a) Applicability of standards or regulations prescribed by the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard. Boats and associated equipment...

  15. 19 CFR 12.85 - Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety... Associated Equipment § 12.85 Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards. (a) Applicability of standards or regulations prescribed by the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard. Boats and associated equipment...

  16. 19 CFR 12.85 - Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety... Associated Equipment § 12.85 Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards. (a) Applicability of standards or regulations prescribed by the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard. Boats and associated equipment...

  17. Child Injury Prevention in the Home: A National Survey of Safety Practices and Use of Safety Equipment in Deprived Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, C. A.; Watson, M. C.; Smith, S.; Coupland, C.; Kendrick, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of home safety practices and use of safety equipment by disadvantaged families participating in a national home safety equipment scheme in England. Design: Cross-sectional postal survey sent to a random sample of 1,000 families. Setting: England, United Kingdom. Results: Half the families (51%) returned a…

  18. Environment, safety, and health considerations for a new accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    J. Donald Cossairt

    2001-04-23

    A study of siting considerations for possible future accelerators at Fermilab is underway. Each candidate presents important challenges in environment, safety, and health (ES&H) that are reviewed generically in this paper. Some of these considerations are similar to those that have been encountered and solved during the construction and operation of other accelerator facilities. Others have not been encountered previously on the same scale. The novel issues will require particular attention coincident with project design efforts to assure their timely cost-effective resolution. It is concluded that with adequate planning, the issues can be addressed in a manner that merits the support of the Laboratory, the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the public.

  19. Human factors and safety considerations of night-vision systems flight using thermal imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rash, Clarence E.; Verona, Robert W.; Crowley, John S.

    1990-10-01

    Helmet Mounted Systems (HMS) must be lightweight, balanced and compatible with life support and head protection assemblies. This paper discusses the design of one particular HMS, the GEC Ferranti NITE-OP/NIGHTBIRD aviator's Night Vision Goggle (NVG) developed under contracts to the Ministry of Defence for all three services in the United Kingdom (UK) for Rotary Wing and fast jet aircraft. The existing equipment constraints, safety, human factor and optical performance requirements are discussed before the design solution is presented after consideration of these material and manufacturing options.

  20. 46 CFR 111.05-33 - Equipment safety grounding (bonding) conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Equipment safety grounding (bonding) conductors. 111.05-33 Section 111.05-33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Equipment Ground, Ground Detection, and Grounded Systems § 111.05-33 Equipment safety grounding...

  1. 46 CFR 111.05-33 - Equipment safety grounding (bonding) conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... § 111.05-33 Equipment safety grounding (bonding) conductors. (a) Each equipment-grounding conductor must be sized in accordance with Section 250.122 of NFPA NEC 2002 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment safety grounding (bonding) conductors....

  2. 46 CFR 111.05-33 - Equipment safety grounding (bonding) conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... § 111.05-33 Equipment safety grounding (bonding) conductors. (a) Each equipment-grounding conductor must be sized in accordance with Section 250.122 of NFPA NEC 2002 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Equipment safety grounding (bonding) conductors....

  3. 38 CFR 17.155 - Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. 17.155 Section 17.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Automotive Equipment and Driver Training § 17.155 Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. (a) The Under Secretary...

  4. 38 CFR 17.155 - Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. 17.155 Section 17.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Automotive Equipment and Driver Training § 17.155 Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. (a) The Under Secretary...

  5. 38 CFR 17.155 - Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. 17.155 Section 17.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Automotive Equipment and Driver Training § 17.155 Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. (a) The Under Secretary...

  6. 38 CFR 17.155 - Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. 17.155 Section 17.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Automotive Equipment and Driver Training § 17.155 Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. (a) The Under Secretary...

  7. 38 CFR 17.155 - Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. 17.155 Section 17.155 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Automotive Equipment and Driver Training § 17.155 Minimum standards of safety and quality for automotive adaptive equipment. (a) The Under Secretary...

  8. Manned remote work station - Safety and rescue considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    It is noted that due to restrictions of payload and volume limitations of current and projected launch systems, space construction of ultralarge space structures is essential. The present paper discusses the concepts of a key piece of construction equipment needed to support assembly of such large structures. Attention is given to the manned remote work station (MRWS), a universal crew cabin to be used as a construction cherry picker, space crane turret, work station on a construction base rail system, or a free flyer. Concepts and safety and rescue requirements for this spacecraft are delineated for early applications in support of Shuttle operations, as well as applications in support of a mid to late 1980's space construction base. Finally, applications in support of constructing and maintaining a solar power satellite system are covered.

  9. Adverse drug reactions and safety considerations of NSAIDs: clinical analysis.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, Shiv; Keshri, Lav; Pathak, Kamla

    2011-11-01

    NSAIDs are the most frequently used drugs for treatment, in Europe and the United States, accounting for approximately 5% of all prescriptions. Moreover, the use of NSAIDs is increasing because these constitute the first-line drug therapy for a wide range of rheumatic conditions. This increase is in part the result of the increasing population of elderly patients, who constitute the group of patients with greatest demand for these agents. There are many types of NSAIDs that vary in potency, action and potential side effects. Thus various efforts have been made to determine the safety considerations including adverse drug effects, duration of drug therapy, drug interactions, precautions and other drugs applied to reduce side effects. Researchers have introduced some novel techniques to diagnose NSAIDs related adverse effects on the gastrointestinal mucosa. The researchers dealing with the development of drug delivery system for these drugs should aim at designing a therapeutically efficacious dosage form with reduced side/adverse effects. Thus an effort has been made in this review to deal with the safety parameters of various NSAIDs with a special emphasis on preclinical and clinical safety analysis and various attempts to minimize the side effects by structural modification or by drug delivery system. PMID:22424538

  10. 46 CFR 31.40-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL. 31.40-10... CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 31.40-10 Cargo Ship... Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such tankships shall meet the applicable...

  11. 46 CFR 31.40-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL. 31.40-10... CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 31.40-10 Cargo Ship... Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such tankships shall meet the applicable...

  12. 46 CFR 31.40-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL. 31.40-10... CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 31.40-10 Cargo Ship... Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such tankships shall meet the applicable...

  13. 46 CFR 31.40-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL. 31.40-10... CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 31.40-10 Cargo Ship... Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such tankships shall meet the applicable...

  14. 46 CFR 31.40-10 - Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate-T/ALL. 31.40-10... CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 31.40-10 Cargo Ship... Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate. (b) All such tankships shall meet the applicable...

  15. 26 CFR 1.187-1 - Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amortization of certain coal mine safety... Corporations (continued) § 1.187-1 Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment. (a) Allowance of... coal mine safety equipment (as defined in § 1.187-2), based on a period of 60 months. Such...

  16. 26 CFR 1.187-1 - Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amortization of certain coal mine safety... Corporations (continued) § 1.187-1 Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment. (a) Allowance of... coal mine safety equipment (as defined in § 1.187-2), based on a period of 60 months. Such...

  17. 26 CFR 1.187-1 - Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amortization of certain coal mine safety... Corporations (continued) § 1.187-1 Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment. (a) Allowance of... coal mine safety equipment (as defined in § 1.187-2), based on a period of 60 months. Such...

  18. 26 CFR 1.187-1 - Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amortization of certain coal mine safety... Corporations (continued) § 1.187-1 Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment. (a) Allowance of... coal mine safety equipment (as defined in § 1.187-2), based on a period of 60 months. Such...

  19. Laser safety considerations for a mobile laser program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flor, Mary

    1997-05-01

    An increased demand for advanced laser technology, especially in the area of cutaneous and cosmetic procedures has prompted physicians to use mobile laser services. Utilization of a mobile laser service allows physicians to provide the latest treatments for their patients while minimizing overhead costs. The high capital expense of laser systems is often beyond the financial means of individual clinicians, group practices, free-standing clinics and smaller community hospitals. Historically rapid technology turnover with laser technology places additional risk which is unacceptable to many institutions. In addition, health care reform is mandating consolidation of equipment within health care groups to keep costs at a minimum. In 1994, Abbott Northwestern Hospital organized an in-house mobile laser technology service which employs a group of experienced laser specialists to deliver and support laser treatments for hospital outreach and other regional physicians and health care facilities. Many of the hospital's internal safety standards and policies are applicable to the mobile environment. A significant challenge is client compliance because of the delicate balance of managing risk while avoiding being viewed as a regulator. The clinics and hospitals are assessed prior to service to assure minimum laser safety standards for both the patient and the staff. A major component in assessing new sites is to inform them of applicable regulatory standards and their obligations to assure optimum laser safety. In service training is provided and hospital and procedures are freely shared to assist the client in establishing a safe laser environment. Physician and nursing preceptor programs are also made available.

  20. Flight Test Safety Considerations for Airborne Science Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Randolph S.

    1997-01-01

    Most of the scientific community that require scientific data or scientific measurements from aircraft do not understand the full implications of putting certain equipment on board high performance aircraft. It is the duty of the NASA Flight Operations personnel to ensure that all Principal Investigators who are given space on NASA flight research aircraft, comply with stringent safety requirements. The attitude of the experienced Flight operations personnel given this duty has been and remains one of insuring that the PI's experiment is allowed to be placed on the aircraft (facility) and can be operated in a manner that will obtain the expected data. This is sometimes a challenge. The success that NASA has in this regard is due to the fact that it is its own authority under public law, to certify its aircraft as airworthy. Airworthiness, fitness for flight, is a complex issue which pulls together all aspects of configuration management, engineering, quality, and flight safety. It is often the case at each NASA Center that is conducting airborne research, that unique solutions to some challenging safety issues are required. These solutions permit NASA to do things that would not be permitted by the Department of Transportation. This paper will use examples of various flight research configurations to show the necessity of a disciplined process leading up to flight test and mission implementation. All new configurations required engineering flight test but many, as noted in this paper, require that the modifications be flight tested to insure that they do not negatively impact on any part of the aircraft operational profiles. The success of these processes has been demonstrated over many years and NASA has accommodated experimental packages that cannot be flown on any other aircraft.

  1. Temperature rise and safety considerations for radiation force ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Bruce A.; Harris, Gerald R.

    2002-11-01

    Current models for estimating temperature increase during ultrasound exposure calculate the steady-state rise, using time-averaged acoustic output, as the worst case for safety consideration. While valid for the typically very short (microsecond) pulses used by conventional diagnostic techniques, this analysis does not necessarily correspond to a worst case scenario for the longer pulses or pulse bursts used by a new method, radiation force imaging. Radiation force imaging, employing ultrasound pulse durations up to hundreds of milliseconds, produces and detects motion in solid tissue or acoustic streaming in fluids via a high intensity beam. Models that calculate the transient temperature rise from these pulses are developed for both the bone at focus and soft tissue cases. Based on accepted time-temperature dose criteria, it is shown that for pulse lengths and intensities utilized by this technique, temperature may increase to levels that raise safety concerns for bone at the focus of the ultrasound beam. Also, the impact on this modality of the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration output limits for diagnostic ultrasound devices is discussed.

  2. Improving platelet transfusion safety: biomedical and technical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Chavarin, Patricia; Laperche, Syria; Morel, Pascal; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lozano, Miguel; Blumberg, Neil; Osselaer, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Platelet concentrates account for near 10% of all labile blood components but are responsible for more than 25% of the reported adverse events. Besides factors related to patients themselves, who may be particularly at risk of side effects because of their underlying illness, there are aspects of platelet collection and storage that predispose to adverse events. Platelets for transfusion are strongly activated by collection through disposal equipment, which can stress the cells, and by preservation at 22 °C with rotation or rocking, which likewise leads to platelet activation, perhaps more so than storage at 4 °C. Lastly, platelets constitutively possess a very large number of bioactive components that may elicit pro-inflammatory reactions when infused into a patient. This review aims to describe approaches that may be crucial to minimising side effects while optimising safety and quality. We suggest that platelet transfusion is complex, in part because of the complexity of the “material” itself: platelets are highly versatile cells and the transfusion process adds a myriad of variables that present many challenges for preserving basal platelet function and preventing dysfunctional activation of the platelets. The review also presents information showing - after years of exhaustive haemovigilance - that whole blood buffy coat pooled platelet components are extremely safe compared to the gold standard (i.e. apheresis platelet components), both in terms of acquired infections and of immunological/inflammatory hazards. PMID:26674828

  3. Safety considerations in the design of Spacelab refrigerator/freezer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hye, A.

    1985-01-01

    A vapor compression refrigerator/freezer has been designed for Spacelab to conduct life sciences experiments. It is equipped with different safety features to eliminate all probable types of failures. The whole Freon loop is enclosed in a second containment so that any leakage of Freon can be contained. The unit is provided with an 'Emergency On' switch to actuate during backup mode which provides the spacecraft power directly to the compressor and the cooling fans while removing the power supply and all normal control elements from the circuit. During this mode, the compressor runs continuously when operating as a freezer (-22 C) and is controlled by a thermostat to cycle when operating as a refrigerator (4 C). It has a push button switch at the front panel to momentarily power the thermometer by a battery to monitor the inside temperature during an emergency. It has a door switch which shuts off the internal cooling fans when the door is opened. All the important critical performance data will be downlinked through a data connector to monitor during mission.

  4. Improving platelet transfusion safety: biomedical and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Chavarin, Patricia; Laperche, Syria; Morel, Pascal; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lozano, Miguel; Blumberg, Neil; Osselaer, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-01

    Platelet concentrates account for near 10% of all labile blood components but are responsible for more than 25% of the reported adverse events. Besides factors related to patients themselves, who may be particularly at risk of side effects because of their underlying illness, there are aspects of platelet collection and storage that predispose to adverse events. Platelets for transfusion are strongly activated by collection through disposal equipment, which can stress the cells, and by preservation at 22 °C with rotation or rocking, which likewise leads to platelet activation, perhaps more so than storage at 4 °C. Lastly, platelets constitutively possess a very large number of bioactive components that may elicit pro-inflammatory reactions when infused into a patient. This review aims to describe approaches that may be crucial to minimising side effects while optimising safety and quality. We suggest that platelet transfusion is complex, in part because of the complexity of the "material" itself: platelets are highly versatile cells and the transfusion process adds a myriad of variables that present many challenges for preserving basal platelet function and preventing dysfunctional activation of the platelets. The review also presents information showing--after years of exhaustive haemovigilance--that whole blood buffy coat pooled platelet components are extremely safe compared to the gold standard (i.e. apheresis platelet components), both in terms of acquired infections and of immunological/inflammatory hazards. PMID:26674828

  5. Safety program considerations for space nuclear reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cropp, L.O.

    1984-08-01

    This report discusses the necessity for in-depth safety program planning for space nuclear reactor systems. The objectives of the safety program and a proposed task structure is presented for meeting those objectives. A proposed working relationship between the design and independent safety groups is suggested. Examples of safety-related design philosophies are given.

  6. 30 CFR 250.1004 - Safety equipment requirements for DOI pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety equipment requirements for DOI pipelines... SHELF Pipelines and Pipeline Rights-of-Way § 250.1004 Safety equipment requirements for DOI pipelines... required by this section on all incoming, departing, and crossing pipelines on platforms....

  7. 19 CFR 12.85 - Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coast Guard boat and associated equipment safety standards. 12.85 Section 12.85 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Safety Standards for Boats and Associated Equipment § 12.85 Coast Guard...

  8. 29 CFR 1915.93 - Motor vehicle safety equipment, operation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements in 29 CFR 1910.178 continue to apply to powered industrial trucks used for shipyard employment. (b... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motor vehicle safety equipment, operation and maintenance... General Working Conditions § 1915.93 Motor vehicle safety equipment, operation and maintenance....

  9. 48 CFR 246.270 - Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations. 246.270 Section 246.270 Federal Acquisition Regulations... ASSURANCE Contract Quality Requirements 246.270 Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment...

  10. 48 CFR 246.270 - Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations. 246.270 Section 246.270 Federal Acquisition Regulations... ASSURANCE Contract Quality Requirements 246.270 Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment...

  11. 48 CFR 246.270 - Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations. 246.270 Section 246.270 Federal Acquisition Regulations... ASSURANCE Contract Quality Requirements 246.270 Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment...

  12. 48 CFR 246.270 - Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations. 246.270 Section 246.270 Federal Acquisition Regulations... ASSURANCE Contract Quality Requirements 246.270 Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment...

  13. 30 CFR 250.806 - Safety and pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety and pollution prevention equipment... pollution prevention equipment quality assurance requirements. (a) General requirements. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, you may install only certified safety and...

  14. 30 CFR 250.1004 - Safety equipment requirements for DOI pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety equipment requirements for DOI pipelines. 250.1004 Section 250.1004 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...-Way § 250.1004 Safety equipment requirements for DOI pipelines. (a) The lessee shall ensure the...

  15. [Ecological and food safety considerations about products of vegetable origin].

    PubMed

    Tapia de Daza, M S; Díaz, R V

    1994-12-01

    Media have paid much attention in recent years to emerging microbiological problems in foods of plant origin. The potential for contamination of fruits and vegetables is high because of the wide variety of conditions to which produce is exposed during growth, harvest, processing and distribution. These considerations acquire great significance in the current scenario of the new processing techniques that offer attributes of convenience and fresh-likeness in response to changes in consumption patterns and increased demand of fresh and minimally processed fruits and vegetables. Thus, reliance on low temperature storage and on improved packaging materials/techniques have increased. Even if produce had not been considered a major vector for foodborne diseases, technologies that extend shelf-life by decreasing the rate of product deterioration might increase the risks associated with pathogenic microorganisms, especially of psychotropic nature, by allowing sufficient time for their growth when retarding the development of competitive spoilage organisms. Processing steps that modify the food microenvironment open new possibilities to support pathogens that, for ecological reason, would have never been naturally present in produce. Ecological and safety aspects related to fruits and vegetables as well as foodborne disease outbreaks traceable to produce and reportedly due to Salmonella and Shigella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium botulinum, Aeromonas hydrophila, Campylobacter jejuni are reviewed. PMID:8984963

  16. TANK VAPOR CHEMICALS OF POTENTIAL CONCERN & EXISTING DIRECT READING INSTRUMENTION & PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT CONSIDERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    BUTLER, N.K.

    2004-11-01

    This document takes the newly released Industrial Hygiene Chemical Vapor Technical Basis (RPP-22491) and evaluates the chemicals of potential concern (COPC) identified for selected implementation actions by the industrial hygiene organization. This document is not intended as a hazard analysis with recommended controls for all tank farm activities. Not all of the chemicals listed are present in all tanks; therefore, hazard analyses can and should be tailored as appropriate. Detection of each chemical by current industrial hygiene non-specific instrumentation in use at the tank farms is evaluated. Information gaps are identified and recommendations are made to resolve these needs. Of the 52 COPC, 34 can be detected with existing instrumentation. Three additional chemicals could be detected with a photoionization detector (PID) equipped with a different lamp. Discussion with specific instrument manufacturers is warranted. Consideration should be given to having the SapphIRe XL customized for tank farm applications. Other instruments, sampling or modeling techniques should be evaluated to estimate concentrations of chemicals not detected by direct reading instruments. In addition, relative instrument response needs to be factored in to action levels used for direct reading instruments. These action levels should be correlated to exposures to the COPC and corresponding occupational exposure limits (OELs). The minimum respiratory protection for each of the COPC is evaluated against current options. Recommendations are made for respiratory protection based on each chemical. Until exposures are sufficiently quantified and analyzed, the current use of supplied air respiratory protection is appropriate and protective for the COPC. Use of supplied air respiratory protection should be evaluated once a detailed exposure assessment for the COPC is completed. The established tank farm OELs should be documented in the TFC-PLN-34. For chemicals without an established tank farm OEL

  17. Administration of Substances to Laboratory Animals: Equipment Considerations, Vehicle Selection, and Solute Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Patricia V; Pekow, Cynthia; Vasbinder, Mary Ann; Brabb, Thea

    2011-01-01

    Administration of substances to laboratory animals requires careful consideration and planning to optimize delivery of the agent to the animal while minimizing potential adverse experiences from the procedure. The equipment selected to deliver substances to animals depends on the length of the study and the nature of the material being administered. This selection provides a significant opportunity for refining animal treatment. Similarly, when substances are administered as solutions or suspensions, attention should be given to selection of vehicles and methods used for preparing the solutions and suspensions. The research team, veterinarian, technical personnel, and IACUC members should be aware of reasons underlying selection of equipment for substance delivery and should consider carefully how substances will be prepared and stored prior to administration to animals. Failure to consider these factors during experimental planning may result in unintentional adverse effects on experimental animals and confounded results. PMID:22330706

  18. Spaceflight Ground Support Equipment Reliability & System Safety Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Rene; Riddlebaugh, Jeffrey; Brinkman, John; Wilkinson, Myron

    2012-01-01

    Presented were Reliability Analysis, consisting primarily of Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), and System Safety Analysis, consisting of Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA), performed to ensure that the CoNNeCT (Communications, Navigation, and Networking re- Configurable Testbed) Flight System was safely and reliably operated during its Assembly, Integration and Test (AI&T) phase. A tailored approach to the NASA Ground Support Equipment (GSE) standard, NASA-STD-5005C, involving the application of the appropriate Requirements, S&MA discipline expertise, and a Configuration Management system (to retain a record of the analysis and documentation) were presented. Presented were System Block Diagrams of selected GSE and the corresponding FMEA, as well as the PHAs. Also discussed are the specific examples of the FMEAs and PHAs being used during the AI&T phase to drive modifications to the GSE (via "redlining" of test procedures, and the placement of warning stickers to protect the flight hardware) before being interfaced to the Flight System. These modifications were necessary because failure modes and hazards were identified during the analysis that had not been properly mitigated. Strict Configuration Management was applied to changes (whether due to upgrades or expired calibrations) in the GSE by revisiting the FMEAs and PHAs to reflect the latest System Block Diagrams and Bill Of Material. The CoNNeCT flight system has been successfully assembled, integrated, tested, and shipped to the launch site without incident. This demonstrates that the steps taken to safeguard the flight system when it was interfaced to the various GSE were successful.

  19. 48 CFR 252.246-7004 - Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. 252.246-7004 Section 252.246-7004 Federal Acquisition..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. As prescribed in 246.270-4, use the following clause: Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations (OCT 2010) (a)...

  20. 48 CFR 252.246-7004 - Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. 252.246-7004 Section 252.246-7004 Federal Acquisition..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. As prescribed in 246.270-4, use the following clause: Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations (OCT 2010) (a)...

  1. 48 CFR 252.246-7004 - Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. 252.246-7004 Section 252.246-7004 Federal Acquisition..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. As prescribed in 246.270-4, use the following clause: SAFETY OF FACILITIES, INFRASTRUCTURE, AND EQUIPMENT FOR MILITARY OPERATIONS (OCT 2010) (a)...

  2. Safety Considerations for Physically Handicapped Individuals in the Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Anne Barrett; Steere, Norman V.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews safety records of physically handicapped individuals, relating safety for all individuals in the laboratory to special concerns for the mobility handicapped, visually handicapped, and hearing impaired individuals. Discusses legal responsibilities and liability. (CS)

  3. Review of recent safety programs at the Hanford Site for new in-tank equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Berglin, E.J.; Johansen, F.P., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-10-31

    The general safety criteria are reviewed; examples of several different safety programs are illustrated; cost and schedule information are presented; and outlines of general safety considerations and specific safety design requirements and solutions are listed. A suggested program approach is covered in some detail.

  4. 29 CFR 1926.1408 - Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-equipment operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-equipment operations. 1926.1408 Section 1926.1408 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.1408 - Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-equipment operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-equipment operations. 1926.1408 Section 1926.1408 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes...

  6. Need for an "integrated safety assessment" of GMOs, linking food safety and environmental considerations.

    PubMed

    Haslberger, Alexander G

    2006-05-01

    information. An integrated assessment might help to focus and save capacities in highly technical areas such as molecular characterization or profiling, which are often necessary for both assessments. In the area of establishing international standards for traded foods, such as for the newly created Standards in Trade and Development Facility (STDF), an integrated assessment might help in the consideration of important environmental aspects involved in health and food safety. Furthermore, an established integrated view on GMOs may create greater consumer confidence in the technology. PMID:16637668

  7. Intimate partner violence in the family: considerations for children's safety.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Harriet L; Wathen, C Nadine; Varcoe, Colleen M

    2013-12-01

    Children's exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV) is increasingly recognized as a type of child maltreatment that has a level of impairment similar to other types of abuse and neglect. Despite advances in the area of IPV, the safety planning strategies recommended as part of the overall response to IPV need to be examined in terms of their implications for children. This article discusses these strategies within the context of child safety, comparing IPV safety planning with approaches aimed at reducing exposure to other types of violence such as child sexual abuse, as well as general child safety strategies. Despite the emphasis on safety planning in information available on responding to IPV, the actual effectiveness of such planning in improving safety and reducing violence is unknown. Safety planning provided to children by a parent experiencing IPV, especially when IPV is ongoing and not recognized by anyone outside the home, may lead to confusing messages for children, particularly if there is an emphasis on secrecy. While awaiting evidence about the effectiveness of specific safety planning strategies for children, we suggest basic principles and general strategies that emphasize universality in terms of education about any type of violence or abuse in the home being unacceptable, as well as the need to focus on safety in general. PMID:23830555

  8. Criticality safety considerations for low-level-waste facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, C.M.

    1995-04-01

    The nuclear criticality safety for handling and burial of certain special nuclear materials (SNM) at low-level-waste (LLW) facilities is licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Recently, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) staff assisted the NRC Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, Low-Level-Waste and Decommissioning Projects Branch, in developing technical specifications for the nuclear criticality safety of {sup 235}U and {sup 235}Pu in LLW facilities. This assistance resulted in a set of nuclear criticality safety criteria that can be uniformly applied to the review of LLW package burial facility license applications. These criteria were developed through the coupling of the historic surface-density criterion with current computational technique to establish safety criteria considering SNM material form and reflector influences. This paper presents a summary of the approach used to establish and to apply the criteria to the licensing review process.

  9. NASA safety standard for lifting devices and equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's minimum safety requirements are established for the design, testing, inspection, maintenance, certification, and use of overhead and gantry cranes (including top running monorail, underhung, and jib cranes), mobile cranes, derrick hoists, and special hoist supported personnel lifting devices (these do not include elevators, ground supported personnel lifts, or powered platforms). Minimum requirements are also addressed for the testing, inspection, and use of Hydra-sets, hooks, and slings. Safety standards are thoroughly detailed.

  10. NASA safety standard for lifting devices and equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-09-01

    NASA's minimum safety requirements are established for the design, testing, inspection, maintenance, certification, and use of overhead and gantry cranes (including top running monorail, underhung, and jib cranes), mobile cranes, derrick hoists, and special hoist supported personnel lifting devices (these do not include elevators, ground supported personnel lifts, or powered platforms). Minimum requirements are also addressed for the testing, inspection, and use of Hydra-sets, hooks, and slings. Safety standards are thoroughly detailed.

  11. 49 CFR 192.171 - Compressor stations: Additional safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... must have adequate fire protection facilities. If fire pumps are a part of these facilities, their operation may not be affected by the emergency shutdown system. (b) Each compressor station prime mover... operates with pressure gas injection must be equipped so that stoppage of the engine automatically...

  12. Design considerations, tooling, and equipment for remote in-service inspection of radioactive piping and pressure-vessel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swannack, D.L.; Schmoker, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes results obtained in use of remotely-operated nondestructive testing (NDT) equipment for inspection of reactor-system components. Experience obtained in operating the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has provided a basis for field verification of remote NDT equipment designs and has suggested development improvements. Remote Viewing and data gathering systems used include periscopes, borescopes, fiberscopes, hybrid borescopes/fiberscopes, and closed circuit television. A summary of design consideration for inspection equipment and power plant design is presented to achieve improved equipment operation and reduction of plant maintenance downtime.

  13. 9 CFR 307.7 - Safety requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... stimulating (EST) equipment. 307.7 Section 307.7 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... manual stimulation or before the carcass chain is started in an automatic system. (c) Operation— (1..., Technical Services, Food Safety and Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC...

  14. 9 CFR 307.7 - Safety requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... stimulating (EST) equipment. 307.7 Section 307.7 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... manual stimulation or before the carcass chain is started in an automatic system. (c) Operation—(1..., Technical Services, Food Safety and Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC...

  15. 9 CFR 307.7 - Safety requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... stimulating (EST) equipment. 307.7 Section 307.7 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... manual stimulation or before the carcass chain is started in an automatic system. (c) Operation—(1..., Technical Services, Food Safety and Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC...

  16. 9 CFR 307.7 - Safety requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... stimulating (EST) equipment. 307.7 Section 307.7 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... manual stimulation or before the carcass chain is started in an automatic system. (c) Operation— (1..., Technical Services, Food Safety and Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC...

  17. 9 CFR 307.7 - Safety requirements for electrical stimulating (EST) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... stimulating (EST) equipment. 307.7 Section 307.7 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION... manual stimulation or before the carcass chain is started in an automatic system. (c) Operation—(1..., Technical Services, Food Safety and Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC...

  18. 26 CFR 1.187-1 - Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amortization of certain coal mine safety... (continued) § 1.187-1 Amortization of certain coal mine safety equipment. (a) Allowance of deduction—(1) In... respect to the amortization of the adjusted basis (for determining gain) of any certified coal mine...

  19. What Are the Safety Considerations for Insulin Control for Athletes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry W.; Olson, Sara; Gaudet, Laura; Jackson, Allen

    2010-01-01

    Athletes diagnosed with diabetes may have difficulty with their blood sugar levels fluctuating during intense exercise. Considerations for athletes with insulin concerns may range anywhere from exercise rehabilitation to the use of an automatic insulin pump. The automatic insulin pump is a small battery-operated device about the size of a pager.…

  20. Neurovestibular Effects of Spaceflight - Considerations for Human Safety and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groen, E.

    2012-01-01

    From orbital spaceflight we know that astronauts may suffer from sensori-motor problems during the first days in weightlessness, and again upon return to Earth. Symptoms include spatial disorientation, motion illusions, postural imbalance, and motion sickness. Symptoms are typically triggered by head movements, indicating a central role of the vestibular system. TNO research has shown that the same symptoms can be elicited by exposing subjects to hyper-gravity in a human centrifuge. This suggests that not weightlessness itself, but the change in G-load causes vestibular adaptation problems. Suborbital spaceflight will expose participants to a sequence of highly variable G-levels. Hence it can be anticipated that this will affect vestibular functioning, with potential consequences for ride comfort (passengers) and flight safety (crew). We therefore propose to invest in research on the physiological responses to G-load profiles specific for suborbital flights with the purpose to establish comfort and safety guidelines for the commercial spaceflight sector.

  1. Safety and emergency preparedness considerations for geotechnical field operations

    SciTech Connect

    Wemple, R.P.

    1989-04-01

    The GEO Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories is involved in several remote-site drilling and/or experimental operations each year. In 1987, the Geothermal Research Division of the Department developed a general set of Safe Operating Procedures (SOPs) that could be applied to a variety of projects. This general set is supplemented by site-specific SOPs as needed. Effective field operations require: integration of safety and emergency preparedness planning with overall project planning, training of field personnel and inventorying of local emergency support resources, and, developing a clear line of responsibility and authority to enforce the safety requirements. Copies of SOPs used in recent operations are included as examples of working documents for the reader.

  2. Overview of Therapeutic Ultrasound Applications and Safety Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas; Smith, Nadine; Bailey, Michael; Czarnota, Gregory; Hynynen, Kullervo; Makin, Inder

    2013-01-01

    Summary Applications of ultrasound in medicine for therapeutic purposes have been an accepted and beneficial use of ultrasonic biological effects for many years. Low power ultrasound of about 1 MHz frequency has been widely applied since the 1950s for physical therapy in conditions such as tendinitis or bursitis. In the 1980s, high pressure-amplitude shockwaves came into use for mechanically resolving kidney stones, and “lithotripsy” rapidly replaced surgery as the most frequent treatment choice. The use of ultrasonic energy for therapy continues to expand, and approved applications now include uterine fibroid ablation, cataract removal (phacoemulsification), surgical tissue cutting and hemostasis, transdermal drug delivery, and bone fracture healing, among others. Undesirable bioeffects can occur including burns for thermal-based therapies and significant hemorrhage for mechanical-based therapies (e. g. lithotripsy). In all these therapeutic applications for bioeffects of ultrasound, standardization, ultrasound dosimetry, benefits assurance and side-effects risk minimization must be carefully considered in order to insure an optimal benefit to risk ratio for the patient. Therapeutic ultrasound typically has well-defined benefits and risks, and therefore presents a tractable safety problem to the clinician. However, safety information can be scattered, confusing or subject to commercial conflict of interest. Of paramount importance for managing this problem is the communication of practical safety information by authoritative groups, such as the AIUM, to the medical ultrasound community. In this overview, the Bioeffects Committee outlines the wide range of therapeutic ultrasound methods, which are in clinical use or under study, and provides general guidance for assuring therapeutic ultrasound safety. PMID:22441920

  3. General Consideration in the History, Physical Examination, and Safety Determination.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Jonathan; Dexter, William; Powell, Amy; Wright, Justin

    2015-09-01

    A thorough medical history is perhaps the most important aspect when evaluating an athlete before wilderness adventure. A physical examination should follow focusing on conditions that may be affected by changes in atmospheric pressure, extremes of temperature, or altitude. This information can then be used to make safety recommendations ensuring that adventurers are able to safely enjoy participation in the wilderness pursuit of their choice. PMID:26340730

  4. General Consideration in the History, Physical Examination, and Safety Determination.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Jonathan; Dexter, William; Powell, Amy; Wright, Justin

    2015-12-01

    A thorough medical history is perhaps the most important aspect when evaluating an athlete before wilderness adventure. A physical examination should follow focusing on conditions that may be affected by changes in atmospheric pressure, extremes of temperature, or altitude. This information can then be used to make safety recommendations ensuring that adventurers are able to safely enjoy participation in the wilderness pursuit of their choice. PMID:26617374

  5. Safety considerations of lithium-thionyl chloride cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, Surampudi; Halpert, Gerald; Stein, Irving

    1986-01-01

    The use of spirally wound lithium-thionyl chloride (Li-SOCl2) cells is currently limited because of their hazardous behavior. Safety hazards have ranged from mild venting of toxic materials to violent explosions and fires. These incidents may be related to both user- and manufacturer-induced causes. Many explanations have been offered to explain the unsafe behavior of the cells under operating and abuse conditions. Explanations fall into two categories: (1) thermal mechanisms, and (2) chemical mechanisms. However, it is quite difficult to separate the two. Both may be responsible for cell venting or explosion. Some safety problems encountered with these cells also may be due to design deficiencies and ineffective quality control during cell fabrication. A well-coordinated basic and applied research program is needed to develop safe Li-SOCl2 cells. Recommendations include: (1) learnig more about Li-SOL2 cell chemistry; (2) modeling cell and battery behavior; (3) optimizing cell design for safety and performance, (4) implementing quality control procedures; and (5) educating users.

  6. Comparative assessment of nanomaterial definitions and safety evaluation considerations.

    PubMed

    Boverhof, Darrell R; Bramante, Christina M; Butala, John H; Clancy, Shaun F; Lafranconi, Mark; West, Jay; Gordon, Steve C

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials continue to bring promising advances to science and technology. In concert have come calls for increased regulatory oversight to ensure their appropriate identification and evaluation, which has led to extensive discussions about nanomaterial definitions. Numerous nanomaterial definitions have been proposed by government, industry, and standards organizations. We conducted a comprehensive comparative assessment of existing nanomaterial definitions put forward by governments to highlight their similarities and differences. We found that the size limits used in different definitions were inconsistent, as were considerations of other elements, including agglomerates and aggregates, distributional thresholds, novel properties, and solubility. Other important differences included consideration of number size distributions versus weight distributions and natural versus intentionally-manufactured materials. Overall, the definitions we compared were not in alignment, which may lead to inconsistent identification and evaluation of nanomaterials and could have adverse impacts on commerce and public perceptions of nanotechnology. We recommend a set of considerations that future discussions of nanomaterial definitions should consider for describing materials and assessing their potential for health and environmental impacts using risk-based approaches within existing assessment frameworks. Our intent is to initiate a dialogue aimed at achieving greater clarity in identifying those nanomaterials that may require additional evaluation, not to propose a formal definition. PMID:26111608

  7. Repository Safety Strategy: Plan to Prepare Safety Case to Support Yucca Mountain Site Recommendation and Licensing Considerations.

    SciTech Connect

    DOE

    2001-01-18

    A key issue for the site recommendation and license application considerations for a high-level waste repository at Yucca Mountain is the ability of that site to protect the public from any undue radiological risk before and after permanent closure. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is therefore preparing a case regarding preclosure and postclosure safety of a potential repository system at Yucca Mountain. This document, Revision 4 of the Repository Safety Strategy (RSS), reports the current status of this safety case and the plans to complete it. This document updates its predecessors to reflect project developments and information learned since previous revisions. This revision is based on the work to date, including RSS workshops conducted from February through June 2000. While previous revisions focused solely on postclosure safety, Revision 4 also addresses the preclosure safety case. This volume, Volume I, presents the preclosure safety strategy. Volume II presents the postclosure safety strategy.

  8. Some considerations on the safety evaluation of nonviral microbial pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Shadduck, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The tactics and rationale of maximum challenge safety tests for nonviral microbial pesticides have been reviewed. Maximum challenge tests and a tier approach to data collection for regulatory purposes offer the best opportunities to detect the acute effects of entomopathogenic organisms in mammals. Premature condemnation of promising organisms that are based on incomplete results of maximum challenge tests must be avoided. Further investigations should be conducted on the role of mammalian immune response in resistance to entomopathogenic organisms and on the value of medium- or long-term exposure tests. PMID:6601535

  9. 77 FR 74196 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Safety Considerations for Product Design To Minimize Medication...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Product Design To Minimize Medication Errors; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance for industry entitled ``Safety Considerations for Product Design to Minimize Medication Errors... using a systems approach to minimize medication errors relating to product design. The draft...

  10. Human Factors And Safety Considerations Of Night Vision Systems Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verona, Robert W.; Rash, Clarence E.

    1989-03-01

    Military aviation night vision systems greatly enhance the capability to operate during periods of low illumination. After flying with night vision devices, most aviators are apprehensive about returning to unaided night flight. Current night vision imaging devices allow aviators to fly during ambient light conditions which would be extremely dangerous, if not impossible, with unaided vision. However, the visual input afforded with these devices does not approach that experienced using the unencumbered, unaided eye during periods of daylight illumination. Many visual parameters, e,g., acuity, field-of-view, depth perception, etc., are compromised when night vision devices are used. The inherent characteristics of image intensification based sensors introduce new problems associated with the interpretation of visual information based on different spatial and spectral content from that of unaided vision. In addition, the mounting of these devices onto the helmet is accompanied by concerns of fatigue resulting from increased head supported weight and shift in center-of-gravity. All of these concerns have produced numerous human factors and safety issues relating to thb use of night vision systems. These issues are identified and discussed in terms of their possible effects on user performance and safety.

  11. Safety considerations with bisphosphonates for the treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Strampel, William; Emkey, Ronald; Civitelli, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are the most commonly prescribed medications for the treatment of osteoporosis. Although evidence supports a good safety profile for these agents, numerous tolerability issues have been associated with their use. This review provides an overview of the safety issues associated with the nitrogen-containing class of bisphosphonates and discusses the potential effect of these issues on adherence. The review specifically considers upper gastrointestinal (UGI) adverse events (AEs), renal toxicity, influenza-like illness, osteonecrosis of the jaw and evidence on how to treat or prevent these events. In clinical trials, UGI AEs, including severe events such as oesophageal ulcer, oesophagitis and erosive oesophagitis, have been reported at similar frequencies in placebo- and active-treatment arms. However, postmarketing studies have highlighted UGI AEs as a concern. These studies show that a significant portion of patients are less compliant with administration instructions outside strict clinical trial supervision, and when oral bisphosphonates are not administered as directed, patients are more likely to experience UGI AEs. Some clinical trials with oral bisphosphonates have suggested that a decrease in the frequency of administration may lead to improvement in gastrointestinal tolerability. In the authors' experience, the issue of UGI tolerability can be minimised by explaining to the patient and/or caregiver the importance of following administration instructions. Intravenous (IV) bisphosphonates have been recently approved for use in osteoporosis, offering an alternative regimen for patients with osteoporosis. Earlier generation IV bisphosphonates (e.g. etidronate) have been associated with acute renal failure. Alternatively, late-generation IV bisphosphonates (i.e. ibandronate) have shown a better safety profile in relation to renal toxicity. Influenza-like illness, often referred to as an acute-phase reaction, covers symptoms such as fatigue, fever

  12. Supporting Faculty with Media Equipped Classrooms: Considerations for Design and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James A.

    This paper gives an overview of the Media Equipped Classroom (MEC) program at the State University of New York at Buffalo. In 1988 a study was undertaken to explore alternate ways of providing media equipment services to classrooms at the university. The traditional (current) model of delivery and set-up of audiovisual equipment, relying upon…

  13. Safety considerations for office-based obstetric and gynecologic procedures.

    PubMed

    Urman, Richard D; Punwani, Nathan; Bombaugh, Maryanne; Shapiro, Fred E

    2013-01-01

    The migration of gynecologic procedures to office-based settings provides numerous advantages for patients and providers alike, including reduced patient expenses, improved scheduling convenience, favorable provider reimbursement, and enhanced continuity of care and patient satisfaction. With rising health care costs-a major concern in health care-procedures will continue to shift to practice environments that optimize care, quality, value, and efficiency. It is imperative that gynecologic offices ensure that performance and quality variations are minimized across different sites of care; physicians should strive to provide care to patients that optimizes safety and is at least equivalent to that delivered at traditional sites. The gynecologic community should nonetheless heed the Institute of Medicine's recommendations and embrace continuous quality improvement. By exercising leadership, office-based gynecologists can forge a culture of competency, teamwork, communication, and performance measurement. PMID:23687556

  14. Malathion for head lice and scabies: treatment and safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Idriss, Shereene; Levitt, Jacob

    2009-08-01

    Malathion is an under-recognized and under-utilized therapy for head lice and scabies largely due to misperceptions about its safety profile. Specifically, its pure form as it exists in pharmaceutical preparations is non-toxic to humans in the low doses available. While labeled for ages six and up, recent studies showed no cholinesterase inhibition in head lice patients aged two-to-six treated with malathion. Flammability of malathion in isopropyl alcohol has reportedly resulted in human injury once in over one million prescriptions filled. Recent efficacy studies of malathion in United States (U.S.) head lice demonstrate efficacy rates of 97-98%. In the present era of permethrin and lindane resistance to head lice, malathion is a first-line option. For scabies, it is a reasonable alternative to permethrin 5% cream, especially when treatment of the scalp or hairy areas is desired. PMID:19663108

  15. Fire safety design considerations for advanced space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The desire to understand and explore space has driven man to overcome the confines of the Earth's atmosphere and accept the challenge of spaceflight. With our increasing ability to travel, work, and explore in space comes a need for a better understanding of the hazards in this relatively new endeavor. One of the most important and immediate needs is to be able to predict the ignition, spread, and growth of fire on board spacecraft. Fire safety aboard spacecraft has always been a concern; however, with the increasing number and duration of proposed missions, it is imperative that the spacecraft be designed with a solid understanding of fire hazards, insuring that all risks have been minimized and extinguishment systems are available.

  16. System safety analysis of well-control equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.H.; Roche, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    In the wake of recent disasters in the oil and gas E and P and petrochemical industries, the importance of system safety analysis is becoming recognized. Reliability assessment techniques, which were developed in the nuclear-power-generation and defense industries, are potentially valuable tools for engineers in the offshore oil and gas business. BOP's and their control systems used on offshore rigs are typically made up of several subsystems. Hydraulic, pneumatic, and electronic modules are interfaced to provide functional control and monitoring of the mechanical BOP's and valves. Two techniques are used for reliability analysis of a blowout preventer (BOP) and a hydraulic control system. Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) examines each part and the consequences of its malfunction. Fault tree analysis (FTA) traces undesired events to their causes. Reliability calculations and data sources are addressed.

  17. Analysis of medical equipment management in relation to the mandatory medical equipment safety manager (MESM) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kai; Hirose, Minoru; Fujiwara, Kousaku; Tsuruta, Harukazu; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Half a decade has passed since the fifth revision of the medical law and mandatory appointment of a medical equipment safety manager (MESM) in hospitals in Japan. During this period, circumstances have changed regarding maintenance of medical equipment (ME). We conducted a survey to examine these changes and the current situation in ME management. Maintenance of ME and related work were found to have increased in many hospitals, but the number of clinical engineering technologists (CETs) has only slightly increased. The appointed MESM was a CET or physician in most hospitals. In hospitals where physicians were appointed as the MESM, 81% had operation managers. Many respondents commented that it was difficult for one person to cover all the tasks required by the MESM, due to a lack of knowledge, too much work, or other reasons. This suggests the importance of an operation manager for ME to work under the MESM. PMID:25193371

  18. Does non-medical grade power cord compromise the safety of medical equipment?

    PubMed Central

    Padmavathi, V; Prasad, PS Vishnu; Kundra, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    A tertiary care 1000 bedded hospital contains more than 10,000 pieces of equipment worth approximately 41 million USD, while the power cords supplied along with the imported equipment do not comply with country-specific norms. Moreover, the local vendors procure power cords with type D/M plug to complete installation and also on-site electrical safety test is not performed. Hence, this project was undertaken to evaluate the electrical safety of all life-saving equipment purchased in the year 2013, referring to the guidelines of International Electrotechnical Commission 62353, the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-99 hospital standard for the analysis of protective earth resistance and chassis leakage current. This study was done with a measuring device namely electrical safety analyser 612 model from Fluke Biomedical. PMID:26903668

  19. Paradigms and safety requirements for a new generation of workplace equipment.

    PubMed

    Missala, Tadeusz

    2014-01-01

    A workplace in the manufacturing industry consists of not only stationary equipment (e.g., machining centres, fixed robots) but also mobile equipment (e.g., automated guided vehicles, mobile robots), with both kinds cooperating directly with workers. Workplace equipment should not only be safe, it should also not generate fear or anxiety; still better if it should inspire calm and confidence. In view of robot laws, this article presents selected examples of robot-human co-operation, reviews safety requirements and safety functions developed to date. It also proposes a package of selected new safety functions, necessary to fulfil this paradigm. It also suggests and presents examples of actions that can make the workplace a human-friendly environment and presents examples of such actions. PMID:24934421

  20. Does non-medical grade power cord compromise the safety of medical equipment?

    PubMed

    Padmavathi, V; Prasad, Ps Vishnu; Kundra, Pankaj

    2015-12-01

    A tertiary care 1000 bedded hospital contains more than 10,000 pieces of equipment worth approximately 41 million USD, while the power cords supplied along with the imported equipment do not comply with country-specific norms. Moreover, the local vendors procure power cords with type D/M plug to complete installation and also on-site electrical safety test is not performed. Hence, this project was undertaken to evaluate the electrical safety of all life-saving equipment purchased in the year 2013, referring to the guidelines of International Electrotechnical Commission 62353, the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-99 hospital standard for the analysis of protective earth resistance and chassis leakage current. This study was done with a measuring device namely electrical safety analyser 612 model from Fluke Biomedical. PMID:26903668

  1. Criticality safety considerations for MSRE fuel drain tank uranium aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbach, D.F.; Hopper, C.M.

    1997-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary criticality safety study of some potential effects of uranium reduction and aggregation in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel drain tanks (FDTs) during salt removal operations. Since the salt was transferred to the FDTs in 1969, radiological and chemical reactions have been converting the uranium and fluorine in the salt to UF{sub 6} and free fluorine. Significant amounts of uranium (at least 3 kg) and fluorine have migrated out of the FDTs and into the off-gas system (OGS) and the auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). The loss of uranium and fluorine from the salt changes the chemical properties of the salt sufficiently to possibly allow the reduction of the UF{sub 4} in the salt to uranium metal as the salt is remelted prior to removal. It has been postulated that up to 9 kg of the maximum 19.4 kg of uranium in one FDT could be reduced to metal and concentrated. This study shows that criticality becomes a concern when more than 5 kg of uranium concentrates to over 8 wt% of the salt in a favorable geometry.

  2. The FDA's Final Rule on Expedited Safety Reporting: Statistical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wittes, Janet; Crowe, Brenda; Chuang-Stein, Christy; Guettner, Achim; Hall, David; Jiang, Qi; Odenheimer, Daniel; Xia, H. Amy; Kramer, Judith

    2015-01-01

    In March 2011, a Final Rule for expedited reporting of serious adverse events took effect in the United States for studies conducted under an Investigational New Drug (IND) application. In December 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) promulgated a final Guidance describing the operationalization of this Final Rule. The Rule and Guidance clarified that a clinical trial sponsor should have evidence suggesting causality before defining an unexpected serious adverse event as a suspected adverse reaction that would require expedited reporting to the FDA. The Rule's emphasis on the need for evidence suggestive of a causal relation should lead to fewer events being reported but, among those reported, a higher percentage actually being caused by the product being tested. This article reviews the practices that were common before the Final Rule was issued and the approach the New Rule specifies. It then discusses methods for operationalizing the Final Rule with particular focus on relevant statistical considerations. It concludes with a set of recommendations addressed to Sponsors and to the FDA in implementing the Final Rule. PMID:26550466

  3. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Safety Showers and Eyewash Fountains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronaugh, John C.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews safety and emergency equipment in their application to chemical laboratories. Discusses American National Standards (ANSI) for equipment. Presents practical considerations for the placement and purchase of equipment. (MVL)

  4. 29 CFR 1926.1408 - Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-equipment operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... person with respect to electrical power transmission and distribution confirms that a line is insulated... or registered professional engineer who is a qualified person with respect to electrical power... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-equipment operations....

  5. 29 CFR 1926.1408 - Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-equipment operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... person with respect to electrical power transmission and distribution confirms that a line is insulated... or registered professional engineer who is a qualified person with respect to electrical power... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Power line safety (up to 350 kV)-equipment operations....

  6. 29 CFR 1915.93 - Motor vehicle safety equipment, operation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements in 29 CFR 1910.178 continue to apply to powered industrial trucks used for shipyard employment. (b... initially used after August 1, 2011 is equipped with a safety belt for each employee operating or riding in... belt, securely and tightly fastened, at all times while operating or riding in a motor vehicle. (3)...

  7. 29 CFR 1915.93 - Motor vehicle safety equipment, operation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements in 29 CFR 1910.178 continue to apply to powered industrial trucks used for shipyard employment. (b... initially used after August 1, 2011 is equipped with a safety belt for each employee operating or riding in... belt, securely and tightly fastened, at all times while operating or riding in a motor vehicle. (3)...

  8. 49 CFR 214.507 - Required safety equipment for new on-track roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... that is readily accessible and complies with 29 CFR 1926.50(d)(2); and (7) An operative and properly... maintenance machines. 214.507 Section 214.507 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Roadway Maintenance Machines and Hi-Rail Vehicles § 214.507 Required safety equipment for new...

  9. 49 CFR 214.507 - Required safety equipment for new on-track roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... that is readily accessible and complies with 29 CFR 1926.50(d)(2); and (7) An operative and properly... maintenance machines. 214.507 Section 214.507 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Roadway Maintenance Machines and Hi-Rail Vehicles § 214.507 Required safety equipment for new...

  10. 49 CFR 214.507 - Required safety equipment for new on-track roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... that is readily accessible and complies with 29 CFR 1926.50(d)(2); and (7) An operative and properly... maintenance machines. 214.507 Section 214.507 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Roadway Maintenance Machines and Hi-Rail Vehicles § 214.507 Required safety equipment for new...

  11. 49 CFR 214.507 - Required safety equipment for new on-track roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... that is readily accessible and complies with 29 CFR 1926.50(d)(2); and (7) An operative and properly... maintenance machines. 214.507 Section 214.507 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Roadway Maintenance Machines and Hi-Rail Vehicles § 214.507 Required safety equipment for new...

  12. 49 CFR 214.507 - Required safety equipment for new on-track roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... that is readily accessible and complies with 29 CFR 1926.50(d)(2); and (7) An operative and properly... maintenance machines. 214.507 Section 214.507 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Roadway Maintenance Machines and Hi-Rail Vehicles § 214.507 Required safety equipment for new...

  13. 46 CFR 309.6 - Adjustments for condition, equipment, and other considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OPERATIONS VALUES FOR WAR RISK INSURANCE § 309.6 Adjustments for condition, equipment, and other... of $50,000, an amount estimated by the Maritime Administration as the fair and reasonable value...

  14. 46 CFR 309.6 - Adjustments for condition, equipment, and other considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OPERATIONS VALUES FOR WAR RISK INSURANCE § 309.6 Adjustments for condition, equipment, and other... of $50,000, an amount estimated by the Maritime Administration as the fair and reasonable value...

  15. 46 CFR 309.6 - Adjustments for condition, equipment, and other considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OPERATIONS VALUES FOR WAR RISK INSURANCE § 309.6 Adjustments for condition, equipment, and other... of $50,000, an amount estimated by the Maritime Administration as the fair and reasonable value...

  16. 46 CFR 309.6 - Adjustments for condition, equipment, and other considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OPERATIONS VALUES FOR WAR RISK INSURANCE § 309.6 Adjustments for condition, equipment, and other... of $50,000, an amount estimated by the Maritime Administration as the fair and reasonable value...

  17. Safety climate and use of personal protective equipment and safety medical devices among home care and hospice nurses.

    PubMed

    Leiss, Jack K

    2014-01-01

    Use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and safety medical devices is mandated for healthcare workers to reduce the risk of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) from exposure to patients' blood. Research has shown that a strong safety climate may promote increased use of PPE. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the association between safety climate and use of PPE among homecare/hospice nurses in North Carolina. To this end, a mail survey was conducted in 2006. The response rate, adjusted on the assumption that the proportion of eligible nurses from among those who did not return the questionnaire or could not be contacted was similar to the proportion among those who did return the questionnaire, was 69% (n=833 eligibles). The percentage of nurses who used the specified PPE was two to three times greater among nurses who had a strong safety climate. Safety climate was only weakly associated with using safety devices. These results suggest that improving safety climate may be a powerful tool for increasing use of PPE. PMID:25055845

  18. Factors Influencing the Safety Behavior of German Equestrians: Attitudes towards Protective Equipment and Peer Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Ikinger, Christina-Maria; Baldamus, Jana; Spiller, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary The handling and riding of horses can be quite dangerous. Although the use of protective gear among equestrians is increasing, a high number of incidents occur and the voluntary use of safety equipment is described as inconsistent to low. Therefore, this study looks at the safety behavior of German equestrians and at factors influencing this behavior to decrease the high number of horse-related injuries. The results reveal that attitudes towards safety products as well as the protective behavior of other horse owners and riding pupils from the stable are key factors that might alter the safety behavior of equestrians. Abstract Human interactions with horses entail certain risks. Although the acceptance and use of protective gear is increasing, a high number of incidents and very low or inconsistent voluntary use of safety equipment are reported. While past studies have examined factors influencing the use of safety gear, they have explored neither their influence on the overall safety behavior, nor their relative influence in relation to each other. The aim of the present study is to fill this gap. We conducted an online survey with 2572 participants. By means of a subsequent multiple regression analysis, we explored 23 different variables in view of their influence on the protective behavior of equestrians. In total, we found 17 variables that exerted a significant influence. The results show that both having positive or negative attitudes towards safety products as well as the protective behavior of other horse owners or riding pupils from the stable have the strongest influence on the safety behavior of German equestrians. We consider such knowledge to be important for both scientists and practitioners, such as producers of protective gear or horse sport associations who might alter safety behavior in such a way that the number of horse-related injuries decreases in the long term. PMID:26901229

  19. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) decontaminated equipment self-container

    SciTech Connect

    Boehnke, W.M.

    1998-09-29

    The purpose of this Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) is to demonstrate that specific decontaminated equipment can be safely used as its own self-container. As a Decontaminated Equipment Self-Container (also referred to as a self-container), no other packaging, such as a burial box, would be required to transport the equipment onsite. The self-container will consist of a piece of equipment or apparatus which has all readily removable interior contamination removed, all of its external openings sealed, and all external surfaces decontaminated to less than 2000 dpm/100 cm for gamma-emitting radionuclides and less than 220 dpm/100 CM2 for alpha-emitting radionuclides.

  20. The OECD Blue Book on Recombinant DNA Safety Considerations: it's influence on ISBR and EFSA activities.

    PubMed

    Schiemann, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    Biosafety regulatory frameworks are intended to serve as mechanisms for ensuring the safe use of biotechnology products without imposing unacceptable risk to human health or the environment, or unintended constraints to technology transfer. The OECD Blue Book on "Recombinant DNA Safety Considerations", setting out principles and concepts for handling genetically modified organisms safely outside of contained laboratory conditions, was a milestone in the history of biotechnology. The "Recombinant DNA Safety Considerations" definitively became the major resource for the formulation of national regulatory frameworks and international regulations, including the Cartagena Protocol. PMID:17640515

  1. Medical accelerator safety considerations: report of AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group No. 35.

    PubMed

    Purdy, J A; Biggs, P J; Bowers, C; Dally, E; Downs, W; Fraass, B A; Karzmark, C J; Khan, F; Morgan, P; Morton, R

    1993-01-01

    Ensuring safe operation for a medical accelerator is a difficult task. Users must assume more responsibility in using contemporary equipment. Additionally, users must work closely with manufacturers in promoting the safe and effective use of such complex equipment. Complex treatment techniques and treatment modality changeover procedures merit detailed, unambiguous written procedural instruction at the control console. A thorough "hands on" training period after receiving instructions, and before assuming treatment responsibilities, is essential for all technologists. Unambiguous written instructions must also be provided to guide technologists in safe response when equipment malfunctions or exhibits unexpected behavior or after any component has been changed or readjusted. Technologists should be given a written list of the appropriate individuals to consult when unexpected machine behavior occurs. They should be assisted in identifying aberrant behavior of equipment. Many centers already provide this instruction, but others may not. Practiced response and discussion with technologists should be a part of an ongoing quality assurance program. An important aspect of a safety program is the need for continuous vigilance. Table III gives a summary of a comprehensive safety program for medical accelerators. Table IV gives a list of summary recommendations as an example of how one might mitigate the consequences of an equipment failure and improve procedures and operator response in the context of the environment described. Most of these recommendations can be implemented almost immediately at any individual treatment center. PMID:8413039

  2. An overview of safety and environmental considerations in the selection of materials for fusion facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petti, D. A.; McCarthy, K. A.; Gulden, W.; Piet, S. J.; Seki, Y.; Kolbasov, B.

    1996-10-01

    Safety and environmental considerations can play a large role in the selection of fusion materials. In this paper, we review the attributes of different structural, plasma facing, and breeding materials from a safety perspective and discuss some generic waste management issues as they relate to fusion materials in general. Specific safety concerns exist for each material that must be dealt with in fusion facility design. Low activation materials offer inherent safety benefits compared with conventional materials, but more work is needed before these materials have the requisite certified databases. In the interim, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) has selected more conventional materials and is showing that the safety concerns with these materials can be addressed by proper attention to design. In the area of waste management disposal criteria differ by country. However, the criteria are all very strict making disposal of fusion components difficult. As a result, recycling has gained increasing attention.

  3. Safety plan for the cooperative telerobotic retrieval system equipment development area

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, T.J.; Jessmore, J.J.

    1995-07-01

    This plan establishes guidelines to minimize safety risks for the cooperative telerobotic retrieval project at the North Boulevard Annex (NBA). This plan has the dual purpose of minimizing safety risks to workers and visitors and of securing sensitive equipment from inadvertent damage by nonqualified personnel. This goal will be accomplished through physical control of work zones and through assigned responsibilities for project personnel. The scope of this plan is limited to establishing the working zone boundaries and entry requirements, and assigning responsibilities for project personnel. This plan does not supersede current safety organization responsibilities for the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area Transuranic (LSFA TRU) Arid outlined in the Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Plan for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program; Tenant Manual; Idaho Falls Building Emergency Control Plan;; applicable Company Procedures; the attached Interface Agreement (Appendix A).

  4. Health and Safety Considerations: Caring for Young Children with Exceptional Health Care Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presler, Betty

    This manual on health and safety considerations in caring for young children with exceptional health care needs is a product of Project EXCEPTIONAL (EXceptional Children: Education in Preschool Techniques for Inclusion, Opportunity-building, Nurturing And Learning), which has the goal of increasing the quality and quantity of inclusive child care…

  5. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility safety equipment list

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-02-24

    This document provides the safety equipment list (SEL) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The SEL was prepared in accordance with the procedure for safety structures, systems, and components (SSCs) in HNF-PRO-516, ''Safety Structures, Systems, and Components,'' Revision 0 and HNF-PRO-097, Engineering Design and Evaluation, Revision 0. The SEL was developed in conjunction with HNF-SO-SNF-SAR-O02, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998). The SEL identifies the SSCs and their safety functions, the design basis accidents for which they are required to perform, the design criteria, codes and standards, and quality assurance requirements that are required for establishing the safety design basis of the SSCs. This SEL has been developed for the CVDF Phase 2 Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future phases of the CVDF SAR until the CVDF final SAR is approved.

  6. Engineering considerations for the economic design, installation and operation of ozonation equipment for cooling water treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, R.G.

    1994-12-31

    Once it has been decided to install ozone for the treatment of cooling water, the next step is to assure that the equipment is sized and designed for the most reliable and economical operation. Design principles are presented which have proved to be effective for ozonation systems which have been treating municipal water and wastewaters so as to maximize the reliability of equipment performance, constancy of ozone output in a fail-safe mode, minimizing power expenditures, while providing for preventive maintenance. For example, rather than purchase a single ozone generator with a second for standby, the purchaser of ozone equipment might install three ozone generators, each of which is capable of producing 50% of the required quantity of ozone. Two of these are on-line continuously, with the third off-line, allowing for planned maintenance downtime. For periods of unusually high ozone demand, on-site liquid oxygen can be made available to double the output of ozone over that available from dried air. Advantages of generating ozone from oxygen will be discussed, and finally, a novel Japanese method of generating ozone from high purity oxygen, adsorption of ozone onto silica gel or molecular sieves, recycling of the oxygen, and intermittent application of the adsorbed ozone to flowing cooling water will be described.

  7. Safety analysis report for packaging, onsite, long-length contaminated equipment transport system

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.A.

    1997-05-09

    This safety analysis report for packaging describes the components of the long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE) transport system (TS) and provides the analyses, evaluations, and associated operational controls necessary for the safe use of the LLCE TS on the Hanford Site. The LLCE TS will provide a standardized, comprehensive approach for the disposal of approximately 98% of LLCE scheduled to be removed from the 200 Area waste tanks.

  8. 33 CFR 164.72 - Navigational-safety equipment, charts or maps, and publications required on towing vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Navigational-safety equipment, charts or maps, and publications required on towing vessels. 164.72 Section 164.72 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS §...

  9. Factors Influencing the Safety Behavior of German Equestrians: Attitudes towards Protective Equipment and Peer Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ikinger, Christina-Maria; Baldamus, Jana; Spiller, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Human interactions with horses entail certain risks. Although the acceptance and use of protective gear is increasing, a high number of incidents and very low or inconsistent voluntary use of safety equipment are reported. While past studies have examined factors influencing the use of safety gear, they have explored neither their influence on the overall safety behavior, nor their relative influence in relation to each other. The aim of the present study is to fill this gap. We conducted an online survey with 2572 participants. By means of a subsequent multiple regression analysis, we explored 23 different variables in view of their influence on the protective behavior of equestrians. In total, we found 17 variables that exerted a significant influence. The results show that both having positive or negative attitudes towards safety products as well as the protective behavior of other horse owners or riding pupils from the stable have the strongest influence on the safety behavior of German equestrians. We consider such knowledge to be important for both scientists and practitioners, such as producers of protective gear or horse sport associations who might alter safety behavior in such a way that the number of horse-related injuries decreases in the long term. PMID:26901229

  10. Environmental, Safety, and Health Considerations: Composite Materials in the Aerospace Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Huai-Pu (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The Aerospace Industries Association, Suppliers of Advanced Composite Materials Association, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration co-sponsored a conference on 'Environmental, Safety, and Health Considerations--Composite Materials in the Aerospace Industry.' The conference was held in Mesa, Arizona, on October 20-21, 1994. Seventeen papers were presented in four sessions including general information, safety, waste, and emissions from composites. Topics range from product stewardship, best work practice, biotransformation of uncured composite materials, to hazardous waste determination and offgassing of composite materials.

  11. Technical considerations related to interim source-term assumptions for emergency planning and equipment qualification. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Niemczyk, S.J.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.

    1982-09-01

    The source terms recommended in the current regulatory guidance for many considerations of light water reactor (LWR) accidents were developed a number of years ago when understandings of many of the phenomena pertinent to source term estimation were relatively primitive. The purpose of the work presented here was to develop more realistic source term assumptions which could be used for interim regulatory purposes for two specific considerations, namely, equipment qualification and emergency planning. The overall approach taken was to adopt assumptions and models previously proposed for various aspects of source term estimation and to modify those assumptions and models to reflect recently gained insights into, and data describing, the release and transport of radionuclides during and after LWR accidents. To obtain illustrative estimates of the magnitudes of the source terms, the results of previous calculations employing the adopted assumptions and models were utilized and were modified to account for the effects of the recent insights and data.

  12. Safety challenges of medical equipment in nurse anaesthetist training in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Santos, A L R; Wauben, L S G L; Guilavogui, S; Brezet, J C; Goossens, R; Rosseel, P M J

    2016-03-01

    Safety challenges related to the use of medical equipment were investigated during the training of nurse anaesthetists in Haiti, using a systems approach to Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE). The Observable Performance Obstacles tool, based on the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) model, was used in combination with exploratory observations during 13 surgical procedures, to identify performance obstacles created by the systemic interrelationships of medical equipment. The identification of performance obstacles is an effective way to study the accumulation of latent factors and risk hazards, and understand its implications in practice and behaviour of healthcare practitioners. In total, 123 performance obstacles were identified, of which the majority was related to environmental and organizational aspects. These findings show how the performance of nurse anaesthetists and their relation to medical equipment is continuously affected by more than user-related aspects. The contribution of systemic performance obstacles and coping strategies to enrich system design interventions and improve healthcare system is highlighted. In addition, methodological challenges of HFE research in low-resource settings related to professional culture and habits, and the potential of community ergonomics as a problem-managing approach are described. PMID:26154027

  13. Safety equipment list for 241-C-106 waste retrieval, Project W-320: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, J.C.

    1994-11-15

    The goals of the C-106 sluicing operation are: (1) to stabilize the tank by reducing the heat load in the tank to less than 42 MJ/hr (40,000 Btu/hour), and (2) to initiate demonstration of single-shell tank (SST) retrieval technology. The purpose of this supporting document (SD) is as follows: (1) to provide safety classifications for items (systems, structures, equipment, components, or parts) for the waste retrieval sluicing system (WRSS), and (2) to document and methodology used to develop safety classifications. Appropriate references are made with regard to use of existing systems, structures, equipments, components, and parts for C-106 single-shell transfer tank located in the C Tank Farm, and 241-AY-102 (AY-102) double shell receiver tanks (DST) located in the Aging Waste Facility (AWF). The Waste Retrieval Sluicing System consists of two transfer lines that would connect the two tanks, one to carry the sluiced waste slurry to AY-102, and the other to return the supernatant liquid to C-106. The supernatant, or alternate fluid, will be used to mobilize waste in C-106 for the sluicing process. The equipment necessary for the WRSS include pumps in each tank, sluicers to direct the supernatant stream in C-106, a slurry distributor in AY-102, HVAC for C-106, instrumentation and control devices, and other existing components as required.

  14. National Ignition Facility start-up/operations engineering and special equipment construction health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect

    Huddleston, P C

    1998-05-08

    This document sets forth the responsibilities, interfaces, guidelines, rules, policy, and regulations for all workers involved in the S/O and SE construction, installation, and acceptance testing. This document is enforced from the first day that S/O and SE workers set foot on the NIF construction site until the end of the Project at Critical Decision 4. This document is applicable only to site activities, which are defined as those that occur within the perimeter of the fenced-off NIF construction zone and the Target Chamber Assembly Area (Helipad). The associated Special Equipment laydown and construction support areas listed in Appendix B are not under this plan; their safety provisions are discussed in the Appendix. Prototype and other support activities, such as the Amplifier Laboratory and Frame Assembly Unit assembly area, are not included in this plan. After completion of the Operational Readiness Review, the Facility Safety Procedure, Operational Safety Requirements, and Operational Safety Procedures are the governing safety documents for the operating facility. The S/O and SE project elements are required to implement measures that create a universal awareness of and promote safe job practices at the site. This includes all Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester, supplement labor organization, and subcontractor employees; visitors; and guests serving the S/O and SE effort.

  15. Control considerations for high frequency, resonant, power processing equipment used in large systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildice, J. W.; Schreiner, K. E.; Wolff, F.

    1987-01-01

    Addressed is a class of resonant power processing equipment designed to be used in an integrated high frequency (20 KHz domain), utility power system for large, multi-user spacecraft and other aerospace vehicles. It describes a hardware approach, which has been the basis for parametric and physical data used to justify the selection of high frequency ac as the PMAD baseline for the space station. This paper is part of a larger effort undertaken by NASA and General Dynamics to be sure that all potential space station contractors and other aerospace power system designers understand and can comfortably use this technology, which is now widely used in the commercial sector. In this paper, we will examine control requirements, stability, and operational modes; and their hardware impacts from an integrated system point of view. The current space station PMAD system will provide the overall requirements model to develop an understanding of the performance of this type of system with regard to: (1) regulation; (2) power bus stability and voltage control; (3) source impedance; (4) transient response; (5) power factor effects, and (6) limits and overloads.

  16. Control considerations for high frequency, resonant, power processing equipment used in large systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildice, J. W.; Schreiner, K. E.; Wolff, F.

    1987-01-01

    Addressed is a class of resonant power processing equipment designed to be used in an integrated high frequency (20 KHz domain), utility power system for large, multi-user spacecraft and other aerospace vehicles. It describes a hardware approach, which has been the basis for parametric and physical data used to justify the selection of high frequency ac as the PMAD baseline for the space station. This paper is part of a larger effort undertaken by NASA and General Dynamics to be sure that all potential space station contractors and other aerospace power system designers understand and can comfortably use this technology, which is now widely used in the commercial sector. In this paper, we will examine control requirements, stability, and operational modes; and their hardware impacts from an integrated system point of view. The current space station PMAD system will provide the overall requirements model to develop an understanding of the performance of this type of system with regard to: (1) regulation; (2) power bus stability and voltage control; (3) source impedance; (4) transient response; (5) power factor effects; and (6) limits and overloads.

  17. Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szumski, Michał

    This chapter describes the most important features of capillary electrophoretic equipment. A presentation of the important developments in high voltage power supplies for chip CE is followed by preparation of fused silica capillaries for use in CE. Detection systems that are used in capillary electrophoresis are widely described. Here, UV-Vis absorbance measurements are discussed including different types of detection cells—also those less popular (u-shaped, Z-shaped, mirror-coated). Fluorescence detection and laser-induced fluorescence detection are the most sensitive detection systems. Several LIF setups, such as collinear, orthogonal, confocal, and sheath-flow cuvette, are presented from the point of view of the sensitivity they can provide. Several electrochemical detectors for CE, such as conductivity, amperometric, and potentiometric, are also shown and their constructions discussed. CE-MS and much less known CE (CEC)-NMR systems are also described. The examples of automation and robotized CE systems together with their potential fields of application are also presented.

  18. Thermodynamic finite-element-method (FEM) eye model for laser safety considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heussner, Nico; Holl, Lukas; Shults, Ariana; Beuth, Thorsten; Umesh Babu, Harsha; Shinohara, Leilei; Bogatscher, Siegwart; Wippler, Matthias; Stork, Wilhelm

    2013-02-01

    With the recent development in the field of micro displays, retinal display and emerging technologies the issue of laser safety of these new devices becomes more and more important. To tackle these problems a lot of basic research will be necessary in order to find appropriate laser safety standards, since the current standards are not fully suitable. In order to avoid animal experiments as far as possible and also aiming for a simulation tool which would assist the manufacturers in their safety considerations, we have developed a thermodynamic model of the whole human eye. Using the software Hypermeshand Ansys Fluentwe created a Finite-Volume-Method model capable of simulating the behavior of all parts of the eye. I.e. the temperature distribution at any point of the eye can be predicted over time. The model also includes the blood flow within the choroid aiming for a realistic thermal behavior.

  19. Qualification of safety-related electrical equipment in France. Methods, approach and test facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondo, E.; Capman, J.L.; Herovard, M.

    1985-05-01

    Requirements for qualification of electrical equipment used in French-built nuclear power plants are stated in a national code, the RCC-E, or Regles de Construction et de Conception des Materiels Electriques. Under the RCC-E, safety related equipment is assigned to one of three different categories, according to location in the plant and anticipated normal, accident and post-accident behavior. Qualification tests differ for each category and procedures range in scope from the standard seismic test to the highly stringent VISA program, which specifies a predetermined sequence of aging, radiation, seismic and simulated accident testing. A network of official French test facilities was developed specifically to meet RCC-E requirements.

  20. 75 FR 1179 - Passenger Equipment Safety Standards; Front End Strength of Cab Cars and Multiple-Unit Locomotives

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... comprehensive safety standards for railroad passenger equipment. See 61 FR 30672. The ANPRM provided background... equipment. See 62 FR 49728. In addition to requesting written comment on the NPRM, FRA also solicited oral... was published on May 12, 1999. See 64 FR 25540. After publication of the final rule,...

  1. Personal Protective Equipment Use and Safety Behaviors among Farm Adolescents: Gender Differences and Predictors of Work Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Deborah B.; Browning, Steven R.; Westneat, Susan C.; Kidd, Pamela S.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Children on farms perform work that places them at risk for acute and chronic negative health outcomes. Despite strategies for preventing and reducing the risk of disease and injury, children's use of personal protective equipment and safety equipped farm machinery has generally remained unreported. Purpose: This paper reports the use of…

  2. Safety and the Human Factor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ann

    1982-01-01

    Discusses four elements of safety programs: (1) safety training; (2) safety inspections; (3) accident investigations; and (4) protective safety equipment. Also discusses safety considerations in water/wastewater treatment facilities focusing on falls, drowning hazards, trickling filters, confined space entry, collection/distribution system safety,…

  3. The Impact of Regulations, Safety Considerations and Physical Limitations on Research Progress at Maximum Biocontainment

    PubMed Central

    Shurtleff, Amy C.; Garza, Nicole; Lackemeyer, Matthew; Carrion, Ricardo; Griffiths, Anthony; Patterson, Jean; Edwin, Samuel S.; Bavari, Sina

    2012-01-01

    We describe herein, limitations on research at biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment laboratories, with regard to biosecurity regulations, safety considerations, research space limitations, and physical constraints in executing experimental procedures. These limitations can severely impact the number of collaborations and size of research projects investigating microbial pathogens of biodefense concern. Acquisition, use, storage, and transfer of biological select agents and toxins (BSAT) are highly regulated due to their potential to pose a severe threat to public health and safety. All federal, state, city, and local regulations must be followed to obtain and maintain registration for the institution to conduct research involving BSAT. These include initial screening and continuous monitoring of personnel, controlled access to containment laboratories, accurate and current BSAT inventory records. Safety considerations are paramount in BSL-4 containment laboratories while considering the types of research tools, workflow and time required for conducting both in vivo and in vitro experiments in limited space. Required use of a positive-pressure encapsulating suit imposes tremendous physical limitations on the researcher. Successful mitigation of these constraints requires additional time, effort, good communication, and creative solutions. Test and evaluation of novel vaccines and therapeutics conducted under good laboratory practice (GLP) conditions for FDA approval are prioritized and frequently share the same physical space with important ongoing basic research studies. The possibilities and limitations of biomedical research involving microbial pathogens of biodefense concern in BSL-4 containment laboratories are explored in this review. PMID:23342380

  4. The impact of regulations, safety considerations and physical limitations on research progress at maximum biocontainment.

    PubMed

    Shurtleff, Amy C; Garza, Nicole; Lackemeyer, Matthew; Carrion, Ricardo; Griffiths, Anthony; Patterson, Jean; Edwin, Samuel S; Bavari, Sina

    2012-12-01

    We describe herein, limitations on research at biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment laboratories, with regard to biosecurity regulations, safety considerations, research space limitations, and physical constraints in executing experimental procedures. These limitations can severely impact the number of collaborations and size of research projects investigating microbial pathogens of biodefense concern. Acquisition, use, storage, and transfer of biological select agents and toxins (BSAT) are highly regulated due to their potential to pose a severe threat to public health and safety. All federal, state, city, and local regulations must be followed to obtain and maintain registration for the institution to conduct research involving BSAT. These include initial screening and continuous monitoring of personnel, controlled access to containment laboratories, accurate and current BSAT inventory records. Safety considerations are paramount in BSL-4 containment laboratories while considering the types of research tools, workflow and time required for conducting both in vivo and in vitro experiments in limited space. Required use of a positive-pressure encapsulating suit imposes tremendous physical limitations on the researcher. Successful mitigation of these constraints requires additional time, effort, good communication, and creative solutions. Test and evaluation of novel vaccines and therapeutics conducted under good laboratory practice (GLP) conditions for FDA approval are prioritized and frequently share the same physical space with important ongoing basic research studies. The possibilities and limitations of biomedical research involving microbial pathogens of biodefense concern in BSL-4 containment laboratories are explored in this review. PMID:23342380

  5. The Design of Transportation Equipment in Terms of Human Capabilities. The Role of Engineering Psychology in Transport Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Ross A.

    Human factors engineering is considered with regard to the design of safety factors for aviation and highway transportation equipment. Current trends and problem areas are identified for jet air transportation and for highway transportation. Suggested solutions to transportation safety problems are developed by applying the techniques of human…

  6. 29 CFR 1926.1410 - Power line safety (all voltages)-equipment operations closer than the Table A zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... accessories) to a complete stop; wind conditions; degree of sway in the power line; lighting conditions, and... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Power line safety (all voltages)-equipment operations... FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1410 Power line safety (all...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.1410 - Power line safety (all voltages)-equipment operations closer than the Table A zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... accessories) to a complete stop; wind conditions; degree of sway in the power line; lighting conditions, and... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Power line safety (all voltages)-equipment operations... FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1410 Power line safety (all...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.1410 - Power line safety (all voltages)-equipment operations closer than the Table A zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; wind conditions; degree of sway in the power line; lighting conditions, and other conditions affecting... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Power line safety (all voltages)-equipment operations... FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1410 Power line safety (all...

  9. 29 CFR 1926.1410 - Power line safety (all voltages)-equipment operations closer than the Table A zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... accessories) to a complete stop; wind conditions; degree of sway in the power line; lighting conditions, and... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Power line safety (all voltages)-equipment operations... FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1410 Power line safety (all...

  10. CSCS certification and school enrollment impacts upon high school strength facilities, equipment, and safety.

    PubMed

    Judge, Lawrence W; Petersen, Jeffrey C; Bellar, David M; Craig, Bruce W; Gilreath, Erin L

    2013-09-01

    The rapid growth and expanding use of high school strength and conditioning facilities (SCFs) creates a need to research and better understand these vital facilities. This study was designed to examine SCFs at the high school level including facility size, equipment, leadership/staffing, and safety. A 70-item online survey instrument, developed with expert input from certified strength professionals, was used to collect data regarding the SCFs in high schools throughout a midwestern state, and was distributed via email to a total of 390 high school athletic directors. Survey respondents (n = 108) all reported the presence of SCFs with 95.4% indicating a dedicated SCF space. A strong positive correlation (r = 0.610, p ≤ 0.001) was determined between the variables of SCF size in square feet and school size measured by total enrollment. Analysis of variance and χ² analyses revealed significant differences in equipment, facility size, and safety factors based on the categorical variables of school size and the presence of certified strength and conditioning specialist (CSCS) leadership. It appears the CSCS's application of their scientific knowledge goes beyond training athletes for the goal of improving athletic performance to actually influence the SCF itself. Athletic administrators at the high school level need to recognize the impact CSCS program leadership can have on the overall quality of the strength and conditioning program and facility. PMID:22505129

  11. Perioperative considerations for patient safety during cosmetic surgery – preventing complications

    PubMed Central

    Ellsworth, Warren A; Basu, C Bob; Iverson, Ronald E

    2009-01-01

    Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential, and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Traditionally, nursing and anesthesia staff have managed patient positioning and safety issues in the operating room. As the number of office-based procedures in the plastic surgeon’s practice increases, understanding and implementing patient safety guidelines by the plastic surgeon is of increasing importance. A review of the Joint Commission’s Universal Protocol highlights requirements set forth to prevent perioperative complications. In the present paper, the importance of implementing these guidelines into the cosmetic surgery practice is reviewed. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, ocular protection and other issues essential for minimization of postoperative morbidity. Additionally, as the demand for body contouring surgery in the cosmetic practice continues to increase, special attention to safety considerations specific to the obese and massive weight loss patients is mandatory. After review of the present paper, the reader should be able to introduce the Joint Commission’s Universal Protocol into their daily practice. The reader will understand key aspects of patient positioning, airway management and ocular protection in cosmetic surgery. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese, massive weight loss patients and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patient’s experience and surgical outcome. PMID:20190907

  12. The long term storage of radioactive waste and spent fuel: safety and policy considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Rowat, J.; Metcalf, P.

    2007-07-01

    Storage is a necessary step in the overall management of radioactive waste. In recent years, due to the unavailability of disposal facilities, storage facilities intended originally as temporary, have had their lifetimes extended and consideration has been given, in some countries, to the use of long term storage (LTS) as a management option. In 2003, the IAEA published a position paper titled 'The Long Term Storage of Radioactive Waste: Safety and Sustainability'. The position paper, which written for a non-specialist audience, focused on seven key factors for safety and sustainability of LTS, namely: safety, maintenance/institutional control, retrieval, security, costs, community attitudes and retention of information. The Agency is preparing a follow-up report to the position paper that elaborates in a more technical manner upon the issues raised in the position paper and issues important for implementation of LTS. It also provides some discussion of the reasons for implementing a LTS option and contrasts LTS with aspects of other management options. The present paper provides an overview of the draft follow-up report. (authors)

  13. Safety evaluation for packaging transportation of equipment for tank 241-C-106 waste sluicing system

    SciTech Connect

    Calmus, D.B.

    1994-08-25

    A Waste Sluicing System (WSS) is scheduled for installation in nd waste storage tank 241-C-106 (106-C). The WSS will transfer high rating sludge from single shell tank 106-C to double shell waste tank 241-AY-102 (102-AY). Prior to installation of the WSS, a heel pump and a transfer pump will be removed from tank 106-C and an agitator pump will be removed from tank 102-AY. Special flexible receivers will be used to contain the pumps during removal from the tanks. After equipment removal, the flexible receivers will be placed in separate containers (packagings). The packaging and contents (packages) will be transferred from the Tank Farms to the Central Waste Complex (CWC) for interim storage and then to T Plant for evaluation and processing for final disposition. Two sizes of packagings will be provided for transferring the equipment from the Tank Farms to the interim storage facility. The packagings will be designated as the WSSP-1 and WSSP-2 packagings throughout the remainder of this Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP). The WSSP-1 packagings will transport the heel and transfer pumps from 106-C and the WSSP-2 packaging will transport the agitator pump from 102-AY. The WSSP-1 and WSSP-2 packagings are similar except for the length.

  14. Technical basis for environmental qualification of microprocessor-based safety-related equipment in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, K.; Wood, R.T.; Hassan, M.; Tanaka, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the results of studies sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide the technical basis for environmental qualification of computer-based safety equipment in nuclear power plants. The studies were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The studies address the following: (1) adequacy of the present test methods for qualification of digital I and C systems; (2) preferred (i.e., Regulatory Guide-endorsed) standards; (3) recommended stressors to be included in the qualification process during type testing; (4) resolution of need for accelerated aging for equipment to be located in a benign environment; and (5) determination of an appropriate approach for addressing the impact of smoke in digital equipment qualification programs. Significant findings from the studies form the technical basis for a recommended approach to the environmental qualification of microprocessor-based safety-related equipment in nuclear power plants.

  15. Environment, safety, and health considerations for a neutrino source based on a muon storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    J. Donald Cossairt

    2000-05-15

    The Neutrino Source presents a number of challenges in the general area of environment, safety, and health. It is the intent of this paper to identify these challenges and make a preliminary, but not detailed assessment of how they might be addressed and of their potential impact on the project. Some of the considerations which must be taken into account are very similar to those that have been encountered and solved during the construction and operation of other facilities at Fermilab and at similar laboratories elsewhere in the US and worldwide. Other considerations have not been encountered previously in connection with the construction and operation of accelerator laboratories. These novel issues will require particular attention as such a project proceeds to assure their timely resolution in a manner that is cost-effective and that meets the approval of the public. In this paper, both the conventional and the novel issues are discussed, with more emphasis on the latter. It is concluded here that with adequate planning in the design stages, these problems can be adequately addressed in a manner that merits the support of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and the public. An abbreviated version of this paper appears as Chapter 14 in the report of a recent feasibility study (Ho 00)and the figures have come from that work.

  16. 10 CFR 50.49 - Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants. 50.49 Section 50.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Standards for Licenses, Certifications, and Regulatory Approvals § 50.49...

  17. 10 CFR 50.49 - Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants. 50.49 Section 50.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Standards for Licenses, Certifications, and Regulatory Approvals § 50.49...

  18. 10 CFR 50.49 - Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants. 50.49 Section 50.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Standards for Licenses, Certifications, and Regulatory Approvals § 50.49...

  19. 10 CFR 50.49 - Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants. 50.49 Section 50.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Standards for Licenses, Certifications, and Regulatory Approvals § 50.49...

  20. 10 CFR 50.49 - Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants. 50.49 Section 50.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Standards for Licenses, Certifications, and Regulatory Approvals § 50.49...

  1. STS-81 CREW DURING SAFETY EQUIPMENT DEMONSTRATION AT LC 39B DURING TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The STS-81 crew gets a description of safety equipment and emergency egress routes on Launch Pad 39B during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) exercises for that mission. They are (from left): Mission Specialists Marsha S. Ivins, J.M. 'Jerry' Linenger and Peter J. K. 'Jeff' Wisoff; Mission Commander Michael A. Baker; Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld; and Pilot Brent W. Jett, Jr. STS-81 is the fifth Shuttle-Mir docking mission and will feature the transfer of Linenger to Mir to replace astronaut John Blaha, who has been on the orbital laboratory since Sept. 19 after arrival there during the STS-79 mission. During STS-81, Shuttle and Mir crews will conduct risk mitigation, human life science, microgravity and materials processing experiments that will provide data for the design, development and operation of the International Space Station. The primary payload is the SPACEHAB-DM double module will provide space for more than 2,000 pounds of hardware, food and water that will be transferred into the Russian space station during five days of docking operations during the 10-day mission. The SPACEHAB will also be used to return experiment samples from the Mir to Earth for analysis and for microgravity experiments during the mission.

  2. Disinfection protocols for necropsy equipment in rabies laboratories: Safety of personnel and diagnostic outcome.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Roberta; Zecchin, Barbara; Tiozzo Caenazzo, Silvia; Cattoli, Giovanni; De Benedictis, Paola

    2016-08-01

    In the last decades, molecular techniques have gradually been adopted for the rapid confirmation of results obtained through gold standard methods. However, international organisations discourage their use in routine laboratory investigations for rabies post-mortem diagnosis, as they may lead to false positive results due to cross-contamination. Cleaning and disinfection are essential to prevent cross-contamination of samples in the laboratory environment. The present study evaluated the efficacy of selected disinfectants on rabies-contaminated necropsy equipment under organic challenge using a carrier-based test. The occurrence of detectable Rabies virus (RABV) antigen, viable virus and RNA was assessed through the gold standard Fluorescent Antibody Test, the Rabies Tissue Culture Infection Test and molecular techniques, respectively. None of the tested disinfectants proved to be effective under label conditions. Off label disinfection protocols were found effective for oxidizing agents and phenolic, only. Biguanide and quaternary ammonium compound were both ineffective under all tested conditions. Overall, discordant results were obtained when different diagnostic tests were compared, which means that in the presence of organic contamination common disinfectants may not be effective enough on viable RABV or RNA. Our results indicate that an effective disinfection protocol should be carefully validated to guarantee staff safety and reliability of results. PMID:27091100

  3. Navy Safety Center data on the effects of fire protection systems on electrical equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Robert S.

    1991-04-01

    Records of the Navy Safety Center, Norfolk, VA were reviewed to find data relevant to inadvertant operation of installed fire extinguishing systems in civilian nuclear power plants. Navy data show the incidence of collateral fire or other damage by fresh water on operating electrical equipment in submarines and in shore facilities is about the same as the civilian experience, about 30 percent. Aboard surface ships, however, the collateral damage incidence in much lower, about 15 percent. With sea water, the collateral damage incidence is at least 75 percent. It is concluded that the fire extinguisher water has to be contaminated, as by rust in sprinkler systems or deposited salt spray, for most collateral damage to occur. Reasons for inadvertant operation (or advertant operation) of firex systems at shore facilities, submarines, and surface ships resemble those for nuclear power plants. Mechanical or electrical failures lead the list, followed by mishaps during maintenance. Detector and alarm system failures are significant problems at Navy shore facilities, and significant at nuclear power plants. Fixed halon and CO2 systems in shore facilities cause no collateral damage. Lists of individual Navy incidents with water and with halon and carbon dioxide are included as appendices.

  4. CTLA-4 blockade with ipilimumab: biology, safety, efficacy, and future considerations

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Luis H

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma remains a critical public health problem worldwide. Patients with stage IV disease have very poor prognosis and their 1-year survival rate is only 25%. Until recently, systemic treatments with a positive impact on overall survival (OS) had remained elusive. In recent years, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) – approved several novel agents targeting the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK pathway (vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and trametinib) – critical in cell division and proliferation of melanoma, and an immune checkpoint inhibitor (ipilimumab) directed against the cytotoxic T lymphocyte Antigen - (CTLA-4). Moreover, recent reports of clinical trials studying other immune checkpoint modulating agents will most likely result in their FDA approval within the next months. This review focuses on ipilimumab, its safety and efficacy, and future considerations. Ipilimumab has demonstrated a positive OS impact after a several-year follow-up. It is also recognized that due to its mechanism of action, the response patterns to ipilimumab can differ from those observed in patients following treatment with conventional cytotoxic agents and even the most recently approved BRAF inhibitors. Most patients (84.8%) experience drug-related adverse events (AEs) of any grade; most of these are mild to moderate and immune mediated. However, a minority of patients may also experience severe and life-threatening AEs. In clinical studies, AEs were managed according to guidelines that emphasized close clinical monitoring and early use of corticosteroids when appropriate. Preliminary results have taught us the potential greater toxicity when in combination with vemurafenib, and the greater antitumor efficacy when combined with nivolumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1), another immune checkpoint inhibitor. Future challenges include the optimization of dosing and toxicities when used as a single agent, and studying the safety and efficacy of

  5. Long Duration Head-Down Tilt Bed Rest Studies: Safety Considerations Regarding Vision Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.; Zanello, S. B.; Yarbough, P. O.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Taibbi, G.; Vizzeri, G.

    2012-01-01

    Visual symptoms reported in astronauts returning from long duration missions in low Earth orbit, including hyperopic shift, choroidal folds, globe flattening and papilledema, are thought to be related to fluid shifts within the body due to microgravity exposure. Because of this possible relation to fluid shifts, safety considerations have been raised regarding the ocular health of head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest subjects. HDT is a widely used ground ]based analog that simulates physiological changes of spaceflight, including fluid shifts. Thus, vision monitoring has been performed in bed rest subjects in order to evaluate the safety of HDT with respect to vision health. Here we report ocular outcomes in 9 healthy subjects (age range: 27-48 years; Male/Female ratio: 8/1) completing bed rest Campaign 11, an integrated, multidisciplinary 70-day 6 degrees HDT bed rest study. Vision examinations were performed on a weekly basis, and consisted of office-based (2 pre- and 2 post-bed rest) and in-bed testing. The experimental design was a repeated measures design, with measurements for both eyes taken for each subject at each planned time point. Findings for the following tests were all reported as normal in each testing session for every subject: modified Amsler grid, red dot test, confrontational visual fields, color vision and fundus photography. Overall, no statistically significant differences were observed for any of the measures, except for both near and far visual acuity, which increased during the course of the study. This difference is not considered clinically relevant as may result from the effect of learning. Intraocular pressure results suggest a small increase at the beginning of the bed rest phase (p=0.059) and lesser increase at post-bed rest with respect to baseline (p=0.046). These preliminary results provide the basis for further analyses that will include correlations between intraocular pressure change pre- and post-bed rest, and optical coherence

  6. De-Orbiting the International Space Station ISS: Safety Considerations and Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremaschi, F.; Huertas, I.; Ortega, G.; Sgobba, T.; Laurel, C.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has proposed to its partners the de-orbiting of the International Space Station (ISS) around the year 2020. Technical plans on how to do it have been presented as long as the year 1999. The current situation of ISS claims for a possible extension of the date of 2020 but to all International Partners is clear that the de-orbiting operations need to be performed with safety as the main and central paradigm. The proposed paper evaluates several scenarios and options for the de- orbiting of ISS. The paper proposes trajectory design considerations, de- orbit strategies and the calculation of casualties and fatalities for some of those. The paper proposes as well some fragment disposal regions using the classic approach of disposing ISS on ground and compares it with the feasibility and cost with the approach of end of life vehicle recycling culture of the European Union. The paper computes and calculates the reliability of all options and establishes a trade-off between all of them. The paper provides a detailed mathematical model that is able to calculate casualty and fatality rates. The mathematical model has been programmed in the ASTOS software tool and the corresponding casualty and fatality curves have been computed for some considered options. The following options are studied, discussed, and traded- off: simple one-go complete disposal of ISS with controlled de-orbiting using a service module, complex partial disposal of ISS elements with controlled de-orbiting using a modified version of service module, same variation using a set of auxiliary vehicles, design of a new vehicle to dispose the ISS and finally the uncontrolled re-entry of the entire ISS. Further, the paper proposes some de-orbiting requirements, and mission design considerations for a successful end-of-mission closure.

  7. Report of an exploratory study: safety and liability considerations for photovoltaic modules/panels, Low Cost Solar Array Project

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, A.S.; Meeker, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    Product safety and product liability considerations are explored for photovoltaic module/array devices. A general review of photovoltaic literature was made using computerized literature searches. A literature search was also made of relevant legal material as it applies to design. Recommendations are made to minimize or eliminate perceived hazards in manufacture and use of a photovoltaic module/array. (MHR)

  8. 75 FR 15687 - Safety and Security Equipment and Services Trade Mission to Brazil

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... Software Cargo Tracking Systems Biometric Equipment (facial, Access Control fingerprint, and iris recognition) Systems Cameras and Associated Burglar Alarms Software GPS Systems Fire Sensors and Alarms...

  9. Safety equipment list for the 241-SY-101 RAPID mitigation project

    SciTech Connect

    MORRIS, K.L.

    1999-06-29

    This document provides the safety classification for the safety (safety class and safety RAPID Mitigation Project. This document is being issued as the project SEL until the supporting authorization basis documentation, this document will be superseded by the TWRS SEL (LMHC 1999), documentation istlralized. Upon implementation of the authorization basis significant) structures, systems, and components (SSCS) associated with the 241-SY-1O1 which will be updated to include the information contained herein.

  10. Adaptive Driving Equipment: Selection and Major Considerations [and] Battery Powered Scooters and 3-Wheelers. Information Support Packets #1 and #2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, John H.

    Two brief guides offer suggestions for persons with physical disabilities who are considering the purchase of adaptive driving equipment, battery-powered scooters, or three wheelers. The first guide offers guidelines for individuals considering purchase of special hand controls or other modifications or a van lift to enhance their independence in…

  11. 30 CFR 250.1004 - Safety equipment requirements for DOI pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... delivering gas to the power plant platform may be equipped with high- and low-pressure sensors (PSHL), which... facilities shall be protected by high- and low-pressure sensors (PSHL) to directly or indirectly shut in...

  12. 30 CFR 250.1004 - Safety equipment requirements for DOI pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... delivering gas to the power plant platform may be equipped with high- and low-pressure sensors (PSHL), which... facilities shall be protected by high- and low-pressure sensors (PSHL) to directly or indirectly shut in...

  13. 30 CFR 250.1004 - Safety equipment requirements for DOI pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... delivering gas to the power plant platform may be equipped with high- and low-pressure sensors (PSHL), which... facilities shall be protected by high- and low-pressure sensors (PSHL) to directly or indirectly shut in...

  14. The Impact Of Occupational Hazards In Workplaces - Maintenance, A Main Target For Ensuring The Safety Of Working Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, Anca Elena; Buica, Georgeta; Darabont, Doru Costin; Beiu, Constantin

    2015-07-01

    For use of work equipment having the economic performance and the highest level of safety, it must be ensured that it complies with the conditions set by the manufacturer in terms of putting into service, use and maintenance operations, ensuring appropriate technical and environmental requirements, including appropriate measures and means of protection. The research aimed to identify and analyze the occupational hazards associated to maintenance operations, in terms of the history of the adjustments, maintenance, cleaning and repair, including the case that occur after the incidents, capital repairs and upgrades. The results of the research consisted in the development of recommendations on the effective management of maintenance activities of work equipment and a software model to enable an efficient management of maintenance, as a tool for occupational hazards in companies - premise for increasing the competitiveness of employers in the market economy.

  15. 75 FR 35444 - Safety and Security Equipment and Services Trade Mission To Brazil

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... systems, and intelligence equipment. The Brazilian government will also invest heavily in high-tech... companies). Participants will receive a briefing that will include market intelligence, as well as an... Residential Security Devices Criminal Investigation and Police Intelligence Systems. Fees and Expenses After...

  16. Safety and tolerability considerations in the use of sildenafil for children with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dodgen, Andrew L; Hill, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Sildenafil is a phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor approved for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in adults. Data from pediatric trials demonstrate a similar acute safety profile to the adult population but have raised concerns regarding the safety of long-term use in children. Interpretation of these trials remains controversial with major regulatory agencies differing in their recommendations – the US Food and Drug Administration recommends against the use of sildenafil for treatment of PAH in children, while the European Medicines Agency supports its use at “low doses”. Here, we review the available pediatric data regarding dosing, acute, and long-term safety and efficacy of sildenafil for the treatment of PAH in children. PMID:26719728

  17. Online, direct-to-consumer access to insulin: patient safety considerations and reform.

    PubMed

    Lovett, Kimberly M; Liang, Bryan A; Mackey, Timothy K

    2012-01-01

    The online, direct-to-consumer (DTC) medical marketplace is proliferating more rapidly than regulation is evolving to ensure proper patient safety and public health controls. Along with this growing body of unrestrained medical testing and pharmaceuticals offered DTC online, most types of insulin and insulin administration products may now be purchased without prescriptions or physician guidance. Given the relatively significant risks of insulin use, the abuse potential, the high prevalence of diabetes mellitus, and the rising population of uninsured and underinsured, it is imperative to reform the online DTC medical marketplace to ensure that patient safety and public health are protected. PMID:23294798

  18. Interim safety equipment list for 241-C-106 waste retrieval, project W-320

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, J.C.

    1996-01-25

    The purpose of this supporting document is to provide safety classifications for systems, structures, and components of the Tank 241-C-106 Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS) and to document the methodology used to develop these safety classifications. The WRSS requires two transfer lines, one to carry sluiced waste slurry to tank 241-AY-102 and the other to return supernatant to tank 241-C-106; pumps in each tank; sluicers to direct the supernatant stream inside tank 241-C-106; a slurry distributor in tank 241-AY-102; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning for tank 241-C-106; and instrumentation and control devices.

  19. Temporal Considerations in Mission Safety Decision Making- An International Space Station Case Study Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herd, Andrew

    2010-09-01

    Operations on the International Space Station(ISS) shall ensure mission success whilst maintaining safety for the ISS crew, ISS and visiting vehicles(also known as Safety of Flight(SoF)). Prior to mission, within the mission development and preparation process operations products are defined to form a boundary around and assure mission success. Over the phases of the safety review process, undertaken within spaceflight hardware design, approaches such as failure tolerance are employed to appropriately control the inherent or induced hazards presented by the spaceflight hardware or its use. Prior to mission execution all nominal operations are certified as being safe -it follows then that only after the instance of “issues”, such as hardware anomalies, that operational deltas arise and need further safety(or risk) assessment to be brought to the appropriate approval authority. In some rare cases the need for a new safety assessment response arises due to a change in safety requirements. During a mission, the tools by which a new safety case is assessed by mission management includes concepts as “time to effect” and “time of exposure” and form part of the normal risk understanding and acceptance process. The ISS Mission Management Team(IMMT) shall assure that the presentable risks are acceptable, in terms the specific risk and the accumulated risk. “Equivalent safety” may be granted for noncompliant conditions that do not meet specific requirements in the exact manner specified; however, the hardware/system design, procedure, or configuration satisfies the intent of the requirement by achieving a comparable or higher degree of safety. Criteria for establishing an “equivalent safety” is based on: a. Use of alternative methods/controls; b. Utilization of procedures, protective devices, preflight verification activities, and crew experience base; c. Reduced time of exposure; d. Likelihood/probability of additional failures after loss of first control

  20. Smart on-board diagnostic decision trees for quantitative aviation equipment and safety procedures validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ali H.; Markarian, Garik; Tarter, Alex; Kölle, Rainer

    2010-04-01

    The current trend in high-accuracy aircraft navigation systems is towards using data from one or more inertial navigation subsystem and one or more navigational reference subsystems. The enhancement in fault diagnosis and detection is achieved via computing the minimum mean square estimate of the aircraft states using, for instance, Kalman filter method. However, this enhancement might degrade if the cause of a subsystem fault has some effect on other subsystems that are calculating the same measurement. One instance of such case is the tragic incident of Air France Flight 447 in June, 2009 where message transmissions in the last moment before the crash indicated inconsistencies in measured airspeed as reported by Airbus. In this research, we propose the use of mathematical aircraft model to work out the current states of the airplane and in turn, using these states to validate the readings of the navigation equipment throughout smart diagnostic decision tree network. Various simulated equipment failures have been introduced in a controlled environment to proof the concept of operation. The results have showed successful detection of the failing equipment in all cases.

  1. 29 CFR 1926.431 - Maintenance of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maintenance of equipment. 1926.431 Section 1926.431 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Electrical Safety-Related Maintenance and Environmental Considerations §...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.431 - Maintenance of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maintenance of equipment. 1926.431 Section 1926.431 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Electrical Safety-Related Maintenance and Environmental Considerations §...

  3. Safety and effectiveness considerations for clinical studies of visual prosthetic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Ethan D.

    2007-03-01

    With the advent of new designs of visual prostheses for the blind, FDA is faced with developing guidance for evaluating their engineering, safety and patient performance. Visual prostheses are considered significant risk medical devices, and their use in human clinical trials must be approved by FDA under an investigation device exemption (IDE). This paper contains a series of test topics and design issues that sponsors should consider in order to assess the safety and efficacy of their device. The IDE application includes a series of pre-clinical and clinical data sections. The pre-clinical section documents laboratory, animal and bench top performance tests of visual prostheses safety and reliability to support a human clinical trial. The materials used in constructing the implant should be biocompatible, sterile, corrosion resistant, and able to withstand any forces exerted on it during normal patient use. The clinical data section is composed of items related to patient-related evaluation of device performance. This section documents the implantation procedure, trial design, statistical analysis and how visual performance is assessed. Similar to cochlear implants, a visual prosthesis is expected to last in the body for many years, and good pre-clinical and clinical testing will help ensure its safety, durability and effectiveness.

  4. 48 CFR 252.246-7004 - Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Safety of Facilities... Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CLAUSES AND FORMS... the requirements of the applicable inspection clause in this contract, that the...

  5. Public Playground Equipment: Suggested Safety Requirements and Supporting Rationale for Swing Assemblies and Straight Slides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahajan, Bal; And Others

    This memorandum report proposes a safety standard to reduce the frequency and severity of children's impacts with the suspended members of swing assemblies and falls from slide surfaces, under conditions of normal use and reasonably foreseeable misuse. The standard applies to swings and straight slides intended for use as public playground…

  6. Report of an exploratory study: Safety and liability considerations for photovoltaic modules/panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, A. S.; Meeker, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    An overview of legal issues as they apply to design, manufacture and use of photovoltaic module/array devices is provided and a methodology is suggested for use of the design stage of these products to minimize or eliminate perceived hazards. Questions are posed to stimulate consideration of this area.

  7. [Earthquakes and healthcare. Considerations and proposals for improving seismic safety of hospitals].

    PubMed

    Polesani, L; Cocuzza, S; Nachiero, D

    2012-01-01

    The Italian territory faces a high seismic risk. Moreover the high vulnerability of health facilities increases the danger for the population. This study departs from an analysis of the state of conservation of the national hospitals and builds upon the data gathered on the recent earthquakes that have shaken Italy. Indeed, the study provides a bulk of preventive measures directed to improve seismic safety of both the national health system and the hospitals strategic value. The focus is mainly centered on emergency management aspects and the maintenance of the functionality of the medical services necessary to overcome the health crisis following an earthquake of high intensity. The research is conducted considering how these issues were addressed in foreign countries. In particular; California represents a central case study, since the high seismicity of the territory requires heavy investments to deal with the seismic safety of the hospitals. PMID:22755504

  8. Health and Safety Considerations Associated with Sodium-Cooled Experimental Nuclear Fuel Dismantlement

    SciTech Connect

    Carvo, Alan E.

    2015-04-01

    Between the mid-1970s and the mid-1980s Sandia National Laboratory constructed eleven experimental assemblies to simulate debris beds formed in a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. All but one of the assemblies were irradiated. The experimental assemblies were transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in 2007 and 2008 for storage, dismantlement, recovery of the uranium for reuse in the nuclear fuel cycle, and disposal of unneeded materials. This paper addresses the effort to dismantle the assemblies down to the primary containment vessel and repackage them for temporary storage until such time as equipment necessary for sodium separation is in place.

  9. Breast milk sharing via the internet: the practice and health and safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Keim, Sarah A; McNamara, Kelly A; Jayadeva, Chenali M; Braun, Ashlea C; Dillon, Chelsea E; Geraghty, Sheela R

    2014-08-01

    To characterize the practice of breast milk sharing via the internet in the US and examine factors associated with participants' communication regarding potential health and safety risks. This cross-sectional study examined all original postings (n = 254) placed during 1 week in 2011 on four websites to facilitate the sharing of breast milk. Postings were characterized for intent and health and safety topics (i.e., selling vs. donating milk, hygiene/handling practices, infectious disease screening, diet/exercise habits, substance and pharmaceutical use, milk quality claims, price) communicated between milk providers and recipients. Approximately 69% of postings were providing milk and 31% were seeking milk; 47% included identifiers. Few provider postings reflected measures to potentially reduce risks to recipients: 20% mentioned using a healthy handling/hygiene practice, 11% offered specifics about infectious disease screening, 51% mentioned limiting/abstaining from 1+ substances. The presence of indications about handling/hygiene, diet/exercise, and abstaining from substances were strongly positively associated with each other (ORs 7.42-13.80), with the odds of selling (ORs 6.03-∞), and with making quality claims (ORs 3.14-13.54), but not with disease screening. One-fifth of recipients sought milk for a child with a medical condition or poor birth outcome. Most recipients (90%) did not specify any health and safety practices of a provider in their posting. Health behaviors and screening for diseases that may affect milk safety are not prominent topics in postings seeking to share milk. This lack of communication may exacerbate the health risks to recipient infants, especially infants at increased risk due to pre-existing health conditions. PMID:24158507

  10. Climate considerations in long-term safety assessments for nuclear waste repositories.

    PubMed

    Näslund, Jens-Ove; Brandefelt, Jenny; Liljedahl, Lillemor Claesson

    2013-05-01

    For a deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel planned in Sweden, the safety assessment covers up to 1 million years. Climate scenarios range from high-end global warming for the coming 100 000 years, through deep permafrost, to large ice sheets during glacial conditions. In contrast, in an existing repository for short-lived waste the activity decays to low levels within a few tens of thousands of years. The shorter assessment period, 100 000 years, requires more focus on climate development over the coming tens of thousands of years, including the earliest possibility for permafrost growth and freezing of the engineered system. The handling of climate and climate change in safety assessments must be tailor-made for each repository concept and waste type. However, due to the uncertain future climate development on these vast time scales, all safety assessments for nuclear waste repositories require a range of possible climate scenarios. PMID:23619797