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Sample records for safety issue gsi

  1. Generic Safety Issue (GSI) 171 -- Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) failure from a loop subsequent to LOCA: Assessment of plant vulnerability and CDF contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Guridi, G.; Samanta, P.; Chu, L.; Yang, J.

    1998-03-01

    Generic Safety Issue 171 (GSI-171), Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) from a Loss Of Offsite Power (LOOP) subsequent to a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA), deals with an accident sequence in which a LOCA is followed by a LOOP. This issue was later broadened to include a LOOP followed by a LOCA. Plants are designed to handle a simultaneous LOCA and LOOP. In this paper, the authors address the unique issues that are involved i LOCA with delayed LOOP (LOCA/LOOP) and LOOP with delayed LOCA (LOOP/LOCA) accident sequences. LOCA/LOOP accidents are analyzed further by developing event-tree/fault-tree models to quantify their contributions to core-damage frequency (CDF) in a pressurized water reactor and a boiling water reactor (PWR and a BWR). Engineering evaluation and judgments are used during quantification to estimate the unique conditions that arise in a LOCA/LOOP accident. The results show that the CDF contribution of such an accident can be a dominant contributor to plant risk, although BWRs are less vulnerable than PWRs.

  2. Aviation Safety Issues Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morello, Samuel A.; Ricks, Wendell R.

    2009-01-01

    The aviation safety issues database was instrumental in the refinement and substantiation of the National Aviation Safety Strategic Plan (NASSP). The issues database is a comprehensive set of issues from an extremely broad base of aviation functions, personnel, and vehicle categories, both nationally and internationally. Several aviation safety stakeholders such as the Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) have already used the database. This broader interest was the genesis to making the database publically accessible and writing this report.

  3. 76 FR 24925 - Solicitation for Public Comment on Potential Alternatives To Resolve Generic Safety Issue 191...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... informing the path forward to resolve Generic Safety Issue (GSI) 191, Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Sump... emergency core cooling system (ECCS) recirculation sump screens and associated flow paths to debris blockage... regulatory path forward options for closure. In a Staff Requirement Memorandum (SRM) dated December 23,...

  4. Module Safety Issues (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2012-02-01

    Description of how to make PV modules so that they are less likely to turn into safety hazards. Making modules inherently safer with minimum additional cost is the preferred approach for PV. Safety starts with module design to ensure redundancy within the electrical circuitry to minimize open circuits and proper mounting instructions to prevent installation related ground faults. Module manufacturers must control the raw materials and processes to ensure that that every module is built like those qualified through the safety tests. This is the reason behind the QA task force effort to develop a 'Guideline for PV Module Manufacturing QA'. Periodic accelerated stress testing of production products is critical to validate the safety of the product. Combining safer PV modules with better systems designs is the ultimate goal. This should be especially true for PV arrays on buildings. Use of lower voltage dc circuits - AC modules, DC-DC converters. Use of arc detectors and interrupters to detect arcs and open the circuits to extinguish the arcs.

  5. Laser megajoule safety issues

    SciTech Connect

    Dubost, S.; Le Tonqueze, Y.

    2008-07-15

    The Laser Megajoule (LMJ) will be an experimental fusion laser facility located at CEA-CESTA research center, close to Bordeaux. Fusion experiments will involve targets filled with tritium, requiring the design of containment devices to ensure worker protection against radiation exposure according to the French safety regulations. This paper reports the work performed by the LMJ safety team to design these confinement devices. At first, the paper describes the tritium inventory evaluated inside the facility. Then, specifications and allocations for the vacuum and air purge systems of the target bay are defined and explained. A spread model is described to evaluate the spatial repartition of the residual contamination in the chamber, concluding to an anisotropic process. Consequently, security factors have been defined according to the different locations inside the target bay. Definition of containment protections for the equipment of the target bay like fume hoods and glove boxes does not depend only on the effects of contamination (internal exposure hazards), but also on activation of materials (external exposure). Consequently, safety requirements have been defined in order to design containment devices. Finally, a specification of containment barriers performances is given (static and dynamic modes). Leakage of the barriers, negatives pressures, cleaning and conditioning are addressed. (authors)

  6. Ground Safety Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, Paul D.

    2007-01-01

    In the history of humankind, every space adventure, great or small, has begun on the ground. While this seems to be stating the obvious, mission and flight hardware designers who have overlooked this fact have paid a high price, either in loss or damage to the hardware pre-launch, or in mission failure or reduction. Designers may risk not only their flight hardware, but they may also risk their lives, their co-workers lives and even the general public by not heeding safety on the ground. Their eyes may be on the stars but their feet are on the ground! This discussion applies to all forms of flight hardware from the largest rockets to the smallest spare parts.

  7. Five major NASA health and safety issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavert, Raymond B.

    2000-01-01

    The goal has been set to establish NASA as number one in safety in the nation. This includes Systems and Mission Safety as well as Occupational Safety for all NASA employees and contractors on and off the job. There are five major health and safety issues important in the pursuit of being number one and they are: (1) Radiation (2) Hearing (3) Habitability/Toxicology (4) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) (5) Stress. The issues have features of accumulated injury since NASA's future missions involve long time human presence in space i.e., International Space Station operations and Mars missions. The objective of this paper is to discuss these five issues in terms of controlling risks and enhancing health and safety. Safety metrics are discussed in terms of the overall goal of NASA to be number one in safety. .

  8. Electrosurgery: principles and safety issues.

    PubMed

    Odell, R C

    1995-09-01

    The use of monopolar electrosurgical energy has been the "gold standard" for the past 50 years. It has diverse capabilities, such as fulguration, precise vaporization, and coaptation of large vessels. Technologic advances in performance and safety have positioned this device as a useful tool in a surgeon's armamentarium. The adaptation of active electrode monitoring for stray energy as a result of insulation failure or capacitive coupling and the use of completely metal trocar cannulas will increase the confidence of the surgeon and the safety of his/ her patient. It is the author's opinion that its use will prove itself in laparoscopy. As with any surgical tool or energy source, education and skill are required. This introduction on the principal of the biophysics of electrical energy on tissue and the safety consideration is a start to further one's understanding of this surgical tool. PMID:8612371

  9. Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIOSH NIOSH Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir America's work ... while also balancing the traditional parenting responsibilities. 1 Work-related health challenges facing women Women face different ...

  10. Road safety issues for bus transport management.

    PubMed

    Cafiso, Salvatore; Di Graziano, Alessandro; Pappalardo, Giuseppina

    2013-11-01

    Because of the low percentage of crashes involving buses and the assumption that public transport improves road safety by reducing vehicular traffic, public interest in bus safety is not as great as that in the safety of other types of vehicles. It is possible that less attention is paid to the significance of crashes involving buses because the safety level of bus systems is considered to be adequate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and perceptions of bus managers with respect to safety issues and the potential effectiveness of various technologies in achieving higher safety standards. Bus managers were asked to give their opinions on safety issues related to drivers (training, skills, performance evaluation and behaviour), vehicles (maintenance and advanced devices) and roads (road and traffic safety issues) in response to a research survey. Kendall's algorithm was used to evaluate the level of concordance. The results showed that the majority of the proposed items were considered to have great potential for improving bus safety. The data indicated that in the experience of the participants, passenger unloading and pedestrians crossing near bus stops are the most dangerous actions with respect to vulnerable users. The final results of the investigation showed that start inhibition, automatic door opening, and the materials and internal architecture of buses were considered the items most strongly related to bus passenger safety. Brake assistance and vehicle monitoring systems were also considered to be very effective. With the exception of driver assistance systems for passenger and pedestrian safety, the perceptions of the importance of other driver assistance systems for vehicle monitoring and bus safety were not unanimous among the bus company managers who participated in this survey. The study results showed that the introduction of new technologies is perceived as an important factor in improving bus safety, but a better understanding

  11. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants: TMI Action Plan requirements; unresolved safety issues; generic safety issues; other multiplant action issues. Supplement 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    As part of ongoing US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts to ensure the quality and accountability of safety issue information, the NRC established a program for publishing an annual report on the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of safety issues in major NRC requirements areas. This information was initially compiled and reported in three NUREG-series volumes. Volume 1, published in March 1991, addressed the status of Three Mile Island (TMI) Action Plan Requirements. Volume 2, published in May 1991, addressed the status of unresolved safety issues (USIs). Volume 3, published in June 1991, addressed the implementation and verification status of generic safety issues (GSIs). The first annual supplement, which combined these volumes into a single report and presented updated information as of September 30, 1991, was published in December 1991. The second annual supplement, which provided updated information as of September 30, 1992, was published in December 1992. Supplement 2 also provided the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of other multiplant action (MPA) issues not related to TMI Action Plan requirements, USIs, or GSIs. This third annual NUREG report, Supplement 3, presents updated information as of September 30, 1993. This report gives a comprehensive description of the implementation and verification status of TMI Action Plan requirements, safety issues designated as USIs, GSIs, and other MPAs that have been resolved and involve implementation of an action or actions by licensees. This report makes the information available to other interested parties, including the public. Additionally, this report serves as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ``A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues,`` which tracks safety issues until requirements are approved for imposition at licensed plants or until the NRC issues a request for action by licensees.

  12. Software safety and reliability issues in safety-related systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zucconi, L.

    1992-09-01

    The increasing number of accidents attributed to computer-based systems is causing increased public awareness of the risk associated with these systems' use in safety-related applications. Examples include the Therac-25 medical LINAC deaths, the growing number of Airbus A320 crashes, the AT T Long-Lines disaster on Martin Luther King Day in 1990, the spate of regional telephone outages of the summer of 1991, and many more. How do safety and reliability sometimes conflict What practical computer system and software development technologies and processes can be applied to increase the safety and reliability of computer systems What are the technical and managerial issues contributing to the construction of less-than-safe computer-based systems How can systems engineers and software engineers work together. to address the issues related to safety and reliability of computer systems This paper will address these topics and include an assessment of the best current state-of-the-practice and upcoming technologies that will carry us into the 21st century.

  13. Safety and reliability issues in safety-related systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zucconi, L.

    1992-03-20

    The increasing number of accidents attributed to computer-based systems is causing increased public awareness of the risk associated with these systems` use in safety-related applications. Examples include the Therac-25 medical LINAC deaths, the growing number of Airbus A320 crashes, the AT&T Long-Lines disaster on Martin Luther King Day in 1990, the spate of regional telephone outages of the summer of 1991, and many more. How do safety and reliability sometimes conflict? What practical computer system and software development technologies and processes can be applied to increase the safety and reliability of computer systems? What are the technical and managerial issues contributing to the construction of less-than-safe computer-based systems? How can systems engineers and software engineers work together to address the issues related safety and reliability of computer systems? This paper will address these topics and include an assessment of the best current state-of-the-practice and of upcoming technologies that will carry us into the 21st century.

  14. Software safety and reliability issues in safety-related systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zucconi, L.

    1992-09-01

    The increasing number of accidents attributed to computer-based systems is causing increased public awareness of the risk associated with these systems` use in safety-related applications. Examples include the Therac-25 medical LINAC deaths, the growing number of Airbus A320 crashes, the AT&T Long-Lines disaster on Martin Luther King Day in 1990, the spate of regional telephone outages of the summer of 1991, and many more. How do safety and reliability sometimes conflict? What practical computer system and software development technologies and processes can be applied to increase the safety and reliability of computer systems? What are the technical and managerial issues contributing to the construction of less-than-safe computer-based systems? How can systems engineers and software engineers work together. to address the issues related to safety and reliability of computer systems? This paper will address these topics and include an assessment of the best current state-of-the-practice and upcoming technologies that will carry us into the 21st century.

  15. Safety and reliability issues in safety-related systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zucconi, L.

    1992-03-20

    The increasing number of accidents attributed to computer-based systems is causing increased public awareness of the risk associated with these systems' use in safety-related applications. Examples include the Therac-25 medical LINAC deaths, the growing number of Airbus A320 crashes, the AT T Long-Lines disaster on Martin Luther King Day in 1990, the spate of regional telephone outages of the summer of 1991, and many more. How do safety and reliability sometimes conflict What practical computer system and software development technologies and processes can be applied to increase the safety and reliability of computer systems What are the technical and managerial issues contributing to the construction of less-than-safe computer-based systems How can systems engineers and software engineers work together to address the issues related safety and reliability of computer systems This paper will address these topics and include an assessment of the best current state-of-the-practice and of upcoming technologies that will carry us into the 21st century.

  16. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Safety Issue 29: Bolting degradation or failure in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.Y.

    1991-09-01

    Generic Safety Issue (GSI)-29 deals with staff concerns about public risk due to degradation or failure of safety-related bolting in nuclear power plants. The issue was initiated in November 1982. Value-impact studies of a mandatory program on safety-related bolting for operating plants were inconclusive: therefore, additional regulatory requirements for operating plants could not be justified in accordance with provisions of 10 CFR 50.109. In addition, based on operating experience with bolting in both nuclear and conventional power plants, the actions already taken through bulletins, generic letters, and information notices, and the industry-proposed actions, the staff concluded that a sufficient technical basis exists for the resolution of GSI-29. The staff further concluded that leakage of bolted pressure joints is possible but catastrophic failure of a reactor coolant pressure boundary joint that will lead to significant accident sequences is highly unlikely. For future plants, it was concluded that a new Standard Review Plant section should be developed to codify existing bolting requirements and industry-developed initiatives. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  17. FAIR project at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kester, Oliver; Spiller, Peter; Stoecker, Horst

    FAIR -- the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe -- constructed at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH in Darmstadt comprises an international centre of heavy ion accelerators that will drive heavy ion and antimatter research (FBTR, 2006). FAIR will provide worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities allowing a large variety of fore-front research in physics and applied science. FAIR will deliver antiproton and ion beams of unprecedented intensities and qualities. The main part of the FAIR facility is a sophisticated and cost efficient accelerator system, which delivers parallel beams to different experiments of the FAIR experimental collaborations -- APPA, NuSTAR, CBM and PANDA. The accelerated primary beams will then be employed to create new, often highly exotic particles in a series of parallel experimental programs. Experiments with exotic particles will explore fundamental processes which are expected to have taken place in the early phases and still happen in the on-going evolution of the Universe. These processes produced the basic constituents of matter and overall structure we observe today...

  18. FLAIR Project at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Welsch, C. P.; Grieser, M.; Ullrich, J.; Wolf, A.

    2006-03-20

    The future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt will produce the highest flux of antiprotons in the world. Within the planned complex of storage rings, it will also be feasible to decelerate the antiprotons to about 30 MeV kinetic energy, opening up the unique possibility to create low energy antiprotons and thus, establish low-energy antiproton physics at GSI. In the Facility for Low-energy Antiproton and Ion Research (FLAIR) the antiprotons shall be slowed down by means of two cooler storage rings. In the second one, the Ultra-low energy electrostatic Storage Ring (USR), energies ranging from 300 keV to 20 keV will be available for various in-ring experiments as well as for efficient injection of antiprotons into traps. In the limit of such small beam energies, the realization of efficient electron cooling, employing electron energies of only a few eV is one of the new challenges. In this contribution, a review of the FLAIR facility is given and its deceleration and cooling scheme is elucidated in comparison to the present AD operation scheme. Special emphasis is placed on the problems related to electron cooling at ultra-low energies.

  19. 48 CFR 246.371 - Notification of potential safety issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... safety issues. 246.371 Section 246.371 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Notification of potential safety issues. (a) Use the clause at 252.246-7003, Notification of Potential Safety Issues, in solicitations and contracts for the acquisition of— (1) Repairable or consumable...

  20. Safety issues of current analgesics: an update

    PubMed Central

    CAZACU, IRINA; MOGOSAN, CRISTINA; LOGHIN, FELICIA

    2015-01-01

    Pain represents a complex experience which can be approached by various medicines. Non-opioid and opioid analgesics are the most common drugs used to manage different types of pain. The increased attention nowadays to pain management entailed concomitantly more frequent adverse drug reactions (ADRs) related to analgesic use. Drug-drug interactions can be sometimes responsible for the adverse effects. However, a significant proportion of analgesic ADRs are preventable, which would avoid patient suffering. In order to draw the attention to analgesics risks and to minimize the negative consequences related to their use, the present review comprises a synthesis of the most important safety issues described in the scientific literature. It highlights the potential risks of the most frequently used analgesic medicines: non-opioid (paracetamol, metamizole, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and opioid analgesics. Even if there is a wide experience in their use, they continue to capture attention with safety concerns and with potential risks recently revealed. Acknowledging potential safety problems represents the first step for health professionals in assuring a safe and efficient analgesic treatment with minimum risks to patients. Taking into consideration all medical and environmental factors and carefully monitoring the patients are also essential in preventing and early detecting analgesic ADRs. PMID:26528060

  1. Microbiological Quality and Safety Issues in Cheesemaking.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Dennis J

    2014-02-01

    As the manufacture of cheese relies in part on the select outgrowth of microorganisms, such conditions can also allow for the multiplication of unwanted contaminants. Milk ultimately becomes contaminated with microorganisms originating from infection, the farm environment, and feedstuffs, as well as milking and processing equipment. Thus, poor sanitation, improper milk handling, and animal health issues can result in not only decreased yield and poor quality but also sporadic cases and outbreaks of dairy-related disease. The entry, establishment, and persistence of food-borne pathogens in dairy processing environments also present a considerable risk to products postprocessing. Food safety management systems coupled with regulatory policies and microbiological standards for milk and milk products currently implemented in various nations work to reduce risk while improving the quality and safety of cheese and other dairy products. With that, cheese has enjoyed an excellent food safety record with relatively few outbreaks of food-borne disease considering the amount of cheese produced and consumed worldwide. However, as cheese production and consumption continue to grow, we must remain vigilant in ensuring the continued production of safe, high-quality cheese. PMID:26082114

  2. Dust Combustion Safety Issues for Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2003-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a safety research task to identify the safety issues and phenomenology of metallic dust fires and explosions that are postulated for fusion experiments. There are a variety of metal dusts that are created by plasma erosion and disruptions within the plasma chamber, as well as normal industrial dusts generated in the more conventional equipment in the balance of plant. For fusion, in-vessel dusts are generally mixtures of several elements; that is, the constituent elements in alloys and the variety of elements used for in-vessel materials. For example, in-vessel dust could be composed of beryllium from a first wall coating, tungsten from a divertor plate, copper from a plasma heating antenna or diagnostic, and perhaps some iron and chromium from the steel vessel wall or titanium and vanadium from the vessel wall. Each of these elements has its own unique combustion characteristics, and mixtures of elements must be evaluated for the mixture’s combustion properties. Issues of particle size, dust temperature, and presence of other combustible materials (i.e., deuterium and tritium) also affect combustion in air. Combustion in other gases has also been investigated to determine if there are safety concerns with “inert” atmospheres, such as nitrogen. Several coolants have also been reviewed to determine if coolant breach into the plasma chamber would enhance the combustion threat; for example, in-vessel steam from a water coolant breach will react with metal dust. The results of this review are presented here.

  3. Health safety issues of synthetic food colorants.

    PubMed

    Amchova, Petra; Kotolova, Hana; Ruda-Kucerova, Jana

    2015-12-01

    Increasing attention has been recently paid to the toxicity of additives used in food. The European Parliament and the Council published the REGULATION (EC) No. 1333/2008 on food additives establishing that the toxicity of food additives evaluated before 20th January 2009 must be re-evaluated by European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). The aim of this review is to survey current knowledge specifically on the toxicity issues of synthetic food colorants using official reports published by the EFSA and other available studies published since the respective report. Synthetic colorants described are Tartrazine, Quinoline Yellow, Sunset Yellow, Azorubine, Ponceau 4R, Erythrosine, Allura Red, Patent Blue, Indigo Carmine, Brilliant Blue FCF, Green S, Brilliant Black and Brown HT. Moreover, a summary of evidence on possible detrimental effects of colorant mixes on children's behaviour is provided and future research directions are outlined. PMID:26404013

  4. Emerging food safety issues: An EU perspective.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, John D G

    2016-05-01

    Safe food is the right of every citizen of the European Union (EU). A comprehensive and dynamic framework of food and feed safety legislation has been put in place and the EU's executive arm - the European Commission - is responsible for ensuring that the EU member states apply food law consistently. Similarly, the Commission plays an important role in ensuring that imported food meets the EU's stringent food safety standards. Consumer perceptions of unsafe food tend to focus on acute outbreaks of bacterial or viral origin. In recent years there have been a number of diverse food crises associated with fraudulent activity which may (e.g. melamine in dairy products in China) or may not (e.g. the horse meat scandal in the EU) represent a genuine food safety risk. Well publicized incidents of chronic exposure to chemical contamination in the EU (e.g. dioxins in meat and mycotoxins in nuts) have required robust coordinated policy responses from the Commission. Despite the decreasing incidence of non-compliant residues of veterinary medicinal products and banned substances in animal products, EU consumers are increasingly concerned about the use of such products in food-producing animals, including in the context of the build-up of antimicrobial resistance in animals and transfer to humans. The Commission plays a key role in coordination of the EU member states' responses to such incidents, in risk management, and in preparation for emerging issues. This paper focuses on how the EU as a whole has dealt with a number of food crises, and what can be learned from past incidents. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27443205

  5. High-heat tank safety issues evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, J.C.

    1993-05-10

    Subsection (b) of Public Law 101-510, Section 3137, {open_quotes}Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation{close_quotes} (PL 101-510), requires the Secretary of Energy to {open_quotes}identify those tanks that may have a serious potential for release of high-level waste due to uncontrolled increase in temperature or pressure{close_quotes}. One of the tanks that has been identified to meet this criteria is single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-106 (Wilson and Reep 1991). This report presents the results of an evaluation of the safety issue associated with tank 241-C-106: the continued cooling required for high heat generation in tank 241-C-106. If tank 241-C-106 should start leaking, continued addition of water for cooling could possibly increase the amount of leakage to the soil column. In turn, if the current methods of cooling tank 241-C-106 are stopped, the sludge temperatures may exceed established temperature limits, the long term structural integrity of the tank liner and concrete would be jeopardized, leading to an unacceptable release to the environment. Among other conclusions, this evaluation has determined that tank 241-C-106 contains enough heat generating wastes to justify retaining this tank on the list {open_quotes}Single-Shell Tanks With High Heat Loads (>40,000 Btu/H){close_quotes} and that to confirm the structural integrity needed for the retrieval of the contents of tank 241-C-106, an updated structural analysis and thermal analysis need to be conducted. Other findings of this evaluation are also reported.

  6. Professional Issues in System Safety Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, John; Thomas, Martyn; Redmill, Felix

    For many years the profession of system safety engineering has been emerging. This paper argues that the time has now come when it requires recognition, a voice, proper governance and leadership. System safety engineering is an amalgam of many disciplines, in particular, software engineering, safety engineering and management, and systems engineering, and this paper shows that system safety engineering must address the most difficult aspects of all of these. But professional matters extend beyond merely technical considerations, and the paper concludes by showing why there is the need for a new professional body.

  7. Occupational health and safety issues in military field hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bricknell, M C

    2001-10-01

    This paper considers the occupational health and safety issues that apply within a military field hospital. It considers NHS occupational health and safety activities and examines how these might be applied within an Army Medical Services unit. Areas that are unique to field hospitals are highlighted in comparison with a static NHS hospital. Some issues for future work are also considered. PMID:11766206

  8. Patient safety: what is really at issue?

    PubMed

    Bagian, James P

    2005-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration found that a number of components were key to implementing a meaningful and effective patient safety program. To truly improve patient safety, the overall goal of your organization must be to prevent harm to the patient, not to eliminate errors. Create a system that is perceived as fair, and mitigate perceived barriers to improving patient safety. Create a transparent system for prioritizing and establishing how resources will be applied to the patient safety effort. Provide tools that support root cause analysis that moves beyond superficial and inadequate questions such as, Whose fault is this? Action that results in improvement, not simply analysis of the problem, is needed. Finally, leadership and management must be visibly involved in the patient safety program. PMID:16223101

  9. Cabin Safety Issues Related to Pre-Departure and Inflight Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) in a partnership between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), participating carriers, and labor organizations. It is designed to improve the National Airspace System by collecting and studying reports detailing unsafe conditions and events in the aviation industry. Employees are able to report safety issues or concerns with confidentiality and without fear of discipline. Safety reports highlighting the human element in cabin safety issues and concerns.

  10. Nuclear power plant safety related pump issues

    SciTech Connect

    Colaccino, J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper summarizes of a number of pump issues raised since the Third NRC/ASME Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing in 1994. General issues discussed include revision of NRC Inspection Procedure 73756, issuance of NRC Information Notice 95-08 on ultrasonic flow meter uncertainties, relief requests for tests that are determined by the licensee to be impractical, and items in the ASME OM-1995 Code, Subsection ISTB, for pumps. The paper also discusses current pump vibration issues encountered in relief requests and plant inspections - which include smooth running pumps, absolute vibration limits, and vertical centrifugal pump vibration measurement requirements. Two pump scope issues involving boiling water reactor waterlog and reactor core isolation cooling pumps are also discussed. Where appropriate, NRC guidance is discussed.

  11. Nuclear data for criticality safety - current issues

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.; Jordan, W.C.; Wright, R.Q.

    1995-06-01

    Traditionally, nuclear data evaluations have been performed in support of the analysis and design of thermal and fast reactors. In general, the neutron spectra characteristic of the thermal and fast systems used for data testing are predominantly in the low- and high-energy range with a relatively small influence from the intermediate-energy range. In the area of nuclear criticality safety, nuclear systems arising from applications involving fissionable materials outside reactors can lead to situations very different from those most commonly found in reactor analysis and design. These systems are not limited to thermal or fast and may have significant influence from the intermediate energy range. The extension of the range of applicability of the nuclear data evaluation beyond thermal and fast systems is therefore needed to cover problems found in nuclear criticality safety. Before criticality safety calculations are performed, the bias and uncertainties of the codes and cross sections that are used must be determined. The most common sources of uncertainties, in general, are the calculational methodologies and the uncertainties related to the nuclear data, such as the microscopic cross sections, entering into the calculational procedure. The aim here is to focus on the evaluated nuclear data pertaining to applications in nuclear criticality safety.

  12. Regulatory views on current criticality safety issues

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, J.M.; Recio, M.

    1996-12-31

    The nuclear facilities in Spain of interest from the stand-point of criticality are a fuel fabrication facility, handling only fresh fuel; seven pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants with different nuclear steam supply system designs; two boiling water reactor (BWR) plants; and an ongoing program of dual-purpose casks (storage and transport) for spent fuel. Given the spent-fuel storage space problems with the original rack designs, a plan was developed and started in 1990 to incorporate high-density racks (borated steel or Boral) in the spent-fuel storage of all plants, giving credit for fuel burnup. Following this plan, five PWR units have licensed burnup-credited criticality safety analyses using a two-zone approach (fresh and spent fuel) for the spent-fuel pool. The two BWR plants have also licensed a criticality safety analysis with credit for the reactivity reduction provided by the gadolinia rods. The only spent-fuel cask yet licensed has followed the expected fresh fuel assumption for the criticality safety evaluation. However, it can be expected that the industry will submit burnup-credit safety analyses for the future casks designs.

  13. Stochastic Cooling Developments at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Nolden, F.; Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Dolinskii, A.; Franzke, B.; Jandewerth, U.; Nesmiyan, I.; Peschke, C.; Petri, P.; Steck, M.; Caspers, F.; Moehl, D.; Thorndahl, L.

    2006-03-20

    Stochastic Cooling is presently used at the existing storage ring ESR as a first stage of cooling for secondary heavy ion beams. In the frame of the FAIR project at GSI, stochastic cooling is planned to play a major role for the preparation of high quality antiproton and rare isotope beams. The paper describes the existing ESR system, the first stage cooling system at the planned Collector Ring, and will also cover first steps toward the design of an antiproton collection system at the planned RESR ring.

  14. Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles; Herring, James Stephen

    1999-10-01

    This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

  15. Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader; J. S. Herring

    1999-09-01

    This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

  16. ISV safety, processing, and starter path issues

    SciTech Connect

    Hilliard, D K; Kindle, C H

    1991-04-01

    Numerous experiments and studies related to safety concerns in the in situ vitrification (ISV) process have been conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Topics of interest include (1) combustible inclusions, (2) sealed containers, (3) radiant heat surge, (4) electrical shock, (5) general risk analysis, and (6) Pu criticality. The data and analyses are those used for the initial ISV development and subsequent improvement; the majority was performed in 1987 or earlier. The purpose of this report is to document these analyses for reference purposes; knowledge gained more recently is, or will be, incorporated in other documents. 33 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  17. Airport ramp safety and crew performance issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Roy; Drew, Charles; Patten, Marcia; Matchette, Robert

    1995-01-01

    This study examined 182 ramp operations incident reports from the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) database, to determine which factors influence ramp operation incidents. It was found that incidents occurred more often during aircraft arrival operations than during departure operations; incidents occurred most often at the gate stop area, less so at the gate entry/exit areas, and least on the ramp fringe areas; and reporters cited fewer incidents when more ground crew were present. The authors offer suggestions for both airline management and flight crews to reduce the rate of ramp incidents.

  18. Corneal Cross-Linking and Safety Issues

    PubMed Central

    Spoerl, Eberhard; Hoyer, Anne; Pillunat, Lutz E; Raiskup, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compile the safety aspects of the corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) by means of the riboflavin/UVA (370 nm) approach. Materials and Methodology: Analysis of the current treatment protocol with respect to safety during CXL. Results: The currently used UVA dose density of 5.4 J/cm2 and the corresponding irradiance of 3 mW/cm2 are below the known damage thresholds of UVA for the corneal endothelium, lens, and retina. Regarding the photochemical damages due to the free radicals the damage threshold for endothelial cells is 0.35 mW/cm2. In a 400μm thick corneal stroma saturated with riboflavin, the irradiance at the endothelial level is about 0.18 mW/cm2, which is a factor of 2 smaller than the damage threshold. Conclusion: As long as the corneal stroma treated has a minimal thickness of 400 microns (as recommended), neither corneal endothelium nor deeper structures such as lens and retina will suffer any damages. The light source should provide a homogenous irradiance avoiding hot spots. PMID:21399770

  19. Gender issues on occupational safety and health.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Eugenio; Vona, Rosa; Monterosso, Davide; Giammarioli, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    The increasing proportion of women in the workforce raises a range of gender-related questions about the different effects of work-related risks on men and women. Few studies have characterized gender differences across occupations and industries, although at this time, the gender sensitive approach is starting to acquire relevance in the field of human preventive medicine. The European Agency for Safety and Health at Work has encouraged a policy of gender equality in all European member states. Italy has adopted European provisions with new specific legislation that integrates the previous laws and introduces the gender differences into the workplace. Despite the fact that gender equal legislation opportunities have been enacted in Italy, their application is delayed by some difficulties. This review examines some of these critical aspects. PMID:27364393

  20. Influence Map Methodology for Evaluating Systemic Safety Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    "Raising the bar" in safety performance is a critical challenge for many organizations, including Kennedy Space Center. Contributing-factor taxonomies organize information about the reasons accidents occur and therefore are essential elements of accident investigations and safety reporting systems. Organizations must balance efforts to identify causes of specific accidents with efforts to evaluate systemic safety issues in order to become more proactive about improving safety. This project successfully addressed the following two problems: (1) methods and metrics to support the design of effective taxonomies are limited and (2) influence relationships among contributing factors are not explicitly modeled within a taxonomy.

  1. Staying silent about safety issues: Conceptualizing and measuring safety silence motives.

    PubMed

    Manapragada, Archana; Bruk-Lee, Valentina

    2016-06-01

    Communication between employees and supervisors about safety-related issues is an important component of a safe workplace. When supervisors receive information from employees about safety issues, they may gain otherwise-missed opportunities to correct these issues and/or prevent negative safety outcomes. A series of three studies were conducted to identify various safety silence motives, which describe the reasons that employees do not speak up to supervisors about safety-related issues witnessed in the workplace, and to develop a tool to assess these motives. Results suggest that employees stay silent about safety issues based on perceptions of altering relationships with others (relationship-based), perceptions of the organizational climate (climate-based), the assessment of the safety issue (issue-based), or characteristics of the job (job-based). We developed a 17-item measure to assess these four motives, and initial evidence was found for the construct and incremental validity of the safety silence motives measure in a sample of nurses. PMID:26974031

  2. Future Facility: FAIR at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, Guenther

    2007-05-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, FAIR, is a new particle accelerator facility to be built at the GSI site in Germany. The research at FAIR will cover a wide range of topics in nuclear and hadron physics, high density plasma and atomic physics, and applications in condensed matter physics and biology. A 1.1 km circumference double ring of rapidly cycling 100 and 300 Tm synchrotrons, will be FAIR's central accelerator system. It will be used to produce, inter alia, high intensity secondary beams of antiprotons and short-lived radioactive nuclei. A subsequent suite of cooler and storage rings will deliver heavy ion and antiproton beams of unprecedented quality. Large experiments are presently being designed by the NUSTAR, PANDA, PAX, CBM, SPARC, FLAIR, HEDgeHOB and BIOMAT collaborations.

  3. Collegiate Aviation Research and Education Solutions to Critical Safety Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This Conference Proceedings is a collection of 6 abstracts and 3 papers presented April 19-20, 2001 in Denver, CO. The conference focus was "Best Practices and Benchmarking in Collegiate and Industry Programs". Topics covered include: satellite-based aviation navigation; weather safety training; human-behavior and aircraft maintenance issues; disaster preparedness; the collegiate aviation emergency response checklist; aviation safety research; and regulatory status of maintenance resource management.

  4. Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Sherman

    2007-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

  5. Understanding Current Safety Issues for Trajectory Based Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael; Stewart, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Increases in procedural complexity were investigated as a possible contributor to flight path deviations in airline operations. Understanding current operational issues and their causes must be embraced to maintain current safety standards while increasing future functionality. ASRS data and expert narratives were used to discover factors relating to pilot deviations. Our investigation pointed to ATC intervention, automation confusion, procedure design, and mixed equipment as primary issues. Future work will need to include objective data and mitigation strategies.

  6. Thermally-related safety issues associated with thermal batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, Ronald Armand

    2006-06-01

    Thermal batteries can experience thermal runaway under certain usage conditions. This can lead to safety issues for personnel and cause damage to associated test equipment if the battery thermally self destructs. This report discusses a number of thermal and design related issues that can lead to catastrophic destruction of thermal batteries under certain conditions. Contributing factors are identified and mitigating actions are presented to minimize or prevent undesirable thermal runaway.

  7. Food Supply and Food Safety Issues in China

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Hon-Ming; Remais, Justin; Fung, Ming-Chiu; Xu, Liqing; Sun, Samuel Sai-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Food supply and food safety are major global public health issues, and are particularly important in heavily populated countries such as China. Rapid industrialisation and modernisation in China are having profound effects on food supply and food safety. In this Review, we identified important factors limiting agricultural production in China, including conversion of agricultural land to other uses, freshwater deficits, and soil quality issues. Additionally, increased demand for some agricultural products is examined, particularly those needed to satisfy the increased consumption of animal products in the Chinese diet, which threatens to drive production towards crops used as animal feed. Major sources of food poisoning in China include pathogenic microorganisms, toxic animals and plants entering the food supply, and chemical contamination. Meanwhile, two growing food safety issues are illegal additives and contamination of the food supply by toxic industrial waste. China’s connections to global agricultural markets are also having important effects on food supply and food safety within the country. Although the Chinese Government has shown determination to reform laws, establish monitoring systems, and strengthen food safety regulation, weak links in implementation remain. PMID:23746904

  8. Food supply and food safety issues in China.

    PubMed

    Lam, Hon-Ming; Remais, Justin; Fung, Ming-Chiu; Xu, Liqing; Sun, Samuel Sai-Ming

    2013-06-01

    Food supply and food safety are major global public health issues, and are particularly important in heavily populated countries such as China. Rapid industrialisation and modernisation in China are having profound effects on food supply and food safety. In this Review, we identified important factors limiting agricultural production in China, including conversion of agricultural land to other uses, freshwater deficits, and soil quality issues. Additionally, increased demand for some agricultural products is examined, particularly those needed to satisfy the increased consumption of animal products in the Chinese diet, which threatens to drive production towards crops used as animal feed. Major sources of food poisoning in China include pathogenic microorganisms, toxic animals and plants entering the food supply, and chemical contamination. Meanwhile, two growing food safety issues are illegal additives and contamination of the food supply by toxic industrial waste. China's connections to global agricultural markets are also having important effects on food supply and food safety within the country. Although the Chinese Government has shown determination to reform laws, establish monitoring systems, and strengthen food safety regulation, weak links in implementation remain. PMID:23746904

  9. The FIRST experiment at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleskac, R.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Agodi, C.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Aumann, T.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Fernández-García, J. P.; Finck, C.; Golosio, B.; Gallardo, M. I.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Juliani, D.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Leifels, Y.; Le Fevre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Piersanti, L.; Quesada, J. M.; Raciti, G.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Spiriti, E.; Stuttge, L.; Tropea, S.; Younis, H.; Patera, V.

    2012-06-01

    The FIRST (Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy) experiment at the SIS accelerator of GSI laboratory in Darmstadt has been designed for the measurement of ion fragmentation cross-sections at different angles and energies between 100 and 1000 MeV/nucleon. Nuclear fragmentation processes are relevant in several fields of basic research and applied physics and are of particular interest for tumor therapy and for space radiation protection applications. The start of the scientific program of the FIRST experiment was on summer 2011 and was focused on the measurement of 400 MeV/nucleon 12C beam fragmentation on thin (8 mm) graphite target. The detector is partly based on an already existing setup made of a dipole magnet (ALADiN), a time projection chamber (TP-MUSIC IV), a neutron detector (LAND) and a time of flight scintillator system (TOFWALL). This pre-existing setup has been integrated with newly designed detectors in the Interaction Region, around the carbon target placed in a sample changer. The new detectors are a scintillator Start Counter, a Beam Monitor drift chamber, a silicon Vertex Detector and a Proton Tagger scintillator system optimized for the detection of light fragments emitted at large angles. In this paper we review the experimental setup, then we present the simulation software, the data acquisition system and finally the trigger strategy of the experiment.

  10. Food Safety. Nourishing News. Volume 3, Issue 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Serving safe food is a critical responsibility for maintaining quality foodservice programs and healthy environments at schools and child care facilities. Child Nutrition Programs hopes you find this newsletter of assistance when reviewing the food safety program you have at each serving site. The articles contained in this issue are: (1) A…

  11. Characterization strategy report for the organic safety issues

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, S.C.; Campbell, J.A.; Fryxell, G.E.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes a logical approach to resolving potential safety issues resulting from the presence of organic components in hanford tank wastes. The approach uses a structured logic diagram (SLD) to provide a pathway for quantifying organic safety issue risk. The scope of the report is limited to selected organics (i.e., solvents and complexants) that were added to the tanks and their degradation products. The greatest concern is the potential exothermic reactions that can occur between these components and oxidants, such as sodium nitrate, that are present in the waste tanks. The organic safety issue is described in a conceptual model that depicts key modes of failure-event reaction processes in tank systems and phase domains (domains are regions of the tank that have similar contents) that are depicted with the SLD. Applying this approach to quantify risk requires knowing the composition and distribution of the organic and inorganic components to determine (1) how much energy the waste would release in the various domains, (2) the toxicity of the region associated with a disruptive event, and (3) the probability of an initiating reaction. Five different characterization options are described, each providing a different level of quality in calculating the risks involved with organic safety issues. Recommendations include processing existing data through the SLD to estimate risk, developing models needed to link more complex characterization information for the purpose of estimating risk, and examining correlations between the characterization approaches for optimizing information quality while minimizing cost in estimating risk.

  12. Ecological Issues Related to Children's Health and Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldridge, Jerry; Kohler, Maxie

    2009-01-01

    Issues concerning the health and safety of children and youth occur at multiple levels. Bronfenbrenner (1995) proposed an ecological systems approach in which multiple systems interact to enhance or diminish children's development. The same systems are at work in health promotion. The authors present and review articles that reflect the multiple…

  13. At Issue: Classroom Management and Safety, an Annotated Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pricer, Wayne F.

    2008-01-01

    In the wake of the horrific shootings at Virginia Tech and Northern Illinois University, many colleges and universities have begun to reexamine and reevaluate classroom management strategies and practices. Several institutions have taken additional steps to try to deal with the issue of physical safety in the classroom. This article presents an…

  14. Occupational health and safety issues among nurses in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    de Castro, A B; Cabrera, Suzanne L; Gee, Gilbert C; Fujishiro, Kaori; Tagalog, Eularito A

    2009-04-01

    Nursing is a hazardous occupation in the United States, but little is known about workplace health and safety issues facing the nursing work force in the Philippines. In this article, work-related problems among a sample of nurses in the Philippines are described. Cross-sectional data were collected through a self-administered survey during the Philippine Nurses Association 2007 convention. Measures included four categories: work-related demographics, occupational injury/illness, reporting behavior, and safety concerns. Approximately 40% of nurses had experienced at least one injury or illness in the past year, and 80% had experienced back pain. Most who had an injury did not report it. The top ranking concerns were stress and overwork. Filipino nurses encounter considerable health and safety concerns that are similar to those encountered by nurses in other countries. Future research should examine the work organization factors that contribute to these concerns and strengthen policies to promote health and safety. PMID:19438081

  15. Occupational Health and Safety Issues Among Nurses in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, A. B.; Cabrera, Suzanne L.; Gee, Gilbert C.; Fujishiro, Kaori; Tagalog, Eularito A.

    2009-01-01

    Nursing is a hazardous occupation in the United States, but little is known about workplace health and safety issues facing the nursing work force in the Philippines. In this article, work-related problems among a sample of nurses in the Philippines are described. Cross-sectional data were collected through a self-administered survey during the Philippine Nurses Association 2007 convention. Measures included four categories: work-related demographics, occupational injury/illness, reporting behavior, and safety concerns. Approximately 40% of nurses had experienced at least one injury or illness in the past year, and 80% had experienced back pain. Most who had an injury did not report it. The top ranking concerns were stress and overwork. Filipino nurses encounter considerable health and safety concerns that are similar to those encountered by nurses in other countries. Future research should examine the work organization factors that contribute to these concerns and strengthen policies to promote health and safety. PMID:19438081

  16. Priority patient safety issues identified by perioperative nurses.

    PubMed

    Steelman, Victoria M; Graling, Paula R; Perkhounkova, Yelena

    2013-04-01

    Much of the work done by perioperative nurses focuses on patient safety. Perioperative nurses are aware that unreported near misses occur every day, and they use that knowledge to prioritize activities to protect the patient. The purpose of this study was to identify the highest priority patient safety issues reported by perioperative RNs. We sent a link to an anonymous electronic survey to all AORN members who had e-mail addresses in AORN's member database. The survey asked respondents to identify top perioperative patient safety issues. We received 3,137 usable responses and identified the 10 highest priority safety issues, including wrong site/procedure/patient surgery, retained surgical items, medication errors, failures in instrument reprocessing, pressure injuries, specimen management errors, surgical fires, perioperative hypothermia, burns from energy devices, and difficult intubation/airway emergencies. Differences were found among practice settings. The information from this study can be used to inform the development of educational programs and the allocation of resources to enhance safe perioperative patient care. PMID:23531307

  17. Iraqi Nurses’ Perspectives on Safety Issues in Maternity Services

    PubMed Central

    Jamil Piro, Tiran; Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Salsali, Mahvash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies introduce maternal and neonatal safety phenomena as important challenges to the public health, particularly in low-income countries. However, few researches are conducted on the identification of safety issues in maternity hospitals in Iraq. It was the first study on nurses’ perspectives on safety issues in Kurdistan, Iraq. Objectives: The current study aimed to describe nurses’ perspectives on what constitutes a safe maternity service in Kurdistan, Iraq. Patients and Methods: A qualitative design, based on a content analysis approach, was used. Ten Kurdish nurses who worked in the delivery room of Kurdistan, Iraq maternity hospital were recruited through purposive sampling. Semi-structured interviews were performed to collect data. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Sampling continued to the level of data saturation. Data analysis was performed based on the steps suggested by Graneheim and Lundman. Results: Thematic analysis led to the identification of six main categories including stressful job, lack of schedule and job description, providing care with limited resources, professional unaccountability, regional sociopolitical factors, and inadequate training. Conclusions: Iraqi nurses identified factors such as limited health resources, lack of job description, and professional unaccountability as major safety issues in maternity services. These findings alarm the need to ensure the provision of females and neonates with appropriate care. This, however, would require coordination between Iraqi Kurdistan health authorities to provide midwifery care facilities, high-quality and relevant staff training, and an effective healthcare system in the maternity units. PMID:26576445

  18. Radiation safety issues related to radiolabeled antibodies. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, D.E.; Baum, J.W.; Meinhold, C. B. )

    1991-03-01

    Techniques related to the use of radiolabeled antibodies in humans are reviewed and evaluated in this report. It is intended as an informational resource for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and NRC licensees. Descriptions of techniques and health and safety issues are provided. Principal methods for labeling antibodies are summarized to help identify related radiation safety problems in the preparation of dosages for administration to patients. The descriptions are derived from an extensive literature review and consultations with experts in the field. A glossary of terms and acronyms is also included. An assessment was made of the extent of the involvement of organizations (other than the NRC) with safety issues related to radiolabeled antibodies, in order to identify regulatory issues which require attention. Federal regulations and guides were also reviewed for their relevance. A few (but significant) differences between the use of common radiopharmaceuticals and radiolabeled antibodies were observed. The clearance rate of whole, radiolabeled immunoglobulin is somewhat slower than common radiopharmaceuticals, and new methods of administration are being used. New nuclides are being used or considered (e.g., Re-186 and At-211) for labeling antibodies. Some of these nuclides present new dosimetry, instrument calibration, and patient management problems. Subjects related to radiation safety that require additional research are identified. 149 refs., 3 figs., 20 tabs.

  19. Ethical issues in patient safety: Implications for nursing management.

    PubMed

    Kangasniemi, Mari; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jasper, Melanie; Turunen, Hannele

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the ethical issues impacting the phenomenon of patient safety and to present implications for nursing management. Previous knowledge of this perspective is fragmented. In this discussion, the main drivers are identified and formulated in 'the ethical imperative' of patient safety. Underlying values and principles are considered, with the aim of increasing their visibility for nurse managers' decision-making. The contradictory nature of individual and utilitarian safety is identified as a challenge in nurse management practice, together with the context of shared responsibility and identification of future challenges. As a conclusion, nurse managers play a strategic role in patient safety. Their role is to incorporate ethical values of patient safety into decision-making at all levels in an organization, and also to encourage clinical nurses to consider values in the provision of care to patients. Patient safety that is sensitive to ethics provides sustainable practice where the humanity and dignity of all stakeholders are respected. PMID:23702894

  20. Safety issues related to synthetic-fuels facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The design, siting, construction, operation, and decommissioning of coal gasification, coal liquefaction, and oil shale facilities could present safety risks both to synfuels workers and to the environmental system unless careful controls are exercised. Many of these hazards are expected to be similar to those associated with conventional mining, mineral processing, coking operations, and refining of petroleum. However, because of the chemical and physical properties of coal and shale and their products, the types of technologies to be employed, and the scales of their operations, it has been suggested that unconventional hazards may occur. Issues which summarize the deliverations and work of the Committee on Synthetic Fuels Facilities Safety in evaluating the various technologies and their potentials for unconventional safety hazards are described in Chapters 2 and 3 of the report.

  1. Science and technology issues in spacecraft fire safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    1987-01-01

    The space station, a permanently-inhabited orbiting laboratory, places new demands on spacecraft fire safety. Long-duration missions may call for more-constrained fire controls, but the accessibility of the space station to a variety of users may call for less-restrictive measures. This paper discusses fire safety issues through a review of the state of the art and a presentation of key findings from a recent NASA Lewis Research Center Workshop. The subjects covered are the fundamental science of low-gravity combustion and the technology advances in fire detection, extinguishment, materials assessment, and atmosphere selection. Key concerns are for the adoption of a fire-safe atmosphere and the substitution for the effective but toxic extinguishant, halon 1301. The fire safety studies and reviews provide several recommendations for further action. One is the expanded research in combustion, sensors, and materials in the low-gravity environment of space. Another is the development of generalized fire-safety standards for spacecraft through cooperative endeavors with aerospace and outside Government and industry sources.

  2. Current issues and perspectives in food safety and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrand, G

    2015-12-01

    In this review, current issues and opportunities in food safety assessment are discussed. Food safety is considered an essential element inherent in global food security. Hazard characterization is pivotal within the continuum of risk assessment, but it may be conceived only within a very limited frame as a true alternative to risk assessment. Elucidation of the mode of action underlying a given hazard is vital to create a plausible basis for human toxicology evaluation. Risk assessment, to convey meaningful risk communication, must be based on appropriate and reliable consideration of both exposure and mode of action. New perspectives, provided by monitoring human exogenous and endogenous exposure biomarkers, are considered of great promise to support classical risk extrapolation from animal toxicology. PMID:26614817

  3. Current and prospective safety issues at the HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Tichler, P.R.

    1996-03-01

    The Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) was designed primarily to produce external neutron beams for experimental research. It is cooled, moderated and reflected by heavy water and uses MTR-ETR type fuel elements containing enriched uranium. The reactor power when operation began in 19965 was 40 MW, was raised to 60 MW in 1982 after a number of plant modifications, and operated at that level until 1989. Since that time safety questions have been raised which resulted in extended shutdowns and a reduction in operating power to 30 MW. This paper will discuss the principle safety issues, plans for their resolution and return to 60 MW operation. In addition, radiation embrittlement of the reactor vessel and thermal shield and its affect on the life of the facility will be briefly discussed.

  4. Safety in GPR prospecting: a rarely-considered issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persico, Raffaele; Pajewski, Lara; Trela, Christiane; Carrick Utsi, Erica

    2016-04-01

    Safety issues (of people first of all, but also of the equipment and environment) are rarely considered in Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) prospecting and, more in general, in near-surface geophysical prospecting. As is right and fully understandable, the scientific community devotes greatest attention first of all to the theoretical and practical aspects of GPR technique, affecting the quality of attainable results, secondly to the efforts and costs needed to achieve them [1-2]. However, the (luckily) growing GPR market and range of applications make it worth giving serious consideration to safety issues, too. The existing manuals dealing with safety in geophysics are mainly concerned with applications requiring "deep" geophysical prospecting, for example the search for oilfields and other hydrocarbon resources [3]. Near-surface geophysics involves less dangers than deep geophysics, of course. Nevertheless, several accidents have already happened during GPR experimental campaigns. We have personally had critical experiences and collected reliable testimonies concerning occurred problems as mountain sicks, fractures of legs, stomach problems, allergic reactions, encounters with potentially-dangerous animals, and more. We have also noticed that much more attention is usually paid to safety issues during indoor experimental activities (in laboratory), rather than during outdoor fieldworks. For example, the Italian National research Council is conventioned with safety experts who hold periodical seminaries about safety aspects. Having taken part to some of them, to our experience we have never heard a "lecture" devoted to outdoor prospecting. Nowadays, any aspects associated to the use of the technologies should be considered. The increasing sensibility and sense of responsibility towards environmental matters impose GPR end-users to be careful not to damage the environment and also the cultural heritage. Near-surface prospecting should not compromise the flora and

  5. Safety and governance issues for neonatal transport services.

    PubMed

    Ratnavel, Nandiran

    2009-08-01

    Neonatal transport is a subspecialty within the field of neonatology. Transport services are developing rapidly in the United Kingdom (UK) with network demographics and funding patterns leading to a broad spectrum of service provision. Applying principles of clinical governance and safety to such a diverse landscape of transport services is challenging but finally receiving much needed attention. To understand issues of risk management associated with this branch of retrieval medicine one needs to look at the infrastructure of transport teams, arrangements for governance, risk identification, incident reporting, feedback and learning from experience. One also needs to look at audit processes, training, communication and ways of team working. Adherence to current recommendations for equipment and vehicle design are vital. The national picture for neonatal transport is evolving. This is an excellent time to start benchmarking and sharing best practice with a view to optimising safety and reducing risk. PMID:19505776

  6. Issues of device safety in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Stanley Chen, Jih-Horn; Kou, Alex; Lee, Wei-Shiang

    2005-01-01

    Safe use of medical devices is a comprehensive concept with its technical integration. It includes not only its procedural operations but also its vigilance to patient status, correct installation of device, proper user's education and training, appropriate device maintenance, user facility compatibility, and acceptable interference from environment. Consequently, in technology advanced countries, the safety of medical device can be monitored by the operations through both the premarket approval and the postmarket surveillance. This also implies that regulations and standards take its own significant role to the safe operations of medical device. However, with the integrated and hierarchical operation of regulations and standards on medical devices is even non-existent in most of developing and underdeveloping countries. This article presents safety issues of medical devices in these particular circumstances. PMID:17282141

  7. Safety issues of dry fuel storage at RSWF

    SciTech Connect

    Clarksean, R.L.; Zahn, T.P.

    1995-02-01

    Safety issues associated with the dry storage of EBR-II spent fuel are presented and discussed. The containers for the fuel have been designed to prevent a leak of fission gases to the environment. The storage system has four barriers for the fission gases. These barriers are the fuel cladding, an inner container, an outer container, and the liner at the RSWF. Analysis has shown that the probability of a leak to the environment is much less than 10{sup {minus}6} per year, indicating that such an event is not considered credible. A drop accident, excessive thermal loads, criticality, and possible failure modes of the containers are also addressed.

  8. 77 FR 14402 - Draft Guidance on Classifying Significant Postmarket Drug Safety Issues; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance entitled ``Classifying Significant Postmarket Drug Safety Issues.'' This draft guidance describes FDA's current approach to classifying a significant postmarket drug safety issue as a ``priority'' tracked safety issue (TSI) or a ``standard'' TSI, with the capability of elevating some priority TSIs to an......

  9. HTGR Dust Safety Issues and Needs for Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Paul W. Humrickhouse

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a summary of high temperature gas-cooled reactor dust safety issues. It draws upon a literature review and the proceedings of the Very High Temperature Reactor Dust Assessment Meeting held in Rockville, MD in March 2011 to identify and prioritize the phenomena and issues that characterize the effect of carbonaceous dust on high temperature reactor safety. It reflects the work and input of approximately 40 participants from the U.S. Department of Energy and its National Labs, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, industry, academia, and international nuclear research organizations on the topics of dust generation and characterization, transport, fission product interactions, and chemical reactions. The meeting was organized by the Idaho National Laboratory under the auspices of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project, with support from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Information gleaned from the report and related meetings will be used to enhance the fuel, graphite, and methods technical program plans that guide research and development under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. Based on meeting discussions and presentations, major research and development needs include: generating adsorption isotherms for fission products that display an affinity for dust, investigating the formation and properties of carbonaceous crust on the inside of high temperature reactor coolant pipes, and confirming the predominant source of dust as abrasion between fuel spheres and the fuel handling system.

  10. Project plan for resolution of the organic waste tank safety issues at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Meacham, J.E.

    1996-10-03

    A multi-year project plan for the Organic Safety Project has been developed with the objective of resolving the organic safety issues associated with the High Level Waste (HLW) in Hanford`s single-shell tanks (SSTS) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). The objective of the Organic Safety Project is to ensure safe interim storage until retrieval for pretreatment and disposal operations begins, and to resolve the organic safety issues by September 2001. Since the initial identification of organics as a tank waste safety issue, progress has been made in understanding the specific aspects of organic waste combustibility, and in developing and implementing activities to resolve the organic safety issues.

  11. Safety in GPR prospecting: a rarely-considered issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persico, Raffaele; Pajewski, Lara; Trela, Christiane; Carrick Utsi, Erica

    2016-04-01

    Safety issues (of people first of all, but also of the equipment and environment) are rarely considered in Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) prospecting and, more in general, in near-surface geophysical prospecting. As is right and fully understandable, the scientific community devotes greatest attention first of all to the theoretical and practical aspects of GPR technique, affecting the quality of attainable results, secondly to the efforts and costs needed to achieve them [1-2]. However, the (luckily) growing GPR market and range of applications make it worth giving serious consideration to safety issues, too. The existing manuals dealing with safety in geophysics are mainly concerned with applications requiring "deep" geophysical prospecting, for example the search for oilfields and other hydrocarbon resources [3]. Near-surface geophysics involves less dangers than deep geophysics, of course. Nevertheless, several accidents have already happened during GPR experimental campaigns. We have personally had critical experiences and collected reliable testimonies concerning occurred problems as mountain sicks, fractures of legs, stomach problems, allergic reactions, encounters with potentially-dangerous animals, and more. We have also noticed that much more attention is usually paid to safety issues during indoor experimental activities (in laboratory), rather than during outdoor fieldworks. For example, the Italian National research Council is conventioned with safety experts who hold periodical seminaries about safety aspects. Having taken part to some of them, to our experience we have never heard a "lecture" devoted to outdoor prospecting. Nowadays, any aspects associated to the use of the technologies should be considered. The increasing sensibility and sense of responsibility towards environmental matters impose GPR end-users to be careful not to damage the environment and also the cultural heritage. Near-surface prospecting should not compromise the flora and

  12. Status report on resolution of Waste Tank Safety Issues at the Hanford Site. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dukelow, G.T.; Hanson, G.A.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide and update the status of activities supporting the resolution of waste tank safety issues and system deficiencies at the Hanford Site. This report provides: (1) background information on safety issues and system deficiencies; (2) a description of the Tank Waste Remediation System and the process for managing safety issues and system deficiencies; (3) changes in safety issue description, prioritization, and schedules; and (4) a summary of the status, plans, order of magnitude, cost, and schedule for resolving safety issues and system deficiencies.

  13. Safety issues in SSTO spacecraft powered by antimatter rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarpley, Christopher; Lewis, Mark J.; Kothari, Ajay

    1990-07-01

    Safety issues related to operating an antimatter-powered spacecraft in the atmosphere are examined. Radiation danger from the high-energy gamma radiation produced by the annihilation reaction, radioactivity induced in the rocket engine because of photonuclear interactions between gamma radiation and shield nuclei, and antimatter containment failure are discussed in detail. The dangers to the public and the crew and payload are then quantified. An engine design reducing the risks associated with operation in the atmosphere is proposed, and its performance is assessed by calculating the temperature profile and the heat transfer to hydrogen as it flows through the tungsten shell structure of the engine. It is noted that the requirement for shielding and the state of magnet technology dictate a radiation shield of enormous mass and, as designed, the booster would not be reusable and the mass of tungsten lost.

  14. Issues related to criticality safety analysis for burnup credit applications

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.; Parks, C.V.

    1995-12-01

    Spent fuel transportation and storage cask designs based on a burnup credit approach must consider issues that are not relevant in casks designed under a fresh fuel loading assumption. Parametric analyses are required to characterize the importance of fuel assembly and fuel cycle parameters on spent fuel composition and reactivity. Numerical models are evaluated to determine the sensitivity of criticality safety calculations to modeling assumptions. This paper discusses the results of studies to determine the effect of two important modeling assumptions on the criticality analysis of pressurized-water reactor (PWR) spent fuel: (1) the effect of assumed burnup history (i.e., specific power during and time-dependent variations in operational power) during depletion calculations, and (2) the effect of axial burnup distributions on the neutron multiplication factor calculated for a three-dimensional (3-D) conceptual cask design.

  15. Characterization strategy for the flammable gas safety issue

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Brewster, M.E.; Roberts, J.S.

    1997-06-01

    The characterization strategy for resolving the flammable gas safety issue for Hanford waste tanks is based on a structured logic diagram (SLD) that displays the outcomes necessary to reach the desired goal of making flammable gas risk acceptable. The diagram provides a structured path that can identify all information inputs, data as well as models, needed to achieve the goal. Tracing the path from need to outcome provides an immediate and clear justification and defense of a specific need. The diagram itself is a {open_quote}picture of a risk calculation{close_quote} and forms the basis for a quantitative model of risk. The SLID, with the risk calculation, identifies options for characterization, mitigation, and controls that have the maximum effect in reducing risk. It provides quantitative input to risk-based decision making so that options are chosen for maximum impact at least cost.

  16. Review of safety and mobility issues among older pedestrians.

    PubMed

    Tournier, Isabelle; Dommes, Aurélie; Cavallo, Viola

    2016-06-01

    Although old people make up an extremely vulnerable road-user group, older pedestrians' difficulties have been studied less extensively than those of older drivers, and more knowledge of this issue is still required. The present paper reviews current knowledge of older-adult problems with the main components of pedestrian activity, i.e., walking and obstacle negotiation, wayfinding, and road crossing. Compared to younger ones, old pedestrians exhibit declining walking skills, with a walking speed decrease, less stable balance, less efficient wayfinding strategies, and a greater number of unsafe road crossing behaviors. These difficulties are linked to age-related changes in sensorial, cognitive, physical, and self-perception abilities. It is now known that visual impairment, physical frailty, and attention deficits have a major negative impact on older pedestrians' safety and mobility, whereas the roles of self-evaluation and self-regulation are still poorly understood. All these elements must be taken into consideration, not only in developing effective safety interventions targeting older pedestrians, but also in designing roads and cars. Recent initiatives are presented here and some recommendations are proposed. PMID:26950033

  17. Risks and issues in fire safety on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert

    1993-01-01

    A fire in the inhabited portion of a spacecraft is a greatly feared hazard, but fire protection in space operations is complicated by two factors. First, the spacecraft cabin is an enclosed volume, which limits the resources for fire fighting and the options for crew escape. Second, an orbiting spacecraft experiences a balance of forces, creating a near-zero-gravity (microgravity) environment that profoundly affects the characteristics of fire initiation, spread, and suppression. The current Shuttle Orbiter is protected by a fire-detection and suppression system whose requirements are derived of necessity from accepted terrestrial and aircraft standards. While experience has shown that Shuttle fire safety is adequate, designers recognize that improved systems to respond specifically to microgravity fire characteristics are highly desirable. Innovative technology is particularly advisable for the Space Station, a forthcoming space community with a complex configuration and long-duration orbital missions, in which the effectiveness of current fire-protection systems is unpredictable. The development of risk assessments to evaluate the probabilities and consequences of fire incidents in spacecraft are briefly reviewed. It further discusses the important unresolved issues and needs for improved fire safety in the Space Station, including those of material selection, spacecraft atmospheres, fire detection, fire suppression, and post-fire restoration.

  18. The NUSTAR Project at GSI and FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerl, J.

    2015-11-01

    NUSTAR comprises the current nuclear structure, astrophysics and reactions programme at GSI and its proposed continuation and extension at FAIR. NUSTAR relies on the availability of exotic rare-isotope beams produced by fragmentation reactions and fission of relativistic heavy ions. The fragment separator FRS and a versatile set of instruments, including gamma arrays, particle spectrometers and a storage ring, enable unique experiments at GSI. The Super-FRS at the FAIR facility will provide several orders of magnitude stronger beams, providing access to the extremes of nuclear stability. To exploit these opportunities novel experimental set-ups are in preparation. R&D efforts have already resulted in improved detectors and enable the NUSTAR collaboration to steadily enhance the sensitivity and selectivity limits of their experiments. Current NUSTAR physics highlights, as well as development projects and activities, will be discussed.

  19. Collegiate Aviation Research and Education Solutions to Critical Safety Issues. UNO Aviation Monograph Series. UNOAI Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Brent, Ed.

    This document contains four papers concerning collegiate aviation research and education solutions to critical safety issues. "Panel Proposal Titled Collegiate Aviation Research and Education Solutions to Critical Safety Issues for the Tim Forte Collegiate Aviation Safety Symposium" (Brent Bowen) presents proposals for panels on the following…

  20. Identification and Resolution of Safety Issues for the Advanced Integral Type PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woong Sik; Jo, Jong Chull; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Hho Jung

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents the interim results of a study on the identification and resolution of safety issues for the AIPWR licensing. The safety issues discussed in this paper include (1) policy issues for which decision-makings are needed for the procedural requirements of licensing system in the regulatory policy point of view, (2) technical issues for which either development of new requirements or amendment of some existing requirements is needed, or (3) other technical issues for which safety verifications are required. The study covers (a) the assessment of applicability of the issues identified from the previous studies to the case of the AIPWR, (b) identification of safety issues through analysis of the international experiences in the design and licensing of advanced reactors, and technical review of the AIPWR design, and (c) development of the resolutions of safety issues, and application of the resolutions to the amendment of regulatory requirements and the licensing review of the AIPWR. As the results of this study, a total of twenty eight safety issues was identified: fourteen issues from the previous studies, including the establishment of design safety goals; four issues from the foreign practices and experiences, including the risk-informed licensing; and ten issues by the AIPWR design review, including reliability of passive safety systems. Ten issues of them have been already resolved and the succeeding study is under way to resolve the remaining ones. (authors)

  1. Current Sports: Medicine Issues. Annual Safety Education Review--1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Timothy T., Ed.

    This document is a collection of papers whose theme is sports safety. Section one, "Government Interest in Sports Safety," includes an article on Washington, D.C.'s focus on sports safety. Section two, "Medical Aspects of Safety in Sports," includes articles regarding the medical basis of restriction from athletics, orthopaedic restrictions, and…

  2. Characterization strategy report for the criticality safety issue

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, A.L.; Doctor, P.G.; Felmy, A.R.; Prichard, A.W.; Serne, R.J.

    1997-06-01

    High-level radioactive waste from nuclear fuels processing is stored in underground waste storage tanks located in the tank farms on the Hanford Site. Waste in tank storage contains low concentrations of fissile isotopes, primarily U-235 and Pu-239. The composition and the distribution of the waste components within the storage environment is highly complex and not subject to easy investigation. An important safety concern is the preclusion of a self-sustaining neutron chain reaction, also known as a nuclear criticality. A thorough technical evaluation of processes, phenomena, and conditions is required to make sure that subcriticality will be ensured for both current and future tank operations. Subcriticality limits must be based on considerations of tank processes and take into account all chemical and geometrical phenomena that are occurring in the tanks. The important chemical and physical phenomena are those capable of influencing the mixing of fissile material and neutron absorbers such that the degree of subcriticality could be adversely impacted. This report describes a logical approach to resolving the criticality safety issues in the Hanford waste tanks. The approach uses a structured logic diagram (SLD) to identify the characterization needed to quantify risk. The scope of this section of the report is limited to those branches of logic needed to quantify the risk associated with a criticality event occurring. The process is linked to a conceptual model that depicts key modes of failure which are linked to the SLD. Data that are needed include adequate knowledge of the chemical and geometric form of the materials of interest. This information is used to determine how much energy the waste would release in the various domains of the tank, the toxicity of the region associated with a criticality event, and the probability of the initiating criticality event.

  3. Guidelines for nuclear power plant safety issue prioritization information development. Supplement 2

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, W.B.; Gallucci, R.H.V.; Konzek, G.J.; Heaberlin, S.W.; Fecht, B.A.; Allen, C.H.; Allen, R.D.; Bickford, W.E., Carbaugh, E.H.; Lewis, J.R.

    1983-12-01

    This is the third in a series of reports to document the use of a methodology developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to calculate, for prioritization purposes, the risk, dose and cost impacts of implementing resolutions to reactor safety issues (NUREG/CR-2800, Andrews et al. 1983). This report contains results of issue-specific analyses for 31 issues. Each issue was considered within the constraints of available information as of summer 1983, and two staff-weeks of labor. The results are referenced, as one consideration in setting priorities for reactor safety issues, in NUREG-0933, A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues.

  4. Guidelines for nuclear power plant safety issue prioritization information development. Supplement 4

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatabai, A.S.; Fecht, B.A.; Powers, T.B.; Bickford, W.E.; Andrews, W.B.; Gallucci, R.H.V.; Bian, S.H.; Daling, P.M.; Eschbach, E.J.; Allen, C.H.

    1986-07-01

    This is the fifth in a series of reports to document the use of a methodology developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to calculate, for prioritization purposes, the risk, dose and cost impacts of implementing resolutions to reactor safety issues (NUREG/CR-2800, Andrews et al. 1983). This report contains results of issue-specific analyses for 23 issues. Each issue was considered within the constraints of available information as of winter 1986, and two staff-weeks of labor. The results are referenced, as one consideration in setting priorities for reactor safety issues, in NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues.''

  5. Nanotechnologies for Alzheimer's disease: diagnosis, therapy, and safety issues.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Davide; Le Droumaguet, Benjamin; Nicolas, Julien; Hashemi, S Hossein; Wu, Lin-Ping; Moghimi, S Moein; Couvreur, Patrick; Andrieux, Karine

    2011-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents the most common form of dementia worldwide, affecting more than 35 million people. Advances in nanotechnology are beginning to exert a significant impact in neurology. These approaches, which are often based on the design and engineering of a plethora of nanoparticulate entities with high specificity for brain capillary endothelial cells, are currently being applied to early AD diagnosis and treatment. In addition, nanoparticles (NPs) with high affinity for the circulating amyloid-β (Aβ) forms may induce "sink effect" and improve the AD condition. There are also developments in relation to in vitro diagnostics for AD, including ultrasensitive NP-based bio-barcodes, immunosensors, as well as scanning tunneling microscopy procedures capable of detecting Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42). However, there are concerns regarding the initiation of possible NP-mediated adverse events in AD, thus demanding the use of precisely assembled nanoconstructs from biocompatible materials. Key advances and safety issues are reviewed and discussed. PMID:21477665

  6. Mobility and safety issues in drivers with dementia.

    PubMed

    Carr, David B; O'Neill, Desmond

    2015-10-01

    Although automobiles remain the mobility method of choice for older adults, late-life cognitive impairment and progressive dementia will eventually impair the ability to meet transport needs of many. There is, however, no commonly utilized method of assessing dementia severity in relation to driving, no consensus on the specific types of assessments that should be applied to older drivers with cognitive impairment, and no gold standard for determining driving fitness or approaching loss of mobility and subsequent counseling. Yet, clinicians are often called upon by patients, their families, health professionals, and driver licensing authorities to assess their patients' fitness-to-drive and to make recommendations about driving privileges. We summarize the literature on dementia and driving, discuss evidenced-based assessments of fitness-to-drive, and outline the important ethical and legal concerns. We address the role of physician assessment, referral to neuropsychology, functional screens, dementia severity tools, driving evaluation clinics, and driver licensing authority referrals that may assist clinicians with an evaluation. Finally, we discuss mobility counseling (e.g. exploration of transportation alternatives) since health professionals need to address this important issue for older adults who lose the ability to drive. The application of a comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach to the older driver with cognitive impairment will have the best opportunity to enhance our patients' social connectedness and quality of life, while meeting their psychological and medical needs and maintaining personal and public safety. PMID:26111454

  7. Are unintentional nurse-attended deliveries a patient safety issue?

    PubMed

    Veltman, Larry

    2016-08-01

    Unintentional nurse-attended deliveries occur on most labor and delivery units. Some precipitous deliveries are unavoidable, but others, occurring after admission with the expectation that the woman's designated provider would attend the delivery are, for a variety of reasons, still attended only by nursing staff. This study was undertaken to establish a benchmark for unintentional nurse-attended deliveries. Fifty perinatal units were studied with respect to their statistics regarding unintentional nurse-attended deliveries. Ten of the 50 perinatal units (20%) did not keep statistics on unintentional nurse-attended deliveries. The average percentage of unintentional nurse-attended deliveries in the 40 perinatal units that did keep this statistic was 1.38% (range 0-5.3%). This benchmark should be useful as the safety issues for these types of deliveries are analyzed. Audits regarding timing of examinations during labor, practices regarding notification of providers and other communication practices, provider arrival times, and involved personnel should help perinatal units develop policies, protocols, and strategies to minimize the chances for unintentional nurse-attended deliveries when there should be enough time and appropriate communication to allow the woman's provider to be present at the delivery. PMID:27547875

  8. Long-term safety issues associated with mixer pump operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kubic, W.L. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    In this report, we examine several long-term issues: the effect of pump operation on future gas release events (GREs), uncontrolled chemical reactions, chronic toxic gas releases, foaming, and erosion and corrosion. Heat load in excess of the design limit, uncontrolled chemical reactions, chronic toxic gas releases, foaming, and erosion and corrosion have been shown not to be safety concerns. The effect of pump operation on future GREs could not be quantified. The problem with evaluating the long-term effects of pump operation on GREs is a lack of knowledge and uncertainty. In particular, the phenomena governing gas retention, particle size distribution, and settling are not well understood, nor are the interactions among these factors understood. There is a possibility that changes in these factors could increase the size of future GREs. Bounding estimates of the potential increase in size of GREs are not possible because of a lack of engineering data. Proper management of the hazards can reduce, but not eliminate, the possibility of undesirable changes. Maintaining temperature within the historical limits can reduce the possibility of undesirable changes. A monitoring program to detect changes in the gas composition and crust thickness will help detect slowly occurring changes. Because pump operation has be shown to eliminate GREs, continued pump operation can eliminate the hazards associated with future GREs.

  9. An interagency space nuclear propulsion safety policy for SEI - Issues and discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, A. C.; Sawyer, J. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An interagency Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative nuclear propulsion program to facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG developed a top level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the nuclear propulsion safety program and the development of Safety Functional Requirements. In addition, the NSPWG reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. Safety topics include reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, safeguards, risk/reliability, operational safety, ground testing, and other considerations. In this paper the emphasis is placed on the safety policy and the issues and considerations that are addressed by the NSPWG recommendations.

  10. Safety issues in cultural heritage management and critical infrastructures management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-12-01

    This special issue is the fourth of its kind in Journal of Geophysics and Engineering , containing studies and applications of geophysical methodologies and sensing technologies for the knowledge, conservation and security of products of human activity ranging from civil infrastructures to built and cultural heritage. The first discussed the application of novel instrumentation, surface and airborne remote sensing techniques, as well as data processing oriented to both detection and characterization of archaeological buried remains and conservation of cultural heritage (Eppelbaum et al 2010). The second stressed the importance of an integrated and multiscale approach for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage, from SAR to GPR to imaging based diagnostic techniques (Masini and Soldovieri 2011). The third enlarged the field of analysis to civil engineering structures and infrastructures, providing an overview of the effectiveness and the limitations of single diagnostic techniques, which can be overcome through the integration of different methods and technologies and/or the use of robust and novel data processing techniques (Masini et al 2012). As a whole, the special issue put in evidence the factors that affect the choice of diagnostic strategy, such as the material, the spatial characteristics of the objects or sites, the value of the objects to be investigated (cultural or not), the aim of the investigation (knowledge, conservation, restoration) and the issues to be addressed (monitoring, decay assessment). In order to complete the overview of the application fields of sensing technologies this issue has been dedicated to monitoring of cultural heritage and critical infrastructures to address safety and security issues. Particular attention has been paid to the data processing methods of different sensing techniques, from infrared thermography through GPR to SAR. Cascini et al (2013) present the effectiveness of a

  11. A prioritization of generic safety issues. Supplement 21, Revision insertion instructions

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1996-12-31

    The report presents the safety priority ranking for generic safety issues related to nuclear power plants. The purpose of these rankings is to assist in the timely and efficient allocation of NRC resources for the resolution of those safety issues that have a significant potential for reducing risk. The safety priority rankings are HIGH, MEDIUM, LOW, and DROP, and have been assigned on the basis of risk significance estimates, the ratio of risk to costs and other impacts estimated to result if resolution of the safety issues were implemented, and the consideration of uncertainties and other quantitative or qualitative factors. To the extent practical, estimates are quantitative.

  12. Issues affecting advanced passive light-water reactor safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beelman, R.J.; Fletcher, C.D.; Modro, S.M.

    1992-08-01

    Next generation commercial reactor designs emphasize enhanced safety through improved safety system reliability and performance by means of system simplification and reliance on immutable natural forces for system operation. Simulating the performance of these safety systems will be central to analytical safety evaluation of advanced passive reactor designs. Yet the characteristically small driving forces of these safety systems pose challenging computational problems to current thermal-hydraulic systems analysis codes. Additionally, the safety systems generally interact closely with one another, requiring accurate, integrated simulation of the nuclear steam supply system, engineered safeguards and containment. Furthermore, numerical safety analysis of these advanced passive reactor designs wig necessitate simulation of long-duration, slowly-developing transients compared with current reactor designs. The composite effects of small computational inaccuracies on induced system interactions and perturbations over long periods may well lead to predicted results which are significantly different than would otherwise be expected or might actually occur. Comparisons between the engineered safety features of competing US advanced light water reactor designs and analogous present day reactor designs are examined relative to the adequacy of existing thermal-hydraulic safety codes in predicting the mechanisms of passive safety. Areas where existing codes might require modification, extension or assessment relative to passive safety designs are identified. Conclusions concerning the applicability of these codes to advanced passive light water reactor safety analysis are presented.

  13. Issues affecting advanced passive light-water reactor safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beelman, R.J.; Fletcher, C.D.; Modro, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Next generation commercial reactor designs emphasize enhanced safety through improved safety system reliability and performance by means of system simplification and reliance on immutable natural forces for system operation. Simulating the performance of these safety systems will be central to analytical safety evaluation of advanced passive reactor designs. Yet the characteristically small driving forces of these safety systems pose challenging computational problems to current thermal-hydraulic systems analysis codes. Additionally, the safety systems generally interact closely with one another, requiring accurate, integrated simulation of the nuclear steam supply system, engineered safeguards and containment. Furthermore, numerical safety analysis of these advanced passive reactor designs wig necessitate simulation of long-duration, slowly-developing transients compared with current reactor designs. The composite effects of small computational inaccuracies on induced system interactions and perturbations over long periods may well lead to predicted results which are significantly different than would otherwise be expected or might actually occur. Comparisons between the engineered safety features of competing US advanced light water reactor designs and analogous present day reactor designs are examined relative to the adequacy of existing thermal-hydraulic safety codes in predicting the mechanisms of passive safety. Areas where existing codes might require modification, extension or assessment relative to passive safety designs are identified. Conclusions concerning the applicability of these codes to advanced passive light water reactor safety analysis are presented.

  14. JV Task - 116 Selenium's Role in the Seafood Safety Issue

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas Ralston; Laura Raymond

    2009-03-30

    Continuing studies under these three funded projects - (JV Task 77 The Health Implications of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction, JV Task 96 Investigating the Importance of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction, and JV Task 116 Selenium's Role in the Seafood Safety Issue) - were performed to determine the effects of different levels of dietary mercury and selenium on the growth and development of test animals, and related tissue analyses, to understand the protective benefits of dietary selenium in reference to low-level exposure to mercury. Maternal exposure to methylmercury from seafood has been found to cause neurodevelopmental harm in children. However, significant nutritional benefits will be lost if fish consumption is needlessly avoided. The results of these studies support the hypothesis that intracellular Se itself is the physiologically important biomolecule and that the harm of mercury toxicity arises when Hg abundance becomes great enough to bind a significant portion of intracellular Se in vulnerable tissues such as the brain. Formation of HgSe limits bioavailability of Se for synthesis of Se-dependent enzymes, particularly in brain tissues. When production of these enzymes is impaired, the loss of their numerous essential functions results in the signs and symptoms of Hg toxicity. The finding that one mole of Se protects against many moles of Hg indicates that its beneficial effect is not due to sequestration of mercury as HgSe but rather due to the biological activity of the Se. Therefore, the selenium content of seafoods must be considered along with their methylmercury contents in evaluating the effect of dietary exposure to mercury.

  15. Safety issues in cultural heritage management and critical infrastructures management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-12-01

    This special issue is the fourth of its kind in Journal of Geophysics and Engineering , containing studies and applications of geophysical methodologies and sensing technologies for the knowledge, conservation and security of products of human activity ranging from civil infrastructures to built and cultural heritage. The first discussed the application of novel instrumentation, surface and airborne remote sensing techniques, as well as data processing oriented to both detection and characterization of archaeological buried remains and conservation of cultural heritage (Eppelbaum et al 2010). The second stressed the importance of an integrated and multiscale approach for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage, from SAR to GPR to imaging based diagnostic techniques (Masini and Soldovieri 2011). The third enlarged the field of analysis to civil engineering structures and infrastructures, providing an overview of the effectiveness and the limitations of single diagnostic techniques, which can be overcome through the integration of different methods and technologies and/or the use of robust and novel data processing techniques (Masini et al 2012). As a whole, the special issue put in evidence the factors that affect the choice of diagnostic strategy, such as the material, the spatial characteristics of the objects or sites, the value of the objects to be investigated (cultural or not), the aim of the investigation (knowledge, conservation, restoration) and the issues to be addressed (monitoring, decay assessment). In order to complete the overview of the application fields of sensing technologies this issue has been dedicated to monitoring of cultural heritage and critical infrastructures to address safety and security issues. Particular attention has been paid to the data processing methods of different sensing techniques, from infrared thermography through GPR to SAR. Cascini et al (2013) present the effectiveness of a

  16. Adult Learning in Health and Safety: Some Issues and Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O Fathaigh, Mairtin

    This document, which was developed for presentation at a seminar on adult learning and safety, examines approaches to occupational safety and health (OSH) learning/training in the workplace. Section 1 examines selected factors affecting adults' learning in workplace OSH programs. The principal dimensions along which individual adult learners will…

  17. Assessing Rural Coalitions That Address Safety and Health Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgus, Shari; Schwab, Charles; Shelley, Mack

    2012-01-01

    Community coalitions can help national organizations meet their objectives. Farm Safety 4 Just Kids depends on coalitions of local people to deliver farm safety and health educational programs to children and their families. These coalitions are called chapters. An evaluation was developed to identify individual coalition's strengths and…

  18. Safety Issues for Experience-Based Training and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Todd

    1991-01-01

    Reviews the literature related to experience-based training and development (EBTD) programs and physical safety. Discusses injury rates, cardiac arrest, and apparent and real risk for clients of different ages. Suggests that EBTD programs need a comprehensive documentation efforts to clarify and evaluate safety records. Contains 27 references. (SV)

  19. Guidelines for nuclear-power-plant safety-issue-prioritization information development

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, W.B.; Gallucci, R.H.V.; Heaberlin, S.W.; Bickford, W.E.; Konzek, G.J.; Strenge, D.L.; Smith, R.I.; Weakley, S.A.

    1983-02-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed a methodology, with examples, to calculate - to an approximation serviceable for prioritization purposes - the risk, dose and cost impacts of implementing resolutions to reactor safety issues. This report is an applications guide to issue-specific calculations. A description of the approach, mathematical models, worksheets and step-by-step examples are provided. Analysis using this method is intended to provide comparable results for many issues at a cost of two staff-weeks per issue. Results will be used by the NRC to support decisions related to issue priorities in allocation of resources to complete safety issue resolutions.

  20. Guidelines for nuclear power plant safety issue prioritization information development. Supplement 5

    SciTech Connect

    Daling, P.M.; Lavender, J.C.

    1996-07-01

    This is the sixth in a series of reports to document the development and use of a methodology developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to calculate, for prioritization purposes, the risk, dose, and cost impacts of implementing potential resolutions to reactor safety issues (see NUREG/CR-2800, Andrews, et al., 1983). This report contains the results of issue-specific analyses for 34 generic issues. Each issue was considered within the constraints of available information at the time the issues were examined and approximately 2 staff-weeks of labor. The results are referenced as one consideration in NUREG-0933, A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues (Emrit, et al., 1983).

  1. Program plan for evaluation of the Ferrocyanide Waste Tank safety issue at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Borsheim, G.L.; Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1994-03-01

    This document describes the background, priorities, strategy and logic, and task descriptions for the Ferrocyanide Waste Tank Safety Program. The Ferrocyanide Safety Program was established in 1990 to provide resolution of a major safety issue identified for 24 high-level radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford Site.

  2. Technology, governance and patient safety: systems issues in technology and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Balka, Ellen; Doyle-Waters, Madeleine; Lecznarowicz, Dorota; FitzGerald, J Mark

    2007-06-01

    Technology and equipment are often identified as contributors to adverse medical events, however technology is seldom the focal point of investigation as a source of medical error or adverse event. It is often seen as both a means of reducing error (e.g., automated drug dispensing machines) or as a major contributing factor to adverse events (e.g., through cognitive overload). Here we review literature about the governance of technology in health settings, which is addressed in relation to patient safety. We outline the challenges of addressing technology governance issues in the health sector, provide an overview of governance processes, and suggest that technology related adverse events have been largely conceptualized as device and user problems rather than system or socio-technical problems, which is reflected in governance processes associated with medical devices. A recognition of the situatedness of medical practices implies that new forms of governance may be required that place greater emphasis on socio-technical and systems issues. PMID:16997620

  3. Environmental and safety issues of the fusion fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Crocker, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the environmental and safety concerns inherent in the development of fusion energy, and the current Department of Energy programs seeking to: (1) develop safe and reliable techniques for tritium control; (2) reduce the quantity of activation products produced; and (3) provide designs to limit the potential for accidents that could result in release of radioactive materials. Because of the inherent safety features of fusion and the early start that has been made in safety problem recognition and solution, fusion should be among the lower risk technologies for generation of commercial power.

  4. Safety issues of manipulator systems under computer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andary, James F.; Carter, Ruth C.; Halterman, Karen; Spidaliere, Peter D.; Tasevoli, Michael; Rad, Adrian L.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the development test flight (DTF-1) mission is presented, and the system design, safety requirements, and safety features are described. The lessons that were learned during the design and early development stages are also presented. The DTF-1 mission objectives are to evaluate: the overall man-machine performance in zero G, Flight Telerobotic Service manipulator design, and workstation design, including handcontrollers and displays. The payload bay and aft flight deck elements, and computer control of the DTF-1 are described. Recommendations for developing and implementing a safety system are presented, and some design alternatives for the next space-qualified telerobotic system are suggested.

  5. Safety Issues at the DOE Test and Research Reactors. A Report to the U.S. Department of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources.

    This report provides an assessment of safety issues at the Department of Energy (DOE) test and research reactors. Part A identifies six safety issues of the reactors. These issues include the safety design philosophy, the conduct of safety reviews, the performance of probabilistic risk assessments, the reliance on reactor operators, the fragmented…

  6. Experience with carbon ion radiotherapy at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäkel, O.; Schulz-Ertner, D.; Karger, C. P.; Heeg, P.; Debus, J.

    2005-12-01

    At GSI, a radiotherapy facility was established using beam scanning and active energy variation. Between December 1997 and April 2004, 220 patients have been treated at this facility with carbon ions. Most patients are treated for chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the base of skull, using a dose of 60 Gye (Gray equivalent) in 20 fractions. Carbon ion therapy is also offered in a combination with conventional radiotherapy for a number of other tumors (adenoidcystic carcinoma, chordoma of the cervical spine and sacrum, atypical menningeoma). The patients treated for skull base tumors showed an overall local control rate after two years of 90%. The overall treatment toxicity was mild. This shows that carbon ion radiotherapy can safely be applied using a scanned beam and encouraged the Heidelberg university hospital to build a hospital based facility for ion therapy.

  7. ASY-EOS experiment at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, P.; Acosta, L.; Adamczyk, M.; Al-Ajlan, A.; Al-Garawi, M.; Al-Homaidhi, S.; Amorini, F.; Auditore, L.; Aumann, T.; Ayyad, Y.; Baran, V.; Basrak, Z.; Benlliure, J.; Boiano, C.; Boisjoli, C.; Boretzky, K.; Brzychczyk, J.; Budzanowski, A.; Cardella, G.; Cammarata, P.; Cavallaro, S.; Chajecki, Z.; Chartier, M.; Chbihi, A.; Colonna, M.; Czech, B.; De Filippo, E.; Di Toro, M.; Famiano, M.; Le Fevre, A.; Gašsparić, A.; Geraci, E.; Grassi, L.; Greco, V.; Guazzoni, C.; Guazzoni, P.; Heil, M.; Heilborn, L.; Introzzi, R.; Isobe, T.; Kezzar, K.; Kiš, M.; Kupny, S.; Kurz, N.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Lasko, P.; Leifels, Y.; Lemmon, R.; Li, Q.; Lombardo, I.; Loria, D.; Lukasik, J.; Lynch, W. G.; Marini, P.; Matthews, Z.; May, L.; Minniti, T.; Mostazo, M.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pawlowski, P.; Petrovici, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Reifarth, R.; Reisdorf, W.; Riccio, F.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Rossi, D.; Santoro, S.; Simon, H.; Skwirczynska, I.; Sosin, Z.; Trautmann, W.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tsang, B.; Veselsky, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.; Wieloch, A.; Wigg, P.; Wilczynski, J.; Wolter, H. H.; Wu, P.; Yennello, S.; Zambon, P.; Zetta, L.; Zoric, M.

    2012-07-01

    The elliptic-flow ratio of neutrons with respect to protons in reactions of neutron rich Heavy-Ion at intermediate energies has been recently proposed as an observable sensitive to the strength of the symmetry term in the nuclear equation of state (EOS) at supra-saturation densities. The recent results obtained from the existing FOPI/LAND data for 197Au+197Au collisions at 400 MeV/nucleon in comparison with the UrQMD model allowed a first estimate of the symmetry term of the EOS but suffer from a considerable statistical uncertainty. In order to obtain an improved data set for Au+Au collisions and to extend the study to other systems, a new experiment was carried out at the GSI laboratory by the ASY-EOS collaboration in May 2011.

  8. Vacuum arc ion source development at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Spaedtke, P.; Emig, H.; Wolf, B.H.

    1996-08-01

    Ion beams produced by the Mevva ion source are well suited for the injection into a synchrotron accelerator due to the low repetition rate (0.2 ... 5 Hz, the higher repetition rate is for the optimization of the linear accelerator only) and the short pulse length (up to 0.5ms). From the beginning of the authors experience with the Mevva ion source at GSI they tried to improve the reliability of pulse-to-pulse reproducibility and to minimize the noise on the extracted ion beam. For accelerator application this is highly necessary, otherwise the accelerator tuning and optimization becomes very difficult or even impossible. Already the beam transport becomes difficult for a noisy beam, because space charge compensation can be destroyed (at least partially). Furthermore a noisy dc-beam results in some rf-buckets which might be even empty.

  9. The ASY-EOS Experiment at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, P.; Chartier, M.; Cozma, M. D.; De Filippo, E.; Le Fèvre, A.; Gannon, S.; Gašparić, I.; Kiš, M.; Kupny, S.; Leifels, Y.; Lemmon, R. C.; Li, Q.; Łukasik, J.; Marini, P.; Pawłowski, P.; Trautmann, W.; Acosta, L.; Adamczyk, M.; Al-Ajlan, A.; Al-Garawi, M.; Al-Homaidhi, S.; Amorini, F.; Auditore, L.; Aumann, T.; Ayyad, Y.; Baran, V.; Basrak, Z.; Bassini, R.; Benlliure, J.; Boiano, C.; Boisjoli, M.; Boretzky, K.; Brzychczyk, J.; Budzanowski, A.; Cardella, G.; Cammarata, P.; Chajecki, Z.; Chbihi, A.; Colonna, M.; Czech, B.; Di Toro, M.; Famiano, M.; Greco, V.; Grassi, L.; Guazzoni, C.; Guazzoni, P.; Heil, M.; Heilborn, L.; Introzzi, R.; Isobe, T.; Kezzar, K.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kurz, N.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Lasko, P.; Lombardo, I.; Lynch, W. G.; Matthews, Z.; May, L.; Minniti, T.; Mostazo, M.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Pleskac, R.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Reifarth, R.; Reisdorf, W.; Riccio, F.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Rossi, D.; Santoro, S.; Simon, H.; Skwirczynska, I.; Sosin, Z.; Stuhl, L.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tsang, M. B.; Verde, G.; Veselsky, M.; Vigilante, M.; Wieloch, A.; Wigg, P.; Wolter, H. H.; Wu, P.; Yennello, S.; Zambon, P.; Zetta, L.; Zoric, M.

    2016-05-01

    The elliptic-flow ratio of neutrons with respect to protons or light complex particles in reactions of heavy ions at pre-relativistic energies has been proposed as an observable sensitive to the strength of the symmetry term of the nuclear equation of state at supra-saturation densities. In the ASY-EOS experiment at the GSI laboratory, flows of neutrons and light charged particles were measured for 197Au+197Au collisions at 400 MeV/nucleon. Flow results obtained for the Au+Au system, in comparison with predictions of the UrQMD transport model, confirm the moderately soft to linear density dependence of the symmetry energy deduced from the earlier FOPI-LAND data.

  10. Issues in School Bus Safety: Real or Red Herring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeds, Robin L.

    1999-01-01

    In many states, the greatest threat to safe student transportation is elimination of the school transportation program. Using public transit buses, large vans, smaller vehicles, or specialized equipment can cause major-issue headaches. False issues include controversies over seat belts, bus design, and optional "bells and whistles." (10…

  11. Guidelines for nuclear-power-plant safety-issue prioritization information development

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, W.B.; Gallucci, R.H.V.; Konzek, G.J.

    1983-05-01

    This is the second in a series of reports to document the use of a methodology developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to calculate, for prioritization purposes, the risk, dose and cost impacts of implementing resolutions to reactor safety issues. This report contains results of issue-specific analyses for 15 issues. Each issue was considered within the contraints of available information as of September 1982 and two staff-weeks of labor. The results will be referenced, as one consideration in setting priorities for reactor safety issues, in an NRC prioritization report to be published at a future date.

  12. Patient Safety and End-of-Life Care: Common Issues, Perspectives, and Strategies for Improving Care.

    PubMed

    Dy, Sydney Morss

    2016-09-01

    The current state of the science in the fields of patient safety and palliative and end-of-life care have many issues in common. This article synthesizes recent systematic reviews and additional research on improving patient safety and end-of-life care and compares each field's perspective on common issues, both in traditional patient safety frameworks and in other areas, and how current approaches in each field can inform the other. The article then applies these overlapping concepts to a key example area: improving documentation of patient preferences for life-sustaining treatment. The synthesis demonstrates how end-of-life issues should be incorporated into patient safety initiatives. In addition, evaluating overlap and comparable issues between patient safety and end-of-life care and comparing different perspectives and improvement strategies can benefit both fields. PMID:25877945

  13. Update on Safety Issues Related to Antihyperglycemic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Carpio, Gandahari Rosa A.; Fonseca, Vivian A.

    2014-01-01

    In Brief The American Diabetes Association emphasizes the importance of individualized patient care in the management of diabetes. One of the important considerations in choosing an antihyperglycemic agent is its side-effect and safety profile. This article reviews the common and clinically significant side effects of each class of agents, including ways to prevent and overcome their occurrence. PMID:26246765

  14. Child Safety: It's No Accident. An Issue Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Div. for Children, Richmond.

    The three major causes of injury and mortality among children in the state of Virginia are, in order of frequency, automobile-related accidents, poison ingestion, and suicide. With respect to injuries sustained in automobile accidents, adults traveling with children by car must accept responsibility for the safety of child passengers. Acute…

  15. Food Safety Issues and the Microbiology of Poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial food safety has emerged as a global concern because of its effect on health of the consumers and the economic impact on the food industry. The economic impact of food-borne illness is estimated at $20-43 billion annually. Campylobacter and Salmonella are the #1 and #2 causes of human food...

  16. Consumer confidence in the safety of food and newspaper coverage of food safety issues: a longitudinal perspective.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Janneke; Van Trijp, Hans; Renes, Reint Jan; Frewer, Lynn J

    2010-01-01

    This study develops a longitudinal perspective on consumer confidence in the safety of food to explore if, how, and why consumer confidence changes over time. In the first study, a theory-based monitoring instrument for consumer confidence in the safety of food was developed and validated. The monitoring instrument assesses consumer confidence together with its determinants. Model and measurement invariance were validated rigorously before developments in consumer confidence in the safety of food and its determinants were investigated over time. The results from the longitudinal analysis show that across four waves of annual data collection (2003-2006), the framework was stable and that the relative importance of the determinants of confidence was, generally, constant over time. Some changes were observed regarding the mean ratings on the latent constructs. The second study explored how newspaper coverage of food safety related issues affects consumer confidence in the safety of food through subjective consumer recall of food safety incidents. The results show that the newspaper coverage on food safety issues is positively associated with consumer recall of food safety incidents, both in terms of intensity and recency of media coverage. PMID:20002892

  17. Safety issues in robotic handling of nuclear weapon parts

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.; Wapman, W.; Fahrenholtz, J.

    1993-12-31

    Robotic systems are being developed by the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center at Sandia National Laboratories to perform automated handling tasks with radioactive weapon parts. These systems will reduce the occupational radiation exposure to workers by automating operations that are currently performed manually. The robotic systems at Sandia incorporate several levels of mechanical, electrical, and software safety for handling hazardous materials. For example, tooling used by the robot to handle radioactive parts has been designed with mechanical features that allow the robot to release its payload only at designated locations in the robotic workspace. In addition, software processes check for expected and unexpected situations throughout the operations. Incorporation of features such as these provides multiple levels of safety for handling hazardous or valuable payloads with automated intelligent systems.

  18. International and NASA SSA and Safety of Flight Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas K,

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the international and NASA interests in Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and space debris as it affects space flight safety. The international interesrt has increased since the collision of the Iridium and Cosmos satellites in 2009. The United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN COPUOS) has commenced a multi-year effort to review the long-term sustainability of outer space activities.

  19. A prioritization of generic safety issues. Supplement 19, Revision insertion instructions

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The report presents the safety priority ranking for generic safety issues related to nuclear power plants. The purpose of these rankings is to assist in the timely and efficient allocation of NRC resources for the resolution of those safety issues that have a significant potential for reducing risk. The safety priority rankings are HIGH, MEDIUM, LOW, and DROP, and have been assigned on the basis of risk significance estimates, the ratio of risk to costs and other impacts estimated to result if resolution of the safety issues were implemented, and the consideration of uncertainties and other quantitative or qualitative factors. To the extent practical, estimates are quantitative. This document provides revisions and amendments to the report.

  20. Safety issues and new rapid detection methods in traditional Chinese medicinal materials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Kong, Weijun; Yang, Meihua; Han, Jianping; Chen, Shilin

    2015-01-01

    The safety of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a major strategic issue that involves human health. With the continuous improvement in disease prevention and treatment, the export of TCM and its related products has increased dramatically in China. However, the frequent safety issues of Chinese medicine have become the ‘bottleneck’ impeding the modernization of TCM. It was proved that mycotoxins seriously affect TCM safety; the pesticide residues of TCM are a key problem in TCM international trade; adulterants have also been detected, which is related to market circulation. These three factors have greatly affected TCM safety. In this study, fast, highly effective, economically-feasible and accurate detection methods concerning TCM safety issues were reviewed, especially on the authenticity, mycotoxins and pesticide residues of medicinal materials. PMID:26579423

  1. Safety, Efficacy, and Legal Issues Related to Dietary Supplements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on the effects of dietary supplements on collegiate and adult populations. Anabolic steroids, amphetamines, and other drugs have been used for decades to improve athletic performance. However, the legal issues and dangers associated with these drugs have resulted in reluctance by many athletes to use them. Because dietary…

  2. High-heat tank safety issue resolution program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, O.S.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this program plan is to provide a guide for selecting corrective actions that will mitigate and/or remediate the high-heat waste tank safety issue for single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-106. This program plan also outlines the logic for selecting approaches and tasks to mitigate and resolve the high-heat safety issue. The identified safety issue for high-heat tank 241-C-106 involves the potential release of nuclear waste to the environment as the result of heat-induced structural damage to the tank`s concrete, if forced cooling is interrupted for extended periods. Currently, forced ventilation with added water to promote thermal conductivity and evaporation cooling is used to cool the waste. At this time, the only viable solution identified to resolve this safety issue is the removal of heat generating waste in the tank. This solution is being aggressively pursued as the permanent solution to this safety issue and also to support the present waste retrieval plan. Tank 241-C-106 has been selected as the first SST for retrieval. The program plan has three parts. The first part establishes program objectives and defines safety issues, drivers, and resolution criteria and strategy. The second part evaluates the high-heat safety issue and its mitigation and remediation methods and alternatives according to resolution logic. The third part identifies major tasks and alternatives for mitigation and resolution of the safety issue. Selected tasks and best-estimate schedules are also summarized in the program plan.

  3. Microbiological food safety issues in Brazil: bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Bruna Carrer; Franco, Bernadette Dora Gombossy de Melo; De Martinis, Elaine Cristina Pereira

    2013-03-01

    The globalization of food supply impacts patterns of foodborne disease outbreaks worldwide, and consumers are having increased concern about microbiological food safety. In this sense, the assessment of epidemiological data of foodborne diseases in different countries has not only local impact, but it can also be of general interest, especially in the case of major global producers and exporters of several agricultural food products, such as Brazil. In this review, the most common agents of foodborne illnesses registered in Brazil will be presented, compiled mainly from official databases made available to the public. In addition, some representative examples of studies on foodborne bacterial pathogens commonly found in Brazilian foods are provided. PMID:23489044

  4. Resolution of Hanford tanks organic complexant safety issue

    SciTech Connect

    Kirch, N.W.

    1998-05-14

    The Hanford Site tanks have been assessed for organic complexant reaction hazards. The results have shown that most tanks contain insufficient concentrations of TOC to support a propagating reaction. It has also been shown that those tanks where the TOC concentration approaches levels of concern, degradation of the organic complexants to less energetic compounds has occurred. The results of the investigations have been documented. The residual organic complexants in the Hanford Site waste tanks do not present a safety concern for long-term storage.

  5. Anticipated transients without scram for light-water reactors: unresolved safety issue Tap A-9

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, E.W.

    1981-03-01

    This is a synopsis of the fourth volume of the NRC staff's review on the subject of anticipated transients without scram, which contains the proposed resolution of this unresolved safety issue in the form of requirements recommended to be imposed on licensees and applicants. A phased approach is proposed, with near-term improvements in safety, both hardware and procedural, being required over the next 1 to 2 y to provide an expeditious safety increment.

  6. Conceptualizing a Genomics Software Institute (GSI)

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jack A.; Catlett, Charlie; Desai, Narayan; Knight, Rob; White, Owen; Robbins, Robert; Sankaran, Rajesh; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Field, Dawn; Meyer, Folker

    2012-01-01

    Microbial ecology has been enhanced greatly by the ongoing ‘omics revolution, bringing half the world's biomass and most of its biodiversity into analytical view for the first time; indeed, it feels almost like the invention of the microscope and the discovery of the new world at the same time. With major microbial ecology research efforts accumulating prodigious quantities of sequence, protein, and metabolite data, we are now poised to address environmental microbial research at macro scales, and to begin to characterize and understand the dimensions of microbial biodiversity on the planet. What is currently impeding progress is the need for a framework within which the research community can develop, exchange and discuss predictive ecosystem models that describe the biodiversity and functional interactions. Such a framework must encompass data and metadata transparency and interoperation; data and results validation, curation, and search; application programming interfaces for modeling and analysis tools; and human and technical processes and services necessary to ensure broad adoption. Here we discuss the need for focused community interaction to augment and deepen established community efforts, beginning with the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), to create a science-driven strategic plan for a Genomic Software Institute (GSI). PMID:22675605

  7. Proton microscopy at GSI and FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, Frank E; Mariam, Fesseha G; Golubev, A A; Turtikov, V I; Varentsov, D

    2009-01-01

    Proton radiography was invented in the 1990's at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as a diagnostic to study dynamic material properties under extreme pressures, strain and strain rate. Since this time hundreds of dynamic proton radiography experiments have been performed at LANL and facilities have been commissioned at the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) in Russia for similar applications in dynamic material studies. Recently an international collaboration was formed to develop a new proton radiography capability for the study of dynamic material properties at the Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) located at Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany. This new Proton microscope for FAIR (PRIOR) will provide radiographic imaging of dynamic systems with unprecedented spatial, temporal and density resolution, resulting in a window for understanding dynamic material properties at new length scales. These dynamic experiments will be driven with many energy sources including heavy ions, high explosives and lasers. The design of the proton microscope and expected radiographic performance is presented.

  8. Software Reliability Issues Concerning Large and Safety Critical Software Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, Khaled; Brown, Barbara

    1996-01-01

    This research was undertaken to provide NASA with a survey of state-of-the-art techniques using in industrial and academia to provide safe, reliable, and maintainable software to drive large systems. Such systems must match the complexity and strict safety requirements of NASA's shuttle system. In particular, the Launch Processing System (LPS) is being considered for replacement. The LPS is responsible for monitoring and commanding the shuttle during test, repair, and launch phases. NASA built this system in the 1970's using mostly hardware techniques to provide for increased reliability, but it did so often using custom-built equipment, which has not been able to keep up with current technologies. This report surveys the major techniques used in industry and academia to ensure reliability in large and critical computer systems.

  9. Containment-emergency-sump performance. Technical findings related to Unresolved Safety Issue A-43. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This report summarizes key technical findings related to the Unresolved Safety Issue A-43, Containment Emergency Sump Performance, and provides recommendations for resolution of attendant safety issues. The key safety questions relate to: (a) effects of insulation debris on sump performance; (b) sump hydraulic performance as determined by design features, submergence, and plant induced effects, and (c) recirculation pump performance wherein air and/or particulate ingestion can occur. The technical findings presented in this report provide information relevant to the design and performance evaluation of the containment emergency sump.

  10. Electronic cigarettes: a review of safety and clinical issues.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Michael; Breland, Alison; Spindle, Tory; Eissenberg, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This clinical case conference discusses 3 cases of patients using electronic cigarettes. Electronic cigarettes, also referred to as electronic nicotine delivery systems or "e-cigarettes," generally consist of a power source (usually a battery) and a heating element (commonly referred to as an atomizer) that vaporize a solution (e-liquid). The user inhales the resulting vapor. E-liquids contain humectants such as propylene glycol and/or vegetable glycerin, flavorings, and usually, but not always, nicotine. Each patient's information is an amalgamation of actual patients and is presented and then followed by a discussion of clinical issues. PMID:25089953

  11. An update on environmental, health and safety issues of interest to the photovoltaic industry

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Viren, J.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-08-01

    There is growing interest in the environmental, health, and safety issues related to new photovoltaic technologies as they approach commercialization. Such issues include potential toxicity of II--VI compounds; the impacts of new environmental regulations on module manufacturers; and, the need for recycling of spent modules and manufacturing wastes. This paper will review these topics. 20 refs.

  12. An update on environmental, health and safety issues of interest to the photovoltaic industry

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Viren, J.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-01-01

    There is growing interest in the environmental, health, and safety issues related to new photovoltaic technologies as they approach commercialization. Such issues include potential toxicity of II--VI compounds; the impacts of new environmental regulations on module manufacturers; and, the need for recycling of spent modules and manufacturing wastes. This paper will review these topics. 20 refs.

  13. An update on environmental, health, and safety issues of interest to the photovoltaic industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskowitz, P. D.; Viren, J.; Fthenakis, V. M.

    1992-12-01

    There is growing interest in the environmental, health, and safety issues related to new photovoltaic technologies as they approach commercialization. Such issues include potential toxicity of II-VI compounds; the impacts of new environmental regulations on module manufacturers; and, the need for recycling of spent modules and manufacturing wastes. This paper will review these topics.

  14. Preliminary Examination of Safety Issues on a University Campus: Personal Safety Practices, Beliefs & Attitudes of Female Faculty & Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Paula C.; Bryden, Pamela J.

    2007-01-01

    University and college campuses are not immune to acts of violence. Unfortunately there is limited information regarding violence in the academic setting among women employees. As such, the purpose of this exploratory research was to examine issues that female faculty and staff members have about safety on and around campus, including concerns…

  15. A review of occupational safety and health issues relevant to the environmental restoration program: Selected case histories and associated issues

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.; McKinney, M.D.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the impact of occupational safety and health (OSH) issues on the environmental restoration process at US Department of Energy sites. PNL selected three remediation projects to study: (1) the 618-9 Burial Ground Expedited Removal Action at the Hanford Site, (2) the Chemical Consolidation Interim Response Action at the Weldon Spring Site, (3) and the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Removal Action and VOC-Arid Integration Demonstration at the Hanford Site. The first two case studies involve sites where a remediation activity has been complete. The third case study involves a remediation activity in its early stages of development. This study identifies OSH issues related to actual cleanup, time, documentation, training, and technology development. These issues need to be considered by DOE before making long-term planning efforts. Section 4.0 of this report describes recommendations for addressing these issues.

  16. Safety Issues at the Defense Production Reactors. A Report to the U.S. Department of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources.

    This report provides an assessment of safety management, safety review, and safety methodology employed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and private contractors. Chapter 1, "The DOE Safety Framework," examines safety objectives for production reactors and processes to implement the objectives. Chapter 2, "Technical Issues," focuses on a variety…

  17. Effects of gamma radiation on raspberries: safety and quality issues.

    PubMed

    Verde, S Cabo; Trigo, M J; Sousa, M B; Ferreira, A; Ramos, A C; Nunes, I; Junqueira, C; Melo, R; Santos, P M P; Botelho, M L

    2013-01-01

    There is an ever-increasing global demand from consumers for high-quality foods with major emphasis placed on quality and safety attributes. One of the main demands that consumers display is for minimally processed, high-nutrition/low-energy natural foods with no or minimal chemical preservatives. The nutritional value of raspberry fruit is widely recognized. In particular, red raspberries are known to demonstrate a strong antioxidant capacity that might prove beneficial to human health by preventing free radical-induced oxidative stress. However, food products that are consumed raw, are increasingly being recognized as important vehicles for transmission of human pathogens. Food irradiation is one of the few technologies that address both food quality and safety by virtue of its ability to control spoilage and foodborne pathogenic microorganisms without significantly affecting sensory or other organoleptic attributes of the food. Food irradiation is well established as a physical, nonthermal treatment (cold pasteurization) that processes foods at or nearly at ambient temperature in the final packaging, reducing the possibility of cross contamination until the food is actually used by the consumer. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of gamma radiation on raspberries in order to assess consequences of irradiation. Freshly packed raspberries (Rubus idaeus L.) were irradiated in a (60)Co source at several doses (0.5, 1, or 1.5 kGy). Bioburden, total phenolic content, antioxidant activity, physicochemical properties such as texture, color, pH, soluble solids content, and acidity, and sensorial parameters were assessed before and after irradiation and during storage time up to 14 d at 4°C. Characterization of raspberries microbiota showed an average bioburden value of 10(4) colony-forming units (CFU)/g and a diverse microbial population predominantly composed of two morphological types (gram-negative, oxidase-negative rods, 35%, and filamentous fungi, 41

  18. Assisted reproductive technologies: medical safety issues in the older woman.

    PubMed

    Segev, Yakir; Riskin-Mashiah, Shlomit; Lavie, Ofer; Auslender, Ron

    2011-06-01

    Abstract Previous study has shown that in the United States, most maternal deaths and severe obstetric complications due to chronic disease are potentially preventable through improved medical care before conception. Many women who need assisted reproductive technology (ART) because of infertility are older than the average pregnant woman. Risks for such chronic diseases as obesity, diabetes mellitus, chronic hypertension, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and malignancy greatly increase with maternal age. Chronic illness increases the risk of the in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedure and is also associated with increased obstetric risk and even death. The objective of this review is to outline the potential risks for older women who undergo ART procedures and pregnancy and to characterize guidelines for evaluation before enrollment in ART programs. A PubMed search revealed that very few studies have related to pre-ART medical evaluation. Therefore, we suggest a pre-ART medical assessment, comparable to the recommendations of the American Heart Association before noncompetitive physical activity and the American Society of Anesthesiologists before elective surgery. This assessment should include a thorough medical questionnaire and medical examination. Further evaluation and treatment should follow to ensure the safety of ART procedures and of ensuing pregnancies. PMID:21510806

  19. Clinical safety issues of measles, mumps and rubella vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, M. A.; Minor, P. D.; Schild, G. C.

    2000-01-01

    The clinical safety of measles and measles-mumps-rubella vaccines has been questioned in recent reports that propose a possible link between measles virus or measles vaccines and the occurrence of juvenile Crohn disease and autism. This article reviews the outcomes of several laboratory investigations which were carried out independently to identify the presence or absence of measles virus in the intestinal tissues derived from cases of inflammatory bowel disease. One research group reported the presence of measles virus particles and genomic RNA in inflammatory bowel disease tissues, but this could not be confirmed by other groups, despite use of techniques that are highly specific and sensitive for the detection of measles virus nucleic acid in clinical specimens down to the molecular level. Based on the published data reviewed here, it can be concluded that there is no direct association between measles virus or measles vaccines and the development of Crohn disease, a conclusion which is supported by most epidemiological findings. PMID:10743285

  20. Understanding and interpreting vision safety issues with vigabatrin therapy.

    PubMed

    Plant, G T; Sergott, R C

    2011-01-01

    Vigabatrin is an irreversible inhibitor of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transaminase. It is effective as adjunctive therapy for adult patients with refractory complex partial seizures (rCPS) who have inadequately responded to several alternative treatments and as monotherapy for children aged 1 month to 2 years with infantile spasms. The well-documented safety profile of vigabatrin includes risk of retinopathy characterized by irreversible, bilateral, concentric peripheral visual field constriction. Thus, monitoring of visual function to understand the occurrence and manage the potential consequences of peripheral visual field defects (pVFDs) is now required for all patients who receive vigabatrin. However, screening for pVFDs for patients with epilepsy was conducted only after the association between vigabatrin and pVFDs was established. We examined the potential association between pVFDs and epilepsy in vigabatrin-naïve patients and attempted to identify confounding factors (e.g., concomitant medications, method of vision assessment) to more accurately delineate the prevalence of pVFDs directly associated with vigabatrin. Results of a prospective cohort study as well as several case series and case reports suggest that bilateral visual field constriction is not restricted to patients exposed to vigabatrin but has also been detected, although much less frequently, in vigabatrin-naïve patients with epilepsy, including those who received treatment with other GABAergic antiepileptic therapy. We also reviewed published data suggesting an association between vigabatrin-associated retinal toxicity and taurine deficiency, as well as the potential role of taurine in the prevention of this retinopathy. PMID:22061181

  1. Radiation Safety Issues in High Altitude Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1995-01-01

    The development of a global economy makes the outlook for high speed commercial intercontinental flight feasible, and the development of various configurations operating from 20 to 30 km have been proposed. In addition to the still unresolved issues relating to current commercial operations (12-16 km), the higher dose rates associated with the higher operating altitudes makes il imperative that the uncertainties in the atmospheric radiation environment and the associated health risks be re-examined. Atmospheric radiation associated with the galactic cosmic rays forms a background level which may, under some circumstances, exceed newly recommended allowable exposure limits proposed on the basis of recent evaluations of the A -bomb survivor data (due to increased risk coefficients). These larger risk coefficients, within the context of the methodology for estimating exposure limits, are resulting in exceedingly low estimated allowable exposure limits which may impact even present day flight operations and was the reason for the CEC workshop in Luxembourg (1990). At higher operating altitudes, solar particles events can produce exposures many orders of magnitude above background levels and pose significant health risks to the most sensitive individuals (such as during pregnancy). In this case the appropriate quality factors are undefined, and some evidence exists which indicates that the quality factor for stochastic effects is a substantial underestimate.

  2. Pesticide Exposure, Safety Issues, and Risk Assessment Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Damalas, Christos A.; Eleftherohorinos, Ilias G.

    2011-01-01

    approved pesticides and the approval of the new compounds in the near future. Thus, new tools or techniques with greater reliability than those already existing are needed to predict the potential hazards of pesticides and thus contribute to reduction of the adverse effects on human health and the environment. On the other hand, the implementation of alternative cropping systems that are less dependent on pesticides, the development of new pesticides with novel modes of action and improved safety profiles, and the improvement of the already used pesticide formulations towards safer formulations (e.g., microcapsule suspensions) could reduce the adverse effects of farming and particularly the toxic effects of pesticides. In addition, the use of appropriate and well-maintained spraying equipment along with taking all precautions that are required in all stages of pesticide handling could minimize human exposure to pesticides and their potential adverse effects on the environment. PMID:21655127

  3. Measuring Safety Levels in Playgrounds Using Environment Assessment Scales: The Issue of Playground Safety in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botsoglou, Kafenia; Hrisikou, Spyridoula; Kakana, Domna Mika

    2011-01-01

    Playgrounds beget an unrivalled context which, through play activity, can foster children's growth. The foremost function of all playgrounds is to provide for safety. In the present study, our primary focus is to determine the degree of adequacy as far as playground equipment is concerned, including estimates of imminent dangers and the level of…

  4. Issues in Software System Safety: Polly Ann Smith Co. versus Ned I. Ludd

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, C. Michael

    2002-01-01

    This paper is a work of fiction, but it is fiction with a very real purpose: to stimulate careful thought and friendly discussion about some questions for which thought is often careless and discussion is often unfriendly. To accomplish this purpose, the paper creates a fictional legal case. The most important issue in this fictional case is whether certain proffered expert testimony about software engineering for safety critical systems should be admitted. Resolving this issue requires deciding the extent to which current practices and research in software engineering, especially for safety-critical systems, can rightly be considered based on knowledge, rather than opinion.

  5. 49 CFR 385.409 - When may a temporary safety permit be issued to a motor carrier?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false When may a temporary safety permit be issued to a motor carrier? 385.409 Section 385.409 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS SAFETY...

  6. Balancing Student Privacy, Campus Security, and Public Safety: Issues for Campus Leaders. Perspectives, Winter 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBain, Lesley

    2008-01-01

    The complex issues of promoting student mental health, privacy and public safety, and the balance among them, weigh on the minds of institutional leaders, educational policymakers, and local, state and federal officials. American campuses have a proud history of intellectual freedom, openness and public accessibility to their communities. However,…

  7. An Analysis of the Safety Issues Involving Local School Children as Pedestrians. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ducote, Kenneth J.

    The New Orleans Public Schools' Department of Planning has been concerned with school children as pedestrians for the past five years. The safety issues include the streets, the drivers, and the children. First, the streets contribute to the hazard because many major streets traverse residential areas; many streets serve as major commuter…

  8. State Legislative Developments on Campus Sexual Violence: Issues in the Context of Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Andrew; Sponsler, Brian A.; Fulton, Mary

    2015-01-01

    NASPA--Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education and Education Commission of the States (ECS) have partnered to address legislative developments and offer considerations for leaders in higher education and policy on two top-level safety issues facing the higher education community: campus sexual violence and guns on campus. The first in a…

  9. Current Status of Health and Safety Issues of Sodium/Metal Chloride (Zebra) Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Trickett, D.

    1998-12-15

    This report addresses environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues associated with sodium/ metal chloride batteries, in general, although most references to specific cell or battery types refer to units developed or being developed under the Zebra trademark. The report focuses on issues pertinent to sodium/metal chloride batteries and their constituent components; however, the fact that some ''issues'' arise from interaction between electric vehicle (EV) and battery design compels occasional discussion amid the context of EV vehicle design and operation. This approach has been chosen to provide a reasonably comprehensive account of the topic from a cell technology perspective and an applications perspective.

  10. Tritium management in a fusion reactor--safety, handling and economical issues--

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, Tetsuo

    2009-02-19

    In order to establish a D-T fusion reactor as an energy source, it is not enough to have a DT burning plasma, and economical conversion of fusion energy to electricity and/or heat, a large enough margin of tritium breeding and tritium safety must be simultaneously achieved. In particular, handling of huge amount of tritium needs significant efforts to ensure that the radiation dose of radiological workers and of the public is below the limits specified by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In this paper, after the introduction of tritium as a fuel of DT reactors and as a radioisotope of hydrogen, tritium safety issues in fuel cycle and blanket systems are summarized. In particular, in-vessel tritium inventory, the most important and uncertain tritium safety issue, is discussed in detail.

  11. Ethical Issues in Patient Safety Research: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Whicher, Danielle M; Kass, Nancy E; Audera-Lopez, Carmen; Butt, Mobasher; Jauregui, Iciar Larizgoitia; Harris, Kendra; Knoche, Jonathan; Saxena, Abha

    2015-09-01

    As many as 1 in 10 patients is harmed while receiving hospital care in wealthy countries. The risk of health care-associated infection in some developing countries is as much as 20 times higher. In response, in many global regions, increased attention has turned to the implementation of a broad program of safety research, encompassing a variety of methods. Although important international ethical guidelines for research exist, literature has been emerging in the last 20 years that begins to apply such guidelines to patient safety research specifically. This paper provides a review of the literature related to ethics, oversight, and patient safety research; identifies issues highlighted in articles as being of ethical relevance; describes areas of consensus regarding how to respond to these ethical issues; and highlights areas where additional ethical analysis and discussion are needed to provide guidance to those in the field. PMID:24618642

  12. Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses safety issues in science, including: allergic reactions to peanuts used in experiments; explosions in lead/acid batteries; and inspection of pressure vessels, such as pressure cookers or model steam engines. (MKR)

  13. Head-up displays and their automotive application: an overview of human factors issues affecting safety.

    PubMed

    Ward, N J; Parkes, A

    1994-12-01

    In response to the recent innovations to use head-up displays (HUDs) in vehicles, this paper discusses the relevant human factors issues arising from this display format and the potential safety implications. A review is made of the relevant HUD literature, primarily from the aviation field. The primary issues for automotive HUDs relevant to system performance and safety in the driving task involve interference from background scene complexity, system novelty, user perceptual style, cognitive disruption, and perceptual tunnelling. Basic research is necessary to investigate the extent of these issues as well as to resolve fundamental design specifications (e.g. HUD size, shape, placement, information content). It is suggested that the introduction of HUDs into vehicles be carefully considered. This will necessitate not only the reconsideration what constitutes an in-vehicle display, but also what constitutes the information to be conveyed. PMID:7857487

  14. Resolution of thermal-hydraulic safety and licensing issues for the system 80+{sup {trademark}} design

    SciTech Connect

    Carpentino, S.E.; Ritterbusch, S.E.; Schneider, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    The System 80+{sup {trademark}} Standard Design is an evolutionary Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) with a generating capacity of 3931 MWt (1350 MWe). The Final Design Approval (FDA) for this design was issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in July 1994. The design certification by the NRC is anticipated by the end of 1995 or early 1996. NRC review of the System 80+ design has involved several new safety issues never before addressed in a regulatory atmosphere. In addition, conformance with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) required that the System 80+ plant address nuclear industry concerns with regard to design, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. A large number of these issues/concerns deals with previously unresolved generic thermal-hydraulic safety issues and severe accident prevention and mitigation. This paper discusses the thermal-hydraulic analyses and evaluations performed for the System 80+ design to resolve safety and licensing issues relevant to both the Nuclear Stream Supply System (NSSS) and containment designs. For the NSSS design, the Safety Depressurization System mitigation capability and resolution of the boron dilution concern are described. Examples of containment design issues dealing with containment shell strength, robustness of the reactor cavity walls and hydrogen mixing under severe accident conditions are also provided. Finally, the overall approach used in the application of NRC`s new (NUREG-1465) radiological source term for System 80+ evaluation is described. The robustness of the System 80+ containment design to withstand severe accident consequences was demonstrated through detailed thermal-hydraulic analyses and evaluations. This advanced design to shown to meet NRC severe accident policy goals and ALWR URD requirements without any special design features and unnecessary costs.

  15. The Geat Britain and Ireland perspective: current perfusion safety issues, preparing for the future.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, J W

    2005-07-01

    The Great Britain and Ireland (GBI) recommendations for standards of monitoring and alarms during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) came into force in January 2004. While perfusion departments in Great Britain and Ireland should now have a good baseline level of safety, it is important that department-specific safety is also considered. Patient safety is paramount, but safety within our speciality must also take into account the protection of the perfusionists' health and the protection of their careers. These different aspects of safety are fundamentally interrelated. This paper focuses on the importance of careful assessment, implementation and documentation when a new component or technique is being introduced to the CPB circuit, even when the aim is to increase safety. Knowledge of the civil justice system and the trends in medical negligence claims are an integral part of perfusionist safety. Perfusion in Great Britain and Ireland is rightly striving for professional recognition from the Health Professions Council (HPC). As we raise the profile of perfusion, we educate more people about the importance of our role and level of responsibility within the cardiac operating team. This will increase the potential for medical negligence claims to be directed specifically at our speciality. All these issues are discussed in detail. PMID:16130368

  16. Analysis of governmental Web sites on food safety issues: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Namkung, Young; Almanza, Barbara A

    2006-10-01

    Despite a growing concern over food safety issues, as well as a growing dependence on the Internet as a source of information, little research has been done to examine the presence and relevance of food safety-related information on Web sites. The study reported here conducted Web site analysis in order to examine the current operational status of governmental Web sites on food safety issues. The study also evaluated Web site usability, especially information dimensionalities such as utility, currency, and relevance of content, from the perspective of the English-speaking consumer. Results showed that out of 192 World Health Organization members, 111 countries operated governmental Web sites that provide information about food safety issues. Among 171 searchable Web sites from the 111 countries, 123 Web sites (71.9 percent) were accessible, and 81 of those 123 (65.9 percent) were available in English. The majority of Web sites offered search engine tools and related links for more information, but their availability and utility was limited. In terms of content, 69.9 percent of Web sites offered information on foodborne-disease outbreaks, compared with 31.5 percent that had travel- and health-related information. PMID:17066944

  17. Inherent safety advantages of carbide fuel systems and technical issues regarding natural convection in LMRs

    SciTech Connect

    Barthold, W.P.

    1984-08-01

    The scope of work is to summarize inherent safety advantages that are unique to the use of a carbide based fuel system and to summarize the technical issues regarding natural convection flow in LMFBR cores. As discussed in this report, carbide fuel provides the designer with far greater flexibility than oxide fuel. Carbide fuel systems can be designed to eliminate major accident initiators. They turn quantitative advantages into a qualitative advantage. The author proposed to LANL a series of core design and component concepts that would greatly enhance the safety of carbide over oxide systems. This report cites a series of safety advantages which potentially exist for a carbide fuel system. Natural convection issues have not been given much attention in the past. Only during the last few years has this issue been addressed in some detail. Despite claims to the contrary by some of the LMR contractors, the author does not think that the natural convection phenomena is fully understood. Some of the approximations made in natural convection transient analyses have probably a greater impact on calculated transient temperatures than the effects under investigation. Only integral in-pile experimental data and single assembly out-of-pile detailed data are available for comparisons with analytical models and correlations. Especially for derated cores, the natural convection capability of a LMR should be far superior to that of a LWR. The author ranks the natural convection capability of the LMR as the most important inherent safety feature.

  18. Search for Two-Proton Emitters at FRS-GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Pfuetzner, M.

    2000-12-31

    A project of studying proton drip-line nuclei in vicinity of {sup 48}Ni, running at GSI Darmstadt, is shortly reviewed. Prospects for spectroscopy studies on {sup 45}Fe, presently identified as the best candidate for the 2p radioactivity, are briefly discussed.

  19. Proton Emission Studies at GSI in the 1980s

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, Sigurd

    2000-12-31

    This article describes the experiments that were performed during the first decade of the operation of UNILAC, GSI-Darmstadt, at the recoil separator SHIP and the on-line mass separator. The measurements resulted in the discovery of the first radioactive ground state proton emitters, {sup 151}Lu and {sup 147}Tm.

  20. Girls' Science Investigations (GSI) New Haven: Evaluating the Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knodell, Claire; Fleming, Bonnie

    2009-05-01

    Girls' Science Investigations (GSI) New Haven seeks to empower the girls of today to shape the science of tomorrow. Funded by the NSF and Yale University and held at Yale, this program was designed to motivate, empower, and interest middle school girls in developing the skills required to pursue a career in science during a day-long investigation of the session's featured topic in science. Yale students and female professors act as mentors and guide younger girls through an environment for understanding and exploring various disciplines of science through hands-on activities in a laboratory setting. GSI strives to close the gap between males and females one action-packed Saturday at a time. This paper evaluates the success of the program. Student participant evaluations over the past 2 years coupled with student testimony and GSI coordinator, instructors', and volunteers' interviews allowed for an analysis of GSI's ability to inspire girls to pursue careers in science. The data indicates that a majority of girls who attended the program were more inclined to continue their study of science. The positive results are detailed in the following paper which points to the hands-on activities and enthusiasm of instructors as integral to the program's success.

  1. Safety and regulatory issues regarding stem cell therapies: one clinic's perspective.

    PubMed

    Centeno, Christopher J; Bashir, Jamil

    2015-04-01

    Stem cells therapies have been in preclinical development for the past 2 decades. A rapidly evolving regulatory landscape has restrained many of these technologies from advancing from the bench to the bedside. Although the large-scale clinical safety of stem cell therapies remains to be fully tested, the total number of patients who have safely received these therapies is large and growing. Prima facie evidence would dictate that certain types of cell therapy are likely safer than others. Understanding the current regulation regarding stem cells involves a discussion of their safety profile, as the 2 issues are closely intertwined. PMID:25864659

  2. Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ohi, J.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report is the first of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues involved in using sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles that may affect the commercialization of Na/S batteries. This and the other reports on recycling, shipping, and vehicle safety are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers cell design and engineering as the basis of safety for Na/S batteries and describes and assesses the potential chemical, electrical, and thermal hazards and risks of Na/S cells and batteries as well as the RD D performed, under way, or to address these hazards and risks. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, universities, and private industry. Subsequent volumes will address environmental, health, and safety issues involved in shipping cells and batteries, using batteries to propel electric vehicles, and recycling and disposing of spent batteries. The remainder of this volume is divided into two major sections on safety at the cell and battery levels. The section on Na/S cells describes major component and potential failure modes, design, life testing and failure testing, thermal cycling, and the safety status of Na/S cells. The section on batteries describes battery design, testing, and safety status. Additional EH S information on Na/S batteries is provided in the appendices.

  3. One-Day Conference on School Safety & Security and Fair Dismissals Issues (Dayton, Ohio, June 24, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Law Association, Dayton, OH.

    This booklet contains five chapters relating to issues in school safety and security, and fair dismissals: (1) "Ohio Legislation and Federal and State Decisions" (Richard J. Dickinson). Items of deliberation include financial matters, school safety issues, administrator and teacher contract matters, Title IX liability, school prayer, drug testing…

  4. Assessment of the food safety issues related to genetically modified foods.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, H A; Kleter, G A; Noteborn, H P; Kok, E J

    2001-09-01

    International consensus has been reached on the principles regarding evaluation of the food safety of genetically modified plants. The concept of substantial equivalence has been developed as part of a safety evaluation framework, based on the idea that existing foods can serve as a basis for comparing the properties of genetically modified foods with the appropriate counterpart. Application of the concept is not a safety assessment per se, but helps to identify similarities and differences between the existing food and the new product, which are then subject to further toxicological investigation. Substantial equivalence is a starting point in the safety evaluation, rather than an endpoint of the assessment. Consensus on practical application of the principle should be further elaborated. Experiences with the safety testing of newly inserted proteins and of whole genetically modified foods are reviewed, and limitations of current test methodologies are discussed. The development and validation of new profiling methods such as DNA microarray technology, proteomics, and metabolomics for the identification and characterization of unintended effects, which may occur as a result of the genetic modification, is recommended. The assessment of the allergenicity of newly inserted proteins and of marker genes is discussed. An issue that will gain importance in the near future is that of post-marketing surveillance of the foods derived from genetically modified crops. It is concluded, among others that, that application of the principle of substantial equivalence has proven adequate, and that no alternative adequate safety assessment strategies are available. PMID:11576435

  5. Application of the risk-based strategy to the Hanford tank waste organic-nitrate safety issue

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, V.L.; Colson, S.D.; Ferryman, T.; Gephart, R.E.; Heasler, P.; Scheele, R.D.

    1997-12-01

    This report describes the results from application of the Risk-Based Decision Management Approach for Justifying Characterization of Hanford Tank Waste to the organic-nitrate safety issue in Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs). Existing chemical and physical models were used, taking advantage of the most current (mid-1997) sampling and analysis data. The purpose of this study is to make specific recommendations for planning characterization to help ensure the safety of each SST as it relates to the organic-nitrate safety issue. An additional objective is to demonstrate the viability of the Risk-Based Strategy for addressing Hanford tank waste safety issues.

  6. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of nickel metal-hydride batteries for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D; Hammel, C J; Mark, J

    1993-08-01

    This report identifies important environment, health, and safety issues associated with nickel metal-hydride (Ni-MH) batteries and assesses the need for further testing and analysis. Among the issues discussed are cell and battery safety, workplace health and safety, shipping requirements, and in-vehicle safety. The manufacture and recycling of Ni-MH batteries are also examined. This report also overviews the ``FH&S`` issues associated with other nickel-based electric vehicle batteries; it examines venting characteristics, toxicity of battery materials, and the status of spent batteries as a hazardous waste.

  7. Safety Issues and Approach to Meet the Safety Requirements in Tokamak Cooling Water System of ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, George F; Reyes, Susana; Chang, Keun Pack; Berry, Jan; Kim, Seokho H

    2010-01-01

    The ITER (Latin for 'the way') tokamak cooling water system (TCWS) consists of several separate systems to cool the major ITER components - the divertor/limiter, the first wall blanket, the neutral beam injector and the vacuum vessel. The ex-vessel part of the TCWS systems provides a confinement function for tritium and activated corrosion products in the cooling water. The Vacuum Vessel System also has a functional safety requirement regarding the residual heat removal from in-vessel components. A preliminary hazards assessment (PHA) was performed for a better understanding of the hazards, initiating events, and defense in depth mechanisms associated with the TCWS. The PHA was completed using the following steps. (1) Hazard Identification. Hazards associated with the TCWS were identified including radiological/chemical/electromagnetic hazards and physical hazards (e.g., high voltage, high pressure, high temperature, falling objects). (2) Hazard Categorization. Hazards identified in step (1) were categorized as to their potential for harm to the workers, the public, and/or the environment. (3) Hazard Evaluation. The design was examined to determine initiating events that might occur and that could expose the public, environment, or workers to the hazard. In addition the system was examined to identify barriers that prevent exposure. Finally, consequences to the public or workers were qualitatively assessed, should the initiating event occur and one or more of the barriers fail. Frequency of occurrence of the initiating event and subsequent barrier failure was qualitatively estimated. (4) Accident Analysis. A preliminary hazards analysis was performed on the conceptual design of the TCWS. As the design progresses, a detailed accident analysis will be performed in the form of a failure modes and effects analysis. The results of the PHA indicated that the principal hazards associated with the TCWS were those associated with radiation. These were low compared to

  8. 49 CFR 385.407 - What conditions must a motor carrier satisfy for FMCSA to issue a safety permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What conditions must a motor carrier satisfy for FMCSA to issue a safety permit? 385.407 Section 385.407 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS...

  9. Road safety in a globalised and more sustainable world: current issues and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Stijn; Risser, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Although many countries have had considerable success in reducing traffic injuries over recent decades, there are still some fundamental problems in this area. At the same time, there is increasing focus on road safety research and policy development in the context of globalisation, sustainability, liveability and health. This special section presents a selection of papers that were presented at the annual ICTCT workshop held on the 8th and 9th of November 2012 in Hasselt, Belgium, and accepted for publication in Accident Analysis and Prevention following the journal's reviewing procedure. The aim of the ICTCT workshop was to analyse road safety facts, data and visions for the future in the wider context of current issues and future challenges in road safety. PMID:24182518

  10. The challenges for global harmonisation of food safety norms and regulations: issues for India.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jamuna

    2014-08-01

    Safe and adequate food is a human right, safety being a prime quality attribute without which food is unfit for consumption. Food safety regulations are framed to exercise control over all types of food produced, processed and sold so that the customer is assured that the food consumed will not cause any harm. From the Indian perspective, global harmonisation of food regulations is needed to improve food and nutrition security, the food trade and delivery of safe ready-to-eat (RTE) foods at all places and at all times. The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) put forward to transform developing societies incorporate many food safety issues. The success of the MDGs, including that of poverty reduction, will in part depend on an effective reduction of food-borne diseases, particularly among the vulnerable group, which includes women and children. Food- and water-borne illnesses can be a serious health hazard, being responsible for high incidences of morbidity and mortality across all age groups of people. Global harmonisation of food regulations would assist in facilitating food trade within and outside India through better compliance, ensuring the safety of RTE catered foods, as well as addressing issues related to the environment. At the same time, regulations need to be optimum, as overregulation may have undue negative effects on the food trade. PMID:23553336

  11. Radiological protection, safety and security issues in the industrial and medical applications of radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    The use of radiation sources, namely radioactive sealed or unsealed sources and particle accelerators and beams is ubiquitous in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation. Besides radiological protection of the workers, members of the public and patients in routine situations, the use of radiation sources involves several aspects associated to the mitigation of radiological or nuclear accidents and associated emergency situations. On the other hand, during the last decade security issues became burning issues due to the potential malevolent uses of radioactive sources for the perpetration of terrorist acts using RDD (Radiological Dispersal Devices), RED (Radiation Exposure Devices) or IND (Improvised Nuclear Devices). A stringent set of international legally and non-legally binding instruments, regulations, conventions and treaties regulate nowadays the use of radioactive sources. In this paper, a review of the radiological protection issues associated to the use of radiation sources in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation is performed. The associated radiation safety issues and the prevention and mitigation of incidents and accidents are discussed. A comprehensive discussion of the security issues associated to the global use of radiation sources for the aforementioned applications and the inherent radiation detection requirements will be presented. Scientific, technical, legal, ethical, socio-economic issues are put forward and discussed.

  12. Girls' Science Investigations (GSI) New Haven Curriculum and Educational Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Sheena; Fleming, Bonnie

    2009-05-01

    Girls' Science Investigations (GSI) New Haven is a program which aims at encouraging middle school girls to pursue careers in science. To accomplish this goal, each day at GSI features a different area of science; ``the material world,'' ``the chemical world,'' and ``the electromagnetic world'' are examples of the sessions held during the past two years. Every session features a short explanation of the science topic given by a volunteer and a variety of hands-on activities, which allow the girls to experiment with and absorb the concepts presented in the short presentations. Activities are selected based on their ability to visualize the concepts under study. The education philosophy of GSI is that if the students have the opportunity to perform science experiments themselves, rather than just watching others do it, and enjoy performing these experiments, then the students will be more confident in their ability to succeed in a scientific field. Thus, in addition to encouraging girls to learn as much science as they can, the volunteers work to ensure that the girls enjoy the program as well. By giving the girls the opportunity to explore science in a fun and exciting way, the girls begin to see themselves as capable of becoming scientists and are more inclined to pursue science in the future.

  13. Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J

    1992-11-01

    This report is the last of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues that may affect the commercial-scale use of sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles. The reports are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers the in-vehicle safety issues of electric vehicles powered by Na/S batteries. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, and private industry. It has three major goals: (1) to identify the unique hazards associated with electric vehicle (EV) use; (2) to describe the existing standards, regulations, and guidelines that are or could be applicable to these hazards; and (3) to discuss the adequacy of the existing requirements in addressing the safety concerns of EVs.

  14. The growing use of herbal medicines: issues relating to adverse reactions and challenges in monitoring safety

    PubMed Central

    Ekor, Martins

    2014-01-01

    The use of herbal medicinal products and supplements has increased tremendously over the past three decades with not less than 80% of people worldwide relying on them for some part of primary healthcare. Although therapies involving these agents have shown promising potential with the efficacy of a good number of herbal products clearly established, many of them remain untested and their use are either poorly monitored or not even monitored at all. The consequence of this is an inadequate knowledge of their mode of action, potential adverse reactions, contraindications, and interactions with existing orthodox pharmaceuticals and functional foods to promote both safe and rational use of these agents. Since safety continues to be a major issue with the use of herbal remedies, it becomes imperative, therefore, that relevant regulatory authorities put in place appropriate measures to protect public health by ensuring that all herbal medicines are safe and of suitable quality. This review discusses toxicity-related issues and major safety concerns arising from the use of herbal medicinal products and also highlights some important challenges associated with effective monitoring of their safety. PMID:24454289

  15. Climate change and food safety: an emerging issue with special focus on Europe.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, M; Marvin, H J P; Kleter, G A; Battilani, P; Brera, C; Coni, E; Cubadda, F; Croci, L; De Santis, B; Dekkers, S; Filippi, L; Hutjes, R W A; Noordam, M Y; Pisante, M; Piva, G; Prandini, A; Toti, L; van den Born, G J; Vespermann, A

    2009-05-01

    According to general consensus, the global climate is changing, which may also affect agricultural and livestock production. The potential impact of climate change on food security is a widely debated and investigated issue. Nonetheless, the specific impact on safety of food and feed for consumers has remained a less studied topic. This review therefore identifies the various food safety issues that are likely to be affected by changes in climate, particularly in Europe. Amongst the issues identified are mycotoxins formed on plant products in the field or during storage; residues of pesticides in plant products affected by changes in pest pressure; trace elements and/or heavy metals in plant products depending on changes in their abundance and availability in soils; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in foods following changes in long-range atmospheric transport and deposition into the environment; marine biotoxins in seafood following production of phycotoxins by harmful algal blooms; and the presence of pathogenic bacteria in foods following more frequent extreme weather conditions, such as flooding and heat waves. Research topics that are amenable to further research are highlighted. PMID:19353812

  16. Environmental, health and safety issues related to commercializing CuInSe{sub 2}-based photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Eberspacher, C.; Fthenakis, V.M.; Moskowtiz, P.D.

    1996-07-01

    Photovoltaics technology is rapidly evolving towards a new generation of low-cost thin film technologies. One of the most promising materials in this new generation is copper indium selenide (CuInSe{sub 2} or CIS). As with any new material, successful commercialization of CIS photovoltaic (PV) technology will require attention to environmental, health and safety issues, including consideration of the sources, usage, and end-of-product-life disposal and/or recycling of the constituent materials. This work focuses on three specific environmental, health and safety (EH and S) issues related to CIS PV: (1) economics are analyzed to determine their impact on materials use and re-use; (2) Federal and California State environmental disposal and waste handling regulations are analyzed to evaluate their impact on PV module manufacturing and end-of-life module handling; and (3) the logistics and economics of product recycling and waste disposal by industries with comparable EH and S issues are examined to quantify the corresponding options available for handling, disposing of and/or recycling manufacturing by-products and end-of-life modules.

  17. Safety implications of cultural and cognitive issues in nuclear power plant operation.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Paulo V R; Dos Santos, Isaac L; Vidal, Mario C R

    2006-03-01

    This research project was designed to investigate cultural and cognitive issues related to the work of nuclear power plant operators during their time on the job in the control room and during simulator training (emergency situations), in order to show how these issues impact on plant safety. The modeling of the operators work deals with the use of operational procedures, the constant changes in the focus of attention and the dynamics of the conflicting activities. The paper focuses on the relationships between the courses of action of the different operators and the constraints imposed by their working environment. It shows that the safety implications of the control room operators' cognitive and cultural issues go far beyond the formal organizational constructs usually implied. Our findings indicate that the competence required for the operators are concerned with developing the possibility of constructing situation awareness, managing conflicts, gaps and time problems created by ongoing task procedures, and dealing with distractions, developing skills for collaborative work. PMID:15993375

  18. Cardiovascular function in nonclinical drug safety assessment: current issues and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sarazan, R Dustan; Mittelstadt, Scott; Guth, Brian; Koerner, John; Zhang, Joanne; Pettit, Syril

    2011-05-01

    There are several recent examples where clinically significant, safety-related, drug effects on hemodynamics or cardiac function were not apparent until large clinical trials were completed or the drugs entered the consumer market. Such late-stage safety issues can have significant impact on patient health and consumer confidence, as well as ramifications for the regulatory, pharmaceutical, and financial communities. This manuscript provides recommendations that evolved from a 2009 HESI workshop on the need for improved translation of nonclinical cardiovascular effects to the clinical arena. The authors conclude that expanded and improved efforts to perform sensitive yet specific evaluations of functional cardiovascular parameters in nonclinical studies will allow pharmaceutical companies to identify suspect drugs early in the discovery and development process while allowing promising drugs to proceed into clinical development. PMID:21527643

  19. CANDU reactors, their regulation in Canada, and the identification of relevant NRC safety issues

    SciTech Connect

    Charak, I.; Kier, P.H.

    1995-04-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL) and its subsidiary in the US, are considering submitting the CANDU 3 design for standard design certification under 10 CFR Part 52. CANDU reactors are pressurized heavy water power reactors. They have some substantially different safety responses and safety systems than the LWRs that the commercial power reactor licensing regulations of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have been developed to deal with. In this report, the authors discuss the basic design characteristics of CANDU reactors, specifically of the CANDU 3 where possible, and some safety-related consequences of these characteristics. The authors also discuss the Canadian regulatory provisions, and the CANDU safety systems that have evolved to satisfy the Canadian regulatory requirements as of December 1992. Finally, the authors identify NRC regulations, mainly in 10 CFR Parts 50 and 100, with issues for CANDU 3 reactor designs. In all, eleven such regulatory issues are identified. They are: (1) the ATWS rule ({section}50.62); (2) station blackout ({section}50.63); (3) conformance with Standard Review Plan (SRP); (4) appropriateness of the source term ({section}50.34(f) and {section}100.11); (5) applicability of reactor coolant pressure boundary (RCPB) requirements ({section}50.55a, etc); (6) ECCS acceptance criteria ({section}50.46)(b); (7) combustible gas control ({section}50.44, etc); (8) power coefficient of reactivity (GDC 11); (9) seismic design (Part 100); (10) environmental impacts of the fuel cycle ({section}51.51); and (11) (standards {section}50.55a).

  20. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of lithium ion electric vehicle batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Vimmerstedt, L.J.; Ring, S.; Hammel, C.J.

    1995-09-01

    The lithium ion system considered in this report uses lithium intercalation compounds as both positive and negative electrodes and has an organic liquid electrolyte. Oxides of nickel, cobalt, and manganese are used in the positive electrode, and carbon is used in the negative electrode. This report presents health and safety issues, environmental issues, and shipping requirements for lithium ion electric vehicle (EV) batteries. A lithium-based electrochemical system can, in theory, achieve higher energy density than systems using other elements. The lithium ion system is less reactive and more reliable than present lithium metal systems and has possible performance advantages over some lithium solid polymer electrolyte batteries. However, the possibility of electrolyte spills could be a disadvantage of a liquid electrolyte system compared to a solid electrolyte. The lithium ion system is a developing technology, so there is some uncertainty regarding which materials will be used in an EV-sized battery. This report reviews the materials presented in the open literature within the context of health and safety issues, considering intrinsic material hazards, mitigation of material hazards, and safety testing. Some possible lithium ion battery materials are toxic, carcinogenic, or could undergo chemical reactions that produce hazardous heat or gases. Toxic materials include lithium compounds, nickel compounds, arsenic compounds, and dimethoxyethane. Carcinogenic materials include nickel compounds, arsenic compounds, and (possibly) cobalt compounds, copper, and polypropylene. Lithiated negative electrode materials could be reactive. However, because information about the exact compounds that will be used in future batteries is proprietary, ongoing research will determine which specific hazards will apply.

  1. Final Review of Safety Assessment Issues at Savannah River Site, August 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bixler, Nathan E.

    2011-12-15

    At the request of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) management, a review team composed of experts in atmospheric transport modeling for environmental radiation dose assessment convened at the Savannah River Site (SRS) on August 29-30, 2011. Though the meeting was prompted initially by suspected issues related to the treatment of surface roughness inherent in the SRS meteorological dataset and its treatment in the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System Version 2 (MACCS2), various topical areas were discussed that are relevant to performing safety assessments at SRS; this final report addresses these topical areas.

  2. Safety and licensing issues that are being addressed by the Power Burst Facility test programs. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    McCardell, R.K.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the results of the experimental program being conducted in the Power Burst Facility and the relationship of these results to certain safety and licensing issues. The safety issues that were addressed by the Power-Cooling-Mismatch, Reactivity Initiated Accident, and Loss of Coolant Accident tests, which comprised the original test program in the Power Burst Facility, are discussed. The resolution of these safety issues based on the results of the thirty-six tests performed to date, is presented. The future resolution of safety issues identified in the new Power Burst Facility test program which consists of tests which simulate BWR and PWR operational transients, anticipated transients without scram, and severe fuel damage accidents, is described.

  3. Implementing new technologies for public safety communication: competing frequency demands and standardization issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Kathryn J.

    1997-01-01

    Attempting to incorporate new technology into an existing environment is often very difficult. The problems are lengthy to resolve, wrought with confusion and seldom turn out like anyone expected. This document represents an overview of one such attempt. It outlines the general areas of concern which could be affected by a transition, and potential problems that may be encountered as a result of the effort. Over the past several decades, many local, state and federal agencies are pressing for more efficient use of frequency spectrums. The urgency of this issue has grown due to the demands of several groups wanting access to these channels for commercial use. Pager systems, cellular telephones, radio systems for private businesses all demand more space. Public safety agencies are starting to fear their needs will diminish in importance as the available channel spectrums are consumed by commercial ventures. How to share these channels, purchase appropriate equipment to meet your needs, and stay within a reasonable budget are not easy tasks. Public safety agencies who rely on communication networks in the performance of their jobs also know why encryption is important. Protecting the rights of citizens as police exchange information over the air, maintaining the integrity of an investigation and officer safety are all concerns police must address each time they use a radio.

  4. Resolving the safety issue for radioactive waste tanks with high organic content

    SciTech Connect

    Babad, H.; Crippen, M.D.; Turner, D.A. ); Gerber, M.A. )

    1993-02-01

    An overview of the Waste Tank Safety Organic Program is provided. The overview discusses the history of the wastes containing high concentrations of organics, existing safety criteria associated with those tanks, and details of thermodynamic studies by Westinghouse Hanford Company bounding potential reactivity. The program to be discussed contains the elements of the collection and analysis of tank historical information; reevaluation of organic tank-listing criteria; the performance of detailed studies on simulated waste; completion of waste characterization for each affected tank; and, as part of issue closure, the preparation of short-term and long-term safety and risk assessments based on results from characterization and the waste simulant studies. This document reports on a number of simplified thermodynamic calculations that were performed to ascertain combustion limits for simple surrogates of organic materials in a nitrate-nitrite containing alkaline waste. For expected waste species, the results of these calculations indicate that the range of reactivity encompasses energies that vary only by a factor of three over the range of normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH) (a fuel rich solvent) to sodium oxalate (a degradation product resulting from in situ organic complexant destruction in Hanford Site wastes).

  5. Current global and Korean issues in radiation safety of nuclear medicine procedures.

    PubMed

    Song, H C

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the management of patient doses in medical imaging has evolved as concern about radiation exposure has increased. Efforts and techniques to reduce radiation doses are focussed not only on the basis of patient safety, but also on the fundamentals of justification and optimisation in cooperation with international organisations such as the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and the World Health Organization. The Image Gently campaign in children and Image Wisely campaign in adults to lower radiation doses have been initiated in the USA. The European Association of Nuclear Medicine paediatric dosage card, North American consensus guidelines, and Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative have recommended the activities of radiopharmaceuticals that should be administered in children. Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), developed predominantly in Europe, may be an important tool to manage patient doses. In Korea, overexposure to radiation, even from the use of medical imaging, has become a public issue, particularly since the accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. As a result, the Korean Nuclear Safety and Security Commission revised the technical standards for radiation safety management in medical fields. In parallel, DRLs for nuclear medicine procedures have been collected on a nationwide scale. Notice of total effective dose from positron emission tomography-computed tomography for cancer screening has been mandatory since mid-November 2014. PMID:26960820

  6. Health, safety and environmental issues relating to cadmium usage in photovoltaic energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. ); Zweibel, K. )

    1989-12-01

    This paper discusses the current technology base and hazards associated with two promising thin-film photovoltaic cells that contain cadmium compounds -- cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}). More specifically, this paper summarizes the toxicological information on cadmium (Cd) compounds; evaluates potential health, safety and environmental hazards associated with cadmium usage in the photovoltaics industry; describes regulatory requirements associated with the use, handling and disposal of cadmium compounds; and lists management options to permit the safe and continued use of these materials. Handling of cadmium in photovoltaic production can present hazards to health, safety and the environment. Prior recognition of these hazards can allow device manufacturers and regulators to implement appropriate and readily available hazard management strategies. Hazards associated with product use (i.e., array fires) and disposal remain controversial and partially unresolved. The most likely effects that could be expected would be those associated with chronic low-level exposures to cadmium wastes. Because of the general immobility of the cadmium present in these devices and availability of environmental and biomonitoring protocols, chronic hazards can be monitored, and remediated if necessary. Nevertheless, concern about cadmium hazards should continue to be emphasized to ensure that health, safety and environmental issues are properly managed. At the same time, the potential role that these systems can play in ameliorating some important health and environmental hazards related to other energy systems should not be ignored. 27 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Summary of tank information relating salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues

    SciTech Connect

    Caley, S.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Active use of these SSTs was phased out completely by November 1980, and the first step toward final disposal of the waste in the SSTs is interim stabilization, which involves removing essentially all of the drainable liquid from the tank. Stabilization can be achieved administratively, by jet pumping to remove drainable interstitial liquid, or by supernatant pumping. To date, 116 tanks have been declared interim stabilized; 44 SSTs have had drainable liquid removed by salt well jet pumping. Of the 149 SSTs, 19 are on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) because the waste in these tanks is known or suspected, in all but one case, to generate and retain mixtures of flammable gases, including; hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Salt well pumping to remove the drainable interstitial liquid from these SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. The scope of this work is to collect and summarize information, primarily tank data and observations, that relate salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues. While the waste within FGWL SSTs is suspected offering flammable gases, the effect of salt well pumping on the waste behavior is not well understood. This study is being conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the Flammable Gas Project at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Understanding the historical tank behavior during and following salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues.

  8. Assimilation of GPM GMI Rainfall Product with WRF GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xuanli; Mecikalski, John; Zavodsky, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international mission to provide next-generation observations of rain and snow worldwide. The GPM built on Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) legacy, while the core observatory will extend the observations to higher latitudes. The GPM observations can help advance our understanding of precipitation microphysics and storm structures. Launched on February 27th, 2014, the GPM core observatory is carrying advanced instruments that can be used to quantify when, where, and how much it rains or snows around the world. Therefore, the use of GPM data in numerical modeling work is a new area and will have a broad impact in both research and operational communities. The goal of this research is to examine the methodology of assimilation of the GPM retrieved products. The data assimilation system used in this study is the community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system for the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model developed by the Development Testbed Center (DTC). The community GSI system runs in independently environment, yet works functionally equivalent to operational centers. With collaboration with the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, this research explores regional assimilation of the GPM products with case studies. Our presentation will highlight our recent effort on the assimilation of the GPM product 2AGPROFGMI, the retrieved Microwave Imager (GMI) rainfall rate data for initializing a real convective storm. WRF model simulations and storm scale data assimilation experiments will be examined, emphasizing both model initialization and short-term forecast of precipitation fields and processes. In addition, discussion will be provided on the development of enhanced assimilation procedures in the GSI system with respect to other GPM products. Further details of the methodology of data assimilation, preliminary result and test on the impact of GPM data and the

  9. Occupational Health and Safety Issues among Vegetable Farmers in Trinidad and the Implications for Extension.

    PubMed

    Baksh, K S; Ganpat, W; Narine, L K

    2015-07-01

    Trinidad has an aged farming population. For a host of reasons, young persons are not entering the agricultural sector; therefore, these aged farmers will continue to be the backbone of the industry. Hence, there is much need for improving the health and safety of the workers within this sector. This first-time study assessed the prevalence of occupational health and safety disorders and discomforts among Trinidad's vegetable farmers in an attempt to understand the extent of the problem within the general farm population. The implications for extension are highlighted, and several recommendations are provided. Small-scale commercial-oriented vegetable farmers (n = 100) from ten of the most populated agricultural areas across Trinidad were surveyed. Results indicated that there was an overall moderate prevalence of occupational injuries among vegetable farmers. Most prevalent were musculoskeletal disorders of the lower back and upper body extremities, watery/burning eyes, skin rashes/itching, headaches, fatigue, dehydration, stress, and injuries attributed to slips and falls. Based on the evidence that a problem exists with health and safety, the extension service can now prepare and deliver programs to educate farmers on the actions necessary to improve their personal health and safety and that of their workers. This type of study has not been done before among farmers in Trinidad. It brings a very important and timely issue to the fore because of the aged farming population. Additionally, since the farmer profile and farming systems are similar in the wider Caribbean, policy makers can take note of the findings and recommendations and embrace actions. PMID:26373214

  10. Assimilation of Dual-Polarimetric Radar Observations with WRF GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xuanli; Mecikalski, John; Fehnel, Traci; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Dual-polarimetric (dual-pol) radar typically transmits both horizontally and vertically polarized radio wave pulses. From the two different reflected power returns, more accurate estimate of liquid and solid cloud and precipitation can be provided. The upgrade of the traditional NWS WSR-88D radar to include dual-pol capabilities will soon be completed for the entire NEXRAD network. Therefore, the use of dual-pol radar network will have a broad impact in both research and operational communities. The assimilation of dual-pol radar data is especially challenging as few guidelines have been provided by previous research. It is our goal to examine how to best use dual-pol radar data to improve forecast of severe storm and forecast initialization. In recent years, the Development Testbed Center (DTC) has released the community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) DA system for the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The community GSI system runs in independently environment, yet works functionally equivalent to operational centers. With collaboration with the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, this study explores regional assimilation of the dual-pol radar variables from the WSR-88D radars for real case storms. Our presentation will highlight our recent effort on incorporating the horizontal reflectivity (ZH), differential reflectivity (ZDR), specific differential phase (KDP), and radial velocity (VR) data for initializing convective storms, with a significant focus being on an improved representation of hydrometeor fields. In addition, discussion will be provided on the development of enhanced assimilation procedures in the GSI system with respect to dual-pol variables. Beyond the dual-pol variable assimilation procedure developing within a GSI framework, highresolution (=1 km) WRF model simulations and storm scale data assimilation experiments will be examined, emphasizing both model initialization and short-term forecast

  11. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of electrochemical capacitors for advanced vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vimmerstedt, L J; Hammel, C J

    1997-04-01

    Electrochemical capacitors are a candidate for traction power assists in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Other advanced automotive applications, while not the primary focus of current development efforts, are also possible. These include load leveling high-energy batteries, power conditioning electronics, electrically hated catalysts, electric power steering, and engine starter power. Higher power and longer cycle life are expected for electrochemical capacitors than for batteries. Evaluation of environmental, health, and safety (EH and S) issues of electrochemical capacitors is an essential part of the development and commercialization of electrochemical capacitors for advanced vehicles. This report provides an initial EH and S assessment. This report presents electrochemical capacitor electrochemistry, materials selection, intrinsic material hazards, mitigation of those hazards, environmental requirements, pollution control options, and shipping requirements. Most of the information available for this assessment pertains to commercial devices intended for application outside the advanced vehicle market and to experiment or prototype devices. Electrochemical capacitors for power assists in HEVs are not produced commercially now. Therefore, materials for advanced vehicle electrochemical capacitors may change, and so would the corresponding EH and S issues. Although changes are possible, this report describes issues for likely electrochemical capacitor designs.

  12. Critical Issues in Sensor Science To Aid Food and Water Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Farahi, R. H.; Passian, A.; Tetard, L.; Thundat, T.

    2012-06-26

    The stability of food and water supplies is widely recognized as a global issue of fundamental importance. Sensor development for food and water safety by nonconventional assays continues to overcome technological challenges. The delicate balance between attaining adequate limits of detection, chemical fingerprinting of the target species, dealing with the complex food matrix, and operating in difficult environments are still the focus of current efforts. While the traditional pursuit of robust recognition methods remains important, emerging engineered nanomaterials and nanotechnology promise better sensor performance but also bring about new challenges. Both advanced receptor-based sensors and emerging non-receptor-based physical sensors are evaluated for their critical challenges toward out-of-laboratory applications.

  13. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of lithium polymer electric vehicle batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D; Hammel, C J

    1995-02-01

    Lithium solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) batteries are being investigated by researchers worldwide as a possible energy source for future electric vehicles (EVs). One of the main reasons for interest in lithium SPE battery systems is the potential safety features they offer as compared to lithium battery systems using inorganic and organic liquid electrolytes. However, the development of lithium SPE batteries is still in its infancy, and the technology is not envisioned to be ready for commercialization for several years. Because the research and development (R&D) of lithium SPE battery technology is of a highly competitive nature, with many companies both in the United States and abroad pursuing R&D efforts, much of the information concerning specific developments of lithium SPE battery technology is proprietary. This report is based on information available only through the open literature (i.e., information available through library searches). Furthermore, whereas R&D activities for lithium SPE cells have focused on a number of different chemistries, for both electrodes and electrolytes, this report examines the general environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues common to many lithium SPE chemistries. However, EH&S issues for specific lithium SPE cell chemistries are discussed when sufficient information exists. Although lithium batteries that do not have a SPE are also being considered for EV applications, this report focuses only on those lithium battery technologies that utilize the SPE technology. The lithium SPE battery technologies considered in this report may contain metallic lithium or nonmetallic lithium compounds (e.g., lithium intercalated carbons) in the negative electrode.

  14. Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of lithium polymer electric vehicle batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbus, D.; Hammel, C. J.

    1995-02-01

    Lithium solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) batteries are being investigated by researchers worldwide as a possible energy source for future electric vehicles (EV's). One of the main reasons for interest in lithium SPE battery systems is the potential safety features they offer as compared to lithium battery systems using inorganic and organic liquid electrolytes. However, the development of lithium SPE batteries is still in its infancy, and the technology is not envisioned to be ready for commercialization for several years. Because the research and development (R&D) of lithium SPE battery technology is of a highly competitive nature, with many companies both in the United States and abroad pursuing R&D efforts, much of the information concerning specific developments of lithium SPE battery technology is proprietary. This report is based on information available only through the open literature (i.e., information available through library searches). Furthermore, whereas R&D activities for lithium SPE cells have focused on a number of different chemistries, for both electrodes and electrolytes, this report examines the general environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues common to many lithium SPE chemistries. However, EH&S issues for specific lithium SPE cell chemistries are discussed when sufficient information exists. Although lithium batteries that do not have a SPE are also being considered for EV applications, this report focuses only on those lithium battery technologies that utilize the SPE technology. The lithium SPE battery technologies considered in this report may contain metallic lithium or nonmetallic lithium compounds (e.g., lithium intercalated carbons) in the negative electrode.

  15. Preparing for safety issues following drug approval: pre-approval risk management considerations

    PubMed Central

    Sharrar, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Risk management plans and risk minimization plans as well as postapproval commitment studies are based on risks identified pre-approval that need to be further characterized or minimized in the postmarketing environment. Although the implementation of these activities are conducted in the postapproval arena, the design of the plans and studies as well as the development of effective postapproval tools and mitigation strategies should be carried out pre-approval. The pre-approval period also provides the opportunity to fully understand the treatment population that is included in the clinical trial program and to determine how the target population for the drug after approval may differ from the clinical trial patient population. When regulators or sponsors have expressed concerns about safety issues identified during clinical development, the result may be a postapproval commitment in the form of a registry or an observational safety study or, in the US, a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) as a condition of approval. Specific examples are given for risk mitigation activities that can be conducted pre-approval. PMID:25114783

  16. Survey of commercial Rhodiola products revealed species diversity and potential safety issues.

    PubMed

    Xin, Tianyi; Li, Xiaojin; Yao, Hui; Lin, Yulin; Ma, Xiaochong; Cheng, Ruiyang; Song, Jingyuan; Ni, Lianghong; Fan, Congzhao; Chen, Shilin

    2015-01-01

    The adulteration of herbal products is a threat to consumer safety. Here we surveyed the species composition of commercial Rhodiola products using DNA barcoding as a supervisory method. A Rhodiola dietary supplement DNA barcode database was successfully constructed using 82 voucher samples from 10 Rhodiola species. Based on the DNA barcoding standard operating procedure (SOP), we used this database to identify 100 Rhodiolae Crenulatae Radix et Rhizoma decoction piece samples that were purchased from drug stores and hospitals. The results showed that only 36 decoction piece sequences (40%) were authentic R. crenulata, which is recorded in Chinese Pharmacopeia, whereas the other samples were all adulterants and may indicate a potential safety issue. Among the adulterants, 35 sequences (38.9%) were authenticated as R. serrata, nine sequences (10%) were authenticated as R. rosea, which is documented in the United States Pharmacopeia, and the remaining samples were authenticated as other three Rhodiola species. This result indicates decoction pieces that are available in the market have complex origins and DNA barcoding is a convenient tool for market supervision. PMID:25661009

  17. Hanford Site organic waste tanks: History, waste properties, and scientific issues. Hanford Tank Safety Project

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.; Schulz, W.W.; Reynolds, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Eight Hanford single-shell waste tanks are included on a safety watch list because they are thought to contain significant concentrations of various organic chemical. Potential dangers associated with the waste in these tanks include exothermic reaction, combustion, and release of hazardous vapors. In all eight tanks the measured waste temperatures are in the range 16 to 46{degree}C, far below the 250 to 380{degree}C temperatures necessary for onset of rapid exothermic reactions and initiation of deflagration. Investigation of the possibility of vapor release from Tank C-103 has been elevated to a top safety priority. There is a need to obtain an adequate number of truly representative vapor samples and for highly sensitive and capable methods and instruments to analyze these samples. Remaining scientific issues include: an understanding of the behavior and reaction of organic compounds in existing underground tank environments knowledge of the types and amounts of organic compounds in the tanks knowledge of selected physical and chemical properties of organic compounds source, composition, quality, and properties of the presently unidentified volatile organic compound(s) apparently evolving from Tank C-103.

  18. White paper: Preliminary assessment of LNG vehicle technology, economics, and safety issues, revision 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powars, Charles; Lucher, Dan; Moyer, Carl; Browning, Lou

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the potential of liquified natural gas (LNG) as a vehicle fuel, to determine market inches, and to identify needed technology improvements. The white paper is being issued when the work is approximately 30 percent complete to preview the study direction, draw preliminary conclusions, and make initial recommendations. Interim findings relative to LNG vehicle technology, economics, and safety are presented. It is important to decide if heavier hydrocarbons should be allowed in LNG vehicle fuel. Development of suitable refueling couplings and vehicle fuel supply pressure systems are recommended. Initial economics analyses considered transit buses and pickup and delivery trucks fueled via onsite liquefiers and imported LNG. Net user costs were more than (but in some cases close to) those for diesel fuel and gasoline. Lowering the cost of small-scale liquefiers would significantly improve the economics of LNG vehicles. New emissions regulations may introduce considerations beyond simple cost comparisons. LNG vehicle safety and available accident data are reviewed. Consistent codes for LNG vehicles and refueling facilities are needed.

  19. Thermoregulatory models of safety-for-flight issues for space operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisacane, V. L.; Kuznetz, L. H.; Logan, J. S.; Clark, J. B.; Wissler, E. H.

    2006-10-01

    This study investigates the use of a mathematical model for thermoregulation as a tool in safety-of-flight issues and proposed solutions for mission operations of the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station. Specifically, this study assesses the effects of elevated cabin temperature and metabolic loads on astronauts wearing the Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) and the Liquid Cooled Ventilation Garment (LCVG). The 225-node Wissler model is validated by comparison with two ground-based human subject tests, firefighters, and surrogate astronauts under anomalous conditions that show good agreement. Subsequent simulations indicate that the performance of the ACES/LCVG is marginal. Increases in either workload or cabin temperature from the nominal will increase rectal temperature, stored heat load, heart rate, and sweating leading to possible deficits in the ability of the astronauts to perform cognitive and motor tasks that could affect the safety of the mission, especially the safe landing of the Shuttle. Specific relationships are given between cabin temperature and metabolic rate that define the threshold for decreased manual dexterity and loss of tracking skills. Model results indicate that the most effective mitigation strategy would be to decrease the LCVG inlet temperature. Methods of accomplishing this are also proposed.

  20. SARNET: Integrating Severe Accident Research in Europe - Safety Issues in the Source Term Area

    SciTech Connect

    Haste, T.; Giordano, P.; Micaelli, J.-C.; Herranz, L.

    2006-07-01

    SARNET (Severe Accident Research Network) is a Network of Excellence of the EU 6. Framework Programme that integrates in a sustainable manner the research capabilities of about fifty European organisations to resolve important remaining uncertainties and safety issues concerning existing and future nuclear plant, especially water-cooled reactors, under hypothetical severe accident conditions. It emphasises integrating activities, spreading of excellence (including knowledge transfer) and jointly-executed research. This paper summarises the main results obtained at the middle of the current 4-year term, highlighting those concerning radioactive release to the environment. Integration is pursued through different methods: the ASTEC integral computer code for severe accident modelling, development of PSA level 2 methods, a means for definition, updating and resolution of safety issues, and development of a web database for storing experimental results. These activities are helped by an evolving Advanced Communication Tool, easing communication amongst partners. Concerning spreading of excellence, educational courses covering severe accident analysis methodology and level 2 PSA have been organised for early 2006. A text book on Severe Accident Phenomenology is being written. A mobility programme for students and young researchers has started. Results are disseminated mainly through open conference proceedings, with journal publications planned. The 1. European Review Meeting on Severe Accidents in November 2005 covered SARNET activities during its first 18 months. Jointly executed research activities concern key issues grouped in the Corium, Containment and Source Term areas. In Source Term, behaviour of the highly radio-toxic ruthenium under oxidising conditions, including air ingress, is investigated. Models are proposed for fuel and ruthenium oxidation. Experiments on transport of oxide ruthenium species are performed. Reactor scenario studies assist in defining

  1. Professional and interprofessional differences in electronic health records use and recognition of safety issues in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Knewton K; Stephenson, Laurel S; Mulanax, Ashley; Bierman, Jesse; Mcgrath, Karess; Scholl, Gretchen; McDougal, Adrienne; Bearden, David T; Mohan, Vishnu; Gold, Jeffrey A

    2016-09-01

    During interprofessional intensive care unit (ICU) rounds each member of the interprofessional team is responsible for gathering and interpreting information from the electronic health records (EHR) to facilitate effective team decision-making. This study was conducted to determine how each professional group reviews EHR data in preparation for rounds and their ability to identify patient safety issues. Twenty-five physicians, 29 nurses, and 20 pharmacists participated. Individual participants were given verbal and written sign-out and then asked to review a simulated record in our institution's EHR, which contained 14 patient safety items. After reviewing the chart, subjects presented the patient and the number of safety items recognised was recorded. About 40%, 30%, and 26% of safety issues were recognised by physicians, nurses, and pharmacists, respectively (p = 0.0006) and no item recognised 100% of the time. There was little overlap between the three groups with only 50% of items predicted to be recognised 100% of the time by the team. Differential recognition was associated with marked differences in EHR use, with only 3/152 EHR screens utilised by all three groups and the majority of screens used exclusively only by one group. There were significant and non-overlapping differences in individual profession recognition of patient safety issues in the EHR. Preferential identification of safety issues by certain professional groups may be attributed to differences in EHR use. Future studies will be needed to determine if shared decision-making during rounds can improve recognition of safety issues. PMID:27341177

  2. Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Tight Western Sands

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, E.F.; Cowan, C.E.; McLaughlin, T.J.

    1980-02-01

    Results of a study to identify and evaluate potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Tight Western Sands are reported. A brief discussion of economic and technical constraints to development of this resource is also presented to place the environmental and safety issues in perspective. A description of the resource base, recovery techniques, and possible environmental effects associated with tight gas sands is presented.

  3. TRB for HADES and FAIR experiments at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, I.; Schrader, C.; Stroeble, H.; Stroth, J.; Tarantrola, A.; Kajetanowicz, M.; Korcyl, K.; Krzemień, W.; Palka, M.; Salabura, P.; TrȨBACZ, R.; Skott, P.; Traxler, M.

    2008-06-01

    TRB module is a multi-purpose Trigger and Readout Board with on-board DAQ functionality developed for the upgrade of the HADES experiment. It contains single computer chip (Etrax) running Linux and the 100 Mbit/s Ethernet interface. It has been orginally designed as the 128-channel Time to Digital Converter based on the HPTDC chip from CERN. The new version of TRB contains 2 Gbit/s optical link and interface connector (15 Gbit/s) implementing the add-on card concept and making the board more flexible. Moreover, FPGA chip (Xilinx, Virtex 4 LX 40) and TigerSharc DSP provide new computing resources which can be used to run on-line analysis algorithms. The TRB is proposed as a prototype of base readout module for the planned detector systems PANDA and CBM at the future FAIR facility at GSI-Darmstadt.

  4. GSI promotes vincristine-induced apoptosis by enhancing multi-polar spindle formation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Akannsha; Zapata, Mariana C; Choi, Yong Sung; Yoon, Sun-Ok

    2014-01-01

    Gamma secretase inhibitors (GSI), cell-permeable small-molecule inhibitors of gamma secretase activity, had been originally developed for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. In recent years, it has been exploited in cancer research to inhibit Notch signaling that is aberrantly activated in various cancers. We previously found that GSI could synergize with anti-microtubule agent, vincristine (VCR) in a Notch-independent manner. Here, we delineate the underlying cell cycle-related mechanism using HeLa cells, which have strong mitotic checkpoints. GSI enhanced VCR-induced cell death, although GSI alone did not affect cell viability at all. GSI augmented VCR-induced mitotic arrest in a dose-dependent manner, which was preceded by apoptotic cell death, as shown by an increase in Annexin V-positive and caspase-positive cell population. Furthermore, GSI amplified multi-polar spindle formation triggered by VCR. Altogether, we show the evidence that GSI enhances VCR-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells via multi-polar mitotic spindle formation, independent of Notch signaling. These data suggest that one or more GS substrates, yet to be identified, in a post-GS processed form, may play a role in maintaining functional centrosomes/mitotic spindles. More significantly, the synergistic effect of GSI in combination with VCR could be exploited in clinical setting to improve the efficacy of VCR. PMID:24200971

  5. Human factors and safety issues associated with actinide retrieval from spent light water reactor fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.

    1992-01-01

    A major problem in environmental restoration and waste management is the disposition of used fuel assemblies from the many light water reactors in the United States, which present a radiation hazard to those whose job is to dispose of them, with a similar threat to the general environment associated with long-term storage in fuel repositories around the country. Actinides resident in the fuel pins as a result of their use in reactor cores constitute a significant component of this hazard. Recently, the Department of Energy has initiated an Actinide Recycle Program to study the feasibility of using pyrochemical (molten salt) processes to recover actinides from the spent fuel assemblies of commercial reactors. This project concerns the application of robotics technology to the operation and maintenance functions of a plant whose objective is to recover actinides from spent fuel assemblies, and to dispose of the resulting hardware and chemical components from this process. Such a procedure involves a number of safety and human factors issues. The purpose of the project is to explore the use of robotics and artificial intelligence to facilitate accomplishment of the program goals while maintaining the safety of the humans doing the work and the integrity of the environment. This project will result in a graphic simulation on a Silicon Graphics workstation as a proof of principle demonstration of the feasibility of using robotics along with an intelligent operator interface. A major component of the operator-system interface is a hybrid artificial intelligence system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which combines artificial neural networks and an expert system into a hybrid, self-improving computer-based system interface. 10 refs.

  6. Human factors and safety issues associated with actinide retrieval from spent light water reactor fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.

    1992-08-01

    A major problem in environmental restoration and waste management is the disposition of used fuel assemblies from the many light water reactors in the United States, which present a radiation hazard to those whose job is to dispose of them, with a similar threat to the general environment associated with long-term storage in fuel repositories around the country. Actinides resident in the fuel pins as a result of their use in reactor cores constitute a significant component of this hazard. Recently, the Department of Energy has initiated an Actinide Recycle Program to study the feasibility of using pyrochemical (molten salt) processes to recover actinides from the spent fuel assemblies of commercial reactors. This project concerns the application of robotics technology to the operation and maintenance functions of a plant whose objective is to recover actinides from spent fuel assemblies, and to dispose of the resulting hardware and chemical components from this process. Such a procedure involves a number of safety and human factors issues. The purpose of the project is to explore the use of robotics and artificial intelligence to facilitate accomplishment of the program goals while maintaining the safety of the humans doing the work and the integrity of the environment. This project will result in a graphic simulation on a Silicon Graphics workstation as a proof of principle demonstration of the feasibility of using robotics along with an intelligent operator interface. A major component of the operator-system interface is a hybrid artificial intelligence system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which combines artificial neural networks and an expert system into a hybrid, self-improving computer-based system interface. 10 refs.

  7. Regulatory issues concerning the safety, efficacy and quality of herbal remedies.

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, Colin G; Schachter, Howard

    2003-12-01

    Herbal remedies and alternative medicines are used throughout the world, and in the past herbs were often the original sources of most drugs. Today we are witnessing an increase in herbal remedy use throughout the Western world raising the question as to how safe are these preparations for the unborn fetus? Many women use herbal products during pregnancy. The dilemma facing most regulatory authorities is that the public considers these products as either traditional medicines or natural food supplements. The user sees no reason for regulation. Most countries have laws concerning foods, drugs, and cosmetics, the details of which seldom clearly define to what section of the law and regulations alternative remedies belong. In most countries alternative remedies are regulated as foods, provided that no medicinal claim is made on the label. The global regulatory sector, however, is changing rapidly. The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) in Australia created a Complimentary Medicines Evaluation Committee in late 1997 to address this issue, and Canada has created a new Natural Health Products Directorate in the realigned Therapeutic Products and Foods Branch in 2000. In parallel, the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products has drafted test procedures and acceptance criteria for herbal drug preparations and herbal medicinal products. In the US, the Food and Drug Administration classifies these natural products as dietary supplements. Manufacturers must label a dietary supplement thus: "this statement has not been evaluated by the FDA [, and] this product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease." Whether these products are foods or drugs is undecided. To add complexity to this issue, most of the potential deleterious effects of natural products on the unborn may be related to hormonal effects (e.g., phytoestrogens) and nutriceutical drug interactions (e.g., St. John's Wort and antidepressants), rather than direct embryotoxicity

  8. Resolution of safety issues associated with the storage of high-level radioactive waste at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Mellinger, G.B. ); Tseng, J.C. )

    1992-08-01

    A number of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) safety issues have been identified at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Resolution of these issues is one of the Highest Priorities of the US Department of Energy. The most urgent issues are the potential for explosions in certain tanks (due to periodic venting of large quantities of flammable gases, or the presence of substantial quantities of ferrocyanide and/or organic compounds in combination with nitrates-nitrites). Other safety issues have been identified as well, such as the requirement for periodic water additions to one tank to control its temperature and the release of noxious vapors from a number of tanks. Substantial progress has been made toward safety issue resolution. Potential mechanisms have been identified for the generation, retention and periodic venting of flammable gas mixtures; potential methods for controlling the periodic release behavior have been identified and in-tank testing will be initiated in 1992. Research is being conducted to determine the initiation temperatures, energetics, reaction sequences and effects of catalysts and initiators on ferrocyanide-nitrate/nitrite reactions; waste characterization on a tank-by-tank basis will be required to identify whether ferrocyanide-containing wastes are safe to store as-is or will require further treatment to eliminate safety concerns. Resolution of all of the Hanford Site HLW safety issues will be accomplished as an integral part of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System, that has been established to manage the storage of these wastes and their preparation for disposal.

  9. Topical calcineurin inhibitors in the treatment of atopic dermatitis - an update on safety issues.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka-Operacz, Magdalena; Jenerowicz, Dorota

    2012-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic skin disorder whose management is complex. Topical corticosteroids have been the mainstay of atopic dermatitis treatment for more than 50 years but have multiple side effects. Topical calcineurin inhibitors including tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are safe and efficacious in atopic dermatitis. In 2005 the FDA issued "black box" warnings for pimecrolimus cream and tacrolimus ointment because of potential safety risks, including skin cancers and lymphomas. However, these concerns are not supported by current data. Topical calcineurin inhibitors are particularly indicated for treating patients with atopic dermatitis in whom topical corticosteroid therapy cannot be employed or may cause irreversible side effects. They can be used advantageously in problem zones. A novel regimen of proactive treatment has been shown to prevent, delay and reduce exacerbations of atopic dermatitis. Therapy with topical calcineurin inhibitors should be managed by an experienced specialist and each patient should receive proper education on how to use them and what possible unwanted effects may be expected. PMID:21974750

  10. Reactor safety issues resolved by the 2D/3D Program. International Agreement Report

    SciTech Connect

    Damerell, P.S.; Simons, J.W.

    1993-07-01

    The 2D/3D Program studied multidimensional thermal-hydraulics in a PWR core and primary system during the end-of-blowdown and post-blowdown phases of a large-break LOCA (LBLOCA), and during selected small-break LOCA (SBLOCA) transients. The program included tests at the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF), the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF), and the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF), and computer analyses using TRAC. Tests at CCTF investigated core thermal-hydraulics and overall system behavior while tests at SCTF concentrated on multidimensional core thermal-hydraulics. The UPTF tests investigated two-phase flow behavior in the downcomer, upper plenum, tie plate region, and primary loops. TRAC analyses evaluated thermal-hydraulic behavior throughout the primary system in tests as well as in PWRs. This report summarizes the test and analysis results in each of the main areas where improved information was obtained in the 2D/3D Program. The discussion is organized in terms of the reactor safety issues investigated.

  11. Quality and safety issues of direct oral anticoagulants in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Benatti, Mario; Bonfanti, Laura; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are increasingly used in patients with atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism. The decision making of clinicians and especially emergency physicians for the appropriate management of patients taking DOACs entails a thorough understanding of pharmacologic profile, practical guidance on their usage, and management of bleeding and/or thrombotic events. The available evidence suggests that the bleeding complications observed in patients taking DOACs are less frequent and potentially less severe than those in patients taking vitamin K antagonists or heparins. This should be regarded as an advantage for emergency physicians, since it would decrease the admission rate of anticoagulated patients and probably require a less aggressive treatment in the emergency department (ED). The greatest challenge of DOACs is so far represented by the lack of clinically usable antidotes, since these (i.e., idarucizumab, andexanet alfa, and aripazine) are in different phases of development. A second major concern is the current lack of consensus about laboratory monitoring for these drugs. Although there is widespread perception that patients on DOACs do not require dose adjustment based on laboratory testing, in some selected clinical situations, laboratory testing may be taken into consideration in the ED. The type of laboratory diagnostics needed for emergency management should hence include tests that are promptly available, affordable to all stat laboratories, and cost effective. The aim of this article is to provide a personal overview on quality and safety issues of DOACs with an ED perspective. PMID:25839867

  12. Health and safety of students in vocational training in Quebec: a gender issue?

    PubMed

    Chatigny, Céline; Riel, Jessica; Nadon, Livann

    2012-01-01

    Health and safety issues in a vocational training center were explored in this study. Several sources and methods were used: group interviews with students in traditionally female [F] and male [M] trades, i.e. hairdressing (7 F) and automated systems electromechanics (8 M, 1 F); self-administered questionnaires on injuries sustained at the school; observations of activities in these programs; and analysis of ministerial documents. Findings indicate that the partially divergent ways that OHS is addressed in these programs cannot be explained only by the specific characteristics of the two trades. Some aspects put female students in hairdressing at a disadvantage: status accorded to OHS in the study programs, learning activities, and conditions for learning and managing prevention and injuries. The discussion focuses on a gender-differentiated analysis, the importance of improving the way OHS is addressed in the programs, in particular, those primarily involving female students, and the need to pursue research. In addition, the results from individual interviews with women (5 F) training for non-traditional trades lead to discussion on the interrelated effects of sex-based gender and professional gender. PMID:22317437

  13. Xylitol: a review on bioproduction, application, health benefits, and related safety issues.

    PubMed

    Ur-Rehman, Salim; Mushtaq, Zarina; Zahoor, Tahir; Jamil, Amir; Murtaza, Mian Anjum

    2015-01-01

    Xylitol is a pentahydroxy sugar-alcohol which exists in a very low quantity in fruits and vegetables (plums, strawberries, cauliflower, and pumpkin). On commercial scale, xylitol can be produced by chemical and biotechnological processes. Chemical production is costly and extensive in purification steps. However, biotechnological method utilizes agricultural and forestry wastes which offer the possibilities of economic production of xylitol by reducing required energy. The precursor xylose is produced from agricultural biomass by chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis and can be converted to xylitol primarily by yeast strain. Hydrolysis under acidic condition is the more commonly used practice influenced by various process parameters. Various fermentation process inhibitors are produced during chemical hydrolysis that reduce xylitol production, a detoxification step is, therefore, necessary. Biotechnological xylitol production is an integral process of microbial species belonging to Candida genus which is influenced by various process parameters such as pH, temperature, time, nitrogen source, and yeast extract level. Xylitol has application and potential for food and pharmaceutical industries. It is a functional sweetener as it has prebiotic effects which can reduce blood glucose, triglyceride, and cholesterol level. This review describes recent research developments related to bioproduction of xylitol from agricultural wastes, application, health, and safety issues. PMID:24915309

  14. Environmental, Ethical and Safety Issues in Chemistry/Science Curricula in Papua New Guinea Provincial High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, W. P.

    1986-01-01

    Chemistry occupies only a small portion of the Papua New Guinea science curriculum in grades seven to ten. Science itself occupies only a small proportion of the total curriculum. Nevertheless the existing syllabus, and previous and planned future revisions of it, give considerable prominence to environmental, health and safety issues. There is a…

  15. Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 1, Cell and battery safety

    SciTech Connect

    Ohi, J.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report is the first of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues involved in using sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles that may affect the commercialization of Na/S batteries. This and the other reports on recycling, shipping, and vehicle safety are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD&D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers cell design and engineering as the basis of safety for Na/S batteries and describes and assesses the potential chemical, electrical, and thermal hazards and risks of Na/S cells and batteries as well as the RD&D performed, under way, or to address these hazards and risks. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, universities, and private industry. Subsequent volumes will address environmental, health, and safety issues involved in shipping cells and batteries, using batteries to propel electric vehicles, and recycling and disposing of spent batteries. The remainder of this volume is divided into two major sections on safety at the cell and battery levels. The section on Na/S cells describes major component and potential failure modes, design, life testing and failure testing, thermal cycling, and the safety status of Na/S cells. The section on batteries describes battery design, testing, and safety status. Additional EH&S information on Na/S batteries is provided in the appendices.

  16. Community Service and User Support for the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) Data Assimilation and Analysis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Hu, M.; Stark, D.; Newman, K.; Zhou, C.; Derber, J.; Lueken, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system is a unified variational data assimilation and analysis system for both global and regional applications. It is currently used as a data assimilation system by various operational centers, including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) (e.g., Global Forecasting System (GFS), North American Mesoscale (NAM) system, the Hurricane WRF (HWRF), and the RAPid Refresh (RAP) system), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Model), and the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA). This analysis system is also used to generate certain analysis products, such as output from NOAA's GFS reanalysis and the Real-Time Mesoscale Analysis (RTMA) (e.g., 2m temperature, 10m winds gust, surface pressure and surface visibility). GSI can also be used to generate analyses for climate studies (e.g., ozone and sea surface temperature (SST) analyses) or assimilate non-'traditional' fields (e.g., aerosol data assimilation) for air quality studies (e.g., dust storms). Lately, an effort was initiated to use GSI for data assimilation throughout the entire atmosphere. One example of such an effort is the development of a data assimilation system for the Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM) at NCEP. Over the past few years, GSI has been transitioned to a community resource through a joint effort led by the Developmental Testbed Center (DTC), in collaboration with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) and other GSI partners. The DTC is a distributed facility with a goal of serving as a bridge between the research and operational communities by transitioning the operational capability to a community resource and committing the contributions from the research community to the operational repository. The DTC has hosted four Community GSI tutorials and released five versions of the community GSI system with a corresponding User's Guide

  17. Legal issues of the environmental safety regulation in the sphere of nanotechnology in Russian Federation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belokrylova, Ekaterina A.

    2013-04-01

    development and application of nanoproducts, inspite of fact, that these relationships have a significant financial segment. Thus, according to the Federal Act from December 13, 2010 "About federal budget for 2011 year and the period of 2012 and 2013 years" the expenses for realisation of program "The infrastructure development of nano industry in Russian Federation for 2008-2011" were 250 milliard of Russian rubbles. The profound analyses of the current legal systems has demonstrated that nowadays the main legal regulation in nano sphere consist of some range of frame documents (accentuated by the author). Thereby, one of the most dynamic and developed field of innovative activities in Russian Federation - nanotechnology - is left out of environmental and legal area of protection and that is might lead to the raising level of ecological risks at the stage of creation and application nano products to the environment and humans' health. During the analyses of annual norms of the Report OECD "Nano technologies: the Environment, health and safety" the conclusion is following - 2010 Russia has an extremely low degree of conceptual realization of the program in the sphere of forming the policy connected with nanotechnology and its impact on the environment and also a lack of implementations of norms into the national legal systems in terms of the assessment criteria of nano safety EHS (Environmental, Health and Safety) and ELSI (Ethical, Legal and Social Issues). To the great regret, there is no independent and precise legal act about the ways to creat and apply nano products with the certain definitions and principles and, more importantly, with the level of legal obligations and responsibility. This gap is not possible to fill by just altering and editing the existed legal acts due to the lack of the state Russian regulation. Thus, one of the most dynamic fields of innovative activities - nano technologies - is practically out of the regulation. It might lead to an increase of

  18. Role of the Bacillus subtilis gsiA gene in regulation of early sporulation gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, J P; Sonenshein, A L

    1992-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis gsiA operon was induced rapidly, but transiently, as cells entered the stationary phase in nutrient broth medium. A mutation at the gsiC locus caused sporulation to be defective and expression of gsiA to be elevated and prolonged. The sporulation defect in this strain was apparently due to persistent expression of gsiA, since a gsiA null mutation restored sporulation to wild-type levels. Detailed mapping experiments revealed that the gsiC82 mutation lies within the kinA gene, which encodes the histidine protein kinase member of a two-component regulatory system. Since mutations in this gene caused a substantial blockage in expression of spoIIA, spoIIG, and spoIID genes, it seems that accumulation of a product of the gsiA operon interferes with sporulation by blocking the completion of stage II. It apparently does so by inhibiting or counteracting the activity of KinA. PMID:1624431

  19. Heavy Ion High Intensity Upgrade of the GSI UNILAC

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, W.; Dahl, L.; Galonska, M.; Glatz, J.; Groening, L.; Hollinger, R.; Richter, S.; Yaramyshev, S.

    2005-06-08

    For the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt the present GSI-accelerator complex, consisting of the linear accelerator UNILAC and the heavy ion synchrotron SIS 18, is foreseen to serve as U28+-injector for up to 1012 particles/s. After a new High Current Injector (HSI) was installed, many different ion species were accelerated in the UNILAC for physics experiments. In 2001 a high energy physics experiment used up to 2{center_dot}109 uranium ions per SIS 18-spill (U73+) while a MEVVA ion source was in routine operation for the first time. In the past two years, different hardware measures and careful fine tuning in all sections of the UNILAC resulted in an increase of the beam intensity to 9.5{center_dot}1010 U27+-ions per 100 {mu}s or 1.5{center_dot}1010 U73+-ions per 100 {mu}s. The contribution reports results of beam measurements during the high current operation with argon and uranium beams (pulse beam power up to 0.5 MW). One of the major tasks was to optimize the beam matching to the Alvarez-DTL. In addition further upgrades, including improved beam diagnostics, are described, which allow to fill the SIS 18 up to its space charge limit (SCL) of 2.7{center_dot}1011 U28+-ions per cycle.

  20. Mitigating Motion Base Safety Issues: The NASA LaRC CMF Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Richard B., Jr.; Grupton, Lawrence E.; Martinez, Debbie; Carrelli, David J.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), Cockpit Motion Facility (CMF) motion base design has taken advantage of inherent hydraulic characteristics to implement safety features using hardware solutions only. Motion system safety has always been a concern and its implementation is addressed differently by each organization. Some approaches rely heavily on software safety features. Software which performs safety functions is subject to more scrutiny making its approval, modification, and development time consuming and expensive. The NASA LaRC's CMF motion system is used for research and, as such, requires that the software be updated or modified frequently. The CMF's customers need the ability to update the simulation software frequently without the associated cost incurred with safety critical software. This paper describes the CMF engineering team's approach to achieving motion base safety by designing and implementing all safety features in hardware, resulting in applications software (including motion cueing and actuator dynamic control) being completely independent of the safety devices. This allows the CMF safety systems to remain intact and unaffected by frequent research system modifications.

  1. 48 CFR 252.246-7003 - Notification of Potential Safety Issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... system; or (iii) Repair, maintenance, logistics support, or overhaul services for systems and subsystems.... Critical safety item means a part, subassembly, assembly, subsystem, installation equipment, or...

  2. Pantex Plant final safety analysis report, Zone 4 magazines. Staging or interim storage for nuclear weapons and components: Issue D

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) contains a detailed description and evaluation of the significant environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) issues associated with the operations of the Pantex Plant modified-Richmond and steel arch construction (SAC) magazines in Zone 4. It provides (1) an overall description of the magazines, the Pantex Plant, and its surroundings; (2) a systematic evaluations of the hazards that could occur as a result of the operations performed in these magazines; (3) descriptions and analyses of the adequacy of the measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards; and (4) analyses of potential accidents and their associated risks.

  3. Electrophysiological effects of 12C on patients undergoing heavy ions therapy at GSI: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannita, W. G.; Narici, L.; Debus, J.; Carozzo, S.; Saturno, M.; Schardt, D.; Schulz-Ertner, D.

    Phosphenes light flashes observed in space have been attributed to heavy ions interfering with the retina photoreceptors However their generating mechanisms are still undefined and neurons of the retina and non-ocular visual structures are as sensitive to ionizing agents as retinal photoreceptors Multiple sources are therefore possible that could question safety in manned space travel Patients undergoing 12C ion therapy of skull tumors also involving the anterior optic pathway often report phosphenes similar to those described by astronauts and volunteers in accelerator experiments In a pilot study their occurrence either within each beam pulse or shortly after it in case of very short pulses correlated with the beam position and local dose deposited near the optic nerve or eye during irradiation Further research is in progress at the GSI Biophysics facilities in Darmstadt FRG Purposes of the study are 1- to identify electrophysiological cortical concomitants of phosphenes 2- to correlate phosphenes with irradiated portions of the anterior visual pathways and with known basic mechanisms of vision and 3- to obtain information to be used in the understanding of phosphenes observed in space We will present preliminary results from the first measurements

  4. In Practice: Weaving the Campus Safety Net by Integrating Student Health Issues into the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Todd A.; Riley, Joan B.

    2009-01-01

    Georgetown University has developed an innovative approach to addressing student health and wellness issues through curriculum infusion--a collaborative pedagogy that introduces real-life health issues faced by college students into their academic courses.

  5. Concept Paper on Health and Safety Issues in Day Care. Final Manuscript.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizzo, Peggy; Aronson, Susan S.

    This report discusses the existence and prevention of major health and safety risks for children in day care and makes recommendations for the Federal Interagency Day Care requirements (FIDCR) concerning health and safety. Section I describes varying concepts of risk related to probability and to possibility of adverse events, and discusses…

  6. A Non-Normal Incidence Pumped Ni-Like Zr XRL for Spectroscopy of Li-Like Heavy Ions at GSI/FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühl, T.; Ursescu, D.; Bagnoud, V.; Javorkova, D.; Rosmej, O.; Zimmer, D.; Cassou, K.; Kazamias, S.; Klisnick, A.; Ros, D.; Zielbauer, B.; Janulewicz, K.; Nickles, P.; Pert, G.; Neumayer, P.; Dunn, J.

    One of the unique features of the PHELIX laser installation is the combination of the ultra-high intensity laser with the heavy-ion accelerator facility at GSI and its planned extension FAIR. Due to this combination, PHELIX will allow novel investigations in the fields of plasma physics, atomic physics, nuclear physics, and accelerator studies. An important issue within the scientific program is the generation of high quality x-ray laser beams for x-ray laser spectroscopy of highly-charged ions. The long range perspective is the study of nuclear properties of radioactive isotopes within the FAIR [1] project. A novel single mirror focusing scheme for the TCE XRL has been successfully implemented by the LIXAM/MBI/GSI collaboration under different pump geometries. Intense and stable laser operation with Ni-like Zr and Ni-like Ag was demonstrated at pump energies between 2 J and 5 J from the PHELIX pre-amplifier section.

  7. Occupational Safety Issues in Residential Construction Surveyed in Wisconsin, United States

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, Sang D.; CARLSON, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Residential construction is a high-risk industry in the U.S. due to the exposure to work-related safety hazards and fall injuries. This study aimed to examine the safety training and safe work practices of construction workers within the small residential construction industry. In order to achieve the study objectives, a survey was designed and sent to approximately 200 Wisconsin based residential construction contractors. About one third of the respondents stated that they did not have any form of safety programs. The study indicated that the most common types of work-related injuries in residential construction were slips/trips/falls and cuts/lacerations. The survey findings also suggested that the residential construction contractors needed to increase the utilization of fall protection safety equipment. Further education and subject matter expert training could provide benefits to improve occupational safety and health of the small business workforce in the residential construction industry. PMID:25016947

  8. Evaluation of station blackout accidents at nuclear power plants: Technical findings related to unresolved safety issue A-44: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    ''Station Blackout,'' which is the complete loss of alternating current (AC) electrical power in a nuclear power plant, has been designated as Unresolved Safety Issue A-44. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on AC power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. This report documents the findings of technical studies performed as part of the program to resolve this issue. The important factors analyzed include: the fequency of loss of offsite power; the probability that emergency or onsite AC power supplies would be unavailable; the capability and reliability of decay heat removal systems independent of AC power; and the likelihood that offsite power would be restored before systems that cannot operate for extended periods without AC power fail, thus resulting in core damage. This report also addresses effects of different designs, locations, and operational features on the estimated frequency of core damage resulting from station blackout events.

  9. Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 4, In-vehicle safety

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.

    1992-11-01

    This report is the last of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues that may affect the commercial-scale use of sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles. The reports are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD&D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers the in-vehicle safety issues of electric vehicles powered by Na/S batteries. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, and private industry. It has three major goals: (1) to identify the unique hazards associated with electric vehicle (EV) use; (2) to describe the existing standards, regulations, and guidelines that are or could be applicable to these hazards; and (3) to discuss the adequacy of the existing requirements in addressing the safety concerns of EVs.

  10. TITLE: Environmental, health, and safety issues offuel cells in transportation. Volume 1: Phosphoricacid fuel-cell buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ring, Shan

    1994-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Phosphoric Acid Fuel-Cell (PAFC) Bus Program to demonstrate the feasibility of fuel cells in heavy-duty transportation systems. As part of this program, PAFC- powered buses are being built to meet transit industry design and performance standards. Test-bed bus-1 (TBB-1) was designed in 1993 and integrated in March 1994. TBB-2 and TBB-3 are under construction and should be integrated in early 1995. In 1987 Phase 1 of the program began with the development and testing of two conceptual system designs- liquid- and air-cooled systems. The liquid-cooled PAFC system was chosen to continue, through a competitive award, into Phase H, beginning in 1991. Three hybrid buses, which combine fuel-cell and battery technologies, were designed during Phase 3. After completing Phase 2, DOE plans a comprehensive performance testing program (Phase H1) to verify that the buses meet stringent transit industry requirements. The Phase 3 study will evaluate the PAFC bus and compare it to a conventional diesel bus. This NREL study assesses the environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues that may affect the commercialization of the PAFC bus. Because safety is a critical factor for consumer acceptance of new transportation-based technologies the study focuses on these issues. The study examines health and safety together because they are integrally related. In addition, this report briefly discusses two environmental issues that are of concern to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first issue involves a surge battery used by the PAFC bus that contains hazardous constituents. The second issue concerns the regulated air emissions produced during operation of the PAFC bus.

  11. Environmental, health, and safety issues of fuel cells in transportation. Volume 1: Phosphoric acid fuel-cell buses

    SciTech Connect

    Ring, S.

    1994-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Phosphoric Acid Fuel-Cell (PAFC) Bus Program to demonstrate the feasibility of fuel cells in heavy-duty transportation systems. As part of this program, PAFC- powered buses are being built to meet transit industry design and performance standards. Test-bed bus-1 (TBB-1) was designed in 1993 and integrated in March 1994. TBB-2 and TBB-3 are under construction and should be integrated in early 1995. In 1987 Phase I of the program began with the development and testing of two conceptual system designs- liquid- and air-cooled systems. The liquid-cooled PAFC system was chosen to continue, through a competitive award, into Phase H, beginning in 1991. Three hybrid buses, which combine fuel-cell and battery technologies, were designed during Phase III. After completing Phase II, DOE plans a comprehensive performance testing program (Phase HI) to verify that the buses meet stringent transit industry requirements. The Phase III study will evaluate the PAFC bus and compare it to a conventional diesel bus. This NREL study assesses the environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues that may affect the commercialization of the PAFC bus. Because safety is a critical factor for consumer acceptance of new transportation-based technologies the study focuses on these issues. The study examines health and safety together because they are integrally related. In addition, this report briefly discusses two environmental issues that are of concern to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first issue involves a surge battery used by the PAFC bus that contains hazardous constituents. The second issue concerns the regulated air emissions produced during operation of the PAFC bus.

  12. Editors' Preface to Special Issue on Drinking Water Safety, Security, and Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recognizing these needs, researchers from Zhejiang University (China), the US EPA and the University of Alberta (Canada) organized the “International Conference on Drinking Water Safety, Security and Sustainability” in October 2011 in Hangzhou, China. The conference was attended...

  13. An investigation and analysis of safety issues in Polish small construction plants

    PubMed Central

    Dąbrowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The construction industry is a booming sector of the Polish economy; however, it is stigmatised by a lower classification due to high occupational risks and an unsatisfactory state of occupational safety. Safety on construction sites is compromised by small construction firms which dominate the market and have high accident rates. This article presents the results of studies (using a checklist) conducted in small Polish construction companies in terms of selected aspects of safety, such as co-operation with the general contractor, occupational health and safety documents, occupational risk assessment, organization of work, protective gear and general work equipment. The mentioned studies and analyses provided the grounds to establish the main directions of preventive measures decreasing occupational risk in small construction companies, e.g., an increase in engagement of investors and general contractors, improvement of occupational health and safety (OSH) documents, an increase in efficiency of construction site managers, better stability of employment and removal of opposing objectives between economic strategy and work safety. PMID:26694002

  14. An investigation and analysis of safety issues in Polish small construction plants.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The construction industry is a booming sector of the Polish economy; however, it is stigmatised by a lower classification due to high occupational risks and an unsatisfactory state of occupational safety. Safety on construction sites is compromised by small construction firms which dominate the market and have high accident rates. This article presents the results of studies (using a checklist) conducted in small Polish construction companies in terms of selected aspects of safety, such as co-operation with the general contractor, occupational health and safety documents, occupational risk assessment, organization of work, protective gear and general work equipment. The mentioned studies and analyses provided the grounds to establish the main directions of preventive measures decreasing occupational risk in small construction companies, e.g., an increase in engagement of investors and general contractors, improvement of occupational health and safety (OSH) documents, an increase in efficiency of construction site managers, better stability of employment and removal of opposing objectives between economic strategy and work safety. PMID:26694002

  15. Workplace health and safety issues among community nurses: a study regarding the impact on providing care to rural consumers

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Daniel; Lê, Quynh; Nguyen, Uyen; Hoang, Ha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the study was to investigate the types of workplace health and safety issues rural community nurses encounter and the impact these issues have on providing care to rural consumers. Methods The study undertook a narrative inquiry underpinned by a phenomenological approach. Community nursing staff who worked exclusively in rural areas and employed in a permanent capacity were contacted among 13 of the 16 consenting healthcare services. All community nurses who expressed a desire to participate were interviewed. Data were collected using semistructured interviews with 15 community nurses in rural and remote communities. Thematic analysis was used to analyse interview data. Results The role, function and structures of community nursing services varied greatly from site to site and were developed and centred on meeting the needs of individual communities. In addition, a number of workplace health and safety challenges were identified and were centred on the geographical, physical and organisational environment that community nurses work across. The workplace health and safety challenges within these environments included driving large distances between client’s homes and their office which lead to working in isolation for long periods and without adequate communication. In addition, other issues included encountering, managing and developing strategies to deal with poor client and carer behaviour; working within and negotiating working environments such as the poor condition of patient homes and clients smoking; navigating animals in the workplace; vertical and horizontal violence; and issues around workload, burnout and work-related stress. Conclusions Many nurses achieved good outcomes to meet the needs of rural community health consumers. Managers were vital to ensure that service objectives were met. Despite the positive outcomes, many processes were considered unsafe by community nurses. It was identified that greater training and

  16. Environment, health and safety issues for sources used in MOVPE growth of compound semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenai-Khatkhate, Deodatta V.; Goyette, Randall J.; DiCarlo, Ronald L., Jr.; Dripps, Gregory

    2004-12-01

    As metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) is becoming well-established production technology, there are equally growing concerns associated with its bearing on personnel and community safety, environmental impact and maximum quantities of hazardous materials permissible in the device fabrication operations. Safety as well as responsible environmental care has always been of paramount importance in the MOVPE-based crystal growth of compound semiconductors. In this paper, we present the findings from workplace exposure monitoring studies on conventional MOVPE sources such as trimethylgallium, triethylgallium, trimethylantimony and diethylzinc. Also reviewed are the environmental, health and safety hazard aspects for metalorganic sources of routine elements, and the means to minimize the risks (i.e., engineering controls) involved while using these MOVPE sources.

  17. Designing a laser scanning picoprojector. Part 2: laser-safety-related issues.

    PubMed

    Wallhead, Ian; Ocaña, Roberto; Quinzá, Paula

    2012-08-10

    Laser scanning picoprojectors present a new challenge in the field of laser safety with methods of calculating accessible emission limits still in their infancy. We present a laser safety analysis and a calculation of an example picoprojector. We show that, due to its scanning operation, a picoprojector should be considered an extended laser source, and we also show that a picoprojector with two separate one-axis microelectromechanical systems mirrors offers a higher safe power limit than a projector with a single scanning mirror. Finally, a safety analysis is done under conditions of mirror failure. We show that, if the projector fails to scan in just one of the axes, the ocular hazard rises sharply, highlighting the need for a fail-safe system to be built into laser scanning picoprojectors. PMID:22885573

  18. Medication safety issue brief. Series II, Part 6: Tapping into your staff's energy.

    PubMed

    2003-11-01

    The front-line workers in a hospital are its greatest resources, particularly when it comes to improving safety. After all, they know the crucial details about day-to-day operations and can offer innovative solutions to problems. But staff members don't always feel comfortable getting involved in change. To tap this hidden well of talent, hospitals leaders should train staff in systems thinking, cultivate a culture of safety and make it easy for employees to contribute their ideas. PMID:14689965

  19. Preliminary Review of Safety Assessment Issues at Savannah River Site, August 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bixler, Nathan E.

    2011-09-19

    At the request of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) management, a review team composed of experts in atmospheric transport modeling for environmental radiation dose assessment convened at the Savannah River Site (SRS) on August 29-30, 2011. Several issues were presented at the meeting for discussion. This is a short summary that is organized in accordance with the primary issues discussed, which is not necessarily a chronological record. Issues include: SRS Meteorological Data and its Use in MACCS2; Deposition Velocities for Particles; Deposition Velocities for Tritium; MACCS2 Dispersion Coefficients; Use of Low Surface Roughness in Open Areas; Adequacy of Meteorological Tower and Instrumentation; Displacement Height; and Validity of MACCS2 Calculations at Close-in Distances. A longer report will be issued at a later date that expands upon these topics and recommendations.

  20. 75 FR 14243 - Pipeline Safety: Girth Weld Quality Issues Due to Improper Transitioning, Misalignment, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... Improper Transitioning, Misalignment, and Welding Practices of Large Diameter Line Pipe AGENCY: Pipeline... girth weld failures due to welding quality issues. Misalignment during welding of large diameter line... bevel and wall thickness transitions, and other improper welding practices that occurred...

  1. How Safe Are You at Work? Occupational Health and Safety Issues for School Counsellors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, John A.

    Schools are becoming increasingly violent places. This workshop presentation examines ways to improve counselor facilities and to enhance work safety. Client populations for school counselors have changed significantly in recent times as school administrators refer more welfare related problems for help. Although violent attacks on counselors may…

  2. Framework for Continuous Assessment and Improvement of Occupational Health and Safety Issues in Construction Companies

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Shahram; Ghasemi, Fakhradin; Mohammadfam, Iraj; Soleimani, Esmaeil

    2014-01-01

    Background Construction industry is among the most hazardous industries, and needs a comprehensive and simple-to-administer tool to continuously assess and promote its health and safety performance. Methods Through the study of various standard systems (mainly Health, Safety, and Environment Management System; Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series 180001; and British Standard, occupational health and safety management systems-Guide 8800), seven main elements were determined for the desired framework, and then, by reviewing literature, factors affecting these main elements were determined. The relative importance of each element and its related factors was calculated at organizational and project levels. The provided framework was then implemented in three construction companies, and results were compared together. Results The results of the study show that the relative importance of the main elements and their related factors differ between organizational and project levels: leadership and commitment are the most important elements at the organization level, whereas risk assessment and management are most important at the project level. Conclusion The present study demonstrated that the framework is easy to administer, and by interpreting the results, the main factors leading to the present condition of companies can be determined. PMID:25379325

  3. Children riding in the back of pickup trucks: a neglected safety issue.

    PubMed

    Woodward, G A; Bolte, R G

    1990-11-01

    Motor vehicle-related trauma is the leading cause of death in children in the United States. All states have pediatric restraint requirements for passenger vehicles to help prevent these deaths and injuries. Only a few states, however, possess safety laws or restrictions for passengers who ride in the back of pickup trucks. A retrospective review of medical records for a 40-month period revealed 40 patients whose injuries were a direct result of being a passenger in the cargo area (bed) of a pickup truck. Their injuries and other pertinent data are discussed. Representatives from the Highway Safety Commission of each state were surveyed about their specific highway safety laws. The responses revealed that all states and the District of Columbia have child restraint requirements for passenger automobiles, 34 states have adult restraint laws, but only 17 states have any type of restriction for passengers riding in the back of pickup trucks. Seventy-one percent of the states with pickup truck regulations include only the preschool-age child. Data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration concerning pickup trucks and passenger fatality are presented and discussed. PMID:2235220

  4. Relational Safety and Liberating Training Spaces: An Application with a Focus on Sexual Orientation Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Pilar; Rankin, Pressley, IV

    2008-01-01

    This article describes and discusses a teaching case of a clinical training situation involving a gay marriage and family therapy student working with a same-sex affectional couple. The conceptual pillars of this teaching case, relational safety and liberating spaces, are advanced as illustrations of how the student developed his voice in the…

  5. Safety improvement issues for mission aborts of future space transportation systems.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer, M; Wächter, M; Sachs, G

    2006-01-01

    Two-stage winged space access vehicles consisting of a carrier stage with airbreathing turbo/ram jet engines and a rocket propelled orbital stage which may significantly reduce space transport costs and have additional advantages offer a great potential for mission safety improvements. Formulating the nominal mission and abort scenarios caused by engine malfunctions as an optimal control problem allows full exploitation of safety capabilities. The shaping of the nominal mission has a significant impact on the prospective safety. For this purpose, most relevant mission aborts are considered together with the nominal mission, treating them as an optimization problem of branched trajectories where the branching point is not fixed. The applied procedure yields a safety improved nominal trajectory, showing the feasibility of the included mission aborts with minimum payload penalty. The other mission aborts can be separately treated, with the initial condition given by the state of the nominal trajectory at the time when a failure occurs. A mission abort plan is set up, covering all emergency scenarios. PMID:16480117

  6. Regulatory aspects of oncology drug safety evaluation: Past practice, current issues, and the challenge of new drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeldt, Hans; Kropp, Timothy; Benson, Kimberly; Ricci, M. Stacey; McGuinn, W. David; Verbois, S. Leigh

    2010-03-01

    The drug development of new anti-cancer agents is streamlined in response to the urgency of bringing effective drugs to market for patients with limited life expectancy. FDA's regulation of oncology drugs has evolved from the practices set forth in Arnold Lehman's seminal work published in the 1950s through the current drafting of a new International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) safety guidance for anti-cancer drug nonclinical evaluations. The ICH combines the efforts of the regulatory authorities of Europe, Japan, and the United States and the pharmaceutical industry from these three regions to streamline the scientific and technical aspects of drug development. The recent development of new oncology drug classes with novel mechanisms of action has improved survival rates for some cancers but also brings new challenges for safety evaluation. Here we present the legacy of Lehman and colleagues in the context of past and present oncology drug development practices and focus on some of the current issues at the center of an evolving harmonization process that will generate a new safety guidance for oncology drugs, ICH S9. The purpose of this new guidance will be to facilitate oncology drug development on a global scale by standardizing regional safety requirements.

  7. WNA's worldwide overview on front-end nuclear fuel cycle growth and health, safety and environmental issues.

    PubMed

    Saint-Pierre, Sylvain; Kidd, Steve

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the WNA's worldwide nuclear industry overview on the anticipated growth of the front-end nuclear fuel cycle from uranium mining to conversion and enrichment, and on the related key health, safety, and environmental (HSE) issues and challenges. It also puts an emphasis on uranium mining in new producing countries with insufficiently developed regulatory regimes that pose greater HSE concerns. It introduces the new WNA policy on uranium mining: Sustaining Global Best Practices in Uranium Mining and Processing-Principles for Managing Radiation, Health and Safety and the Environment, which is an outgrowth of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) cooperation project that closely involved industry and governmental experts in uranium mining from around the world. PMID:21399410

  8. Applications of Advanced Nondestructive Measurement Techniques to Address Safety of Flight Issues on NASA Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Advanced nondestructive measurement techniques are critical for ensuring the reliability and safety of NASA spacecraft. Techniques such as infrared thermography, THz imaging, X-ray computed tomography and backscatter X-ray are used to detect indications of damage in spacecraft components and structures. Additionally, sensor and measurement systems are integrated into spacecraft to provide structural health monitoring to detect damaging events that occur during flight such as debris impacts during launch and assent or from micrometeoroid and orbital debris, or excessive loading due to anomalous flight conditions. A number of examples will be provided of how these nondestructive measurement techniques have been applied to resolve safety critical inspection concerns for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), and a variety of launch vehicles and unmanned spacecraft.

  9. Safety Issues of HG and PB as IFE Target Materials: Radiological Versus Chemical Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Cadwallader, L C; Moir, R W; Rio, G. D; Sanz, J

    2002-11-11

    We have performed a safety assessment of mercury and lead as possible hohlraum materials for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) targets, including for the first time a comparative analysis of the radiological and toxicological consequences of an accidental release. In order to calculate accident doses to the public, we have distinguished between accidents at the target fabrication facility and accidents at other areas of the power plant. Regarding the chemical toxicity assessment, we have used the USDOE regulations to determine the maximum allowable release in order to protect the public from adverse health effects. Opposite to common belief, it has been found that the chemical safety requirements for these materials appear to be more stringent than the concentrations that would result in an acceptable radiological dose.

  10. Issues in the Management of Acute Agitation: How Much Current Guidelines Consider Safety?

    PubMed Central

    Pacciardi, Bruno; Mauri, Mauro; Cargioli, Claudio; Belli, Simone; Cotugno, Biagio; Di Paolo, Luca; Pini, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Agitated behavior constitutes up to 10% of emergency psychiatric interventions. Pharmacological tranquilization is often used as a valid treatment for agitation but a strong evidence base does not underpin it. Available literature shows different recommendations, supported by research data, theoretical considerations, or clinical experience. Rapid tranquilization (RT) is mainly based on parenteral drug treatment and the few existing guidelines on this topic, when suggesting the use of first generation antipsychotics and benzodiazepines, include drugs with questionable tolerability profile such as chlorpromazine, haloperidol, midazolam, and lorazepam. In order to systematically evaluate safety concerns related to the adoption of such guidelines, we reviewed them independently from principal diagnosis while examining tolerability data for suggested treatments. There is a growing evidence about safety profile of second generation antipsychotics for RT but further controlled studies providing definitive data in this area are urgently needed. PMID:23675355

  11. Quality and Safety in Orthopaedics: Learning and Teaching at the Same Time: AOA Critical Issues.

    PubMed

    Black, Kevin P; Armstrong, April D; Hutzler, Lorraine; Egol, Kenneth A

    2015-11-01

    Increasing attention has been placed on providing higher quality and safer patient care. This requires the development of a new set of competencies to better understand and navigate the system and lead the orthopaedic team. While still trying to learn and develop these competencies, the academic orthopaedist is also expected to model and teach them.The orthopaedic surgeon must understand what is being measured and why, both for purposes of providing better care and to eliminate unnecessary expense in the system. Metrics currently include hospital-acquired conditions, "never events," and thirty-day readmission rates. More will undoubtedly follow.Although commitment and excellence at the individual level are essential, the orthopaedist must think at the systems level to provide the highest value of care. A work culture characterized by respect and trust is essential to improved communication, teamwork, and confidential peer review. An increasing number of resources, both in print and electronic format, are available for us to understand what we can do now to improve quality and safety.Resident education in quality and safety is a fundamental component of the systems-based practice competency, the Next Accreditation System, and the Clinical Learning Environment Review. This needs to be longitudinally integrated into the curriculum and applied parallel to the development of resident knowledge and skill, and will be best learned if resident learning is experiential and taught within a genuine culture of quality and safety. PMID:26537169

  12. Interconnected but underprotected? Parents' methods and motivations for information seeking on digital safety issues.

    PubMed

    Davis, Vauna

    2012-12-01

    Parents need information and skills to meet the demands of mediating connected technology in their homes. Parents' methods and motivations for learning to protect children from digital risks were reported through a survey. This study explores relationships between information seeking, parents' concerns, risks children have experienced, and access to connected devices, in addition to the use and satisfaction of various digital safety resources. Three types of information-seeking behavior were identified: (a) protective information seeking, to protect children from being confronted with harmful content; (b) problem-solving information seeking, to help children who have been negatively affected by connected technology; and (c) attentive learning, by attending to media resources passively encountered on this topic. Friends and family are the dominant source of digital safety information, followed by presentations and the Internet. Parents' top concerns for their children using connected technology were accidental exposure to pornography, and sexual content in Internet-based entertainment. Higher numbers of risks experienced by children were positively associated with parents' problem-solving information seeking and level of attentive learning. Parents who were more concerned exhibited more problem-solving information seeking; but despite the high level of concern for children's safety online, 65 percent of parents seek information on this subject less than twice per year. Children have access to a mean of five connected devices at home; a higher number of devices was correlated with increased risks experienced by children, but was not associated with increased concern or information seeking from parents. PMID:23098226

  13. Don't Let Legal Issues Put You in Hot Water! A Safety and Liability Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkle, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Providing a safe classroom and laboratory environment should be the first priority of any career-technical and technology/engineering education instructor. Doing so not only increases the opportunity for student learning, but it also keeps instructors "out of hot water" with respect to legal issues of liability. In today's litigious society, where…

  14. Standard for developing and issuing DOE safety guides and implementation guides

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This standard establishes the style, format, content, and process for preparing and issuing DOE guides. It is intended for use by all DOE components, including contractors. The DOE guides provide information on DOE`s expectations on meeting the provisions of rules, orders, notices, manuals, immediate action directives, and regulatory standards (requirements documents) or policies.

  15. IV and V Issues in Achieving High Reliability and Safety in Critical Control System Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikora, A. P.; Schneidewind, N. F.; Munson, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    Risk analysis and integrated verification and validation are two important elements in a plan for ensuring the safety of critical software systems. We describe an approach we are currently developing for integrating risk analysis, and metrics analysis, and propose a fault predictor that would integrate the results of these activities. Practical difficulties associated with our approach are also discussed, as are limitations of the proposed predictor. We conclude with a discussion of what as been learned to date, and with suggestions for future work.

  16. Waste compatibility safety issues and final results for tank 241-T-110 push mode samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-05-15

    This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-T-110. Push mode core segments were removed from risers 2 and 6 between January 29, 1997, and February 7, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-T-110 Push Mode Core Sampling and analysis Plan (TSAP) and Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT) or differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses exceeded the notification limits stated in DQO.

  17. Issues and relationships among software standards for nuclear safety applications. Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J.A.; Preckshot, G.G.; Lawrence, J.D.; Johnson, G.L.

    1996-03-26

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is assisting the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with the development of draft regulatory guides for selected software engineering standards. This report describes the results of the initial task in this work. The selected software standards and a set of related software engineering standards were reviewed, and the resulting preliminary elements of the regulatory positions are identified in this report. The importance of a thorough understanding of the relationships among standards useful for developing safety-related software is emphasized. The relationship of this work to the update of the Standard Review Plan is also discussed.

  18. Safety issues of space liquid-helium and solid-cryogen systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Peter V.

    2002-05-01

    Safety of hardware and personnel is a major concern in space programs. Space cryogenic systems are particularly prone to risk because of their complexity and because of the potential for overpressurization resulting from blockage of vent paths during the integration and test process. A number of space flight programs with liquid-helium and solid-cryogen systems have had incidents which resulted in risk or actual damage to flight hardware, or in risk to personnel. Since such incidents typically occur late in the development cycle, costs due to delays are extremely high. A second major of area of risk is the use of cooling loops in solid cryogen systems. When cooling is performed, the cryogen contracts and cryogen from warmer locations vaporizes and is deposited in the voids. This can lead to rupture of tankage and plumbing. Risk reduction measures include two-fault tolerant design, systematic use of burst disks and relief valves, careful analysis of possible risks, detailed and well-reviewed procedures and redundancy of critical systems, such as valves and valve drive circuitry. We will discuss the design and operation of space cryogenics systems from a safety point of view. We will also describe a number of incidents, their causes, the corrective steps taken and lessons learned.

  19. Technical support for the Ukrainian State Committee for Nuclear Radiation Safety on specific waste issues

    SciTech Connect

    Little, C.A.

    1995-07-01

    The government of Ukraine, a now-independent former member of the Soviet Union, has asked the United States to assist its State Committee for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SCNRS) in improving its regulatory control in technical fields for which it has responsibility. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is providing this assistance in several areas, including management of radioactive waste and spent fuel. Radioactive wastes resulting from nuclear power plant operation, maintenance, and decommissioning must be stored and ultimately disposed of appropriately. In addition, radioactive residue from radioisotopes used in various industrial and medical applications must be managed. The objective of this program is to provide the Ukrainian SCNRS with the information it needs to establish regulatory control over uranium mining and milling activities in the Zheltye Vody (Yellow Waters) area and radioactive waste disposal in the Pripyat (Chernobyl) area among others. The author of this report, head of the Environmental Technology Section, Health Sciences Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, accompanied NRC staff to Ukraine to meet with SCNRS staff and visit sites in question. The report highlights problems at the sites visited and recommends license conditions that SCNRS can require to enhance safety of handling mining and milling wastes. The author`s responsibility was specifically for the visit to Zheltye Vody and the mining and milling waste sites associated with that facility. An itinerary for the Zheltye Vody portion of the trip is included as Appendix A.

  20. Health, safety and environmental issues relating to cadmium usage in photovoltaic energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. ); Zweibel, K. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the current technology base and hazards associated with two promising thin-film photovoltaic cells that contain cadmium compounds--cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium deselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}). More specifically, this paper summarized the toxicological information on cadmium (Cd) compounds;evaluates potential health, safety and environmental hazards associated with cadmium usage in the photovoltaics industry; describes regulatory requirements associated with the use, handling and disposal of cadmium compounds; and lists management options to permit the safe and continued use of these materials. Handling of cadmium in photovoltaic production can present hazards to health, safety and the environment. Prior recognition of these hazards can allow device manufacturers and regulators to implement appropriate and readily available hazard management strategies. Hazards associated with product use (i.e., array fires) and disposal remain controversial and partially unresolved. The most likely effects that could be expected would be those associated with chronic low-level exposures to cadmium wastes. Because of the general immobility of the cadmium present in these devices and availability of environmental and biomonitoring protocols, chronic hazards can be monitored, and remediated if necessary. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Vectra GSI, Inc. low-level waste melter testing Phase 1 test report

    SciTech Connect

    Stegen, G.E.; Wilson, C.N.

    1996-02-21

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Vectra GSI, Inc. was one of seven vendors selected for Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW that were completed during fiscal year 1995. The attached report prepared by Vectra GSI, Inc. describes results of melter testing using slurry feed and dried feeds. Results of feed drying and prereaction tests using a fluid bed calciner and rotary dryer also are described.

  2. Experimental Study and Computational Simulations of Key Pebble Bed Thermo-mechanics Issues for Design and Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuhiro, Akira; Potirniche, Gabriel; Cogliati, Joshua; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2014-07-08

    An experimental and computational study, consisting of modeling and simulation (M&S), of key thermal-mechanical issues affecting the design and safety of pebble-bed (PB) reactors was conducted. The objective was to broaden understanding and experimentally validate thermal-mechanic phenomena of nuclear grade graphite, specifically, spheres in frictional contact as anticipated in the bed under reactor relevant pressures and temperatures. The contact generates graphite dust particulates that can subsequently be transported into the flowing gaseous coolent. Under postulated depressurization transients and with the potential for leaked fission products to be adsorbed onto graphite 'dust', there is the potential for fission products to escape from the primary volume. This is a design safety concern. Furthermore, earlier safety assessment identified the distinct possibility for the dispersed dust to combust in contact with air if sufficient conditions are met. Both of these phenomena were noted as important to design review and containing uncertainty to warrant study. The team designed and conducted two separate effects tests to study and benchmark the potential dust-generation rate, as well as study the conditions under which a dust explosion may occure in a standardized, instrumented explosion chamber.

  3. Occupational Health and Safety Issues in Ontario Sawmills and Veneer/Plywood Plants: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Dave K.; Demers, Cecil; Shaw, Don; Verma, Paul; Kurtz, Lawrence; Finkelstein, Murray; des Tombe, Karen; Welton, Tom

    2010-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted within the Ontario sawmill and veneer/plywood manufacturing industry. Information was collected by postal questionnaire and observational walk-through surveys. Industrial hygiene walk-through surveys were conducted at 22 work sites, and measurements for wood dust, noise, and bioaerosol were taken. The aim of the study was to obtain data on the current status regarding health and safety characteristics and an estimate of wood dust, noise, and bioaerosol exposures. The occupational exposure to wood dust and noise are similar to what has been reported in this industry in Canada and elsewhere. Airborne wood dust concentration ranged between 0.001 mg/m3 and 4.87 mg/m3 as total dust and noise exposure ranged between 55 and 117 dB(A). The study indicates the need for a more comprehensive industry-wide study of wood dust, noise, and bioaersols. PMID:21253473

  4. Qualitative Risk Assessment for an LNG Refueling Station and Review of Relevant Safety Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, N.; Herring, J.S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

    1998-02-01

    This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tank truck deliveries, and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis, and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of ``best practice`` information throughout the LNG community.

  5. HANFORD PLUTONIUM FINISHG PLAN (PFP) COMPLETES PLUTONIUM STABILIZATION KEY SAFETY ISSUES CLOSED

    SciTech Connect

    GERBER, M.S.

    2004-02-24

    A long and intense effort to stabilize and repackage nearly 18 metric tons (MT) of plutonium-bearing leftovers from defense production and nuclear experiments concluded successfully in February, bringing universal congratulations to the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The victorious stabilization and packaging endeavor at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), managed and operated by prime contractor Fluor Hanford, Inc., finished ahead of all milestones in Hanford's cleanup agreement with regulators, and before deadlines set by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB), a part of the federal Executive Branch that oversees special nuclear materials. The PFP stabilization and packaging project also completed under budget for its four-year tenure, and has been nominated for a DOE Secretarial Award. It won the Project of the Year Award in the local chapter competition of the Project Management Institute, and is being considered for awards at the regional and national level.

  6. Reentry safety for the Topaz II Space Reactor: Issues and analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, L.W.; Trost, L.C.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the reentry safety analyses conducted for the TOPAZ II Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP). Scoping calculations were performed on the reentry aerothermal breakup and ground footprint of reactor core debris. The calculations were used to assess the risks associated with radiologically cold reentry accidents and to determine if constraints should be placed on the core configuration for such accidents. Three risk factors were considered: inadvertent criticality upon reentry impact, atmospheric dispersal of U-235 fuel, and the Special Nuclear Material Safeguards risks. Results indicate that the risks associated with cold reentry are very low regardless of the core configuration. Core configuration constraints were therefore not established for radiologically cold reentry accidents.

  7. Occupational health and safety issues in Ontario sawmills and veneer/plywood plants: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Verma, Dave K; Demers, Cecil; Shaw, Don; Verma, Paul; Kurtz, Lawrence; Finkelstein, Murray; des Tombe, Karen; Welton, Tom

    2010-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted within the Ontario sawmill and veneer/plywood manufacturing industry. Information was collected by postal questionnaire and observational walk-through surveys. Industrial hygiene walk-through surveys were conducted at 22 work sites, and measurements for wood dust, noise, and bioaerosol were taken. The aim of the study was to obtain data on the current status regarding health and safety characteristics and an estimate of wood dust, noise, and bioaerosol exposures. The occupational exposure to wood dust and noise are similar to what has been reported in this industry in Canada and elsewhere. Airborne wood dust concentration ranged between 0.001 mg/m³ and 4.87 mg/m³ as total dust and noise exposure ranged between 55 and 117 dB(A). The study indicates the need for a more comprehensive industry-wide study of wood dust, noise, and bioaersols. PMID:21253473

  8. Interim qualitative risk assessment for an LNG refueling station and review of relevant safety issues

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, N.; Herring, S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

    1997-07-01

    This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tanker truck delivers and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects analysis and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of best practice information throughout the LNG community.

  9. Research Lasers and Air Traffic Safety: Issues, Concerns and Responsibilities of the Research Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessler, Phillip J., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The subject of outdoor use of lasers relative to air traffic has become a diverse and dynamic topic. During the past several decades, the use of lasers in outdoor research activities have increased significantly. Increases in the outdoor use of lasers and increases in air traffic densities have changed the levels of risk involved. To date there have been no documented incidents of air traffic interference from research lasers; however, incidents involving display lasers have shown a marked increase. As a result of the national response to these incidents, new concerns over lasers have arisen. Through the efforts of the SAE G-10T Laser Safety Hazards Subcommittee and the ANSI Z136.6 development committee, potential detrimental effects to air traffic beyond the traditional eye damage concerns have been identified. An increased emphasis from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the Center for Devices and Radiological Hazards (CDRH), and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) along with increased concern by the public have resulted in focused scrutiny of potential hazards presented by lasers. The research community needs to rethink the traditional methods of risk evaluation and application of protective measures. The best current approach to assure adequate protection of air traffic is the application of viable hazard and risk analysis and the use of validated protective measures. Standards making efforts and regulatory development must be supported by the research community to assure that reasonable measures are developed. Without input, standards and regulations can be developed that are not compatible with the needs of the research community. Finally, support is needed for the continued development and validation of protective measures.

  10. Clinical safety and tolerability issues in use of triazole derivatives in management of fungal infections

    PubMed Central

    Neofytos, Dionissios; Avdic, Edina; Magiorakos, Anna-Pelagia

    2010-01-01

    There has been an increase in the number of patients susceptible to invasive fungal infections (IFIs) leading to a greater need for effective, well tolerated, and easily administered antifungal agents. The advent of triazoles has revolutionized the care of patients requiring treatment or prophylaxis for IFIs. However, triazoles have been associated with a number of adverse events and significant drug–drug interactions. While commonly used, physicians and patients should be aware of the distinct properties of these agents in order to ensure that patients are optimally treated with the least amount of toxicity possible. Clinicians should have a full understanding of the basic pharmacokinetics, absorption, and bioavailability of triazoles. Moreover, knowledge of the drug–drug interactions and potential toxicities of each agent is critical prior to administering a triazole. Careful history taking, thorough review of the patient’s medication list, and detailed discussion with the patients and their families about the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of these agents should be performed. Clinicians treating patients with triazoles should closely follow them, monitor pertinent laboratory tests, and consider measuring drug levels as needed. This article will review the basic pharmacokinetic properties and most frequently encountered adverse events and pitfalls associated with triazoles in clinical practice. PMID:21701616

  11. Issues and challenges for pedestrian active safety systems based on real world accidents.

    PubMed

    Hamdane, Hédi; Serre, Thierry; Masson, Catherine; Anderson, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze real crashes involving pedestrians in order to evaluate the potential effectiveness of autonomous emergency braking systems (AEB) in pedestrian protection. A sample of 100 real accident cases were reconstructed providing a comprehensive set of data describing the interaction between the vehicle, the environment and the pedestrian all along the scenario of the accident. A generic AEB system based on a camera sensor for pedestrian detection was modeled in order to identify the functionality of its different attributes in the timeline of each crash scenario. These attributes were assessed to determine their impact on pedestrian safety. The influence of the detection and the activation of the AEB system were explored by varying the field of view (FOV) of the sensor and the level of deceleration. A FOV of 35° was estimated to be required to detect and react to the majority of crash scenarios. For the reaction of a system (from hazard detection to triggering the brakes), between 0.5 and 1s appears necessary. PMID:26047007

  12. [Spanish drivers' beliefs about speed. Speeding is a major issue of road safety].

    PubMed

    Montoro González, Luis; Roca Ruiz, Javier; Lucas-Alba, Antonio

    2010-11-01

    Extending and updating our knowledge concerning drivers' motivational and cognitive processes is of essential importance if we are to apply policies with long-lasting effects. This study presents data from a representative national survey analyzing the Spanish drivers' beliefs about speed, the risks of speeding, the degree of violation of speed-limits and the reasons for speeding. Results indicate that Spanish drivers rate speeding as a serious offence, yet not among the most dangerous ones. All in all, they claim to comply mostly with the speed limits. However, some interesting violation patterns emerge: observance is lower for generic speed limits according to road type (vs. specific limits shown by certain road signs), and particularly in motorways (vs. single carriageways and urban areas). Risk perception and reasons for speeding emerge as the main factors predicting the levels of speed violations reported. Results suggest that any effective intervention strategy should consider such factors, namely the link between speed, road safety, and drivers' specific reasons for speeding. PMID:21044524

  13. Isolation of Enterobacter sakazakii from ass' milk in Sicily: case report, safety and legal issues.

    PubMed

    Conte, F; Passantino, A

    2008-07-01

    Enterobacter sakazakii (Es) infections are likely to involve newborns and infants, causing meningitis and necrotizing enterocolitis and sepsis. Contamination of infant formulae milk during factory production or bottle preparation is implicated. Es has been isolated from environmental sources and from food other than infant formula and milk powder, but why it is associated only with the consumption of infant formulae, is unclear. According to Regulation (EC) No. 2073/2005 on the microbiological criteria for foodstuffs, Es is considered a microorganisms of greatest concern in infant formulae and follow-on formulae. Es is included between "safety criteria". The isolation of two strains of Es from 50 samples of ass' milk in Sicily is described. The antibiotic resistance profile of the isolates revealed a multiple resistance profile, including fluoroquinolones, commonly used to treat the infections. The authors underline the importance of survey because in Italy ass' milk is considered one of the solutions for infants suffering from hypersensitivity to milk protein of some animal species. There is scarce information about the ecology and the uncertainty concerning the source of infection in the children and adults; the authors are concerned that ass' milk could become a high-risk food. PMID:18571118

  14. Development and Implementation of Dynamic Scripts to Execute Cycled GSI/WRF Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Berndt, Emily; Li, Xuanli; Watson, Leela

    2014-01-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction (NWP) model and Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation (DA) are the operational systems that make up the North American Mesoscale (NAM) model and the NAM Data Assimilation System (NDAS) analysis used by National Weather Service forecasters. The Developmental Testbed Center (DTC) manages and distributes the code for the WRF and GSI, but it is up to individual researchers to link the systems together and write scripts to run the systems, which can take considerable time for those not familiar with the code. The objective of this project is to develop and disseminate a set of dynamic scripts that mimic the unique cycling configuration of the operational NAM to enable researchers to develop new modeling and data assimilation techniques that can be easily transferred to operations. The current version of the SPoRT GSI/WRF Scripts (v3.0.1) is compatible with WRF v3.3 and GSI v3.0.

  15. Aruna Shanbaug and workplace safety for women: the real issue sidestepped.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sreelekha

    2016-01-01

    Aruna Shanbaug (born 1948) passed away on May 18, 2015 and the coverage that the news got on the front pages and the primetime news slots surprised everyone. One wonders whether this news would have got so much coverage had it not involved the sensational euthanasia debate. That Aruna should have been projected as the face of the euthanasia debate in India disturbs those who have been following her "story". The fact remains that it was a debate set off by Pinki Virani - for people like Aruna - with due respect to the former's earnest intentions and efforts. That Aruna was subjected to violence in November 1973 was nothing but the potential experience of every working woman in India. Aruna should be remembered for that reason - a cause much more bitter than passive euthanasia. She has been and will remain the face of working women in India against whom male prejudice has remained unabated even 42 years after Aruna became a victim. How many Arunas were assaulted, murdered and violated physically, emotionally and mentally during this period? To a substantial number of Indians, women still belong to the hearth and the harem, and the rapist of the Delhi girl whom we nicknamed Nirbhaya told us this impudently from within the Tihar jail in Delhi (i). India as a society seems to refuse to recognise the ethical issues associated with denying women their right to be safe at their workplaces. PMID:26725005

  16. Clinical review: Balancing the therapeutic, safety, and economic issues underlying effective antipseudomonal carbapenem use

    PubMed Central

    Slama, Thomas G

    2008-01-01

    Antipseudomonal carbapenems have played a useful role in our antimicrobial armamentarium for 20 years. However, a review of their use during that period creates concern that their clinical effectiveness is critically dependent on attainment of an appropriate dosing range. Unfortunately, adequate carbapenem dosing is missed for many reasons, including benefit/risk misconceptions, a narrow therapeutic window for imipenem and meropenem (due to an increased rate of seizures at higher doses), increasingly resistant pathogens requiring higher doses than are typically given, and cost containment issues that may limit their use. To improve the use of carbapenems, several initiatives should be considered: increase awareness about appropriate treatment with carbapenems across hospital departments; determine optimal dosing regimens for settings where multidrug resistant organisms are more likely encountered; use of, or combination with, an alternative antimicrobial agent having more favorable pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, or adverse event profile; and administer a newer carbapenem with lower propensity for resistance development (for example, reduced expression of efflux pumps or greater stability against carbapenemases). PMID:18983709

  17. Multiple BM harvests in pediatric donors for thalassemic siblings: safety, efficacy and ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Biral, E; Chiesa, R; Cappelli, B; Roccia, T; Frugnoli, I; Noè, A; Soliman, C; Fiori, R; Cursi, L; Cattaneo, F; Evangelio, C; Miniero, R; Ciceri, F; Roncarolo, M G; Marktel, S

    2008-09-01

    Allogeneic BMT represents the only chance of cure for beta-thalassemia. Occasionally, two affected individuals from the same family share a matched healthy sibling. Moreover, a high incidence of transplant rejection is still observed in Pesaro class III patients, requiring a second BMT procedure. In these settings, one option is to perform a second BM harvest from the same donor. Although BM harvest is a safe procedure in children, ethical issues concerning this invasive practice still arise. Here, we describe our series of seven pediatric, healthy donors, who donated BM more than once in favor of their beta-thalassemic HLA-identical siblings between June 2005 and January 2008. Three donors donated BM twice to two affected siblings and four donors donated twice for the same sibling following graft rejection of the first BMT. All donors tolerated the procedures well and no relevant side effects occurred. There was no significant difference between the two harvests concerning cell yield and time to engraftment. Our experience shows that for pediatric donors, a second BM donation is safe and feasible and good cellularity can be obtained. We suggest that a second harvest of a pediatric donor can be performed when a strong indication for BMT exists. PMID:18574444

  18. Investigation of flammable gas and thermal safety issues for retrieval of waste from Tank 241-AN-105

    SciTech Connect

    Caley, S.M.; Stewart, C.W.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Cuta, J.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Panisko, F.E.

    1998-09-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to identify and resolve some of the flammable gas and thermal safety issues potentially associated with the retrieval of waste from Tank 241-AN-105 (AN-105), which is the first double-shell tank scheduled for waste retrieval at Hanford. The planned retrieval scenario includes the following steps in AN-105: (1) degas the tank using two submerged mixing pumps, (2) turn off the mixer pump(s) and allow any suspended solids to settle, (3) decant the supernatant to the intermediate feed staging tank(s) (IFSTs) (AP-102 and/or AP-104) using water/caustic dilution at the transfer pump inlet, (4) add the remaining dilution water/caustic to the slurry remaining in AN-105, (5) mix the tank with the mixer pump(s) until the soluble solids dissolve, (6) turn off the mixer pump(s) and let the insoluble solids settle, and (7) decant the new supernatant to the IFST(s), leaving the insoluble solids behind. Three waste retrieval safety issues are addressed in this report. They are (1) the controlled degassing of AN-105 to ensure that the headspace remains <25% of the lower flammability limit (LFL), (2) an assessment of how dissolved gas (mainly ammonia) released during the transfer of the supernatant in AN-105 to the IFSTs and the water/caustic dilution of the remaining slurry in AN-105 will affect the flammability in these tanks; and (3) an assessment of the maximum waste temperatures that might occur in AN-105 during retrieval operations.

  19. Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Devonian shale

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and examine potential public health and safety issues and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Devonian age shale. This document will serve as background data and information for planners within the government to assist in development of our new energy technologies in a timely and environmentally sound manner. This report describes the resource and the DOE eastern gas shales project in Section 2. Section 3 describes the new and developing recovery technologies associated with Devonian shale. An assessment of the environment, health and safety impacts associated with a typical fields is presented in Section 4. The typical field for this assessment occupies ten square miles and is developed on a 40-acre spacing (that is, there is a well in each 40-acre grid). This field thus has a total of 160 wells. Finally, Section 5 presents the conclusions and recommendations. A reference list is provided to give a greater plant. Based on the estimated plant cost and the various cases of operating income, an economic analysis was performed employing a profitability index criterion of discounted cash flow to determine an interest rate of return on the plant investment.

  20. Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D.

    1992-09-01

    Recycling and disposal of spent sodium-sulfur (Na/S) batteries are important issues that must be addressed as part of the commercialization process of Na/S battery-powered electric vehicles. The use of Na/S batteries in electric vehicles will result in significant environmental benefits, and the disposal of spent batteries should not detract from those benefits. In the United States, waste disposal is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Understanding these regulations will help in selecting recycling and disposal processes for Na/S batteries that are environmentally acceptable and cost effective. Treatment processes for spent Na/S battery wastes are in the beginning stages of development, so a final evaluation of the impact of RCRA regulations on these treatment processes is not possible. The objectives of tills report on battery recycling and disposal are as follows: Provide an overview of RCRA regulations and requirements as they apply to Na/S battery recycling and disposal so that battery developers can understand what is required of them to comply with these regulations; Analyze existing RCRA regulations for recycling and disposal and anticipated trends in these regulations and perform a preliminary regulatory analysis for potential battery disposal and recycling processes. This report assumes that long-term Na/S battery disposal processes will be capable of handling large quantities of spent batteries. The term disposal includes treatment processes that may incorporate recycling of battery constituents. The environmental regulations analyzed in this report are limited to US regulations. This report gives an overview of RCRA and discusses RCRA regulations governing Na/S battery disposal and a preliminary regulatory analysis for Na/S battery disposal.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of Bacillus subtilis glucose starvation-inducible genes: control of gsiA by the ComP-ComA signal transduction system.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, J P; Bukusoglu, G; Sonenshein, A L

    1992-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis glucose starvation-inducible transcription units, gsiA and gsiB, were characterized by DNA sequencing, transcriptional mapping, mutational analysis, and expression in response to changes in environmental conditions. The gsiA operon was shown to consist of two genes, gsiAA and gsiAB, predicted to encode 44.9- and 4.8-kDa polypeptides, respectively. The gsiB locus contains a single cistron which encodes a protein of unusual structure; most of its amino acids are arranged in five highly conserved, tandemly repeated units of 20 amino acids. The 5' ends of gsiA and gsiB mRNAs were located by primer extension analysis; their locations suggest that both are transcribed by RNA polymerase containing sigma A. Expression of both gsiA and gsiB was induced by starvation for glucose or phosphate or by addition of decoyinine, but only gsiA was induced by exhaustion of nutrient broth or by amino acid starvation. Regulation of gsiA expression was shown to be dependent upon the two-component signal transduction system ComP-ComA, which also controls expression of genetic competence genes. Mutations in mecA bypassed the dependency of gsiA expression on ComA. Disruption of gsiA relieved glucose repression of sporulation but did not otherwise interfere with sporulation, development of competence, motility, or glucose starvation survival. We propose that gsiA and gsiB are members of an adaptive pathway of genes whose products are involved in responses to nutrient deprivation other than sporulation. Images PMID:1378051

  2. Decision making under uncertainty: An investigation into the application of formal decision-making methods to safety issue decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, M P

    1992-12-01

    As part of the NRC-sponsored program to study the implications of Generic Issue 57, Effects of Fire Protection System Actuation on Safety-Related Equipment,'' a subtask was performed to evaluate the applicability of formal decision analysis methods to generic issues cost/benefit-type decisions and to apply these methods to the GI-57 results. In this report, the numerical results obtained from the analysis of three plants (two PWRs and one BWR) as developed in the technical resolution program for GI-57 were studied. For each plant, these results included a calculation of the person-REM averted due to various accident scenarios and various proposed modifications to mitigate the accident scenarios identified. These results were recomputed to break out the benefit in terms of contributions due to random event scenarios, fire event scenarios, and seismic event scenarios. Furthermore, the benefits associated with risk (in terms of person-REM) averted from earthquakes at three different seismic ground motion levels were separately considered. Given this data, formal decision methodologies involving decision trees, value functions, and utility functions were applied to this basic data. It is shown that the formal decision methodology can be applied at several different levels. Examples are given in which the decision between several retrofits is changed from that resulting from a simple cost/benefit-ratio criterion by virtue of the decision-makinger's expressed (and assumed) preferences.

  3. Safety Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, James H.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Five articles in this issue focus on safety education in agricultural laboratories. Topics discussed include teacher liability; elements of a safety instruction program; state and federal safety standards; ground fault current protection; and eye protection requirements and equipment. (SK)

  4. Assessing farm tractor incidents and awareness levels of operators for tractor safety issues in the Hatay province of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Keskin, S Görücü; Keskin, M; Soysal, Y

    2012-04-01

    Studies and statistical data on safety issues related to farm tractors and machinery are very limited in developing countries, including Turkey. This study was carried out to investigate tractor-related incidents in the Hatay province, located in the mid-south of Turkey. A questionnaire was conducted with 107 tractor operators using face-to-face interviews. Data were evaluated according to the incident type, machinery involved, and mechanism of injury or fatality. A total of 101 incidents were reported by 77 of the 107 respondents. Most of the incidents were due to tractor rollovers (65.4%), 14.8% of the incidents were due to entanglement of body parts in moving machinery, and 12.9% involved crashing into other vehicles or obstacles. The leading cause of the incidents was personal mistakes (60.4%). Fatalities resulted from 25.7% of the incidents, while 45.5% of the incidents caused non-fatal injuries. Only 5.6% of the tractors had a ROPS-enclosed cab. The percentage of ROPS-equipped tractors was 19.6%, while 41.3% of the tractors had a shade cover and 33.6% had no protective structure. Only one of the respondents used a seatbelt, although 44.9% of them stated that seatbelts should be used. It was also found that only 13.5% of the operators had training in work safety, while 95.1% stated that incidents might be reduced if people were trained. Development of appropriate policies and training programs are needed for safer operation of agricultural machinery to reduce injuries and fatalities due to farm accidents. PMID:22655521

  5. Inhaled pulmonary vasodilators for persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn: safety issues relating to drug administration and delivery devices

    PubMed Central

    Cosa, Nathan; Costa, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) aims to reduce pulmonary vascular resistance while maintaining systemic vascular resistance. Selective pulmonary vasodilation may be achieved by targeting pulmonary-specific pathways or by delivering vasodilators directly to the lungs. Abrupt withdrawal of a pulmonary vasodilator can cause rebound pulmonary hypertension. Therefore, use of consistent delivery systems that allow for careful monitoring of drug delivery is important. This manuscript reviews published studies of inhaled vasodilators used for treatment of PPHN and provides an overview of safety issues associated with drug delivery and delivery devices as they relate to the risk of rebound pulmonary hypertension. Off-label use of aerosolized prostacyclins and an aerosolized prostaglandin in neonates with PPHN has been reported; however, evidence from large randomized clinical trials is lacking. The amount of a given dose of aerosolized drug that is actually delivered to the lungs is often unknown, and the actual amount of drug deposited in the lungs can be affected by several factors, including patient size, nebulizer used, and placement of the nebulizer within the breathing circuit. Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is the only pulmonary vasodilator approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of PPHN. The iNO delivery device, INOmax DSIR®IR, is designed to constantly monitor NO, NO2, and O2 deliveries and is equipped with audible and visual alarms to alert providers of abrupt discontinuation and incorrect drug concentration. Other safety features of this device include two independent backup delivery systems, a backup drug cylinder, a battery that provides up to 6 hours of uninterrupted medication delivery, and 27 alarms that monitor delivery, dosage, and system functions. The ability of the drug delivery device to provide safe, consistent dosing is important to consider when selecting a pulmonary vasodilator. PMID

  6. Inhaled pulmonary vasodilators for persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn: safety issues relating to drug administration and delivery devices.

    PubMed

    Cosa, Nathan; Costa, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) aims to reduce pulmonary vascular resistance while maintaining systemic vascular resistance. Selective pulmonary vasodilation may be achieved by targeting pulmonary-specific pathways or by delivering vasodilators directly to the lungs. Abrupt withdrawal of a pulmonary vasodilator can cause rebound pulmonary hypertension. Therefore, use of consistent delivery systems that allow for careful monitoring of drug delivery is important. This manuscript reviews published studies of inhaled vasodilators used for treatment of PPHN and provides an overview of safety issues associated with drug delivery and delivery devices as they relate to the risk of rebound pulmonary hypertension. Off-label use of aerosolized prostacyclins and an aerosolized prostaglandin in neonates with PPHN has been reported; however, evidence from large randomized clinical trials is lacking. The amount of a given dose of aerosolized drug that is actually delivered to the lungs is often unknown, and the actual amount of drug deposited in the lungs can be affected by several factors, including patient size, nebulizer used, and placement of the nebulizer within the breathing circuit. Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is the only pulmonary vasodilator approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of PPHN. The iNO delivery device, INOmax DSIR®IR, is designed to constantly monitor NO, NO2, and O2 deliveries and is equipped with audible and visual alarms to alert providers of abrupt discontinuation and incorrect drug concentration. Other safety features of this device include two independent backup delivery systems, a backup drug cylinder, a battery that provides up to 6 hours of uninterrupted medication delivery, and 27 alarms that monitor delivery, dosage, and system functions. The ability of the drug delivery device to provide safe, consistent dosing is important to consider when selecting a pulmonary vasodilator. PMID

  7. Mechanism of 'GSI oscillations' in electron capture by highly charged hydrogen-like atomic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Krainov, V. P.

    2012-07-15

    We suggest a qualitative explanation of oscillations in electron capture decays of hydrogen-like {sup 140}Pr and {sup 142}Pm ions observed recently in an ion experimental storage ring (ESR) of Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) mbH, Darmstadt, Germany. This explanation is based on the electron multiphoton Rabi oscillations between two Zeeman states of the hyperfine ground level with the total angular momentum F = 1/2. The Zeeman splitting is produced by a constant magnetic field in the ESR. Transitions between these states are produced by the second, sufficiently strong alternating magnetic field that approximates realistic fields in the GSI ESR. The Zeeman splitting amounts to only about 10{sup -5} eV. This allows explaining the observed quantum beats with the period 7 s.

  8. Digital geological information delivery in the Geological Survey of Ireland (GSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Mary

    2014-05-01

    Digital information is delivered though a web portal with other spatial data from the Department of Communications Energy and Natural Resources. Individual viewers specific to major GSI topics can be access for a central web page on the GSI website. Most data is available to download from our data download site the Interactive Web Data Delivery System (IWDDS) which is interactively linked to our main viewers. More recent viewers include 3D viewers able to show the topography of a selected area, as well as dynamic legends for some layers and the ability to choose from a selection of basemaps and choose the transparency of each basemap. The hardware infrastructure for web delivery is based on virtual server technology and SAN technology, this maximises uptime and ease of administration as well as providing a flexible scaling of architecture as the need arises.

  9. Assimilation of NUCAPS Retrieved Profiles in GSI for Unique Forecasting Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily Beth; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Blankenship, Clay

    2015-01-01

    Hyperspectral IR profiles can be assimilated in GSI as a separate observation other than radiosondes with only changes to tables in the fix directory. Assimilation of profiles does produce changes to analysis fields and evidenced by: Innovations larger than +/-2.0 K are present and represent where individual profiles impact the final temperature analysis.The updated temperature analysis is colder behind the cold front and warmer in the warm sector. The updated moisture analysis is modified more in the low levels and tends to be drier than the original model background Analysis of model output shows: Differences relative to 13-km RAP analyses are smaller when profiles are assimilated with NUCAPS errors. CAPE is under-forecasted when assimilating NUCAPS profiles, which could be problematic for severe weather forecasting Refining the assimilation technique to incorporate an error covariance matrix and creating a separate GSI module to assimilate satellite profiles may improve results.

  10. Nuclear astrophysics experiments with stored, highly-charged ions at FRS-ESR at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Scheidenberger, Christoph

    2010-08-12

    At the FRS-ESR complex of GSI a nuclear physics program with exotic nuclei has been established in last 18 years, which also addresses key questions and nuclear properties relevant in nuclear astrophysics. The paper summarizes production of exotic nuclei, lifetime studies of highly-charged ions, direct mass measurements and reactions at internal targets. A few comments on the analysis of two-body weak decays are given.

  11. Real-time Aerosol Forecasting over North America using RAP-Chem and the GSI.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    RAP-Chem is an implementation of WRF-Chem meteorology-chemistry model that is run daily at NOAA/ESRL over continental domain for air-quality forecasting. The chemical forecasts are combined with observations of species using three-dimensional variational data assimilation procedure implemented in the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI). In the presentation we detail the method of the assimilation and show verification statistics of the model performance.

  12. Grid Computing at GSI for ALICE and FAIR - present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Kilian; Uhlig, Florian; Karabowicz, Radoslaw; Montiel-Gonzalez, Almudena; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Preuss, Carsten

    2012-12-01

    The future FAIR experiments CBM and PANDA have computing requirements that fall in a category that could currently not be satisfied by one single computing centre. One needs a larger, distributed computing infrastructure to cope with the amount of data to be simulated and analysed. Since 2002, GSI operates a tier2 center for ALICE@CERN. The central component of the GSI computing facility and hence the core of the ALICE tier2 centre is a LSF/SGE batch farm, currently split into three subclusters with a total of 15000 CPU cores shared by the participating experiments, and accessible both locally and soon also completely via Grid. In terms of data storage, a 5.5 PB Lustre file system, directly accessible from all worker nodes is maintained, as well as a 300 TB xrootd-based Grid storage element. Based on this existing expertise, and utilising ALICE's middleware ‘AliEn’, the Grid infrastructure for PANDA and CBM is being built. Besides a tier0 centre at GSI, the computing Grids of the two FAIR collaborations encompass now more than 17 sites in 11 countries and are constantly expanding. The operation of the distributed FAIR computing infrastructure benefits significantly from the experience gained with the ALICE tier2 centre. A close collaboration between ALICE Offline and FAIR provides mutual advantages. The employment of a common Grid middleware as well as compatible simulation and analysis software frameworks ensure significant synergy effects.

  13. Development and Implementation of Dynamic Scripts to Execute Cycled WRF/GSI Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Berndt, Emily; Li, Quanli; Watson, Leela

    2014-01-01

    Automating the coupling of data assimilation (DA) and modeling systems is a unique challenge in the numerical weather prediction (NWP) research community. In recent years, the Development Testbed Center (DTC) has released well-documented tools such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) DA system that can be easily downloaded, installed, and run by researchers on their local systems. However, developing a coupled system in which the various preprocessing, DA, model, and postprocessing capabilities are all integrated can be labor-intensive if one has little experience with any of these individual systems. Additionally, operational modeling entities generally have specific coupling methodologies that can take time to understand and develop code to implement properly. To better enable collaborating researchers to perform modeling and DA experiments with GSI, the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed a set of Perl scripts that couple GSI and WRF in a cycling methodology consistent with the use of real-time, regional observation data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/Environmental Modeling Center (EMC). Because Perl is open source, the code can be easily downloaded and executed regardless of the user's native shell environment. This paper will provide a description of this open-source code and descriptions of a number of the use cases that have been performed by SPoRT collaborators using the scripts on different computing systems.

  14. Use of MODIS Cloud Top Pressure to Improve Assimilation Yields of AIRS Radiances in GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Radiances from hyperspectral sounders such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) are routinely assimilated both globally and regionally in operational numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems using the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system. However, only thinned, cloud-free radiances from a 281-channel subset are used, so the overall percentage of these observations that are assimilated is somewhere on the order of 5%. Cloud checks are performed within GSI to determine which channels peak above cloud top; inaccuracies may lead to less assimilated radiances or introduction of biases from cloud-contaminated radiances.Relatively large footprint from AIRS may not optimally represent small-scale cloud features that might be better resolved by higher-resolution imagers like the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Objective of this project is to "swap" the MODIS-derived cloud top pressure (CTP) for that designated by the AIRS-only quality control within GSI to test the hypothesis that better representation of cloud features will result in higher assimilated radiance yields and improved forecasts.

  15. Mediator's Assessment of Safety Issues and Concerns (MASIC): reliability and validity of a new intimate partner violence screen.

    PubMed

    Pokman, Viktoria; Rossi, Fernanda S; Holtzworth-Munroe, Amy; Applegate, Amy G; Beck, Connie J A; D'Onofrio, Brian M

    2014-10-01

    We investigated reliability and validity of the Mediator's Assessment of Safety Issues and Concerns (MASIC), a screening interview for intimate partner violence and abuse (IPV/A) in family mediation settings. Clients at three family mediation clinics in the United States and Australia (N = 391) provided reports of the other parent's IPV/A. Internal consistency of the total screen was excellent. A confirmatory factor analysis provided evidence that the MASIC assesses seven types of IPV/A: psychological abuse, coercive controlling behaviors, threats of severe violence, physical violence, severe physical violence, sexual violence, and stalking. Sex differences on differing types of violence victimization were generally consistent with previous research. Higher levels of victimization predicted self-reported consequences of abuse (e.g., fear, injuries). More abusive parties, as identified by their partners on the MASIC, had more Protective Orders and No Contact Orders and criminal convictions and crimes potentially related to IPV/A. Results provide initial evidence of the reliability and validity of the MASIC but more research is needed. PMID:24671737

  16. Comment on 'Time modulation of K-shell electron capture decay rates of H-like heavy ions at GSI experiments.'

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.; Physics; Weizmann Inst. of Science; Tel Aviv Univ.

    2010-04-16

    A Comment on the Letter by A.N. Ivanov and P. Kienle, Physical Review Letters volume 103, Issue 6, 062502 (2009). The authors of the Letter offer a Reply to experimental data at GSI, the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K shell electron capture decays of the H-like heavy ions with one electron in the K shell, such as {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+}, {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, and {sup 122}I{sup 52+}, are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC} of the order of a few seconds, obeying an A scaling T{sub EX}=A/20 s, where A is the mass number of the mother nuclei, and with amplitudes a{sub d {sup EC}}{approx}0.21. We show that these data can be explained in terms of the interference of two massive neutrino mass eigenstates. The appearance of the interference term is due to overlap of massive neutrino mass eigenstate energies and of the wave functions of the daughter ions in two-body decay channels, caused by the energy and momentum uncertainties introduced by time differential detection of the daughter ions in GSI experiments.

  17. A regional GSI-based EnKF system for the Rapid Refresh configuration: Tests for Satellite Radiance Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kefeng; Xue, Ming

    2015-04-01

    A regional ensemble Kalman filter data assimilation (EnKF) system based on the NCEP operational Grid-point Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system has been established for the target Rapid Refresh (RAP) applications. The EnKF system borrows the data processing and observation operators from the GSI system, and pre-calculates observation priors using the GSI. The filter is based on the serial ensemble square-root Kalman filter (EnSRF) and updates both the state vector and observation priors and its distributed memory parallelization is carried out at the state vector level. In this study, the impact of satellite radiance including AMSU, AIRS, MHS and HIRS within the established EnKF-RAP framework was examined. Testing is performed at the ~40 km grid spacing, and its performance is compared to the GSI system which uses three dimensional variation method. The performance is evaluated in terms of short-range (up to 18 hours) forecast errors verified again soundings. The assimilation of AMSU-A data improved the forecast accuracy for all the verified variables especially for the wind components; the assimilation of AIRS data greatly improved the forecast accuracy of relative humidity; when all the radiance data were assimilated, the forecast is the best. The forecast started from EnKF analysis is consistently better than from GSI analysis though the relative improvement is smaller than GSI. In additional, the configurations like bias correction and thinning for radiance assimilation within ENKF-RAP will be presented and discussed.

  18. Multiple positive and negative elements involved in the regulation of expression of GSY1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, Indira; Miller, Steven; Meinke, Marilyn; LaPorte, David C

    2003-07-18

    GSY1 is one of the two genes encoding glycogen synthase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both the GSY1 message and the protein levels increased as cells approached stationary phase. A combination of deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis revealed a complex promoter containing multiple positive and negative regulatory elements. Expression of GSY1 was dependent upon the presence of a TATA box and two stress response elements (STREs). Expression was repressed by Mig1, which mediates responses to glucose, and Rox1, which mediates responses to oxygen. Characterization of the GSY1 promoter also revealed a novel negative element. This element, N1, can repress expression driven by either an STRE or a heterologous element, the UAS of CYC1. Repression by N1 is dependent on the number of these elements that are present, but is independent of their orientation. N1 repressed expression when placed either upstream or downstream of the UAS, although the latter position is more effective. Gel shift analysis detected a factor that appears to bind to the N1 element. The complexity of the GSY1 promoter, which includes two STREs and three distinct negative elements, was surprising. This complexity may allow GSY1 to respond to a wide range of environmental stresses. PMID:12697770

  19. Notch3-specific inhibition using siRNA knockdown or GSI sensitizes paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Haeyoun; Jeong, Ju-Yeon; Song, Ji-Ye; Kim, Tae Heon; Kim, Gwangil; Huh, Jin Hyung; Kwon, Ah-Young; Jung, Sang Geun; An, Hee Jung

    2016-07-01

    Notch signaling plays an important role in ovarian cancer chemoresistance, which is responsible for recurrence. Gamma-secretase inhibitor (GSI) is a broad-spectrum Notch inhibitor, but it has serious side effects. The efficacy of Notch3-specific inhibition in paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancers was assessed in this study, which has not yet been evaluated relative to GSI. To analyze the effect of Notch3-specific inhibition on paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancers, we compared cell viability, apoptosis, cell migration, angiogenesis, cell cycle, and spheroid formation after treatment with either Notch3 siRNA or GSI in paclitaxel-resistant SKpac cells and parental SKOV3 cells. Expression levels of survival, cell cycle, and apoptosis-related proteins were measured and compared between groups. Notch3 was significantly overexpressed in chemoresistant cancer tissues and cell lines relative to chemosensitive group. In paclitaxel-resistant cancer cells, Notch inhibition significantly reduced viability, migration, and angiogenesis and increased apoptosis, thereby boosting sensitivity to paclitaxel. Spheroid formation was also significantly reduced. Both Notch3 siRNA-treated cells and GSI-treated cells arrested in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Proteins of cell survival, cyclin D1 and cyclin D3 were reduced, whereas p21 and p27 were elevated. Both GSI and Notch3 siRNA treatment reduced expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (BCL-W, BCL2, and BCL-XL) and increased expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bad, Bak, Bim, Bid, and Bax). These results indicate that Notch3-specific inhibition sensitizes paclitaxel-resistant cancer cells to paclitaxel treatment, with an efficacy comparable to that of GSI. This approach would be likely to avoid the side effects of broad-spectrum GSI treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26207830

  20. Interdisciplinary Quality Improvement Conference: Using a Revised Morbidity and Mortality Format to Focus on Systems-Based Patient Safety Issues in a VA Hospital: Design and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gerstein, Wendy H; Ledford, Judith; Cooper, Jacqueline; Lloyd, Melissa G; Moore, Timothy; Harji, Farzana; Twitty, Vivian; Brooks, Annette; Oliver, Rosalinda C; Goff, James M

    2016-03-01

    The Veterans Healthcare Administration (VA) has embraced patient safety and quality improvement in the quest to improve care for veterans. The New Mexico VA Health Care System introduced a new morbidity and mortality conference, called the Interdisciplinary Quality Improvement Conference (IQIC), using patient case presentations to focus on underlying systems in the clinical care environment. The revised conference design also effectively teaches the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core requirements for resident education. A formal process was established for case selection, presentation, systems issue identification, tracking, and follow-up. The IQIC has enabled the identification of more than 20 system issues at the study institution. Outcome data show lasting improvement in system issues that were addressed by this mechanism. The VA IQIC is an effective method to both identify and correct systems issues that affect patient care and is an effective method for teaching residents the 6 ACGME requirements for residency education. PMID:25332453

  1. Food Safety Education Using an Interactive Multimedia Kiosk in a WIC Setting: Correlates of Client Satisfaction and Practical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trepka, Mary Jo; Newman, Frederick L.; Huffman, Fatma G.; Dixon, Zisca

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess acceptability of food safety education delivered by interactive multimedia (IMM) in a Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children Program (WIC) clinic. Methods: Female clients or caregivers (n = 176) completed the food-handling survey; then an IMM food safety education program on a computer kiosk.…

  2. A Case Study of Environmental, Health and Safety Issues Involving the Burlington, Massachusetts Public School System. "Tips, Suggestions, and Resources for Investigating and Resolving EHS Issues in Schools."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresser, Todd H.

    An investigation was initiated concerning the environmental health within the Burlington, Massachusetts public school system to determine what specific environmental hazards were present and determine ways of eliminating them. This report presents 20 case studies that detail the environmental health issues involved, the approaches taken in…

  3. RECENT TEST RESULTS OF THE FAST-PULSED 4 T COS DIPOLE GSI 001.

    SciTech Connect

    MORITZ, G.; KAUGERTS, J.; ESCALLIER, J.; GANETIS, G.; JAIN, A.; MARONE, A.; MURATORE, J.; THOMAS, R.; WANDERER, P.; ET AL.

    2005-05-26

    For the FAIR-project at GSI a model dipole was built at BNL with the nominal field of 4 T and a nominal ramp rate of 1 T/S. The magnet design was similar to the RHIC dipole, with some changes for loss reduction and better cooling. The magnet was already successfully tested in a vertical cryostat, with good training behavior. Cryogenic losses were measured and first results of field harmonics were published. However, for a better understanding of the cooling process, quench currents at several ramp rates were investigated. Detailed measurements of the field harmonics at 2 T/S between 0 and 4 T were performed.

  4. Production of high current proton beams using complex H-rich molecules at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adonin, A.; Barth, W.; Heymach, F.; Hollinger, R.; Vormann, H.; Yakushev, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this contribution, the concept of production of intense proton beams using molecular heavy ion beams from an ion source is described, as well as the indisputable advantages of this technique for operation of the GSI linear accelerator. The results of experimental investigations, including mass-spectra analysis and beam emittance measurements, with different ion beams (CH3+,C2H4+,C3H7+) using various gaseous and liquid substances (methane, ethane, propane, isobutane, and iodoethane) at the ion source are summarized. Further steps to improve the ion source and injector performance with molecular beams are depicted.

  5. Production of high current proton beams using complex H-rich molecules at GSI.

    PubMed

    Adonin, A; Barth, W; Heymach, F; Hollinger, R; Vormann, H; Yakushev, A

    2016-02-01

    In this contribution, the concept of production of intense proton beams using molecular heavy ion beams from an ion source is described, as well as the indisputable advantages of this technique for operation of the GSI linear accelerator. The results of experimental investigations, including mass-spectra analysis and beam emittance measurements, with different ion beams (CH3(+),C2H4(+),C3H7(+)) using various gaseous and liquid substances (methane, ethane, propane, isobutane, and iodoethane) at the ion source are summarized. Further steps to improve the ion source and injector performance with molecular beams are depicted. PMID:26932072

  6. Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: methane from coal seams

    SciTech Connect

    Ethridge, L.J.; Cowan, C.E.; Riedel, E.F.

    1980-07-01

    Potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from the recovery of gas from coalbeds are identified and examined. The technology of methane recovery is described and economic and legal barriers to production are discussed. (ACR)

  7. Use of MODIS Cloud Top Pressure to Improve Assimilation Yields of AIRS Radiances in GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Improvements to global and regional numerical weather prediction have been demonstrated through assimilation of data from NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Current operational data assimilation systems use AIRS radiances, but impact on regional forecasts has been much smaller than for global forecasts. Previously, it has been shown that cloud top designation associated with quality control procedures within the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system used operationally by a number of Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) partners may not provide the best representation of cloud top pressure (CTP). Because this designated CTP determines which channels are cloud-free and, thus, available for assimilation, ensuring the most accurate representation of this value is imperative to obtaining the greatest impact from satellite radiances. This paper examines the assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data used in operational numerical weather prediction by comparing analysis increments and numerical forecasts generated using operational techniques with a research technique that swaps CTP from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for the value of CTP calculated from the radiances within GSI.

  8. Towards the Handing of Cloud-Affected Infrared Radiances in the GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, William

    2012-01-01

    In the gridpoint statistical interpolation (GSI) data assimilation algorithm, only thermal infrared measurements determined to be uncontaminated by clouds are assimilated. Using this approach, typically only 19-29% of footprints are deemed to have no cloud affects through the measured spectra. This study will discuss the efforts underway at the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, in conjunction with the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA), to actively assimilate these morecomplicated observations by using a graybody assumption. In the GSI, cloud top pressure and effective cloud amount are retrieved concurrently using a minimum residual method. This study will address the limitations and advantages of the technique and the modifications underway to the assimilation system to incorporate those two parameters into the radiative transfer forward operators and TL/AD calculations. Furthermore, it will explain the efforts underway to incorporate these parameters into the control vector so that they can be altered variationally as part of the minimization.

  9. Characterization of complex rock masses by combined borehole GSI and sonic logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapigni, Michele; Agliardi, Federico; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2015-04-01

    Reliable assessment of the strength and hydraulic properties of rock masses at depth is key to a number of geological, engineering and geohazard applications, including tunnelling, reservoir characterization and slope stability analysis. Rock mass investigations usually exploit direct geomechanical core logging and indirect geophysical techniques. A cost-effective and reliable characterisation of rock mass quality by direct investigation is often hampered by extremely variable lithological and structural conditions. On the other hand, available indirect methods correlating rock mass properties with geophysical investigation results apply to near-surface (upper few tens of meters in depth) and rely on rock mass descriptors poorly suitable for complex rocks (including deformed, weathered, or damaged rocks). Thus, there is a need to set up: 1) robust and versatile approaches to quantify (direct) rock mass descriptors suitable for complex geological conditions from drillcores; 2) statistically-sound relationships between such descriptors and rock mass properties obtained by (indirect) geophysical methods. We focus on the analysis of relationships between sonic P-wave velocity and rock mass quality described by the Geological Strength Index (GSI), both quantified in deep boreholes. The GSI is a suitable descriptor of rock mass structure and weathering, suitable for application to nearly all kind of rock types and geological conditions. We used site investigation data gathered to design a 9.2 km long headrace tunnel in a crystalline core complex of the central italian Alps. We analysed three boreholes up to 400 m deep in gneiss and meta-sedimentary rocks (including gypsum-anhydrite, marbles, decomposed carbonates) from which high quality HQ drillcores were extracted, allowing high-resolution geological and geomechanical logging. In the same boreholes, geophysical logging was performed using a "full-wave" sonic tool (transmitter operating at 27 kHz, receivers recording up

  10. Issues for resolving adverse effects on the safety culture of human work underload and workload transitions in complex human-machine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, T.G.

    1996-08-01

    A workshop was conducted whose specific purpose was to build on earlier work of the US National Research Council, US federal government agencies, and the larger human factors community to: (1) clarify human factors issues pertaining to degraded safety performance in advanced human-machine systems(e.g., nuclear production, transportation, aerospace) due to human work underload and workload transition, and (2) develop strategies for resolving these issues. The workshop affirmed that: (1) work underload and workload transition are issues that will have to be addressed by designers of advanced human-machine systems, especially those relying on automation, if cost, performance, safety, and operator acceptability are to be optimized, (2) human machine allocation models, standards and guidelines which go beyond simple capability approaches will be needed to preclude or seriously diminish the work underload and workload transition problems, and (3) the 16 workload definition, measurement, situational awareness, and trust issues identified during the workshop, need resolution if these models, standards, and guidelines are to be achieved.

  11. Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV

    SciTech Connect

    William J. O’Donnell; Donald S. Griffin

    2007-05-07

    The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

  12. 76 FR 58846 - Final Interim Staff Guidance: Review of Evaluation To Address Gas Accumulation Issues in Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... guidance documents. Disposition: On November 12, 2009 (74 FR 58323), the NRC staff issued proposed DC/COL....5.2, ``Containment Spray System'' of NUREG-0800, ``Standard Review Plan for the Review of...

  13. [Topical issues of biological safety under current conditions. Part 3. Scientific provision for the national regulation of the biological safety framework in its broad interpretation].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G; Smolensky, V Yu; Ezhlova, E B; Demina, Yu V; Toporkov, V P; Toporkov, A V; Lyapin, M N; Kutyrev, V V

    2014-01-01

    Consequent of investigation concerned with biological safety (BS) framework development in its broad interpretation, reflected in the Russian Federation State Acts, identified have been conceptual entity parameters of the up-to-date broad interpretation of BS, which have formed a part of the developed by the authors system for surveillance (prophylaxis, localization, indication, identification, and diagnostics) and control (prophylaxis, localization, and response/elimination) over the emergency situations of biological (sanitary-epidemiological) character. The System functionality is activated through supplying the content with information data which are concerned with monitoring and control of specific internal and external threats in the sphere of BS provision fixed in the Supplement 2 of the International Health Regulations (IHR, 2005), and with the previously characterized nomenclature of hazardous biological factors. The system is designed as a network-based research-and-practice tool for evaluation of the situation in the sphere of BS provision, as well as assessment of efficacy of management decision making as regards BS control and proper State policy implementation. Most of the system elements either directly or indirectly relate to the scope of activities conducted by Federal Service for Surveillance in the Sphere of Consumers Rights Protection and Human Welfare, being substantial argument for allocating coordination functions in the sphere of BS provision to this government agency and consistent with its function as the State Coordinator on IHR (2005). The data collected serve as materials to Draft Federal Law "Concerning biological safety provision of the population". PMID:25971137

  14. An Examination of Internet Filtering and Safety Policy Trends and Issues in South Carolina's K-12 Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicks, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    School districts have implemented filtering and safety policies in response to legislative and social mandates to protect students from the proliferation of objectionable online content. Subject related literature suggests these policies are more restrictive than legal mandates require and are adversely affecting information access and…

  15. Immunotoxicity of the colour additive caramel colour III; a review on complicated issues in the safety evaluation of a food additive.

    PubMed

    Houben, G F; Penninks, A H

    1994-08-12

    Food additives can be regarded as the safest constituents of our daily food. Nevertheless, complicated issues with respect to their safety evaluation do also occur. In this review paper, some of these issues are illustrated by the description and evaluation of the research on the immunotoxicity of the food additive Caramel Colour III. Caramel Colour III is commonly used as a color additive in many products for human consumption. Toxicity studies conducted in the seventies demonstrated that administration of Caramel Colour III can cause a reduction in total white blood cell counts in rats, due to reduced lymphocyte counts. Studies reviewed in this paper demonstrated several other effects of Caramel Colour III on the immune system of rodents, including disturbed immune functions and changed resistance in infection models. In addition, studies in rats demonstrated that most of the effects occur only when the animals are fed a diet low in vitamin B6. The imidazole derivative 2-acetyl-4(5)-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxy-butyl)-imidazole (THI) was found to be responsible for the immunotoxicity. Issues such as the mechanism of action of THI and the role of vitamin B6 are discussed. Finally, the results of a human intervention study and the observed effect levels of THI in rats are discussed in terms of safety of the use of Caramel Colour III in our daily food supply. PMID:8079366

  16. Feasibility of OTR imaging of non-relativistic ions at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The feasibility of using the optical transition radiation (OTR) generated as a 11.4- to 300-MeV/u ion beam passes through a single metal conducting plane for a minimally intercepting beam profile monitor for GSI/Darmstadt has been evaluated for the first time. Although these are non-relativistic beams, their beta and gamma values are similar to the 80-keV electron-beam imaging studies previously done on the CTF3 injector. With anticipated beam intensities of 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 11} particles per pulse and the predicted charge-squared dependence of OTR, the ion charge state becomes a critical factor for photon production. The OTR signal from the ion charge integrated over the video field time should be comparable to or larger than the CTF3 electron case. These signal strengths will allow a series of experiments to be done that should further elucidate the working regime of this technique.

  17. Bacillus subtilis GSY 1057 assay for aflatoxin B activation by rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri).

    PubMed

    Schoenhard, G L; Bishop, P E; Lee, D J; Sinnhuber, R O

    1975-09-01

    A rapid and sensitive microbial assay was developed to detect lethal products of aflatoxin B metabolism by rainbow trout (Salmon gairdneri) Mt. Shasta strain. Bacillus subtilis GSY 1057 (hisA1, uvr-1, metB4), a DNA repair deficient strain, was incubated for 20 min in the 20,000 times g supernate from trout liver homogenates which had been preincubated for 10 min with various levels of aflatoxin B. Serial dilutions of the incubation mixture were plated in triplicate on tryptose blood agar base plates and colonies were counted after 12 hr at 37 degrees C. One mumole aflatoxin B in 3.2 ml incubation mixture reduced viability 60%. PMID:808527

  18. Is the GSI anomaly due to neutrino oscillations? A real time perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jun; Boyanovsky, Daniel; Hutasoit, Jimmy A.; Holman, Richard

    2010-08-15

    We study a model for the 'GSI anomaly' in which we obtain the time evolution of the population of parent and daughter particles directly in real time, considering explicitly the quantum entanglement between the daughter particle and neutrino mass eigenstates in the two-body decay. We confirm that the decay rate of the parent particle and the growth rate of the daughter particle do not feature a time modulation from interference of neutrino mass eigenstates. The lack of interference is a consequence of the orthogonality of the mass eigenstates. This result also follows from the density matrix obtained by tracing out the unobserved neutrino states. We confirm this result by providing a complementary explanation based on Cutkosky rules applied to the Feynman diagram that describes the self energy of the parent particle.

  19. The ASY-EOS experiment at GSI: investigating symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, P.; Chartier, M.; Cozma, M. D.; De Filippo, E.; Le Fèvre, A.; Gannon, S.; Gašparić, I.; Kiš, M.; Kupny, S.; Leifels, Y.; Lemmon, R. C.; Li, Q.; Łukasik, J.; Marini, P.; Pawłowski, P.; Santoro, S.; Trautmann, W.; Veselsky, M.; Acosta, L.; Adamczyk, M.; Al-Ajlan, A.; Al-Garawi, M.; Al-Homaidhi, S.; Amorini, F.; Auditore, L.; Aumann, T.; Ayyad, Y.; Baran, V.; Basrak, Z.; Bassini, R.; Benlliure, J.; Boiano, C.; Boisjoli, M.; Boretzky, K.; Brzychczyk, J.; Budzanowski, A.; Cardella, G.; Cammarata, P.; Chajecki, Z.; Chbihi, A.; Colonna, M.; Czech, B.; Di Toro, M.; Famiano, M.; Greco, V.; Grassi, L.; Guazzoni, C.; Guazzoni, P.; Heil, M.; Heilborn, L.; Introzzi, R.; Isobe, T.; Kezzar, K.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kurz, N.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Lasko, P.; Lombardo, I.; Lynch, W. G.; Matthews, Z.; May, L.; Minniti, T.; Mostazo, M.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Pleskac, R.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Reifarth, R.; Reisdorf, W.; Riccio, F.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Rossi, D.; Simon, H.; Skwirczynska, I.; Sosin, Z.; Stuhl, L.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tsang, M. B.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.; Wieloch, A.; Wigg, P.; Wolter, H. H.; Wu, P.; Yennello, S.; Zambon, P.; Zetta, L.; Zoric, M.

    2014-03-01

    The elliptic-flow ratio of neutrons with respect to protons or light complex particles in reactions of heavy-ions at pre-relativistic energies has been proposed as an observable sensitive to the strength of the symmetry term of the nuclear equation of state at supra-saturation densities. The results obtained from the existing FOPI/LAND data for 197Au+197Au collisions at 400 MeV/nucleon in comparison with the UrQMD model simulations favoured a moderately soft symmetry term, but suffer from a considerable statistical uncertainty. These results have been confirmed by an independent analysis based on the Tübingen QMD simulations. In order to obtain an improved data set for Au+Au collisions and to extend the study to other systems, a new experiment was carried out at the GSI laboratory by the ASY-EOS collaboration. The present status of the data analysis is reported

  20. The ASY-EOS experiment at GSI: investigating the symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, P.; Chartier, M.; De Filippo, E.; Le Fèvre, A.; Gannon, S.; Gašparić, I.; Kiš, M.; Kupny, S.; Leifels, Y.; Lemmon, R. C.; Łukasik, J.; Marini, P.; Pagano, A.; Pawłowski, P.; Santoro, S.; Trautmann, W.; Veselsky, M.; Acosta, L.; Adamczyk, M.; Al-Ajlan, A.; Al-Garawi, M.; Al-Homaidhi, S.; Amorini, F.; Auditore, L.; Aumann, T.; Ayyad, Y.; Baran, V.; Basrak, Z.; Benlliure, J.; Boiano, C.; Boisjoli, M.; Boretzky, K.; Brzychczyk, J.; Budzanowski, A.; Cardella, G.; Cammarata, P.; Chajecki, Z.; Chbihi, A.; Colonna, M.; Cozma, D.; Czech, B.; Di Toro, M.; Famiano, M.; Geraci, E.; Greco, V.; Grassi, L.; Guazzoni, C.; Guazzoni, P.; Heil, M.; Heilborn, L.; Introzzi, R.; Isobe, T.; Kezzar, K.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kurz, N.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Lasko, P.; Li, Q.; Lombardo, I.; Lynch, W. G.; Matthews, Z.; May, L.; Minniti, T.; Mostazo, M.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Reifarth, R.; Reisdorf, W.; Riccio, F.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Rossi, D.; Simon, H.; Skwirczynska, I.; Sosin, Z.; Stuhl, L.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tsang, M. B.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.; Wieloch, A.; Wigg, P.; Wolter, H. H.; Wu, P.; Yennello, S.; Zambon, P.; Zetta, L.; Zoric, M.

    2013-03-01

    The elliptic-flow ratio of neutrons with respect to protons in reactions of neutron rich heavy-ions systems at intermediate energies has been proposed as an observable sensitive to the strength of the symmetry term in the nuclear Equation Of State (EOS) at supra-saturation densities. The recent results obtained from the existing FOPI/LAND data for 197Au+197Au collisions at 400 MeV/nucleon in comparison with the UrQMD model allowed a first estimate of the symmetry term of the EOS but suffer from a considerable statistical uncertainty. In order to obtain an improved data set for Au+Au collisions and to extend the study to other systems, a new experiment was carried out at the GSI laboratory by the ASY-EOS collaboration in May 2011.

  1. Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, FAIR, at the GSI site

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, Guenther

    2006-11-17

    FAIR is a new large-scale particle accelerator facility to be built at the GSI site in Germany. The research pursued at FAIR will cover a wide range of topics in nuclear and hadron physics, as well as high density plasma physics, atomic and antimatter physics, and applications in condensed matter physics and biology. The working horse of FAIR will be a 1.1km circumference double ring of rapidly cycling 100 and 300Tm synchrotrons, which will be used to produce high intensity secondary beams of short-lived radioactive ions or antiprotons. A subsequent suite of cooler and storage rings will deliver heavy ion and antiproton beams of unprecedented quality. Large experimental facilities are presently being designed by the NUSTAR, PANDA, PAX, CBM, SPARC, FLAIR, HEDgeHOB and BIOMAT collaborations.

  2. Lognormal Assimilation of Water Vapor in a WRF-GSI Cycled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, S. J.; Kliewer, A.; Jones, A. S.; Forsythe, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent publications have shown the viability of both detecting a lognormally-distributed signal for water vapor mixing ratio and the improved quality of satellite retrievals in a 1DVAR mixed lognormal-Gaussian assimilation scheme over a Gaussian-only system. This mixed scheme is incorporated into the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) assimilation scheme with the goal of improving forecasts from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model in a cycled system. Results are presented of the impact of treating water vapor as a lognormal random variable. Included in the analysis are: 1) the evolution of Tropical Storm Chris from 2006, and 2) an analysis of a "Pineapple Express" water vapor event from 2005 where a lognormal signal has been previously detected.

  3. Deep Sequencing of Plant and Animal DNA Contained within Traditional Chinese Medicines Reveals Legality Issues and Health Safety Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Coghlan, Megan L.; Haile, James; Houston, Jayne; Murray, Dáithí C.; White, Nicole E.; Moolhuijzen, Paula; Bellgard, Matthew I.; Bunce, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been practiced for thousands of years, but only within the last few decades has its use become more widespread outside of Asia. Concerns continue to be raised about the efficacy, legality, and safety of many popular complementary alternative medicines, including TCMs. Ingredients of some TCMs are known to include derivatives of endangered, trade-restricted species of plants and animals, and therefore contravene the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) legislation. Chromatographic studies have detected the presence of heavy metals and plant toxins within some TCMs, and there are numerous cases of adverse reactions. It is in the interests of both biodiversity conservation and public safety that techniques are developed to screen medicinals like TCMs. Targeting both the p-loop region of the plastid trnL gene and the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene, over 49,000 amplicon sequence reads were generated from 15 TCM samples presented in the form of powders, tablets, capsules, bile flakes, and herbal teas. Here we show that second-generation, high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of DNA represents an effective means to genetically audit organic ingredients within complex TCMs. Comparison of DNA sequence data to reference databases revealed the presence of 68 different plant families and included genera, such as Ephedra and Asarum, that are potentially toxic. Similarly, animal families were identified that include genera that are classified as vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered, including Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) and Saiga antelope (Saiga tatarica). Bovidae, Cervidae, and Bufonidae DNA were also detected in many of the TCM samples and were rarely declared on the product packaging. This study demonstrates that deep sequencing via HTS is an efficient and cost-effective way to audit highly processed TCM products and will assist in monitoring their legality and safety especially when

  4. Criticality safety and shielding design issues in the development of a high-capacity cask for truck transport

    SciTech Connect

    Boshoven, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) will be submitting an application for certification to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the GA-4 and GA-9 Casks In 1992. The GA-4 and GA-9 Casks are high-capacity legal weight truck casks designed to transport light water reactor spent fuel assemblies. To maintain a capacity of four pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) spent fuel assemblies, the GA-4 Cask uses burnup credit as part of the criticality control for initial enrichments over 3.0 wt% U-235. Using the US Department of Energy (DOE) Burnup Credit Program as a basis, GA has performed burnup credit analysis which is included in the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP). The GA-9 Cask can meet the criticality safety requirements using the fresh fuel'' assumption. Our approach to shielding design is to optimize the GA-4 and GA-9 Cask shielding configurations for minimum weights and maximum payloads. This optimization involves the use of the most effective shielding material, square cross-section geometry with rounded corners and tapered neutron shielding sections in the non-fuel regions.

  5. Criticality safety and shielding design issues in the development of a high-capacity cask for truck transport

    SciTech Connect

    Boshoven, J.K.

    1992-08-01

    General Atomics (GA) will be submitting an application for certification to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the GA-4 and GA-9 Casks In 1992. The GA-4 and GA-9 Casks are high-capacity legal weight truck casks designed to transport light water reactor spent fuel assemblies. To maintain a capacity of four pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) spent fuel assemblies, the GA-4 Cask uses burnup credit as part of the criticality control for initial enrichments over 3.0 wt% U-235. Using the US Department of Energy (DOE) Burnup Credit Program as a basis, GA has performed burnup credit analysis which is included in the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP). The GA-9 Cask can meet the criticality safety requirements using the ``fresh fuel`` assumption. Our approach to shielding design is to optimize the GA-4 and GA-9 Cask shielding configurations for minimum weights and maximum payloads. This optimization involves the use of the most effective shielding material, square cross-section geometry with rounded corners and tapered neutron shielding sections in the non-fuel regions.

  6. Thermal overload protection for electric motors on safety-related motor-operated valves: Generic Issue II. E. 6. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Rothberg, O.

    1988-06-01

    NRC regulatory positions, as stated in Regulatory Guide 1.106, Revision 1, have been identified by the Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) as potential contributors to valve motor burnout. AEOD is particularly concerned about the allowed policy of bypassing thermal overload devices during normal or accident conditions. Regulatory Guide 1.106 favors compromising the function of thermal overload devices in favor of completing the safety-related action of valves. The purpose of this study was to determine if the guidance contained in Regulatory Guide 1.106 is appropriate and, if not, to recommend the necessary changes. This report describes thermal overload devices commonly used to protect safety-related valve operator motors. The regulatory guidelines stated in Regulatory Guide 1.106 along with the limitations of thermal overload protection are discussed. Supplements and alternatives to thermal overload protection are also described. Findings and conclusions of several AEOD reports are discussed. Information obtained from the standard review plan, standard technical specifications, technical specifications from representative plants, and several papers are cited.

  7. Study of certain tether safety issues. Continuation of investigation of electrodynamic stabilization and control of long orbiting tethers, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.; Grossi, M. D.; Arnold, D.

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of long tethers (10-100 km) in space are addressed under two failure situations with potential safety impact: instantaneous jamming of the reel controlling the tether during deployment and cutting of the tether due to a meteor strike or other similar phenomena. Dual and multiple mass point models were used in the SAO SKYHOOK program to determine this behavior. The results of the program runs were verified analytically or by comparison with previously verified results. The study included the effects of tether damping and air drag where appropriate. Most runs were done with the tether system undamped since we believe this best represents the true behavior of the tether. Means for controlling undesirable behavior of the tether, such as viscous dampers in the subsatellite, were also studied.

  8. Development and application of the Safe Performance Index as a risk-based methodology for identifying major hazard-related safety issues in underground coal mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinilakodi, Harisha

    The underground coal mining industry has been under constant watch due to the high risk involved in its activities, and scrutiny increased because of the disasters that occurred in 2006-07. In the aftermath of the incidents, the U.S. Congress passed the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006 (MINER Act), which strengthened the existing regulations and mandated new laws to address the various issues related to a safe working environment in the mines. Risk analysis in any form should be done on a regular basis to tackle the possibility of unwanted major hazard-related events such as explosions, outbursts, airbursts, inundations, spontaneous combustion, and roof fall instabilities. One of the responses by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 2007 involved a new pattern of violations (POV) process to target mines with a poor safety performance, specifically to improve their safety. However, the 2010 disaster (worst in 40 years) gave an impression that the collective effort of the industry, federal/state agencies, and researchers to achieve the goal of zero fatalities and serious injuries has gone awry. The Safe Performance Index (SPI) methodology developed in this research is a straight-forward, effective, transparent, and reproducible approach that can help in identifying and addressing some of the existing issues while targeting (poor safety performance) mines which need help. It combines three injury and three citation measures that are scaled to have an equal mean (5.0) in a balanced way with proportionate weighting factors (0.05, 0.15, 0.30) and overall normalizing factor (15) into a mine safety performance evaluation tool. It can be used to assess the relative safety-related risk of mines, including by mine-size category. Using 2008 and 2009 data, comparisons were made of SPI-associated, normalized safety performance measures across mine-size categories, with emphasis on small-mine safety performance as compared to large- and

  9. Irradiated ignition over solid materials in reduce pressure environment: Fire safety issue in man-made enclosure system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, N.; Aoki, A.

    Effects of ambient pressure and oxygen yield on irradiated ignition characteristics over solid combustibles have been studied experimentally Aim of the present study is to elucidate the flammability and chance of fire in depressurized enclosure system and give ideas for the fire safety and fire fighting strategies in such environment Thin cellulosic paper is considered as the solid combustible since cellulose is one of major organic compounds and flammables in the nature Applied atmosphere consists of inert gas either CO2 or N2 and oxygen and various mixture ratios are of concerned Total ambient pressure level is varied from 0 1MPa standard atmospheric pressure to 0 02MPa Ignition is initiated by external thermal flux exposed into the solid surface as a model of unexpected thermal input to initiate the localized fire Thermal degradation of the solid induces combustible gaseous products e g CO H2 or other low class of HCs and the gas mixes with ambient oxygen to form the combustible mixture over the solid Heat transfer from the hot irradiated surface into the mixture accelerates the local exothermic reaction in the gas phase and finally thermal runaway ignition is achieved Ignition event is recorded by high-speed digital video camera to analyze the ignition characteristics Flammable map in partial pressure of oxygen Pox and total ambient pressure Pt plane is made to reveal the fire hazard in depressurized environment Results show that wider flammable range is obtained depending on the imposed ambient

  10. Production and Decay of Element 114 Isotopes with the BGS (LBNL) and TASCA (GSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Jacklyn

    2010-11-01

    During the last 10 years, the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS) group has published numerous reports of the production and decay of superheavy elements (SHE) with Z=112-118 in ^48Ca irradiations of actinide targets. Recently the production of element 114 in the ^242Pu(^48Ca,3-4n) reaction was verified at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator (BGS). Later experiments at the BGS successfully extended the region of known SHE nuclides along the neutron-deficient side using the ^242Pu(^48Ca,5n)^285114 reaction. Almost concurrently with the BGS, the TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fúr Schwerionenforschung investigated the ^244Pu(^48Ca,3-4n) reaction and observed cross sections on the order of 10 pb for the production of element 114 when the more neutron-rich ^244Pu target was used. An alpha-decay branch in ^281Ds was also discovered, leading to the new nucleus ^277Hs. Cross sections, decay modes and decay properties all agree with those published by the DGFRS group. Implications of these results on the field of heavy elements will be discussed.

  11. Measurements of 12 C ion fragmentation on thin carbon target from the FIRST collaboration at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppi, M.; FIRST Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The FIRST (Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy) experiment at GSI laboratory took data in summer 2011, studying the collisions of a 12C ion beam with Carbon and Au thin targets. The experiment main purpose is the double differential cross section measurement of the carbon ion fragmentation at energies that are relevant both for tumor therapy and space radiation protection applications (100-1000 MeV/u). The FIRST dataset contains carbon ions collisions on a 3.43 g·Cin-2 carbon target (about 24 M events) and on a 0.96 g·cm-2 Au target (about 4.5 M events). The SIS (heavy ion synchrotron) was used to accelerate the 12C ions at the energy of 400 MeV/u. The preliminary results of differential cross sections measurements as a function of angle and energy for carbon target, in the small angle region (θ ≤ 5°), are presented.

  12. MEASURED AND CALCULATED LOSSES IN A MODEL DIPOLE FOR GSI'S HEAVY ION SYNCHROTRON.

    SciTech Connect

    WANDERER,P.; ANERELLA,M.; GANETIS,G.; GHOSH,A.K.; JOSHI,P.; MARONE,A.; MURATORE,J.; ET AL.

    2003-06-15

    The new heavy ion synchrotron facility proposed by GSI will have two superconducting magnet rings in the same tunnel, with rigidities of 300T{center_dot}m and 10OT{center_dot}m. Fast ramp times are needed. These can cause problems of ac loss and field distortion in the magnets. For the high energy ring, a lm model dipole magnet has been built, based on the RHIC dipole design. This magnet was tested under boiling liquid helium in a vertical dewar. The quench current showed very little dependence on ramp rate. The ac losses, measured by an electrical method, were fitted to straight line plots of loss/cycle versus ramp rate, thereby separating the eddy current and hysteresis components. These results were compared with calculated values, using parameters which had previously been measured on short samples of cable. Reasonably good agreement between theory and experiment was found, although the measured hysteresis loss is higher than expected in ramps to the highest field levels.

  13. The Impact of Green Stormwater Infrastructure Installation on Surrounding Health and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Low, Sarah C.; Henning, Jason; Branas, Charles C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the health and safety effects of urban green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) installments. Methods. We conducted a difference-in-differences analysis of the effects of GSI installments on health (e.g., blood pressure, cholesterol and stress levels) and safety (e.g., felonies, nuisance and property crimes, narcotics crimes) outcomes from 2000 to 2012 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We used mixed-effects regression models to compare differences in pre- and posttreatment measures of outcomes for treatment sites (n = 52) and randomly chosen, matched control sites (n = 186) within multiple geographic extents surrounding GSI sites. Results. Regression-adjusted models showed consistent and statistically significant reductions in narcotics possession (18%–27% less) within 16th-mile, quarter-mile, half-mile (P < .001), and eighth-mile (P < .01) distances from treatment sites and at the census tract level (P < .01). Narcotics manufacture and burglaries were also significantly reduced at multiple scales. Nonsignificant reductions in homicides, assaults, thefts, public drunkenness, and narcotics sales were associated with GSI installation in at least 1 geographic extent. Conclusions. Health and safety considerations should be included in future assessments of GSI programs. Subsequent studies should assess mechanisms of this association. PMID:25602887

  14. Overview of the Safety Issues Associated with the Compressed Natural Gas Fuel System and Electric Drive System in a Heavy Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.C.

    2002-11-14

    This report evaluates the hazards that are unique to a compressed-natural-gas (CNG)-fueled heavy hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) design compared with a conventional heavy vehicle. The unique design features of the heavy HEV are the CNG fuel system for the internal-combustion engine (ICE) and the electric drive system. This report addresses safety issues with the CNG fuel system and the electric drive system. Vehicles on U. S. highways have been propelled by ICEs for several decades. Heavy-duty vehicles have typically been fueled by diesel fuel, and light-duty vehicles have been fueled by gasoline. The hazards and risks posed by ICE vehicles are well understood and have been generally accepted by the public. The economy, durability, and safety of ICE vehicles have established a standard for other types of vehicles. Heavy-duty (i.e., heavy) HEVs have recently been introduced to U. S. roadways, and the hazards posed by these heavy HEVs can be compared with the hazards posed by ICE vehicles. The benefits of heavy HEV technology are based on their potential for reduced fuel consumption and lower exhaust emissions, while the disadvantages are the higher acquisition cost and the expected higher maintenance costs (i.e., battery packs). The heavy HEV is more suited for an urban drive cycle with stop-and-go driving conditions than for steady expressway speeds. With increasing highway congestion and the resulting increased idle time, the fuel consumption advantage for heavy HEVs (compared with conventional heavy vehicles) is enhanced by the HEVs' ability to shut down. Any increase in fuel cost obviously improves the economics of a heavy HEV. The propulsion system for a heavy HEV is more complex than the propulsion system for a conventional heavy vehicle. The heavy HEV evaluated in this study has in effect two propulsion systems: an ICE fueled by CNG and an electric drive system with additional complexity and failure modes. This additional equipment will result in a less

  15. Worker Safety and Health Issues Associated with the DOE Environmental Cleanup Program: Insights From the DOE Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public health Standards Steering Group

    SciTech Connect

    M.C. Edelson; Samuel C. Morris; Joan M. Daisey

    2001-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public Health Standards Steering Group (or ''SSG'') was formed in 1990. It was felt then that ''risk'' could be an organizing principle for environmental cleanup and that risk-based cleanup standards could rationalize clean up work. The environmental remediation process puts workers engaged in cleanup activities at risk from hazardous materials and from the more usual hazards associated with construction activities. In a real sense, the site remediation process involves the transfer of a hypothetical risk to the environment and the public from isolated contamination into real risks to the workers engaged in the remediation activities. Late in its existence the SSG, primarily motivated by its LANL representative, Dr. Harry Ettinger, actively investigated issues associated with worker health and safety during environmental remediation activities. This paper summarizes the insights noted by the SSG. Most continue to be pertinent today.

  16. Monte Carlo simulations for the shielding of the future high-intensity accelerator facility FAIR at GSI.

    PubMed

    Radon, T; Gutermuth, F; Fehrenbacher, G

    2005-01-01

    The Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) is planning a significant expansion of its accelerator facilities. Compared to the present GSI facility, a factor of 100 in primary beam intensities and up to a factor of 10,000 in secondary radioactive beam intensities are key technical goals of the proposal. The second branch of the so-called Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is the production of antiprotons and their storage in rings and traps. The facility will provide beam energies a factor of approximately 15 higher than presently available at the GSI for all ions, from protons to uranium. The shielding design of the synchrotron SIS 100/300 is shown exemplarily by using Monte Carlo calculations with the FLUKA code. The experimental area serving the investigation of compressed baryonic matter is analysed in the same way. In addition, a dose comparison is made for an experimental area operated with medium energy heavy-ion beams. Here, Monte Carlo calculations are performed by using either heavy-ion primary particles or proton beams with intensities scaled by the mass number of the corresponding heavy-ion beam. PMID:16381714

  17. Framing Scientific Analyses for Risk Management of Environmental Hazards by Communities: Case Studies with Seafood Safety Issues

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Nancy L.; Drew, Christina H.; Acharya, Chetana; Mitchell, Todd A.; Donatuto, Jamie L.; Burns, Gary W.; Burbacher, Thomas M.; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2005-01-01

    Risk management provides a context for addressing environmental health hazards. Critical to this approach is the identification of key opportunities for participation. We applied a framework based on the National Research Council’s (NRC) analytic–deliberative risk management dialogue model that illustrates two main iterative processes: informing and framing. The informing process involves conveying information from analyses of risk issues, often scientific, to all parties so they can participate in deliberation. In the framing process, ideas and concerns from stakeholder deliberations help determine what and how scientific analyses will be carried out. There are few activities through which affected parties can convey their ideas from deliberative processes for framing scientific analyses. The absence of participation results in one-way communication. The analytic–deliberative dialogue, as envisioned by the NRC and promoted by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), underscores the importance of two-way communication. In this article we present case studies of three groups—an Asian and Pacific Islander community coalition and two Native American Tribes—active in framing scientific analyses of health risks related to contaminated seafood. Contacts with these organizations were established or enhanced through a regional NIEHS town meeting. The reasons for concern, participation, approaches, and funding sources were different for each group. Benefits from their activities include increased community involvement and ownership, better focusing of analytical processes, and improved accuracy and appropriateness of risk management. These examples present a spectrum of options for increasing community involvement in framing analyses and highlight the need for increased support of such activities. PMID:16263503

  18. Current Status of the Development of a Transportable and Compact VLBI System by NICT and GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, Atsutoshi; Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Ujihara, Hideki; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Tetsuro; Kurihara, Shinobu; Miura, Yuji; Matsuzaka, Shigeru; Tanimoto, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    MARBLE (Multiple Antenna Radio-interferometer for Baseline Length Evaluation) is under development by NICT and GSI. The main part of MARBLE is a transportable VLBI system with a compact antenna. The aim of this system is to provide precise baseline length over about 10 km for calibrating baselines. The calibration baselines are used to check and validate surveying instruments such as GPS receiver and EDM (Electro-optical Distance Meter). It is necessary to examine the calibration baselines regularly to keep the quality of the validation. The VLBI technique can examine and evaluate the calibration baselines. On the other hand, the following roles are expected of a compact VLBI antenna in the VLBI2010 project. In order to achieve the challenging measurement precision of VLBI2010, it is well known that it is necessary to deal with the problem of thermal and gravitational deformation of the antenna. One promising approach may be connected-element interferometry between a compact antenna and a VLBI2010 antenna. By measuring repeatedly the baseline between the small stable antenna and the VLBI2010 antenna, the deformation of the primary antenna can be measured and the thermal and gravitational models of the primary antenna will be able to be constructed. We made two prototypes of a transportable and compact VLBI system from 2007 to 2009. We performed VLBI experiments using theses prototypes and got a baseline length between the two prototypes. The formal error of the measured baseline length was 2.7 mm. We expect that the baseline length error will be reduced by using a high-speed A/D sampler.

  19. Optimizing expression and purification of an ATP-binding gene gsiA from Escherichia coli k-12 by using GFP fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongshan; Xiang, Quanju; Wang, Guangjun; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng

    2011-01-01

    The cloning, expression and purification of the glutathione (sulfur) import system ATP-binding protein (gsiA) was carried out. The coding sequence of Escherichia coli gsiA, which encodes the ATP-binding protein of a glutathione importer, was amplified by PCR, and then inserted into a prokaryotic expression vector pWaldo-GFPe harboring green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene. The resulting recombinant plasmid pWaldo-GFP-GsiA was transformed into various E. coli strains, and expression conditions were optimized. The effect of five E. coli expression strains on the production of the recombinant gsiA protein was evaluated. E. coli BL21 (DE3) was found to be the most productive strain for GsiA-GFP fusion-protein expression, most of which was insoluble fraction. However, results from in-gel and Western blot analysis suggested that expression of recombinant GsiA in Rosetta (DE3) provides an efficient source in soluble form. By using GFP as reporter, the most suitable host strain was conveniently obtained, whereby optimizing conditions for overexpression and purification of the proteins for further functional and structural studies, became, not only less laborious, but also time-saving. PMID:22215971

  20. Using the WTO/TBT enquiry point to monitor tendencies in the regulation of environment, health, and safety issues affecting the chemical industry.

    PubMed

    Pio Borges Menezes, Rodrigo; Maria de Souza Antunes, Adelaide

    2005-04-01

    The growing importance of technical regulation affecting the use and sale of chemical products is a topic of interest not only for the chemical industry, but also for governments, nongovernmental organizations, consumers, and interested communities. The results of such regulation on behalf of the environment, health and safety of individuals, as well as its economic effects on industrial activity, are well understood in the United States and recently in the European Union. In less developed countries, however, the general level of public understanding of these issues is still minimal. It is common knowledge that the so-called "regulatory asymmetry" between countries at different levels of development contributes to the establishment of technical barriers to trade. Such asymmetries, however, also have other impacts: the displacement of polluting industrial sectors to countries which have less demanding regulations, the concentration of unsafe and harmful environmental conditions in certain parts of the globe, and the competitive disadvantage for industries located in countries where control is more rigid. This study analyses information on a wide range of technical regulations issued by World Trade Organization (WTO) members, and focuses on those regulations that affect the chemical industry. This information is available through the WTO Enquiry Points, organizations created in each country to administrate the Technical Barriers to Trade Agreement (TBT). This article consists of an analysis of 4,301 notifications of technical regulations by WTO member states in the 7-year period following the establishment of the WTO in 1995. Starting from this mass of information, 585 notifications that affect the circulation or use of chemical products were isolated. Of this group, 71% refer to only 15 countries. This group of notifications was further classified according to their motivation (the environment, health, safety), by the type of product affected (medications, fuels

  1. Quality and safety issues highlighted by patients in the handling of laboratory test results by general practices–a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In general practice internationally, many care teams handle large numbers of laboratory test results relating to patients in their care. Related research about safety issues is limited with most of the focus on this workload from secondary care and in North American settings. Little has been published in relation to primary health care in the UK and wider Europe. This study aimed to explore experiences and perceptions of patients with regards to the handling of test results by general practices. Methods A qualitative research approach was used with patients. The setting was west of Scotland general practices from one National Health Service territorial board area. Patients were purposively sampled from practice held lists of patients who received a number of laboratory tests because of chronic medical problems or surveillance of high risk medicines. Focus groups were held and were audio-recorded. Tapes were transcribed and subjected to qualitative analysis. Transcripts were coded and codes merged into themes by two of the researchers. Results 19 participants from four medical practices took part in four focus groups. The main themes identified were: 1. Patients lacked awareness of the results handling process in their practice. 2. Patients usually did not contact their practice for test results, unless they considered themselves to be ill. 3. Patients were concerned about the appropriateness of administrators being involved in results handling. 4. Patients were concerned about breaches of confidentiality when administrators were involved in results handling. 5. Patients valued the use of dedicated results handling staff. 6. Patients welcomed the use of technology to alert them to results being available, and valued the ability to choose how this happened. Conclusions The study confirms the quality and safety of care problems associated with results handling systems and adds to our knowledge of the issues that impact in these areas. Practices need to be

  2. Rural Schools and Safety Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Marilyn L.

    This paper reviews the literature on violence and crime in schools and on prevention strategies and programs. A section on demographics examines incidence of crime and victimization in school, age of students involved, and types of violent behaviors. Underlying causes and conditions include family breakdown, substance abuse, poverty, and fear.…

  3. NASA SPoRT Modeling and Data Assimilation Research and Transition Activities Using WRF, LIS and GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Blankenship, Clay B.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Berndt, Emily B.

    2014-01-01

    weather research and forecasting ===== The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has numerous modeling and data assimilation (DA) activities in which the WRF model is a key component. SPoRT generates realtime, research satellite products from the MODIS and VIIRS instruments, making the data available to NOAA/NWS partners running the WRF/EMS, including: (1) 2-km northwestern-hemispheric SST composite, (2) daily, MODIS green vegetation fraction (GVF) over CONUS, and (3) NASA Land Information System (LIS) runs of the Noah LSM over the southeastern CONUS. Each of these datasets have been utilized by specific SPoRT partners in local EMS model runs, with select offices evaluating the impacts using a set of automated scripts developed by SPoRT that manage data acquisition and run the NCAR Model Evaluation Tools verification package. SPoRT is engaged in DA research with the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) and Ensemble Kalman Filter in LIS for soil moisture DA. Ongoing DA projects using GSI include comparing the impacts of assimilating Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances versus retrieved profiles, and an analysis of extra-tropical cyclones with intense non-convective winds. As part of its Early Adopter activities for the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, SPoRT is conducting bias correction and soil moisture DA within LIS to improve simulations using the NASA Unified-WRF (NU-WRF) for both the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity and upcoming SMAP mission data. SPoRT has also incorporated real-time global GVF data into LIS and WRF from the VIIRS product being developed by NOAA/NESDIS. This poster will highlight the research and transition activities SPoRT conducts using WRF, NU-WRF, EMS, LIS, and GSI.

  4. Introducing RiskSOAP to communicate the distributed situation awareness of a system about safety issues: an application to a robotic system.

    PubMed

    Chatzimichailidou, Maria Mikela; Dokas, Ioannis M

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces the RiskSOAP ('RiskSOAP' is the abbreviation for Risk SituatiOn Awareness Provision.) indicator to measure the capability of a complex socio-technical system to provide its agents with situation awareness (SA) about the presence of its threats and vulnerabilities and enables analysts to assess distributed SA. The RiskSOAP methodology adopts a comparative approach between two design versions of a system differing in the elements and characteristics that can enhance or cause the degradation of the awareness provision capability. The methodology uniquely combines three methods: (1) the STPA hazard analysis, (2) the EWaSAP early warning sign identification approach, and (3) a dissimilarity measure for calculating the distance between binary sets. In this paper, the RiskSOAP methodology was applied to a robotic system and the findings show that the indicator is an objective measure for the system's capability to provide its agents with SA about its threats and vulnerabilities. Practitioner Summary: This paper suggests a novel methodology for assessing distributed situation awareness (DSA) regarding safety issues. Given that systems consist of specifications and components possible to be mapped, the risk SA provision capability (RiskSOAP) methodology demonstrates the feasibility of measuring to what extent systems' elements contribute to the emergence of DSA. PMID:26230156

  5. Time Modulation of the K-Shell Electron Capture Decay Rates of H-like Heavy Ions at GSI Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. N.; Kienle, P.

    2009-08-07

    According to experimental data at GSI, the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K shell electron capture decays of the H-like heavy ions with one electron in the K shell, such as {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+}, {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, and {sup 122}I{sup 52+}, are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC} of the order of a few seconds, obeying an A scaling T{sub EC}=A/20 s, where A is the mass number of the mother nuclei, and with amplitudes a{sub d}{sup EC}approx0.21. We show that these data can be explained in terms of the interference of two massive neutrino mass eigenstates. The appearance of the interference term is due to overlap of massive neutrino mass eigenstate energies and of the wave functions of the daughter ions in two-body decay channels, caused by the energy and momentum uncertainties introduced by time differential detection of the daughter ions in GSI experiments.

  6. Stacking of 3 GeV Antiprotons with a Moving Barrier Bucket Method at the GSI-RESR

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, T.; Beller, P.; Franzke, B.; Nesmiyan, I.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Moehl, D.; Kikuchi, T.

    2006-03-20

    At the FAIR project at GSI, 3GeV pbar beams are to be accumulated in the RESR ring up to the intensity of 1.0e11. Every 5 seconds a new batch of 1.0e8 pbars is transferred from a Collector Ring (CR) where the pbar beams are pre-cooled to the momentum spread of 0.1% with stochastic cooling. The main task of the RESR is the accumulation of 1000 batches from the CR. In the classical way established at CERN's AA/AC, a new batch is injected on the injection orbit and is stacked in the radially separated stacking region. In the present paper, an alternative way, azimuthal separation with barrier bucket is proposed. The process is simulated up to 1000 injections and the emittance growth and the intra-beam scattering effects are evaluated.

  7. Data-flow coupling and data-acquisition triggers for the PreSPEC-AGATA campaign at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralet, D.; Pietri, S.; Aubert, Y.; Bellato, M.; Bortolato, D.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Dosme, N.; Gadea, A.; Gerl, J.; Golubev, P.; Grave, X.; Johansson, H. T.; Karkour, N.; Korichi, A.; Kurz, N.; Lafay, X.; Legay, E.; Linget, D.; Pietralla, N.; Rudolph, D.; Schaffner, H.; Stezowski, O.; Travers, B.; Wieland, O.

    2015-06-01

    The PreSPEC setup for high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy using radioactive ion beams was employed for experimental campaigns in 2012 and 2014. The setup consisted of the state of the art Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) and the High Energy γ deteCTOR (HECTOR+) positioned around a secondary target at the final focal plane of the GSI FRagment Separator (FRS) to perform in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy of exotic nuclei. The Lund York Cologne CAlorimeter (LYCCA) was used to identify the reaction products. In this paper we report on the trigger scheme used during the campaigns. The data-flow coupling between the Multi-Branch System (MBS) based Data AcQuisition (DAQ) used for FRS-LYCCA and the "Nouvelle Acquisition temps Réel Version 1.2 Avec Linux" (NARVAL) based acquisition system used for AGATA are also described.

  8. A new data acquisition system for Schottky signals in atomic physics experiments at GSI's and FAIR's storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trageser, C.; Brandau, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Müller, A.; Nolden, F.; Sanjari, S.; Stöhlker, T.

    2015-11-01

    A new continuous and broadband data acquisition system for measurements of Schottky-signals of ions revolving in a storage ring has been implemented. This set-up is capable of recording the radio frequency (RF) signal of the ions that circulate in the storage ring with a sustained acquisition rate of more than 3.5× {10}7 IQ-samples per second. This allows several harmonics of the full momentum acceptance of a storage ring to be measured at the same time. The RF signal analyzer modules are complemented by further electronic modules such as counters, precision clocks and synchronization modules that facilitate a seamless integration with main experimental data acquisitions for atomic and nuclear physics. In this contribution, the setup and first results from a test run at the experimental storage ring at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany, are presented.

  9. GSI-I (Z-LLNle-CHO) inhibits γ-secretase and the proteosome to trigger cell death in precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Meng, X; Matlawska-Wasowska, K; Girodon, F; Mazel, T; Willman, C L; Atlas, S; Chen, I-M; Harvey, R C; Hunger, S P; Ness, S A; Winter, S S; Wilson, B S

    2011-07-01

    Gamma secretase inhibitors (GSIs) comprise a growing class of compounds that interfere with the membrane-bound Notch signaling protein and its downstream intra-nuclear transcriptional targets. As GSI-I (Z-LLNle-CHO) is also a derivative of a widely used proteosome inhibitor MG-132, we hypothesized that this compound might be active in precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell lines and patient samples. We found that GSI-I treatment of precursor-B ALL blasts induced apoptotic cell death within 18-24 h. With confirmation using RNA and protein analyses, GSI-I blocked nuclear accumulation of cleaved Notch1 and Notch2, and inhibited Notch targets Hey2 and Myc. Microarray analyses of 207 children with high-risk precursor-B ALL demonstrate that Notch pathway expression is a common feature of these neoplasms. However, microarray studies also implicated additional transcriptional targets in GSI-I-dependent cell death, including genes in the unfolded protein response, nuclear factor-κB and p53 pathways. Z-LLNle-CHO blocks both γ-secretase and proteosome activity, inducing more robust cell death in precursor-B ALL cells than either proteosome-selective or γ-secretase-selective inhibitors alone. Using Z-LLNle-CHO in a nonobese diabetes/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) precursor-B ALL xenograft model, we found that GSI-I alone delayed or prevented engraftment of B-lymphoblasts in 50% of the animals comprising the experimental group, suggesting that this compound is worthy of additional testing. PMID:21494254

  10. The capture and dissemination of integrated 3D geospatial knowledge at the British Geological Survey using GSI3D software and methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Holger; Mathers, Steve; Sobisch, Hans-Georg

    2009-06-01

    The Geological Surveying and Investigation in 3 Dimensions (GSI3D) software tool and methodology has been developed over the last 15 years. Since 2001 this has been in cooperation with the British Geological Survey (BGS). To-date over a hundred BGS geologists have learned to use the software that is now routinely deployed in building systematic and commercial 3D geological models. The success of the GSI3D methodology and software is based on its intuitive design and the fact that it utilises exactly the same data and methods, albeit in digital forms, that geologists have been using for two centuries in order to make geological maps and cross-sections. The geologist constructs models based on a career of observation of geological phenomena, thereby incorporating tacit knowledge into the model. This knowledge capture is a key element to the GSI3D approach. In BGS GSI3D is part of a much wider set of systems and work processes that together make up the cyberinfrastructure of a modern geological survey. The GSI3D software is not yet designed to cope with bedrock structures in which individual stratigraphic surfaces are repeated or inverted, but the software is currently being extended by BGS to encompass these more complex geological scenarios. A further challenge for BGS is to enable its 3D geological models to become part of the semantic Web using GML application schema like GeoSciML. The biggest benefits of widely available systematic geological models will be an enhanced public understanding of the sub-surface in 3D, and the teaching of geoscience students.

  11. STRE- and cAMP-independent transcriptional induction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae GSY2 encoding glycogen synthase during diauxic growth on glucose.

    PubMed

    Parrou, J L; Enjalbert, B; François, J

    1999-10-01

    It has been shown that the so-called stationary phase GSY2 gene encoding glycogen synthase was induced as the cells left the exponential phase of growth, while glucose and all other nutrients were still plentiful in the medium (Parrou et al., 1999). Since this effect was essentially controlled at the transcriptional level, we looked for the cis- and trans-acting elements required for this specific growth-related genetic event. We demonstrated that mutations of the HAP2/3/4 binding site and of the two STress-Responsive cis-Elements (STRE) did not abolish the early induction of GSY2, although the latter mutation led to a 20-fold drop in the transcriptional activity of the promoter, as determined from lacZ gene fusions. Insertion of a DNA fragment (from -390 to -167 bp, relative to the ATG) of the promoter lacking the two STREs, upstream to the TATA box of a CYC1-lacZ fusion gene, allowed this reporter gene to be induced with a kinetic similar to that of GSY2-lacZ. Mutations in BCY1, which results in a hyperactive protein kinase A, did not alleviate the early induction, while causing a five- to 10-fold reduction in the transcriptional activity of GSY2. In addition, the repressive effect of protein kinase A was quantitatively conserved when both STREs were mutated in GSY2 promoter, indicating that the negative control of gene expression by the RAS-cAMP signalling pathway does not act solely through STREs. Taken together, these results are indicative of an active process that couples growth control to dynamic glucose consumption. PMID:10514565

  12. Playground Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sipes, James L.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the issues of risk, liability, and fun when landscaping playgrounds with safety in mind. The importance of playground surfaces and several preventive measures landscapers can use to reduce the risk of injury are discussed. Concluding comments address playground design features and liability. (GR)

  13. School Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Newsletter of the Comprehensive Center-Region VI, 1999

    1999-01-01

    The articles in this issue dealing with school safety discusses what rural and small urban settings are doing to prevent violence and to educate young people about prosocial alternatives to violence. The research is quite clear that female, minority, and gay students are the targets of a disproportionate amount of harassment and violence, both in…

  14. Art Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCATA Journal for Art Teachers, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Advocating that Canadian art programs should use and model environmentally safe practices, the articles in this journal focus on issues of safe practices in art education. Articles are: (1) "What is WHMIS?"; (2) "Safety Precautions for Specific Art Processes"; (3) "Toxic Substances"; (4) "Using Clay, Glazes, and Kilns Safely in the Classroom"…

  15. Hand Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... en gatillo See More... Hand Anatomy Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening ... en gatillo See More... Hand Anatomy Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening ...

  16. Hand Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis ... Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis ...

  17. 60-day waste compatibility safety issue and final results for 244-TX DCRT, grab samples TX-95-1, TX-95-2, and TX-95-3

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Three grab samples (TX-95-1, TX-95-2, and TX-95-3) were taken from tank 241- TX-244 riser 8 on November 7, 1995 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on that same day. Samples TX-95-1 and TX-95-2 were designated as supernate liquids, and sample TX-95-3 was designated as a supernate/sludge. These samples were analyzed to support the waste compatibility safety program. Accuracy and precision criteria were met for all analyses. No notifications were required based on sample results. This document provides the analysis to support the waste compatibility safety program.

  18. Emerging issues in improving food and physical activity environments: strategies for addressing land use, transportation, and safety in 3 California-wide initiatives.

    PubMed

    Aboelata, Manal J; Navarro, Amanda M

    2010-11-01

    Mounting research has suggested linkages between neighborhood safety, community design, and transportation patterns and eating and activity behaviors and health outcomes. On the basis of a review of evaluation findings from 3 multisite healthy eating and activity initiatives in California, we provide an overview of 3 community process strategies-engaging local advocates, linking safety to health, and collaborating with local government officials-that may be associated with the successful development and implementation of long-term community-improvement efforts and should be explored further. PMID:20864697

  19. Keeping Texas Children Safe in School. Common Sense Solutions To Help Address the Safety Issues and Challenges Facing Most Public School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Comptroller of Public Accounts, Austin.

    This booklet presents ways to ensure student safety in Texas schools. It offers a 10-step plan that, when implemented in a systematic way, can reduce acts of school violence. The steps are divided into three components: prevention, intervention, and enforcement. In prevention it is important to know the goals and objectives; to be proactive; to…

  20. Teenager Views on Issues Related to Traffic Safety Education and the Licensing of Teenage Drivers: Results of a Statewide Opinion Survey on Washington Teenage Drivers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomfield, Gary J.; Kinch, Robert

    In Washington, the existence of driver education programs is being threatened by tough economic times. To determine the opinions of teenage drivers about their traffic safety education (TSE) experience, the process of learning to drive, and the licensing of 16- and 17-year-olds, 10 percent of TSE students (N=1,070) were surveyed. Further data were…

  1. Comparison of rates of safety issues and reporting of trial outcomes for medical devices approved in the European Union and United States: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Thomas J; Sokolov, Elisaveta; Franklin, Jessica M; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate safety alerts and recalls, publication of key trial outcomes, and subsequent US approval of high profile medical devices introduced in the European Union. Design Cohort study. Setting Novel cardiovascular, orthopedic, and neurologic devices approved in the EU through Conformité Européenne marking between 2005 and 2010. Data sources Public and commercial databases searched up to January 2016 for press releases and announcements of approvals; public Food and Drug Administration and European regulatory authority databases for US approvals and safety alerts and recalls; and Medline, Embase, and Web of Science for peer reviewed publications. Main outcome measures We categorized the novelty of the devices in the study sample as a “major innovation” or an “other change,” and extracted descriptive data about the devices and information on any safety alerts and withdrawals. Linear regression models examined factors associated with differential EU and US approvals. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate factors associated with safety alerts and recalls and the publication of trial outcomes for devices categorized as major innovations. Models controlled for time, therapeutic category, regulatory pathway, size of sponsoring company, and indicator variables for devices approved first in the EU and devices approved only in the EU. Results 67% (206/309) of devices identified were approved in both the US and the EU, of which 63% (129/206) were approved first in the EU. The unadjusted rate of safety alerts and recalls for devices approved first in the EU was 27% (62/232) compared with 14% (11/77) for devices approved first in the US. The adjusted hazard ratio for safety alerts and recalls was 2.9 (95% confidence interval 1.4 to 6.2) for devices approved first in the EU. The results of pivotal trials were published for 49% (37/75) of devices categorized as major innovations, with an overall publication rate of 37% five

  2. Combinatorial control by the protein kinases PKA, PHO85 and SNF1 of transcriptional induction of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GSY2 gene at the diauxic shift.

    PubMed

    Enjalbert, B; Parrou, J L; Teste, M A; François, J

    2004-07-01

    Genes involved in storage carbohydrate metabolism are coordinately induced when yeast cells are subjected to conditions of stress, or when they exit the exponential growth phase on glucose. We show that the STress Responsive Elements (STREs) present in the promoter of GSY2 are essential for gene activation under conditions of stress, but dispensable for gene induction and glycogen accumulation at the diauxic shift on glucose. Using serial promoter deletion, we found that the latter induction could not be attributed to a single cis -regulatory sequence, and present evidence that this mechanism depends on combinatorial transcriptional control by signalling pathways involving the protein kinases Pho85, Snf1 and PKA. Two contiguous regions upstream of the GSY2 coding region are necessary for negative control by the cyclin-dependent protein kinase Pho85, one of which is a 14-bp G/C-rich sequence. Positive control by Snf1 is mediated by Mig1p, which acts indirectly on the distal part of the GSY2 promoter. The PKA pathway has the most pronounced effect on GSY2, since transcription of this gene is almost completely abolished in an ira1ira2 mutant strain in which PKA is hyperactive. The potent negative effect of PKA is dependent upon a branched pathway involving the transcription factors Msn2/Msn4p and Sok2p. The SOK2 branch was found to be effective only under conditions of high PKA activity, as in a ira1ira2 mutant, and this effect was independent of Msn2/4p. The Msn2/4p branch, on the other hand, positively controls GSY2 expression directly through the STREs, and indirectly via a factor that still remains to be discovered. In summary, this study shows that the transcription of GSY2 is regulated by several different signalling pathways which reflect the numerous factors that influence glycogen synthesis in yeast, and suggests that the PKA pathway must be deactivated to allow gene induction at the diauxic shift. PMID:15221454

  3. Workplace Health and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Career Development Inst., Springfield.

    This booklet is one of six texts from a workplace literacy curriculum designed to assist learners in facing the increased demands of the workplace. It is a short guide to workplace health and safety issues, laws, and regulations, especially in Massachusetts. Topics covered include the following: (1) safety issues--workplace ergonomics, the…

  4. School Safety Audit Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMary, Jo Lynne; Owens, Marsha; Ramnarain, A. K. Vijay

    The 1997 Virginia General Assembly passed legislation directing school boards to require all schools to conduct safety audits. This audit is designed to assess the safety conditions in each public school to: (1) identify and, if necessary, develop solutions for physical safety concerns, including building security issues; and (2) identify and…

  5. Revitalizing Nuclear Safety Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    This report covers the general issues involved in nuclear safety research and points out the areas needing detailed consideration. Topics included are: (1) "Principles of Nuclear Safety Research" (examining who should fund, who should conduct, and who should set the agenda for nuclear safety research); (2) "Elements of a Future Agenda for Nuclear…

  6. The TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus (TASCA) at GSI Optimization of ion-optical structures and magnet designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semchenkov, A.; Brüchle, W.; Jäger, E.; Schimpf, E.; Schädel, M.; Mühle, C.; Klos, F.; Türler, A.; Yakushev, A.; Belov, A.; Belyakova, T.; Kaparkova, M.; Kukhtin, V.; Lamzin, E.; Sytchevsky, S.

    2008-10-01

    The new, highly efficient gas-filled TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus (TASCA) was designed and built at GSI with the aim to study chemical and physical properties of superheavy elements with atomic numbers 104 and higher produced in heavy-ion reactions with actinide targets. To reach the highest possible transmission, while exploiting an existing dipole magnet and two quadrupoles of a previously used gas-filled separator, an optimization of the ion-optical structure of TASCA was performed with the program TRANSPORT. Two modes of TASCA operation, the "High Transmission Mode" and the "Small Image-size Mode" were selected. Magnetic field measurements were carried out with the dipole and were compared with KOMPOT model calculations. Magnetic field model calculations of the dipole and the quadrupoles, including a duct and a large exit valve, were performed to optimize the pole pieces of the dipole and the ducts. This increased the efficiency up to 50%. Both modes of operation were successfully tested in first commissioning experiments.

  7. X-ray spectroscopy of warm and hot electron components in the CAPRICE source plasma at EIS testbench at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Mascali, D. Celona, L.; Castro, G.; Torrisi, G.; Neri, L.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Maimone, F.; Maeder, J.; Tinschert, K.; Spaedtke, K. P.; Rossbach, J.; Lang, R.; Romano, F. P.; Musumarra, A.; Altana, C.; Caliri, C.

    2014-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming to detect X radiation emitted by the plasma of the CAPRICE source – operating at GSI, Darmstadt – has been carried out. Two different detectors (a SDD – Silicon Drift Detector and a HpGe – hyper-pure Germanium detector) have been used to characterize the warm (2–30 keV) and hot (30–500 keV) electrons in the plasma, collecting the emission intensity and the energy spectra for different pumping wave frequencies and then correlating them with the CSD of the extracted beam measured by means of a bending magnet. A plasma emissivity model has been used to extract the plasma density along the cone of sight of the SDD and HpGe detectors, which have been placed beyond specific collimators developed on purpose. Results show that the tuning of the pumping frequency considerably modifies the plasma density especially in the warm electron population domain, which is the component responsible for ionization processes: a strong variation of the plasma density near axis region has been detected. Potential correlations with the charge state distribution in the plasma are explored.

  8. Thermal reactor safety

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

  9. Measurement issues in the color specification of fluorescent-retroreflective materials for high-visibility traffic signing and personal safety applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, David M.; Donahue, Timothy J.

    2003-07-01

    The use of fluorescent-retroreflective materials in transportation safety applications (traffic signing and personal safety garments) has increased significantly over the last decade. The improved photostability of modern fluorescent colorant systems finally allows transportation agencies to make full use of the safety benefits of high visibility fluorescent signing and garments. As the use of fluorescent colored materials has grown, so has the need for accurate colorimetry to reliably and reproducibly describe the properties of these materials. Specifications for materials used in visual signaling are written in terms of absolute chromaticity and luminance factor limits. Therefore, accurate color measurement based on technically sound procedures is necessary to describe these materials. The bispectral or two-monochromator method is the referee procedure for determining the general (illuminant-independent) colorimetric properties of fluorescent materials. Until recently the ability to do bispectral fluorescent colorimetry was limited to a few high level photometric laboratories, almost solely National Standards Laboratories. Commercial bispectral fluorescent colorimeters are now available. The purpose of this paper is to examine the state-of=the-art in the colorimetry of fluorescent-retroreflective high visibility materials. Inter-comparisons were made between bispectral instruments and commercials 1-monochromator instruments. Measurements made on a series of fluorescent-retroreflective and non-retroreflective (diffusely reflecting) fluorescent materials were made on both types of instrument. Ordinary colored retroreflective and diffuse reflective materials were also measured. Representative results of the measurement inter-comparisons are presented and the effects of instrument geometry and illumination are discussed. The results are presented in terms of uncertainty in the determination of luminance factors and chromaticity coordinates. Accuracy is assessed

  10. Space engine safety system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Meyer, Claudia M.

    1991-01-01

    A rocket engine safety system is designed to initiate control procedures which will minimize damage to the engine and vehicle or test stand in the event of an engine failure. This report describes the features and the implementation issues associated with rocket engine safety systems. Specific concerns of safety systems applied to a space-based engine and long duration space missions are discussed. Examples of safety system features and architectures are given from recent safety monitoring investigations conducted for the Space Shuttle Main Engine and for future liquid rocket engines. Also, a general design and implementation process for rocket engine safety systems is presented.

  11. Space engine safety system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Meyer, Claudia M.

    1991-01-01

    A rocket engine safety system was designed to initiate control procedures to minimize damage to the engine or vehicle or test stand in the event of an engine failure. The features and the implementation issues associated with rocket engine safety systems are discussed, as well as the specific concerns of safety systems applied to a space-based engine and long duration space missions. Examples of safety system features and architectures are given, based on recent safety monitoring investigations conducted for the Space Shuttle Main Engine and for future liquid rocket engines. Also, the general design and implementation process for rocket engine safety systems is presented.

  12. Health and Safety Issues for Travelers Attending the World Cup and Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games in Brazil, 2014 to 2016

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Joanna; Sotir, Mark J.; Cunningham, Timothy J.; Harvey, Kira A.; Virginia Lee, C.; Stoney, Rhett J.; Gershman, Mark D.; Brunette, Gary W.; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Travelers from around the globe will attend the 2014 Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) World Cup and the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Brazil. Travelers to these mass gathering events may be exposed to a range of health risks, including a variety of infectious diseases. Most travelers who become ill will present to their primary care physicians, and thus it is important that clinicians are aware of the risks their patients encountered. OBJECTIVE To highlight health and safety concerns for people traveling to these events in Brazil so that health care practitioners can better prepare travelers before they travel and more effectively diagnose and treat travelers after they return. EVIDENCE REVIEW We reviewed both peer-reviewed and gray literature to identify health outcomes associated with travel to Brazil and mass gatherings. Thirteen specific infectious diseases are described in terms of signs, symptoms, and treatment. Relevant safety and security concerns are also discussed. FINDINGS Travelers to Brazil for mass gathering events face unique health risks associated with their travel. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Travelers should consult a health care practitioner 4 to 6 weeks before travel to Brazil and seek up-to-date information regarding their specific itineraries. For the most up-to-date information, health care practitioners can visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Travelers’ Health website (http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel) or review CDC’s Yellow Book online (http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/yellowbook-home-2014). PMID:24887552

  13. The Role of the Engineered Barrier System in Safety Cases for Geological Radioactive Waste Repoitories: An NEA Initiaive in Co-Operations with the EC, Process Issues and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    D.G. Bennett; A.J. Hooper; S. Voinis; H. Umeki; A.V. Luik; J. Alonso

    2006-02-07

    The Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Radioactive Waste Management Committee in co-operation with the European Commission (EC) is conducting a project to develop a greater understanding of how to achieve the necessary integration for successful design, construction, testing, modeling, and assessment of engineered barrier systems. The project also seeks to clarify the role that the EBS plays in assuring the overall safety of a repository. A framework for the EBS Project is provided by a series of workshops that allow discussion of the wide range of activities necessary for the design, assessment and optimization of the EBS, and the integration of this information into the safety case. The topics of this series of workshops have been planned so that the EBS project will work progressively through the main aspects comprising one cycle of the design and optimization process. This paper seeks to communicate key results from the EBS project to a wider audience. The paper focuses on two topics discussed at the workshops: process issues and the role of modeling.

  14. Aflatoxin B1 metabolism to aflatoxicol and derivatives lethal to Bacillus subtilis GSY 1057 by rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) liver.

    PubMed

    Schoenhard, G L; Lee, D J; Howell, S E; Pawlowski, N E; Libbey, L M; Sinnhuber, R O

    1976-06-01

    Aflatoxicol, R0, was isolated from Mt. Shasta strain rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), and liver homogenates were incubated with aflatoxin B1. Its identity was confirmed by mass, infrared, and ultraviolet spectrometry. The structure was identical to one of the diastereomers prepared by chemical reduction of aflatoxin B1. Aflatoxicol was apparently formed by a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent soluble enzyme of the 105,000 x g supernatant from rainbow trout. Aflatoxicol was not lethal in phosphate buffer to Bacillus subtilis GSY 1057 (metB4, hisA1, uvr-1) nor were aflatoxins B1, Q1, and B2. In the presence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate and trout liver microsomes, aflatoxicol reduced the viability of B. subtilis. Aflatoxin B2, which lacks the vinyl ether present in the other compounds, could not be activated. The product of aflatoxin B1 activation by trout liver microsomes was sought after incubation of 14C-labeled aflatoxin B1. The radioactivity was found in unaltered aflatoxin B1 and in three extremely polar metabolites. The quantity of the new metabolites and the level of microbial lethality was reduced by addition of cytosine and cysteine to the incubation medium. The vinyl ether configuration was a structural requirement for activation, and this finding and the nature of the enzymatic reaction were consistent with the hypothesis that the compounds were metabolized to highly reactive and unstable electrophilic products which bound to nucleophiles such as cytosine and were lethal to B. subtilis. The formation of aflatoxicol as the major product of trout liver metabolism is of great significance considering that it could be activated to a lethal compound and that rainbow trout are one of the most sensitive species to aflatoxin B1-induced carcinoma. PMID:5190

  15. PET imaging for treatment verification of ion therapy: Implementation and experience at GSI Darmstadt and MGH Boston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parodi, Katia; Bortfeld, Thomas; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Fiedler, Fine; Knopf, Antje; Paganetti, Harald; Pawelke, Jörg; Shakirin, Georgy; Shih, Helen

    2008-06-01

    Ion beams offer the possibility of improved conformation of the dose delivered to the tumor with better sparing of surrounding tissue and critical structures in comparison to conventional photon and electron external radiation treatment modalities. Full clinical exploitation of this advantage can benefit from in vivo confirmation of the actual beam delivery and, in particular, of the ion range in the patient. During irradiation, positron emitters like 15O (half-life T1/2≈2 min) and 11C ( T1/2≈20 min) are formed in nuclear interactions between the ions and the tissue. Detection of this transient radioactivity via positron emission tomography (PET) and comparison with the expectation based on the prescribed beam application may serve as an in vivo, non-invasive range validation method of the whole treatment planning and delivery chain. For technical implementation, PET imaging during irradiation (in-beam) requires the development of customized, limited angle detectors with data acquisition synchronized with the beam delivery. Alternatively, commercial PET or PET/CT scanners in close proximity to the treatment site enable detection of the residual activation from long-lived emitters shortly after treatment (offline). This paper reviews two clinical examples using a dedicated in-beam PET scanner for verification of carbon ion therapy at GSI Darmstadt, Germany, as well as a commercial offline PET/CT tomograph for post-radiation imaging of proton treatments at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA. Challenges as well as pros and cons of the two imaging approaches in dependence of the different ion type and beam delivery system are discussed.

  16. 13th meeting of the Scientific Group on Methodologies for the Safety Evaluation of Chemicals (SGOMSEC): alternative testing methodologies and conceptual issues.

    PubMed Central

    Blaauboer, B J; Balls, M; Barratt, M; Casati, S; Coecke, S; Mohamed, M K; Moore, J; Rall, D; Smith, K R; Tennant, R; Schwetz, B A; Stokes, W S; Younes, M

    1998-01-01

    Substantial world-wide resources are being committed to develop improved toxicological testing methods that will contribute to better protection of human health and the environment. The development of new methods is intrinsically driven by new knowledge emanating from fundamental research in toxicology, carcinogenesis, molecular biology, biochemistry, computer sciences, and a host of other disciplines. Critical evaluations and strong scientific consensus are essential to facilitate adoption of alternative methods for use in the safety assessment of drugs, chemicals, and other environmental factors. Recommendations to hasten the development of new alternative methods included increasing emphasis on the development of mechanism-based methods, increasing fundamental toxicological research, increasing training on the use of alternative methods, integrating accepted alternative methods into toxicity assessment, internationally harmonizating chemical toxicity classification schemes, and increasing international cooperation to develop, validate, and gain acceptance of alternative methods. PMID:9599687

  17. Malaria and blood transfusion: major issues of blood safety in malaria-endemic countries and strategies for mitigating the risk of Plasmodium parasites.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Saleh; Karunamoorthi, Kaliyaperumal

    2016-01-01

    Malaria inflicts humankind over centuries, and it remains as a major threat to both clinical medicine and public health worldwide. Though hemotherapy is a life-sustaining modality, it continues to be a possible source of disease transmission. Hence, hemovigilance is a matter of grave concern in the malaria-prone third-world countries. In order to pursue an effective research on hemovigilance, a comprehensive search has been conducted by using the premier academic-scientific databases, WHO documents, and English-language search engines. One hundred two appropriate articles were chosen for data extraction, with a particular reference to emerging pathogens transmitted through blood transfusion, specifically malaria. Blood donation screening is done through microscopic examination and immunological assays to improve the safety of blood products by detection major blood-borne pathogens, viz., HIV, HBV, HCV, syphilis, and malarial parasites. Transfusion therapy significantly dwindles the preventable morbidity and mortality attributed to various illnesses and diseases, particularly AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. Examination of thick and thin blood smears are performed to detect positivity and to identify the Plasmodium species, respectively. However, all of these existing diagnostic tools have their own limitations in terms of sensitivity, specificity, cost-effectiveness, and lack of resources and skilled personnel. Globally, despite the mandate need of screening blood and its components according to the blood-establishment protocols, it is seldom practiced in the low-income/poverty-stricken settings. In addition, each and every single phase of transfusion chain carries sizable inherent risks from donors to recipients. Interestingly, opportunities also lie ahead to enhance the safety of blood-supply chain and patients. It can be achieved through sustainable blood-management strategies like (1) appropriate usage of precise diagnostic tools/techniques, (2) promoting

  18. Nuclear safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, D.

    1991-01-01

    Topics dealing with nuclear safety are addressed which include the following: general safety requirements; safety design requirements; terrestrial safety; SP-100 Flight System key safety requirements; potential mission accidents and hazards; key safety features; ground operations; launch operations; flight operations; disposal; safety concerns; licensing; the nuclear engine for rocket vehicle application (NERVA) design philosophy; the NERVA flight safety program; and the NERVA safety plan.

  19. Safe performance of magnetic resonance of the heart in patients with magnetic resonance conditional pacemaker systems: the safety issue of the ESTIMATE study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background No published data exist about the safety of diagnostic magnetic resonance (MR) of the heart performed in a larger series of patients implanted with MR conditional pacemakers (PM). The purpose of our study is to analyse safety and potential alterations of electrical lead parameters in patients implanted with the EnRhythm/Advisa MRI SureScan PM with 5086MRI leads (Medtronic Inc.) during and after MR of the heart at 1.5 Tesla. Methods Patients enrolled in this single center pilot study who underwent non-clinically indicated diagnostic MR of the heart were included in this analysis. Heart MR was performed for analyses of potential changes in right and left ventricular functional parameters under right ventricular pacing at 80 and 110 bpm. Atrial/ventricular sensing, atrial/ventricular pacing capture threshold [PCT], and pacing impedances were assessed immediately before, during, and immediately after MR, as well at 3 and 15 months post MR. Results Thirty-six patients (mean age 69 ± 13 years; high degree AV block 18 [50%]) underwent MR of the heart. No MR related adverse events occurred during MR or thereafter. Ventricular sensing differed significantly between the FU immediately after MR (10.3 ± 5.3 mV) and the baseline FU (9.8 ± 5.3 mV; p < 0.05). Despite PCT [V/0.4ms] was not significantly different between the FUs (baseline: 0.84 ± 0.27; in-between MR scans: 0.82 ± 0.27; immediately after MR: 0.84 ± 0.24; 3-month: 0.85 ± 0.23; 15-month: 0.90 ± 0.67; p = ns), 7 patients (19%) showed PCT increases by 100% (max. PCT measured: 1.0 V) at the 3-month FU compared to baseline. RV pacing impedance [Ω/5V] differed significantly at the FU in-between MR scans (516 ± 47), and at the 15-month FU (482 ± 58) compared to baseline (508 ± 75). Conclusion The results of our study suggest MR of the heart to be safe in patients with the MR conditional EnRhythm/Advisa system, albeit although noticeable but

  20. Resolution of tank C-106 organic fuel-related concerns in support of retrieval and resolution of the high-heat safety issue at the Hanford site

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1997-01-29

    Single-shell W C-106 is on an accelerated schedule for partial retrieval of its softer, high-he-at sludge. The sludge is being transferred to a double-shell tank because they have the capacity to handle more heat-bearing materials than do single-shell tanks. Also, unlike single-shell tanks, they have not shown any tendency to leak. This transfer will eliminate the need to add water to C-106, thus lowering the risk of waste leaching to the environment. The transfer also will allow obligations to the Washington State Department of Ecology regarding removal of drainable liquid from all single-shell tanks to be met. Current schedules show the soft-sludge retrieval starting in September 1997. To prepare for retrieval, issues related to the risk from potential propagating reactions caused by the organic chemistry of tank C-106 were evaluated.

  1. Citing reports of alarm-related deaths, the Joint Commission issues a sentinel event alert for hospitals to improve medical device alarm safety.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    As medical devices become more widely used in hospitals, there is evidence that providers are becoming overwhelmed by the alarms that emanate from these machines. Experts link the problem with 566 alarm-related deaths reported in an FDA database between January 2005 and June 2010, and 80 alarm-related deaths reported in The Joint Commission's (TJC) own sentinel event database between January 2009 and June 2012. The ED is among the hospital sites where the adverse events reported to TJC most often occurred. Providers in some hospital units have to deal with thousands of alarm signals every day, and an estimated 85% to 95% of these alerts don't require any intervention, according to TJC. Experts say with so much noise and so many false alarms, clinicians can become desensitized to the medical-device alarms. The types of alarms that administrators should be most concerned about in the ED are dysrhythmia alarms on heart monitors, oxygen saturation alarms, and signals that a patient has a low respiratory rate. Experts urge hospitals to develop cross-disciplinary teams to address alarm safety on an ongoing basis, and to assemble action plans for improvement that contain baseline metrics that can be used to chart progress. PMID:23776996

  2. Ethical issues and risk/benefit assessment of iron chelation therapy: advances with deferiprone/deferoxamine combinations and concerns about the safety, efficacy and costs of deferasirox.

    PubMed

    Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2008-01-01

    New developments in the area of iron and other metal metabolism and toxicity and the effects and uses of chelators have been presented at the 16th International Conference on Chelation (ICOC), Limassol, Cyprus in October 2006. Marketing practices by pharmaceutical companies, contradictory policies by regulatory authorities and ineffective policies by health authorities deprive thousands of thalassemia and other transfused patients of life saving iron chelating drugs and of efficacious chelation treatments. Thousands of patients were using deferasirox (DFRA) worldwide a few months after the European Union (EU) authorities, and about 1 year after the Food and Drugs Administration (FDA), proceeded to its accelerated approval with no sufficient evidence that the drug was efficacious, especially for clearing excess cardiac iron, and also safe. Cases of fatal, acute, irreversible renal and liver failure, fatal agranulocytosis and other toxicities have recently been reported with DFRA. The FDA has not yet approved deferiprone (L1) depriving thousands of patients of potentially life saving treatment. The high cost of DFRA at 60 euros/g, L1 at 5.5 euros/g and deferoxamine (DFO) at 8.3 euros/g, diminishes the prospects of universal chelation therapy, especially for patients in developing countries. The safety and efficacy record of L1, DFO, and their combination in particular, appear to provide universal solutions in the treatment of transfusional iron overload, and also in reducing mortality because of their ability to clear rapidly and effectively excess cardiac iron. PMID:18274978

  3. DNA-DSB in CHO-K1 cells induced by heavy-ions: Break rejoining and residual damage (GSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taucher-Scholz, G.; Heilmann, J.; Becher, G.; Kraft, G.

    1994-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB's) are the critical lesions involved in cellular effects of ionizing radiation. Therefore, the evaluation of DSB induction in mammalian cells after heavy ion irradiation is an essential task for the assessment of high-LET radiation risk in space. Of particular interest has been the question of how the biological efficiency for the cellular inactivation endpoint relates to the initial lesions (DSBs) at varying LETs. For cell killing, an increased Relative Biological Efficiency (RBE) has been determined for highLET radiation around 100-200 keV/mu m. At higher LET, the RBE's decrease again to values below one for the very heavy particles. At GSI, DSB-induction was measured in CHO-K1 cells following irradiation with accelerated particles covering a wide LET range. The electrophoretic elution of fragmented DNA out of agarose plugs in a constant electrical field was applied for the detection of DSB's. The fraction of DNA retained was determined considering the relative intensities of ethidium bromide fluorescence in the well and in the gel lane. Dose-effect curves were established, from which the RBE for DSB induction was calculated at a fraction of 0.7 of DNA retained In summary, these rejoining studies are in line with an enhanced severity of the DNA DSB's at higher LET's, resulting in a decreased repairability of the induced lesions. However, no information concerning the fidelity of strand breaks rejoining is provided in these studies. To assess correct rejoining of DNA fragments an experimental system involving individual DNA hybridization bands has been set up. In preliminary experiments Sal I generated DNA fragments of 0.9 Mbp were irradiated with xrays and incubated for repair However, restitution of the original signals was not observed, probably due to the high radiation dose necessary for breakage of a fragment of this size. A banding pattern with NotI hybridization signals in a higher MW range (3Mbp) has been obtained by varying

  4. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Safety Issue 105: Interfacing system loss-of-coolant accident in light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    An interfacing systems loss of coolant accident (ISLOCA) involves failure or improper operation of pressure isolation valves (PIVs) that compose the boundary between the reactor coolant system and low-pressure rated systems. Some ISLOCAs can bypass containment and result in direct release of fission products to the environment. A cost/benefit evaluation, using three PWR analyses, calculated the benefit of two potential modifications to the plants. Alternative 1 is improved plant operations to optimize the operator`s performance and reduce human error probabilities. Alternative 2 adds pressure sensing devices, cabling, and instrumentation between two PIVs to provide operators with continuous monitoring of the first PIV. These two alternatives were evaluated for the base case plants (Case 1) and for each plant, assuming the plants had a particular auxiliary building design in which severe flooding would be a problem if an ISLOCA occurred. The auxiliary building design (Case 2) was selected from a survey that revealed a number of designs with features that provided less than optimal resistance to ECCS equipment loss caused by a ISLOCA-induced environment. The results were judged not to provide sufficient basis for generic requirements. It was concluded that the most viable course of action to resolve Generic Issue 105 is licensee participation in individual plant examinations (IPEs).

  5. Safety after cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Huber, Charlotte

    2009-08-01

    The Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority's reporting system is a confidential, statewide Internet reporting system to which all Pennsylvania hospitals, outpatient-surgery facilities, and birthing centers, as well as some abortion facilities, must file information on medical errors. Safety Monitor is a column from the authority that informs nurses on issues that can affect patient safety and presents strategies they can easily integrate into practice. For more information on the authority, visit www.patientsafetyauthority.org. For the original article discussed in this column or for other articles on patient safety, click on "Patient Safety Advisories" and then "Advisory Library" in the left-hand navigation menu. PMID:19641415

  6. Principles of Safety Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Pugsley, M K; Authier, S; Curtis, M J

    2008-01-01

    Safety Pharmacology is a rapidly developing discipline that uses the basic principles of pharmacology in a regulatory-driven process to generate data to inform risk/benefit assessment. The aim of Safety Pharmacology is to characterize the pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic (PK/PD) relationship of a drug's adverse effects using continuously evolving methodology. Unlike toxicology, Safety Pharmacology includes within its remit a regulatory requirement to predict the risk of rare lethal events. This gives Safety Pharmacology its unique character. The key issues for Safety Pharmacology are detection of an adverse effect liability, projection of the data into safety margin calculation and finally clinical safety monitoring. This article sets out to explain the drivers for Safety Pharmacology so that the wider pharmacology community is better placed to understand the discipline. It concludes with a summary of principles that may help inform future resolution of unmet needs (especially establishing model validation for accurate risk assessment). Subsequent articles in this issue of the journal address specific aspects of Safety Pharmacology to explore the issues of model choice, the burden of proof and to highlight areas of intensive activity (such as testing for drug-induced rare event liability, and the challenge of testing the safety of so-called biologics (antibodies, gene therapy and so on.). PMID:18604233

  7. The application of value-impact analysis to USI A-45: Summary report of UCLA studies on value-impact analysis in relation to USI A-45. [Decay-heat removal safety issues

    SciTech Connect

    Cave, L.; Kastenberg, W.E.

    1987-09-01

    In the Task Action Plan for Unresolved Safety Issue A-45 (After-Heat Removal) it was recognized that the value-impact (VI) analysis of possible solutions would be an essential part of the work, particularly in the later stages. Accordingly, a review of existing methods and development of a methodology to meet the specific requirements of TAP A-45 was undertaken. In this report each of the principal areas of work is described. Due to the high capital costs associated with major changes to DHR systems, values arising from avertable ''offsite costs'' (i.e., the costs of the potential effects on the health and safety of the public, both direct and indirect) would be insufficient to justify any significant changes to DHR systems simply on the grounds of cost effectiveness. Therefore, a major part of the work reported here has been a study of possible additional avertable costs that should properly be included in the ''value'' term of the V-I analysis.

  8. Multicultural Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Charrles; Kampfe, Charlene

    This chapter examines issues related to working with diverse populations with addictions. A brief history of multiculturalism and multicultural counseling is presented. Issues particular to the treatment of people with addictions are examined, as well as prevention and assessment issues. Substance abuse issues among people in the gay male and…

  9. Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 2, Battery recycling and disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D

    1992-09-01

    Recycling and disposal of spent sodium-sulfur (Na/S) batteries are important issues that must be addressed as part of the commercialization process of Na/S battery-powered electric vehicles. The use of Na/S batteries in electric vehicles will result in significant environmental benefits, and the disposal of spent batteries should not detract from those benefits. In the United States, waste disposal is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Understanding these regulations will help in selecting recycling and disposal processes for Na/S batteries that are environmentally acceptable and cost effective. Treatment processes for spent Na/S battery wastes are in the beginning stages of development, so a final evaluation of the impact of RCRA regulations on these treatment processes is not possible. The objectives of tills report on battery recycling and disposal are as follows: Provide an overview of RCRA regulations and requirements as they apply to Na/S battery recycling and disposal so that battery developers can understand what is required of them to comply with these regulations; Analyze existing RCRA regulations for recycling and disposal and anticipated trends in these regulations and perform a preliminary regulatory analysis for potential battery disposal and recycling processes. This report assumes that long-term Na/S battery disposal processes will be capable of handling large quantities of spent batteries. The term disposal includes treatment processes that may incorporate recycling of battery constituents. The environmental regulations analyzed in this report are limited to US regulations. This report gives an overview of RCRA and discusses RCRA regulations governing Na/S battery disposal and a preliminary regulatory analysis for Na/S battery disposal.

  10. Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Safety criteria for ferrocyanide watch list tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, A.K.; Meacham, J.E.; Barney, G.S.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides a technical basis for closing the ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) at the Hanford Site. Three work efforts were performed in developing this technical basis. The efforts described herein are: 1. The formulation of criteria for ranking the relative safety of waste in each ferrocyanide tank. 2. The current classification of tanks into safety categories by comparing available information on tank contents with the safety criteria; 3. The identification of additional information required to resolve the ferrocyanide safety issue.

  11. TWRS safety program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, L.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    Management of Nuclear Safety, Industrial Safety, Industrial Hygiene, and Fire Protection programs, functions, and field support resources for Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) has, until recently, been centralized in TWRS Safety, under the Emergency, Safety, and Quality organization. Industrial hygiene technician services were also provided to support operational needs related to safety basis compliance. Due to WHC decentralization of safety and reengineering efforts in West Tank Farms, staffing and safety responsibilities have been transferred to the facilities. Under the new structure, safety personnel for TWRS are assigned directly to East Tank Farms, West Tank Farms, and a core Safety Group in TWRS Engineering. The Characterization Project Operations (CPO) safety organization will remain in tact as it currently exists. Personnel assigned to East Tank Farms, West Tank Farms, and CPO will perform facility-specific or project-specific duties and provide field implementation of programs. Those assigned to the core group will focus on activities having a TWRS-wide or programmatic focus. Hanford-wide activities will be the responsibility of the Safety Center of Expertise. In order to ensure an effective and consistent safety program for TWRS under the new organization program functions, goals, organizational structure, roles, responsibilities, and path forward must be clearly established. The purpose of the TWRS Safety Program Plan is to define the overall safety program, responsibilities, relationships, and communication linkages for safety personnel under the new structure. In addition, issues associated with reorganization transition are addressed, including training, project ownership, records management, and dissemination of equipment. For the purpose of this document ``TWRS Safety`` refers to all safety professionals and technicians (Industrial Safety, Industrial Hygiene, Fire Protection, and Nuclear Safety) within the TWRS organization, regardless of their

  12. Biology Laboratory Safety Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Christine L.

    The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that schools prepare or adapt a biosafety manual, and that instructors develop a list of safety procedures applicable to their own lab and distribute it to each student. In this way, safety issues will be brought to each student's attention. This document is an example of such a manual. It contains…

  13. ERCMExpress. Volume 2, Issue 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This issue of the Emergency Response and Crisis Management (ERCM) Technical Assistance Center's "ERCMExpress" promotes emergency exercises as an effective way to validate school safety plans. Simulations of emergency situations, or emergency exercises, are integral to a sound school safety plan. They offer opportunities for district and schools to…

  14. ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL

    SciTech Connect

    Gravois, Melanie

    2007-06-27

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Issues Management Program encompasses the continuous monitoring of work programs, performance and safety to promptly identify issues to determine their risk and significance, their causes, and to identify and effectively implement corrective actions to ensure successful resolution and prevent the same or similar problems from occurring. This document describes the LBNL Issues Management Program and prescribes the process for issues identification, tracking, resolution, closure, validation, and effectiveness of corrective actions. Issues that are governed by this program include program and performance deficiencies or nonconformances that may be identified through employee discovery, internal or external oversight assessment findings, suggested process improvements and associated actions that require formal corrective action. Issues may also be identified in and/or may result in Root Cause Analysis (RCA) reports, Price Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) reports, Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) reports, Accident Investigation reports, assessment reports, and External Oversight reports. The scope of these issues may include issues of both high and low significance as well as adverse conditions that meet the reporting requirements of the University of California (UC) Assurance Plan for LBNL or other reporting entities (e.g., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Energy). Issues that are found as a result of a walk-around or workspace inspection that can be immediately corrected or fixed are exempt from the requirements of this document.

  15. Studies on fission with ALADIN. Precise and simultaneous measurement of fission yields, total kinetic energy and total prompt neutron multiplicity at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Julie-Fiona; Taieb, Julien; Chatillon, Audrey; Bélier, Gilbert; Boutoux, Guillaume; Ebran, Adeline; Gorbinet, Thomas; Grente, Lucie; Laurent, Benoit; Pellereau, Eric; Alvarez-Pol, Héctor; Audouin, Laurent; Aumann, Thomas; Ayyad, Yassid; Benlliure, Jose; Casarejos, Enrique; Cortina Gil, Dolores; Caamaño, Manuel; Farget, Fanny; Fernández Domínguez, Beatriz; Heinz, Andreas; Jurado, Beatriz; Kelić-Heil, Aleksandra; Kurz, Nikolaus; Nociforo, Chiara; Paradela, Carlos; Pietri, Stéphane; Ramos, Diego; Rodríguez-Sànchez, Jose-Luis; Rodríguez-Tajes, Carme; Rossi, Dominic; Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Simon, Haik; Tassan-Got, Laurent; Vargas, Jossitt; Voss, Bernd; Weick, Helmut

    2015-12-01

    A novel technique for fission studies, based on the inverse kinematics approach, is presented. Following pioneering work in the nineties, the SOFIA Collaboration has designed and built an experimental set-up dedicated to the simultaneous measurement of isotopic yields, total kinetic energies and total prompt neutron multiplicities, by fully identifying both fission fragments in coincidence, for the very first time. This experiment, performed at GSI, permits to study the fission of a wide variety of fissioning systems, ranging from mercury to neptunium, possibly far from the valley of stability. A first experiment, performed in 2012, has provided a large array of unprecedented data regarding the nuclear fission process. An excerpt of the results is presented. With this solid starter, further improvements of the experimental set-up are considered, which are consistent with the expected developments at the GSI facility, in order to measure more fission observables in coincidence. The completeness reached in the SOFIA data, permits to scrutinize the correlations between the interesting features of fission, offering a very detailed insight in this still unraveled mechanism.

  16. Studies of heavy ion-induced high-energy density states in matter at the GSI Darmstadt SIS-18 and future FAIR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Adonin, A.; Deutsch, C.; Fortov, V. E.; Grandjouan, N.; Geil, B.; Grayaznov, V.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Kulish, M.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Mintsev, V.; Ni, P.; Nikolaev, D.; Piriz, A. R.; Shilkin, N.; Spiller, P.; Shutov, A.; Temporal, M.; Ternovoi, V.; Udrea, S.; Varentsov, D.

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents numerical simulation results of heating and compression of matter using intense beams of energetic heavy ions. In this study we consider different beam parameters that include those which are currently available at the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS18 at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt and those which will be available in the near future as a result of the upgraded facility. In addition to this, we carried out detailed calculations considering parameters of high-intensity beam which will be generated at the GSI future Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR facility) that has been approved by the German Government. These simulations show that by using the above ion beam parameter range, it will be possible to carry out very useful studies on the thermophysical properties of high-energy density (HED) states in matter. This scheme would make it possible to investigate those regions of the phase diagram that are either very difficult to access or even are unaccessible using the traditional methods of shock waves. Moreover, employing a hollow ion beam which has an annular (ring shaped) focal spot, it would be possible to achieve a low entropy compression of a test material like hydrogen, which is enclosed in a cylindrical shell of a high-density material such as lead or gold. These experiments will enable one to study the interiors of Giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn as well as to investigate the problem of hydrogen metallization.

  17. Handbook for Public Playground Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Product Safety Commission, Washington, DC.

    Playgrounds, being a fundamental part of the childhood experience, should be safe havens for children. This handbook includes technical safety guidelines for designing, constructing, operating, and maintaining public playgrounds. It also includes a "Public Playground Safety Checklist" to highlight some of the most important safety issues for…

  18. Lift truck safety review

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents safety information about powered industrial trucks. The basic lift truck, the counterbalanced sit down rider truck, is the primary focus of the report. Lift truck engineering is briefly described, then a hazard analysis is performed on the lift truck. Case histories and accident statistics are also given. Rules and regulations about lift trucks, such as the US Occupational Safety an Health Administration laws and the Underwriter`s Laboratories standards, are discussed. Safety issues with lift trucks are reviewed, and lift truck safety and reliability are discussed. Some quantitative reliability values are given.

  19. Imitation Firearms a Real Safety Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Catherine A.; Hurst, Marianne D.

    2004-01-01

    This article reports how fake firearms have become a growing problem for schools. These sophisticated look-alikes have caused a spate of incidents involving students at campuses and school-sponsored events. In Utah, two students were suspended from the Uintah High School pending an investigation after they were caught with look-alike pistols at a…

  20. Safety issues in high speed machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    There are several risks related to High-Speed Milling, but they have not been systematically determined or studied so far. Increased loads by high centrifugal forces may result in dramatic hazards. Flying tools or fragments from a tool with high kinetic energy may damage surrounding people, machines and devices. In the project, mechanical risks were evaluated, theoretic values for kinetic energies of rotating tools were calculated, possible damages of the flying objects were determined and terms to eliminate the risks were considered. The noise levels of the High-Speed Machining center owned by the Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) and the Technical Research Center of Finland (VTT) in practical machining situation were measured and the results were compared to those after basic preventive measures were taken.

  1. Safety issues for hydrogen-powered vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ringland, J.T.

    1994-03-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy of overlayers, interfaces, and buried regions of semiconductors has seen a rapid growth in recent years. The characteristics of the annihilation gamma rays depend strongly on the local environment of the annihilation sites, and can be used to probe defect concentrations in a range inaccessible to conventional defect probes. Some of the recent success of the technique in examining low concentrations of point defects in technologically important Si-based structures is discussed.

  2. Introduction to LNG vehicle safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratvold, Delma; Friedman, David; Chernoff, Harry; Farkhondehpay, Dariush; Comay, Claudia

    1994-03-01

    Basic information on the characteristics of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is assembled to provide an overview of safety issues and practices for the use of LNG vehicles. This document is intended for those planning or considering the use of LNG vehicles, including vehicle fleet owners and operators, public transit officials and boards, local fire and safety officials, manufacturers and distributors, and gas industry officials. Safety issues and mitigation measures that should be considered for candidate LNG vehicle projects are addressed.

  3. Ethical issues in psychopharmacology

    PubMed Central

    McHenry, L

    2006-01-01

    The marketing of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the psychopharmacological industry presents a serious moral problem for the corporate model of medicine. In this paper I examine ethical issues relating to the efficacy and safety of these drugs. Pharmaceutical companies have a moral obligation to disclose all information in their possession bearing on the true risks and benefits of their drugs. Only then can patients make fully informed decisions about their treatment. PMID:16816041

  4. Upgrading the GSI beamline microscope with a confocal fluorescence lifetime scanner to monitor charged particle induced chromatin decondensation in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, Elham; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Durante, Marco; Jakob, Burkhard

    2015-12-01

    We report the upgrade of the GSI beamline microscope coupled to the linear accelerator UNILAC by a confocal FLIM scanner utilizing time correlated single photon counting technique (TCSPC). The system can now be used to address the radiation induced chromatin decondensation in more detail and with higher sensitivity compared to intensity based methods. This decondensation of heterochromatic areas is one of the early DNA damage responses observed after charged particle irradiation and might facilitate the further processing of the induced lesions. We describe here the establishment of different DNA dyes as chromatin compaction probes usable for quantification of the DNA condensation status in living cells utilizing lifetime imaging. In addition, we find an evidence of heterochromatic chromatin decondensation in ion irradiated murine chromocenters detected after subsequent fixation using FLIM measurements.

  5. β-decay and β-delayed Neutron Emission Measurements at GSI-FRS Beyond N=126, for r-process Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero-Folch, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Cortès, G.; Taín, J.L.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ameil, F.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Bowry, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Davinson, T.; and others

    2014-06-15

    New measurements of very exotic nuclei in the neutron-rich region beyond N=126 have been performed at the GSI facility with the fragment separator (FRS). The aim of the experiment is to determine half-lives and β-delayed neutron emission branching ratios of isotopes of Hg, Tl and Pb in this region. This contribution summarizes final counting statistics for identification and for implantation, as well as the present status of the data analysis of the half-lives. In summary, isotopes of Pt, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi, Po, At, Rn and Fr were clearly identified and several of them ({sup 208-211}Hg, {sup 211-215}Tl, {sup 214-218}Pb) were implanted with enough statistics to determine their half-lives. About half of them are expected to be neutron emitters, in such cases it will become possible to obtain the neutron emission probabilities, Pn.

  6. 76 FR 58812 - Patient Safety Organizations: Delisting for Cause of Patient Safety Organization One, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... information regarding the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and Quality... organizations whose mission and primary activity is to conduct activities to improve patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the Patient Safety Rule to implement the Patient Safety......

  7. 78 FR 40146 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Northern Metropolitan Patient Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... information regarding the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and Quality... patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the Patient Safety Rule to implement... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations:...

  8. Issues Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sando, Joe S.

    A program for teaching techniques of critical thinking on issues concerning American Indians was developed for students at Albuquerque Indian School. It was designed to include not only the students but also their families with learning activities that required consultation in search of answers or understanding. The first issue presented sought to…

  9. Effects of Kamdhenu Ark and Active Immunization by Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone Conjugate (GnRH-BSA) on Gonadosomatic Indices (GSI) and Sperm Parameters in Male Mus musculus

    PubMed Central

    Ganaie, Javid Ahmad; Gautam, Varsha; Shrivastava, Vinoy Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Background Active immunization against GnRH decreases the secretion of gonadotropins and causes cessation of gonadal function, thereby, inducing infertility. Based on the immunoenhancing activity of Kamdhenu ark (distilled cow urine), this study was performed to evaluate its effects on the gonadosomatic indices (GSI) and sperm parameters in male mice receiving a GnRH contraceptive vaccine. Methods Sixty adult male mice of Parke's strain were divided into three groups of twenty. Group I served as the controls, while group II was immunized by GnRH-BSA conjugate (50/0.2/35 µg/ml/g BW) by four intraperitoneal injections at different intervals on days 1, 30, 60 and 90. However, group III was supplemented daily by oral Kamdhenu ark (100 ppm) along with GnRH-BSA immunizations. The animals were sacrificed after 30, 60, 90 and 120 days and their testis and epididymis were dissected out weighed and semen analysis was performed. Results GSI values, sperm motility, sperm count and sperm morphology in male Mus musculus were decreased significantly in all the experimental groups as compared to the control group (p<0.01). Kamdhenu ark significantly enhanced the effect of GnRH vaccine on the aforesaid parameters especially in 90 and 120 days treated groups (p<0.05). Conclusion The changes witnessed in sperm parameters suggested that the GnRH-BSA immunization suppressed the activities of gonadotropins and testosterone directly through hypothalamo-hypophysial-gonadal axis and indirectly by acting on the testes which may modulate the sperm morphology, sperm count and motility. However, Kamdhenu ark seems to have enhanced these effects because of its immune-modulatory properties too. PMID:23926493

  10. School Safety Concerns All Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Megan

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that school safety is an issue that concerns all students. Discusses how the staff of the Rockwood South (Missouri) "RAMpage" covered the shootings at Columbine High School in a 14-page issue and in follow-up issues. Suggests that the student newspaper covered the controversial topic in an appropriate, tasteful manner. (RS)

  11. Family Issues

    MedlinePlus

    ... not mean that everyone gets along all the time. Conflicts are a part of family life. Many things can lead to conflict, such as illness, disability, addiction, job loss, school problems, and marital issues. Listening to ...

  12. 75 FR 57281 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary delisting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... safety of health care ] delivery. The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Final Rule (Patient Safety... patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the Patient Safety Rule to implement... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations:......

  13. 75 FR 63498 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Final Rule (Patient Safety... patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the Patient Safety Rule to implement... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations:......

  14. Summertime Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Violence & Safety Life Stages & Populations Travelers' Health Workplace Safety & Health Features Media Sign up for Features Get Email Updates ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Summertime Safety Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The feature ...

  15. Drug Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  16. Aerospace safety advisory panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report from the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) contains findings, recommendations, and supporting material concerning safety issues with the space station program, the space shuttle program, aeronautics research, and other NASA programs. Section two presents findings and recommendations, section three presents supporting information, and appendices contain data about the panel membership, the NASA response to the March 1993 ASAP report, and a chronology of the panel's activities during the past year.

  17. Safety in Children's Formal Play Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Paul F.; Lockhart, Robert

    This study was designed to examine the issue of the safety of children's formal play environments. Safety was defined in terms of morbidity and mortality data. Protection and safety education were considered the prime factors in accident prevention while the goal of a safety program was considered to be the minimizing of injuries. Several data…

  18. 20 CFR 725.463 - Issues to be resolved at hearing; new issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Issues to be resolved at hearing; new issues... OF THE FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT, AS AMENDED Hearings § 725.463 Issues to be resolved at hearing; new issues. (a) Except as otherwise provided in this section, the hearing shall be confined...

  19. DIPS Space Exploration Initiative safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dix, Terry E.

    The Dynamic Isotope Power Subsystem has been identified for potential applications for the Space Exploration Initiative. A qualitative safety assessment has been performed to demonstrate the overall safety adequacy of the Dynamic Isotope Power Subsystem for these applications. Mission profiles were defined for reference lunar and Martian flights. Accident scenarios were qualitatively defined for all mission phases. Safety issue were then identified. The safety issues included radiation exposure, fuel containment, criticality, diversion, toxic materials, heat flux to the extravehicular mobility unit, and disposal. The design was reviewed for areas where safety might be further improved. Safety would be improved by launching the fuel separate from the rest of the subsystem on expendable launch vehicles, using a fuel handling tool during unloading of the hot fuel canister, and constructing a cage-like structure around the reversible heat removal system lithium heat pipes. The results of the safety assessment indicate that the DIPS design with minor modifications will produce a low risk concept.

  20. CDC Vital Signs: Child Passenger Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Safety Healthcare-associated Infections HIV / AIDS Motor Vehicle Safety Obesity Prescription Drug Overdoses Teen Pregnancy Tobacco ... the Issue Related Pages February 2014 43% Motor vehicle deaths among children age 12 and under decreased ...

  1. Medicolegal issues.

    PubMed

    Torres, Abel; Konda, Sailesh; Nino, Tanya; de Golian, Emily

    2016-01-01

    The legal landscape in dermatology is constantly evolving. Dermatologists should nurture strong physician-patient relationships with proper informed consent and stay abreast of legal issues as they pertain to today's practice of medicine. Medicolegal issues that have risen to the forefront include wrong-site surgery, delegation of procedures to nonphysician operators, and compounding of medications. Additionally, although the marriage of health care and technology has facilitated our practice of medicine, it has opened doors to new medicolegal pitfalls associated with the use of electronic medical records, teledermatology, and even social media. This contribution will highlight some of the common medicolegal issues in dermatology along with recommendations to minimize exposure to litigation. PMID:26773630

  2. 75 FR 13342 - Pipeline Safety: Workshop on Distribution Pipeline Construction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... Construction AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of... Safety Representatives (NAPSR) on new distribution pipeline construction. The workshop will allow stakeholders in the pipeline safety community to learn about and discuss construction issues and...

  3. U.S. Coast Guard, Office of Boating Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Report Recalls Product Assurance Branch Boating Safety Circulars Beacon Alerts Marine Safety Alerts Multimedia PSA's Image Library ... Grants Nonprofit Organization Grants Grant Archives Grant Links Beacon Alerts MARINE SAFETY ALERT ISSUED FOR FOAM LIFE ...

  4. Unaddressed Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochester, J. Martin

    2005-01-01

    Walter Parker's January article, "Teaching Against Idiocy," raises important and fascinating issues relating to the proper role and function of the K-12 social studies classroom. Although J. Martin Rochester, the author of this article, agrees with his basic premise that schools obviously have an obligation to help promote citizenship education,…

  5. Sanskrit Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Barbara Stoler, Ed.

    1971-01-01

    This issue of "Mahfil" is devoted to Sanskrit literature and contains a note on Sanskrit pronunciation and selections of Sanskrit literature. It also contains articles analyzing and discussing various aspects of the literature, including "Sanskrit Rhetoric and Poetic,""The Creative Role of the Goddess Vac in the 'Rgveda,'""Vedic and Epic…

  6. Bond Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  7. Impacts of AMSU-A, MHS and IASI data assimilation on temperature and humidity forecasts with GSI-WRF over the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Y.; Xu, J.; Powell, A. M., Jr.; Shao, M.; Min, J.; Pan, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Using NOAA's Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system and NCAR's Advanced Research WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) (ARW-WRF) regional model, six experiments are designed by (1) a control experiment (CTRL) and five data assimilation (DA) experiments with different data sets, including (2) conventional data only (CON); (3) microwave data (AMSU-A + MHS) only (MW); (4) infrared data (IASI) only (IR); (5) a combination of microwave and infrared data (MWIR); and (6) a combination of conventional, microwave and infrared observation data (ALL). One-month experiments in July 2012 and the impacts of the DA on temperature and moisture forecasts at the surface and four vertical layers over the western United States have been investigated. The four layers include lower troposphere (LT) from 800 to 1000 hPa, middle troposphere (MT) from 400 to 800 hPa, upper troposphere (UT) from 200 to 400 hPa, and lower stratosphere (LS) from 50 to 200 hPa. The results show that the regional GSI-WRF system is underestimating the observed temperature in the LT and overestimating in the UT and LS. The MW DA reduced the forecast bias from the MT to the LS within 30 h forecasts, and the CON DA kept a smaller forecast bias in the LT for 2-day forecasts. The largest root mean square error (RMSE) is observed in the LT and at the surface (SFC). Compared to the CTRL, the MW DA produced the most positive contribution in the UT and LS, and the CON DA mainly improved the temperature forecasts at the SFC. However, the IR DA gave a negative contribution in the LT. Most of the observed humidity in the different vertical layers is overestimated in the humidity forecasts except in the UT. The smallest bias in the humidity forecast occurred at the SFC and in the UT. The DA experiments apparently reduced the bias from the LT to UT, especially for the IR DA experiment, but the RMSEs are not reduced in the humidity forecasts. Compared to the CTRL, the IR DA experiment has a larger

  8. Safety analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.

    1995-01-01

    We are engaged in a research program in safety-critical computing that is based on two case studies. We use these case studies to provide application-specific details of the various research issues, and as targets for evaluation of research ideas. The first case study is the Magnetic Stereotaxis System (MSS), an investigational device for performing human neurosurgery being developed in a joint effort between the Department of Physics at the University of Virginia and the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Iowa. The system operates by manipulating a small permanent magnet (known as a 'seed') within the brain using an externally applied magnetic field. By varying the magnitude and gradient of the external magnetic field, the seed can be moved along a non-linear path and positioned at a site requiring therapy, e.g., a tumor. The magnetic field required for movement through brain tissue is extremely high, and is generated by a set of six superconducting magnets located in a housing surrounding the patient's head. The system uses two X-ray cameras positioned at right angles to detect in real time the locations of the seed and of X-ray opaque markers affixed to the patient's skull. the X-ray images are used to locate the objects of interest in a canonical frame of reference. the second case study is the University of Virginia Research Nuclear Reactor (UVAR). It is a 2 MW thermal, concrete-walled pool reactor. The system operates using 20 to 25 plate-type fuel assemblies placed on a rectangular grid plate. There are three scramable safety rods, and one non-scramable regulating rod that can be put in automatic mode. It was originally constructed in 1959 as a 1 MW system, and it was upgraded to 2 MW in 1973. Though only a research reactor rather than a power reactor, the issues raised are significant and can be related to the problems faced by full-scale reactor systems.

  9. The railroad perspective: Issues behind the issues

    SciTech Connect

    Furber, C.P.; Brobst, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Rail transportation is a vital segment of DOE's spent fuel program. Most of the shipments from reactors to a repository or to a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility will be by rail, and essentially all of the shipments from an MRS to a repository. Casks must move economically and efficiently, while at the same time providing adequate safety to the public and transport workers, and meeting the legal/institutional constraints. Shippers are faced with the problem of procuring transportation services in a safe manner at a reasonable cost, trying to balance freight charges against cask inventory costs. Carriers are cautious about accepting potentially high hazard materials in routine service, and are worried about uninsured losses in case of accidents. Both shippers and carriers operate under different scheduling and operational criteria. Technical and institutional constraints add to the complexity of the operation. Standardization of shipping casks and rail car design will ease the resolution of the complex problems now existent. This paper discusses the economic, safety, operational, and legal issues surrounding rail transportation.

  10. Spaceport Hawaii - Environmental issues

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, T.B. )

    1992-03-01

    The geographical, economic, and infrastructural factors of the Island of Hawaii make this island an ideal site for a privately owned and operated commercial launching facility for launching small- to medium-sized payloads into both equatorial and polar orbits. This paper describes the preparation of an environmental impact statement, which was initiated as a prelude to the eventual construction and operation of the commercial launching facility on the Island of Hawaii and which follows the Hawaii State law and the National Environmental Policy Act. The issues discussed are the regional characteristics of the Island of Hawaii, the candidate launch vehicles, the flight safety considerations, the spaceport development issues, and the potential impact of the future spaceport on the Mauna Kea Observatory on the Island of Hawaii.

  11. Environmental Issues are Controversial Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepburn, Mary Allaire

    The extensive social-scientific interest and continuing relevance of environmental study assure its immediate and long-range importance in the social studies. But the crisis atmosphere surrounding this issue threatens a thoughtful, systematic approach to the subject, and poses the danger of a careless rush to activity. As social studies educators,…

  12. Planning for Campus Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    From natural disasters to criminal violence, facilities officers are often called on to address campus safety and security issues beyond their usual responsibilities. Their experiences in coping with unanticipated events have produced a catalogue of lessons learned that can help them and their peers at other institutions who might face the same…

  13. Aerospace safety advisory panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Data acquired on the actual flight experience with the various subsystems are assessed. These subsystems include: flight control and performance, structural integrity, orbiter landing gear, lithium batteries, EVA and prebreathing, and main engines. Improvements for routine operations are recommended. Policy issues for operations and flight safety for aircraft operations are discussed.

  14. Elevating standards, improving safety.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Richard

    2014-08-01

    In our latest 'technical guidance' article, Richard Clarke, sales and marketing director at one of the UK's leading lift and escalator specialists, Schindler, examines some of the key issues surrounding the specification, maintenance, and operation of lifts in hospitals to help ensure the highest standards of safety and reliability. PMID:25219081

  15. Auditing Schools for Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Eric,

    2000-01-01

    Explores the issues involved in conducting effective safety audits for educational facilities. Areas covered include auditing for site characteristics, access control, lighting, building exterior, door types and locking mechanisms, key control, alarm system controls, security monitors, and vision panels in the doors. (GR)

  16. Safety Management Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fido, A. T.; Wood, D. O.

    This document discusses the issues that need to be considered by the education and training system as it responds to the changing needs of industry in Great Britain. Following a general introduction, the development of quality management ideas is traced. The underlying principles of safety and risk management are clarified and the implications of…

  17. Theoretical Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2007-04-01

    The theoretical issues in the interpretation of the precision measurements of the nucleon-to-Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes are highlighted. The results of these measurements are confronted with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD, and QCD-inspired models. The link of the nucleon-to-Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs) is also discussed.

  18. New results from isochronous mass measurements of neutron-rich uranium fission fragments with the FRS-ESR-facility at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knöbel, R.; Diwisch, M.; Geissel, H.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Patyk, Z.; Plaß, W. R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sun, B.; Weick, H.; Bosch, F.; Boutin, D.; Chen, L.; Dimopoulou, C.; Dolinskii, A.; Franczak, B.; Franzke, B.; Hausmann, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, S. A.; Matoš, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Münzenberg, G.; Nakajima, S.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Ohtsubo, T.; Ozawa, A.; Stadlmann, J.; Steck, M.; Suzuki, T.; Walker, P. M.; Winkler, M.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2016-05-01

    Masses of uranium fission fragments have been measured with the FRagment Separator (FRS) combined with the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at GSI. A 410-415 MeV/u 238U projectile beam was fast extracted from the synchrotron SIS-18 with an average intensity of 109/spill. The projectiles were focused on a 1g/cm2 beryllium target at the entrance of the FRS to create neutron-rich isotopes via abrasion-fission. The fission fragments were spatially separated with the FRS and injected into the isochronous storage ring ESR for fast mass measurements without applying cooling. The Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS) was performed under two different experimental conditions, with and without B ρ-tagging at the high-resolution dispersive central focal plane of the FRS. The evaluation has been done for the combined data sets from both experiments with a new method of data analysis. The use of a correlation matrix has provided experimental mass values for 23 different neutron-rich isotopes for the first time and 6 masses with improved values. The new masses were obtained for nuclides in the element range from Se to Ce. The applied analysis has given access even to rare isotopes detected with an intensity of a few atoms per week. The novel data analysis and systematic error determination are described and the results are compared with extrapolations of experimental values and theoretical models.

  19. Modeling event building architecture for the triggerless data acquisition system for PANDA experiment at the HESR facility at FAIR/GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korcyl, K.; Konorov, I.; Kühn, W.; Schmitt, L.

    2012-12-01

    A novel architecture is being proposed for the data acquisition and trigger system of the PANDA experiment at the HESR facility at FAIR/GSI. The experiment will run without hardware trigger signal using timestamps to correlate detector data from a given time window. The broad physics program in combination with the high rate of 2 * 107 interactions per second requires very selective filtering algorithms accessing information from many detectors. Therefore the effective filtering will happen later than in today's systems ie. after the event building. To assess that, the complete architecture will be built of two stages: the data concentrator stage providing event building and the rate reduction stage. For the former stage, which requires a throughput of 100 GB/s to perform event building, we propose two layers of ATCA crates filled with Compute Nodes - modules designed at IHEP and University of Giessen for trigger and data acquisition systems. Currently each board is equipped with 5 Virtex4 FX60 FPGAs and high bandwidth connectivity is provided by 8 front panel RocketIO ports and 12 backplane ports for the inter-module communication. We designed simplified models of the components of the architecture and using the SystemC library as support for the discrete event simulations, demonstrate the expected throughput of the full-size system. We also show impact of some architectural choices and key parameters on the architecture's performance.

  20. 78 FR 12065 - Patient Safety Organizations: Delisting for Cause for Independent Data Safety Monitoring, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... whose mission and primary activity is to conduct activities to improve patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Final Rule (Patient Safety..., aggregate, and analyze confidential information regarding the quality and safety of health care...

  1. 78 FR 59036 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Cogent Patient Safety Organization, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... regarding the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Final... organizations whose mission and primary activity is to conduct activities to improve patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the Patient Safety Rule to implement the Patient......

  2. 76 FR 71345 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Emergency Medicine Patient Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... confidential information regarding the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and... conduct activities to improve patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations:...

  3. 76 FR 7853 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Oregon Patient Safety Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... organizations whose mission and primary activity is to conduct activities to improve patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the Patient Safety Rule to implement the Patient Safety Act..., and analyze confidential information regarding the quality and safety of health care delivery....

  4. 76 FR 79192 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From HSMS Patient Safety Organization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... confidential information regarding the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and... conduct activities to improve patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations:...

  5. 77 FR 25179 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Surgical Safety Institute

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the Patient Safety and Quality... of health care delivery. The Patient Safety Rule, 42 CFR part 3, authorizes AHRQ, on behalf of the... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations:...

  6. 76 FR 71345 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Child Health Patient Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... confidential information regarding the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and... conduct activities to improve patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations:...

  7. Drug safety and the media

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Patrick C; Evans, Stephen J W; Beard, Keith

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the problems that may arise as a result of media coverage of drug safety issues. In order to promote more balanced coverage and avoid unnecessary scares, professionals working in the area of drug safety should rethink their strategies for dealing with the media. PMID:16433866

  8. Evolution of space reactor safety

    SciTech Connect

    Wetch, J.R. )

    1993-01-10

    This paper summarizes some of the major safety issues and proposed and developed solutions to real and perceived problems. Safety of the public, operating personnel, facilities and the environment has always been a driving concern of the public, government agencies, system designers and users of nuclear power and propulsion systems.

  9. Fire Safety in Extraterrestrial Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Despite rigorous fire-safety policies and practices, fire incidents are possible during lunar and Martian missions. Fire behavior and hence preventive and responsive safety actions in the missions are strongly influenced by the low-gravity environments in flight and on the planetary surfaces. This paper reviews the understanding and key issues of fire safety in the missions, stressing flame spread, fire detection, suppression, and combustion performance of propellants produced from Martian resources.

  10. ERCMExpress, Volume 2, Issue 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This issue of ERCMExpress presents food safety and food defense for schools. Many schools and school districts across the country have established emergency management plans; however, these plans are often not comprehensive, practiced regularly or written in collaboration with the local community. It is recommended that schools adopt a…

  11. ERCMExpress. Volume 2, Issue 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This issue of ERCMExpress provides direction to schools and school districts in "Creating Emergency Management Plans." To ensure the safety of students, faculty and staff, schools and school districts nationwide should create comprehensive, multi-hazard emergency management plans that focus on the four phases of emergency management--…

  12. Feasibility Study of Using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) and Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR) for Reducing Radiation and Iodine Contrast Dose in Abdominal CT Patients with High BMI Values

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zheng; Zhao, Xin-ming; Zhao, Yan-feng; Wang, Xiao-yi; Zhou, Chun-wu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively investigate the effect of using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) for reducing radiation and iodine contrast dose in abdominal CT patients with high BMI values. Materials and Methods 26 patients (weight > 65kg and BMI ≥ 22) underwent abdominal CT using GSI mode with 300mgI/kg contrast material as study group (group A). Another 21 patients (weight ≤ 65kg and BMI ≥ 22) were scanned with a conventional 120 kVp tube voltage for noise index (NI) of 11 with 450mgI/kg contrast material as control group (group B). GSI images were reconstructed at 60keV with 50%ASIR and the conventional 120kVp images were reconstructed with FBP reconstruction. The CT values, standard deviation (SD), signal-noise-ratio (SNR), contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) of 26 landmarks were quantitatively measured and image quality qualitatively assessed using statistical analysis. Results As for the quantitative analysis, the difference of CNR between groups A and B was all significant except for the mesenteric vein. The SNR in group A was higher than B except the mesenteric artery and splenic artery. As for the qualitative analysis, all images had diagnostic quality and the agreement for image quality assessment between the reviewers was substantial (kappa = 0.684). CT dose index (CTDI) values for non-enhanced, arterial phase and portal phase in group A were decreased by 49.04%, 40.51% and 40.54% compared with group B (P = 0.000), respectively. The total dose and the injection rate for the contrast material were reduced by 14.40% and 14.95% in A compared with B. Conclusion The use of GSI and ASIR provides similar enhancement in vessels and image quality with reduced radiation dose and contrast dose, compared with the use of conventional scan protocol. PMID:26079259

  13. Vaccine Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... During Pregnancy Frequently Asked Questions about Vaccine Recalls Historical Vaccine Safety Concerns FAQs about GBS and Menactra ... CISA Resources for Healthcare Professionals Evaluation Current Studies Historical Background 2001-12 Publications Technical Reports Vaccine Safety ...

  14. 75 FR 57477 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Final Rule... activities to improve patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the Patient Safety... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations:...

  15. Safety Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

    Safety policies, procedures, and related information are presented in this manual to assist school personnel in a continuing program of accident prevention. Chapter 1 discusses safety education and accident prevention in general. Chapter 2 covers traffic regulations relating to school safety patrols, school bus transportation, bicycles, and…

  16. 78 FR 42818 - SafetyAlert: Safety Alert: Risks Associated With Liquid Petroleum (LP) Gas Odor Fade

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration ] SafetyAlert: Safety Alert: Risks Associated With...), DOT. ACTION: Safety Alert Notice. SUMMARY: PHMSA is issuing this safety alert to notify the public of... purpose of this alert is to advise shippers and carriers of the recommended procedures to ensure that...

  17. Schoolyard Ponds: Safety and Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danks, Sharon Gamson

    2001-01-01

    Engaging, attractive schoolyard ponds provide habitat for wildlife and hold great educational promise. Reviews water safety and liability issues including mud, stagnant pond water that serves as mosquito breeding grounds, and drowning. Offers ideas for creatively addressing those issues through site planning, shallow water depth, signage and…

  18. School Safety: A Collaborative Effort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Review, 2000

    2000-01-01

    The "ERIC Review" announces research results, publications, and new programs relevant to each issue's theme topic. This issue focuses on school safety and violence prevention. An introductory section includes two articles: "How Safe Is My Child's School?" (Kevin Mitchell) and "Making America's Schools Safer" (U.S. Secretary of Education Richard W.…

  19. Pipeline issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisley, Joe T.

    1990-01-01

    The declining pool of graduates, the lack of rigorous preparation in science and mathematics, and the declining interest in science and engineering careers at the precollege level promises a shortage of technically educated personnel at the college level for industry, government, and the universities in the next several decades. The educational process, which starts out with a large number of students at the elementary level, but with an ever smaller number preparing for science and engineering at each more advanced educational level, is in a state of crisis. These pipeline issues, so called because the educational process is likened to a series of ever smaller constrictions in a pipe, were examined in a workshop at the Space Grant Conference and a summary of the presentations and the results of the discussion, and the conclusions of the workshop participants are reported.

  20. Quantitative Assessment of Radon-222 Degassing Phenomenon from the Investigation of Groundwater/Surface water Interaction (GSI) processes in Shallow Turbulent Rivers in Campania region, Southern Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuomo, A.; Guadagnolo, D.; Guida, D.; Guida, M.; Paschke, A.; Schubert, M.; Siervo, V.

    2012-04-01

    In the investigation of Groundwater/Surface water Interaction (GSI) processes in different water bodies typologies, the use of Environmental Tracers, like Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, have been proven to be an extremely reliable and powerful tool. In particular, among them the (short-lived) radionuclide Radon-222 (referred to as Radon), occurring in the gaseous phase in normal conditions of temperature and pressure, has the advantages to be almost chemically inert, easily detectable on site and its physical signal is not disturbed by any kind of anthropically produced "noise". Therefore, differently from other tracers of artificial nature, it can be safely and successfully employed especially in natural environments, like Natural Parks and Wildlife Protected Areas, because it does not contaminate the surrounding environments being a Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material. Radon, produced in every mineral matrix through the spontaneous decay of Radium, turns out to be rather soluble in water, even though depending on the temperature of the water body, and, therefore, it occurs ubiquitously in all kinds of natural waters. In particular, Radon activity concentrations values, measured in groundwater, are typically some (from three to four) orders of magnitude higher than those ones detected, instead, in surface waters. For such reasons Radon turns out to be a remarkable tool for the Groundwater/Surface water Interaction (GSI) processes and a good indicator for the localization and the semi-quantitative assessment of groundwater discharges into different kinds of water bodies like lakes, rivers and sea. This work summarizes some outcomes from a series of experimental measurements campaigns performed in relevant river basins of Campania region, southern Italy, where interdisciplinary investigations about Groundwater-River Interactions have been carried on using Radon as a Natural Tracer. The experimental measurement campaigns have been performed using the Radon

  1. 31 CFR 560.528 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aircraft safety. 560.528 Section 560..., Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.528 Aircraft safety. Specific licenses may be issued on... insure the safety of civil aviation and safe operation of U.S.-origin commercial passenger aircraft....

  2. 31 CFR 560.528 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aircraft safety. 560.528 Section 560..., Authorizations and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.528 Aircraft safety. Specific licenses may be issued on a... the safety of civil aviation and safe operation of U.S.-origin commercial passenger aircraft....

  3. 31 CFR 560.528 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aircraft safety. 560.528 Section 560..., Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.528 Aircraft safety. Specific licenses may be issued on... insure the safety of civil aviation and safe operation of U.S.-origin commercial passenger aircraft....

  4. 31 CFR 560.528 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the safety of civil aviation and safe operation of U.S.-origin commercial passenger aircraft. ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aircraft safety. 560.528 Section 560..., Authorizations and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.528 Aircraft safety. Specific licenses may be issued on...

  5. 31 CFR 560.528 - Aircraft safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aircraft safety. 560.528 Section 560..., Authorizations and Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.528 Aircraft safety. Specific licenses may be issued on a... the safety of civil aviation and safe operation of U.S.-origin commercial passenger aircraft....

  6. Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Cadwallader

    2005-01-31

    This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

  7. Aviation Safety Simulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houser, Scott; Yackovetsky, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Simulation Model is a software tool that enables users to configure a terrain, a flight path, and an aircraft and simulate the aircraft's flight along the path. The simulation monitors the aircraft's proximity to terrain obstructions, and reports when the aircraft violates accepted minimum distances from an obstruction. This model design facilitates future enhancements to address other flight safety issues, particularly air and runway traffic scenarios. This report shows the user how to build a simulation scenario and run it. It also explains the model's output.

  8. National Safety Council

    MedlinePlus

    ... Introduction Safety Management Systems Workplace Safety Consulting Employee Perception Surveys Research Journey to Safety Excellence Join the ... Safety Safety Management Systems Workplace Safety Consulting Employee Perception Surveys Research Journey to Safety Excellence Join the ...

  9. Safety system status monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.R.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Rideout, T.H.; Cowley, P.J.

    1984-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has studied the safety aspects of monitoring the preoperational status of safety systems in nuclear power plants. The goals of the study were to assess for the NRC the effectiveness of current monitoring systems and procedures, to develop near-term guidelines for reducing human errors associated with monitoring safety system status, and to recommend a regulatory position on this issue. A review of safety system status monitoring practices indicated that current systems and procedures do not adequately aid control room operators in monitoring safety system status. This is true even of some systems and procedures installed to meet existing regulatory guidelines (Regulatory Guide 1.47). In consequence, this report suggests acceptance criteria for meeting the functional requirements of an adequate system for monitoring safety system status. Also suggested are near-term guidelines that could reduce the likelihood of human errors in specific, high-priority status monitoring tasks. It is recommended that (1) Regulatory Guide 1.47 be revised to address these acceptance criteria, and (2) the revised Regulatory Guide 1.47 be applied to all plants, including those built since the issuance of the original Regulatory Guide.

  10. New elements produced at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Sigurd

    1998-12-01

    In two series of experiments at SHIP, six new elements (Z=107-112) were synthesized via fusion reactions using lead or bismuth targets and 1n-deexcitation channels. The isotopes were unambiguously identified by means of α-α correlations. Not fission, but alpha decay is the dominant decay mode. Cross-sections decrease by two orders of magnitude from bohrium (Z=107) to element 112, for which a cross-section of 1 pb was measured. Based on our results, it is likely that the production of isotopes of element 114 close to the island of spherical SuperHeavy Elements (SHE) could be achieved by fusion reactions using 208Pb targets. Systematic studies of the reaction cross-sections indicate that the transfer of nucleons is an important process for the initiation of fusion. The data allow for the fixing of a narrow energy window for the production of SHE using 1n-emission channels. The likelihood of broadening the energy window by investigation of radiative capture reactions, use of neutron deficient projectile isotopes and use of actinide targets is discussed.

  11. New elements produced at GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, Sigurd

    1998-12-21

    In two series of experiments at SHIP, six new elements (Z=107-112) were synthesized via fusion reactions using lead or bismuth targets and 1n-deexcitation channels. The isotopes were unambiguously identified by means of {alpha}-{alpha} correlations. Not fission, but alpha decay is the dominant decay mode. Cross-sections decrease by two orders of magnitude from bohrium (Z=107) to element 112, for which a cross-section of 1 pb was measured. Based on our results, it is likely that the production of isotopes of element 114 close to the island of spherical SuperHeavy Elements (SHE) could be achieved by fusion reactions using {sup 208}Pb targets. Systematic studies of the reaction cross-sections indicate that the transfer of nucleons is an important process for the initiation of fusion. The data allow for the fixing of a narrow energy window for the production of SHE using 1n-emission channels. The likelihood of broadening the energy window by investigation of radiative capture reactions, use of neutron deficient projectile isotopes and use of actinide targets is discussed.

  12. Health and safety

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, K. )

    1990-05-01

    This article discusses health and safety in coal mines and the primary issues in this area during 1989. Particular attention is given to the employment figures as well as the fatality statistics. According to this article, employment was up during 1989 to approximately 164,000 workers as compared to 136,000 in 1969. Attention is also given to dealing with coal mining regulations as well as a crackdown on illegal operators in the industry.

  13. Lightning safety of animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Chandima

    2012-11-01

    This paper addresses a concurrent multidisciplinary problem: animal safety against lightning hazards. In regions where lightning is prevalent, either seasonally or throughout the year, a considerable number of wild, captive and tame animals are injured due to lightning generated effects. The paper discusses all possible injury mechanisms, focusing mainly on animals with commercial value. A large number of cases from several countries have been analyzed. Economically and practically viable engineering solutions are proposed to address the issues related to the lightning threats discussed.

  14. Nuclear safety policy working group recommendations on nuclear propulsion safety for the space exploration initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Albert C.; Lee, James H.; Mcculloch, William H.; Sawyer, J. Charles, Jr.; Bari, Robert A.; Cullingford, Hatice S.; Hardy, Alva C.; Niederauer, George F.; Remp, Kerry; Rice, John W.

    1993-01-01

    An interagency Nuclear Safety Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) nuclear propulsion program. These recommendations, which are contained in this report, should facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG has recommended a top-level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the SEI nuclear propulsion safety program. In addition, the NSPWG has reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top-level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. These recommendations should be useful for the development of the program's top-level requirements for safety functions (referred to as Safety Functional Requirements). The safety requirements and guidelines address the following topics: reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, safeguards, risk/reliability, operational safety, ground testing, and other considerations.

  15. Safety Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halligan, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Colleges across the country are rising to the task by implementing safety programs, response strategies, and technologies intended to create a secure environment for teachers and students. Whether it is preparing and responding to a natural disaster, health emergency, or act of violence, more schools are making campus safety a top priority. At…

  16. Solidifying Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covault, Craig

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Solidifying Safety: NASA s new safety organization spools up, as the 1SS program grapples with long-term risk. 2. Earth to Orbit O'Keefe telling skeptical lawmakers Orbital Space Plan (OSP) will cover exploration vision. China's rapid pace.

  17. Safety First

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taft, Darryl

    2011-01-01

    Ned Miller does not take security lightly. As director of campus safety and emergency management at the Des Moines Area Community College (DMACC), any threat requires serious consideration. As community college administrators adopt a more proactive approach to campus safety, many institutions are experimenting with emerging technologies, including…

  18. Nuclear economics: Issues and facts

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, C.R.

    1993-12-31

    Nuclear economics has become on the more prominent topics related to nuclear power. Beyond the subjects of nuclear safety and waste disposal, questions and concerns of nuclear power economics have emerged with growing frequency in utility board rooms, in state and federal regulatory proceedings, and in the media. What has caused nuclear power economics to become such a popular topic? This paper addresses issues and facts related to historical nuclear plant costs, new nuclear plant projections, and warning signals for future plants.

  19. Food safety.

    PubMed

    Borchers, Andrea; Teuber, Suzanne S; Keen, Carl L; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-10-01

    affects the development of the central nervous system and the male reproductive organs. Genetically modified foods present new challenges to regulatory agencies around the world because consumer fears that the possible health risks of these foods have not been allayed. An emerging threat to food safety possibly comes from the increasing use of nanomaterials, which are already used in packaging materials, even though their toxicity remains largely unexplored. Numerous scientific groups have underscored the importance of addressing this issue and developing the necessary tools for doing so. Governmental agencies such as the US Food and Drug Administration and other agencies in the USA and their counterparts in other nations have the increasingly difficult task of monitoring the food supply for these chemicals and determining the human health risks associated with exposure to these substances. The approach taken until recently focused on one chemical at a time and one exposure route (oral, inhalational, dermal) at a time. It is increasingly recognized, however, that many of the numerous chemicals we are exposed to everyday are ubiquitous, resulting in exposure from food, water, air, dust, and soil. In addition, many of these chemicals act on the same target tissue by similar mechanisms. "Mixture toxicology" is a rapidly growing science that addresses the complex interactions between chemicals and investigates the effects of cumulative exposure to such "common mechanism groups" of chemicals. It is to be hoped that this results in a deeper understanding of the risks we face from multiple concurrent exposures and makes our food supply safer. PMID:19911313

  20. 78 FR 29392 - Embedded Digital Devices in Safety-Related Systems, Systems Important to Safety, and Items Relied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing for public comment Draft Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) 2013-XX, ``Embedded Digital Devices in Safety-Related Systems, Systems Important to Safety, and Items Relied on For Safety.'' The NRC staff has developed the draft RIS to clarify the NRC's technical position on existing regulatory requirements for the quality and reliability of basic......

  1. Issues concerned with future light-water-reactor designs

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, L.S.

    1982-03-01

    This article discusses some light-water-reactor (LWR) design issues that are based on operating experiences and the results of water-reactor safety research. The impacts of these issues on reactor safety are described, and new engineering concepts are identified to encourage further improvement in future light-water-reactor designs.

  2. Environmental issues in China

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, P.S.

    1991-10-01

    Global concern about the environment is increasing, and the People's Republic of China (PRC) is not immune from such concerns. The Chinese face issues similar to those of many other developing nations. The US Department of Energy is particularly interested in national and world pollution issues, especially those that may infringe on other countries' economic growth and development. The DOE is also interested in any opportunities that might exist for US technical assistance and equipment in combating environmental problems. Our studies of articles in the China Daily, and English-language daily newspaper published by the Chinese government, show that population, pollution, and energy are major concerns of the Chinese Communist Party. Thus this report emphasizes the official Chinese government view. Supporting data were also obtained from other sources. Regardless of the severity of their various environmental problems, the Chinese will only try to remedy those problems with the greatest negative effects on its developing economy. They will be looking for foreign assistance, financial and informational, to help implement solutions. With the Chinese government seeking assistance, the United States has an opportunity to export basic technical information, especially in the areas of pollution control and monitoring, oil exploration methods, oil drilling technology, water and sewage treatment procedures, hazardous waste and nuclear waste handling techniques, and nuclear power plant safety procedures. In those areas the US has expertise and extensive technical experience, and by exporting the technologies the US would benefit both economically and politically. 59 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Population-based analysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use among children in four European countries in the SOS project: what size of data platforms and which study designs do we need to assess safety issues?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Data on utilization patterns and safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in children are scarce. The purpose of this study was to investigate the utilization of NSAIDs among children in four European countries as part of the Safety Of non-Steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (SOS) project. Methods We used longitudinal patient data from seven databases (GePaRD, IPCI, OSSIFF, Pedianet, PHARMO, SISR, and THIN) to calculate prevalence rates of NSAID use among children (0–18 years of age) from Germany, Italy, Netherlands, and United Kingdom. All databases contained a representative population sample and recorded demographics, diagnoses, and drug prescriptions. Prevalence rates of NSAID use were stratified by age, sex, and calendar time. The person-time of NSAID exposure was calculated by using the duration of the prescription supply. We calculated incidence rates for serious adverse events of interest. For these adverse events of interest, sample size calculations were conducted (alpha = 0.05; 1-beta = 0.8) to determine the amount of NSAID exposure time that would be required for safety studies in children. Results The source population comprised 7.7 million children with a total of 29.6 million person-years of observation. Of those, 1.3 million children were exposed to at least one of 45 NSAIDs during observation time. Overall prevalence rates of NSAID use in children differed across countries, ranging from 4.4 (Italy) to 197 (Germany) per 1000 person-years in 2007. For Germany, United Kingdom, and Italian pediatricians, we observed high rates of NSAID use among children aged one to four years. For all four countries, NSAID use increased with older age categories for children older than 11. In this analysis, only for ibuprofen (the most frequently used NSAID), enough exposure was available to detect a weak association (relative risk of 2) between exposure and asthma exacerbation (the most common serious adverse event of interest

  4. 76 FR 7854 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Quality Excellence, Inc./PSO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Final Rule (Patient Safety... patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the Patient Safety Rule to implement... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations:......

  5. 76 FR 7855 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Community Medical Foundation for Patient...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Final Rule (Patient Safety... patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the Patient Safety Rule to implement... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations:......

  6. New Automated System Available for Reporting Safety Concerns | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A new system has been developed for reporting safety issues in the workplace. The Environment, Health, and Safety’s (EHS’) Safety Inspection and Issue Management System (SIIMS) is an online resource where any employee can report a problem or issue, said Siobhan Tierney, program manager at EHS.

  7. Software safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy

    1987-01-01

    Software safety and its relationship to other qualities are discussed. It is shown that standard reliability and fault tolerance techniques will not solve the safety problem for the present. A new attitude requires: looking at what you do NOT want software to do along with what you want it to do; and assuming things will go wrong. New procedures and changes to entire software development process are necessary: special software safety analysis techniques are needed; and design techniques, especially eliminating complexity, can be very helpful.

  8. Watch Out! A Teacher's Guide to Traffic Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This guide provides teachers with activities that can initiate an awareness of the New York city-wide traffic safety campaign and reinforce safety education. It contains the following: (1) background information on safety rules for teachers; (2) curriculum topics that can include traffic safety issues; (3) class- and school-wide activities for…

  9. A Geospatial Mixed Methods Approach to Assessing Campus Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hites, Lisle S.; Fifolt, Matthew; Beck, Heidi; Su, Wei; Kerbawy, Shatomi; Wakelee, Jessica; Nassel, Ariann

    2013-01-01

    Background: While there is no panacea for alleviating campus safety concerns, safety experts agree that one of the key components to an effective campus security plan is monitoring the environment. Despite previous attempts to measure campus safety, quantifying perceptions of fear, safety, and risk remains a challenging issue. Since perceptions of…

  10. 75 FR 29155 - Publicly Available Consumer Product Safety Information Database

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ...The Consumer Product Safety Commission (``Commission,'' ``CPSC,'' or ``we'') is issuing a notice of proposed rulemaking that would establish a publicly available consumer product safety information database (``database''). Section 212 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (``CPSIA'') amended the Consumer Product Safety Act (``CPSA'') to require the Commission to establish and......

  11. NASA's Software Safety Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsay, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    requirements. This allows the projects leeway to meet these requirements in many forms that best suit a particular project's needs and safety risk. In other words, it tells the project what to do, not how to do it. This update also incorporated advances in the state of the practice of software safety from academia and private industry. It addresses some of the more common issues now facing software developers in the NASA environment such as the use of Commercial-Off-the-Shelf Software (COTS), Modified OTS (MOTS), Government OTS (GOTS), and reused software. A team from across NASA developed the update and it has had both NASA-wide internal reviews by software engineering, quality, safety, and project management. It has also had expert external review. This presentation and paper will discuss the new NASA Software Safety Standard, its organization, and key features. It will start with a brief discussion of some NASA mission failures and incidents that had software as one of their root causes. It will then give a brief overview of the NASA Software Safety Process. This will include an overview of the key personnel responsibilities and functions that must be performed for safety-critical software.

  12. INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM SAFETY CULTURE IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVE

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD JA JR

    2009-01-16

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) identified safety culture as one of their top Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) related priorities. A team was formed to address this issue. The team identified a consensus set of safety culture principles, along with implementation practices that could be used by DOE, NNSA, and their contractors. Documented improvement tools were identified and communicated to contractors participating in a year long pilot project. After a year, lessons learned will be collected and a path forward determined. The goal of this effort was to achieve improved safety and mission performance through ISMS continuous improvement. The focus of ISMS improvement was safety culture improvement building on operating experience from similar industries such as the domestic and international commercial nuclear and chemical industry.

  13. Safety Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Miriam C., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Outlines a cooperative effort in Iowa to eliminate dangerous or unwanted chemicals from school science storerooms. Also reviews the Council of State Science Supervisor's safety program and discusses how to prevent cuts and punctures from jagged glass tubing. (JN)

  14. Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... are four basic steps to food safety at home: Clean - always wash your fruits and vegetables, hands, counters, and cooking utensils. Separate - keep raw foods to themselves. Germs can spread from one food ...

  15. Implementation of the INEEL safety analyst training standard

    SciTech Connect

    E. E. Hochhalter

    2000-04-28

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) safety analysis units at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) are in the process of implementing the recently issued INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard (STD-1107). Safety analyst training and qualifications are integral to the development and maintenance of core safety analysis capabilities. The INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard (STD-1107) was developed directly from EFCOG Training Subgroup draft safety analyst training plan template, but has been adapted to the needs and requirements of the INEEL safety analysis community. The implementation of this Safety Analyst Training Standard is part of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Implementation currently underway at the INEEL. The objective of this paper is to discuss (1) the INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard, (2) the development of the safety analyst individual training plans, (3) the implementation issues encountered during this initial phase of implementation, (4) the solutions developed, and (5) the implementation activities remaining to be completed.

  16. Implementation of the INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard

    SciTech Connect

    Hochhalter, E Eugene

    2000-05-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) safety analysis units at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) are in the process of implementing the recently issued INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard (STD-1107). Safety analyst training and qualifications are integral to the development and maintenance of core safety analysis capabilities. The INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard (STD-1107) was developed directly from EFCOG Training Subgroup draft safety analyst training plan template, but has been adapted to the needs and requirements of the INEEL safety analysis community. The implementation of this Safety Analyst Training Standard is part of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Implementation currently underway at the INEEL. The objective of this paper is to discuss (1) the INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard, (2) the development of the safety analyst individual training plans, (3) the implementation issues encountered during this initial phase of implementation, (4) the solutions developed, and (5) the implementation activities remaining to be completed.

  17. 2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea Hoffman

    2011-12-01

    The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel

  18. Worker Health and Safety: An Area of Conflicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashford, Nicholas A.

    1975-01-01

    The article outlines four basic conflicts concerning occupational health and safety, discusses the nature and dimensions of health and safety problems, examines the generation of information and its diffusion, and deals briefly with some economic issues. (Author)

  19. Animal issues and society.

    PubMed

    Grabau, J H

    1993-05-01

    Animal use topics are sensitive issues today. Animal uses issues are often presented as black and white or 'we' are right and 'they' are wrong. This is clearly demonstrated in the available literature from most organizations. Topics presented will include: delineation of issues and concerned groups; examples of animal issues in education and agriculture; the terrorist issue; examples of animal issues/sportsman issues; examples of political and legislative impact; and examples of biomedical and toxicology animal use issues. PMID:8516774

  20. Decays of the Three Top Contributors to the Reactor ν[over ¯]_{e} High-Energy Spectrum, ^{92}Rb, ^{96gs}Y, and ^{142}Cs, Studied with Total Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rasco, B C; Wolińska-Cichocka, M; Fijałkowska, A; Rykaczewski, K P; Karny, M; Grzywacz, R K; Goetz, K C; Gross, C J; Stracener, D W; Zganjar, E F; Batchelder, J C; Blackmon, J C; Brewer, N T; Go, S; Heffron, B; King, T; Matta, J T; Miernik, K; Nesaraja, C D; Paulauskas, S V; Rajabali, M M; Wang, E H; Winger, J A; Xiao, Y; Zachary, C J

    2016-08-26

    We report total absorption spectroscopy measurements of ^{92}Rb, ^{96gs}Y, and ^{142}Cs β decays, which are the most important contributors to the high energy ν[over ¯]_{e} spectral shape in nuclear reactors. These three β decays contribute 43% of the ν[over ¯]_{e} flux near 5.5 MeV emitted by nuclear reactors. This ν[over ¯]_{e} energy is particularly interesting due to spectral features recently observed in several experiments including the Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO Collaborations. Measurements were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by means of proton-induced fission of ^{238}U with on-line mass separation of fission fragments and the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer. We observe a β-decay pattern that is similar to recent measurements of ^{92}Rb, with a ground-state to ground-state β feeding of 91(3)%. We verify the ^{96gs}Y ground-state to ground-state β feeding of 95.5(20)%. Our measurements substantially modify the β-decay feedings of ^{142}Cs, reducing the β feeding to ^{142}Ba states below 2 MeV by 32% when compared with the latest evaluations. Our results increase the discrepancy between the observed and the expected reactor ν[over ¯]_{e} flux between 5 and 7 MeV, the maximum excess increases from ∼10% to ∼12%. PMID:27610847