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1

Pedestrian Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... Travel & Motor Vehicle Safety En Español Travel & Motor Vehicle Safety Pedestrian Safety Main Points Emergency physicians treat ... patients each year who are injured by motor vehicles while walking. Sixty-eight thousand pedestrians were injured ...

2

Pedestrian Safety Almost Everyone is a Pedestrian  

E-print Network

Pedestrian Safety #12;Almost Everyone is a Pedestrian 12 Percent of Traffic at Alton Rd 0.00 20.00 40.00 60.00 80.00 100.00 30 sec. 1 min. 2 min. Length of Vehicle Minimum Green Time Percent #12;Uncertainty Reduces Compliance Uncertainly About Whether The Push Button

Bertini, Robert L.

3

Designing for Pedestrian Safety... 1  

E-print Network

for those professionals that have an impact on the pedestrian system: traffic engineers, maintenance for this two-day presentation which I attended. Thomas Dewar, whiskey distiller, (1864-1930) remarked, "There the highway system · It will make roads safer for ALL users. Although pedestrian safety and accessibility has

Walter, M.Todd

4

Traffic Safety Facts: Pedestrians  

MedlinePLUS

... 14 percent of all traffic fatalities in motor vehicle traffic crashes. Since 2002, the number of pedestrian ... SE., Washington, DC 20590 3 Table 3 Motor Vehicle Traffic Crash Fatalities and Injuries and Pedestrians Killed ...

5

Teaching Pedestrian Safety Skills to Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study employed a multiple baseline design with a reversal to evaluate the effects of two interventions for improving pedestrian safety: (a) a pedestrian safety awareness campaign and (b) a training, feedback, and reinforcement package. Elementary school children in grades one through six were the participants. Six behaviors pertinent to…

Miller, Jada A.; Austin, John; Rohn, Don

2004-01-01

6

Arizona Traffic Safety Education, K-3. Pedestrian Safety, Grade 3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One in a series designed to assist Arizona elementary and junior high school teachers in developing children's traffic safety skills, this curriculum guide contains nine lessons on pedestrian safety for use in grade 3. Introductory information provided for the teacher includes basic highway safety concepts, stressing communication methods for…

Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

7

Arizona Traffic Safety Education, K-8. Pedestrian Safety, Grade 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One in a series designed to assist Arizona elementary and junior high school teachers in developing children's traffic safety skills, this curriculum guide contains eight lessons on pedestrian safety for use in grade 2. Introductory information provided for the teacher includes basic highway safety concepts, stressing communication methods for…

Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

8

Pedestrians' crossing behaviors and safety at unmarked roadway in China.  

PubMed

Pedestrians' crossing out of crosswalks (unmarked roadway) contributed to many traffic accidents, but existing pedestrian studies mainly focus on crosswalk crossing in developed countries specifically. Field observation of 254 pedestrians at unmarked roadway in China showed that 65.7% of them did not look for vehicles after arriving at the curb. Those who did look and pay attention to the traffic did so for duration of time that followed an exponential distribution. Pedestrians preferred crossing actively in tentative ways rather than waiting passively. The waiting time at the curb, at the median, and at the roadway all followed exponential distributions. During crossing, all pedestrians looked at the oncoming vehicles. When interacting with these vehicles, 31.9% of them ran and 11.4% stepped backwards. Running pedestrians usually began running at the borderline rather than within the lanes. Pedestrians preferred safe to short paths and they crossed second half of the road with significantly higher speed. These behavioral patterns were rechecked at an additional site with 105 pedestrians and the results showed much accordance. In terms of safety, pedestrians who were middle aged, involved in bigger groups, looked at vehicles more often before crossing or interacted with buses rather than cars were safer while those running were more dangerous. Potential applications of these findings, including building accurate simulation models of pedestrians and education of drivers and pedestrians in developing countries were also discussed. PMID:21819820

Zhuang, Xiangling; Wu, Changxu

2011-11-01

9

Multi-level hot zone identification for pedestrian safety.  

PubMed

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), while fatalities from traffic crashes have decreased, the proportion of pedestrian fatalities has steadily increased from 11% to 14% over the past decade. This study aims at identifying two zonal levels factors. The first is to identify hot zones at which pedestrian crashes occurs, while the second are zones where crash-involved pedestrians came from. Bayesian Poisson lognormal simultaneous equation spatial error model (BPLSESEM) was estimated and revealed significant factors for the two target variables. Then, PSIs (potential for safety improvements) were computed using the model. Subsequently, a novel hot zone identification method was suggested to combine both hot zones from where vulnerable pedestrians originated with hot zones where many pedestrian crashes occur. For the former zones, targeted safety education and awareness campaigns can be provided as countermeasures whereas area-wide engineering treatments and enforcement may be effective safety treatments for the latter ones. Thus, it is expected that practitioners are able to suggest appropriate safety treatments for pedestrian crashes using the method and results from this study. PMID:25603547

Lee, Jaeyoung; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Choi, Keechoo; Huang, Helai

2015-03-01

10

Characterization of pedestrian accidents and an examination of infrastructure measures to improve pedestrian safety in Israel.  

PubMed

The high share of pedestrian fatalities in Israel provided the impetus for this study which looked for infrastructure solutions to improve pedestrian safety. First, a detailed analysis of pedestrian accidents in 2006-2007, with an emphasis on the infrastructure characteristics involved, was performed; it found that 75% of the fatalities and 95% of the injuries occurred in urban areas, the majority of cases occurring on road sections (not at junctions). About 80% of the accidents took place when a pedestrian crossed the road, the majority of them at non-crosswalk locations or at non-signalized crosswalks. International comparisons showed that the characteristics of fatal pedestrian accidents in Israel were similar to the average pedestrian accident in Europe in terms of accident location, time, and the demographic characteristics of the victims. A typology of pedestrian fatalities in Israel was built for the years 2003-2006; it demonstrated a high share of accidents at these locations: in Jewish or mixed-population towns-not at pedestrian crossings on urban street sections, and both at pedestrian crossings and not at pedestrian crossings at urban junctions; in Arab towns; and on dual-carriageway rural roads. Second, based on a literature study, a summary of about 60 pedestrian-safety-related measures was developed. Third, to diagnose the infrastructure characteristics and deficiencies associated with pedestrian accidents, detailed field studies were carried out at 95 urban locations. A major finding revealed that more than 80% of the sites with a high concentration of pedestrian-vehicle accidents in Israel were situated on arterial multi-lane streets belonging to city centers, where on a micro-level there were no indications of major deficiencies in the basic design elements of most sites. Finally, cross-checking of the safety problems identified and the infrastructure solutions available provided lists of measures recommended for application at various types of sites. It was concluded that in order to generate a significant change in the state of pedestrian injury in Israel, a move from spot treatment to a systemic treatment of the problem is required. A systemic inquiry and the transformation of the urban road network should be performed in order to diminish the areas of vehicle-pedestrian conflicts and to significantly reduce vehicle speeds in areas of pedestrian presence and activity. PMID:22062338

Gitelman, Victoria; Balasha, Doron; Carmel, Roby; Hendel, Limor; Pesahov, Fany

2012-01-01

11

Arizona Traffic Safety Education, K-8. Pedestrian Safety, Grades K-1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One in a series designed to assist Arizona elementary and junior high school teachers in developing children's traffic safety skills, this curriculum guide contains thirteen lessons on pedestrian safety for use in kindergarten and grade 1. Introductory information provided for the teacher includes basic highway safety concepts, stressing…

Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

12

Does Excessive Daytime Sleepiness Affect Children's Pedestrian Safety?  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: Many cognitive factors contribute to unintentional pedestrian injury, including reaction time, impulsivity, risk-taking, attention, and decision-making. These same factors are negatively influenced by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), which may place children with EDS at greater risk for pedestrian injury. Design, Participants, and Methods: Using a case-control design, 33 children age 8 to 16 y with EDS from an established diagnosis of narcolepsy or idiopathic hypersomnia (IHS) engaged in a virtual reality pedestrian environment while unmedicated. Thirty-three healthy children matched by age, race, sex, and household income served as controls. Results: Children with EDS were riskier pedestrians than healthy children. They were twice as likely to be struck by a virtual vehicle in the virtual pedestrian environment than healthy controls. Attentional skills of looking at oncoming traffic were not impaired among children with EDS, but decision-making for when to cross the street safely was significantly impaired. Conclusions: Results suggest excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) from the clinical sleep disorders known as the hypersomnias of central origin may have significant consequences on children's daytime functioning in a critical domain of personal safety, pedestrian skills. Cognitive processes involved in safe pedestrian crossings may be impaired in children with EDS. In the pedestrian simulation, children with EDS appeared to show a pattern consistent with inattentional blindness, in that they “looked but did not process” information in their pedestrian environment. Results highlight the need for heightened awareness of potentially irreversible consequences of untreated sleep disorders and identify a possible target for pediatric injury prevention. Citation: Avis KT; Gamble KL; Schwebel DC. Does excessive daytime sleepiness affect children's pedestrian safety? SLEEP 2014;37(2):283-287. PMID:24497656

Avis, Kristin T.; Gamble, Karen L.; Schwebel, David C.

2014-01-01

13

California Guide for Pedestrian Safety Education. Volumes I-III.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is designed to serve as the basis for a pedestrian safety education program for pupils in kindergarten through grade two. The basic printed materials for use in the program are provided in three volumes, each of which is intended for a different audience. Volume I, directed to school administrators and teachers, contains information for…

California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

14

Mobile telephones, distracted attention, and pedestrian safety.  

PubMed

Driver distraction is a major cause of traffic accidents, with mobile telephones as a key source of distraction. In two studies, we examined distraction of pedestrians associated with mobile phone use. The first had 60 participants walk along a prescribed route, with half of them conversing on a mobile phone, and the other half holding the phone awaiting a potential call, which never came. Comparison of the performance of the groups in recalling objects planted along the route revealed that pedestrians conversing recalled fewer objects than did those not conversing. The second study had three observers record pedestrian behavior of mobile phone users, i-pod users, and pedestrians with neither one at three crosswalks. Mobile phone users crossed unsafely into oncoming traffic significantly more than did either of the other groups. For pedestrians as with drivers, cognitive distraction from mobile phone use reduces situation awareness, increases unsafe behavior, putting pedestrians at greater risk for accidents, and crime victimization. PMID:18215534

Nasar, Jack; Hecht, Peter; Wener, Richard

2008-01-01

15

Effectiveness of virtual reality for teaching pedestrian safety.  

PubMed

Sixty percent to 70% of pedestrian injuries in children under the age of 10 years are the result of the child either improperly crossing intersections or dashing out in the street between intersections. The purpose of this injury prevention research study was to evaluate a desktop virtual reality (VR) program that was designed to educate and train children to safely cross intersections. Specifically, the objectives were to determine whether children can learn pedestrian safety skills while working in a virtual environment and whether pedestrian safety learning in VR transfers to real world behavior. Following focus groups with a number of key experts, a virtual city with eight interactive intersections was developed. Ninety-five children participated in a community trial from two schools (urban and suburban). Approximately half were assigned to a control group who received an unrelated VR program, and half received the pedestrian safety VR intervention. Children were identified by group and grade by colored tags on their backpacks, and actual street crossing behavior of all children was observed 1 week before and 1 week after the interventions. There was a significant change in performance after three trials with the VR intervention. Children learned safe street crossing within the virtual environment. Learning, identified as improved street-crossing behavior, transferred to real world behavior in the suburban school children but not in the urban school. The results are discussed in relation to possibilities for future VR interventions for injury prevention. PMID:12123238

McComas, Joan; MacKay, Morag; Pivik, Jayne

2002-06-01

16

Optimal Design of HGV Front Structure for Pedestrian Safety  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper addresses a pedestrian safety design of front structure of Heavy Goods Vehicle (HGV) by two concepts; firstly by equipping a lower bumper stiffener structure under the front bumper and secondly by putting an airbag in front of the HGV front panel. In this study, HGV-pedestrian collision accident was simulated by the crash analysis solver MADYMO environment, where the HGV model with the speed of 20 km/h was collided with an adult male and with an adult female pedestrian, respectively. The bumper and lower bumper stiffener were varied their positions, while the airbag was adjusted the vent hole size and the position of airbag in front of front panel vertically. The pedestrian injuries that can be sustained during the simulation impact were limited at the critical body parts of head, chest, upper leg; an injury criteria of Head Injury Criterion (HIC), Thorax Cumulative 3ms Acceleration (C3ms) and peak loads of femur, respectively. Because of various parameters and constraints of initial conditions and injury thresholds, a multi-objective optimization design problem considered these main injury criterion is solved in order to achieve the best solution for this study. The results of optimized design parameters for each cases and conditions were obtained and the possibilities of the proposed concept were discussed.

Ramli, Faiz Redza; Yamazaki, Koetsu

17

Advancing Pedestrian Safety at Rail Grade Crossings Paul Metaxatos and P.S. Sriraj  

E-print Network

Advancing Pedestrian Safety at Rail Grade Crossings Paul Metaxatos and P.S. Sriraj Urban1 2 Contrary to the declining number of fatalities due to train-vehicle collisions at highway-3 rail grade crossings, the number of pedestrian and bicycle fatalities at highway- and4 pathway-rail grade

Illinois at Chicago, University of

18

Factors influencing safety in a sample of marked pedestrian crossings selected for safety inspections in the city of Oslo.  

PubMed

This paper reports an analysis of factors influencing safety in a sample of marked pedestrian crossings in the city of Oslo, Norway. The sample consists of 159 marked pedestrian crossings where a total of 316 accidents were recorded during a period of five years. The crossings were selected for inspection because of they were, for various reasons, regarded as sub-standard. The sample of crossings is therefore not representative of all pedestrian crossings in Oslo. Factors influencing the number of accidents were studied by means of negative binomial regression. Factors that were studied included the volume of pedestrians and vehicles, the number of traffic lanes at the crossing, the location of the crossing (midblock or junction), the type of traffic control, the share of pedestrians using the crossing and the speed of approaching vehicles. The analysis confirmed the presence of a "safety-in-numbers" effect, meaning that an increase in the number of pedestrians is associated with a lower risk of accident for each pedestrian. Crossings located in four-leg junctions or roundabouts had more accidents than crossings located in three-leg junctions or on sections between junctions. A high share of pedestrians crossing the road outside the marked crossing was associated with a high number of accidents. Increased speed was associated with an increased number of accidents. PMID:23764878

Elvik, Rune; Sørensen, Michael W J; Nævestad, Tor-Olav

2013-10-01

19

Training children in pedestrian safety: distinguishing gains in knowledge from gains in safe behavior.  

PubMed

Pedestrian injuries contribute greatly to child morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence suggests that training within virtual pedestrian environments may improve children's street crossing skills, but may not convey knowledge about safety in street environments. We hypothesized that (a) children will gain pedestrian safety knowledge via videos/software/internet websites, but not when trained by virtual pedestrian environment or other strategies; (b) pedestrian safety knowledge will be associated with safe pedestrian behavior both before and after training; and (c) increases in knowledge will be associated with increases in safe behavior among children trained individually at streetside locations, but not those trained by means of other strategies. We analyzed data from a randomized controlled trial evaluating pedestrian safety training. We randomly assigned 240 children ages 7-8 to one of four training conditions: videos/software/internet, virtual reality (VR), individualized streetside instruction, or a no-contact control. Both virtual and field simulations of street crossing at 2-lane bi-directional mid-block locations assessed pedestrian behavior at baseline, post-training, and 6-month follow-up. Pedestrian knowledge was assessed orally on all three occasions. Children trained by videos/software/internet, and those trained individually, showed increased knowledge following training relative to children in the other groups (ps < 0.01). Correlations between pedestrian safety knowledge and pedestrian behavior were mostly non-significant. Correlations between change in knowledge and change in behavior from pre- to post-intervention also were non-significant, both for the full sample and within conditions. Children trained using videos/software/internet gained knowledge but did not change their behavior. Children trained individually gained in both knowledge and safer behavior. Children trained virtually gained in safer behavior but not knowledge. If VR is used for training, tools like videos/internet might effectively supplement training. We discovered few associations between knowledge and behavior, and none between changes in knowledge and behavior. Pedestrian safety knowledge and safe pedestrian behavior may be orthogonal constructs that should be considered independently for research and training purposes. PMID:24573688

Schwebel, David C; McClure, Leslie A

2014-06-01

20

Pedestrian and traffic safety in parking lots at SNL/NM : audit background report.  

SciTech Connect

This report supplements audit 2008-E-0009, conducted by the ES&H, Quality, Safeguards & Security Audits Department, 12870, during fall and winter of FY 2008. The study evaluates slips, trips and falls, the leading cause of reportable injuries at Sandia. In 2007, almost half of over 100 of such incidents occurred in parking lots. During the course of the audit, over 5000 observations were collected in 10 parking lots across SNL/NM. Based on benchmarks and trends of pedestrian behavior, the report proposes pedestrian-friendly features and attributes to improve pedestrian safety in parking lots. Less safe pedestrian behavior is associated with older parking lots lacking pedestrian-friendly features and attributes, like those for buildings 823, 887 and 811. Conversely, safer pedestrian behavior is associated with newer parking lots that have designated walkways, intra-lot walkways and sidewalks. Observations also revealed that motorists are in widespread noncompliance with parking lot speed limits and stop signs and markers.

Sanchez, Paul Ernest

2009-03-01

21

The influence of carrying a backpack on college student pedestrian safety.  

PubMed

University students walk frequently, and individuals ages 18-22 have among the highest rates of pedestrian injury among any age group in the United States. These injuries are caused by a wide range of individual, interpersonal, and environmental factors, but one factor that has not been previously considered carefully is the influence of wearing a heavy backpack on pedestrian safety. Backpacks are known to slow walking speed and disrupt perception of one's environment, so it is reasonable to question whether they might also influence safe pedestrian behavior. Ninety-six college students engaged in 20 street-crossings within a virtual pedestrian environment. Half the crossings were completed while bearing a backpack weighing 12% of their body weight; the other half were completed without any burdens. Results suggest that participants walked more slowly, left less safe time to spare after crossing the virtual street, and experienced more frequent hits or close calls with traffic when crossing while carrying the backpack. They also missed fewer safe opportunities to cross while carrying the backpack. Our tests of several demographic characteristics, pedestrian behaviors, and backpack use, as covariates suggest the finding holds across all subsamples included in our study. Implications for pedestrian safety and future research are discussed. PMID:19245896

Schwebel, David C; Pitts, Danielle Dulion; Stavrinos, Despina

2009-03-01

22

The Effects of Acute Sleep Restriction on Adolescents' Pedestrian Safety in a Virtual Environment  

PubMed Central

Purpose Over 8,000 American adolescents ages 14-15 require medical attention due to pedestrian injury annually. Cognitive factors contributing to pedestrian safety include reaction time, impulsivity, risk-taking, attention, and decision-making. These characteristics are also influenced by sleep restriction. Experts recommend adolescents obtain 8.5 hours of uninterrupted sleep each night, but most American adolescents do not. Inadequate sleep may place adolescents at risk for pedestrian injury. Method Using a within-subjects design, fifty-five 14- and 15-year-olds engaged in a virtual reality pedestrian environment in two conditions, scheduled a week apart: sleep-restricted (4 hours sleep previous night) and adequate sleep (8.5 hours). Sleep was assessed using actigraphy and pedestrian behavior via four outcome measures: time to initiate crossing, time before contact with vehicle while crossing, virtual hits/close calls and attention to traffic (looks left and right). Results While acutely sleep restricted, adolescents took more time to initiate pedestrian crossings, crossed with less time before contact with vehicles, experienced more virtual hits/close calls and looked left and right more often compared to when adequately rested. Results were maintained after controlling for age, gender, ethnicity and average total sleep duration prior to each condition. Discussion Adolescent pedestrian behavior in the simulated virtual environment was markedly different, and generally more risky, when acutely sleep restricted compared to adequately rested. Inadequate sleep may influence cognitive functioning to the extent that pedestrian safety is jeopardized among adolescents capable of crossing streets safely when rested. Policy decisions might be educated by these results. PMID:24012066

Davis, Aaron L.; Avis, Kristin T.; Schwebel, David C.

2013-01-01

23

Walk This Way! Taking Steps for Pedestrian Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... Stages & Populations Travelers' Health Workplace Safety & Health Features Media Sign up for Features Get Email Updates To ... gov/Pubs/811888.pdf. [1.2 MB] Features Media Sign up for Features Get Email Updates To ...

24

Classroom Activities in School Bus and Pedestrian Safety Education. Bulletin No. 93138.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School bus and related pedestrian safety education is prevention-oriented so that students will learn how to avoid bus-related accidents. This manual provides lesson plans emphasizing the school bus stop, loading and unloading zones, emergency evacuation drills, and appropriate behavior on the school bus. The guide also recognizes demographic…

Wisconsin State Dept. of Transportation, Madison.

25

An Analysis of the Safety Issues Involving Local School Children as Pedestrians. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The New Orleans Public Schools' Department of Planning has been concerned with school children as pedestrians for the past five years. The safety issues include the streets, the drivers, and the children. First, the streets contribute to the hazard because many major streets traverse residential areas; many streets serve as major commuter…

Ducote, Kenneth J.

26

Impact of a pilot walking school bus intervention on children's pedestrian safety behaviors: a pilot study  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Walking school buses (WSB) increased children's physical activity, but impact on pedestrian safety behaviors (PSB) is unknown. We tested the feasibility of a protocol evaluating changes to PSB during a WSB program. Outcomes were school-level street crossing PSB prior to (Time 1) and during weeks 4–5...

27

Using Theory to Guide Practice in Children's Pedestrian Safety Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Few pedestrian injury prevention programs appear to articulate the theory upon which their design and evaluation are based. This article describes how theory was used to plan, develop, implement, and evaluate the educational component of a comprehensive child pedestrian intervention. Organizational and planning theories were used to guide the…

Cross, Donna; Hall, Margaret; Howat, Peter

2003-01-01

28

WalkSafe: a pedestrian safety app for mobile phone users who walk and talk while crossing roads  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research in social science has shown that mobile phone conversations distract users, presenting a significant impact to pedestrian safety; for example, a mobile phone user deep in conversation while crossing a street is generally more at risk than other pedestrians not engaged in such behavior. We propose WalkSafe, an Android smartphone application that aids people that walk and talk, improving

Tianyu Wang; Giuseppe Cardone; Antonio Corradi; Lorenzo Torresani; Andrew T. Campbell

2012-01-01

29

Toy Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... organizations to advocate for the removal of rare-earth magnets from the marketplace. We put together a ... Safety Child Pedestrian Safety International Walk to School Day Halloween Safety Environmental Task Forces CPS Certification Training ...

30

Using Interactive Multimedia to Teach Pedestrian Safety: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: To evaluate an interactive multimedia (IMM) program that teaches young children safe pedestrian skills. Methods: The program uses IMM (animation and video) to teach children critical skills for crossing streets safely. A computer-delivered video assessment and a real-life street simulation were used to measure the effectiveness of the…

Glang, Ann; Noell, John; Ary, Dennis; Swartz, Lynne

2005-01-01

31

Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses safety issues in science, including: allergic reactions to peanuts used in experiments; explosions in lead/acid batteries; and inspection of pressure vessels, such as pressure cookers or model steam engines. (MKR)

Education in Science, 1996

1996-01-01

32

Distraction and pedestrian safety: how talking on the phone, texting, and listening to music impact crossing the street.  

PubMed

As use of handheld multimedia devices has exploded globally, safety experts have begun to consider the impact of distraction while talking, text-messaging, or listening to music on traffic safety. This study was designed to test how talking on the phone, texting, and listening to music may influence pedestrian safety. 138 college students crossed an interactive, semi-immersive virtual pedestrian street. They were randomly assigned to one of four groups: crossing while talking on the phone, crossing while texting, crossing while listening to a personal music device, or crossing while undistracted. Participants distracted by music or texting were more likely to be hit by a vehicle in the virtual pedestrian environment than were undistracted participants. Participants in all three distracted groups were more likely to look away from the street environment (and look toward other places, such as their telephone or music device) than were undistracted participants. Findings were maintained after controlling for demographics, walking frequency, and media use frequency. Distraction from multimedia devices has a small but meaningful impact on college students' pedestrian safety. Future research should consider the cognitive demands of pedestrian safety, and how those processes may be impacted by distraction. Policymakers might consider ways to protect distracted pedestrians from harm and to reduce the number of individuals crossing streets while distracted. PMID:22269509

Schwebel, David C; Stavrinos, Despina; Byington, Katherine W; Davis, Tiffany; O'Neal, Elizabeth E; de Jong, Desiree

2012-03-01

33

Pedestrian behavior and safety on a two-stage crossing with a center refuge island and the effect of winter weather on pedestrian compliance rate.  

PubMed

Despite a burgeoning research effort directed at understanding the effects of age, gender, disability, group size, traffic control condition and street width on pedestrian safety and compliance rate as they cross a signalized intersection, remarkably little is known about the compliance rate at a signal controlled two-stage crossing and how pedestrians react to different weather conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether pedestrian behavior becomes more risky in inclement weather through the investigation of street crossing behavior and compliance under different weather and road surface conditions at a busy two-stage crossing. Road crossing behavior was filmed at one eight-lane divided road strip at a downtown site in Toronto metropolitan area. The intersection was filmed unobtrusively from a rooftop by one camera set to record both oncoming near-side traffic and pedestrian movements. Pedestrian behavior and compliance rate were scored for a number of determinants of safe road crossing actions. Overall, the results show that road crossing behavior in inclement weather conditions was less safe than in fine weather. The designs of signal timing and configuration of the center refuge island also adversely influenced pedestrian behavior at this crossing, and adverse weather conditions further exacerbated the noncompliance rate. This paper presents new information on compliance rate at a two-stage crossing that emphasizes the need to consider the influence of traffic signal design and weather conditions on pedestrians' behavior. More studies are needed to develop traffic control techniques to allow pedestrians to cross wide two-stage crossings in safety. PMID:20441826

Li, Yue; Fernie, Geoff

2010-07-01

34

Child pedestrian safety: parental supervision, modeling behaviors, and beliefs about child pedestrian competence.  

PubMed

Pedestrian injuries are a significant health risk to children, particularly those 5-9 years of age. Surprisingly, few studies have explored parent-related factors that may moderate this risk. The present study used naturalistic observations of parent-child pairs crossing at uncontrolled intersections and a short interview to examine parental supervision of children during crossings, modeling of safe-crossing behaviors, beliefs about how children come to cross streets safely, and whether child attributes (age, sex) relate to parental practices and beliefs. Results revealed that parents more closely supervised younger than older children, they modeled safer crossing practices for sons more than daughters, particularly younger sons, and although over half the sample believed children need to be explicitly taught how to cross safely, few actually provided any instruction when crossing with their children. Providing parents both with guidelines for how to accurately appraise their child's readiness for crossing independently and with information about best practices for teaching children how to cross safely may facilitate parents' implementing these practices, particularly if this is coupled with public advocacy highlighting the important role they could play to reduce the risk of child pedestrian injury. PMID:19664443

Morrongiello, Barbara A; Barton, Benjamin K

2009-09-01

35

Development and Implementation of a Conflict-based Assessment of Pedestrian Safety (CAPS) to Evaluate Accessibility of Complex Intersections  

PubMed Central

This paper develops and implements the Conflict-based Assessment of Pedestrian Safety (CAPS) methodology for evaluating pedestrian accessibility at complex intersections. In past years, a significant research has been done on pedestrian access to modern roundabouts and other complex intersection forms, including a significant focus on the accessibility for pedestrians who are blind. A majority of these studies have relied on actual street crossings by study participants under supervision of trained Orientation and Mobility (O&M) Specialist. These crossing studies were used to evaluate risk from a measurement of intervention events, where the O&M specialist had to physically stop the participant from crossing. While providing arguably the most accurate data for the crossing risk at a particular intersection, actual street crossings can be dangerous to the study participants, and are further very time consuming and expensive to conduct. The CAPS method presented in this paper emphasizes the use of conflict-based safety factors to quantify risk. The CAPS method relates pedestrian crossing decisions to advanced measurements of vehicle dynamics to estimate lane-by-lane conflicts. CAPS identifies the grade of conflict based on a score generated on a five-criterion rating scale. Each of these criteria or factors has different severity levels, and when combined, provides an overall risk rating of the crossing decision. The CAPS framework was applied to a study of blind pedestrian crossings at a multi-lane roundabout. The resulting risk scores were calibrated from actual O&M interventions observed during the study to give confidence in the CAPS performance. The calibrated CAPS framework correctly matched all (high risk) O&M intervention events, and further identifies other (lower risk) pedestrian-vehicle conflicts. The resulting method has the potential to allow for a faster and most importantly safer evaluation of complex intersections for pedestrian access. Since all factors are measured prior to the pedestrian stepping into the roadway, this approach is compatible with crossing indicator studies, where the participants merely indicate when they would cross, rather than actually stepping into the roadway. The CAPS framework therefore allows for a more objective and consistent safety assessment of pedestrian crossings in a research context without having pedestrians physically step into the roadway. PMID:23914006

Salamati, Katayoun; Rouphail, Nagui M.; Cunningham, Christopher; Long, Richard; Barlow, Janet

2011-01-01

36

Development and Implementation of a Conflict-based Assessment of Pedestrian Safety (CAPS) to Evaluate Accessibility of Complex Intersections.  

PubMed

This paper develops and implements the Conflict-based Assessment of Pedestrian Safety (CAPS) methodology for evaluating pedestrian accessibility at complex intersections. In past years, a significant research has been done on pedestrian access to modern roundabouts and other complex intersection forms, including a significant focus on the accessibility for pedestrians who are blind. A majority of these studies have relied on actual street crossings by study participants under supervision of trained Orientation and Mobility (O&M) Specialist. These crossing studies were used to evaluate risk from a measurement of intervention events, where the O&M specialist had to physically stop the participant from crossing. While providing arguably the most accurate data for the crossing risk at a particular intersection, actual street crossings can be dangerous to the study participants, and are further very time consuming and expensive to conduct. The CAPS method presented in this paper emphasizes the use of conflict-based safety factors to quantify risk. The CAPS method relates pedestrian crossing decisions to advanced measurements of vehicle dynamics to estimate lane-by-lane conflicts. CAPS identifies the grade of conflict based on a score generated on a five-criterion rating scale. Each of these criteria or factors has different severity levels, and when combined, provides an overall risk rating of the crossing decision. The CAPS framework was applied to a study of blind pedestrian crossings at a multi-lane roundabout. The resulting risk scores were calibrated from actual O&M interventions observed during the study to give confidence in the CAPS performance. The calibrated CAPS framework correctly matched all (high risk) O&M intervention events, and further identifies other (lower risk) pedestrian-vehicle conflicts. The resulting method has the potential to allow for a faster and most importantly safer evaluation of complex intersections for pedestrian access. Since all factors are measured prior to the pedestrian stepping into the roadway, this approach is compatible with crossing indicator studies, where the participants merely indicate when they would cross, rather than actually stepping into the roadway. The CAPS framework therefore allows for a more objective and consistent safety assessment of pedestrian crossings in a research context without having pedestrians physically step into the roadway. PMID:23914006

Salamati, Katayoun; Schroeder, Bastian; Rouphail, Nagui M; Cunningham, Christopher; Long, Richard; Barlow, Janet

2012-07-12

37

The Advocacy for Pedestrian Safety Study: Cluster Randomised Trial Evaluating a Political Advocacy Approach to Reduce Pedestrian Injuries in Deprived Communities  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether advocacy targeted at local politicians leads to action to reduce the risk of pedestrian injury in deprived areas. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting 239 electoral wards in 57 local authorities in England and Wales. Participants 617 elected local politicians. Interventions Intervention group politicians were provided with tailored information packs, including maps of casualty sites, numbers injured and a synopsis of effective interventions. Main outcome measures 25–30 months post intervention, primary outcomes included: electoral ward level: percentage of road traffic calmed; proportion with new interventions; school level: percentage with 20 mph zones, Safe Routes to School, pedestrian training or road safety education; politician level: percentage lobbying for safety measures. Secondary outcomes included politicians’ interest and involvement in injury prevention, and facilitators and barriers to implementation. Results Primary outcomes did not significantly differ: % difference in traffic calming (0.07, 95%CI: ?0.07 to 0.20); proportion of schools with 20 mph zones (RR 1.47, 95%CI: 0.93 to 2.32), Safe Routes to School (RR 1.34, 95%CI: 0.83 to 2.17), pedestrian training (RR 1.23, 95%CI: 0.95 to 1.61) or other safety education (RR 1.16, 95%CI: 0.97 to 1.39). Intervention group politicians reported greater interest in child injury prevention (RR 1.09, 95%CI 1.03 to 1.16), belief in potential to help prevent injuries (RR 1.36, 95%CI 1.16 to 1.61), particularly pedestrian safety (RR 1.55, 95%CI 1.19 to 2.03). 63% of intervention politicians reported supporting new pedestrian safety schemes. The majority found the advocacy information surprising, interesting, effectively presented, and could identify suitable local interventions. Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility of an innovative approach to translational public health by targeting local politicians in a randomised controlled trial. The intervention package was positively viewed and raised interest but changes in interventions were not statistically significance. Longer term supported advocacy may be needed. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN91381117 PMID:23577088

Lyons, Ronan A.; Kendrick, Denise; Towner, Elizabeth M. L.; Coupland, Carol; Hayes, Mike; Christie, Nicola; Sleney, Judith; Jones, Sarah; Kimberlee, Richard; Rodgers, Sarah E.; Turner, Samantha; Brussoni, Mariana; Vinogradova, Yana; Sarvotham, Tinnu; Macey, Steven

2013-01-01

38

Hand Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower Safety Pumpkin Carving Safety Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Safety Removing ... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower Safety Pumpkin Carving Safety Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Safety Removing ...

39

The role of the built environment in explaining relationships between perceived and actual pedestrian and bicyclist safety.  

PubMed

While the conventional approach to safety planning has emphasized crash analysis with police-reported crash information, transportation professionals increasingly recognize the importance of proactively identifying potential crash risk and considering environmental characteristics. In a proactive approach, individuals' perception of crash risk provides important information in identifying potential crash risk. As built environment characteristics influence the levels of pedestrian and bicycle safety, this study examined how perceived and actual crash risk are related with each other and with respect to built environmental characteristics. Our results showed that residents who live in low density-single residential neighborhoods are more likely to perceive their neighborhood as dangerous relative to residents of compact, mixed-use neighborhoods even though the latter exhibited higher actual crash rates. The results of path analyses confirmed that a simultaneous but opposite relationship exists between perceived and actual crash risks. Our results indicate that higher actual crash risk increases perceived crash risk, while higher perceived crash risk is negatively associated to actual crash rates. Consequently, low density and non-mixed land uses increase individuals perception of crash risk, and increased perception of risk and unfriendly environment for pedestrian and bikers reduces actual crash rates as a result of behavioral changes. From a policy standpoint, more attention and proactive interventions are desirable in suburban areas beyond the areas with high crash rates, as some of these areas have high-perceived risks. PMID:19540957

Cho, Gihyoug; Rodríguez, Daniel A; Khattak, Asad J

2009-07-01

40

An evaluation of four types of railway pedestrian crossing safety intervention.  

PubMed

This study evaluated a programme of interventions designed to reduce the incidence of illegal and unsafe crossing of a rail corridor at a city station by boys on their way to and from the adjacent high school in Auckland, New Zealand. The boys were observed crossing before, during, and after implementation of each intervention; in addition, surveys were carried out before and after the programme to discover the boys' attitudes. Rail safety education in school, punishment for every unsafe crossing (continuous punishment), and punishment occasionally for unsafe crossing (intermittent punishment) were associated with significant decreases in unsafe crossing compared with that observed prior to any intervention. General communications about rail safety were not associated with significant decreases in unsafe crossing. When interventions were examined consecutively, unsafe crossing was significantly reduced between the communications and education phases, and even more so between education and continuous punishment, but there was no statistically significant difference in frequency of unsafe crossing between continuous and intermittent punishment. It was concluded that punishment may be more effective in reducing unsafe behaviour in this type of situation than targeted education, and is much more effective than communications to heighten awareness. PMID:12729812

Lobb, Brenda; Harré, Niki; Terry, Nicola

2003-07-01

41

The Pedestrian Detection Method Using an Extension Background Subtraction about the Driving Safety Support Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, the traffic accident occurs frequently with explosion of traffic density. Therefore, we think that the safe and comfortable transportation system to defend the pedestrian who is the traffic weak is necessary. First, we detect and recognize the pedestrian (the crossing person) by the image processing. Next, we inform all the drivers of the right or left turn that the pedestrian exists by the sound and the image and so on. By prompting a driver to do safe driving in this way, the accident to the pedestrian can decrease. In this paper, we are using a background subtraction method for the movement detection of the movement object. In the background subtraction method, the update method in the background was important, and as for the conventional way, the threshold values of the subtraction processing and background update were identical. That is, the mixing rate of the input image and the background image of the background update was a fixation value, and the fine tuning which corresponded to the environment change of the weather was difficult. Therefore, we propose the update method of the background image that the estimated mistake is difficult to be amplified. We experiment and examines in the comparison about five cases of sunshine, cloudy, evening, rain, sunlight change, except night. This technique can set separately the threshold values of the subtraction processing and background update processing which suited the environmental condition of the weather and so on. Therefore, the fine tuning becomes possible freely in the mixing rate of the input image and the background image of the background update. Because the setting of the parameter which suited an environmental condition becomes important to minimize mistaking percentage, we examine about the setting of a parameter.

Muranaka, Noriaki; Date, Kei; Tokumaru, Masataka; Imanishi, Shigeru

42

Community variations in population exposure to near-field tsunami hazards as a function of pedestrian travel time to safety  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Efforts to characterize population exposure to near-field tsunami threats typically focus on quantifying the number and type of people in tsunami-hazard zones. To develop and prioritize effective risk-reduction strategies, emergency managers also need information on the potential for successful evacuations and how this evacuation potential varies among communities. To improve efforts to properly characterize and differentiate near-field tsunami threats among multiple communities, we assess community variations in population exposure to tsunamis as a function of pedestrian travel time to safety. We focus our efforts on the multiple coastal communities in Grays Harbor and Pacific Counties (State of Washington, USA), where a substantial resident and visitor population is threatened by near-field tsunamis related to a potential Cascadia subduction zone earthquake. Anisotropic, path-distance modeling is conducted to estimate travel times to safety and results are merged with various population data, including residents, employees, public venues, and dependent-care facilities. Results suggest that there is substantial variability among communities in the number of people that may have insufficient time to evacuate. Successful evacuations may be possible in some communities assuming slow-walking speeds, are plausible in others if travel speeds are increased, and are unlikely in another set of communities given the large distances and short time horizon. Emergency managers can use these results to prioritize the location and determine the most appropriate type of tsunami risk-reduction strategies, such as education and training in areas where evacuations are plausible and vertical-evacuation structures in areas where they are not.

Wood, Nathan J.; Schmidtlein, Mathew C.

2013-01-01

43

Nuclear safety  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Topics dealing with nuclear safety are addressed which include the following: general safety requirements; safety design requirements; terrestrial safety; SP-100 Flight System key safety requirements; potential mission accidents and hazards; key safety features; ground operations; launch operations; flight operations; disposal; safety concerns; licensing; the nuclear engine for rocket vehicle application (NERVA) design philosophy; the NERVA flight safety program; and the NERVA safety plan.

Buden, D.

1991-01-01

44

76 FR 40860 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for Pedestrian Safety Enhancement Act of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...etc); useful range of detection of vehicles by pedestrians, warning...HVs to aid pedestrian detection of these vehicles. The Japanese Ministry...have a comparable ICE vehicle profile for which a safe detection distance at a given...

2011-07-12

45

Safety Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Five articles in this issue focus on safety education in agricultural laboratories. Topics discussed include teacher liability; elements of a safety instruction program; state and federal safety standards; ground fault current protection; and eye protection requirements and equipment. (SK)

Daniels, James H.; And Others

1980-01-01

46

WalkSafe: A Pedestrian Safety App for Mobile Phone Users Who Walk and Talk While Crossing Roads  

E-print Network

are the main contributing factors in car crashes that involve pedestrian [11]. In most cases, drivers of the WalkSafe App that is capable of real-time detection of the front and back views of cars, indicating cars are approaching or moving away from the user, respectively. WalkSafe is implemented on Android

Torresani, Lorenzo

47

The effects of local and non-local traffic on child pedestrian safety: a spatial displacement of risk.  

PubMed

In most places, motor-vehicle traffic volume is associated with increased risk of child pedestrian injury; however, the burden of risk is geographically complex. In some neighbourhoods, proportionally fewer drivers may be local, meaning that the moral and practical responsibility of risk to children is displaced from one place (e.g., the suburbs) to another (e.g., downtown). Using the City of Toronto, Canada, as a case study, this research asks two related questions: 1) what is the variation in traffic volume by neighbourhood of origin and socioeconomic status and 2) what is the relationship between the geographical origin of traffic and the risk of collisions involving child pedestrians and motor-vehicles? We find that low-income downtown neighbourhoods have the highest proportion of non-local traffic. We also find that while higher local traffic activity is associated with lower risk of collision, higher flow-through traffic activity (excluding traffic from major thoroughfares) is associated with higher risk of collision. We interpret the former as very likely a proxy of parents' frequency of chauffeuring children to school, and the latter an illustration of the spatial displacement of risk between Toronto neighbourhoods. Our results suggest that more attention needs to be paid to account for the externalization of harm experienced by children, particularly in low-income downtown neighbourhoods. PMID:23265805

Yiannakoulias, Nikolaos; Scott, Darren M

2013-03-01

48

Food Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... More Information Health and Nutrition Information for Preschoolers Food Safety Preschoolers' immune systems are still developing. This ... more about food safety Resources for Nutrition & Health Food Groups & Related Topics Fruits Vegetables Grains Protein Foods ...

49

Safety teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Safety teams have become a popular means to recognize and prevent injuries in the workplace. In fact, organizations, such as OSHA, NIOSH, NIEHS, DOE, and the Ohio BWC, not only encourage safety teams, but have implemented them in their organizations. However, safety teams may not be legal as defined by NLRB Act Sections 2(5) and 8(a)(2). Objective: To determine

Joseph R. Muscatello; Brian P. Heshizer

2002-01-01

50

RURAL PASSENGER SAFETY RESOURCES Exhibits (Insure for $500)  

E-print Network

) (T, A) Cell phone use and Driving (Cingular) (A) Air Bags Pedestrian Safety: (C) Bee A Safe Ped Adventures in Bicycle Safety (AA) Recreational Helmet Usage (C, T) Ride Smart: It's Time to Start (AA) Safe

51

ATV Safety  

E-print Network

, Extension Safety Program The Texas A&M University System Source: All-Terrain Vehicle 2001 Injury and Exposure Studies. Consumer Product Safety Commission. January 2003. Causes of Injuries and Fatalities ATV accidents are rarely caused by design flaws. Most... of those laws are summarized below. Certification requirements. A person may not oper- ate an ATV on public property unless he or she attends a state-approved ATV safety training course and holds a safety certificate, or unless he or she is under...

Smith, David

2004-09-16

52

Lab Safety  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The North Carolina Community College System BioNetwork's interactive eLearning tools (IETs) are reusable chunks of training that can be deployed in a variety of courses or training programs. IETs are designed to enhance, not replace hands-on training. Learners are able to enter a hands-on lab experience better prepared and more confident. This particular IET delves into laboratory safety, and covers interacting with the lab environment and a new lab partner. Topics covered include proper dress, housekeeping, safety equipment, mixing, fire safety, and spills. When the module is completed, visitors will be able to demonstrate proper lab safety techniques.

53

Pedestrian Facilities in South Africa: Research and Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

An overview of the pedestrian accident problem in South Africa is given, and the engineering solutions implemented to improve pedestrian safety are discussed. The pedestrian problem accounts for part of the road safety problem in South Africa. In recent years there has been a reduction in the number of pedestrian fatalities and injuries. Research findings in the early 1980s showed

Hubrecht Ribbens

1996-01-01

54

Safety issues  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of the NASA safety review process is to make sure that any system hazards that can endanger the manned flight system are precluded. The systems that address manned flight in a payload safety review process are discussed. The types of basic hazards that are normally addressed on any of the payloads are: contamination, electrical shock, explosions, radiation, and temperature extremes.

Rohal, R.

1991-01-01

55

Surveying Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a safety program for teaching science. In the summer of 1999, specific Wisconsin safety laws, codes, and standards were researched and a training program including content, training sites, and dates was developed. One-day training programs were planned for six regions throughout the state. (SAH)

Gerlovich, Jack A.; Whitsett, John; Lee, Shelley; Parsa Rahul

2001-01-01

56

Safety First  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ned Miller does not take security lightly. As director of campus safety and emergency management at the Des Moines Area Community College (DMACC), any threat requires serious consideration. As community college administrators adopt a more proactive approach to campus safety, many institutions are experimenting with emerging technologies, including…

Taft, Darryl

2011-01-01

57

Safety Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Colleges across the country are rising to the task by implementing safety programs, response strategies, and technologies intended to create a secure environment for teachers and students. Whether it is preparing and responding to a natural disaster, health emergency, or act of violence, more schools are making campus safety a top priority. At…

Halligan, Tom

2009-01-01

58

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Safety Tip #22  

E-print Network

for out-of-control vehicles. Wear hearing protection and a safety vest. Wear a hard hat and safety goggles to protect yourself from branches and flying debris. Wear leather gloves and boots that have hard toes, facilities, and employment without regard to race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital

Minnesota, University of

59

Software safety  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Software safety and its relationship to other qualities are discussed. It is shown that standard reliability and fault tolerance techniques will not solve the safety problem for the present. A new attitude requires: looking at what you do NOT want software to do along with what you want it to do; and assuming things will go wrong. New procedures and changes to entire software development process are necessary: special software safety analysis techniques are needed; and design techniques, especially eliminating complexity, can be very helpful.

Leveson, Nancy

1987-01-01

60

Safety - PPE  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This high school activity from the Florida Advanced Technological Education (FL-ATE) Center challenges "your students' ability to identify safety hazards, as they play the role of a safety inspector." On this page, visitors will find a link to two company overview sheets, one with information about TECO, a company that generate and distributes electricity, and another with information about CF Industries, a fertilizer producer. The site also provides a lesson plan, a PowerPoint presentation, and a student handout. This is a great resource to introduce students to hands-on practices in safety inspection in different industries.

61

Pedestrian Protection Systems: Issues, Survey, and Challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the recent research on the enhancement of pedestrian safety to help develop a better un- derstanding of the nature, issues, approaches, and challenges surrounding the problem. It presents a comprehensive review of research efforts underway dealing with pedestrian safety and collision avoidance. The importance of pedestrian protection is emphasized in a global context, discussing the research programs

Tarak Gandhi; Mohan Manubhai Trivedi

2007-01-01

62

Sun Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... Links Buttons and Badges Stay Informed Cancer Home Sun Safety Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... other shelter before you need relief from the sun. Your best bet to protect your skin is ...

63

Food Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... in food handling, cooking, and storage can prevent foodborne illness. There are four basic steps to food safety at home: Clean - always wash your fruits and vegetables, hands, counters, and ... reached its expiration date. United States Department of Agriculture

64

Fire Safety  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... smoke alarms and sprinklers save lives. Dry (Christmas) Tree vs. High Moisture Tree Fire Video by Maury Grundy The U.S. Fire ... when it ignites a maintained (wet) cut Christmas tree and a dry tree. Fire Prevention and Safety ...

65

Fireworks Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... at 350 °F Water boils at 212 °F Fireworks Safety Fireworks are often used to mark special ... fireworks NFPA is opposed to consumer use of fireworks. This includes sparklers and firecrackers. Even sparklers burn ...

66

Aerospace Safety  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site from SpaceTEC National Aerospace Technical Education Center presents materials on aerospace safety. Topics include hazard communications, lockout/tagout, confined space entry, fall protection, PPE, firefighting and bloodborne pathogens.

67

ATV Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... an ATV: Be at least 16 years old. Health and safety experts strongly discourage ATV use by anyone younger than 16. Operating an ATV demands that drivers be skilled at making quick adjustments, such as ...

68

Water Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... best measure of protection. Back Continue Making Kids Water Wise It's important to teach your kids proper ... water during bad weather, especially lightning. Back Continue Water Park Safety Water parks can be a lot ...

69

LASER SAFETY POLICY MANUAL ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY  

E-print Network

LASER SAFETY POLICY MANUAL ISSUED BY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY OFFICE OF RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY and GEORGIA TECH LASER SAFETY COMMITTEE July 1, 2010 Revised July 31, 2012 #12;Laser Safety Program 1-1 #12;Laser Safety Policy Manual TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. POLICY AND SCOPE

Houston, Paul L.

70

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY GENERAL SAFETY MANUAL  

E-print Network

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY GENERAL SAFETY MANUAL May 10, 2002 #12;i Acknowledgements Environmental Health and Safety gratefully acknowledges the assistance provided by the University Safety Council extremely helpful. #12;ii Environmental Health and Safety General Safety Manual Table of Contents Section

Maroncelli, Mark

71

Safety Guidelines  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In order for students to inquire confidently, we must create safe classroom environments. Safety is not just a set of rules but a state of mind, and perhaps, most importantly, it is an attitude and a set of skills that carry over into a students' daily life. But research also shows that the space in which students inquire is vital to their safety and security. This chapter summarizes some of the important factors that contribute to safe laboratory environments.

James T. Biehle

2007-01-01

72

Railroad grade-level street crossings present serious potential safety hazards  

E-print Network

Railroad grade-level street crossings present serious potential safety hazards for people traveling Improvements for Pedestrians, Cyclists at Grade Crossings Data shows railroad crossings continue to prove

Illinois at Chicago, University of

73

Environmental Health and Safety  

E-print Network

.janicki@mcgill.ca 8888-43866 ANSI (American National Standards Institute) Class 3b or 4 lasers Biological safety-training/whmis-training] Radiation safety [https://www.mcgill.ca/ehs/safety-training/radiation-safety- training] Laser safety [https://www.mcgill.ca/ehs/safety-training/laser-safetyEnvironmental Health and Safety EHS-FORM-022 v.1.1 Page 1 of 1 Laboratory safety self

Shoubridge, Eric

74

Health and Safety Services Safety Guide 21  

E-print Network

Health and Safety Services Safety Guide 21 The safe use of lasers #12;Safety Guide 21 The safe use of lasers Health and Safety Services ii October 2008 The safe use of lasers Contents Summary......................................................................................................................................................................1 2.1. Duties on Heads of School 1 2.2. The University Laser Safety Officer (ULSO) 1 2.3. Duties

Reading, University of

75

Toolbox Safety Talk Golf Cart Safety  

E-print Network

Toolbox Safety Talk Golf Cart Safety Environmental Health & Safety Facilities Safety & Health to Environmental Health & Safety for recordkeeping. Golf carts are utilized on campus for groundskeepers and personal injury. Only trained and authorized personnel may operate golf carts capable of carrying more than

Pawlowski, Wojtek

76

Medication Safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the 1999 landmark report by the Institute of Medicine, ''To Err is Human,'' increasing attention has been directed toward patient safety in the United States, and in fact world wide. This report estimated that approxi- mately 44,000 to 98,000 patients die annually as a result of errors in the care received, and that more than a million patients are

Carol A. Keohane; David W. Bates

2008-01-01

77

School Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The articles in this issue dealing with school safety discusses what rural and small urban settings are doing to prevent violence and to educate young people about prosocial alternatives to violence. The research is quite clear that female, minority, and gay students are the targets of a disproportionate amount of harassment and violence, both in…

The Newsletter of the Comprehensive Center-Region VI, 1999

1999-01-01

78

Safety First!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author relates how a hands-on chemistry investigation provided her the inspiration to develop an effective safety lesson for her third grade chemistry class. She began the lesson by demonstrating the use of pH indicator paper to show that ordinary household (white) vinegar was an acid. With the students, she wondered aloud…

Longfield, Judith

2006-01-01

79

Sun Safety  

MedlinePLUS

Everyday Fitness Ideas from the National Institute on Aging at NIH www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Sun Safety There are many ways to be physically ... l Share your exercise story. National Institute on ... Go4Life is a registered trademark of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

80

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Safety Shoes  

E-print Network

, caustics, cutting oils, and petroleum products, neoprene or nitrile boots are often required to prevent Institute's (ANSI) label inside each shoe. Prevent foot injuries by using common safety sense and wearing origin, sex, age, marital status, disability, public as- sistance status, veteran status, or sexual

Minnesota, University of

81

Machine Shop Safety Tips & Safety Guidelines GENERAL SAFETY TIPS  

E-print Network

Machine Shop Safety Tips & Safety Guidelines GENERAL SAFETY TIPS · Safety glasses with side shields distance away from moving machine parts, work pieces, and cutters. · Use hand tools for their designed to oil, clean, adjust, or repair any machine while it is running. Stop the machine and lock the power

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

82

Electrical Fire Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... and education. Consumer Product Safety Commission safety guide: electronics and electrical . Electrical safety information on ground fault circuit interrupters, arc fault circuit interrupters, household extension cords, and spotting possible safety problems with electrical ...

83

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY  

E-print Network

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Department of Occupational Health and Safety Revised December 2009 #12;Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Management System 1. Introduction.............................................................................................................. 3 2.2 Management of Health and Safety

84

CPSC Safety Guides  

MedlinePLUS

... Information Hobbies Playgrounds Pools and Spas Recent OnSafety Blogs March 06, 2015 Daylight Saving Time change smoke ... Product Safety: Jacqueline Jones-Smith Read More OnSafety Blogs Inside CPSC: Recalls Safety Education Regulations, Laws & Standards ...

85

Safety harness  

DOEpatents

A safety harness to be worn by a worker, especially a worker wearing a plastic suit thereunder for protection in a radioactive or chemically hostile environment, which safety harness comprises a torso surrounding portion with at least one horizontal strap for adjustably securing the harness about the torso, two vertical shoulder straps with rings just forward of the of the peak of the shoulders for attaching a life-line and a pair of adjustable leg supporting straps releasibly attachable to the torso surrounding portion. In the event of a fall, the weight of the worker, when his fall is broken and he is suspended from the rings with his body angled slightly back and chest up, will be borne by the portion of the leg straps behind his buttocks rather than between his legs. Furthermore, the supporting straps do not restrict the air supplied through hoses into his suit when so suspended.

Gunter, Larry W. (615 Sand Pit Rd., Leesville, SC 29070)

1993-01-01

86

Farm Safety  

PubMed Central

Accident and safety are related terms; the higher the accident rate in any industry, the greater is the need for safety measures designed to prevent accidents. This article discusses the accident and safety problems in agriculture, which includes horticulture and forestry. There is still a tendency among townspeople to think of the countryside as peaceful and tranquil, a place where nothing happens very quickly and far removed from violent death or crippling injury. This pleasant rustic picture has undergone a striking change in the last 30 years owing to considerable agricultural mechanization and the development of chemical pesticides, which have brought new dangers to those who live and work on the land. Although men have readily adapted themselves to new machines and methods, they have not proved as able to recognize new dangers and learn how to guard against them. In consequence, accidents have increased to such an extent that the whole industry has realized the need for positive preventive measures. In this country, it is generally accepted that an employer of labour has a responsibility to provide safe working conditions for those he employs. Farm safety legislation goes a little further and usually requires an employer to provide necessary safeguards, with the added requirement on a worker to make use of them. It is a feature of accident prevention work that it never reaches a stage when it can be regarded as complete. Even when a reduction in accidents has been achieved, the effort must be sustained or the trend will be quickly reversed. Images PMID:5904095

Wilson, G. S.

1966-01-01

87

HEALTH, SAFETY & INTRODUCTION  

E-print Network

reporting · DSE Assessments · Risk Assessments · Electrical Safety #12;HEALTH, SAFETY & WELLBEING POLICYHEALTH, SAFETY & WELLBEING NEW STAFF INDUCTION #12;INTRODUCTION · University Health, Safety and Wellbeing Policy · The role of the Health & Safety Office · School/Unit Health & Safety Management

Sussex, University of

88

Space Syntax for pedestrian exposure forecasting and collision risk analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This project used Space Syntax to create a Pedestrian Risk Index for the city of Oakland, California. The Index helped planners identify high risk intersections for the first time, using predicted pedestrian volumes and existing pedestrian - vehicle collision data. A major challenge facing pedestrian safety advocates and urban planners at this time is the availability of detailed, high quality

Noah Raford

89

Environmental Health and Instructional Safety Employee Safety  

E-print Network

Program 22 Medical Monitoring 23 Office Safety 23 Personal Protective Equipment 24 Table of Contents #12Environmental Health and Instructional Safety #12;Employee Safety Page 1 To our University an environment for students, faculty, staff, and visitors that will not adversely affect their health and safety

de Lijser, Peter

90

Safety Gear  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The following resource is from Lessonopoly, which has created student activities and lesson plans to support the video series, Science of the Olympic Winter Games, created by NBC Learn and the National Science Foundation. Featuring exclusive footage from NBC Sports and contributions from Olympic athletes and NSF scientists, the series will help teach your students valuable scientific concepts. In this lesson, students will consider the design factors that impact safety gear by creating their own “helmet” for an egg. Students will experiment with shape, materials and design in this hands-on project. Students will use their experiences and additional research to debate the topic of having a mandatory helmet law for bicyclists.

2010-01-01

91

User Site Safety Orientation Emergency Information  

E-print Network

;NOTE: Security Gate 17 is only open Monday-Friday 6 am-10 pm. Access during other hours through Gate 17 Open Monday-Friday 6 am-10 pm. For after hours access, pedestrians use one of turnstiles, seeUser Site Safety Orientation Emergency Information Be aware of emergency exits in your buildings

Wechsler, Risa H.

92

Road safety issues for bus transport management.  

PubMed

Because of the low percentage of crashes involving buses and the assumption that public transport improves road safety by reducing vehicular traffic, public interest in bus safety is not as great as that in the safety of other types of vehicles. It is possible that less attention is paid to the significance of crashes involving buses because the safety level of bus systems is considered to be adequate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and perceptions of bus managers with respect to safety issues and the potential effectiveness of various technologies in achieving higher safety standards. Bus managers were asked to give their opinions on safety issues related to drivers (training, skills, performance evaluation and behaviour), vehicles (maintenance and advanced devices) and roads (road and traffic safety issues) in response to a research survey. Kendall's algorithm was used to evaluate the level of concordance. The results showed that the majority of the proposed items were considered to have great potential for improving bus safety. The data indicated that in the experience of the participants, passenger unloading and pedestrians crossing near bus stops are the most dangerous actions with respect to vulnerable users. The final results of the investigation showed that start inhibition, automatic door opening, and the materials and internal architecture of buses were considered the items most strongly related to bus passenger safety. Brake assistance and vehicle monitoring systems were also considered to be very effective. With the exception of driver assistance systems for passenger and pedestrian safety, the perceptions of the importance of other driver assistance systems for vehicle monitoring and bus safety were not unanimous among the bus company managers who participated in this survey. The study results showed that the introduction of new technologies is perceived as an important factor in improving bus safety, but a better understanding of their actual effectiveness and related risk factor avoidance must be developed to permit their useful implementation in bus fleets. PMID:23850401

Cafiso, Salvatore; Di Graziano, Alessandro; Pappalardo, Giuseppina

2013-11-01

93

Rebuilding a safety culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of a culture of safety and NASA since the Challenger accident is reviewed. The technical elements of the strengthened NASA safety program are described, including problem reporting, risk\\/assessment\\/risk management, operational safety, and safety assurance are addressed. Future directions in the development of safety are considered.

George A. Rodney

1991-01-01

94

ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH AND SAFETY  

E-print Network

ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAMS SPRING 2012 Including: Free Information Session New Program in Health and Safety CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION #12;2 Our Health and Safety Programs Workplace Health and Safety Certificate Program For every dollar invested in workplace safety, organizations

California at Davis, University of

95

Herbal Safety  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the past decade, there has been an increased interest in herbal medicines and treatments, both from the mainstream medical community and the general public. One need look no further than the cold drink section of the local supermarket to see the various herbal supplements that are prominently displayed on many drink labels. In an effort to provide critical evaluations of these various herbs and related products, the University of Texas at El Paso has created this important website in order to disseminate information about research findings related to herbal use and to provide these findings in both English and Spanish. There are a number of very helpful fact sheets presented here, including those that the deal with such commonly used medicinal herbs and plants, such as ginseng, chamomile, pumpkin seeds, and St. John's Wort. The Herbal Safety site also contains information on recent medical studies that examine the effectiveness of such medicinal treatments.

96

Propeller Safety  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With over 412,000 members, the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) continues to work for the issues that are important to its members. One area that they are very concerned with is providing educational materials and opportunities for those persons who would like to enter the aircraft maintenance field. They are continuingly updating their online collection of technical primers and general overviews. One particular noteworthy publication is their "Propeller Safety" manual. Within the document's 12 pages, visitors can learn the basics about working around the propeller, prop mechanics, and key maintenance matters. Along the way, interested parties will find helpful graphics, photographs, and visual aids that will help them identify various problem areas.

97

Safety Manual Prepared by the  

E-print Network

Radiation and Laser Safety 19 Laser Safety 21 Compressed Gas and Cryogenic Safety 22 Electrical Safety 24IMS Safety Manual Prepared by the IMS Safety Committee January 1991 (revised 1/2009) Institute 2 Introduction 3 IMS Laboratory Safety Reporting Policy 4 IMS Safety Committee 5 Fire Safety

Alpay, S. Pamir

98

Attentional bias toward safety predicts safety behaviors.  

PubMed

Safety studies have primarily focused on how explicit processes and measures affect safety behavior and subsequent accidents and injuries. Recently, safety researchers have paid greater attention to the role of implicit processes. Our research focuses on the role of attentional bias toward safety (ABS) in workplace safety. ABS is a basic, early-stage cognitive process involving the automatic and selective allocation of attentional resources toward safety cues, which reflect the implicit motivational state of employees regarding safety goal. In this study, we used two reaction time-based paradigms to measure the ABS of employees in three studies: two modified Stroop tasks (Studies 1 and 2) and a visual dot-probe task (Study 3). Results revealed that employees with better safety behavior showed significant ABS (Study 2), and greater ABS than employees with poorer safety behavior (Studies 1 and 2). Moreover, ABS was positively associated with the perceived safety climate and safety motivation of employees, both of which mediate the effect of ABS on safety behavior (Study 3). These results contributed to a deeper understanding of how early-stage automatic perceptual processing affects safety behavior. The practical implications of these results were also discussed. PMID:24922613

Xu, Yaoshan; Li, Yongjuan; Wang, Guangxi; Yuan, Xiao; Ding, Weidong; Shen, Zhongxiang

2014-10-01

99

Pool & Spa Safety Act  

MedlinePLUS

... Stories Pool Safely Home Consumer Product Safety Commission, CPSC CPSC Home The Pool & Spa Safety Act Contact Information About PoolSafely.gov and CPSC The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is ...

100

Medical Device Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Medical Devices Print this page Share this page E-mail this page Home Medical Devices Medical Device Safety Medical Device Safety Search the Medical Device Safety Section Medical ...

101

Paper Shredder Safety Alert  

MedlinePLUS

Paper Shredder Safety Alert Consumer model paper shredders are very popular. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission ( ... offers the following safety tips when using a paper shredder: ? Never allow children to operate paper shredders, ...

102

Surveying Science Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports the results of a National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) study that analyzed science classroom safety. Examines the potential need for a national safety indexing system to rank states with regard to science safety. (DDR)

Gerlovich, Jack A.; Parsa, Rahul

2002-01-01

103

ETE Electrical Safety  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource is a collection of safety topics that may be discussed in electrical safety meetings or classes. Topics include fuse removal, GFCIs, electrical shock, first aid, LOTO, PPE, fire safety, and hazardous locations.

104

Household Safety: Preventing Drowning  

MedlinePLUS

... Expect Ebola: What to Know Household Safety: Preventing Drowning KidsHealth > Parents > First Aid & Safety > Home Sweet Home > Household Safety: Preventing Drowning Print A A A Text Size What's in ...

105

Water Safety Quiz  

MedlinePLUS

Water Safety Quiz Trivia quiz loading... Please enable javascript. Stay Safe around Water Download water safety tips in English or Spanish and share them with your friends. Make Water Safety a Priority Contact your local Red Cross ...

106

Safety analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We are engaged in a research program in safety-critical computing that is based on two case studies. We use these case studies to provide application-specific details of the various research issues, and as targets for evaluation of research ideas. The first case study is the Magnetic Stereotaxis System (MSS), an investigational device for performing human neurosurgery being developed in a joint effort between the Department of Physics at the University of Virginia and the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Iowa. The system operates by manipulating a small permanent magnet (known as a 'seed') within the brain using an externally applied magnetic field. By varying the magnitude and gradient of the external magnetic field, the seed can be moved along a non-linear path and positioned at a site requiring therapy, e.g., a tumor. The magnetic field required for movement through brain tissue is extremely high, and is generated by a set of six superconducting magnets located in a housing surrounding the patient's head. The system uses two X-ray cameras positioned at right angles to detect in real time the locations of the seed and of X-ray opaque markers affixed to the patient's skull. the X-ray images are used to locate the objects of interest in a canonical frame of reference. the second case study is the University of Virginia Research Nuclear Reactor (UVAR). It is a 2 MW thermal, concrete-walled pool reactor. The system operates using 20 to 25 plate-type fuel assemblies placed on a rectangular grid plate. There are three scramable safety rods, and one non-scramable regulating rod that can be put in automatic mode. It was originally constructed in 1959 as a 1 MW system, and it was upgraded to 2 MW in 1973. Though only a research reactor rather than a power reactor, the issues raised are significant and can be related to the problems faced by full-scale reactor systems.

Knight, John C.

1995-01-01

107

Nuclear criticality safety guide  

SciTech Connect

This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C. [eds.] [eds.

1996-09-01

108

RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office  

E-print Network

RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office 130 DeSoto Street G-7 Parran with sources of ionizing radiation are required to be instructed in the basic principles of radiation protection and the potential risks of ionizing radiation. Radiation Safety Office personnel provide

Sibille, Etienne

109

Environmental Health & Safety Office of Radiological Safety  

E-print Network

safety training and submit this registration to the LSO prior to use of Class 3B or 4 lasers. A copy will be returned to the Laser Supervisor to be filed in the Laboratory Laser Safety Notebook. Both the Laser Safety Page 2 of 2 FORM LU-1 Revision 01 1/31/2012 TO BE COMPLETED BY THE LASER USER REGISTRANT I have

Houston, Paul L.

110

EFFECTS OF PEDESTRIAN PROMPTS ON MOTORIST YIELDING AT CROSSWALKS  

PubMed Central

Pedestrian safety is a serious concern at busy intersections and pedestrian campuses across the nation. Although crosswalks and signs inform pedestrians where to cross, there is no standard protocol for pedestrians to signal drivers that they wish to use the crosswalks, except to stand in or at the crosswalk. We examined the effects of two pedestrian prompts, a raised hand and extended arm, on motorist yielding at uncontrolled crosswalks. The two prompts were effective at increasing yielding. PMID:21541107

Crowley-Koch, Brian J; Van Houten, Ron; Lim, Eunyoung

2011-01-01

111

SHSD Manager Safety Engineering Group Manager  

E-print Network

. Shepherd: Explosives Safety, Facility Authorization Basis, Nuclear Safety R. Travis: Readiness Evaluations Safety, Machine Shop Safety, Tier I Program, Traffic Safety S. Moss: Nuclear Criticality Safety G

112

Testing safety commitment in organizations through interpretations of safety artifacts  

Microsoft Academic Search

ProblemSafety culture relates to injuries and safety incidents in organizations, but is difficult to asses and measure. We describe a preliminary test of assessing an organization's safety culture by examining employee interpretations of organizational safety artifacts (safety signs).

Gil Luria; Anat Rafaeli

2008-01-01

113

CCB Laboratory Safety Orientation Checklist Laboratory Safety Training Review  

E-print Network

/blood-borne pathogens, radiation safety, laser safety, liquid pyrophoric, etc...). ReviewCCB Laboratory Safety Orientation Checklist Laboratory Safety Training Review Attend CCB's Lab 300 in-class safety training. All personnel working within CCB

Heller, Eric

114

Food safety.  

PubMed

Food can never be entirely safe. Food safety is threatened by numerous pathogens that cause a variety of foodborne diseases, algal toxins that cause mostly acute disease, and fungal toxins that may be acutely toxic but may also have chronic sequelae, such as teratogenic, immunotoxic, nephrotoxic, and estrogenic effects. Perhaps more worrisome, the industrial activities of the last century and more have resulted in massive increases in our exposure to toxic metals such as lead, cadmium, mercury, and arsenic, which now are present in the entire food chain and exhibit various toxicities. Industrial processes also released chemicals that, although banned a long time ago, persist in the environment and contaminate our food. These include organochlorine compounds, such as 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethene) (DDT), other pesticides, dioxins, and dioxin-like compounds. DDT and its breakdown product dichlorophenyl dichloroethylene affect the developing male and female reproductive organs. In addition, there is increasing evidence that they exhibit neurodevelopmental toxicities in human infants and children. They share this characteristic with the dioxins and dioxin-like compounds. Other food contaminants can arise from the treatment of animals with veterinary drugs or the spraying of food crops, which may leave residues. Among the pesticides applied to food crops, the organophosphates have been the focus of much regulatory attention because there is growing evidence that they, too, affect the developing brain. Numerous chemical contaminants are formed during the processing and cooking of foods. Many of them are known or suspected carcinogens. Other food contaminants leach from the packaging or storage containers. Examples that have garnered increasing attention in recent years are phthalates, which have been shown to induce malformations in the male reproductive system in laboratory animals, and bisphenol A, which negatively affects the development of the central nervous system and the male reproductive organs. Genetically modified foods present new challenges to regulatory agencies around the world because consumer fears that the possible health risks of these foods have not been allayed. An emerging threat to food safety possibly comes from the increasing use of nanomaterials, which are already used in packaging materials, even though their toxicity remains largely unexplored. Numerous scientific groups have underscored the importance of addressing this issue and developing the necessary tools for doing so. Governmental agencies such as the US Food and Drug Administration and other agencies in the USA and their counterparts in other nations have the increasingly difficult task of monitoring the food supply for these chemicals and determining the human health risks associated with exposure to these substances. The approach taken until recently focused on one chemical at a time and one exposure route (oral, inhalational, dermal) at a time. It is increasingly recognized, however, that many of the numerous chemicals we are exposed to everyday are ubiquitous, resulting in exposure from food, water, air, dust, and soil. In addition, many of these chemicals act on the same target tissue by similar mechanisms. "Mixture toxicology" is a rapidly growing science that addresses the complex interactions between chemicals and investigates the effects of cumulative exposure to such "common mechanism groups" of chemicals. It is to be hoped that this results in a deeper understanding of the risks we face from multiple concurrent exposures and makes our food supply safer. PMID:19911313

Borchers, Andrea; Teuber, Suzanne S; Keen, Carl L; Gershwin, M Eric

2010-10-01

115

Bromine Safety  

SciTech Connect

The production and handling in 1999 of about 200 million kilograms of bromine plus substantial derivatives thereof by Great Lakes Chemical Corp. and Albemarle Corporation in their southern Arkansas refineries gave OSHA Occupational Injury/Illness Rates (OIIR) in the range of 0.74 to 1.60 reportable OIIRs per 200,000 man hours. OIIRs for similar industries and a wide selection of other U.S. industries range from 1.6 to 23.9 in the most recent OSHA report. Occupational fatalities for the two companies in 1999 were zero compared to a range in the U.S.of zero for all computer manufacturing to 0.0445 percent for all of agriculture, forestry and fishing in the most recent OSHA report. These results show that bromine and its compounds can be considered as safe chemicals as a result of the bromine safety standards and practices at the two companies. The use of hydrobromic acid as an electrical energy storage medium in reversible PEM fuel cells is discussed. A study in 1979 of 20 megawatt halogen working fluid power plants by Oronzio de Nora Group found such energy to cost 2 to 2.5 times the prevailing base rate at that time. New conditions may reduce this relative cost. The energy storage aspect allows energy delivery at maximum demand times where the energy commands premium rates. The study also found marginal cost and performance advantages for hydrobromic acid over hydrochloric acid working fluid. Separate studies in the late 70s by General Electric also showed marginal performance advantages for hydrobromic acid.

Meyers, B

2001-04-09

116

Safety Standards for Projectors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The safety of projectors and related viewing devices for school, home, and business use is of paramount importance. The Advisory Committee on Safety (ACOS) of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) has established a working group to consider the problem of projector safety and to make recommendations for safety standards. (CMV)

Wyman, Raymond

1979-01-01

117

Nuclear Powerplant Safety: Operations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Powerplant systems and procedures that ensure the day-to-day health and safety of people in and around the plant is referred to as operational safety. This safety is the result of careful planning, good engineering and design, strict licensing and regulation, and environmental monitoring. Procedures that assure operational safety at nuclear…

Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

118

Radiation Safety September 2013  

E-print Network

Radiation Safety Manual September 2013 Office of Environment, Health & Safety #12;RADIATION SAFETY of ionizing radiation as a valuable tool to extend fundamental knowledge. These activities are an important of radiation-producing machines and radioactive materials attests to the success of its radiation safety

California at Irvine, University of

119

Radiation Safety Program Annual Review  

E-print Network

.................................................................................................3 MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT OF THE RADIATION SAFETY/LASER SAFETY PROGRAMS .............3 LICENSE RENEWAL SAFETY/LASER SAFETY PROGRAM OVERVIEW.......................................................4 RADIATION for Radiation Producing Machines (RPM) Expires 8/31/2011 MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT OF THE RADIATION SAFETY/LASER

Lyubomirsky, Ilya

120

Launch Services Safety Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA/KSC Launch Services Division Safety (SA-D) services include: (1) Assessing the safety of the launch vehicle (2) Assessing the safety of NASA ELV spacecraft (S/C) / launch vehicle (LV) interfaces (3) Assessing the safety of spacecraft processing to ensure resource protection of: - KSC facilities - KSC VAFB facilities - KSC controlled property - Other NASA assets (4) NASA personnel safety (5) Interfacing with payload organizations to review spacecraft for adequate safety implementation and compliance for integrated activities (6) Assisting in the integration of safety activities between the payload, launch vehicle, and processing facilities

Loftin, Charles E.

2008-01-01

121

TWRS safety program plan  

SciTech Connect

Management of Nuclear Safety, Industrial Safety, Industrial Hygiene, and Fire Protection programs, functions, and field support resources for Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) has, until recently, been centralized in TWRS Safety, under the Emergency, Safety, and Quality organization. Industrial hygiene technician services were also provided to support operational needs related to safety basis compliance. Due to WHC decentralization of safety and reengineering efforts in West Tank Farms, staffing and safety responsibilities have been transferred to the facilities. Under the new structure, safety personnel for TWRS are assigned directly to East Tank Farms, West Tank Farms, and a core Safety Group in TWRS Engineering. The Characterization Project Operations (CPO) safety organization will remain in tact as it currently exists. Personnel assigned to East Tank Farms, West Tank Farms, and CPO will perform facility-specific or project-specific duties and provide field implementation of programs. Those assigned to the core group will focus on activities having a TWRS-wide or programmatic focus. Hanford-wide activities will be the responsibility of the Safety Center of Expertise. In order to ensure an effective and consistent safety program for TWRS under the new organization program functions, goals, organizational structure, roles, responsibilities, and path forward must be clearly established. The purpose of the TWRS Safety Program Plan is to define the overall safety program, responsibilities, relationships, and communication linkages for safety personnel under the new structure. In addition, issues associated with reorganization transition are addressed, including training, project ownership, records management, and dissemination of equipment. For the purpose of this document ``TWRS Safety`` refers to all safety professionals and technicians (Industrial Safety, Industrial Hygiene, Fire Protection, and Nuclear Safety) within the TWRS organization, regardless of their location in the organization.

Calderon, L.M., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-01

122

UTSI Safety Manual Reference to corresponding UT System Safety Policies  

E-print Network

Safety SA0500 Laser Safety SA0600 Reporting Safety and Health Concerns SA0700 Safety and Environmental1 UTSI Safety Manual Reference to corresponding UT System Safety Policies: www.utk.edu/administration/ Under OFFICE MANAGEMENT, link to Safety under Policies and Procedures On the left side, link

Davis, Lloyd M.

123

SNTP environmental, safety, and health  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs on space nuclear thermal propulsion (SNTP) environmental, safety, and health are presented. Topics covered include: program safety policy; program safety policies; and DEIS public hearing comments.

Harmon, Charles D.

1993-01-01

124

Occupational Health and Safety Manual  

E-print Network

Occupational Health and Safety Manual #12;1 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 York University Occupational Health and Safety Policy and Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Occupational Health and Safety Legislation

125

Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan  

E-print Network

Respirator Use • Laser Safety • Forklift Safety • Incidentallasers, microwave sources, radioactive CORROSIVE ELECTRICAL WEAR SAFETYLASER BEAM - IN BLACK LETTERS ON YELLOW FIELD, EMED CO. EA SIGN, SAFETY,

Ricks Editor, R.

2009-01-01

126

Traffic Safety Culture Center for Transportation Safety  

E-print Network

respondents believe that texting while driving (85 percent) and cell phone use (81 percent) have become bigger in Texas is 34 percent. Supporters of a law to ban cell phone use while driving outnumber opponentsThe Texas Traffic Safety Culture Survey Center for Transportation Safety November 2010

127

Magnetic Field Safety Magnetic Field Safety  

E-print Network

Magnetic Field Safety Training #12;Magnetic Field Safety Strong Magnetic Fields exist around energized magnets. High magnetic fields alone are a recognized hazard only for personnel with certain medical conditions such as pacemakers, magnetic implants, or embedded shrapnel. In addition, high magnetic

McQuade, D. Tyler

128

Hazmat Safety Community  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website created by the US Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, provides information on hazardous materials, regulations, safety advisory notices, training, as well as additional information.

US Department of Transportation (US Department of Transportation)

2012-01-05

129

Spacecraft Fire Safety  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fire detection, fire standards and testing, fire extinguishment, inerting and atmospheres, fire-related medical science, aircraft fire safety, Space Station safety concerns, microgravity combustion, spacecraft material flammability testing, and metal combustion are among the topics considered.

Margle, Janice M. (editor)

1987-01-01

130

Gun Safety Tips  

MedlinePLUS

... You are here Home > Safety Tips > Tip > Guns Gun Safety Tips Store Guns and Ammunition Safely Store ... visit about safe gun storage practices. Dispose of Guns You Don't Need If you decide that ...

131

Aviation safety analysis  

E-print Network

Introduction: Just as the aviation system is complex and interrelated, so is aviation safety. Aviation safety involves design of aircraft and airports, training of ground personnel and flight crew members' maintenance of ...

Ausrotas, Raymond A.

1984-01-01

132

National Safety Council  

MedlinePLUS

... Collaborating. ? making our world safer ® ? National Window Safety Week is April 5-11 NSC and the window ... educates caregivers through initiatives like National Window Safety Week. Get the Facts Be Ready for an OSHA ...

133

Safety behaviour: a reconsideration.  

PubMed

There is ample evidence that the use of safety behaviour can interfere with the progress of therapy, particularly if exposure is involved. As a result, it is widely asserted that safety behaviour is anti-therapeutic. However, an unqualified rejection of safety behaviour should be reconsidered because we now have theoretical justification, experimental evidence and clinical observations showing that the judicious use of safety behaviour, especially in the early stages of treatment, can be facilitative. Experiments in which escape behaviour facilitated fear reduction, and others in which the use of safety gear facilitated fear reduction, are reviewed. It also appears that safety behaviour does not necessarily prevent disconfirmatory experiences. We propose that additional investigations of the judicious use of safety behaviour will help to elucidate therapeutic uses of safety behaviour in the treatment of anxious and related types of psychopathology. PMID:18199423

Rachman, S; Radomsky, Adam S; Shafran, Roz

2008-02-01

134

Household Safety: Button Batteries  

MedlinePLUS

... Expect Ebola: What to Know Household Safety: Button Batteries KidsHealth > Parents > First Aid & Safety > Home Sweet Home > ... child swallows one. These guidelines can help. Safe Battery Storage & Use Store all unused batteries out of ...

135

Facility safety study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The safety of NASA's in house microelectronics facility is addressed. Industrial health standards, facility emission control requirements, operation and safety checklists, and the disposal of epitaxial vent gas are considered.

1979-01-01

136

Water safety and drowning  

MedlinePLUS

... among people of all ages. Learning and practicing water safety is important to prevent drowning accidents. ... Water safety tips for all ages include: Learn CPR. Never swim alone. Never dive into water unless ...

137

Generic safety documentation model  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to be a resource for preparers of safety documentation for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico facilities. It provides standardized discussions of some topics that are generic to most, if not all, Sandia/NM facilities safety documents. The material provides a ``core`` upon which to develop facility-specific safety documentation. The use of the information in this document will reduce the cost of safety document preparation and improve consistency of information.

Mahn, J.A.

1994-04-01

138

DOE handbook electrical safety  

SciTech Connect

Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

NONE

1998-01-01

139

Electrical safety guidelines  

SciTech Connect

The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

Not Available

1993-09-01

140

Aviation Safety Issues Database  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The aviation safety issues database was instrumental in the refinement and substantiation of the National Aviation Safety Strategic Plan (NASSP). The issues database is a comprehensive set of issues from an extremely broad base of aviation functions, personnel, and vehicle categories, both nationally and internationally. Several aviation safety stakeholders such as the Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) have already used the database. This broader interest was the genesis to making the database publically accessible and writing this report.

Morello, Samuel A.; Ricks, Wendell R.

2009-01-01

141

Safety analysts training  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this task was to support ESH-3 in providing Airborne Release Fraction and Respirable Fraction training to safety analysts at LANL who perform accident analysis, hazard analysis, safety analysis, and/or risk assessments at nuclear facilities. The task included preparation of materials for and the conduct of two 3-day training courses covering the following topics: safety analysis process; calculation model; aerosol physic concepts for safety analysis; and overview of empirically derived airborne release fractions and respirable fractions.

Bolton, P.

2000-10-01

142

Agriscience Shop Safety  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

After completing this project, you should be able to pass the Shop Safety Test, allowing you to participate in the Agriscience Shop. Before you are allowed into the shop, you are required to pass a Shop Safety Test. The tools that follow will help you prepare for the test. Use the Shop Safety Chart that Mr. Creel gave you in class to take notes on important safety rules. OSHA is the "governmental ...

Mr. Creel

2011-11-02

143

Health, Safety & Wellbeing Policy  

E-print Network

Health, Safety & Wellbeing Policy Statement The University of Glasgow is one of the four oldest our very best to minimise the risk to the health, safety and wellbeing of staff, students, researchers resource and our students as our valued customers and partners. We acknowledge health and safety as a core

Mottram, Nigel

144

Annual Fire Safety Report  

E-print Network

2010 Annual Fire Safety Report University of California, Irvine HIGHER EDUCATION OPPORTUNITY to the Fire Safety in Student Housing Buildings of current or perspective students and employees be reported INTRODUCTION Fire Safety is an essential tool in protecting a campus community from injuries, deaths, business

Loudon, Catherine

145

Fire Safety January 2011  

E-print Network

1 Fire Safety PROCEDURES January 2011 firesafety@uwo.ca Campus Phones ­ EMERGENCY ­ Dial 911 Fire Safety Service is the focal point for the coordinated administration of the University Fire Safety program and plans, and is the University's representative in contacts dealing with all aspects of Fire

Lennard, William N.

146

Situational awareness and safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers the applicability of situation awareness concepts to safety in the control of complex systems. Much of the research to date has been conducted in aviation, which has obvious safety implications. It is argued that the concepts could be extended to other safety critical domains. The paper presents three theories of situational awareness: the three-level model, the interactive

N. A Stanton; P. R. G Chambers; J Piggott

2001-01-01

147

Revitalizing Nuclear Safety Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report covers the general issues involved in nuclear safety research and points out the areas needing detailed consideration. Topics included are: (1) "Principles of Nuclear Safety Research" (examining who should fund, who should conduct, and who should set the agenda for nuclear safety research); (2) "Elements of a Future Agenda for Nuclear…

National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

148

EHS Online Safety Training  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page from Oklahoma State University provides access to a number of occupational safety modules. All modules are available to view online, and some include PowerPoint or Microsoft Word documents as well. Topics include electrical safety, lockout/tagout, safety data sheets, asbestos and bloodborne pathogens.

149

Earth Sciences Safety Handbook  

E-print Network

- 14 Lasers 25 Lifts 15 Manual Handling 23 No Smoking Policy 2 Office Safety and Use of Computer Heads of SectionsRadiation Protection Supervisors Laser Safety Officer Fire Managers (both sitesEarth Sciences Safety Handbook October 2012 Web version - updated Oct 12 #12;1 CONTENTS SUBJECT

Cambridge, University of

150

Earth Sciences Safety Handbook  

E-print Network

- 14 Lasers 25 Lifts 15 Manual Handling 23 No Smoking Policy 2 Office Safety and Use of Computer Heads of SectionsRadiation Protection Supervisors Laser Safety Officer Fire Managers (both sitesEarth Sciences Safety Handbook October 2013 Web version - updated Oct 13 #12;1 CONTENTS SUBJECT

Cambridge, University of

151

LASER SAFETY Valrie REITA  

E-print Network

LASER SAFETY Valérie REITA Pôle Optique Juillet 2009Juillet 2009 www.neel.cnrs.fr #12.90% Courtesy of: Rockwell Laser Industries ­ Industrial Laser Safety 1999 www.neel.cnrs.fr #12;Minimal Reactive of: Rockwell Laser Industries ­ Industrial Laser Safety 1999 #12;Summary of Basic Laser Biological

Canet, Léonie

152

Environmental Health & Safety  

E-print Network

Environmental Health & Safety Sub Department Name 480 Oak Rd, Stanford, CA 94305 T 650.723.0448 F 650.725.3468 DEPUTY DIRECTOR, ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY Exempt, Full-Time (100% FTE) Posted May 1, 2014 The Department of Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) at Stanford University seeks

153

Department Of Public Safety Annual Security & Fire Safety Report  

E-print Network

center, emergency medical services, safety programs and education, HAZMAT response, fire safety, alarmDepartment Of Public Safety Annual Security & Fire Safety Report 2011 In compliance with the Jeanne Safety. I encourage you to visit our web page, http://www.rowan.edu/safety browse through its sections

Rusu, Adrian

154

Safety Criteria and Safety Lifecycle for Artificial Neural Networks  

E-print Network

Safety Criteria and Safety Lifecycle for Artificial Neural Networks Zeshan Kurd, Tim Kelly and Jim performance based techniques that aim to improve the safety of neural networks for safety critical for safety assurance. As a result, neural networks are typically restricted to advisory roles in safety

Kelly, Tim

155

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2012-2103  

E-print Network

Streeto · Biosafety Manager: Sid Paula · Laser Safety Officer: Xiaowei Yan · Radiation Safety: StephenSEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2012-2103 Program Structure and Responsibilities Dr. Anas Chalah #12;SEAS Safety Program SEAS Safety Program Structure We have developed a great model

156

________________________ _____Environment, Health, & Safety _____ ______________________ Training Program  

E-print Network

Safety Course Prerequisite: No Course Length: Four hour lecture plus one hour practical Medical Approval________________________ _____Environment, Health, & Safety _____ ______________________ Training that affect safety Explain safety and property considerations associated with high value/high consequence

Eisen, Michael

157

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program  

E-print Network

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212 Health & Safety www.ehs.columbia.edu Revised May 2011 Please Submit in Duplicate to: The Radiation Safety: ______________________________________________ Date: ______________ Radiation Safety Officer at Receiving Institution

Jia, Songtao

158

Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety  

E-print Network

Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Panagiotis Scarlatos, Ph.D., Director Transportation Safety and Security #12;Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Partners #12 evacuations · Tracking systems for hazardous materials Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety

Fernandez, Eduardo

159

Radiation Safety (Revised March 2010)  

E-print Network

Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated December 2012 Stanford University, Stanford California #12; #12; Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated Environmental Health and Safety, Stanford University, Stanford California #12; CREDITS This Radiation Safety

Kay, Mark A.

160

Science Education Safety  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Downloadable guides published by the Council of State Science Supervisors (CSSS) that provide information on laboratory safety practices in elementary and secondary schools. Topics include legal issues, the purchase, storage, and disposal of chemicals, chemical hygiene, and response to spills or accidents. There is also information on the use of plants or animals in the lab, protective equipment, laboratory layouts, glassware and electricity precautions, field-trip safety, and other topics. The site also includes a science safety checklist, recommendations for general lab safety, and links to safety information from other websites.

161

Safety and IVHM  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

When we address safety in a book on the business case for IVHM, the question arises whether safety isn t inherently in conflict with the need of operators to run their systems as efficiently (and as cost effectively) as possible. The answer may be that the system needs to be just as safe as needed, but not significantly more. That begs the next question: How safe is safe enough? Several regulatory bodies provide guidelines for operational safety, but irrespective of that, operators do not want their systems to be known as lacking safety. We illuminate the role of safety within the context of IVHM.

Goebel, Kai

2012-01-01

162

NASA Software Safety Standard  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

If software is a critical element in a safety critical system, it is imperative to implement a systematic approach to software safety as an integral part of the overall system safety programs. The NASA-STD-8719.13A, "NASA Software Safety Standard", describes the activities necessary to ensure that safety is designed into software that is acquired or developed by NASA, and that safety is maintained throughout the software life cycle. A PDF version, is available on the WWW from Lewis. A Guidebook that will assist in the implementation of the requirements in the Safety Standard is under development at the Lewis Research Center (LeRC). After completion, it will also be available on the WWW from Lewis.

Rosenberg, Linda

1997-01-01

163

Missouri Elementary Science Safety Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this safety manual is to provide a resource to help manage and minimize potential risks in science classrooms where students spend up to 60% of instructional time engaged in hands-on activities. Information on general laboratory safety, science equipment safety, safety with plants, safety with animals, safety with chemicals, field…

Lemons, Judith L.

164

NASA Safety Manual. Volume 3: System Safety  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Volume 3 of the NASA Safety Manual sets forth the basic elements and techniques for managing a system safety program and the technical methods recommended for use in developing a risk evaluation program that is oriented to the identification of hazards in aerospace hardware systems and the development of residual risk management information for the program manager that is based on the hazards identified. The methods and techniques described in this volume are in consonance with the requirements set forth in NHB 1700.1 (VI), Chapter 3. This volume and future volumes of the NASA Safety Manual shall not be rewritten, reprinted, or reproduced in any manner. Installation implementing procedures, if necessary, shall be inserted as page supplements in accordance with the provisions of Appendix A. No portion of this volume or future volumes of the NASA Safety Manual shall be invoked in contracts.

1970-01-01

165

Environmental Health & Safety Safety in the Workplace  

E-print Network

and lengths from Medline BD Disposable Luer-LokTM Syringes - provides secure connection to prevent needle from - available in sizes XXS ­ XL from HexAmor Turtleskin Insider Plus Safety Glove Liners - available in sizes

Jawitz, James W.

166

Resolving conflicting safety cultures  

SciTech Connect

Several nuclear power plant sites have been wounded in the crossfire between two distinct corporate cultures. The traditional utility culture lies on one side and that of the nuclear navy on the other. The two corporate cultures lead to different perceptions of [open quotes]safety culture.[close quotes] This clash of safety cultures obscures a very important point about nuclear plant operations: Safety depends on organizational learning. Organizational learning provides the foundation for a perception of safety culture that transcends the conflict between utility and nuclear navy cultures. Corporate culture may be defined as the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs shared by employees of a given company. Safety culture is the part of corporate culture concerning shared attitudes and beliefs affecting individual or public safety. If the safety culture promotes behaviors that lead to greater safety, employees will tend to [open quotes]do the right thing[close quotes] even when circumstances and formal guidance alone do not ensure that actions will be correct. Safety culture has become particularly important to nuclear plant owners and regulators as they have sought to establish and maintain a high level of safety in today's plants.

Slider, J.E. (Slider Associates, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)); Patterson, M. (SCIENTECH, Rockville, MD (United States))

1993-01-01

167

[Patient safety in Sweden].  

PubMed

This article describes the patient safety work in Sweden and the cooperation between the Nordic countries in the area of patient safety. It depicts the national infrastructure, methods and partners in patient safety work as well as the development in key areas. Since 2000, the interest in patient safety and quality issues has significantly increased. A national study (2009) showed that more than 100,000 patients (8.6?%) experienced preventable harm in hospitals. Since 2007, all Swedish counties and regions work on the "National commitment for increased patient safety" to systematically minimize adverse events in the healthcare system. Also, a national strategy for patient safety has been proposed based on a new law regulating the responsibility for patient safety (2011) and a zero vision in terms of preventable harm and adverse events. The Nordic collaboration in this field currently focuses on the development of indicators and quality measurement with respect to nosocomial infections, harm in inpatient somatic care, patient safety culture, hospital mortality and polypharmacy in the elderly. The Nordic collaboration is driven by the development, exchange and documentation of experiences and evidence on patient safety indicators. The work presented in this article is only a part of the Swedish and the Nordic efforts related to patient safety and provides an interesting insight into how this work can be carried out. PMID:25430735

Rutberg, H; Eckhardt, M; Biermann, O

2015-01-01

168

Principles of Safety Pharmacology  

PubMed Central

Safety Pharmacology is a rapidly developing discipline that uses the basic principles of pharmacology in a regulatory-driven process to generate data to inform risk/benefit assessment. The aim of Safety Pharmacology is to characterize the pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic (PK/PD) relationship of a drug's adverse effects using continuously evolving methodology. Unlike toxicology, Safety Pharmacology includes within its remit a regulatory requirement to predict the risk of rare lethal events. This gives Safety Pharmacology its unique character. The key issues for Safety Pharmacology are detection of an adverse effect liability, projection of the data into safety margin calculation and finally clinical safety monitoring. This article sets out to explain the drivers for Safety Pharmacology so that the wider pharmacology community is better placed to understand the discipline. It concludes with a summary of principles that may help inform future resolution of unmet needs (especially establishing model validation for accurate risk assessment). Subsequent articles in this issue of the journal address specific aspects of Safety Pharmacology to explore the issues of model choice, the burden of proof and to highlight areas of intensive activity (such as testing for drug-induced rare event liability, and the challenge of testing the safety of so-called biologics (antibodies, gene therapy and so on.). PMID:18604233

Pugsley, M K; Authier, S; Curtis, M J

2008-01-01

169

Lightweight Materials and Safety  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this report presented at a California Air Resources Board (CARB) workshop by the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT), the relationship between mass, size, safety, and materials are examined. After describing the factors influencing vehicle safety (drivers and environment, size and weight, crashworthiness, and materials), solutions to safer vehicles are presented. It is determined to improve safety, mass should be reduced through the use of lighter high-strength materials (aluminum and steel), while also improving vehicle geometry and design to absorb impact. An example of improved safety through high strength-materials and geometry is illustrated with design changes Honda has made to the Civic (05-06 models). Also compared in this report are material and safety studies by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

The International Council on Clean Transportation

170

Control-Chain Safety Tray and Friction Pull  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tray mounted above suspended ceiling keeps sprinkler-system control chain safely out of way of pedestrian traffic below. Tray reached easily by using fireman's hook short stepladder, or chair or by jumping up to grasp chain. Safety tray used for infrequently used control chains on vents and dampers.

Hajdik, G.; Peek, C. R.

1984-01-01

171

Thermal reactor safety  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

Not Available

1980-06-01

172

Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

Rivkin, C.; Burgess, R.; Buttner, W.

2015-01-01

173

[Safety nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs].  

PubMed

The choice of a specific medication belonging to a drug class is under the criteria of efficacy, safety, cost and suitability. NSAIDs currently constitute one of the most consumed drug in the world, so it is very important review of the safety aspects of this drug class. This review has the objective of analyze the safety of NSAIDs on 3 main criteria: gastrolesivity, cardiotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. PMID:25760746

Oscanoa-Espinoza, Teodoro Julio

2015-01-01

174

Transport Safety Research Centre  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Transportation Safety Research Centre conducts research on the causes of accidents and injuries in real world crashes. The Centre aims to "reduce traffic casualties and mitigate the broader impact of transport on society by conducting world-leading basic and applied research." The Key Interests section allows visitors to read more about the aspects of transportation safety investigated by the center, including road user behavior, infrastructure safety research, and road safety policy. Two publications are also available for download: "Feasibility study for equipment database and exposure data evaluation" and "Effectiveness of Electronic Stability Control Systems in Great Britain."

175

SHIPBOARD LABORATORY SAFETY PROGRAM  

E-print Network

SHIPBOARD LABORATORY SAFETY PROGRAM INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM U.S. IMPLEMENTING ................................................................................................................................7 Other TAMU and SIEM Offshore Policies and Programs

176

Lift truck safety review  

SciTech Connect

This report presents safety information about powered industrial trucks. The basic lift truck, the counterbalanced sit down rider truck, is the primary focus of the report. Lift truck engineering is briefly described, then a hazard analysis is performed on the lift truck. Case histories and accident statistics are also given. Rules and regulations about lift trucks, such as the US Occupational Safety an Health Administration laws and the Underwriter`s Laboratories standards, are discussed. Safety issues with lift trucks are reviewed, and lift truck safety and reliability are discussed. Some quantitative reliability values are given.

Cadwallader, L.C.

1997-03-01

177

Safety Logics I: Absolute Safety Zhisheng Huang and John Bell #  

E-print Network

medical safety­critical system would consider states in which the patient dies as a result of treatmentSafety Logics I: Absolute Safety Zhisheng Huang and John Bell # Applied Logic Group Department}@dcs.qmw.ac.uk Abstract In this paper we distinguish between absolute safety and normative safety, and develop a formal

Huang, Zhisheng

178

December 8, 2011 Safety Committee Meeting HMSC Safety Committee  

E-print Network

and posted. 5. Todd Cross mentioned that Zee Medical was missing the HMSC shop kit. 6. The Safety Meeting December 8, 2011 Safety Committee Meeting HMSC Safety Committee December 8, 2011 Present facilities manager and chair the safety committee meetings and be the contact and point person on safety

179

SAFETY ALERT -ATTENTION SAFETY DEPARTMENT!!! IMMEDIATE ACTION REQUIRED  

E-print Network

SAFETY ALERT - ATTENTION SAFETY DEPARTMENT!!! IMMEDIATE ACTION REQUIRED This alert is to inform you stampings as shown in Illustration I of the Sherwood alert: CGA 580 or CGA 580 48-99 03-00 If you find any: Sherwood Safety Alert (See Reverse Side) 21 June 2000 #12;SAFETY ALERT* -ATTENTION SAFETY DEPARTMENT

Gleeson, Joseph G.

180

ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH DIVISION Chapter 10: Laser Safety  

E-print Network

ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH DIVISION Chapter 10: Laser Safety Laser Service Subcontractor Work safety officer (SLSO), buyer, and SLAC laser safety officer (LSO) (or an acting LSO if the LSO (JSA) documents A description of laser safety training for subcontractor personnel Approval

Wechsler, Risa H.

181

Traffic signal design and simulation for vulnerable road users safety and bus preemption  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mostly, pedestrian car accidents occurred at a signalized interaction is because pedestrians cannot across the intersection safely within the green light. From the viewpoint of pedestrian, there might have two reasons. The first one is pedestrians cannot speed up to across the intersection, such as the elders. The other reason is pedestrians do not sense that the signal phase is going to change and their right-of-way is going to be lost. Developing signal logic to protect pedestrian, who is crossing an intersection is the first purpose of this study. In addition, to improve the reliability and reduce delay of public transportation service is the second purpose. Therefore, bus preemption is also considered in the designed signal logic. In this study, the traffic data of the intersection of Chong-Qing North Road and Min-Zu West Road, Taipei, Taiwan, is employed to calibrate and validate the signal logic by simulation. VISSIM 5.20, which is a microscopic traffic simulation software, is employed to simulate the signal logic. From the simulated results, the signal logic presented in this study can protect pedestrians crossing the intersection successfully. The design of bus preemption can reduce the average delay. However, the pedestrian safety and bus preemption signal will influence the average delay of cars largely. Thus, whether applying the pedestrian safety and bus preemption signal logic to an intersection or not should be evaluated carefully.

Lo, Shih-Ching; Huang, Hsieh-Chu

2015-01-01

182

A Silent Safety Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) referred 8 times to the NASA "Silent Safety Program." This term, "Silent Safety Program" was not an original observation but first appeared in the Rogers Commission's Investigation of the Challenger Mishap. The CAIB on page 183 of its report in the paragraph titled 'Encouraging Minority Opinion,' stated "The Naval Reactor Program encourages minority opinions and "bad news." Leaders continually emphasize that when no minority opinions are present, the responsibility for a thorough and critical examination falls to management. . . Board interviews revealed that it is difficult for minority and dissenting opinions to percolate up through the agency's hierarchy. . ." The first question and perhaps the only question is - what is a silent safety program? Well, a silent safety program may be the same as the dog that didn't bark in Sherlock Holmes' "Adventure of the Silver Blaze" because system safety should behave as a devil's advocate for the program barking on every occasion to insure a critical review inclusion. This paper evaluates the NASA safety program and provides suggestions to prevent the recurrence of the silent safety program alluded to in the Challenger Mishap Investigation. Specifically targeted in the CAM report, "The checks and balances the safety system was meant to provide were not working." A silent system safety program is not unique to NASA but could emerge in any and every organization. Principles developed by Irving Janis in his book, Groupthink, listed criteria used to evaluate an organization's cultural attributes that allows a silent safety program to evolve. If evidence validates Jams's criteria, then Jams's recommendations for preventing groupthink can also be used to improve a critical evaluation and thus prevent the development of a silent safety program.

Goodin, James Ronald

2006-01-01

183

Safety Training for Laboratory Personnel  

E-print Network

for Researchers Annual 17 Radiation Safety Training Initial 18 Laser Safety Initial #12;Safety Training Yes No 17 Radiation Safety Yes No 18 Class 3b or 4 Laser SSafety Training for Laboratory Personnel EH&S 1/10/2014 Safety Training Matrix http

Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

184

Physics Safety Induction OCTOBER 2012  

E-print Network

Jegathesan ­ School Manager · Tim St. Pierre ­ Biological Safety Officer · Andre Luiten ­ Laser Safety Officer · Chunnong Zhao ­ Laser Safety Officer (Gingin) · Grant Walker ­ Industry Safety Officer · RenuPhysics Safety Induction OCTOBER 2012 FACULTY OF SCIENCES #12;The University of Western Australia

Tobar, Michael

185

Laser Safety Management Policy Statement ............................................................................................................1  

E-print Network

Laser Safety Management Policy Statement.............................................................................................................2 Unit Laser Safety Officer (ULSO).........................................................................2 University Laser Safety Adviser (ULSA

Davidson, Fordyce A.

186

The University of North Carolina Highway Safety Research Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created in 1965 by the North Carolina General Assembly, the Highway Safety Research Center (HSRC) is dedicated to improving "the safety, security, access and efficiency of all surface transportation modes through a balanced, interdisciplinary program of research, evaluation and information dissemination." Part of that information dissemination happens via this website, where visitors can find safety information, research reports, and their newsletter. New visitors should look at their "Safety Information" first. Here they will find helpful tips on bicycle safety, pedestrian safety, animal-vehicle crash information, and distracted and drowsy drivers. Moving on, the "Research Library" area contains selected full-text publications based on HSRC staff research, along with an exhaustive bibliography of previous papers from 1967 to 1990. Finally, visitors can also peruse their newsletter, which is published quarterly.

187

CHEMICAL SAFETY Emergency Numbers  

E-print Network

Storage 11 Chemical Inventory 12 Chemical Transportation 13 Chemical Labeling 13 Chemical Spills 14 Ethidium Bromide Spills 15 Injuries 16 4. Laboratory Safety Inspections Safety Officer Inspections 17 5 Oxidizing Materials 22 Toxic Materials 24 Corrosive Materials 24 Dangerously Reactive Materials 25 7

Bolch, Tobias

188

Russell Furr Laboratory Safety &  

E-print Network

Safety Culture Survey Fire Marshal Inspections Laboratory Plans Review New Research Safety Initiatives and the tBuLi ignited Sheri Sangji's clothing caught fire and she sustained 2nd and 3rd degree burns Facilities Management Risk Mitigation Matching Fund (proposed/beta) Spill clean-up assistance (4

189

Local Safety Committee Engineering  

E-print Network

surface. - L. Roth suggested that another short-term solution is to move 6-8 cylinders to the Welding Shop. The need for more local lab- specific ERPs was discussed. Action P. Hart and T. Zintel will complete & Safety Discipline/Infraction Policy & Procedures P. Hauser created a draft Health & Safety Disciple

Saskatchewan, University of

190

Nuclear Safety Analysis Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Immediately after the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident, the US utility industry asked the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to set up a Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) charged with analyzing the accident, deriving lessons to be learned from it, and performing other safety-related functions. Financed by industry subscriptions and staffed with a nucleus of EPRI employees, with loaned employees

E. L. Zebroski; M. C. Leverett

1981-01-01

191

Criticality safety database  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) Database is being developed by OSTI at the request of NE-74 to help workers in the area of nuclear criticality safety to accomplish their mission. It is a bibliographic database resident on the OSTI VAX cluster, and can be searched by BASIS software.

Beasley, M.; Rutkowski, R.

1994-09-01

192

Querying Safety Cases  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Querying a safety case to show how the various stakeholders' concerns about system safety are addressed has been put forth as one of the benefits of argument-based assurance (in a recent study by the Health Foundation, UK, which reviewed the use of safety cases in safety-critical industries). However, neither the literature nor current practice offer much guidance on querying mechanisms appropriate for, or available within, a safety case paradigm. This paper presents a preliminary approach that uses a formal basis for querying safety cases, specifically Goal Structuring Notation (GSN) argument structures. Our approach semantically enriches GSN arguments with domain-specific metadata that the query language leverages, along with its inherent structure, to produce views. We have implemented the approach in our toolset AdvoCATE, and illustrate it by application to a fragment of the safety argument for an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) being developed at NASA Ames. We also discuss the potential practical utility of our query mechanism within the context of the existing framework for UAS safety assurance.

Denney, Ewen W.; Naylor, Dwight; Pai, Ganesh

2014-01-01

193

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY  

E-print Network

Nuclear Safety and Control Act Radiation Emitting Devices Act Smoke-Free Places Act Transportation is based on the premise that significant progress in preventing accidents and illnesses can only workplaces. This legal framework within which workplace health and safety operates in Nova Scotia, is termed

Brownstone, Rob

194

Workplace Health and Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is one of six texts from a workplace literacy curriculum designed to assist learners in facing the increased demands of the workplace. It is a short guide to workplace health and safety issues, laws, and regulations, especially in Massachusetts. Topics covered include the following: (1) safety issues--workplace ergonomics, the…

Massachusetts Career Development Inst., Springfield.

195

Radiological Safety Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Written to be used concurrently with the U.S. Army's Radiological Safety Course, this publication discusses the causes, sources, and detection of nuclear radiation. In addition, the transportation and disposal of radioactive materials are covered. The report also deals with the safety precautions to be observed when working with lasers, microwave…

Army Ordnance Center and School, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

196

Safety Precautions for Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Safety information is discussed and outlined in this guide. Areas include: (1) general laboratory safety rules; (2) general rules and guidelines for animals in the elementary classroom; (3) general guidelines for the physical sciences; (4) general rules for using animals in investigations, with specifics on the care and handling of mammals,…

Folks, John; And Others

197

Electricity: Usage and Safety  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This 10:16 video considers use and safety regarding electricity. The video describes the fundamentals of electricity including how electricity travels from power plants to homes and businesses. This includes a basic discussion of circuits as well as safety measures typically included such as circuit breakers and grounding.         

198

Pedestrian signalization and the risk of pedestrian-motor vehicle collisions in Lima, Peru.  

PubMed

Safe walking environments are essential for protecting pedestrians and promoting physical activity. In Peru, pedestrians comprise over three-quarters of road fatality victims. Pedestrian signalization plays an important role managing pedestrian and vehicle traffic and may help improve pedestrian safety. We examined the relationship between pedestrian-motor vehicle collisions and the presence of visible traffic signals, pedestrian signals, and signal timing to determine whether these countermeasures improved pedestrian safety. A matched case-control design was used where the units of study were crossing locations. We randomly sampled 97 control-matched collisions (weighted N=1134) at intersections occurring from October, 2010 to January, 2011 in Lima. Each case-control pair was matched on proximity, street classification, and number of lanes. Sites were visited between February, 2011 and September, 2011. Each analysis accounted for sampling weight and matching and was adjusted for vehicle and pedestrian traffic flow, crossing width, and mean vehicle speed. Collisions were more common where a phased pedestrian signal (green or red-light signal) was present compared to no signalization (odds ratio [OR] 8.88, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.32-59.6). A longer pedestrian-specific signal duration was associated with collision risk (OR 5.31, 95% CI 1.02-9.60 per 15-s interval). Collisions occurred more commonly in the presence of any signalization visible to pedestrians or pedestrian-specific signalization, though these associations were not statistically significant. Signalization efforts were not associated with lower risk for pedestrians; rather, they were associated with an increased risk of pedestrian-vehicle collisions. PMID:24821630

Quistberg, D Alex; Koepsell, Thomas D; Boyle, Linda Ng; Miranda, J Jaime; Johnston, Brian D; Ebel, Beth E

2014-09-01

199

University of Florida Environmental Health & Safety  

E-print Network

University of Florida Environmental Health & Safety Biological Safety Office 2014 Bloodborne.......................................................................................................5 Medical Record.....................................................................................................19 #12;Exposure Control Plan Environmental Health & Safety January 2014 Biological Safety Office Page

Slatton, Clint

200

Patient Safety Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Patient Safety Network (PSNet) website contains recent news and resources to provide those studying to be in the medical profession and for those currently in the medical field. Resources include an extensive glossary as well as a vast supply of articles from various periodicals. The site also contains numerous �Did You Know?� articles that include visual aids and citations. Articles can be sorted or browsed by target audience, resource type, clinical area, error type, safety target, approach to improving safety, and setting of care. Users have the ability to sign up for the weekly AHRQ Patient Safety Network and monthly AHRQ Web Morbidity and Mortality (WEBM&M) newsletters. Users may also sign up for a free account on the AHRQ Patient Safety Network website to receive e-mail alerts that match the users' interests.

201

Formalizing Probabilistic Safety Claims  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A safety claim for a system is a statement that the system, which is subject to hazardous conditions, satisfies a given set of properties. Following work by John Rushby and Bev Littlewood, this paper presents a mathematical framework that can be used to state and formally prove probabilistic safety claims. It also enables hazardous conditions, their uncertainties, and their interactions to be integrated into the safety claim. This framework provides a formal description of the probabilistic composition of an arbitrary number of hazardous conditions and their effects on system behavior. An example is given of a probabilistic safety claim for a conflict detection algorithm for aircraft in a 2D airspace. The motivation for developing this mathematical framework is that it can be used in an automated theorem prover to formally verify safety claims.

Herencia-Zapana, Heber; Hagen, George E.; Narkawicz, Anthony J.

2011-01-01

202

Safety for Older Consumers. Home Safety Checklist.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A home safety checklist geared to the needs of older adults is presented in this document. The beginning of the checklist highlights potential hazards which may need to be checked in more than one area of the home, such as electric cords, smoke detectors, rugs, telephone areas, and emergency exit plans. The rest of the checklist is organized…

Consumer Product Safety Commission, Washington, DC.

203

Toolbox Safety Talk Forklift Operator Safety  

E-print Network

person to precisely lift and place large heavy loads with little effort. Using a tool such as a forklift on roadways, observe all traffic laws. Each forklift that travels on a roadway must have an orange slow-in sheet to Environmental Health & Safety for recordkeeping. Date:____________________ Start Time

Pawlowski, Wojtek

204

Toolbox Safety Talk Welding & Metal Work Safety  

E-print Network

purging the lines, light the torch with only the fuel gas valve open. · Check valves should be installed on both torch inlets and operating properly. Check valves can stop the reverse flow of gases regulators, and/or torch inlets. For more information on metal working, welding, or machine shop safety

Pawlowski, Wojtek

205

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Summer in Minnesota means high humidity and sunny, hot  

E-print Network

the victim liquids to drink. Treat for shock until professional medical help arrives. Heat Stress Safety TipSafety First Safety Last Safety Always Summer in Minnesota means high humidity and sunny, hot days the information provided on the reverse side of this safety tip sheet. Please refrain from reading the information

Minnesota, University of

206

Safety management practices and safety behaviour: assessing the mediating role of safety knowledge and motivation.  

PubMed

Safety management practices not only improve working conditions but also positively influence employees' attitudes and behaviours with regard to safety, thereby reducing accidents in workplace. This study measured employees' perceptions on six safety management practices and self-reported safety knowledge, safety motivation, safety compliance and safety participation by conducting a survey using questionnaire among 1566 employees belonging to eight major accident hazard process industrial units in Kerala, a state in southern part of India. The reliability and unidimesionality of all the scales were found acceptable. Path analysis using AMOS-4 software showed that some of the safety management practices have direct and indirect relations with the safety performance components, namely, safety compliance and safety participation. Safety knowledge and safety motivation were found to be the key mediators in explaining these relationships. Safety training was identified as the most important safety management practice that predicts safety knowledge, safety motivation, safety compliance and safety participation. These findings provide valuable guidance for researchers and practitioners for identifying the mechanisms by which they can improve safety of workplace. PMID:20728666

Vinodkumar, M N; Bhasi, M

2010-11-01

207

_____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ __________________ Training Program  

E-print Network

Safety Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 3 hour Medical Approval: None Delivery Mode: Classroom1/9/2014 _____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety with respect to safety and compliance. The course stresses specific approved techniques, tools, equipment

208

_____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ __________________ Training Program  

E-print Network

: Electrical Safety Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 10 minutes Medical Approval: None Delivery Mode1/15/2014 _____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety the responsibilities of line management in regards to LOTO Subject Matter Expert: EHS Electrical Safety Program

209

_____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ __________________ Training Program  

E-print Network

11/22/2011 _____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety: General Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 1 hour Medical Approval: None Delivery Mode: classroom overview of the safety principles of the Division's safety processes and culture. Discussion will include

Eisen, Michael

210

_____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ __________________ Training Program  

E-print Network

Safety Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 30 minutes Medical Approval: None Delivery Mode: Web_____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ __________________ Training Program EHS 246 ~ Electrical Safety for Guests and Visitors Course Syllabus Subject Category: Electrical

211

_____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ __________________ Training Program  

E-print Network

to Safety at the JGI Course Prerequisite: EHS0010 Course Length: 1 hour Medical Approval: No Delivery Mode_____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ __________________ Training to give new employees and guests a general overview of the safety principles of the Joint Genome Institute

Eisen, Michael

212

Water Safety for Older Children  

MedlinePLUS

... Water Safety for Older Children Safety & Prevention Listen Water Safety for Older Children Article Body Drowning ranks ... overestimated their swimming ability and their knowledge of water-survival skills. Here are some guidelines to keep ...

213

Georgia Institute of Laboratory Safety  

E-print Network

)........................................................................................................ 13 Laser Safety Committee (LSCGeorgia Institute of Technology Laboratory Safety Manual April 29, 2013 #12;Georgia Institute of Technology Laboratory Safety Manual 2 Contents 1. INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION................ 9

214

Georgia Institute of Laboratory Safety  

E-print Network

).........................................................................................................13 Laser Safety Committee (LSCGeorgia Institute of Technology Laboratory Safety Manual May 15, 2013 #12;Georgia Institute of Technology Laboratory Safety Manual 2 Contents 1. INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION ............... 9

215

Parents' Self-Reported Behaviors Related to Health and Safety of Very Young Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports a survey that documented the health and safety behaviors of parents of children in Head Start programs. Nearly all parents reported using car seats, teaching handwashing and pedestrian safety, and locking away medicine and alcohol. Sixty percent reported storing guns and bullets safely, possessing working fire extinguishers, and having…

Hendricks, Charlotte M.; Reichert, Ann

1996-01-01

216

RC-375 Driver and Traffic Safety 32-Hour Classroom Curriculum Rubric  

E-print Network

donation and organ and tissue donation procedures. 0-10 115.28(11)(c) At least thirty (30) minutes with such hazards 0-10 115.28(11)(b) At least thirty (30) minutes of instruction relating to organ and tissue motorcycle safety and pedestrian /bicycle safety awareness organizations 0-10 115.28(11)(d) Instruction

Wu, Mingshen

217

Environmental, safety, and health engineering  

SciTech Connect

A complete guide to environmental, safety, and health engineering, including an overview of EPA and OSHA regulations; principles of environmental engineering, including pollution prevention, waste and wastewater treatment and disposal, environmental statistics, air emissions and abatement engineering, and hazardous waste storage and containment; principles of safety engineering, including safety management, equipment safety, fire and life safety, process and system safety, confined space safety, and construction safety; and principles of industrial hygiene/occupational health engineering including chemical hazard assessment, personal protective equipment, industrial ventilation, ionizing and nonionizing radiation, noise, and ergonomics.

Woodside, G.; Kocurek, D.

1997-12-31

218

Evaluation of the efficacy of simulation games in traffic safety education of kindergarten children.  

PubMed Central

Using a simulation game designed to teach children to obey certain traffic safety rules, an experimental study was conducted with 136 five-year-old children in four Quebec schools. Within each classroom, subjects were randomly divided into four groups: three intervention groups and one control group. Each of the experimental groups was subjected to a different intervention with outcome measured using three instruments related to attitudes, behavior, and transfer of learning of pedestrian traffic safety. Results suggest that simulation games including role-playing/group dynamics and modeling/training can change attitudes and modify behavior in the area of pedestrian traffic safety in children of this age. PMID:2916716

Renaud, L; Suissa, S

1989-01-01

219

Carlsbad Area Office vehicle safety program  

SciTech Connect

The Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) Vehicle Safety Program (VSP) establishes the minimum requirements for CAO personnel to safely operate government vehicles and provides direction to effectively reduce the number of vehicle accidents, reduce the severity of vehicle accidents, and minimize vehicular property damage. This Program covers the operations of Government Services Administration (GSA) vehicles, rental or leased vehicles, and special purpose vehicles used at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the performance of work. Additionally, this Program encourages CAO employees to use safe driving habits while operating their privately owned vehicles, motorcycles, or bicycles, or, as pedestrians, to be aware of the hazards associated with traffic in and around CAO facilities. Vehicle safety is a shared responsibility in this organization. At anytime a CAO employee witnesses an unsafe act relating to the operation of a motor vehicle, it is their responsibility to notify their Team Leader (TL) or Assistant Manager (AM), or contact the CAO Safety and Occupational Health Manager (SOHM). Employees are encouraged to participate in the Carlsbad Area Office Federal Employees Safety Committee (FESC) activities and goals in order to address vehicle safety concerns. The FESC is designed to be a forum for all federal employees to improve the health and safety of the organization. The VSP is an effective method of ensuring the health and safety of CAO employees during the operation of government vehicles. The human resources of the CAO are the most valuable assets of this organization and any lost manhours are difficult to replace. Safe driving habits and defensive driving methods should always be practiced to preserve the health and safety of all employees.

NONE

1996-12-01

220

Patient Safety in Surgery  

PubMed Central

Background: Improving patient safety is an increasing priority for surgeons and hospitals since sentinel events can be catastrophic for patients, caregivers, and institutions. Patient safety initiatives aimed at creating a safe operating room (OR) culture are increasingly being adopted, but a reliable means of measuring their impact on front-line providers does not exist. Methods: We developed a surgery-specific safety questionnaire (SAQ) and administered it to 2769 eligible caregivers at 60 hospitals. Survey questions included the appropriateness of handling medical errors, knowledge of reporting systems, and perceptions of safety in the operating room. MANOVA and ANOVA were performed to compare safety results by hospital and by an individual's position in the OR using a composite score. Multilevel confirmatory factor analysis was performed to validate the structure of the scale at the operating room level of analysis. Results: The overall response rate was 77.1% (2135 of 2769), with a range of 57% to 100%. Factor analysis of the survey items demonstrated high face validity and internal consistency (? = 0.76). The safety climate scale was robust and internally consistent overall and across positions. Scores varied widely by hospital [MANOVA omnibus F (59, 1910) = 3.85, P < 0.001], but not position [ANOVA F (4, 1910) = 1.64, P = 0.16], surgeon (mean = 73.91), technician (mean = 70.26), anesthesiologist (mean = 71.57), CRNA (mean = 71.03), and nurse (mean = 70.40). The percent of respondents reporting good safety climate in each hospital ranged from 16.3% to 100%. Conclusions: Safety climate in surgical departments can be validly measured and varies widely among hospitals, providing the opportunity to benchmark performance. Scores on the SAQ can serve to evaluate interventions to improve patient safety. PMID:16632997

Makary, Martin A.; Sexton, J Bryan; Freischlag, Julie A.; Millman, E Anne; Pryor, David; Holzmueller, Christine; Pronovost, Peter J.

2006-01-01

221

The development of an automatic method of safety monitoring at Pelican crossings.  

PubMed

This paper reports on the development of a method for automatic monitoring of safety at Pelican crossings. Historically, safety monitoring has typically been carried out using accident data, though given the rarity of such events it is difficult to quickly detect change in accident risk at a particular site. An alternative indicator sometimes used is traffic conflicts, though this data can be time consuming and expensive to collect. The method developed in this paper uses vehicle speeds and decelerations collected using standard in situ loops and tubes, to determine conflicts using vehicle decelerations and to assess the possibility of automatic safety monitoring at Pelican crossings. Information on signal settings, driver crossing behaviour, pedestrian crossing behaviour and delays, and pedestrian-vehicle conflicts was collected synchronously through a combination of direct observation, video analysis, and analysis of output from tube and loop detectors. Models were developed to predict safety, i.e. pedestrian-vehicle conflicts using vehicle speeds and decelerations. PMID:15919048

Malkhamah, Siti; Tight, Miles; Montgomery, Frank

2005-09-01

222

Culture of safety.  

PubMed

In this article, the principles behind high-reliability organizations and a culture of safety are explored. Three areas in which health care has the greatest potential for improvement in safety culture are also discussed: a nonpunitive response to error; handoffs and transitions; and safe staffing. Tools for frontline nurses to help improve their organization's culture of safety in these areas are reviewed. Information is also given for nurses responding to error, including participating in root-cause analysis and supporting health care workers involved in adverse events. PMID:25680493

Hershey, Kristen

2015-03-01

223

Lithium ion cell safety  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The safety characteristics of recent commercial lithium ion cells are examined in relation to their use for cellular phones. These are prismatic cells with an aluminum cell housing (can) and a 500-600 mA h capacity. They have one of two types of 4-V class cathodes, lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO 2) or lithium manganese oxide (LiMn 2O 4). This report provides results of the safety tests that we performed on lithium ion cells and outlines our views regarding their safety.

Tobishima, Shin-ichi; Takei, Koji; Sakurai, Yoji; Yamaki, Jun-ichi

224

Experimenting With Safety Gear  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The following resource is from Lessonopoly, which has created student activities and lesson plans to support the video series, Science of the Olympic Winter Games, created by NBC Learn and the National Science Foundation. Featuring exclusive footage from NBC Sports and contributions from Olympic athletes and NSF scientists, the series will help teach your students valuable scientific concepts.Students will learn several important characteristics about the process of creating safety gear. Students will create a device to protect an egg from cracking if dropped. Students will learn about the concept of dispersing energy, and learn how safety helmets and other safety gear help keep Olympic athletes alive.

2010-01-01

225

Aircraft fire safety research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the past 15 years, very significant progress has been made toward enhancing aircraft fire safety in both normal and hostile (combat) operational environments. Most of the major aspects of the aircraft fire safety problem are touched upon here. The technology of aircraft fire protection, although not directly applicable in all cases to spacecraft fire scenarios, nevertheless does provide a solid foundation to build upon. This is particularly true of the extensive research and testing pertaining to aircraft interior fire safety and to onboard inert gas generation systems, both of which are still active areas of investigation.

Botteri, Benito P.

1987-01-01

226

Health and Safety Policy Statement4 Health and Safety Policy  

E-print Network

Health and Safety Policy Statement4 Health and Safety Policy Statement UnIVERSITY OF LEEDS-based health and safety management system and workplace health framework, and by allocating the resources as a minimum l the development of a health and safety management framework based upon the University protocols

Haase, Markus

227

Annual Security and Fire Safety Report | 2010 public safety  

E-print Network

10027 Tel: 212-854-2797 Fax: 212-932-0798 medical center campus Department of Public safety 109 BlackAnnual Security and Fire Safety Report | 2010 col u m bia univer sity public safety #12;Contents A Message from the Vice President for Public Safety.............................................1 The Clery

Kim, Philip

228

Safety and Security What do Safety/Security work with?  

E-print Network

with Police reports · Education in "First medical aid" · Education in laboratory safety #12;If somethingSafety and Security on campus #12;Agenda · What do Safety/Security work with? · If something happens · Opening hours · Remember · Website · How to find us #12;The Section for Safety and Security work

229

Food Safety and Technology Food Safety and Technology  

E-print Network

Food Safety and Technology Food Safety and Technology Institute for Food Safety and Health IIT Program Manager: Renee McBrien The Institute for Food Safety and Health (IFSH), with IIT faculty, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) scientists, and food industry experts, provides a unique training

Heller, Barbara

230

Radiation Safety Manual Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY  

E-print Network

Radiation Safety Manual ­ Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL For Columbia University NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital New York State Psychiatric Institute Barnard College December 2012 #12;Radiation Safety Manual ­ Dec 2012 Page 1 Table of Contents Introduction Chapter I: Radiation Safety Program A. Program

Grishok, Alla

231

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-print Network

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;#12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Protocol Title: Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers

Dai, Pengcheng

232

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-print Network

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for Sealed Source Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of sealed sources located

Dai, Pengcheng

233

Laser Safety Department of Environmental Health and Safety  

E-print Network

Laser Safety Department of Environmental Health and Safety 800 West Campbell Rd., SG10 Richardson 2012 #12;2 Introduction The University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) has established a Laser Safety Program to provide controls and safety guidance to relevant research and educational activities involving Lasers

O'Toole, Alice J.

234

Visual Arts Safety Plan: 1. Visual Arts Safety Manual  

E-print Network

for good practice. The requirements for working with Lasers can be found in SY-17. This Penn State Safety requirements. In addition, the policy requires the issuance and required use of laser specific safety materials Safety Plan: 1. Visual Arts Safety Manual 2. Unit Specific Plan

Maroncelli, Mark

235

ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, HEALTH, AND QUALITY DIVISION Chapter 42: Subcontractor Safety  

E-print Network

, maintenance, and servicing of laser systems follow the process defined in Laser Safety: Laser ServiceENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, HEALTH, AND QUALITY DIVISION Chapter 42: Subcontractor Safety Quick Start.slac.stanford.edu/esh/eshmanual/references/subcontractorQuickstart.pdf 1 Who needs to know about these requirements The requirements of Subcontractor Safety apply to SLAC

Wechsler, Risa H.

236

PHOTOVOICE: Reducing pedestrian injuries in children.  

PubMed

Pedestrian injury is the second leading cause of injury related death for children. The purpose of this research project was to determine the effectiveness of pedestrian and road traffic safety education with children, as part of the Walk This Way program through Safe Kids USA. Through the implementation of PHOTOVOICE, a project that captured children's narratives coinciding with a photograph, children engaged in community exploration to identify pedestrian hazards in their communities and explore possible solutions utilizing their photography and narrations. Children participated in an engaging educational session, a community fieldtrip, and reflection. Results concluded that, despite a small increase in post test scores, an increase in awareness of hazards in the community and successful identification of community hazards was achieved. The goal of this research project was determine the effectiveness of a hands-on pedestrian and road traffic safety educational program with children. The results of this research project will be integrated with similar projects completed across the country through the program Walk This Way with Safe Kids USA. Both this research project and the Walk This Way program aim to promote behavior change in children and create safer communities to reduce pedestrian related injury. The overall goal of this research project andthe Walk This Way program is to increase education on a national level in regards to pedestrian safety for children and provide a basis for lobbying for public policy changes pertaining to road and pedestrian safety. PMID:23241696

Van Oss, Tracy; Quinn, Danielle; Viscosi, Pauline; Bretscher, Kristen

2013-01-01

237

Cooking Fire Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... to your organization’s website or USFA’s website. Stock photography Use these free, high resolution photos to customize ... be dangerous. UL is a global independent safety science company with more than a century of expertise ...

238

Mine Safety & Health Administration  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created in 1978 as a part of the United States Department of Labor, the Mine Safety & Health Administration (MSHA) is dedicated to "protecting miners' safety & health". On the MSHA homepage, visitors can make their way through sections that include "Highlights", "Online Tools", "Quick Links", and "Data Transparency at MSHA". In terms of getting an overview of their work, the "Highlights" area is a fine place to start. Here visitors can view press releases, informational studies, and links to safety regulations and mine evacuation procedures. The homepage also features a brief statistical portrait of the nation's mines in the "MSHA by the Numbers" area, along with basic information on fatalities in mines. On the right-hand side of the homepage visitors with more of a technical interest in the nation's mines will appreciate the inclusion of various reports on mine safety compliance and training modules.

239

BAM! Your Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... the House Street Smartz Sun Proof Tick Tactics Tsunami What Health Issues Where In Your Area? Xpert ... forget to learn all about sun safety too!! Tsunami Flash: Take a look at what tsunamis are ...

240

Child safety seats  

MedlinePLUS

... LATCH system. LATCH stands for lower anchors and tethers for children. This system is designed to make ... where the cushions meet. A strap called a tether connects the top of the safety seat to ...

241

Organizational Culture and Safety  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

'..only a fool perseveres in error.' Cicero. Humans will break the most advanced technological devices and override safety and security systems if they are given the latitude. Within the workplace, the operator may be just one of several factors in causing accidents or making risky decisions. Other variables considered for their involvement in the negative and often catastrophic outcomes include the organizational context and culture. Many organizations have constructed and implemented safety programs to be assimilated into their culture to assure employee commitment and understanding of the importance of everyday safety. The purpose of this paper is to examine literature on organizational safety cultures and programs that attempt to combat vulnerability, risk taking behavior and decisions and identify the role of training in attempting to mitigate unsafe acts.

Adams, Catherine A.

2003-01-01

242

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An assessment of NASA's safety performance for 1983 affirms that NASA Headquarters and Center management teams continue to hold the safety of manned flight to be their prime concern, and that essential effort and resources are allocated for maintaining safety in all of the development and operational programs. Those conclusions most worthy of NASA management concentration are given along with recommendations for action concerning; product quality and utility; space shuttle main engine; landing gear; logistics and management; orbiter structural loads, landing speed, and pitch control; the shuttle processing contractor; and the safety of flight operations. It appears that much needs to be done before the Space Transportation System can achieve the reliability necessary for safe, high rate, low cost operations.

1984-01-01

243

Parent's Firearm Safety Checklist  

MedlinePLUS

Parent’s Firearm Safety Checklist IN YOUR HOME ? Before you buy a gun, consider less dangerous ways to keep your ... have the necessary knowledge to use it safely. ? Firearms should be stored unloaded and in a locked ...

244

Understanding Patient Safety Confidentiality  

MedlinePLUS

... care quality issues. To encourage the reporting and analysis of medical errors, PSQIA provides Federal privilege and ... information collected and created during the reporting and analysis of patient safety events. The confidentiality provisions will ...

245

Older Consumers Safety Checklist  

MedlinePLUS

... get help if you fall. To help prevent fire deaths and injuries: • Install a smoke alarm in ... and all heat-producing appliances. • Practice an emergency fire escape plan. For more safety information, visit CPSC’s ...

246

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) provided oversight on the safety aspects of many NASA programs. In addition, ASAP undertook three special studies. At the request of the Administrator, the panel assessed the requirements for an assured crew return vehicle (ACRV) for the space station and reviewed the organization of the safety and mission quality function within NASA. At the behest of Congress, the panel formed an independent, ad hoc working group to examine the safety and reliability of the space shuttle main engine. Section 2 presents findings and recommendations. Section 3 consists of information in support of these findings and recommendations. Appendices A, B, C, and D, respectively, cover the panel membership, the NASA response to the findings and recommendations in the March 1992 report, a chronology of the panel's activities during the reporting period, and the entire ACRV study report.

1993-01-01

247

Child Passenger Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... Stages & Populations Travelers' Health Workplace Safety & Health Features Media Sign up for Features Get Email Updates To ... Health with CDC [5:19 minutes] (2011) Features Media Sign up for Features Get Email Updates To ...

248

National Patient Safety Foundation  

MedlinePLUS

... Store Home Donate Help Creating a world where patients and those who care for them are free ... Joint Commission Journal Focus Archive Stand Up for Patient Safety Welcome Stand Up Members Stand Up e- ...

249

Leftovers and Food Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service Topics Careers Data Collection and Reports Fact Sheets Food Defense and Emergency ... Site Map A-Z Index Help Topics Careers Data Collection and Reports Fact Sheets Food Defense and Emergency ...

250

Doneness Versus Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service Topics Careers Data Collection and Reports Fact Sheets Food Defense and Emergency ... Site Map A-Z Index Help Topics Careers Data Collection and Reports Fact Sheets Food Defense and Emergency ...

251

Refrigeration and Food Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service Topics Careers Data Collection and Reports Fact Sheets Food Defense and Emergency ... Site Map A-Z Index Help Topics Careers Data Collection and Reports Fact Sheets Food Defense and Emergency ...

252

Irradiation and Food Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service Topics Careers Data Collection and Reports Fact Sheets Food Defense and Emergency ... Site Map A-Z Index Help Topics Careers Data Collection and Reports Fact Sheets Food Defense and Emergency ...

253

Freezing and Food Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service Topics Careers Data Collection and Reports Fact Sheets Food Defense and Emergency ... Site Map A-Z Index Help Topics Careers Data Collection and Reports Fact Sheets Food Defense and Emergency ...

254

Fires and Food Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service Topics Careers Data Collection and Reports Fact Sheets Food Defense and Emergency ... Site Map A-Z Index Help Topics Careers Data Collection and Reports Fact Sheets Food Defense and Emergency ...

255

Mail Order Food Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service Topics Careers Data Collection and Reports Fact Sheets Food Defense and Emergency ... Site Map A-Z Index Help Topics Careers Data Collection and Reports Fact Sheets Food Defense and Emergency ...

256

Postmarket Drug Safety Information  

MedlinePLUS

... NIH), and other government agencies and health-related organizations. FDA's Response to the Institute of Medicine's 2006 Report FDA Reinforces Commitment to Drug Safety [ARCHIVED] The Future of Drug ...

257

CHEMICAL SAFETY ALERTS-  

EPA Science Inventory

Chemical Safety Alerts are short publications which explain specific hazards that have become evident through chemical accident investigation efforts. EPA has produced over a dozen Alerts to date. This year's Alert: Managing Chemical Reactivity Hazards...

258

The Hermes safety strategy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Hermes space vehicle currently in project for the European Space Agency will open the road to European autonomous manned space missions at the beginning of the 21st century. The safety objectives are very ambitious and will require the implementation of a comprehensive safety assurance program, aimed at reducing the risks to an acceptable level. The risk acceptance is based on identification, ranking and minimization of Critical Items including all potential departures from the safety requirements. Prime contractors shall prepare a Critical Item List for their elements, and submit it to the Hermes Program Directorate for review; approval of the residual open critical items shall be obtained before launch. An independent committee (HESAC) has been set up by the ESA and the French National Space Center (CNES) Directors General to assess the adequacy of the Safety Control Program.

Rosso, R.

259

Religious Candles Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... for SAFETY Information www.nfpa.org/education Religious Candle Lit candles are used in religious services, in places of ... in the home. Whether you are using one candle, or more than one on a candelabra, kinara, ...

260

First Aid and Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... Choosing Safe Baby Products: Strollers Choosing Safe Baby Products: Toys Choosing Safe Toys Choosing Safe Toys for School- ... Pets Sexting: What Parents Need to Know Taking Care of Your ... Infant Seats & Child Safety Seats Choosing Safe Baby Products: Strollers Cold, ...

261

Household Safety: Preventing Choking  

MedlinePLUS

... should be regarded as potential choking hazards. Continue Toys, Balloons, and Other Small Objects Get on your ... that could pose a choking hazard, including: balloons toys with small parts and doll accessories coins safety ...

262

Aerospace Operational Safety  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video from SpaceTEC National Aerospace Technical Education Center explains aerospace operational safety including contaminants and cleanliness. This three and a half minute video is one of the aerospace certification readiness courses.

263

Burns and Fire Safety  

MedlinePLUS

1 Burns and Fire Safety Fact Sheet (2014) Fatalities ? 325 children ages 19 and under died from fires or ... from 1999 to 2011. 1 1999?2011 Fire/Burn Fatalities and Death Rate Among Children Ages 19 ...

264

Archetypes for Organisational Safety  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We propose a framework using system dynamics to model the dynamic behavior of organizations in accident analysis. Most current accident analysis techniques are event-based and do not adequately capture the dynamic complexity and non-linear interactions that characterize accidents in complex systems. In this paper we propose a set of system safety archetypes that model common safety culture flaws in organizations, i.e., the dynamic behaviour of organizations that often leads to accidents. As accident analysis and investigation tools, the archetypes can be used to develop dynamic models that describe the systemic and organizational factors contributing to the accident. The archetypes help clarify why safety-related decisions do not always result in the desired behavior, and how independent decisions in different parts of the organization can combine to impact safety.

Marais, Karen; Leveson, Nancy G.

2003-01-01

265

Carbon Monoxide Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... Media Fire Protection Technology Carbon monoxide safety outreach materials Help inform residents in your community about the ... muscular coordination Loss of consciousness Ultimately death Outreach materials from the U.S. Fire Administration Handout: portable generators ...

266

Updated Lightning Safety Recommendations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes the recommendations of the Lightning Safety Group (LSG), which was first convened during the 1998 American Meteorological Society Conference. Findings outline appropriate actions under various circumstances when lightning threatens. (WRM)

Vavrek, R. James; Holle, Ronald L.; Lopez, Raul E.

1999-01-01

267

Auto Battery Safety Facts  

MedlinePLUS

... 2010 Prevent Blindness America ® All rights reserved. The Battery’s Purpose: A motor vehicle battery does the following ... the air conditioner or radio are turned on. Battery Safety Precautions To prevent an accident that could ...

268

Safety, Security & Fire Report  

E-print Network

Procedures Communications Evacuation Promoting a Safe & Secure Campus Environment Violence Prevention Sexual Assault Prevention & Response Relationship Abuse & Domestic Violence Resources Missing Person Procedure Personnel, and support staff. SUDPS personnel provide public safety services during large scale sporting

Straight, Aaron

269

Chemical Safety Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the need to enhance understanding of chemical safety in educational facilities that includes adequate staff training and drilling requirements. The question of what is considered proper training is addressed. (GR)

Shaw, Richard

2000-01-01

270

Gun Safety (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC School Violence and the News Childproofing and Preventing Household Accidents ... Your Child Gun Safety Should You Worry About School Violence? Someone at School Has a Weapon. What Should ...

271

Farm Health and Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... health and safety hazards, including Chemicals and pesticides Machinery, tools and equipment that can be dangerous Hazardous ... accidents can cause injuries. Most farm accidents involve machinery. Proper machine inspection and maintenance can help prevent ...

272

Laser Safety Introduction  

E-print Network

Laser Safety #12;Introduction · A Laser is a device that controls the way energized atoms release photons. · LASER is an acronym for "Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation" · The light emitted by a laser is non

McQuade, D. Tyler

273

Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips  

E-print Network

Protect yourself and your family from the deadly effects of carbon monoxide--a colorless, odorless poisonous gas. This publication describes the warning signs of carbon monoxide exposure and includes a home safety checklist....

Shaw, Bryan W.; Garcia, Monica L.

1999-07-26

274

Car Seat Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... certified child passenger safety technician.) Guidelines for Choosing Car Seats Choose a seat with a label that ... about 16 kilograms), depending on the model. Infant car seats should always be installed to face the ...

275

Jurassic Park Safety Audit  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Using the first 30 minutes of the film Jurassic Park, the student will audit it for violations of safety rules and regulations, OSHA violations, and violations of HASP's. Access to the activity required free and quick registration with ATEEC.

276

Safety Auditing and Assessments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Safety professionals typically do not engage in audits and independent assessments with the vigor as do our quality brethren. Taking advantage of industry and government experience conducting value added Independent Assessments or Audits benefits a safety program. Most other organizations simply call this process "internal audits." Sources of audit training are presented and compared. A relation of logic between audit techniques and mishap investigation is discussed. An example of an audit process is offered. Shortcomings and pitfalls of auditing are covered.

Goodin, James Ronald (Ronnie)

2005-01-01

277

Aerospace safety advisory panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report from the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) contains findings, recommendations, and supporting material concerning safety issues with the space station program, the space shuttle program, aeronautics research, and other NASA programs. Section two presents findings and recommendations, section three presents supporting information, and appendices contain data about the panel membership, the NASA response to the March 1993 ASAP report, and a chronology of the panel's activities during the past year.

1994-01-01

278

Software system safety  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Software itself is not hazardous, but since software and hardware share common interfaces there is an opportunity for software to create hazards. Further, these software systems are complex, and proven methods for the design, analysis, and measurement of software safety are not yet available. Some past software failures, future NASA software trends, software engineering methods, and tools and techniques for various software safety analyses are reviewed. Recommendations to NASA are made based on this review.

Uber, James G.

1988-01-01

279

Biologic Safety in Psoriasis  

PubMed Central

The development of targeted biologic agents has revolutionized the treatment of psoriasis. In this review, the authors focus on the published long-term (? one year) safety data for the use of tumor necrosis factor-? antagonists etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab, as well as the IL-12/IL-23 antagonist ustekinumab, in adult patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. The efficacy of these currently available biologic therapies has been demonstrated in several studies, and their safety profiles are also reassuring. PMID:25741401

Mansouri, Yasaman

2015-01-01

280

Software Safety Risk in Legacy Safety-Critical Computer Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Safety Standards contain technical and process-oriented safety requirements. Technical requirements are those such as "must work" and "must not work" functions in the system. Process-Oriented requirements are software engineering and safety management process requirements. Address the system perspective and some cover just software in the system > NASA-STD-8719.13B Software Safety Standard is the current standard of interest. NASA programs/projects will have their own set of safety requirements derived from the standard. Safety Cases: a) Documented demonstration that a system complies with the specified safety requirements. b) Evidence is gathered on the integrity of the system and put forward as an argued case. [Gardener (ed.)] c) Problems occur when trying to meet safety standards, and thus make retrospective safety cases, in legacy safety-critical computer systems.

Hill, Janice L.; Baggs, Rhoda

2007-01-01

281

NWSM 50-1115 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY  

E-print Network

.................................................................... 8-1 9 COMPRESSED GAS SAFETY ................................................................................................... 31-1 32 MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY

282

pamphlet2014.docx Office of Research Safety  

E-print Network

Safety 16 Hazard Reporting 17 Laser Safety 18 Hazardous Waste Disposal 19 Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) 20pamphlet2014.docx Office of Research Safety SAFETY INFORMATION EMPLOYEE HANDOUT EMERGENCY" Other Health and Safety Phone Numbers Research Safety http://ors.uchc.edu 2723 Office of Research Safety

Kim, Duck O.

283

Safety system status monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has studied the safety aspects of monitoring the preoperational status of safety systems in nuclear power plants. The goals of the study were to assess for the NRC the effectiveness of current monitoring systems and procedures, to develop near-term guidelines for reducing human errors associated with monitoring safety system status, and to recommend a regulatory position on this issue. A review of safety system status monitoring practices indicated that current systems and procedures do not adequately aid control room operators in monitoring safety system status. This is true even of some systems and procedures installed to meet existing regulatory guidelines (Regulatory Guide 1.47). In consequence, this report suggests acceptance criteria for meeting the functional requirements of an adequate system for monitoring safety system status. Also suggested are near-term guidelines that could reduce the likelihood of human errors in specific, high-priority status monitoring tasks. It is recommended that (1) Regulatory Guide 1.47 be revised to address these acceptance criteria, and (2) the revised Regulatory Guide 1.47 be applied to all plants, including those built since the issuance of the original Regulatory Guide.

Lewis, J.R.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Rideout, T.H.; Cowley, P.J.

1984-03-01

284

Safety Basis Report  

SciTech Connect

As part of the internal Integrated Safety Management Assessment verification process, it was determined that there was a lack of documentation that summarizes the safety basis of the current Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site characterization activities. It was noted that a safety basis would make it possible to establish a technically justifiable graded approach to the implementation of the requirements identified in the Standards/Requirements Identification Document. The Standards/Requirements Identification Documents commit a facility to compliance with specific requirements and, together with the hazard baseline documentation, provide a technical basis for ensuring that the public and workers are protected. This Safety Basis Report has been developed to establish and document the safety basis of the current site characterization activities, establish and document the hazard baseline, and provide the technical basis for identifying structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that perform functions necessary to protect the public, the worker, and the environment from hazards unique to the YMP site characterization activities. This technical basis for identifying SSCs serves as a grading process for the implementation of programs such as Conduct of Operations (DOE Order 5480.19) and the Suspect/Counterfeit Items Program. In addition, this report provides a consolidated summary of the hazards analyses processes developed to support the design, construction, and operation of the YMP site characterization facilities and, therefore, provides a tool for evaluating the safety impacts of changes to the design and operation of the YMP site characterization activities.

R.J. Garrett

2002-01-14

285

Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Safety criteria for ferrocyanide watch list tanks  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a technical basis for closing the ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) at the Hanford Site. Three work efforts were performed in developing this technical basis. The efforts described herein are: 1. The formulation of criteria for ranking the relative safety of waste in each ferrocyanide tank. 2. The current classification of tanks into safety categories by comparing available information on tank contents with the safety criteria; 3. The identification of additional information required to resolve the ferrocyanide safety issue.

Postma, A.K.; Meacham, J.E.; Barney, G.S. [and others] [and others

1994-01-01

286

Visual assessment of pedestrian crashes.  

PubMed

Of the numerous factors that play a role in fatal pedestrian collisions, the time of day, day of the week, and time of year can be significant determinants. More than 60% of all pedestrian collisions in 2007 occurred at night, despite the presumed decrease in both pedestrian and automobile exposure during the night. Although this trend is partially explained by factors such as fatigue and alcohol consumption, prior analysis of the Fatality Analysis Reporting System database suggests that pedestrian fatalities increase as light decreases after controlling for other factors. This study applies graphical cross-tabulation, a novel visual assessment approach, to explore the relationships among collision variables. The results reveal that twilight and the first hour of darkness typically observe the greatest frequency of pedestrian fatal collisions. These hours are not necessarily the most risky on a per mile travelled basis, however, because pedestrian volumes are often still high. Additional analysis is needed to quantify the extent to which pedestrian exposure (walking/crossing activity) in these time periods plays a role in pedestrian crash involvement. Weekly patterns of pedestrian fatal collisions vary by time of year due to the seasonal changes in sunset time. In December, collisions are concentrated around twilight and the first hour of darkness throughout the week while, in June, collisions are most heavily concentrated around twilight and the first hours of darkness on Friday and Saturday. Friday and Saturday nights in June may be the most dangerous times for pedestrians. Knowing when pedestrian risk is highest is critically important for formulating effective mitigation strategies and for efficiently investing safety funds. This applied visual approach is a helpful tool for researchers intending to communicate with policy-makers and to identify relationships that can then be tested with more sophisticated statistical tools. PMID:21094328

Griswold, Julia; Fishbain, Barak; Washington, Simon; Ragland, David R

2011-01-01

287

NSTA Portal to Science Safety  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Science Teachers Association's (NSTA) Science Safety Advisory Board recently launched the Safety in the Science Classroom portal. This portal serves as a gateway to safety resources for teachers, supervisors, and administrators. It also contains an evolving list of safety resources for elementary, middle, and high schools. The list…

Roy, Ken

2010-01-01

288

Safety Manual for Special Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed for administrators, teachers, and parents of special students, the guide focuses on school safety plans in special education classrooms. A summary of a task force's recommendations on school safety is presented, followed by a list of regulations concerning security in the school and safety plans. Three typical sample school safety plans…

New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Special Education.

289

Public Safety Annual Security Report  

E-print Network

Materials 32 Open Flames and Flammables 32 Fire and Safety Awareness 32 Fire Reporting 33 Emergency of Public Safety 2 Campus Safety 3 Public Safety Mission Statement 3 Who We Are 3 Access To Facilities 4 Awareness Programs 28 Timely Warnings 28 Missing Students 29 Emergency Response and Evacuation 29 Fire

Dennett, Daniel

290

Environmental Health Safety & Business Services  

E-print Network

biological radiological and chemical committees, to name a few, and beyond into the Dallas-Fort Worth region, Safety Technician, EHS Derrick Neal, Safety Technician, EHS Ann Pho, Lab Safety Technician, EHS Rey Salinas, Safety Technician, EHS Jeff Chesser, Graduate Intern, EHS

O'Toole, Alice J.

291

SEAS Safety Committee Meeting Minutes  

E-print Network

no safety signs, plastic bottle of acetone was on floor w/o secondary containment, multiple indications) Bio-safety officer ­ · Bio-safety reviews ­ very important. Please send email to determine if need to be monitored by bio-safety committee. spaula@mcb.harvard.edu, Bio-lab 1050, 5-2345. · Regulations o NIH

292

Food Safety Policy December 2011  

E-print Network

Food Safety Policy December 2011 #12;www.surrey.ac.uk2 Food Safety Policy Some Useful Telephone the line to be put through to an operator. www.surrey.ac.uk 3 Food Safety Policy Contents Page 1 5 6. Glossary of Terms 7 Appendix 1. Guidance in support of the Food Safety Policy 8 Appendix 2

Doran, Simon J.

293

SAFETY ASSESSMENT & CERTIFICATION FOR UAS  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the certification process to gain clearance to operate in unsegregated airspace, new UASs will require a robust Safety Assessment process. The authors have looked at the civil manned aircraft safety assessment process defined in ARP 4761 and the safety certi fication process in ARP4754, as used to demonstrate compliance with EASA \\/ FAA safety target requirements, in

Andrew R Evans; Mark Nicholson

294

pamphlet04.doc SAFETY INFORMATION  

E-print Network

Electrical Power Failure 13 Emergency Procedures 14 Fire Safety 15 Hazard Reporting 16 Laser Safety 17pamphlet04.doc SAFETY INFORMATION EMPLOYEE HANDOUT EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE (Fire, Police, Accident, Spill, Medical) Campus Locations Dial "7777" Off Campus Dial "911" Other Health and Safety Numbers

Oliver, Douglas L.

295

_____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ ________ Training Program  

E-print Network

281 ­ Laser Safety Retraining Course Syllabus Subject Category: Laser Safety Course Prerequisite: None of Class 3b or 4 lasers. Course covers safety implications associated with alignment procedures to do in a laser emergency Subject Matter Expert: LBNL Laser Safety Officer. Instructional Designer

Knowles, David William

296

_____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ ________ Training Program  

E-print Network

303 ­ Laser Lessons Learned Training Course Syllabus Subject Category: Laser Safety Course Course Purpose: In compliance with the Special Operations Report on Laser Safety, laser safety training for detecting possible laser safety failures before they occur. Course Objectives: After completing

Knowles, David William

297

Food Safety for Pregnant and Breastfeeding Women  

MedlinePLUS

... safety while breastfeeding For More Information Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Food Safety Food safety is especially important for pregnant ... careful about food safety while you are pregnant. Food safety advice for everyone Keep food safe to ...

298

The effects of mobile phone use on pedestrian crossing behaviour at signalized and unsignalized intersections.  

PubMed

Research amongst drivers suggests that pedestrians using mobile telephones may behave riskily while crossing the road, and casual observation suggests concerning levels of pedestrian mobile-use. An observational field survey of 270 females and 276 males was conducted to compare the safety of crossing behaviours for pedestrians using, versus not using, a mobile phone. Amongst females, pedestrians who crossed while talking on a mobile phone crossed more slowly, and were less likely to look at traffic before starting to cross, to wait for traffic to stop, or to look at traffic while crossing, compared to matched controls. For males, pedestrians who crossed while talking on a mobile phone crossed more slowly at unsignalized crossings. These effects suggest that talking on a mobile phone is associated with cognitive distraction that may undermine pedestrian safety. Messages explicitly suggesting techniques for avoiding mobile-use while road crossing may benefit pedestrian safety. PMID:16919588

Hatfield, Julie; Murphy, Susanne

2007-01-01

299

49 CFR 385.11 - Notification of safety rating and safety fitness determination.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Notification of safety rating and safety fitness determination. 385.11 Section...CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS SAFETY FITNESS PROCEDURES General § 385.11...Notification of safety rating and safety fitness determination. (a)...

2011-10-01

300

49 CFR 385.11 - Notification of safety rating and safety fitness determination.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Notification of safety rating and safety fitness determination. 385.11 Section...CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS SAFETY FITNESS PROCEDURES General § 385.11...Notification of safety rating and safety fitness determination. (a)...

2010-10-01

301

Surface controlled subsurface safety valve  

SciTech Connect

A surface controlled subsurface safety valve is disclosed for deep well service. Communication of control fluid to the subsurface safety valve is controlled by a pilot valve at a subsurface location in close proximity to the safety valve. Responsiveness of the subsurface safety valve to decrease in control fluid pressure is thereby increased and the safety valve's closure speed is also increased. The pilot valve controllably communicates pressurized control fluid to open the safety valve and allows control fluid to be displaced into the flow path through the safety valve during valve closure.

Adams, J.B. Jr.

1984-02-14

302

Pedestrian crash trends and potential countermeasures from around the world.  

PubMed

As automobile transportation continues to increase around the world, bicyclists, pedestrians, and motorcyclists, also known as vulnerable road users (VRUs), will become more susceptible to traffic crashes, especially in countries where traffic laws are poorly enforced. Many countries, however, are employing innovative strategies to ensure that road users can more safely navigate the urban landscape. While bicyclists and motorcyclists are important road users, this paper will focus on pedestrian crash problems and solutions. Pedestrians are most at risk in urban areas due in part to the large amount of pedestrian and vehicle activity in urban areas. With this in mind, designing safe, accessible, and comprehensive facilities for pedestrians is vital to reducing pedestrian crashes. This paper will provide some insight into the magnitude of the pedestrian crash problem around the world, and will offer some lessons learned from several countries, particularly in Europe and the U.S., for improving pedestrian safety. Beginning with pedestrian safety statistics at the global, regional, and national levels, this paper will address potential countermeasures and strategies for improving pedestrian safety from an international perspective. PMID:22062330

Zegeer, Charles V; Bushell, Max

2012-01-01

303

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Construction employers are required to provide medical  

E-print Network

industry) 1926.103 Respiratory protection (construction industry) Links: Occupational Safety and HealthSafety First Safety Last Safety Always Construction employers are required to provide medical and consultation on matters of occupational health. · Making provisions prior to the start of the construction

Minnesota, University of

304

LABORATORY SAFETY MANUAL (rev. February, 2014) General Laboratory Safety: Information, Policies and Procedures (MNI)  

E-print Network

Laser SafetyLABORATORY SAFETY MANUAL (rev. February, 2014) General Laboratory Safety: Information, Policies and Procedures (MNI) [download this manual from Lab Safety Document Centre - Montreal Neurological Institute

Shoubridge, Eric

305

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Annual Report of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) presents results of activities during calendar year 2001. The year was marked by significant achievements in the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) programs and encouraging accomplishments by the Aerospace Technology Enterprise. Unfortunately, there were also disquieting mishaps with the X-43, a LearJet, and a wind tunnel. Each mishap was analyzed in an orderly process to ascertain causes and derive lessons learned. Both these accomplishments and the responses to the mishaps led the Panel to conclude that safety and risk management is currently being well served within NASA. NASA's operations evidence high levels of safety consciousness and sincere efforts to place safety foremost. Nevertheless, the Panel's safety concerns have never been greater. This dichotomy has arisen because the focus of most NASA programs has been directed toward program survival rather than effective life cycle planning. Last year's Annual Report focused on the need for NASA to adopt a realistically long planning horizon for the aging Space Shuttle so that safety would not erode. NASA's response to the report concurred with this finding. Nevertheless, there has been a greater emphasis on current operations to the apparent detriment of long-term planning. Budget cutbacks and shifts in priorities have severely limited the resources available to the Space Shuttle and ISS for application to risk-reduction and life-extension efforts. As a result, funds originally intended for long-term safety-related activities have been used for operations. Thus, while safety continues to be well served at present, the basis for future safety has eroded. Section II of this report develops this theme in more detail and presents several important, overarching findings and recommendations that apply to many if not all of NASA's programs. Section III of the report presents other significant findings, recommendations and supporting material applicable to specific program areas. Appendix A presents a list of Panel members. Appendix B contains the reaction of the ASAP to NASA's response to the calendar year 2000 findings and recommendations. In accordance with a practice started last year, this Appendix includes brief narratives as well as classifications of the responses as 'open,' 'closed,' or 'continuing.' Appendix C details the Panel's activities during the reporting period.

2002-01-01

306

Shared safety management  

SciTech Connect

In the past 18 months, American Ref-Fuel, a Houston-based waste-to-energy company, has had three of its plants designated as Star facilities under the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) administered by OSHA. The VPP Star participants are a select group of facilities that have designed and implemented exemplary health and safety programs. They must show performance consistent with the VPP goal of aligning labor, management and OSHA into a cooperative relationship. Having a safe work environment has always been one of the core culture issues at American Ref-Fuel. They have learned the best way to maintain excellence is to listen to how each employee is affected in daily activities by safety issues and take actions to constantly reinforce the message that safety concerns never fall on deaf ears. The VPP process encourages identification of potential safety problems before they occur. The program promotes ongoing integration of safety into all facility activities, with the overall objective of eliminating employee injuries and improving plant performance; two important considerations for plant owners and facility managers searching for new tools to improve their overall bottom line.

Hanna, L.; Stumpf, C.

1995-11-01

307

Safety of obesity drugs.  

PubMed

The safety of obesity drugs has historically been poor. This and the stigmatisation of obesity in society ensured that a higher standard of safety for obesity drugs must be met. The authors review the safety disasters of obesity drugs that were withdrawn. The authors then review the safety of presently available drugs--benzphetamine, phendimetrazine, diethylpropion, phentermine, sibutramine and orlistat. The safety of rimonabant, a drug with a pending new drug application that has an independent effect on metabolic syndrome, is also reviewed. The authors compare the stage of obesity drug development to that of hypertension in the 1950s. As new and safer drugs with more downstream mechanisms are developed that have independent effects on the cardiovascular risks associated with obesity, third party reimbursement for obesity medicine is likely to improve. This may lead to obesity being treated like hypertension and other chronic diseases with long-term medication. With improved technological tools, the authors believe this process will be more rapid for obesity than it was for hypertension. PMID:16255666

Greenway, Frank L; Caruso, Mary K

2005-11-01

308

Nuclear Safety Analysis Center  

SciTech Connect

Immediately after the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident, the US utility industry asked the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to set up a Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) charged with analyzing the accident, deriving lessons to be learned from it, and performing other safety-related functions. Financed by industry subscriptions and staffed with a nucleus of EPRI employees, with loaned employees from utility companies, reactor manufacturers, national laboratories, and other industries, NSAC now has 35 to 40 professionals. The NSAC's present program is a natural outgrowth of its TMI investigation and involves: evaluation of significant plant operating events; nuclear power plant experience case studies; response to regulatory issues; generic safety studies; technical and operating information clearinghouse; and strategic analysis. The NSAC is fulfilling a need that probably existed in the industry for many years before the TMI accident and is expected to exist indefinitely.

Zebroski, E.L. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA); Leverett, M.C.

1981-01-01

309

Biological safety cabinetry.  

PubMed Central

The biological safety cabinet is the one piece of laboratory and pharmacy equipment that provides protection for personnel, the product, and the environment. Through the history of laboratory-acquired infections from the earliest published case to the emergence of hepatitis B and AIDS, the need for health care worker protection is described. A brief description with design, construction, function, and production capabilities is provided for class I and class III safety cabinets. The development of the high-efficiency particulate air filter provided the impetus for clean room technology, from which evolved the class II laminar flow biological safety cabinet. The clean room concept was advanced when the horizontal airflow clean bench was manufactured; it became popular in pharmacies for preparing intravenous solutions because the product was protected. However, as with infectious microorganisms and laboratory workers, individual sensitization to antibiotics and the advent of hazardous antineoplastic agents changed the thinking of pharmacists and nurses, and they began to use the class II safety cabinet to prevent adverse personnel reactions to the drugs. How the class II safety cabinet became the mainstay in laboratories and pharmacies is described, and insight is provided into the formulation of National Sanitation Foundation standard number 49 and its revisions. The working operations of a class II cabinet are described, as are the variations of the four types with regard to design, function, air velocity profiles, and the use of toxins. The main certification procedures are explained, with examples of improper or incorrect certifications. The required levels of containment for microorganisms are given. Instructions for decontaminating the class II biological safety cabinet of infectious agents are provided; unfortunately, there is no method for decontaminating the cabinet of antineoplastic agents. Images PMID:2070345

Kruse, R H; Puckett, W H; Richardson, J H

1991-01-01

310

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report covers the activities of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) for calendar year 1998-a year of sharp contrasts and significant successes at NASA. The year opened with the announcement of large workforce cutbacks. The slip in the schedule for launching the International Space Station (ISS) created a 5-month hiatus in Space Shuttle launches. This slack period ended with the successful and highly publicized launch of the STS-95 mission. As the year closed, ISS assembly began with the successful orbiting and joining of the Functional Cargo Block (FGB), Zarya, from Russia and the Unity Node from the United States. Throughout the year, the Panel maintained its scrutiny of NASAs safety processes. Of particular interest were the potential effects on safety of workforce reductions and the continued transition of functions to the Space Flight Operations Contractor. Attention was also given to the risk management plans of the Aero-Space Technology programs, including the X-33, X-34, and X-38. Overall, the Panel concluded that safety is well served for the present. The picture is not as clear for the future. Cutbacks have limited the depth of talent available. In many cases, technical specialties are "one deep." The extended hiring freeze has resulted in an older workforce that will inevitably suffer significant departures from retirements in the near future. The resulting "brain drain" could represent a future safety risk unless appropriate succession planning is started expeditiously. This and other topics are covered in the section addressing workforce. In the case of the Space Shuttle, beneficial and mandatory safety and operational upgrades are being delayed because of a lack of sufficient present funding. Likewise, the ISS has little flexibility to begin long lead-time items for upgrades or contingency planning.

1999-01-01

311

Relationship of Safety Climate and Safety Performance in Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the relationship between measures of hospital safety climate and hospital performance on selected Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs). Data Sources Primary data from a 2004 survey of hospital personnel. Secondary data from the 2005 Medicare Provider Analysis and Review File and 2004 American Hospital Association's Annual Survey of Hospitals. Study Design A cross-sectional study of 91 hospitals. Data Collection Negative binomial regressions used an unweighted, risk-adjusted PSI composite as dependent variable and safety climate scores and controls as independent variables. Some specifications included interpersonal, work unit, and organizational safety climate dimensions. Others included separate measures for senior managers and frontline personnel's safety climate perceptions. Principal Findings Hospitals with better safety climate overall had lower relative incidence of PSIs, as did hospitals with better scores on safety climate dimensions measuring interpersonal beliefs regarding shame and blame. Frontline personnel's perceptions of better safety climate predicted lower risk of experiencing PSIs, but senior manager perceptions did not. Conclusions The results link hospital safety climate to indicators of potential safety events. Some aspects of safety climate are more closely related to safety events than others. Perceptions about safety climate among some groups, such as frontline staff, are more closely related than perceptions in other groups. PMID:19178583

Singer, Sara; Lin, Shoutzu; Falwell, Alyson; Gaba, David; Baker, Laurence

2009-01-01

312

Seismic Safety Guide  

SciTech Connect

This guide provides managers with practical guidelines for administering a comprehensive earthquake safety program. The Guide is comprehensive with respect to earthquakes in that it covers the most important aspects of natural hazards, site planning, evaluation and rehabilitation of existing buildings, design of new facilities, operational safety, emergency planning, special considerations related to shielding blocks, non-structural elements, lifelines, fire protection and emergency facilities. Management of risk and liabilities is also covered. Nuclear facilities per se are not dealt with specifically. The principles covered also apply generally to nuclear facilities but the design and construction of such structures are subject to special regulations and legal controls.

Eagling, D.G. (ed.)

1983-09-01

313

The safety leadership.  

PubMed

In this paper the authors present a careful consideration about the role of leadership, the fundamental element for the success of Behavior-Based Safety (B-BS) programs within companies. Lees and Faulkner have been training, coaching and writing about Behavior-Based Safety for the last ten years. Considerable data has been gathered during this process and the paramount factor in its success is leadership. An effective leader can create many spectacular successes. The success stories are all predicated on good leadership, without that a good product, great processes and quality people are all wasted and often find themselves on the rocks of frustration. PMID:20518204

Lees, Howard; Faulkner, Bruce

2010-01-01

314

Operational safety reliability research  

SciTech Connect

Operating reactor events such as the TMI accident and the Salem automatic-trip failures raised the concern that during a plant's operating lifetime the reliability of systems could degrade from the design level that was considered in the licensing process. To address this concern, NRC is sponsoring the Operational Safety Reliability Research project. The objectives of this project are to identify the essential tasks of a reliability program and to evaluate the effectiveness and attributes of such a reliability program applicable to maintaining an acceptable level of safety during the operating lifetime at the plant.

Hall, R.E.; Boccio, J.L.

1986-01-01

315

Metabolites in safety testing.  

PubMed

Traditionally, only circulating concentrations of parent drug have been measured in the rodent and nonrodent test species used for drug safety assessments and served as an index of systemic exposure for comparisons to human exposures. Circulating concentrations of metabolites have generally only been measured in specialized circumstances (e.g., parent compound was extensively metabolized). Measurement of only the parent compound is usually sufficient when the metabolite profile in humans is similar to that in at least one of the animal species used in the nonclinical safety assessment. However, it is possible that metabolites formed in humans might not be present in the rodent and nonrodent test species used for drug safety assessments or the metabolites are formed at disproportionately higher concentrations in humans than in the animal test species. Generally, metabolites identified only in human plasma or metabolites present at disproportionately higher concentrations in humans than in any of the animal test species should be considered for safety assessment. The Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) published a Guidance for Industry on Safety Testing of Drug Metabolites that provides current thinking within CDER on the nonclinical safety assessment of human drug metabolites derived from drug products. The CDER guidance defines human metabolites that can raise a safety concern as those formed at greater than 10% of parent drug systemic exposure at a steady state. By contrast, the more recent International Conference on Harmonization: Guideline on Nonclinical Safety Studies for the Conduct of Human Clinical Trials and Marketing Authorization for Pharmaceuticals (ICH M3[R2]) describes the threshold as 10% of total drug-related exposure. Where they differ, the ICH guidance supersedes the CDER Guidance. The purpose of this article is to provide a perspective on the important details of these guidances from a regulatory review standpoint, as well as discuss some concerns that have arisen from the regulated industry regarding the CDER guidance. Such issues include parent drug that is extensively metabolized, metabolism by intestinal bacteria and metabolites formed by nonclinical test species but not humans. PMID:21083045

Robison, Timothy W; Jacobs, Abigail

2009-10-01

316

Operating Room Fire Safety  

PubMed Central

Operating room fires are a rare but preventable danger in modern healthcare operating rooms. Optimal outcomes depend on all operating room personnel being familiar with their roles in fire prevention and fire management. Despite the recommendations of major safety institutes, this familiarity is not the current practice in many healthcare facilities. Members of the anesthesiology and the surgery departments are commonly not actively involved in fire safety programs, fire drills, and fire simulations that could lead to potential delays in prevention and management of intraoperative fires. PMID:21603334

Hart, Stuart R.; Yajnik, Amit; Ashford, Jeffrey; Springer, Randy; Harvey, Sherry

2011-01-01

317

[Safety in surgery].  

PubMed

The effectiveness of the World Health Organization's (WHO) surgical safety checklist (SSCL) in decreasing mortality and morbidity of surgical procedures was firstly suggested in 2009; the checklist is now strongly recommended internationally for adoption as a highly effective yet economically simple intervention. However, since 2009 several published studies have reported inconsistent results, besides many issues concerning local implementation. Drawing on the recently published experience carried out in Ontario, a concise overview of the current debate is presented, with some comments on implications for the national healthcare system in Italy. More generally, the need to include the implementation of the SSCL in a larger effort addressing safety in surgery is pointed out. PMID:25072541

Rodella, Stefania

2014-01-01

318

SAFETY & WELLNESS Annual Report 2012-2013  

E-print Network

of non- compliance. #12;HEALTH, SAFETY & WELLNESS Facilities Safety The Facilities Safety ProgramHEALTH, SAFETY & WELLNESS Annual Report 2012-2013 #12;HEALTH, SAFETY & WELLNESS UPDATE ON SAFETY PROGRAMS The professionals working in the Health and Safety team and Rehabilitation Services group have had

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

319

Automobile safety regulations and death reductions in the United States.  

PubMed Central

The effectiveness of federal automobile safety standards was examined using detailed data on 236,000 vehicles in fatal crashes in the United States during 1975-1978. Controlling statistically for type of regulation, types of vehicles, and ages of vehicles, the federal motor vehicle safety standards were associated with substantial reductions in car occupant death per 100 million vehicle miles travelled, and some reductions in fatal collisions of the federally regulated vehicles with pedestrians, motorcyclists, and bicyclists. Some 37,000 fewer deaths occurred in 1975-1978 than would have been expected without the federal standards. PMID:7258443

Robertson, L S

1981-01-01

320

The Importance of Radiofrequency Safety into Occupational Safety Coursework  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Typical safety programs, both undergraduate and graduate, do not explore issues related with RF hazards and safety. Without federal regulations and enforcement, the topic is usually disregarded and thus creating future safety professionals without any knowledge of the possibilities of RF hazards at the future employment. This paper will discuss what is radiofrequency, how radiofrequency is used, regulatory agencies and compliance issues in regards to radiofrequency and finally research of Safety, Health and Environmental programs across the United States.

321

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS SAFETY AND EMERGENCY  

E-print Network

................................................................................................................13 5.5 Laser SafetyDEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES MANUAL #12;INTRODUCTION This manual has been............................................................................................................1 II. General Safety Rules

Liu, Kai

322

Child Safety Curriculum Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents a set of child safety curriculum guidelines intended to help prevent child victimization and to promote safer living and learning environments for children and adolescents across America. These guidelines were developed to help educators, law enforcement personnel, and members of other youth-serving agencies teach children…

National School Safety Center, Malibu, CA.

323

Safety check valve  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes a safety check valve, for use with a pumping unit for petroleum fluids, the pumping unit including a polished rod and a stuffing box. It comprises: a valve housing having upper and lower ends and a central bore extending between the upper and lower ends and adapted to have the polished rod pass through the central bore;

Spears

1992-01-01

324

Nanodrugs: pharmacokinetics and safety  

PubMed Central

To date, various nanodrug systems have been developed for different routes of administration, which include dendrimers, nanocrystals, emulsions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, micelles, and polymeric nanoparticles. Nanodrug systems have been employed to improve the efficacy, safety, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of pharmaceutical substances. In particular, functionalized nanodrug systems can offer enhanced bioavailability of orally taken drugs, prolonged half-life of injected drugs (by reducing immunogenicity), and targeted delivery to specific tissues. Thus, nanodrug systems might lower the frequency of administration while providing maximized pharmacological effects and minimized systemic side effects, possibly leading to better therapeutic compliance and clinical outcomes. In spite of these attractive pharmacokinetic advantages, recent attention has been drawn to the toxic potential of nanodrugs since they often exhibit in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and genotoxicity. A better understanding of the pharmacokinetic and safety characteristics of nanodrugs and the limitations of each delivery option is necessary for the further development of efficacious nanodrugs with high therapeutic potential and a wide safety margin. This review highlights the recent progress in nanodrug system development, with a focus on the pharmacokinetic advantages and safety challenges. PMID:24591825

Onoue, Satomi; Yamada, Shizuo; Chan, Hak-Kim

2014-01-01

325

Aerospace safety advisory panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) monitored NASA's activities and provided feedback to the NASA Administrator, other NASA officials and Congress throughout the year. Particular attention was paid to the Space Shuttle, its launch processing and planned and potential safety improvements. The Panel monitored Space Shuttle processing at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and will continue to follow it as personnel reductions are implemented. There is particular concern that upgrades in hardware, software, and operations with the potential for significant risk reduction not be overlooked due to the extraordinary budget pressures facing the agency. The authorization of all of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Block II components portends future Space Shuttle operations at lower risk levels and with greater margins for handling unplanned ascent events. Throughout the year, the Panel attempted to monitor the safety activities related to the Russian involvement in both space and aeronautics programs. This proved difficult as the working relationships between NASA and the Russians were still being defined as the year unfolded. NASA's concern for the unique safety problems inherent in a multi-national endeavor appears appropriate. Actions are underway or contemplated which should be capable of identifying and rectifying problem areas. The balance of this report presents 'Findings and Recommendations' (Section 2), 'Information in Support of Findings and Recommendations' (Section 3) and Appendices describing Panel membership, the NASA response to the March 1994 ASAP report, and a chronology of the panel's activities during the reporting period (Section 4).

1995-01-01

326

[Medication safety in hospitals].  

PubMed

Drug therapy is one of the most common therapeutic interventions in the medical care of in-patients. It is a complex risk-associated procedure, which is why risk prevention is of top priority in medication safety. Medical care in hospitals is organised via various forms of distribution, e.g. the traditional distribution on the ward or as computerised unit dose drug dispensing system. In order to improve medication safety, the computerised unit dose drug dispensing system was introduced in the Ruppiner Kliniken in 2009. The implementation of the system to the clinic was scientifically evaluated within the scope of a diploma thesis which focused on the examination and analysis of medication safety and its evolvement. Amongst others, medication errors were detected and classified (via DokuPIK). The thesis showed that the implementation of the computerised unit dose system had a positive impact on the reduction of consequences of common and clinically relevant medication errors, thereby enhancing medication safety for the patient. PMID:22582518

Sleinitz, Annett; Heyde, Christian; Kloft, Charlotte

2012-04-01

327

August 2009 CONTRACTOR SAFETY  

E-print Network

INTRODUCTION EMERGENCY INFORMATION 1 Important Telephone Numbers 1 Reporting Injuries 2 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 2 Contractor Employee Conduct 2 Emergency Evacuation 3 Exit Signs 3 Fire Alarms 3 House Keeping 4 Injury Trash, Waste, and Scrap Disposal 8 Training Documentation 8 CONSTRUCTION SAFETY & HAZARD COMMUNICATION

de Lijser, Peter

328

Laboratory safety handbook  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Safety, defined as 'freedom from danger, risk, or injury,' is difficult to achieve in a laboratory environment. Inherent dangers, associated with water analysis and research laboratories where hazardous samples, materials, and equipment are used, must be minimized to protect workers, buildings, and equipment. Managers, supervisors, analysts, and laboratory support personnel each have specific responsibilities to reduce hazards by maintaining a safe work environment. General rules of conduct and safety practices that involve personal protection, laboratory practices, chemical handling, compressed gases handling, use of equipment, and overall security must be practiced by everyone at all levels. Routine and extensive inspections of all laboratories must be made regularly by qualified people. Personnel should be trained thoroughly and repetitively. Special hazards that may involve exposure to carcinogens, cryogenics, or radiation must be given special attention, and specific rules and operational procedures must be established to deal with them. Safety data, reference materials, and texts must be kept available if prudent safety is to be practiced and accidents prevented or minimized.

Skinner, E.L.; Watterson, C.A.; Chemerys, J.C.

1983-01-01

329

Alcohol and Traffic Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Seven papers discuss current issues and applied social research concerning alcohol traffic safety. Prevention, policy input, methodology, planning strategies, anti-drinking/driving programs, social-programmatic orientations of Mothers Against Drunk Driving, Kansas Driving Under the Influence Law, New Jersey Driving While Impaired Programs,…

Dickman, Frances Baker, Ed.

1988-01-01

330

Calibration facility safety plan  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A set of requirements is presented to insure the highest practical standard of safety for the Apollo 17 Calibration Facility in terms of identifying all critical or catastrophic type hazard areas. Plans for either counteracting or eliminating these areas are presented. All functional operations in calibrating the ultraviolet spectrometer and the testing of its components are described.

Fastie, W. G.

1971-01-01

331

Aerospace safety advisory panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data acquired on the actual flight experience with the various subsystems are assessed. These subsystems include: flight control and performance, structural integrity, orbiter landing gear, lithium batteries, EVA and prebreathing, and main engines. Improvements for routine operations are recommended. Policy issues for operations and flight safety for aircraft operations are discussed.

1983-01-01

332

Electrical Safety During Transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Technologic innovations enable management of medical equipment and power supply systems, with improvements that can affect the technical aspects, economics, and quality of medical service. Herein are outlined some technical guidelines, proposed by Istituto Superiore per la Prevenzione e la Sicurezza del Lavoro, for increasing the effectiveness of the power supply system and the safety of patients and surgeons in

G. L. Amicucci; L. Di Lollo; F. Fiamingo; V. Mazzocchi; G. Platania; D. Ranieri; R. Razzano; G. Camin; G. Sebastiani; P. Gentile

2010-01-01

333

Beach and Surf Safety  

MedlinePLUS

Beach and Surf Safety While the beach can be a fun and relaxing place to enjoy your summer, it is important to also respect the power of the sea. ... hospitals." While you should keep in mind different beaches have different dangers, ACEP offers the following practical ...

334

SYSTEM SAFETY PROGRESS REPORT,  

E-print Network

bolts with sufficient force to strike astronaut EMU or to transmit sufficient force through UHT to throw explosive potential. The additional safety effort required has been defined to the LSP Experiment Manager) Release tests on LSP Boyd Bolts will be performed to confirm existence of hazard or to reduce the hazard

Rathbun, Julie A.

335

Consumer Product Safety Commission  

MedlinePLUS

... Alarms October 28 2014 Baja and One World Technologies Agree to $4.3 Million Civil Penalty, Internal Compliance Improvements for Failure to Report Defective Minibikes and Go-Carts October 27 2014 CPSC Announces Winners of First-Ever Apps Challenge New Apps Help Consumers Track Recalls Product Safety ...

336

Airline Safety and Economy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This video documents efforts at NASA Langley Research Center to improve safety and economy in aircraft. Featured are the cockpit weather information needs computer system, which relays real time weather information to the pilot, and efforts to improve techniques to detect structural flaws and corrosion, such as the thermal bond inspection system.

1993-01-01

337

Safety Assessment of Probiotics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Viable microbes have been a natural part of human diet throughout the history of mankind. Today, different fermented foods and other foods containing live microbes are consumed around the world, including industrialized countries, where the diet has become increasingly sterile during the last decades. By definition, probiotics are viable microbes with documented beneficial effects on host health. Probiotics have an excellent safety record, both in humans and in animals. Despite the wide and continuously increasing consumption of probiotics, adverse events related to probiotic use are extremely rare. Many popular probiotic strains such as lactobacilli and bifidobacteria can be considered as components of normal healthy intestinal microbiota, and thus are not thought to pose a risk for the host health - in contrast, beneficial effects on health are commonly reported. Nevertheless, the safety of probiotics is an important issue, in particular in the case of new potential probiotics which do not have a long history of safe use, and of probiotics belonging to species for which general assumption of safety cannot be made. Furthermore, safety of probiotics in high-risk populations such as critically ill patients and immunocompromized subjects deserves particular attention, as virtually all reported cases of bacteremia and fungemia associated with probiotic use, involve subjects with underlying diseases, compromised immune system or compromised intestinal integrity.

Lahtinen, Sampo J.; Boyle, Robert J.; Margolles, Abelardo; Frias, Rafael; Gueimonde, Miguel

338

SAFETY FIRST STUDY SAFELY  

E-print Network

SAFETY FIRST WORK AND STUDY SAFELY Emergency Information Contact and Action Guide #12;2 Quick;3 Situation-Specific Instructions Event Medical Emergency Fire Police Emergency Bomb Threat Tornado Chemical.743.2000. #12;8 Tornado In the event of a tornado or tornado warning: 1. Listen to NOAA Weather Radio

Gelfond, Michael

339

Medical Oxygen Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... to the air a patient uses to breath. Fire needs oxygen to burn. If a fire should start in an oxygen-enriched area, the ... Homes where medical oxygen is used need specific fire safety rules to keep people safe from fire ...

340

Rasmussen on reactor safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

A discussion is presented of the methodology employed in the reactor ; safety study which formed the basis of the WASH-1400 report. A brief discussion ; is also presented of risks outside the scope of the WASH-1400 report. These ; include hazards in shipping, waste disposal, sabotage, and theft of fissionable ; material. (DG);

Rasmussen

1975-01-01

341

Four worries for safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several authors have recently defended a safety condition on knowl- edge according to which one knows only if one's belief couldn't easily have been wrong. The basic understanding of this clause is that S's belief that p is safe iff in all close worlds in which S believes that p, p is true. Here I raise four problems for basic

Julien Dutant

2008-01-01

342

Toxicology and Chemical Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Topics addressed in this discussion of toxicology and chemical safety include routes of exposure, dose/response relationships, action of toxic substances, and effects of exposure to chemicals. Specific examples are used to illustrate the principles discussed. Suggests prudence in handling any chemicals, whether or not toxicity is known. (JN)

Hall, Stephen K.

1983-01-01

343

Communicating for Safety's Sake  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

No community is safe until every member takes responsibility for the community's collective safety. College communities are no different from families, towns and businesses in that respect. Getting everyone to accept responsibility is a challenge and skilled communication is an important component of the solution. As part of the front line,…

Wiesner, Robert

2005-01-01

344

EMERGENCY INSTRUCTIONS SAFETY PROCEDURES  

E-print Network

CENTER - Emergencies and immediate response to FIRE/SMOKE, CHEMICAL SPILLS, UTILITY FAILURES, etc... 4-6000 STAT PAGE - Hospital (Patient Areas) Call to page personnel quickly through the page operators. 4-8400 OCCUPATIONALAND ENvIRONMENTAL MEDICINE ­ NON-EMERGENCY #12;ELECTRICAL SAFETY Electrical devices must be properly

Spence, Harlan Ernest

345

Strengthening the safety net.  

PubMed

If you've ever built a house of cards or played a game of Jenga, you know how quickly an ill-timed move can destroy your goal of maintaining equilibrium. The consequence of upsetting one piece of the whole is a common metaphor many safety net providers use to help other healthcare organizations understand their role in the system. The fiscal and physical pressure on just one safety net provider can create a dangerous ripple effect in a community, threatening the stability of other area providers and access to care for the patients they serve. "We have created a complicated tension within our healthcare system," says Stuart H. Altman, Ph.D., HFACHE, professor, National Health Policy, at Brandeis University in Waltham, MA. "If any single major sector of the system is out of balance, the others will be affected in a very negative way." Depending (in part) on geography as well as local and state politics, the fate of "non"-safety net providers can hinge on the success of those organizations whose primary mission is to provide indigent care. "If the safety net fails, the whole healthcare system could potentially collapse because the remaining providers simply cannot handle all of the demand," says C. Duane Dauner, FACHE, president of the California Healthcare Association in Sacramento. The current situations in Washington, D.C., Dallas, and several California counties illustrate this domino effect Dauner describes. PMID:14716922

May, Ellen Lanser

2004-01-01

346

Electrical safety leadership  

Microsoft Academic Search

To discuss the differences between normal leadership and great leadership as it pertains to the development and implementation of a world class electrical safety program. The classic and latest thoughts from some of the world's foremost proponents of outstanding leadership principles will be used as the basis for this paper. These concepts will be used to describe how outstanding or

Mike Doherty

2010-01-01

347

Tempered For Safety  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This document provides a learning module on tempered safety glass. In this activity, instructors demonstrate the fracture toughness of tempered glass, thereby illustrating how the glass is toughened and introducing the concept of the fractography of glass. It can be used in classrooms from elementary to college levels.

Reidmeyer, Mary R.

348

AEROSPACE SAFETY ADVISORY PANEL  

E-print Network

AEROSPACE SAFETY ADVISORY PANEL National Aeronautics and Space Administration Washington, DC 20546 VADM National Aeronautics and Space Administration Washington, DC 20546 Dear Mr. Bolden: Pursuant to Section 106(b) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act of 2005 (P.L. 109

349

Safety & Environmental Protection Services  

E-print Network

them unless all the fire safety precautions are in place and working. But surely we don't have fires heating and cooking activities; · candle flames and other naked flames. A common feature tends FOR THE CURRENT REVISION. · A candle, lit to give a bedroom atmosphere for a quiet summer evening indoors, is left

Guo, Zaoyang

350

Canadian hydrogen safety program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Canadian hydrogen safety program (CHSP) is a project initiative of the Codes & Standards Working Group of the Canadian transportation fuel cell alliance (CTFCA) that represents industry, academia, government, and regulators. The Program rationale, structure and contents contribute to acceptance of the products, services and systems of the Canadian Hydrogen Industry into the Canadian hydrogen stakeholder community. It facilitates

I. MacIntyre; A. V. Tchouvelev; D. R. Hay; J. Wong; J. Grant; P. Benard

2007-01-01

351

A Misleading Safety Record.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comparing the safety record of school buses to that of automobiles does not account for the nonschool time when automobiles are used. Experiences where seat belts are installed in school buses show that students use them, insurance is not a problem, and cost is slight. (MLF)

Fast, Carol

1985-01-01

352

Atomic Power Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: What is Atomic Power?; What Does Safety Depend On?; Control of Radioactive Material During Operation; Accident Prevention; Containment in the Event of an Accident; Licensing and…

Hogerton, John F.

353

Centrifuges Biological Safety  

E-print Network

Centrifuges Biological Safety General Biosafety Practices (GBP) Why You Should Care Centrifuges use centrifuges go fast enough to pose dangers. Mechanical hazards can include stress to the rotor metal, fatigue, that lead to accidents involving centrifuges. Hazardous materials can include biologicals and chemicals

Pawlowski, Wojtek

354

Usage and Safety Activities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page presents activities related to usage and safety from the Science & Engineering in the Lives of Students project. Activities include Battery and Bulb, Examine GFCI Outlet, Grounding and Protecting, Insulators, and Waste. Each activity includes a detailed description, list of the materials needed, science concepts covered, and reflection questions.

355

Obstacles to Laser Safety  

SciTech Connect

The growth of laser development & technology has been remarkable. Unfortunately, a number of traps or obstacles to laser safety have also developed with that growth. The goal of this article is to highlight those traps, in the hope that an aware laser user will avoid them. These traps have been the cause or contributing factor of many a preventable laser accident.

Barat, K

2005-04-25

356

Fundamentals of Laser Safety  

E-print Network

Fundamentals of Laser Safety The University of Florida Business Affairs Division of EH&S #12;Part 1: Fundamentals of Laser Operation #12;Laser Fundamentals The light emitted from a laser is monochromatic (or wavelengths) of light. Lasers emit light that is highly directional, that is, laser light

Wu, Dapeng Oliver

357

Safety Guards for Machinery. Module SH-34. Safety and Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This student module on safety guards for machinery is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module discusses how machinery can be made safer to use by the installation of safety guards. Following the introduction, seven objectives (each keyed to a page in the text) the student is expected to accomplish are listed (e.g.,…

Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

358

The Strategy for Safety: Preventing Crises through Safety Audits  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article the author demonstrates the importance of school safety audits and describes what schools should focus on in a safety audit. Ultimately, each school should determine its own safety audit strategy based on its unique circumstances, including the type of community within which it is located, the age of the students it serves, and the…

Schwartz, Sara Goldsmith

2013-01-01

359

National Transportation Safety Board Office of Aviation Safety  

E-print Network

1 National Transportation Safety Board Office of Aviation Safety Washington, D.C. 20594, Colorado Date: December 20, 2008 Time: 1818 Mountain Standard Time (0118 UTC1 December 21, 2008) Aircraft. Eick Senior Meteorologist/Group Chairmen National Transportation Safety Board Operational Factors

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

360

National Transportation Safety Board Office of Aviation Safety  

E-print Network

National Transportation Safety Board Office of Aviation Safety Washington, D.C. 20594-2000 June 15 at 0118 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) Aircraft: Boeing 737-500, N18611, Continental Airlines Flight Transportation Safety Board Washington D.C. Member: Kris Kimmons1 Systems Operations Manager Continental Airlines

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

361

Radiation Safety Manual August 1999 UW Environmental Health and Safety  

E-print Network

Page v Radiation Safety Manual August 1999 UW Environmental Health and Safety Glossary accelerator target and uncharged high-energy radiation is subsequently produced (neutrons or x-rays). ALARA - An acronym formed from the phrase "As Low as Reasonably Achievable." The phrase refers to a radiation safety

Wilcock, William

362

Laser Safety Inspection Criteria  

SciTech Connect

A responsibility of the Laser Safety Officer (LSO) is to perform laser audits. The American National Standard Z136.1 Safe Use of Lasers references this requirement through several sections. One such reference is Section 1.3.2.8, Safety Features Audits, ''The LSO shall ensure that the safety features of the laser installation facilities and laser equipment are audited periodically to assure proper operation''. The composition, frequency and rigor of that inspection/audit rests in the hands of the LSO. A common practice for institutions is to develop laser audit checklists or survey forms It is common for audit findings from one inspector or inspection to the next to vary even when reviewing the same material. How often has one heard a comment, ''well this area has been inspected several times over the years and no one ever said this or that was a problem before''. A great number of audit items, and therefore findings, are subjective because they are based on the experience and interest of the auditor to particular items on the checklist. Beam block usage, to one set of eyes might be completely adequate, while to another, inadequate. In order to provide consistency, the Laser Safety Office of the National Ignition Facility Directorate has established criteria for a number of items found on the typical laser safety audit form. The criteria are distributed to laser users. It serves two broad purposes; first, it gives the user an expectation of what will be reviewed by an auditor. Second, it is an opportunity to explain audit items to the laser user and thus the reasons for some of these items, such as labelling of beam blocks.

Barat, K

2005-06-13

363

Analyzing fault in pedestrian-motor vehicle crashes in North Carolina.  

PubMed

Crashes between pedestrians and motor vehicles are an important traffic safety concern. This paper explores the assignment of fault in such crashes, where observed factors are associated with pedestrian at fault, driver at fault, or both at fault. The analysis is based on police reported crash data for 1997 through 2000 in North Carolina, U.S.A. The results show that pedestrians are found at fault in 59% of the crashes, drivers in 32%, and both are found at fault in 9%. The results indicate drivers need to take greater notice of pedestrians when drivers are turning, merging, and backing up as these are some of the prime factors associated with the driver being found at fault in a crash. Pedestrians must apply greater caution when crossing streets, waiting to cross, and when walking along roads, as these are correlated with pedestrians being found at fault. The results suggest a need for campaigns focused on positively affecting pedestrian street-crossing behavior in combination with added jaywalking enforcement. The results also indicate that campaigns to increase the use of pedestrian visibility improvements at night can have a significant positive impact on traffic safety. Intoxication is a concern and the results show that it is not only driver intoxication that is affecting safety, but also pedestrian intoxication. The findings show in combination with other research in the field, that results from traffic safety studies are not necessarily transferable between distant geographic locations, and that location-specific safety research needs to take place. It is also important to further study the specific effects of the design of the pedestrian environment on safety, e.g. crosswalk spacing, signal timings, etc., which together may affect pedestrian safety and pedestrian behavior. PMID:20728631

Ulfarsson, Gudmundur F; Kim, Sungyop; Booth, Kathleen M

2010-11-01

364

NATIONAL AGRICULTURE SAFETY DATABASE (NASD)  

EPA Science Inventory

NASD is a national central repository of agricultural health, safety, and injury prevention materials for the agricultural community and especially for agricultural safety specialists. The mission of the NASD project is: to provide a national information resource for the dissemin...

365

Food Safety and Raw Milk  

MedlinePLUS

... Investigations Foodborne Illness A-Z CDC Vital Signs: Listeria & Salmonella Food Safety Spotlight Antibiotic Resistance and Food ... Found in Raw Milk Campylobacter Salmonella E. coli Listeria Related Links FoodSafety.gov Multistate Foodborne Outbreaks Estimates ...

366

FLUOR HANFORD SAFETY MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes safety management programs used within the scope of the ''Project Hanford Management Contract''. The document has been developed to meet the format and content requirements of DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses''. This document provides summary descriptions of Fluor Hanford safety management programs, which Fluor Hanford nuclear facilities may reference and incorporate into their safety basis when producing facility- or activity-specific documented safety analyses (DSA). Facility- or activity-specific DSAs will identify any variances to the safety management programs described in this document and any specific attributes of these safety management programs that are important for controlling potentially hazardous conditions. In addition, facility- or activity-specific DSAs may identify unique additions to the safety management programs that are needed to control potentially hazardous conditions.

GARVIN, L J; JENSEN, M A

2004-04-13

367

Patient Safety Threat - Syringe Reuse  

MedlinePLUS

... About CDC.gov . Injection Safety Share Compartir A Patient Safety Threat – Syringe Reuse Important Information! Please read ... due to syringe reuse by your healthcare provider. Patients need to be aware of a very serious ...

368

Flinders University Job Safety Analysis  

E-print Network

Flinders University Job Safety Analysis Date: Work Order/ Job No: Location: Description: Prepared:____________ Signature: Reviewed30-09-09 #12;Flinders University Job Safety Analysis F. U. Responsible Person

369

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND  

E-print Network

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND College Park, Maryland Revised May 2001 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS FORWARD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.3.4.2. University of Maryland Personnel Visiting Other Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2

Rubloff, Gary W.

370

Finding Out about Fireworks Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... the Body Works Main Page Finding Out About Fireworks Safety KidsHealth > Kids > Staying Safe > Playing It Safe Outdoors and on the Road > Finding Out About Fireworks Safety Print A A A Text Size Isn' ...

371

Smoking and Home Fire Safety  

MedlinePLUS

Smoking fire safety outreach materials As a member of the fire service, you know all too well ... in Residential Buildings (2008-2010) PDF 330 KB Smoking fire safety messages to share It is important ...

372

Safety in the Physics Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Briefly defines the legal aspects of safety. Presents prominent safety hazards and procedures that should be followed when dealing with electricity, radioactive materials, lasers, poisons, and vacuum apparatus. (GS)

Bullen, Brother T. G.

1974-01-01

373

Normalization of Process Safety Metrics  

E-print Network

This study is aimed at exploring new process safety metrics for measuring the process safety performance in processing industries. Following a series of catastrophic incidents such as the Bhopal chemical tragedy (1984) and Phillips 66 explosion...

Wang, Mengtian

2012-10-19

374

Potential of Pedestrian Protection Systems-A Parameter Study Using Finite Element Models of Pedestrian Dummy and Generic Passenger Vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To study the potential of an active, a passive, and an integrated safety system (combined active and passive) in reducing pedestrian upper body loading in typical impact configurations.Methods: Finite element simulations using models of generic sedan car fronts and the Polar II pedestrian dummy were performed for three impact configurations at two impact speeds. Chest contact force, head injury

Rikard Fredriksson; Jaeho Shin; Costin D. Untaroiu

2011-01-01

375

College of Science Safety Manual  

E-print Network

..............................................................................................................2 Employer Commitment to Safety Management Practices.........................................5 Roles ........................................................................................................6 Hazard Management ...............................................................................................................8 Personal Protective Equipment (PPE

Hickman, Mark

376

Aug 2012 / RL SCIENCE SAFETY  

E-print Network

Ultra-violet Radiation 34 27 Noise 34 28 Laser Safety: 35 28.1 General 35 28.2 Ophthalmic Examinations and Lasers on loan 38 28.8 Summary of Requirements for the Safe Use of Lasers 38 29 Office Safety and the UseAug 2012 / RL COLLEGE OF SCIENCE SAFETY HANDB00K 2013-2014 Student Safety Handbook for the College

Harman, Neal.A.

377

Distance between speed humps and pedestrian crossings: does it matter?  

PubMed

Speed humps are a common physical measure installed at pedestrian crossings to reduce vehicle speeds therefore improve the safety and mobility of pedestrians at the crossing. The aim of this study was to determine whether variations in distance between speed humps and pedestrian crossings contribute differently to the safety and mobility of pedestrians and cyclists, especially children and the elderly, and if so, how. Three sites in Sweden were studied, where vehicle speed measurements and video filming at the site resulted in manually coded, road user behaviour of 1972 pedestrians and cyclists. Road user behaviour at three test sites and two comparison sites equipped with speed cushion at distances of about 5m and 10 m from the pedestrian crossing, i.e. about one or two car lengths, were studied. As vehicle speeds were somewhat lower at the pedestrian crossing when the distance between the speed cushion to the pedestrian crossing was greater, and there were positive aspects regarding the mobility of the pedestrians and cyclists, a greater distance of about 10 m or two car lengths between the hump and the pedestrian crossing is suggested. The present study only covers speed cushions, but the same distance is also regarded as important when installing other types of physical measures to reduce vehicle speed. PMID:21658513

Johansson, Charlotta; Rosander, Peter; Leden, Lars

2011-09-01

378

Fall Protection Characteristics of Safety Belts and Human Impact Tolerance  

PubMed Central

Abstract: Many fatal accidents due to falls from heights have occurred at construction sites not only in Japan but also in other countries. This study aims to determine the fall prevention performance of two types of safety belts: a body belt1), which has been used for more than 40?yr in the Japanese construction industry as a general type of safety equipment for fall accident prevention, and a full harness2, 3), which has been used in many other countries. To determine human tolerance for impact trauma, this study discusses features of safety belts with reference4,5,6,7,8,9) to relevant studies in the medical science, automobile crash safety, and aircrew safety. For this purpose, simple drop tests were carried out in a virtual workplace to measure impact load, head acceleration, and posture in the experiments, the Hybrid-III pedestrian model10) was used as a human dummy. Hybrid-III is typically employed in official automobile crash tests (New Car Assessment Program: NCAP) and is currently recognized as a model that faithfully reproduces dynamic responses. Experimental results shows that safety performance strongly depends on both the variety of safety belts used and the shock absorbers attached onto lanyards. These findings indicate that fall prevention equipment, such as safety belts, lanyards, and shock absorbers, must be improved to reduce impact injuries to the human head and body during falls. PMID:25345426

HINO, Yasumichi; OHDO, Katsutoshi; TAKAHASHI, Hiroki

2014-01-01

379

ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE, SAFETY CULTURE, AND SAFETY PERFORMANCE AT RESEARCH FACILITIES.  

SciTech Connect

Organizational culture surveys of research facilities conducted several years ago and archival occupational injury reports were used to determine whether differences in safety performance are related to general organizational factors or to ''safety culture'' as reflected in specific safety-related dimensions. From among the organizations surveyed, a pair of facilities was chosen that were similar in size and scientific mission while differing on indices of work-related injuries. There were reliable differences in organizational style between the facilities, especially among workers in environment, safety, and health functions; differences between the facilities (and among job categories) on the safety scale were more modest and less regular.

BROWN,W.S.

2000-07-30

380

Moving forward with safety culture.  

PubMed

Radiation safety and protection of people are shared goals of the Health Physics Society (HPS) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A positive safety culture contributes to achieving radiation safety and protection of people, which are important to both the HPS and the NRC. Through unprecedented collaboration and engagement with diverse stakeholders, the NRC and the stakeholders developed a Safety Culture Policy Statement. The policy statement defines safety culture and describes the traits of a positive safety culture. Consideration of both safety and security issues and the interface of safety and security are underlying principles that support the policy. Examination of significant events, both within the nuclear industry and in society at large, illustrates how weaknesses in these traits can contribute to the occurrence and consequences of safety incidents, including serious injury and loss of life. With the policy statement in place, the NRC is moving forward with outreach and education about safety culture. Health physicists and other radiation safety specialists play an essential role in enhancing safety culture. PMID:22378209

Weber, Michael

2012-04-01

381

Playground Safety. The Long Trail.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the evolution of playground safety, discussing the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) "Handbook for Public Playground Safety" and examining the direction in which CPSC guidelines are moving. The paper notes the importance of certification of playground equipment, reviews pertinent questions to address, and describes new…

Wallach, Frances

1995-01-01

382

ITER safety challenges and opportunities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The challenges for the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in safety and environment are presented, along with some thoughts on how to overcome them. The first programmatic challenge is to fund a comprehensive safety and environmental ITER R&D plan. The second is to strengthen safety and environment work and personnel in the international team. The third is to establish an

S. J. Piet

1991-01-01

383

Safety in the sleep laboratory.  

PubMed

The importance of workplace safety cannot be understated. The safety of employees affects morale, attendance, and workman's compensation. Federal organizations and agencies have provided guidelines to help ensure the health and safety of the technician and the patients who visit the sleep center. This article discusses commonly encountered hazards and ways to address them. PMID:16530650

Hobby, Mary Kay

2006-03-01

384

Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety  

E-print Network

, and neutron spectra. The NE nuclear criticality safety (NCS) capabilities are based on a staff with decadesNuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety The Nuclear Engineering Division (NE) of Argonne National Laboratory is experienced in performing criticality safety and shielding evaluations for nuclear

Kemner, Ken

385

Safety and Health Training Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information obtained from a survey of safety and health training activities undertaken by Federal agencies is provided in the document which serves as a resource guide and directory of agency safety programs. The document, intended to help Federal managers meet their safety training needs with available government resources, is divided into four…

Federal Safety Advisory Council, Washington, DC.

386

CAHNRS Safety Committee Meeting Minutes  

E-print Network

CAHNRS Safety Committee Meeting Minutes December 10, 2013 Present: Daniel Edge-Garza, Rick Rupp and Russ Schaff are the EHS contact for lab safety questions. Daniel Edge-Garza asked for EHS' help the importance of safety within the college. Edge-Garza pointed out three areas of particular concern, 1

Collins, Gary S.

387

Patient Safety in Nursing Homes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Safety of residents has gained increased popularity in recent years following a report from the Institute of Medicine attributing 98,000 hospital deaths each year to errors by staff. As a result, regulatory agencies, advocates, and health care providers have shifted their focus to understanding patient safety and developing a culture that promotes safety. However, nursing homes lag behind other health

Kali Thomas

2011-01-01

388

Driver Safety Training Facilities Management's  

E-print Network

Driver Safety Training Facilities Management's Environmental Health & Safety Division Presents... #12;Items to be Covered: Vehicle pre-check Driver safety issues Safe truck operation Safe trailer your horn if you must to signal to other drivers. #12;Safe Truck Operation Be sure all materials

Soerens, Thomas

389

University of Vermont Environmental Safety  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The UVM Environmental Safety site presents news, information, and services to support health and safety of laboratory personnel. While some of the site is geared toward UVM researchers, there is plenty of free information about chemical safety, biosafety, and waste disposal useful to students, educators, and researchers across the country.

390

Water Safety and Young Children  

MedlinePLUS

... Water Safety And Young Children Safety & Prevention Listen Water Safety And Young Children Article Body Water is one of the most ominous hazards your ... can drown in only a few inches of water, even if they’ve had swimming instruction. Swimming ...

391

School Chemistry Laboratory Safety Guide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The guide presents information about ordering, using, storing, and maintaining chemicals in the high school laboratory. The guide also provides information about chemical waste, safety and emergency equipment, assessing chemical hazards, common safety symbols and signs, and fundamental resources relating to chemical safety, such as Material…

Brundage, Patricia; Palassis, John

2006-01-01

392

Developed 2007 _____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ __________________  

E-print Network

the utility of the laser hazard classification system to your safety Course Instructional Materials: Power point presentation Instructor: LBNL Laser Safety Officer Training Compliance Requirements: 8CCR 3203, Chapter 16 Laser Safety - http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/pub3000/CH16.html Appendix B. AHD Guidelines for Laser

Eisen, Michael

393

TUFTS UNIVERSITY LASER SAFETY PROGRAM  

E-print Network

TUFTS UNIVERSITY LASER SAFETY PROGRAM Second Edition September 2005 #12;#12;1 PURPOSE: The Laser of Lasers, ANSI Z136.1 (copy on file with the Environmental Health & Safety Office, 419 Boston Ave). The Laser Safety Plan is designed to protect Tufts employees and students in the safe operation

Dennett, Daniel

394

LASER SAFETY POLICY Policy Statement  

E-print Network

LASER SAFETY POLICY Policy Statement Each department that acquires or operates lasers for use in laboratories or research is responsible for reporting laser acquisition to the Office of Laboratory Safety, selecting a departmental deputy laser safety officer, mandating training for its laser operators

Vertes, Akos

395

SAFETY IN THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

MONTHLY ARTICLES ON LABORATORY SAFETY THAT APPEARED IN THE "JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL EDUCATION" BETWEEN JANUARY 1964, AND JANUARY 1967, ARE COMBINED IN THIS MANUAL FOR HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE CHEMISTRY TEACHERS. A GENERAL SECTION DEALS WITH (1) RESPONSIBILITY FOR ACCIDENT PREVENTION, (2) SAFETY CONSIDERATION IN RESEARCH PROPOSALS, (3) A SAFETY

STEERE, NORMAN V.

396

Investigation on laser safety informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the aid of the detection on the multimedia messaging service (MMS) of the laser accidents, novel insecurity factors in laser safety informatics are investigated. By using continuously improved laser self-organization safety system, new concepts of laser safety are developed. Various kinds of accidents can be avoided when comprehensive protective measures are taken.

Chongwen Guan; Shizhan Lei; Yingjian Wang

2009-01-01

397

Handbook for Public Playground Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Playgrounds, being a fundamental part of the childhood experience, should be safe havens for children. This handbook includes technical safety guidelines for designing, constructing, operating, and maintaining public playgrounds. It also includes a "Public Playground Safety Checklist" to highlight some of the most important safety issues for…

Consumer Product Safety Commission, Washington, DC.

398

Missouri Secondary Science Safety Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this safety manual is to provide a resource to help manage and minimize potential risks in science classrooms where students spend up to 60% of instructional time engaged in hands-on activities. This manual contains information on standards, legal aspects, and responsibilities for science safety; general laboratory safety for…

Lemons, Judith L.

399

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During 1997, the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) continued its safety reviews of NASA's human space flight and aeronautics programs. Efforts were focused on those areas that the Panel believed held the greatest potential to impact safety. Continuing safe Space Shuttle operations and progress in the manufacture and testing of primary components for the International Space Station (ISS) were noteworthy. The Panel has continued to monitor the safety implications of the transition of Space Shuttle operations to the United Space Alliance (USA). One area being watched closely relates to the staffing levels and skill mix in both NASA and USA. Therefore, a section of this report is devoted to personnel and other related issues that are a result of this change in NASA's way of doing business for the Space Shuttle. Attention will continue to be paid to this important topic in subsequent reports. Even though the Panel's activities for 1997 were extensive, fewer specific recommendations were formulated than has been the case in recent years. This is indicative of the current generally good state of safety of NASA programs. The Panel does, however, have several longer term concerns that have yet to develop to the level of a specific recommendation. These are covered in the introductory material for each topic area in Section 11. In another departure from past submissions, this report does not contain individual findings and recommendations for the aeronautics programs. While the Panel devoted its usual efforts to examining NASA's aeronautic centers and programs, no specific recommendations were identified for inclusion in this report. In lieu of recommendations, a summary of the Panel's observations of NASA's safety efforts in aeronautics and future Panel areas of emphasis is provided. With profound sadness the Panel notes the passing of our Chairman, Paul M. Johnstone, on December 17, 1997, and our Staff Assistant, Ms. Patricia M. Harman, on October 5, 1997. Other changes to the Panel composition during the past year were: the resignation of Mr. Dennis E. Fitch as a Consultant; the appointment of Mr. Roger D. Schaufele as a Consultant; and the assignment of Ms. Susan M. Smith as Staff Assistant.

1998-01-01

400

[Agricultural biotechnology safety assessment].  

PubMed

Genetically modified (GM) crops were first introduced to farmers in 1995 with the intent to provide better crop yield and meet the increasing demand for food and feed. GM crops have evolved to include a thorough safety evaluation for their use in human food and animal feed. Safety considerations begin at the level of DNA whereby the inserted GM DNA is evaluated for its content, position and stability once placed into the crop genome. The safety of the proteins coded by the inserted DNA and potential effects on the crop are considered, and the purpose is to ensure that the transgenic novel proteins are safe from a toxicity, allergy, and environmental perspective. In addition, the grain that provides the processed food or animal feed is also tested to evaluate its nutritional content and identify unintended effects to the plant composition when warranted. To provide a platform for the safety assessment, the GM crop is compared to non-GM comparators in what is typically referred to as composition equivalence testing. New technologies, such as mass spectrometry and well-designed antibody-based methods, allow better analytical measurements of crop composition, including endogenous allergens. Many of the analytical methods and their intended uses are based on regulatory guidance documents, some of which are outlined in globally recognized documents such as Codex Alimentarius. In certain cases, animal models are recommended by some regulatory agencies in specific countries, but there is typically no hypothesis or justification of their use in testing the safety of GM crops. The quality and standardization of testing methods can be supported, in some cases, by employing good laboratory practices (GLP) and is recognized in China as important to ensure quality data. Although the number of recommended, in some cases, required methods for safety testing are increasing in some regulatory agencies, it should be noted that GM crops registered to date have been shown to be comparable to their nontransgenic counterparts and safe . The crops upon which GM development are based are generally considered safe. PMID:25876504

McClain, Scott; Jones, Wendelyn; He, Xiaoyun; Ladics, Gregory; Bartholomaeus, Andrew; Raybould, Alan; Lutter, Petra; Xu, Haibin; Wang, Xue

2015-01-01

401

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report presents the results of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) activities during 2002. The format of the report has been modified to capture a long-term perspective. Section II is new and highlights the Panel's view of NASA's safety progress during the year. Section III contains the pivotal safety issues facing NASA in the coming year. Section IV includes the program area findings and recommendations. The Panel has been asked by the Administrator to perform several special studies this year, and the resulting white papers appear in Appendix C. The year has been filled with significant achievements for NASA in both successful Space Shuttle operations and International Space Station (ISS) construction. Throughout the year, safety has been first and foremost in spite of many changes throughout the Agency. The relocation of the Orbiter Major Modifications (OMMs) from California to Kennedy Space Center (KSC) appears very successful. The transition of responsibilities for program management of the Space Shuttle and ISS programs from Johnson Space Center (JSC) to NASA Headquarters went smoothly. The decision to extend the life of the Space Shuttle as the primary NASA vehicle for access to space is viewed by the Panel as a prudent one. With the appropriate investments in safety improvements, in maintenance, in preserving appropriate inventories of spare parts, and in infrastructure, the Space Shuttle can provide safe and reliable support for the ISS for the foreseeable future. Indications of an aging Space Shuttle fleet occurred on more than one occasion this year. Several flaws went undetected in the early prelaunch tests and inspections. In all but one case, the problems were found prior to launch. These incidents were all handled properly and with safety as the guiding principle. Indeed, launches were postponed until the problems were fully understood and mitigating action could be taken. These incidents do, however, indicate the need to analyze the Space Shuttle certification criteria closely. Based on this analysis, NASA can determine the need to receritfy the vehicles and to incorporate more stringent inspections throughout the process to minimize launch schedule impact. A highly skilled and experience workforce will be increasingly important for safe and reliable operations as the Space Shuttle vehicles and infrastructure continue to age.

2002-01-01

402

Total safety management: An approach to improving safety culture  

SciTech Connect

A little over 4 yr ago, Admiral James D. Watkins became Secretary of Energy. President Bush, who had appointed him, informed Watkins that his principal task would be to clean up the nuclear weapons complex and put the US Department of Energy (DOE) back in the business of producing tritium for the nation's nuclear deterrent. Watkins recognized that in order to achieve these objectives, he would have to substantially improve the DOE's safety culture. Safety culture is a relatively new term. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) used it in a 1986 report on the root causes of the Chernobyl nuclear accident. In 1990, the IAEA's International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group issued a document focusing directly on safety culture. It provides guidelines to the international nuclear community for measuring the effectiveness of safety culture in nuclear organizations. Safety culture has two principal aspects: an organizational framework conducive to safety and the necessary organizational and individual attitudes that promote safety. These obviously go hand in hand. An organization must create the right framework to foster the right attitudes, but individuals must have the right attitudes to create the organizational framework that will support a good safety culture. The difficulty in developing such a synergistic relationship suggests that achieving and sustaining a strong safety culture is not easy, particularly in an organization whose safety culture is in serious disrepair.

Blush, S.M. (Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01

403

BOSTON UNIVERSITY POLICE Safety on Campus  

E-print Network

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Boston University Medical Campus Public Safety DepartmentBOSTON UNIVERSITY POLICE Safety on Campus Boston University's Annual Security and Fire Safety, suspicious circumstances, and safety-related emergencies occurring on University property promptly

Guenther, Frank

404

10 CFR 830.202 - Safety basis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety basis. 830.202 Section 830.202 Energy ...OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT Safety Basis Requirements § 830.202 Safety basis. (a) The contractor responsible for...

2013-01-01

405

10 CFR 830.202 - Safety basis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety basis. 830.202 Section 830.202 Energy ...OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT Safety Basis Requirements § 830.202 Safety basis. (a) The contractor responsible for...

2010-01-01

406

10 CFR 830.202 - Safety basis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety basis. 830.202 Section 830.202 Energy ...OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT Safety Basis Requirements § 830.202 Safety basis. (a) The contractor responsible for...

2011-01-01

407

10 CFR 830.202 - Safety basis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety basis. 830.202 Section 830.202 Energy ...OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT Safety Basis Requirements § 830.202 Safety basis. (a) The contractor responsible for...

2012-01-01

408

10 CFR 830.202 - Safety basis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety basis. 830.202 Section 830.202 Energy ...OF ENERGY NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT Safety Basis Requirements § 830.202 Safety basis. (a) The contractor responsible for...

2014-01-01

409

14 CFR 27.1413 - Safety belts.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-01-01 false Safety belts. 27.1413 Section...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS...CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1413 Safety belts. Each safety...

2011-01-01

410

14 CFR 27.1413 - Safety belts.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-01-01 false Safety belts. 27.1413 Section...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS...CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1413 Safety belts. Each safety...

2010-01-01

411

14 CFR 27.1413 - Safety belts.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 false Safety belts. 27.1413 Section...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS...CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1413 Safety belts. Each safety...

2013-01-01

412

14 CFR 27.1413 - Safety belts.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-01-01 false Safety belts. 27.1413 Section...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS...CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1413 Safety belts. Each safety...

2012-01-01

413

14 CFR 27.1413 - Safety belts.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 2014-01-01 false Safety belts. 27.1413 Section...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS...CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1413 Safety belts. Each safety...

2014-01-01

414

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Laboratory Safety and Chemical Hygiene  

E-print Network

...............................................................................................14 2.7.4 Laser Safety CommitteeNORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Laboratory Safety and Chemical Hygiene Plan Office for Research Safety.............................................................................................................................................12 2.6 Office for Research Safety

Shull, Kenneth R.

415

Investigation of pedestrian crashes on two-way two-lane rural roads in Ethiopia.  

PubMed

Understanding pedestrian crash causes and contributing factors in developing countries is critically important as they account for about 55% of all traffic crashes. Not surprisingly, considerable attention in the literature has been paid to road traffic crash prediction models and methodologies in developing countries of late. Despite this interest, there are significant challenges confronting safety managers in developing countries. For example, in spite of the prominence of pedestrian crashes occurring on two-way two-lane rural roads, it has proven difficult to develop pedestrian crash prediction models due to a lack of both traffic and pedestrian exposure data. This general lack of available data has further hampered identification of pedestrian crash causes and subsequent estimation of pedestrian safety performance functions. The challenges are similar across developing nations, where little is known about the relationship between pedestrian crashes, traffic flow, and road environment variables on rural two-way roads, and where unique predictor variables may be needed to capture the unique crash risk circumstances. This paper describes pedestrian crash safety performance functions for two-way two-lane rural roads in Ethiopia as a function of traffic flow, pedestrian flows, and road geometry characteristics. In particular, random parameter negative binomial model was used to investigate pedestrian crashes. The models and their interpretations make important contributions to road crash analysis and prevention in developing countries. They also assist in the identification of the contributing factors to pedestrian crashes, with the intent to identify potential design and operational improvements. PMID:25770907

Tulu, Getu Segni; Washington, Simon; Haque, Md Mazharul; King, Mark J

2015-05-01

416

Safety Intervention Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect

Judging safety intervention effectiveness is often left up to the eye of the beholder. Safety and Health Professionals must increase skills and increase their body of knowledge, based on scientific evidence, that can be applied confidently in the workplace. Evidence must be collected and analyzed to separate the interventions of the month with those that stand the test of time. The book Guide to Evaluating the Effectiveness of Strategies for Preventing Work injuries DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 2001-119, April 2001, serves as a primary reference. An example study related to biorhythms, popular in the late 1970s, is used to illustrate the separating of scientific evidence and pseudo-science hype. The cited biorhythm study focuses on the relationship of the accident dates and the three biorhythmic cycles (physical, emotional, and intelligence).

ZIMMERMAN, R.O.

2001-10-16

417

Electrical safety in dialysis.  

PubMed

Electrical hazards in dialysis equipment arise from the unintended passage of electric current through the patient. The main primary electrical hazards are described, and typical thresholds quoted. The complete dialysis installation is considered in some detail, bearing in mind the recently published British Standard on the Safety of Electromedical Equipment, BS 5724, Part 1. The microshock risk from leakage and fault currents flowing through the patient via the dialyser and lines is assessed and found to be of very little significance. Equipment that has been constructed to BS 5724 should not, by its design, give rise to primary electrical hazards. The continuing safety of dialysis installations can, however, only be ensured by regular routine testing, and suitable tests are described. It is concluded that, with regularly maintained and tested equipment, dialysis should be considered a relatively safe procedure as far as primary electrical hazards are concerned. PMID:490609

Deller, A G

1979-07-01

418

PharmSafety.org  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Patient safety in the healthcare professions is a constant concern, and all practitioners want to be able to address this issue effectively and accurately. PharmSafety.org offers one way to provide that assurance, through the education and continued training of pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and pharmacy assistants. Funded by an unrestricted educational grant from the McKesson Foundation, the site�s extensive CE (Continuing Education) Center is free for anyone to access; it simply requires creating a logon and password. Students, educators, practitioners and administrators can all choose their career level, occupational category and subcategories at registration, and then work through seven self-study modules personalized for their field within the study of pharmacy. The site also offers articles from practice and research journals, technical reports, conference handouts, and links to additional resources.

Grasha, Anthony F.

419

Basics of Safety Switches  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This course is one of the quickStep series offered by Siemens in Safety Switches. These are FREE on-line industrial knowledge building tutorials. quickSTEPs are a great start for industry novices moving into technical jobs or staff in operational support rolls. They can also be very effectively used as out of class assignments for review or to build fundamental skills. Each course includes: an online tutorial organized as a number of units, lessons with self check quiz questions, a glossary of terms, a self-check final exam with scoring, an extensive downloadable PDF study guide. This course offers: current protection, fuses, enclosures, switch design, switch terminology, safety switches, a final exam, a glossary and a 72 page study guide.

420

Lab Safety Training Guide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by Princeton University's Environmental Health & Safety division, this extensive lab safety training guide provides basic information for working safely with laboratory chemicals and equipment. The "Introduction" to the site contains information specific to doing such work at Princeton, so visitors should direct their attention over to the left-hand side of the page. Here they will find sections that cover basic procedures regarding the use of flammable liquids, compressed gases, fume hoods, peroxides, and about a dozen other things that one might encounter in such a setting. Along with offering some lists of instructions, each area also has some helpful graphics that will help those just getting started in a lab identify key procedures and commonly-encountered pieces of equipment.

421

Inositol safety: clinical evidences.  

PubMed

Myo-inositol is a six carbon cyclitol that contains five equatorial and one axial hydroxyl groups. Myo-inositol has been classified as an insulin sensitizing agent and it is commonly used in the treatment of the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). However, despite its wide clinical use, there is still scarce information on the myo-inositol safety and/or side effects. The aim of the present review was to summarize and discuss available data on the myo-inositol safety both in non-clinical and clinical settings. The main outcome was that only the highest dose of myo-inositol (12 g/day) induced mild gastrointestinal side effects such as nausea, flatus and diarrhea. The severity of side effects did not increase with the dosage. PMID:21845803

Carlomagno, G; Unfer, V

2011-08-01

422

[Immunological safety of transfusion].  

PubMed

Transfusion safety lies on the strict application of measures aimed: at avoiding the occurrence of acute hazards, as far as they can be prevented by e.g. the ABO compatibility for red blood cell concentrates and therapeutic plasma; at reducing the frequency of other acute accidents such as TRALI or post-transfusion GVH (based on the implementation of measures which prove to be largely efficacious though not completely); and at reducing delayed incidents and hazards. The implementation of such immunological safety measures also aim at favoring the transfusion efficacy, in avoiding the lysis of transfused red cells or platelets. Perfect immunological compatibility (match) is impossible because transfused cells expose several hundreds of molecular variants with antigenic properties. Adaptive immunity is largely based upon antigen/antibody conflicts and it predominates in transfusion immunological hazards, but inflammation (as well as other components of innate immunity) is now acknowledged as a major actor of transfusion immunological linked hazards. PMID:25578545

Muller, Jean-Yves; Chiaroni, Jacques; Garraud, Olivier

2015-02-01

423

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report covers the activities of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) for calendar year 1998-a year of sharp contrasts and significant successes at NASA. The year opened with the announcement of large workforce cutbacks. The slip in the schedule for launching the International Space Station (ISS) created a five-month hiatus in Space Shuttle launches. This slack period ended with the successful and highly publicized launch of the STS-95 mission. As the year closed, ISS assembly began with the successful orbiting and joining of the Functional Cargo Block (FGB), Zarya, from Russia and the Unity Node from the United States. Throughout the year, the Panel maintained its scrutiny of NASA's safety processes. Of particular interest were the potential effects on safety of workforce reductions and the continued transition of functions to the Space Flight Operations Contractor. Attention was also given to the risk management plans of the Aero-Space Technology programs, including the X-33, X-34, and X-38. Overall, the Panel concluded that safety is well served for the present. The picture is not as clear for the future. Cutbacks have limited the depth of talent available. In many cases, technical specialties are 'one deep.' The extended hiring freeze has resulted in an older workforce that will inevitably suffer significant departures from retirements in the near future. The resulting 'brain drain' could represent a future safety risk unless appropriate succession planning is started expeditiously. This and other topics are covered in the section addressing workforce. The major NASA programs are also limited in their ability to plan property for the future. This is of particular concern for the Space Shuttle and ISS because these programs are scheduled to operate well into the next century. In the case of the Space Shuttle, beneficial and mandatory safety and operational upgrades are being delayed because of a lack of sufficient present funding. Likewise, the ISS has little flexibility to begin long lead-time items for upgrades or contingency planning. For example, the section on computer hardware and software contains specific findings related to required longer range safety-related actions. NASA can be proud of its accomplishments this past year, but must remain ever vigilant, particularly as ISS assembly begins to accelerate. The Panel will continue to focus on both the short- and long-term aspects of risk management and safety planning. This task continues to be made manageable and productive by the excellent cooperation the Panel receives from both NASA and its contractors. Particular emphasis will continue to be directed to longer term workforce and program planning issues as well as the immediate risks associated with ISS assembly and the initial flights of the X-33 and X-34. Section 2 of this report presents specific findings and recommendations generated by ASAP activities during 1998. Section 3 contains more detailed information in support of these findings and recommendations. Appendix A is a current roster of Panel members, consultants, and staff. Appendix B contains NASA's response to the findings and recommendations from the 1997 ASAP Annual Report. Appendix C details the fact-finding activities of the Panel in 1998. During the year, Mr. Richard D. Blomberg was elected chair of the Panel and Vice Admiral (VADM) Robert F Dunn was elected deputy chair. VADM Bernard M. Kauderer moved from consultant to member. Mr. Charles J. Donlan retired from the Panel after many years of meritorious service. Ms. Shirley C. McCarty and Mr. Robert L. ('Hoot') Gibson joined the Panel as consultants.

1999-01-01

424

Material Safety Data Sheets  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Loctite corporation, which manufactures sealants, adhesives and coatings, has recently posted online a searchable database of materials safety information pages. Users enter keywords to retrieve listings of composition, physical properties, toxicity, and stability of compounds. Recommendations for storage and disposal, emergency first aid, and fire management are also provided. The database features Loctite products exclusively, but it does contain substantial listings that researchers and workers handling chemicals might need.

425

Challenges of safety evaluation.  

PubMed

Each application for authorisation of a medicinal product must be accompanied by the particulars and documents referred to in Directive 2001/83/EC on the Community code relating to medicinal products for human use. Details on the documentation needed for traditional herbal medicinal products (THMP) are given in article 16c of the above mentioned Directive. It is pointed out that a bibliographic review of safety data together with an expert report and additional data, if necessary, are required. The Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products (HMPC) provides in its "Guideline on the use of the CTD format in the preparation of a registration application for traditional herbal medicinal products" (EMA/HMPC/71049/2007 Rev. 1) guidance on how to present the information and the dossier needed for an application. There, in agreement with the Directive 2001/83/EC, a bibliographical review of safety data is required within the "Non-clinical Overview". However, it is assumable that for such products, with a long tradition of usage bibliographical information relating to non-clinical safety are available, even if incomplete or not in accordance with today?s state of the art. In the "Guideline on non-clinical documentation for herbal medicinal products in applications for marketing authorisation (bibliographical and mixed applications) and in applications for simplified registration" (EMEA/HMPC/32116/2005) it is reflected how to deal with such an incomplete set of data for traditional herbal medicinal products and crucial information are highlighted. This article will focus on the explanation of the requirements needed for the non-clinical safety evaluation of THMPs and some detailed explanations of the performance and interpretation of the mutagenicity studies. PMID:25150528

Wiesner, Jacqueline

2014-12-01

426

Lightning safety of animals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper addresses a concurrent multidisciplinary problem: animal safety against lightning hazards. In regions where lightning is prevalent, either seasonally or throughout the year, a considerable number of wild, captive and tame animals are injured due to lightning generated effects. The paper discusses all possible injury mechanisms, focusing mainly on animals with commercial value. A large number of cases from several countries have been analyzed. Economically and practically viable engineering solutions are proposed to address the issues related to the lightning threats discussed.

Gomes, Chandima

2012-11-01

427

Introduction to Electrical Safety  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This document from CREATE California provides an introduction to electrical safety which would be useful for students in a classsroom setting as well as learners about to enter the workforce. The document discusses common electrical industrial accidents such as electrical shock, electrical burns, electrical fires and misuse of tools and equipment. Common warning and caution signs are also included in the material, which is available for download in PDF file format.

428

CONVEYOR SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and objective of this analysis is to systematically identify and evaluate hazards related to the Yucca Mountain Project Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) surface and subsurface conveyor system (for a list of conveyor subsystems see section 3). This process is an integral part of the systems engineering process; whereby safety is considered during planning, design, testing, and construction. A largely qualitative approach was used since a radiological System Safety Analysis is not required. The risk assessment in this analysis characterizes the accident scenarios associated with the conveyor structures/systems/components in terms of relative risk and includes recommendations for mitigating all identified risks. The priority for recommending and implementing mitigation control features is: (1) Incorporate measures to reduce risks and hazards into the structure/system/component (S/S/C) design, (2) add safety devices and capabilities to the designs that reduce risk, (3) provide devices that detect and warn personnel of hazardous conditions, and (4) develop procedures and conduct training to increase worker awareness of potential hazards, on methods to reduce exposure to hazards, and on the actions required to avoid accidents or correct hazardous conditions. The scope of this analysis is limited to the hazards related to the design of conveyor structures/systems/components (S/S/Cs) that occur during normal operation. Hazards occurring during assembly, test and maintenance or ''off normal'' operations have not been included in this analysis. Construction related work activities are specifically excluded per DOE Order 5481.1B section 4. c.

M. Salem

1995-06-23

429

AFR-100 safety analyses  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Fast Reactor-100 (AFR-100) is Argonne National Laboratory's 250 MWth metal-fueled modular sodium-cooled pool-type fast reactor concept. [1] A series of accident sequences that focused on the AFR-100's ability to provide protection against reactor damage during low probability accident sequences resulting from multiple equipment failures were examined. Protected and Unprotected Loss of Flow (PLOF and ULOF) and Unprotected Transient Over-Power (UTOP) accidents were simulated using the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 safety analysis code. The large heat capacity of the sodium in the pool-type reactor allows the AFR-100 to absorb large amounts of energy during a PLOF with relatively small temperature increases throughout the system. During a ULOF with a 25-second flow halving time, coolant and cladding temperatures peak around 720 deg. C within the first minute before reactivity feedback effects decrease power to match the flow. Core radial expansion and fuel Doppler provide the necessary feedback during the UTOP to bring the system back to critical before system temperatures exceed allowable limits. Simulation results indicate that adequate ULOF safety margins exist for the AFR-100 design with flow halving times of twenty-five seconds. Significant safety margins are maintained for PLOF accidents as well as UTOP accidents if a rod stop is used. (authors)

Sumner, T.; Moisseytsev, A.; Wei, T. Y. C. [Argonne National Laboratory, Bldg. 208, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439-4842 (United States)

2012-07-01

430

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report provides findings, conclusions and recommendations regarding the National Space Transportation System (NSTS), the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP), aeronautical projects and other areas of NASA activities. The main focus of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) during 1988 has been monitoring and advising NASA and its contractors on the Space Transportation System (STS) recovery program. NASA efforts have restored the flight program with a much better management organization, safety and quality assurance organizations, and management communication system. The NASA National Space Transportation System (NSTS) organization in conjunction with its prime contractors should be encouraged to continue development and incorporation of appropriate design and operational improvements which will further reduce risk. The data from each Shuttle flight should be used to determine if affordable design and/or operational improvements could further increase safety. The review of Critical Items (CILs), Failure Mode Effects and Analyses (FMEAs) and Hazard Analyses (HAs) after the Challenger accident has given the program a massive data base with which to establish a formal program with prioritized changes.

1989-01-01

431

The safety of probiotics.  

PubMed

Probiotics are generally defined as microorganisms that, when consumed, generally confer a health benefit on humans. There is considerable interest in probiotics for a variety of medical conditions, and millions of people around the world consume probiotics daily for perceived health benefits. Lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, and lactococci have generally been regarded as safe. There are 3 theoretical concerns regarding the safety of probiotics: (1) the occurrence of disease, such as bacteremia or endocarditis; (2) toxic or metabolic effects on the gastrointestinal tract; and (3) the transfer of antibiotic resistance in the gastrointestinal flora. In this review, the evidence for safety of the use of or the study of probiotics is examined. Although there are rare cases of bacteremia or fungemia related to the use of probiotics, epidemiologic evidence suggests no population increase in risk on the basis of usage data. There have been many controlled clinical trials on the use of probiotics that demonstrate safe use. The use of probiotics in clinical trials should be accompanied by the use of a data-safety monitoring board and by knowledge of the antimicrobial susceptibilities of the organism used. PMID:18181712

Snydman, David R

2008-02-01

432

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report provides findings, conclusions and recommendations regarding the National Space Transportation System (NSTS), the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP), aeronautical projects and other areas of NASA activities. The main focus of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) during 1988 has been monitoring and advising NASA and its contractors on the Space Transportation System (STS) recovery program. NASA efforts have restored the flight program with a much better management organization, safety and quality assurance organizations, and management communication system. The NASA National Space Transportation System (NSTS) organization in conjunction with its prime contractors should be encouraged to continue development and incorporation of appropriate design and operational improvements which will further reduce risk. The data from each Shuttle flight should be used to determine if affordable design and/or operational improvements could further increase safety. The review of Critical Items (CILs), Failure Mode Effects and Analyses (FMEAs) and Hazard Analyses (HAs) after the Challenger accident has given the program a massive data base with which to establish a formal program with prioritized changes.

1989-03-01

433

Model-Based Safety Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

System safety analysis techniques are well established and are used extensively during the design of safety-critical systems. Despite this, most of the techniques are highly subjective and dependent on the skill of the practitioner. Since these analyses are usually based on an informal system model, it is unlikely that they will be complete, consistent, and error free. In fact, the lack of precise models of the system architecture and its failure modes often forces the safety analysts to devote much of their effort to gathering architectural details about the system behavior from several sources and embedding this information in the safety artifacts such as the fault trees. This report describes Model-Based Safety Analysis, an approach in which the system and safety engineers share a common system model created using a model-based development process. By extending the system model with a fault model as well as relevant portions of the physical system to be controlled, automated support can be provided for much of the safety analysis. We believe that by using a common model for both system and safety engineering and automating parts of the safety analysis, we can both reduce the cost and improve the quality of the safety analysis. Here we present our vision of model-based safety analysis and discuss the advantages and challenges in making this approach practical.

Joshi, Anjali; Heimdahl, Mats P. E.; Miller, Steven P.; Whalen, Mike W.

2006-01-01

434

Leadership for safety: industrial experience  

PubMed Central

The importance of leadership for effective safety management has been the focus of research attention in industry for a number of years, especially in energy and manufacturing sectors. In contrast, very little research into leadership and safety has been carried out in medical settings. A selective review of the industrial safety literature for leadership research with possible application in health care was undertaken. Emerging findings show the importance of participative, transformational styles for safety performance at all levels of management. Transactional styles with attention to monitoring and reinforcement of workers' safety behaviours have been shown to be effective at the supervisory level. Middle managers need to be involved in safety and foster open communication, while ensuring compliance with safety systems. They should allow supervisors a degree of autonomy for safety initiatives. Senior managers have a prime influence on the organisation's safety culture. They need to continuously demonstrate a visible commitment to safety, best indicated by the time they devote to safety matters. PMID:15576692

Flin, R; Yule, S

2004-01-01

435

DIPS space exploration initiative safety  

SciTech Connect

The Dynamic Isotope Power Subsystem has been identified for potential applications for the Space Exploration Initiative. A qualitative safety assessment has been performed to demonstrate the overall safety adequacy of the Dynamic Isotope Power Subsystem for these applications. Mission profiles were defined for reference lunar and martian flights. Accident scenarios were qualitatively defined for all mission phases. Safety issues were then identified. The safety issues included radiation exposure, fuel containment, criticality, diversion, toxic materials, heat flux to the extravehicular mobility unit, and disposal. The design was reviewed for areas where safety might be further improved. Safety would be improved by launching the fuel separate from the rest of the subsystem on expendable launch vehicles, using a fuel handling tool during unloading of the hot fuel canister, and constructing a cage-like structure around the reversible heat removal system lithium heat pipes. The results of the safety assessment indicate that the DIPS design with minor modifications will produce a low risk concept.

Dix, T.E. (Rockwell International/Rocketdyne Division, 6633 Canoga Avenue, MS HB07, Canoga Park, California 91303 (US))

1991-01-01

436

Is the relationship between the built environment and physical activity moderated by perceptions of crime and safety?  

PubMed Central

Background Direct relationships between safety concerns and physical activity have been inconsistently patterned in the literature. To tease out these relationships, crime, pedestrian, and traffic safety were examined as moderators of built environment associations with physical activity. Methods Exploratory analyses used two cross-sectional studies of 2068 adults ages 20–65 and 718 seniors ages 66+ with similar designs and measures. The studies were conducted in the Baltimore, Maryland-Washington, DC and Seattle-King County, Washington regions during 2001–2005 (adults) and 2005–2008 (seniors). Participants were recruited from areas selected to sample high- and low- income and walkability. Independent variables perceived crime, traffic, and pedestrian safety were measured using scales from validated instruments. A GIS-based walkability index was calculated for a street-network buffer around each participant’s home address. Outcomes were total physical activity measured using accelerometers and transportation and leisure walking measured with validated self-reports (IPAQ-long). Mixed effects regression models were conducted separately for each sample. Results Of 36 interactions evaluated across both studies, only 5 were significant (p?safety was rated high and environments were favorable. There was not consistent evidence that safety concerns reduced the beneficial effects of favorable environments on physical activity. Only pedestrian safety showed evidence of a consistent main effect with physical activity outcomes, possibly because pedestrian safety items (e.g., crosswalks, sidewalks) were not as subjective as those on the crime and traffic safety scales. Conclusions Clear relationships between crime, pedestrian, and traffic safety with physical activity levels remain elusive. The development of more precise safety variables and the use of neighborhood-specific physical activity outcomes may help to elucidate these relationships. PMID:24564971

2014-01-01

437

Software Safety Risk in Legacy Safety-Critical Computer Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Safety-critical computer systems must be engineered to meet system and software safety requirements. For legacy safety-critical computer systems, software safety requirements may not have been formally specified during development. When process-oriented software safety requirements are levied on a legacy system after the fact, where software development artifacts don't exist or are incomplete, the question becomes 'how can this be done?' The risks associated with only meeting certain software safety requirements in a legacy safety-critical computer system must be addressed should such systems be selected as candidates for reuse. This paper proposes a method for ascertaining formally, a software safety risk assessment, that provides measurements for software safety for legacy systems which may or may not have a suite of software engineering documentation that is now normally required. It relies upon the NASA Software Safety Standard, risk assessment methods based upon the Taxonomy-Based Questionnaire, and the application of reverse engineering CASE tools to produce original design documents for legacy systems.

Hill, Janice; Baggs, Rhoda

2007-01-01

438

Safety study application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) is committed to performing and documenting safety analyses for facilities it manages for the Department of Energy (DOE). Included are analyses of existing facilities done under the aegis of the Safety Analysis Report Upgrade Program, and analyses of new and modified facilities. A graded approach is used wherein the level of analysis and documentation for each facility is commensurate with the magnitude of the hazard(s), the complexity of the facility and the stage of the facility life cycle. Safety analysis reports (SARs) for hazard Category 1 and 2 facilities are usually detailed and extensive because these categories are associated with public health and safety risk. SARs for Category 3 are normally much less extensive because the risk to public health and safety is slight. At Energy Systems, safety studies are the name given to SARs for Category 3 (formerly {open_quotes}low{close_quotes}) facilities. Safety studies are the appropriate instrument when on-site risks are limited to irreversible consequences to a few people, and off-site consequences are limited to reversible consequences to a few people. This application guide provides detailed instructions for performing safety studies that meet the requirements of DOE Orders 5480.22, {open_quotes}Technical Safety Requirements,{close_quotes} and 5480.23, {open_quotes}Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.{close_quotes} A seven-chapter format has been adopted for safety studies. This format allows for discussion of all the items required by DOE Order 5480.23 and for the discussions to be readily traceable to the listing in the order. The chapter titles are: (1) Introduction and Summary, (2) Site, (3) Facility Description, (4) Safety Basis, (5) Hazardous Material Management, (6) Management, Organization, and Institutional Safety Provisions, and (7) Accident Analysis.

Not Available

1993-07-01

439

Systems engineered health and safety criteria for safety analysis reports  

SciTech Connect

The world of safety analysis is filled with ambiguous words: codes and standards; consequences and risks; hazard and accident, and health and safety. These words have been subject to disparate interpretations by Safety Analysis Report (SAR) writers, readers and users. ``Principal health and safety criteria`` has been one of the most frequently misused terms; rarely is it used consistently or effectively. This paper offers an easily understood definition for ``principal health and safety criteria,`` and uses systems engineering to convert an otherwise mysterious topic into the primary means of producing an integrated SAR. This paper is based upon SARs being written for Environmental Restoration & Waste Management activities for the Department of Energy (DOE). Requirements for these SARs are prescribed in DOE Order 5480.23, ``Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports``.

Beitel, G.A.; Morcos, N.

1993-08-01

440

The Vaccine Safety Datalink: successes and challenges monitoring vaccine safety.  

PubMed

The Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) is a collaborative project between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and 9 health care organizations. Established in 1990, VSD is a vital resource informing policy makers and the public about the safety of vaccines used in the United States. Large linked databases are used to identify and evaluate adverse events in over 9 million individuals annually. VSD generates rapid, important safety assessments for both routine vaccinations and emergency vaccination campaigns. VSD monitors safety of seasonal influenza vaccines in near-real time, and provided essential information on the safety of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine during the recent pandemic. VSD investigators have published important studies demonstrating that childhood vaccines are not associated with autism or other developmental disabilities. VSD prioritizes evaluation of new vaccines; searches for possible unusual health events after vaccination; monitors vaccine safety in pregnant women; and has pioneered development of biostatistical research methods. PMID:25108215

McNeil, Michael M; Gee, Julianne; Weintraub, Eric S; Belongia, Edward A; Lee, Grace M; Glanz, Jason M; Nordin, James D; Klein, Nicola P; Baxter, Roger; Naleway, Allison L; Jackson, Lisa A; Omer, Saad B; Jacobsen, Steven J; DeStefano, Frank

2014-09-22

441

Guardrail influence on pedestrian crossing behavior at roundabouts.  

PubMed

Pedestrians account for 10-30% of all road accident fatalities in western countries, and therefore efforts to improve pedestrian safety are of major importance. Research can support these efforts in various ways, particularly by studying road crossing patterns, and by exploring pedestrian compliance rates to safety laws and guidelines. This paper focuses on pedestrian crossing behavior at roundabouts. The main goal of the present study was to quantify the effect of guardrails at roundabouts as a tool to direct pedestrians to crosswalks. We examined these effects under various conditions, such as guardrail type, traffic volume, estimated age group, gender, road type, and crosswalk type. The present study was based on field observations at 20 arms at 10 roundabouts in Israel, conducted during 2009. 60 h of video recordings were analyzed. 11,116 pedestrian crossings were observed, of which 2749 (24.7%) were not at a crosswalk, thus violating the law. Binary Logit model results suggest that the rate of violations without guardrail is 20-30% higher than the rate with full guardrail (depending on specific conditions). Compliance rates were found to be higher when traffic volumes were higher. The findings reported in the present study are a valuable contribution to support practical decisions regarding guardrails at roundabouts. Insights from this study on pedestrian crossing patterns at roundabouts can also provide a basis for suggestions of other pedestrian safety improvements. PMID:23911616

Cohen, Ariel; Bar-Gera, Hillel; Parmet, Yisrael; Ronen, Adi

2013-10-01

442

Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This annual report is based on the activities of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel in calendar year 2000. During this year, the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) moved into high gear. The launch of the Russian Service Module was followed by three Space Shuttle construction and logistics flights and the deployment of the Expedition One crew. Continuous habitation of the ISS has begun. To date, both the ISS and Space Shuttle programs have met or exceeded most of their flight objectives. In spite of the intensity of these efforts, it is clear that safety was always placed ahead of cost and schedule. This safety consciousness permitted the Panel to devote more of its efforts to examining the long-term picture. With ISS construction accelerating, demands on the Space Shuttle will increase. While Russian Soyuz and Progress spacecraft will make some flights, the Space Shuttle remains the primary vehicle to sustain the ISS and all other U.S. activities that require humans in space. Development of a next generation, human-rated vehicle has slowed due to a variety of technological problems and the absence of an approach that can accomplish the task significantly better than the Space Shuttle. Moreover, even if a viable design were currently available, the realities of funding and development cycles suggest that it would take many years to bring it to fruition. Thus, it is inescapable that for the foreseeable future the Space Shuttle will be the only human-rated vehicle available to the U.S. space program for support of the ISS and other missions requiring humans. Use of the Space Shuttle will extend well beyond current planning, and is likely to continue for the life of the ISS.

2001-01-01

443

Lightning safety of animals.  

PubMed

This paper addresses a concurrent multidisciplinary problem: animal safety against lightning hazards. In regions where lightning is prevalent, either seasonally or throughout the year, a considerable number of wild, captive and tame animals are injured due to lightning generated effects. The paper discusses all possible injury mechanisms, focusing mainly on animals with commercial value. A large number of cases from several countries have been analyzed. Economically and practically viable engineering solutions are proposed to address the issues related to the lightning threats discussed. PMID:22215021

Gomes, Chandima

2012-11-01

444

Animal Safety Handling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What are at least three things to remember when handling all animals? Use Graphic Organizer Take notes on handling all different types of livestock. Read about Livestock Handling Safety and Good Relationships Be sure to record facts in your organizer. Read and explore Recommended Basic Livestock Handling. Dr. Grandin s guidelines Be sure to click on each link and take notes in organizer. Watch Sheep and Cattle Handling Guidelines Video Observe sheep and cattle handling practices. Read the first five sections of Know your livestock and be safe ...

Mr. Hammond

2012-04-11

445

Perspectives on reactor safety  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor, safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) historical perspective; (2) accident sequences; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course.

Haskin, F.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Camp, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01

446

Radiation Safety System  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this work is to provide an overview of a Radiation safety system (RSS) designed for protection from prompt radiation hazard at accelerator facilities. RSS design parameters, functional requirements and constraints are derived from hazard analysis and risk assessment undertaken in the design phase of the facility. The two main subsystems of a RSS are access control system (ACS) and radiation control system (RCS). In this text, a common approach to risk assessment, typical components of ACS and RCS, desirable features and general design principles applied to RSS are described.

Vylet, Vaclav; /Jefferson Lab; Liu, James C.; /SLAC; Walker, Lawrence S.; /Los Alamos

2012-04-04

447

International Nuclear Safety Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP) has updated their map collection in the areas of Soviet designed reactors distributed throughout Eastern Europe and of Ukrainian nuclear power reactors. Information about each reactor is available by clicking on the maps. In addition to the maps, the digital library contains photos, graphics, presentations, and an online database of INSP related reports and information. The site also provides information about Soviet designed reactors and initiatives being undertaken by the US Department of Energy to improve conditions at the Chornobyl nuclear power plant. INSP is part of the US Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology.

448

Food Safety Month  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Did you know that September is Food Safety Month? To find out more about it, visit this Website from the US Food and Drug Administration, where you can take the 'Fridge Quiz, learn about the "thaw law" and download the cold storage chart (.pdf). Although the site is intended primarily for food science educators, it contains factsheets, games and activities that might be of interest to general audiences. For instance, did you know that non-dairy whipped topping is safe in the refrigerator for 3 months?! Heaps of graphics and brochures for educators can be downloaded from .pdf files.

2001-01-01

449

Radiation safety system.  

PubMed

The goal of this work is to provide an overview of a Radiation safety system (RSS) designed for protection from prompt radiation hazard at accelerator facilities. RSS design parameters, functional requirements and constraints are derived from hazard analysis and risk assessment undertaken in the design phase of the facility. The two main subsystems of a RSS are access control system (ACS) and radiation control system (RCS). In this text, a common approach to risk assessment, typical components of ACS and RCS, desirable features and general design principles applied to RSS are described. PMID:19783555

Vylet, Vaclav; Liu, James C; Walker, Lawrence S

2009-11-01

450

International Nuclear Safety Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory provides this site, highlighted by nuclear plants and material properties databases. The nuclear plants database can be searched by country, plant type, and operational status, as well as browsed by clickable map. Information retrieved may include location, type of reactor, controlling utility, and suppliers. The material properties database contains selected information on materials by type and property. In addition, there is a safety analysis results bibliographic database, with abstracts on literature (available in the INSC library) on Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. Note that the site is a work in progress and that some areas are not open to the public.

451

Manufacturing Safety and Awareness  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The North Carolina Community College System BioNetwork's interactive eLearning tools (IETs) are reusable chunks of training that can be deployed in a variety of courses or training programs. IETs are designed to enhance, not replace hands-on training. Learners are able to enter a hands-on lab experience better prepared and more confident. This particular IET delves into manufacturing safety and awareness, including identifying hazards, risk assessment, and hazard prevention or control. An assessment follows the module to gauge student understanding.

452

The Psychology of Safety  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many studies of mishaps show that human error is a factor in a significant majority of accidents. Trying to decide how to change human behavior to be safer is generally the biggest challenge of any safety program. However, understanding the human psyche is the first step to changing behavior. Many studies focus on the before and after of an accident, but what about the thoughts of a person in the commission of an unsafe act? This is a less understood area. Examining it reveals why it is not well comprehended. This paper attempts to examine a part of the thought process, with an eye to helping influence people to less hurtful actions.

Anderson, Brenda Lindley

2011-01-01

453

Developing a patient safety plan.  

PubMed

Many healthcare organizations are focused on the development of a strategic plan to enhance patient safety. The challenge is creating a plan that focuses on patient safety outcomes, integrating the multitude of internal and external drivers of patient safety, aligning improvement initiatives to create synergy and providing a framework for meaningful measurement of intermediate and long-term results while remaining consistent with an organizational mission, vision and strategic goals. This strategy-focused approach recognizes that patient safety initiatives completed in isolation will not provide consistent progress toward a goal, and that a balanced approach is required that includes the development and systematic execution of bundles of related initiatives. This article outlines the process used by Hamilton Health Sciences in adopting Kaplan and Norton's strategy map methodology underpinned by their balanced scorecard framework to create a comprehensive multi-year plan for patient safety that integrates best practice literature from patient safety, quality and organizational development. PMID:18382157

Zimmerman, Rosanne; Ip, Ivan; Christoffersen, Emily; Shaver, Jill

2008-01-01

454

78 FR 59036 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Cogent Patient Safety Organization, Inc.  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Cogent Patient Safety Organization, Inc. AGENCY: Agency...SUMMARY: The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act...

2013-09-25

455

76 FR 7853 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Oregon Patient Safety Commission  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Oregon Patient Safety Commission AGENCY: Agency for...SUMMARY: Oregon Patient Safety Commission: AHRQ has...

2011-02-11

456

78 FR 40146 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Northern Metropolitan Patient Safety...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Northern Metropolitan Patient Safety Institute AGENCY: Agency for...SUMMARY: The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement...

2013-07-03

457

76 FR 58812 - Patient Safety Organizations: Delisting for Cause of Patient Safety Organization One, Inc.  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Delisting for Cause of Patient Safety Organization One, Inc. AGENCY...SUMMARY: Patient Safety Organization One, Inc.: AHRQ...

2011-09-22

458

76 FR 29333 - Pipeline Safety: Meetings of the Technical Pipeline Safety Standards Committee and the Technical...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. PHMSA-2011-0127] Pipeline Safety: Meetings of the Technical Pipeline Safety Standards Committee and the...

2011-05-20

459

75 FR 45591 - Pipeline Safety: Notice of Technical Pipeline Safety Advisory Committee Meetings  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration...Part 192 [Docket No. PHMSA-2009-0203] Pipeline Safety: Notice of Technical Pipeline Safety Advisory Committee Meetings...

2010-08-03

460

77 FR 38132 - Pipeline Safety: Meeting of the Technical Pipeline Safety Standards Committee and the Technical...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. PHMSA-2009-0203] Pipeline Safety: Meeting of the Technical Pipeline Safety Standards Committee and the...

2012-06-26

461

75 FR 72778 - Pipeline Safety: Technical Pipeline Safety Advisory Committee Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 195 [Docket No. PHMSA-2009-0203] Pipeline Safety: Technical Pipeline Safety Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY:...

2010-11-26

462

76 FR 43743 - Pipeline Safety: Meetings of the Technical Pipeline Safety Standards Committee and the Technical...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. PHMSA-2011-0127] Pipeline Safety: Meetings of the Technical Pipeline Safety Standards Committee and the...

2011-07-21

463

Tower crane safety in the construction industry: A Hong Kong study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tower cranes are extensively used for lifting materials in construction sites. Most construction sites are very confined and close to public. Tower crane accidents not only hazard workers in construction sites, but also pedestrians. This paper investigates tower crane safety in related to the understanding and degree of executing statutory requirements and non-statutory guidelines for the use of tower cranes

Vivian W. Y. Tam; Ivan W. H. Fung

2011-01-01

464

Research on vulnerable road user's traffic safety design at city intersection  

Microsoft Academic Search

With rapid development of road construction and passenger car entering family, it leads to the traveling convenience as well as the serious traffic accidents and greater economic loss in China. Intersection is the traffic accident prone location in city, where car, bicycle and pedestrian conflict at many points. Moreover there's little consideration of the vulnerable road users' right and safety

Wang Shuling; Guo Jifu; Chen Jinchuan; Chen Yanyan; Wang Zhenhua

465

Fire Safety in Extraterrestrial Environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Despite rigorous fire-safety policies and practices, fire incidents are possible during lunar and Martian missions. Fire behavior and hence preventive and responsive safety actions in the missions are strongly influenced by the low-gravity environments in flight and on the planetary surfaces. This paper reviews the understanding and key issues of fire safety in the missions, stressing flame spread, fire detection, suppression, and combustion performance of propellants produced from Martian resources.

Friedman, Robert

1998-01-01

466

Locomotive safety device  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes the environment of a longitudinally extending and diesel engine type railroad locomotive classified under a stopped and ''blue flag'' condition, the locomotive having its traction wheels powerable from a high-voltage main-generator. The locomotive is also equipped with a low-voltage auxiliary-generator having electrical circuitry connected to locomotive installed alarm means, to at least one fuel valve for the diesel engine, to locomotive forward-rearward motive directional control, and to locomotive acceleration control. The low-voltage electrical circuitry extends the locomotive longitudinal length and terminates as two endward multi-pins receptacles. The improvement of a locomotive safety device tending to enforce upon would be the locomotive operators ''blue flag'' condition. The locomotive safety device is adapted to removably engaged with a locomotive multipins receptacle and comprises a multi-perforate plug including electrically conductive bushings adapted to be removably inserted into electrically conductive relationship with appropriately selected individual pins of the multi-pins receptacle.

Kleffman, D.R.; Phiffer, L.V.

1987-01-20

467

Safety Critical Mechanisms  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spaceflight mechanisms have a reputation for being difficult to develop and operate successfully. This reputation is well earned. Many circumstances conspire to make this so: the environments in which the mechanisms are used are extremely severe, there is usually limited or no maintenance opportunity available during operation due to this environment, the environments are difficult to replicate accurately on the ground, the expense of the mechanism development makes it impractical to build and test many units for long periods of time before use, mechanisms tend to be highly specialized and not prone to interchangeability or off-the-shelf use, they can generate and store a lot of energy, and the nature of mechanisms themselves, as a combination of structures, electronics, etc. designed to accomplish specific dynamic performance, makes them very complex and subject to many unpredictable interactions of many types. In addition to their complexities, mechanism are often counted upon to provide critical vehicle functions that can result in catastrophic events should the functions not be performed. It is for this reason that mechanisms are frequently subjected to special scrutiny in safety processes. However, a failure tolerant approach, along with good design and development practices and detailed design reviews, can be developed to allow such notoriously troublesome mechanisms to be utilized confidently in safety-critical applications.

Robertson, Brandan

2008-01-01

468

Peculiarities of medication safety.  

PubMed

The modern concept of patient safe medical treatment lays responsibility for undesirable complications on lacks of healthcare system (structural, organizational and operative); not on medical workers or products of medical purpose. A spirit to comprehension of scales of a problem of a safety the sharp increase of number of judicial claims in occasion of causing harm has served health of patients. If to the beginning of 1970 th in the USA one claim on 100 doctors to 2011 frequency of supply of claims has increased in 12 times was annually registered on the average, and average payment under claims has increased for the same period about 2000 dollars up to 1500000 dollars. The problem of ensuring patient safety is topical. 72 (24%) of the 300 patients interrogated by the authors have declared that at various times were victims of inadequate rendering of medical aid. Among them of 96 (32%) have specified an establishment to them of the wrong diagnosis or purpose of wrong treatment. Results from the current study show the necessity of creation in Georgia systems of monitoring to increase the security of treatment, participation in this business of patients, creation of special preventive and training programs for the medical personnel and students, strengthening of cooperation with the international organizations in area of improvement of quality and a security of medical aid. PMID:23567310

Kvizhinadze, N; Gerzmava, O

2013-03-01

469

Shuttle Safety Improvements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle has been flying for over 20 years and based on the Orbiter design life of 100 missions it should be capable of flying at least 20 years more if we take care of it. The Space Shuttle Development Office established in 1997 has identified those upgrades needed to keep the Shuttle flying safely and efficiently until a new reusable launch vehicle (RLV) is available to meet the agency commitments and goals for human access to space. The upgrade requirements shown in figure 1 are to meet the program goals, support HEDS and next generation space transportation goals while protecting the country 's investment in the Space Shuttle. A major review of the shuttle hardware and processes was conducted in 1999 which identified key shuttle safety improvement priorities, as well as other system upgrades needed to reliably continue to support the shuttle miss ions well into the second decade of this century. The high priority safety upgrades selected for development and study will be addressed in this paper.

Henderson, Edward

2001-01-01

470

Pedestrian injuries due to mobile phone use in public places.  

PubMed

Research shows that pedestrians, similar to drivers, experience reduced situation awareness, distracted attention and unsafe behavior when talking or texting on their mobile phones. The present study centered on injuries related to mobile phone use among pedestrians. It used data from the US Consumer Product Safety Commission on injuries in hospital emergency rooms from 2004 through 2010. It found that mobile-phone related injuries among pedestrians increased relative to total pedestrian injuries, and paralleled the increase in injuries for drivers, and in 2010 exceeded those for drivers. Pedestrian injuries related to mobile-phone use were higher for males and for people under 31 years old. Using a mobile phone while walking puts pedestrians at risk of accident, injury or death. PMID:23644536

Nasar, Jack L; Troyer, Derek

2013-08-01

471

European perspectives of food safety.  

PubMed

Food safety has been a growing concern among European Union (EU) citizens over the last decades. Despite the fact that food has never been safer, consumers are considerably uncertain and increasingly critical about the safety of their food. The introduction of new principles, such as the primary responsibility of producers, traceability, risk analysis, the separation of risk assessment and risk management provided a more transparent, science-based system in Europe, which can help to restore consumers' lost confidence. The present EU integrated approach to food safety 'from farm to fork' aims to assure a high level of food safety within the EU. PMID:24515443

Bánáti, Diána

2014-08-01

472

Lessons Learned from Safety Events  

SciTech Connect

The Hydrogen Incident Reporting and Lessons Learned website (www.h2incidents.org) was launched in 2006 as a database-driven resource for sharing lessons learned from hydrogen-related safety events to raise safety awareness and encourage knowledge-sharing. The development of this database, its first uses and subsequent enhancements have been described at the Second and Third International Conferences on Hydrogen Safety. [1,2] Since 2009, continuing work has not only highlighted the value of safety lessons learned, but enhanced how the database provides access to another safety knowledge tool, Hydrogen Safety Best Practices (http://h2bestpractices.org). Collaborations with the International Energy Agency (IEA) Hydrogen Implementing Agreement (HIA) Task 19 – Hydrogen Safety and others have enabled the database to capture safety event learnings from around the world. This paper updates recent progress, highlights the new “Lessons Learned Corner” as one means for knowledge-sharing and examines the broader potential for collecting, analyzing and using safety event information.

Weiner, Steven C.; Fassbender, Linda L.

2012-11-01

473

Seismic Safety Study  

SciTech Connect

During the past three decades, the Laboratory has been proactive in providing a seismically safe working environment for its employees and the general public. Completed seismic upgrades during this period have exceeded $30M with over 24 buildings structurally upgraded. Nevertheless, seismic questions still frequently arise regarding the safety of existing buildings. To address these issues, a comprehensive study was undertaken to develop an improved understanding of the seismic integrity of the Laboratory's entire building inventory at the Livermore Main Site and Site 300. The completed study of February 2005 extended the results from the 1998 seismic safety study per Presidential Executive Order 12941, which required each federal agency to develop an inventory of its buildings and to estimate the cost of mitigating unacceptable seismic risks. Degenkolb Engineers, who performed the first study, was recontracted to perform structural evaluations, rank order the buildings based on their level of seismic deficiencies, and to develop conceptual rehabilitation schemes for the most seriously deficient buildings. Their evaluation is based on screening procedures and guidelines as established by the Interagency Committee on Seismic Safety in Construction (ICSSC). Currently, there is an inventory of 635 buildings in the Laboratory's Facility Information Management System's (FIMS's) database, out of which 58 buildings were identified by Degenkolb Engineers that require seismic rehabilitation. The remaining 577 buildings were judged to be adequate from a seismic safety viewpoint. The basis for these evaluations followed the seismic safety performance objectives of DOE standard (DOE STD 1020) Performance Category 1 (PC1). The 58 buildings were ranked according to three risk-based priority classifications (A, B, and C) as shown in Figure 1-1 (all 58 buildings have structural deficiencies). Table 1-1 provides a brief description of their expected performance and damage state following a major earthquake, rating the seismic vulnerability (1-10) where the number 10 represents the highest and worst. Buildings in classifications A and B were judged to require the Laboratory's highest attention towards rehabilitation, classification C buildings could defer rehabilitation until a major remodel is undertaken. Strengthening schemes were developed by Degenkolb Engineers for the most seriously deficient A and B classifications (15 total), which the Laboratory's Plant Engineering Department used as its basis for rehabilitation construction cost estimates. A detailed evaluation of Building 2580, a strengthening scheme, and a construction cost estimate are pending. Specific details of the total estimated rehabilitation costs, a proposed 10-year seismic rehabilitation plan, exemption categories by building, DOE performance guidelines, cost comparisons for rehabilitation, and LLNL reports by Degenkolb Engineers are provided in Appendix A. Based on the results of Degenkolb Engineers evaluations, along with the prevailing practice for the disposition of seismically deficient buildings and risk-based evaluations, it is concluded that there is no need to evacuate occupants from these 58 buildings prior to their rehabilitation.

Tokarz, F J; Coats, D W

2006-05-16

474

RADIATION SAFETY COMMITTEE The Radiation Safety Committee shall advise the Provost on all policy matters relating to radiation safety;  

E-print Network

RADIATION SAFETY COMMITTEE Functions The Radiation Safety Committee shall advise the Provost on all policy matters relating to radiation safety; formulate campus radiation safety policies in compliance the Risk Manager) monitor the performance of the Radiation Safety Officer as it relates to implementation

Sze, Lawrence

475

Safety Lifecycle for Developing Safety Critical Artificial Neural Networks  

E-print Network

Safety Lifecycle for Developing Safety Critical Artificial Neural Networks Zeshan Kurd, Tim Kelly Department of Computer Science University of York, York, YO10 5DD, UK. {zeshan.kurd, tim of the ANN (within its weights, links and neurons). This has greater potential for `transparency' or white

Kelly, Tim

476

A safety counterculture challenge to a “safety climate”  

Microsoft Academic Search

This case study is about a small group of workmen caught in a common dilemma regarding work safety. They must work safely and maintain production within a pathological organization that does not meaningfully reward participation or communication. They do so as a group and socially construct danger, injury and safety for themselves. They constitute a functioning counterculture and challenge the

Gregory Wayne Walker

2010-01-01

477

Safety diagnosis in industrial work settings: The safety diagnosis questionnaire  

Microsoft Academic Search

While organizations are responsible for providing a safe work environment for their employees, it is oftentimes difficult to do so solely through safety engineering. Workers must also be aware of the hazards in their workplace and adjust their behavior to avoid risk. A “Safety Diagnosis Questionnaire” was developed to address the issue of human behavior in the work environment. It

Carl Graf Hoyos; Franz Ruppert

1995-01-01

478

VIEW OF WEST BANK OF ?SAFETY ROD PACKAGE,? INCLUDING SAFETY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW OF WEST BANK OF ?SAFETY ROD PACKAGE,? INCLUDING SAFETY ROD MOTOR DRIVES (B AND C), DRUMS, AND CLUTCHES, IN A THREE-TIERED RACK IN THE PDP ROOM AT LEVEL +27?, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

479

VIEW OF EAST BANK OF ?SAFETY ROD PACKAGE,? INCLUDING SAFETY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW OF EAST BANK OF ?SAFETY ROD PACKAGE,? INCLUDING SAFETY ROD MOTOR DRIVES (B AND C), DRUMS, AND CLUTCHES, IN A THREE-TIERED RACK IN THE PDP ROOM AT LEVEL +27?, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

480

SAFETY PROCEDURE & GUIDELINES SUBJECT: Health and Safety Training  

E-print Network

workers, and used as part of the employee's initial job instruction. #12;2 2.2 General training employee orientation. For more information on the training, please see the website: httpSAFETY PROCEDURE & GUIDELINES SUBJECT: Health and Safety Training APPLIES TO: All Departments

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

481

September 2013 Laboratory Safety Manual Section 7 -Safety Training  

E-print Network

are responsible for ensuring that all employees receive adequate training in order to understand the hazards for tracking the training new employees receive before working with hazardous chemicals and other hazards the responsibility of employee safety very seriously. Mandatory safety training is a key component of this commitment

Wilcock, William

482

Environmental Health and Safety Fire and Life Safety Laboratory Assessment  

E-print Network

Environmental Health and Safety Fire and Life Safety Laboratory Assessment PI, through holes in walls or in any other manner that might expose them to damage. Power supply or other high. (wide and deep) of clear floor space in front of all electrical panels and main electrical shutoff

483

Understanding industrial safety signs: implications for occupational safety management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the understanding of industrial safety signs and messages by registered and non-registered safety officers in Hong Kong with ten different user factors, and examine the relationship between cognitive sign features and sign comprehensibility. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The research methodology includes the survey development and appropriate statistical analyses. In total, 92 Hong

K. L. Chan; Alan H. S. Chan

2011-01-01

484

INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM SAFETY CULTURE IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVE  

SciTech Connect

In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) identified safety culture as one of their top Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) related priorities. A team was formed to address this issue. The team identified a consensus set of safety culture principles, along with implementation practices that could be used by DOE, NNSA, and their contractors. Documented improvement tools were identified and communicated to contractors participating in a year long pilot project. After a year, lessons learned will be collected and a path forward determined. The goal of this effort was to achieve improved safety and mission performance through ISMS continuous improvement. The focus of ISMS improvement was safety culture improvement building on operating experience from similar industries such as the domestic and international commercial nuclear and chemical industry.

MCDONALD JA JR

2009-01-16

485

Impact of e-safety applications on cyclists' safety.  

PubMed

In years to come, urban areas face the challenge of making transport sustainable in terms of environment and competitiveness. Cycling is a perfect transport means in urban areas. Cyclists have a high casualty rate and should be given special attention in road safety policy. Actions to promote cycling in cities should go together with improving road safety. ICT can be used to develop intelligent applications assisting cyclists to avoid, prevent or mitigate accidents. This paper presents the results of activities focused on the assessment of impacts of ICT on the safety of cyclists, realised in the framework of the EU project SAFECYCLE ( www.safecycle.eu ). E-safety applications were identified that can enhance the safety of cyclists in Europe. Eleven applications were analysed in term of benefits and costs. The results highlighted important differences between European countries in term of awareness about cycling, knowledge about ICT applications and also impacts of these applications. PMID:25363736

Tripodi, Antonino; Persia, Luca

2014-11-01

486

HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN  

E-print Network

HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY June 2012 #12;UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY 2012 Contents Page Foreword by the Principal 2 A) Health and Safety Policy Statement 3 B) Organisation and Responsibilities for Health and Safety 4 C) Health and Safety Management in Schools/Support Services 6 D) Training

Levi, Ran

487

2014 Hospital National Patient Safety Goals  

E-print Network

communication NPSG.02.03.01 Identify patient safety risks NPSG.15.01.01 Prevent mistakes in surgery UP.012014 Hospital National Patient Safety Goals The purpose of the National Patient Safety Goals is to improve patient safety. The goals focus on problems in health care safety and how to solve them

Finley Jr., Russell L.

488

The Emergency Medical Services Safety Attitudes Questionnaire  

Microsoft Academic Search

To characterize safety culture in emergency medical services (EMS), the authors modified a validated safety culture instrument, the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). The pilot instrument was administered to 3 EMS agencies in a large metropolitan area. The authors characterized safety culture across 6 domains: safety climate, teamwork climate, perceptions of management, job satisfaction, working conditions, and stress recognition. The feasibility

P. Daniel Patterson; David T. Huang; Rollin J. Fairbanks; Henry E. Wang

2010-01-01

489

Job Safety and Health It's the law!  

E-print Network

Job Safety and Health It's the law! EMPLOYEES: Must have access to: · DOE safety and health publications; · The worker safety and health program for their location; · This safety and health poster related to worker safety and health; · Decline to perform an assigned task because of a belief

Lee, Jason R.

490

Food Safety Participant Materials for Notebook  

E-print Network

UNIT 5: Food Safety Participant Materials for Notebook #12;Navigating for Success Food Safety p 1 Food Safety Good food safety practices are crucial to reducing foodborne illnesses. Nutrition educators need to be well-versed in the importance of food safety and have a clear understanding of good food

491

RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL 2012 RICE UNIVERSITY 1  

E-print Network

RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL 2012 RICE UNIVERSITY 1 Rice University Radiation Safety Manual Environmental Health and Safety MS 123 P.O. Box 1892 Houston, TX 77251-1892 February 2013 #12;RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL 2012 RICE UNIVERSITY 2 INTRODUCTION The goal of the Radiation Safety Manual is to assist lab

Natelson, Douglas

492

RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1  

E-print Network

RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1 Rice University Radiation Safety Manual Environmental Health and Safety MS 123 P.O. Box 1892 Houston, TX 77251-1892 January 2014 #12;RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 2 INTRODUCTION The goal of the Radiation Safety Manual is to assist lab

Natelson, Douglas

493

Environmental Health and Safety Standard Operating  

E-print Network

Environmental Health and Safety Standard Operating Guideline Laser Safety Program LS-1 RRSS Approved by: DG Rynders Written by: DG Rynders, JM Lynch Revision date: 10/2012 Revised by: N/A Laser_Safety_Program_Guide.doc Page 1 of 19 Laser Safety Guide Environmental Health and Safety 1.0 Purpose and Requirements This guide

Davis, H. Floyd

494

LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1  

E-print Network

LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1 Rice University Laser Safety Manual Environmental Health and Safety MS 123 P.O. Box 1892 Houston, TX 77251-1892 January 2014 #12;LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 2 Introduction The objective of the Rice University Laser Safety program is to assist all levels

Natelson, Douglas

495

LASER SAFETY COMMITTEE CHARTER November, 2005  

E-print Network

LASER SAFETY COMMITTEE CHARTER November, 2005 Function The Safety Review Committee (SRC) performs-committees to address specific health and safety matters. The Laser Safety Committee (LSC) is one of the SRC expert sub-committees. The Laser SafetyCommittee recommends policies and practices regarding the conduct and regulatory compliance

Knowles, David William

496

LASER SAFETY MANUAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES  

E-print Network

LASER SAFETY MANUAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR LASER SAFETY AT TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY LUBBOCK, TEXAS September 2002 #12;V-1 TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY LASER SAFETY MANUAL TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION I ­ MANAGEMENT OF LASER LICENSE Introduction A. Laser Safety Program I - 1 B. Radiation Laser Safety Committee I

Zhang, Yuanlin

497

LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2012 RICE UNIVERSITY 1  

E-print Network

LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2012 RICE UNIVERSITY 1 Rice University Laser Safety Manual Environmental Health and Safety MS 123 P.O. Box 1892 Houston, TX 77251-1892 December 2012 #12;LASER SAFETY MANUAL 2012 RICE at Rice University that uses Class 3B and 4 lasers. Responsibilities Laser Safety Officer (LSO) ­ The LSO

Natelson, Douglas

498

Multiple pedestrian detection using IR LED stereo camera  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of the U.S. Department of Transportations Intelligent Vehicle Initiative (IVI) program, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is conducting R&D in vehicle safety and driver information systems. There is an increasing number of applications where pedestrian monitoring is of high importance. Visionbased pedestrian detection in outdoor scenes is still an open challenge. People dress in very different colors that sometimes blend with the background, wear hats or carry bags, and stand, walk and change directions unpredictably. The background is various, containing buildings, moving or parked cars, bicycles, street signs, signals, etc. Furthermore, existing pedestrian detection systems perform only during daytime, making it impossible to detect pedestrians at night. Under FHWA funding, we are developing a multi-pedestrian detection system using IR LED stereo camera. This system, without using any templates, detects the pedestrians through statistical pattern recognition utilizing 3D features extracted from the disparity map. A new IR LED stereo camera is being developed, which can help detect pedestrians during daytime and night time. Using the image differencing and denoising, we have also developed new methods to estimate the disparity map of pedestrians in near real time. Our system will have a hardware interface with the traffic controller through wireless communication. Once pedestrians are detected, traffic signals at the street intersections will change phases to alert the drivers of approaching vehicles. The initial test results using images collected at a street intersection show that our system can detect pedestrians in near real time.

Ling, Bo; Zeifman, Michael I.; Gibson, David R. P.

2007-09-01

499

77 FR 25179 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Surgical Safety Institute  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment...Surgical Safety Institute of its status as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of...

2012-04-27

500

76 FR 22033 - Safety Zone; Red River Safety Zone, Red River, MN  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...USCG-2011-0263] RIN 1625-AAOO Safety Zone; Red River Safety Zone, Red River, MN AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary...MN is establishing a temporary safety zone on the Red River, MN. This safety zone is being...

2011-04-20