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Sample records for saline soluble inorganic

  1. Solubility of plutonium(VI) carbonate in saline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Sean D.; Runde, Wolfgang; Neu, Mary P.

    2007-06-01

    Among the plutonium oxidation states found to form in the environment, mobile plutonium(VI) can exist under oxidizing conditions and in waters with high chloride content due to radiolysis effects. We are investigating the solubility and speciation of plutonium(VI) carbonate under conditions relevant to natural waters and brines such as those found near some geologic radioactive waste repositories. The solid Pu(VI) phase PuO 2CO 3(s) was prepared and its solubility was measured in NaCl and NaClO 4 solutions in a CO 2 atmosphere as a function of pH and ionic strength (0.1-5.6 m). The concentration of soluble plutonium in solution was calculated from spectroscopic data and liquid scintillation counting. Spectroscopic measurements also revealed the plutonium oxidation state. The apparent solubility product of PuO 2CO 3(s) was determined at selected electrolyte concentrations to be, log Ks,0 = -13.95 ± 0.07 (0.1 m NaCl), log Ks,0 = -14.07 ± 0.13 (5.6 m NaCl), and log Ks,0 = -15.26 ± 0.11 (5.6 m NaClO 4). Specific ion interaction theory was used to calculate the solubility product at zero ionic strength, logKs,0∘=-14.82±0.05.

  2. Microbial response to salinity stress in a tropical sandy soil amended with native shrub residues or inorganic fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Sall, Saïdou Nourou; Ndour, Ndèye Yacine Badiane; Diédhiou-Sall, Siré; Dick, Richard; Chotte, Jean-Luc

    2015-09-15

    Soil degradation and salinization caused by inappropriate cultivation practices and high levels of saltwater intrusion are having an adverse effect on agriculture in Central Senegal. The residues of Piliostigma reticulatum, a local shrub that coexists with crops, were recently shown to increase particulate organic matter and improve soil quality and may be a promising means of alleviating the effects of salinization. This study compared the effects of inorganic fertilizer and P. reticulatum residues on microbial properties and the ability of soil to withstand salinity stress. We hypothesized that soils amended with P. reticulatum would be less affected by salinity stress than soils amended with inorganic fertilizer and control soil. Salinity stress was applied to soil from a field site that had been cultivated for 5 years under a millet/peanut crop rotation when microbial biomass, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) community profile, catabolic diversity, microbial activities were determined. Microbial biomass, nitrification potential and dehydrogenase activity were higher by 20%, 56% and 69% respectively in soil with the organic amendment. With salinity stress, the structure and activities of the microbial community were significantly affected. Although the biomass of actinobacteria community increased with salinity stress, there was a substantial reduction in microbial activity in all soils. The soil organically amended was, however, less affected by salinity stress than the control or inorganic fertilizer treatment. This suggests that amendment using P. reticulatum residues may improve the ability of soils to respond to saline conditions. PMID:26143083

  3. Field and Laboratory Studies of Reactions between Atmospheric Water Soluble Organic Acids and Inorganic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Shilling, John E.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-06-25

    Atmospheric inorganic particles undergo complex heterogeneous reactions that change their physicochemical properties. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids [1-2]. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with water soluble organic acids (WSOA) and release gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) resulting in formation of organic salts [3]. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where multi-phase reactions are driven by the volatility of nitric acid. Furthermore, secondary organic material, which is a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits the same reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present a systematic study of reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA, SOM, and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis.

  4. The Interplay between Inorganic Phosphate and Amino Acids determines Zinc Solubility in Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    Rumschik, Sean M.; Nydegger, Irma; Zhao, Jinfu; Kay, Alan R

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is an important polyanion needed for ATP synthesis and bone formation. Since it is found at millimolar levels in plasma it is usually incorporated as a constituent of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) formulations for maintaining brain slices. In this paper we show that Pi limits the extracellular zinc concentration by inducing metal precipitation. We present data suggesting that amino acids like histidine may counteract the Pi-induced zinc precipitation by the formation of soluble zinc complexes. We propose that the interplay between Pi and amino acids in the extracellular space may influence the availability of metals for cellular uptake. PMID:19183267

  5. Evidence for the Role of Vacuolar Soluble Pyrophosphatase and Inorganic Polyphosphate in Trypanosoma cruzi Persistence*

    PubMed Central

    Galizzi, Melina; Bustamante, Juan M.; Fang, Jianmin; Miranda, Kildare; Medeiros, Lia C. Soares; Tarleton, Rick L.; Docampo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Summary Trypanosoma cruzi infection leads to development of a chronic disease but the mechanisms that the parasite utilizes to establish a persistent infection despite activation of a potent immune response by the host are currently unknown. Unusual characteristics of T. cruzi are that it possesses cellular levels of pyrophosphate (PPi) at least ten times higher than those of ATP and molar levels of inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) within acidocalcisomes. We characterized an inorganic soluble EF-hand containing pyrophosphatase from T. cruzi (TcVSP) that, depending on the pH and cofactors, can hydrolyze either pyrophosphate (PPi) or polyphosphate (polyP). The enzyme is localized to both acidocalcisomes and cytosol. Overexpression of TcVSP (TcVSP-OE) resulted in a significant decrease in cytosolic PPi, and short and long chain polyP levels. Additionally, the TcVSP-OE parasites showed a significant growth defect in fibroblasts, less responsiveness to hyperosmotic stress, and reduced persistence in tissues of mice, suggesting that PPi and polyP are essential for the parasite to resist the stressful conditions in the host and to maintain a persistent infection. PMID:24033456

  6. Collection and analysis of inorganic and water soluble organic aerosols over Maryland and Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, L. C.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Phinney, K.; Conny, J.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols aloft have slower removal than those near the ground, in part, because dry and wet deposition rates result in longer lifetimes and greater range of influence. Knowledge of deposition rates and range of transport for different species are important for developing local and regional air quality policy. Currently, the vertical distribution of organic aerosols (OA's) and their polar, oxidized fraction is largely unknown. Comprehensive methods to analyze aerosol composition collected in the boundary layer and the lower free troposphere are lacking. During DISCOVER AQ 2011, both the NASA P3 and Cessna 402B collected aerosols, through shrouded aerosol inlets, onto Teflon and quartz fiber filters. Collection occurred in both the boundary layer and lower free troposphere over Maryland and Virginia, USA. After extraction with water and optimizing separation via ion chromatography, commonly identified secondary organic aerosols can be separated based on their functionality as mono-, di-, or polycarboxylic acids. Inorganic aerosol components can simultaneously be separated and identified with the same method. Individual organic acid compound analysis with detection limits in the low ppb range can be achieved when conductivity/ultraviolet/ and mass spectrometric detectors are placed in tandem. Additionally, thermo optical analysis can be used to determine the mass fraction of water soluble organic carbon versus the total collected mass. This research is designed to provide information on the vertical distribution of particulate organic carbon in the atmosphere, its optical properties, information on aerosol transport in the lower free troposphere, and to provide water soluble organic aerosol structural characterization.

  7. Formation of soluble microbial products (SMP) by activated sludge at various salinities.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Ai-Min; Xu, Juan; Li, Wen-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-02-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) present a significant component of effluent organic matter from biological wastewater treatment reactors, and can affect the membrane fouling and formation of disinfection by-products. Thus, SMP have attracted increasing concerns in wastewater treatment and reclamation. In this work, the formation of SMP by activated sludge at various NaCl concentrations is investigated by using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and fluorescence regional integration (FRI). The results show that a high level of salinity decreases substrate removal efficiency and leads to an accumulation of SMP, especially proteins. Three components of SMP, one protein-like and two humic-acid-like components, are identified by PARAFAC, which exhibit different trends with the variation of NaCl concentration. FRI analysis reveals that the majority of protein fluorescence is attributed to tryptophan and tryptophan-like proteins, rather than tyrosine and tyrosine-like proteins. With an increase in NaCl concentration, the normalized volume percentages of tyrosine and tryptophan region increase, while those of humic- and fulvic-acid-like region decrease significantly. This work demonstrates that salinity affects the formation of SMP, and that EEM with PARAFAC in combination with FRI analysis is a useful tool to get insight into the formation of SMP by activated sludge. PMID:22622691

  8. Freshwater and Saline Loads of Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen to Hood Canal and Lynch Cove, Western Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, Anthony J.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Frans, Lonna M.; Noble, Marlene; Kendall, Carol; Josberger, Edward G.; Huffman, Raegan L.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2006-01-01

    Hood Canal is a long (110 kilometers), deep (175 meters) and narrow (2 to 4 kilometers wide) fjord of Puget Sound in western Washington. The stratification of a less dense, fresh upper layer of the water column causes the cold, saltier lower layer of the water column to be isolated from the atmosphere in the late summer and autumn, which limits reaeration of the lower layer. In the upper layer of Hood Canal, the production of organic matter that settles and consumes dissolved oxygen in the lower layer appears to be limited by the load of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN): nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia. Freshwater and saline loads of DIN to Hood Canal were estimated from available historical data. The freshwater load of DIN to the upper layer of Hood Canal, which could be taken up by phytoplankton, came mostly from surface and ground water from subbasins, which accounts for 92 percent of total load of DIN to the upper layer of Hood Canal. Although DIN in rain falling on land surfaces amounts to about one-half of the DIN entering Hood Canal from subbasins, rain falling directly on the surface of marine waters contributed only 4 percent of the load to the upper layer. Point-source discharges and subsurface flow from shallow shoreline septic systems contributed less than 4 percent of the DIN load to the upper layer. DIN in saline water flowing over the sill into Hood Canal from Admiralty Inlet was at least 17 times the total load to the upper layer of Hood Canal. In September and October 2004, field data were collected to estimate DIN loads to Lynch Cove - the most inland marine waters of Hood Canal that routinely contain low dissolved-oxygen waters. Based on measured streamflow and DIN concentrations, surface discharge was estimated to have contributed about one-fourth of DIN loads to the upper layer of Lynch Cove. Ground-water flow from subbasins was estimated to have contributed about one-half of total DIN loads to the upper layer. In autumn 2004, the relative

  9. Comparative Proteomics of Thellungiella halophila Leaves from Plants Subjected to Salinity Reveals the Importance of Chloroplastic Starch and Soluble Sugars in Halophyte Salt Tolerance*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuchu; Chang, Lili; Wang, Baichen; Wang, Dan; Li, Pinghua; Wang, Limin; Yi, Xiaoping; Huang, Qixing; Peng, Ming; Guo, Anping

    2013-01-01

    Thellungiella halophila, a close relative of Arabidopsis, is a model halophyte used to study plant salt tolerance. The proteomic/physiological/transcriptomic analyses of Thellungiella plant leaves subjected to different salinity levels, reported herein, indicate an extraordinary ability of Thellungiella to adapt to large concentrations of exogenous saline by compartmentalizing Na+ into cell vacuoles and accumulating proline and soluble sugars as organic osmolytes. Salinity stress stimulated the accumulation of starch in chloroplasts, which resulted in a greatly increased content of starch and total sugars in leaves. Comparative proteomics of Thellungiella leaves identified 209 salt-responsive proteins. Among these, the sequences of 108 proteins were strongly homologous to Arabidopsis protein sequences, and 30 had previously been identified as Thellungiella proteins. Functional classification of these proteins into 16 categories indicated that the majority are involved in carbohydrate metabolism, followed by those involved in energy production and conversion, and then those involved in the transport of inorganic ions. Pathway analysis revealed that most of the proteins are involved in starch and sucrose metabolism, carbon fixation, photosynthesis, and glycolysis. Of these processes, the most affected were starch and sucrose metabolism, which might be pivotal for salt tolerance. The gene expression patterns of the 209 salt-responsive proteins revealed through hierarchical clustering of microarray data and the expression patterns of 29 Thellungiella genes evaluated via quantitative RT-PCR were similar to those deduced via proteomic analysis, which underscored the possibility that starch and sucrose metabolism might play pivotal roles in determining the salt tolerance ability of Thellungiella. Our observations enabled us to propose a schematic representation of the systematic salt-tolerance phenotype in Thellungiella and suggested that the increased accumulation of

  10. Characterization of the size-segregated water-soluble inorganic ions at eight Canadian rural sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Vet, R.; Wiebe, A.; Mihele, C.; Sukloff, B.; Chan, E.; Moran, M. D.; Iqbal, S.

    2008-07-01

    Size-segregated water-soluble inorganic ions, including particulate sulphate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-), ammonium (NH4+), chloride (Cl-) and base cations (K+, Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+), were measured using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) during fourteen short-term field campaigns at eight locations in both polluted and remote regions of eastern and central Canada. The size distributions of SO42- and NH4+ were unimodal, peaking at 0.3 0.6 μm in diameter, during most of the campaigns, although a bimodal distribution was found during one campaign and a trimodal distribution during another campaign made at a coastal site. The size distributions of NO3- were unimodal, peaking at 4.0 7.0 μm, during the warm-season campaigns and bimodal, with one peak at 0.3 0.6 μm and another at 4 7 μm, during the cold-season campaigns. A unimodal size distribution, peaking at 4 6 μm, was found for Cl-, Na+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ during approximately half of the campaigns and a bimodal distribution, with one peak at 2 μm and the other at 6 μm, was found during the rest of the campaigns. For K+, a bimodal distribution, with one peak at 0.3 μm and the other at 4 μm, was observed during most of the campaigns. The measured ion concentrations varied by one order of magnitude across the various sites. The air-mass origins and meteorological conditions both played important roles in formulating the observed geographical and seasonal patterns of these ion species concentration levels, size distributions and fine particle acidity.

  11. Levels and indoor-outdoor relationships of PM 10 and soluble inorganic ions in Beirut, Lebanon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, N. A.; Atallah, M.; Al-Kadamany, G.

    2009-03-01

    PM 10, which is considered among the major indoor and outdoor pollutants, was measured in several residential homes and corresponding outdoor environments in the Great Beirut area over the summer and winter seasons of 2005. Few studies on PM 10 levels indoors in Beirut are restricted to short-term periods in public places. In this study, 78 PM 10 samples were collected on Teflon filters using an active sampler at a flow rate of 5 L/min. PM 10 mass concentrations were determined by gravimetric analysis, and inorganic chemical speciation was carried out using ion chromatography. Outdoors, PM 10 elevated mass concentrations correlated well with high traffic density. The observed high intra-site temporal variation (minimum of 34 and a maximum of 120 μg/m 3) was attributed to the dynamic air masses passing over the Eastern Mediterranean region. Indoors, PM 10 levels were highly affected by outdoor levels, but were enhanced over those of outdoors when smoking activities were recorded. In winter, the overall average outdoor concentration dropped by 19%, whereas the average indoor concentration increased by 50% over the ones calculated for the summer. Ventilation and air exchange rates were found to be approximately equal to unity during summer since most doors and windows remain open. This rate drops to almost half during winter. As for particulate ions namely nitrates and sulfates, the former showed concentrations that are higher than the values reported in the region in both winter and summer seasons, suggesting high emissions from local vehicles. However, SO 42- average concentrations were comparable to values reported in other studies conducted in Eastern Mediterranean sites. Soluble particulate nitrates and sulfates exhibited similar indoor and outdoor levels in non-smoking homes (IO ~ 1), but in smoking homes the drop in nitrate concentrations reached around 70%, indicating a high anionic reactivity with tobacco smokes.

  12. [Characteristics of mass size distributions of water-soluble, inorganic ions during summer and winter haze days of Beijing].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Min; Liu, Zi-Rui; Chen, Hong; Wang, Yue-Si

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the size distribution characteristics of water soluble inorganic ions in haze days, the particle samples were collected by two Andersen cascade impactors in Beijing during summer and winter time and each sampling period lasted two weeks. Online measurement of PM10 and PM2.5 using TEOM were also conducted at the same time. Sources and formation mechanism of water soluble inorganic ions were analyzed based on their size distributions. The results showed that average concentrations of PM10 and PM 2.5 were (245.5 +/- 8.4) microg x m(-3) and (120.2 +/- 2.0) microg x m(-3) during summer haze days (SHD), and were (384.2 +/- 30.2) microg x m(-3) and (252.7 +/- 47.1) microg x m(-3) during winter haze days (WHD), which suggested fine particles predominated haze pollution episode in both seasons. Total water-soluble inorganic ions concentrations were higher in haze days than those in non-haze days, especially in fine particles. Furthermore, concentrations of secondary inorganic ions (SO4(2-), NO3(-) and NH4(+)) increased quicker than other inorganic ions in fine particles during haze days, indicating secondary inorganic ions played an important role in the formation of haze pollution. Similar size distributions were found for all Sinorganic water soluble ions except for NO3(-), during SHD and WHD. SO4(2-) and NH4(+) dominated in the fine mode (PM1.0) while Mg2+ and Ca2+ accumulated in coarse fraction, Na+, Cl- and K+ showed a bimodal distribution. For NO3(-), however, it showed a bimodal distribution during SHD and a unimodal distribution dominated in the fine fraction was found during WHD. The average mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of SO4(2-) was 0.64 microm in SHD, which suggested the formation of SO4(2-) was mainly attributed to in-cloud processes. Furthermore, a higher apparent conversion rate of sulfur dioxide (SOR) was found in SHD, indicating more fine particles were produced by photochemical reaction in haze days than that in non-haze days. The

  13. Characterization of the size-segregated water-soluble inorganic ions at eight Canadian rural sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Vet, R.; Wiebe, A.; Mihele, C.; Sukloff, B.; Chan, E.; Moran, M. D.; Iqbal, S.

    2008-12-01

    Size-segregated water-soluble inorganic ions, including particulate sulphate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-), ammonium (NH4+), chloride (Cl-), and base cations (K+, Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+), were measured using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) during fourteen short-term field campaigns at eight locations in both polluted and remote regions of eastern and central Canada. The size distributions of SO42- and NH4+ were unimodal, peaking at 0.3-0.6 µm in diameter, during most of the campaigns, although a bimodal distribution was found during one campaign and a trimodal distribution was found during another campaign made at a coastal site. SO42- peaked at slightly larger sizes in the cold seasons (0.5-0.6 µm) compared to the hot seasons (0.3-0.4 µm) due to the higher relative humidity in the cold seasons. The size distributions of NO3- were unimodal, peaking at 4.0-7.0 µm during the warm-season campaigns, and bimodal, with one peak at 0.3-0.6 µm and another at 4-7 µm during the cold-season campaigns. A unimodal size distribution, peaking at 4-6 µm, was found for Cl-, Na+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ during approximately half of the campaigns and a bimodal distribution, with one peak at 2 µm and the other at 6 µm, was found during the rest of the campaigns. For K+, a bimodal distribution, with one peak at 0.3 µm and the other at 4 µm, was observed during most of the campaigns. Seasonal contrasts in the size-distribution profiles suggest that emission sources and air mass origins were the major factors controlling the size distributions of the primary aerosols while meteorological conditions were more important for the secondary aerosols. The dependence of the particle acidity on the particle size from the nucleation mode to the accumulation mode was not consistent from site to site or from season to season. Particles in the accumulation mode were more acidic than those in the nucleation mode when submicron particles were in the state of strong acidity; however, when

  14. Analysis of inorganic nitrogen and related anions in high salinity water using ion chromatography with tandem UV and conductivity detectors.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brian; Gandhi, Jay; Zhang, Chunlong Carl

    2011-09-01

    Over 97% of the Earth's water is high salinity water in the form of gulfs, oceans, and salt lakes. There is an increasing concern for the quality of water in bays, gulfs, oceans, and other natural waters. These waters are affected by many different sources of contamination. The sources are, but not limited to, groundwater run-off of nitrogen containing fertilizer, pesticides, cleaning agents, solid wastes, industrial waters, and many more. The final destinations of these contaminants are rivers, lakes, and bayous that eventually will lead to bays, gulfs, and oceans. Many industries depend on the quality of these waters, such as the fishing industry. In addition to wild marine life, there are large aquariums and fish and shrimp farms that are required to know the quality of the water. However, the ability of these industries to monitor their processes is limited. Most analytical methods do not apply to the analysis of high salinity waters. They are dependent on wet chemistry techniques, spectrophotometers, and flow analyzers. These methods do not have the accuracy, precision, and sensitivity when compared to ion chromatography (IC). Since the inception of IC, it has become a standard practice for determining the content of many different water samples. Many IC methods are limited in the range of analytes that can be detected, as well as the numerous sample sources of which the methods are applicable. The main focus of current IC methods does not include high salinity waters. This research demonstrates an ion chromatographic method that has the ability to determine low level concentrations of inorganic nitrogen and related anions (nitrite-N, nitrate-N, phosphorous-P, sulfate, bromide, chloride, sulfide, fluoride, ammonia, calcium, and magnesium) in a single run using a combination of UV and conductivity detectors. This method is applicable to various waters, and uses both freshwater and high salinity water samples. PMID:21859532

  15. Numerical Procedures for the Calculations of Inorganic Solubility and Cohesive Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D.

    1996-01-01

    The entire history of chemistry bears witness to the extraorinary importance of the phenomena of solubility. It is necessary to emphasize that the Hildebrand parameter (solubility parameter) is fundamentally a liquid state property. When gases are considered they are treated as hypothetical.

  16. Degradation of Environmental Contaminants with Water-Soluble Cobalt Catalysts: An Integrative Inorganic Chemistry Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Alexandra L.; Messersmith, Reid E.; Green, David B.; Fritsch, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    We present an integrative laboratory investigation incorporating skills from inorganic chemistry, analytical instrumentation, and physical chemistry applied to a laboratory-scale model of the environmental problem of chlorinated ethylenes in groundwater. Perchloroethylene (C[subscript 2]Cl[subscript 4], PCE) a common dry cleaning solvent,…

  17. [Isolation and catalytic properties of the soluble monomeric form of inorganic pyrophosphatase from baker's yeast].

    PubMed

    Kasho, V N; Bakuleva, N P; Baĭkov, A A; Avaeva, S M

    1982-06-01

    Data from sedimentation analysis suggest that modification of about 40% of free amino groups of inorganic pyrophosphatase by maleic anhydride, pH 10.5, results in a loss of the enzyme ability to form dimers at neutral values of pH. The specific activity of monomeric pyrophosphatase is 50-80% of that of the dimeric form. The monomer has a pH optimum of about 7, requires metal ions for activation of both enzyme and substrate and is capable of exergonic synthesis of PPi in the active center. The enzyme binding to PPi is strongly stabilized by fluoride. The experimental data indicate that the individual subunit of inorganic pyrophosphatase possesses all the main catalytic properties of native dimeric molecule. PMID:6126223

  18. Multimodel Predictive System for Carbon Dioxide Solubility in Saline Formation Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zan; Small, Mitchell J; Karamalidis, Athanasios K

    2013-02-05

    The prediction of carbon dioxide solubility in brine at conditions relevant to carbon sequestration (i.e., high temperature, pressure, and salt concentration (T-P-X)) is crucial when this technology is applied. Eleven mathematical models for predicting CO{sub 2} solubility in brine are compared and considered for inclusion in a multimodel predictive system. Model goodness of fit is evaluated over the temperature range 304–433 K, pressure range 74–500 bar, and salt concentration range 0–7 m (NaCl equivalent), using 173 published CO{sub 2} solubility measurements, particularly selected for those conditions. The performance of each model is assessed using various statistical methods, including the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). Different models emerge as best fits for different subranges of the input conditions. A classification tree is generated using machine learning methods to predict the best-performing model under different T-P-X subranges, allowing development of a multimodel predictive system (MMoPS) that selects and applies the model expected to yield the most accurate CO{sub 2} solubility prediction. Statistical analysis of the MMoPS predictions, including a stratified 5-fold cross validation, shows that MMoPS outperforms each individual model and increases the overall accuracy of CO{sub 2} solubility prediction across the range of T-P-X conditions likely to be encountered in carbon sequestration applications.

  19. [Characteristics of aerosol water-soluble inorganic ions in three types air-pollution incidents of Nanjing City].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiu-Chen; Zhu, Bin; Su, Ji-Feng; Wang, Hong-Lei

    2012-06-01

    In order to compare aerosol water-soluble inorganic species in different air-pollution periods, samples of PM10, PM2.1, PM1.1 and the main water-soluble ions (NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Na+, K+, NO2(-), F(-), NO3(-), Cl(-), SO4(2-)) were measured, which were from 3 air-pollution incidents (continued pollution in October 16-30 of 2009, sandstorm pollution in April 27-30 of 2010, and crop burning pollution in June 14 of 2010. The results show that aerosol pollution of 3 periods is serious. The lowest PM2.1/PM10 is only 0.27, which is from sandstorm pollution period, while the largest is 0. 7 from crop burning pollution period. In continued pollution periods, NO3(-) and SO4(2-) are the dominant ions, and the total anions account for an average of 18.62%, 32.92% and 33.53% of PM10, PM2.1 and PM1.1. Total water-soluble ions only account for 13.36%, 23.72% and 28.54% of PM10, PM2.1 and PM1.1 due to the insoluble species is increased in sandstorm pollution period. The mass concentration of Ca2+ in sandstorm pollution period is higher than the other two pollution periods, and which is mainly in coarse particles with diameter larger than 1 microm. All the ten water-soluble ions are much higher in crop burning pollution especially K+ which is the tracer from crop burning. The peak mass concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-) and NH4+ are in 0.43-0.65 microm. PMID:22946180

  20. 2D Inorganic-Antimalarial Drug-Polymer Hybrid with pH-Responsive Solubility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Yeong; Yang, Jae-Hun; Lee, Ji-Hee; Choi, Goeun; Park, Dae-Hwan; Jo, Mi-Rea; Choi, Soo-Jin; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2015-10-01

    Artesunic acid (ASH), an antimalarial drug, has low oral bioavailability due to its low aqueous solubility. To overcome this problem, artesunate (AS) was intercalated into zinc basic salt (ZBS) via co-precipitation. AS was immobilized with a tilted double layer arrangement, which was also confirmed by XRD and 1-D electron density mapping. In order to decrease the release rate of AS under gastrointestinal conditions and to simultaneously increase the release rate of AS under intestinal conditions, ZBS-AS was coated with EUDRAGIT L100 (ZBS-AS-L100). Finally, we performed an in-vivo pharmacokinetic study to compare the oral bioavailability of AS of ZBS-AS-L100 with that of ASH. Surprisingly, it was found that the former is 5.5 times greater than the latter due to an enhanced solubility of AS thanks to the ternary hybridization with ZBS and EUDRAGIT L100. Therefore, the present ZBS-AS-L100 system has a great potential as a novel antimalarial drug formulation with pH selectivity and enhanced bioavailability. PMID:25965188

  1. Characteristics of concentrations and water-soluble inorganic ions in PM2.5 in Handan City, Hebei province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, C. C.; Wang, L. T.; Zhang, F. F.; Wei, Z.; Ma, S. M.; Ma, X.; Yang, J.

    2016-05-01

    In order to explore the spatial, temporal, and chemical characteristics of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution in Handan city, China, a comprehensive dataset including continuous online observations at four air quality monitoring stations in 2013 and 2014, and the concentrations of water-soluble inorganic ions (WSII) (NO3-, SO42 -, NH4+, Cl-, Na+, Mg2 +, K+, Ca2 +) in PM2.5 samples collected in four representative seasons in 2013 and 2014 are analyzed in this study. And the principal component analysis (PCA) method is applied to identify the source of WSII in Handan. Our results indicate that PM2.5 concentration decreased from 139.4 μg/m3 in 2013 to 116.0 μg/m3 in 2014 on annual average. Spatial variations of PM2.5 mass are not pronounced, indicating that PM2.5 is nearly evenly spread over the study area. The seasonal variations of PM2.5 concentration are significant, normally with 1.7 to 2.4 times higher in winter than in summer. The concentrations of TWSII (total water-soluble inorganic ions) remain relatively stable in two years, with annual averages of 63.1 μg/m3 in 2013 and 57.2 μg/m3 in 2014. SNA (SO42 -, NO3-, NH4+) dominates in the TWSII, accounting for ~ 87% of the TWSII. Similar to PM2.5, WSII exhibits obvious seasonal variations with higher concentrations in autumn and winter, lower in spring and summer. PM2.5 samples are acidic in spring, summer and autumn of 2013, while in winter of 2013 and all seasons of 2014, they are alkaline. SO42 -, NO3- are formed mainly through homogeneous reactions, heterogeneous reactions also exist in winter. Finally, the major sources of WSII in Handan are identified as the mixture of secondary origin, coal combustion, biomass burning (46.1%), dust sources (25.8%), and motor vehicle (12.3%).

  2. Carbonic anhydrases are producers of S-nitrosothiols from inorganic nitrite and modulators of soluble guanylyl cyclase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Hanff, Erik; Böhmer, Anke; Zinke, Maximilian; Gambaryan, Stepan; Schwarz, Alexandra; Supuran, Claudiu T; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2016-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and S-nitrosocysteine are highly potent signaling molecules, acting both by cGMP-dependent and cGMP-independent mechanisms. The NO metabolite nitrite (NO2 (-)) is a major NO reservoir. Hemoglobin, xanthine oxidoreductase and carbonic anhydrase (CA) have been reported to reduce/convert nitrite to NO. We evaluated the role and the physiological importance of CA for an extra-platelet CA/nitrite/NO/cGMP pathway in human platelets. Authentic NO was analyzed by an NO-sensitive electrode. GSNO and GS(15)NO were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). cGMP was determined by LC-MS/MS or RIA. In reduced glutathione (GSH) containing aqueous buffer (pH 7.4), human and bovine erythrocytic CAII-mediated formation of GSNO from nitrite and GS(15)NO from (15)N-nitrite. In the presence of L-cysteine and GSH, this reaction was accompanied by NO release. Incubation of nitrite with bovine erythrocytic CAII and recombinant soluble guanylyl cyclase resulted in cGMP formation. Upon incubation of nitrite with bovine erythrocytic CAII and washed human platelets, cGMP and P-VASP(S239) were formed in the platelets. This study provides the first evidence that extra-platelet nitrite and erythrocytic CAII may modulate platelet function in a cGMP-dependent manner. The new nitrite-dependent CA activity may be a general principle and explain the cardioprotective effects of inorganic nitrite in the vasculature. We propose that nitrous acid (ONOH) is the primary CA-catalyzed reaction product of nitrite. PMID:27129464

  3. Seasonal variation and secondary formation of size-segregated aerosol water-soluble inorganic ions during pollution episodes in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Zirui; Zhang, Junke; Wen, Tianxue; Ji, Dongsheng; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-02-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a serious issue that has aroused great public attention in Beijing. To examine the seasonal characteristics of aerosols in typical pollution episodes, water-soluble inorganic ions (SO42 -, NO3-, NH4+, Cl-, K+, Na+, Ca2 + and Mg2 +) in size-segregated PM collected by an Anderson sampler (equipped with 50% effective cut-off diameters of 9.0, 5.8, 4.7, 3.3, 2.1, 1.1, 0.65, 0.43 μm and an after filter) were investigated in four intensive campaigns from June 2013 to May 2014 in the Beijing urban area. Pronounced seasonal variation of TWSIs in fine particles (aerodynamic diameter less than 2.1 μm) was observed, with the highest concentration in summer (71.5 ± 36.3 μg/m3) and the lowest in spring (28.1 ± 15.2 μg/m3). Different ion species presented different seasonal characteristics of mass concentration and size distribution, reflecting their different dominant sources. As the dominant component, SO42 -, NO3- and NH4+ (SNA) in fine particles appeared to play an important role in the formation of high PM pollution since its contribution to the TWSIs and PM2.1 mass increased significantly during pollution episodes. Due to the hygroscopic growth and enhanced secondary formation in the droplet mode (0.65-2.1 μm) from clean days to polluted days, the size distribution peak of SNA in the fine mode tended to shift from 0.43-0.65 μm to 0.65-2.1 μm. Relative humidity (RH) and temperature contributed to influence the secondary formation and regulate the size distributions of sulfates and nitrates. Partial correlation analysis found that high RH would promote the sulfur and nitrogen oxidation rates in the fine mode, while high temperature favored the sulfur oxidation rate in the condensation mode (0.43-0.65 μm) and reduced the nitrogen oxidation rate in the droplet mode (0.65-2.1 μm). The NO3-/SO42 - mass ratio in PM2.1 (73% of the samples) exceeded 1.0, suggesting that vehicle exhaust currently makes a greater contribution to aerosol

  4. Sr2+/Ca2+ and 44Ca/40Ca fractionation during inorganic calcite formation: III. Impact of salinity/ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianwu; Niedermayr, Andrea; Köhler, Stephan J.; Böhm, Florian; Kısakürek, Basak; Eisenhauer, Anton; Dietzel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In order to apply Sr/Ca and 44Ca/40Ca fractionation during calcium carbonate (CaCO3) formation as a proxy to reconstruct paleo-environments, it is essential to evaluate the impact of various environmental factors. In this study, a CO2 diffusion technique was used to crystallize inorganic calcite from aqueous solutions at different ionic strength/salinity by the addition of NaCl at 25 °C. Results show that the discrimination of Sr2+ versus Ca2+ during calcite formation is mainly controlled by precipitation rate (R in μmol/m2/h) and is weakly influenced by ionic strength/salinity. In analogy to Sr incorporation, 44Ca/40Ca fractionation during precipitation of calcite is weakly influenced by ionic strength/salinity too. At 25 °C the calcium isotope fractionation between calcite and aqueous calcium ions (Δ44/40Cacalcite-aq = δ44/40Cacalcite − δ44/40Caaq) correlates inversely to log R values for all experiments. In addition, an inverse relationship between Δ44/40Cacalcite-aq and log DSr, which is independent of temperature, precipitation rate, and aqueous (Sr/Ca)aq ratio, is not affected by ionic strength/salinity either. Considering the log DSr and Δ44/40Cacalcite-aq relationship, Sr/Ca and δ44/40Cacalcite values of precipitated calcite can be used as an excellent multi-proxy approach to reconstruct environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, precipitation rate) of calcite growth and diagenetic alteration. PMID:22347722

  5. Dithizone derivatives as sensitive water soluble chromogenic reagents for the ion chromatographic determination of inorganic and organo-mercury in aqueous matrices.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Matthew J; Jones, Phil; Haddad, Paul R

    2003-10-01

    Water-soluble sulfonate and the novel carboxylate analogues of dithizone, combined with ion interaction chromatography on a Dionex Acclaim 120 C18 silica column (250 x 4.6 mm id) with an eluent consisting of 10 mM tetrabutylammonium bromide and 60:40 methanol:water, have been developed as highly sensitive chromogenic ligands for the quantitative isocratic determination of inorganic and organo-mercury compounds in aqueous matrices in under 12 min. Using an optimised post column reagent system containing 0.65 mM dye, 0.5% Triton X-100 and 50 mM sodium hydroxide, good linearity (0-7.5 mg L(-1) R2 > 0.999), reproducibility using peak area measurements (RSD 0.69-1.38%, n = 8), and limits of detection (4-12 microg L(-1)) were achieved for methyl mercury, inorganic mercury and phenyl mercury. PMID:14667153

  6. [Characterization of water-soluble inorganic ions in PM2.5 and PM1.0 in summer in Guangzhou].

    PubMed

    Tao, Jun; Zhang, Ren-jian; Dong, Lin; Zhang, Tao; Zhu, Li-hua; Han, Jing-lei; Xu, Zhen-cheng

    2010-07-01

    PM2.5 and PM1.0 samples were collected simultaneously during July of 2008 in Guangzhou. The concentrations of water-soluble inorganic ions (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, F-, Cl-, NO3-, and SO4(2-)) were determined by ion chromatography. Meteorological parameters, atmospheric scattering, visibility, and concentrations of trace gases (SO2, NO2, and O3) for this period were also recorded. The results showed the total water-soluble inorganic ions concentrations were (25.5 +/- 10.9) microg x m(-1) and (22. 7 +/- 10.5) microg x m(-3) in PM2.5 and PM1.0, which occupied (47.9 +/- 4.3)% and (49.3 +/- 4.3)% of PM mass respectively. Sulfate was the most abundant ion and contributed (25.8 +/- 4.0)% of PM2.5 mass and (27.5 +/- 4.5)% of PM1.0 mass respectively. High temperature and high ozone level favored the formation of sulfate from sulfur dioxide, while the high relative humidity favored the formation of nitrate were observed. Moreover, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium in PM2.5 and PM1.0 had great impact on the scattering coefficient and visibility degradation. PMID:20825004

  7. Salinization and Saline Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengosh, A.

    2003-12-01

    L-1), although the chloride comprises only a fraction of the total dissolved salts in water. The Cl/TDS ratio varies from 0.1 in nonmarine saline waters to ˜0.5 in marine-associated saline waters. Water salinity is also defined by electrical conductivity (EC). In soil studies, the electrical conductivity and the ratio of Na/√(Ca+Mg) (SAR) are often used as an indirect measure of soil salinity. In addition to chloride, high levels of other dissolved constituents may limit the use of water for domestic, agriculture, and industrial applications. In some parts of Africa, China, and India, for example, high fluoride content is associated with saline groundwater and causes severe dental and skeletal fluorosis (Shiklomanov, 1997). Hence, the "salinity" problem is only the "tip of the iceberg," as high levels of salinity are associated with high concentrations of other inorganic pollutants (e.g., sodium, sulfate, boron, fluoride), and bioaccumulated elements (e.g., selenium, and arsenic) (see Chapter 9.03).The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that the chloride concentration of the water supply for human consumption should not exceed 250 mg L-1. Agriculture applications also depend upon the salinity level of the supplied water. Many crops, such as citrus, avocado, and mango, are sensitive to chloride concentration in irrigation water (an upper limit of 250 mg L-1). In addition, long-term irrigation with water enriched with sodium results in a significant reduction in the hydraulic conductivity and hence the fertility of the irrigated soil. Similarly, the industrial sector demands water of high quality. For example, the high-tech industry requires a large amount of water with low levels of dissolved salts. Hence, the salinity level of groundwater is one of the limiting factors that determine the suitability of water for a variety of applications.The salinity problem is a global phenomenon but it is more severe in water-scarce areas, such as arid and semi

  8. Salinization and Saline Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengosh, A.

    2003-12-01

    L-1), although the chloride comprises only a fraction of the total dissolved salts in water. The Cl/TDS ratio varies from 0.1 in nonmarine saline waters to ˜0.5 in marine-associated saline waters. Water salinity is also defined by electrical conductivity (EC). In soil studies, the electrical conductivity and the ratio of Na/√(Ca+Mg) (SAR) are often used as an indirect measure of soil salinity. In addition to chloride, high levels of other dissolved constituents may limit the use of water for domestic, agriculture, and industrial applications. In some parts of Africa, China, and India, for example, high fluoride content is associated with saline groundwater and causes severe dental and skeletal fluorosis (Shiklomanov, 1997). Hence, the "salinity" problem is only the "tip of the iceberg," as high levels of salinity are associated with high concentrations of other inorganic pollutants (e.g., sodium, sulfate, boron, fluoride), and bioaccumulated elements (e.g., selenium, and arsenic) (see Chapter 9.03).The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that the chloride concentration of the water supply for human consumption should not exceed 250 mg L-1. Agriculture applications also depend upon the salinity level of the supplied water. Many crops, such as citrus, avocado, and mango, are sensitive to chloride concentration in irrigation water (an upper limit of 250 mg L-1). In addition, long-term irrigation with water enriched with sodium results in a significant reduction in the hydraulic conductivity and hence the fertility of the irrigated soil. Similarly, the industrial sector demands water of high quality. For example, the high-tech industry requires a large amount of water with low levels of dissolved salts. Hence, the salinity level of groundwater is one of the limiting factors that determine the suitability of water for a variety of applications.The salinity problem is a global phenomenon but it is more severe in water-scarce areas, such as arid and semi

  9. Host-guest chemistry for tuning colloidal solubility, self-organization and photoconductivity of inorganic-capped nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnarchuk, Maryna I.; Yakunin, Sergii; Piveteau, Laura; Kovalenko, Maksym V.

    2015-12-01

    Colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs), functionalized with inorganic capping ligands, such as metal chalcogenide complexes (MCCs), have recently emerged as versatile optoelectronic materials. As-prepared, highly charged MCC-capped NCs are dispersible only in highly polar solvents, and lack the ability to form long-range ordered NC superlattices. Here we report a simple and general methodology, based on host-guest coordination of MCC-capped NCs with macrocyclic ethers (crown ethers and cryptands), enabling the solubilization of inorganic-capped NCs in solvents of any polarity and improving the ability to form NC superlattices. The corona of organic molecules can also serve as a convenient knob for the fine adjustment of charge transport and photoconductivity in films of NCs. In particular, high-infrared-photon detectivities of up to 3.3 × 1011 Jones with a fast response (3 dB cut-off at 3 kHz) at the wavelength of 1,200 nm were obtained with films of PbS/K3AsS4/decyl-18-crown-6 NCs.

  10. Host–guest chemistry for tuning colloidal solubility, self-organization and photoconductivity of inorganic-capped nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Bodnarchuk, Maryna I.; Yakunin, Sergii; Piveteau, Laura; Kovalenko, Maksym V.

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs), functionalized with inorganic capping ligands, such as metal chalcogenide complexes (MCCs), have recently emerged as versatile optoelectronic materials. As-prepared, highly charged MCC-capped NCs are dispersible only in highly polar solvents, and lack the ability to form long-range ordered NC superlattices. Here we report a simple and general methodology, based on host–guest coordination of MCC-capped NCs with macrocyclic ethers (crown ethers and cryptands), enabling the solubilization of inorganic-capped NCs in solvents of any polarity and improving the ability to form NC superlattices. The corona of organic molecules can also serve as a convenient knob for the fine adjustment of charge transport and photoconductivity in films of NCs. In particular, high-infrared-photon detectivities of up to 3.3 × 1011 Jones with a fast response (3 dB cut-off at 3 kHz) at the wavelength of 1,200 nm were obtained with films of PbS/K3AsS4/decyl-18-crown-6 NCs. PMID:26647828

  11. [Characteristics of Water-Soluble Inorganic Ions in PM2.5 Emitted from Coal-Fired Power Plants].

    PubMed

    Ma, Zi-zhen; Li, Zhen; Jiang, Jing-kun; Ye, Zhi-xiang; Deng, Jian-guo; Duan, Lei

    2015-07-01

    To characterize the primary PM2.5 emission from coal-fired power plants in China, and to quantitatively evaluate the effects of flue gas denitrification and desulfurization on PM2.5 emission, a pulverized coal fired (PC) power plant and a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) plant were selected for measuring the mass concentration and water-soluble ion composition of PM2.5 in flue gas. The results showed that the mass concentration of PM2.5 generated from the CFB was much higher than that from the PC, while the mass concentrations of PM2.5 emitted from these two plants were very similar, because the CFB was equipped with an electrostatic-bag precipitator (EBP) with higher PM2.5 removal efficiency than the common electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Although the total concentration of water-soluble ions in PM2.5 generated from the PC was lower than that from the CFB, the total concentration of water-soluble ions in PM2.5 emitted from the PC was much higher than that from the CFB, which implied that PM2.5 emission from the PC was greatly affected by the flue gas treatment installations. For example, the flue gas denitrification system produced H2SO4 mist, part of which reacted with the excessive NH3 in the flue gas to form NH4HSO4 in PM2.5 and to increase the acidity of PM2.5. In addition, the escaping of desulfurization solution during the flue gas desulfurization process could also introduce NH4+ and SO2- into PM2.5. Therefore, although the main water-soluble ions in PM2.5 generated from both of the plants were Ca2+ and SO(4)2-, the major cation was changed to NH4+ when emitted from PC. PMID:26489299

  12. Hypertonic saline solutions do not influence the solubility of sputum from secretor and non-secretor cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, Marcelo A.I.; Brandão de Mattos, Cinara C.; Ferreira, Ana Iara C.; Barja, Paulo R.; Santos de Faria Junior, Newton; de Oliveira, Luís Vicente F.; de Mattos, Luiz C.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Functional alterations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) increase the viscoelasticity of pulmonary secretions of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and require the use of therapeutic aerosols. The biochemical properties of exocrine secretions are influenced by the expression of the FUT2 gene which determine the secretor and non-secretor phenotypes of the ABH glycoconjugates. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of secretor and non-secretor phenotypes by means of photoacoustic analysis, both the typical interaction time (t 0) and the solubilization interval (Δt) of the sputum of secretor and non-secretor CF patients nebulized by hypertonic saline solutions at different concentrations. Material and methods Sputum samples were obtained by spontaneous expectoration from 6 secretor and 4 non-secretor patients with CF. Each sample was nebulized with 3%, 6%, and 7% hypertonic saline solutions in a photoacoustic cell. The values of t 0 and Δt were determined using the Origin 7.5® computer program (Microcal Software Inc.). The t-test was employed using the GraphPad Instat 3.0® computer program to calculate the mean and standard deviation for each parameter. Results For all hypertonic saline solutions tested, the mean values of t 0 and Δt do not show statistically significant differences between secretor and non-secretor patients. Conclusions The secretor and non-secretor phenotypes do not influence the in vitro solubilization of the sputum nebulized by hypertonic saline solutions at different concentrations when analysed by photoacoustic technique. PMID:22291775

  13. Solubility Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 106 IUPAC-NIST Solubility Database (Web, free access)   These solubilities are compiled from 18 volumes (Click here for List) of the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry(IUPAC)-NIST Solubility Data Series. The database includes liquid-liquid, solid-liquid, and gas-liquid systems. Typical solvents and solutes include water, seawater, heavy water, inorganic compounds, and a variety of organic compounds such as hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons, alcohols, acids, esters and nitrogen compounds. There are over 67,500 solubility measurements and over 1800 references.

  14. Polyimide/metal composite films via in situ decomposition of inorganic additives - Soluble polyimide versus polyimide precursor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rancourt, J. D.; Porta, G. M.; Moyer, E. S.; Madeleine, D. G.; Taylor, L. T.

    1988-01-01

    Polyimide-metal oxide (Co3O4 or CuO) composite films have been prepared via in situ thermal decomposition of cobalt (II) chloride or bis(trifluoroacetylacetonato)copper(II). A soluble polyimide (XU-218) and its corresponding prepolymer (polyamide acid) were individually employed as the reaction matrix. The resulting composites exhibited a greater metal oxide concentration at the air interface with polyamide acid as the reaction matrix. The water of imidization that is released during the concurrent polyamide acid cure and additive decomposition is believed to promote metal migration and oxide formation. In contrast, XU-218 doped with either HAuCl4.3H2O or AgNO3 yields surface gold or silver when thermolyzed (300 C).

  15. An automated analyzer to measure surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes of water soluble inorganic aerosol compounds and reactive trace gases.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rick M; Trebs, Ivonne; Otjes, René; Jongejan, Piet A C; Ten Brink, Harry; Phillips, Gavin; Kortner, Michael; Meixner, Franz X; Nemitz, Eiko

    2009-03-01

    Here, we present a new automated instrument for semicontinuous gradient measurements of water-soluble reactive trace gas species (NH3, HNO3, HONO, HCl, and SO2) and their related aerosol compounds (NH4+, NO3-, Cl-, SO4(2-)). Gas and aerosol samples are collected simultaneously at two heights using rotating wet-annular denuders and steam-jet aerosol collectors, respectively. Online (real-time) analysis using ion chromatography (IC) for anions and flow injection analysis (FIA) for NH4+ and NH3 provide a half-hourly averaged gas and aerosol gradients within each hour. Through the use of syringe pumps, IC preconcentration columns, and high-quality purified water, the system achieves detection limits (3sigma-definition) under field conditions of typically: 136/207,135/114, 29/ 22,119/92, and 189/159 ng m(-3) for NH3/NH4+, HNO3/NO3-, HONO/ NO2-, HCl/Cl- and SO2/SO4(2-), respectively. The instrument demonstrates very good linearity and accuracy for liquid and selected gas phase calibrations over typical ambient concentration ranges. As shown by examples from field experiments, the instrument provides sufficient precision (3-9%), even at low ambient concentrations, to resolve vertical gradients and calculate surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes undertypical meteorological conditions of the atmospheric surface layer using the aerodynamic gradient technique. PMID:19350912

  16. Mass size distributions of water-soluble inorganic and organic ions in size-segregated aerosols over metropolitan Newark in the US east coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunliang; Gao, Yuan

    2008-06-01

    To characterize the mass size distributions of water-soluble inorganic and organic ions associated with urban particulate matter, a total of 15 sets of size-segregated aerosol samples were collected by a 10-stage Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) in the urban area of Newark in New Jersey from July to December 2006. The mass concentrations of PM1.8 accounted for ∼68% of the mass concentrations of PM10. The mass concentrations of the total water-soluble ions in PM1.8 accounted for 31-81% of the mass concentrations of PM1.8. Sulfate was the dominant ion in fine particles, accounting for 31% of the PM1.8 mass with its dominant mode at 0.32-0.56 μm throughout all the samples. Nitrate size distributions were bi-modal, peaking at 0.32-0.56 and 3.2-5.6 μm, and the shift of the nitrate dominant fraction between fine and coarse modes was affected by temperature. The ratios of nitrate to PM1.8 varied significantly, 0.5-27%. The C2-C4 dicarboxylic acids accounted for 1.9±0.9% of PM1.8 mass, with oxalate being the dominant ion. The size distributions of oxalate exhibited two to four modes with the dominant one at 0.32-0.56 μm. Chloride existed in both coarse and fine modes, suggesting the influence of sea-salt aerosol and anthropogenic emissions. A crucial formation mechanism for the mass size distributions of these ions observed at this location is likely to be a combination of the gas-to-particle conversion and in-cloud/fog processing.

  17. Characteristics of water-soluble inorganic and organic ions in aerosols over the Southern Ocean and coastal East Antarctica during austral summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guojie; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Qi; Li, Wei; Chen, Liqi

    2013-12-01

    characterize the concentrations and size distributions of water-soluble organic and inorganic aerosol species, including Na+, non-sea-salt sulfate (nss SO42-), methane sulfonate (MSA), oxalate, and succinate, over the Southern Ocean (SO) and coastal East Antarctica (CEA), bulk and size-segregated aerosols were collected from 40°S, 100°E to 69°S, 76°E and between 69°S, 76°E and 66°S, 110°E during a cruise from November 2010 to March 2011. Results show that sea salt was the major component of the total aerosol mass, accounting for 72% over the SO and 56% over CEA. The average concentrations of nss SO42- varied from 420 ng m-3 over the SO to 480 ng m-3 over CEA. The concentrations of MSA ranged from 63 to 87 ng m-3 over the SO and from 46 to 170 ng m-3 in CEA. The average concentrations of oxalate were 3.8 ng m-3 over the SO and 2.2 ng m-3 over CEA. The concentrations of formate, acetate, and succinate were lower than those of oxalate. A bimodal size distribution of aerosol mass existed over CEA, peaking at 0.32-0.56 µm and 3.2-5.6 µm. MSA was accumulated in particles of 0.32-0.56 µm over CEA. High chloride depletion was associated with fine-mode particles enriched with nss SO42-, MSA, and oxalate. Higher cation-to-anion and NH4+/nss SO42- ratios in aerosols over CEA compared to that over the SO imply the higher neutralization capacity of the marine atmosphere over CEA.

  18. PEGylated Inorganic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Karakoti, Ajay S.; Das, Soumya; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Seal, Sudipta

    2011-02-25

    Application of inorganic nanoparticles in diagnosis and therapy has become a critical component in targeted treatment of diseases. The surface modification of inorganic oxides is important for providing diversity in size, shape, solubility, long term stability and attachment of selective functional groups. PEGylation of surfaces is a key strategic approach for providing stealth characteristics to nanomaterials otherwise identified as foreign materials by human body. The current review describes the role of surface modification of oxides by polyethylene glycol (PEG) in providing versatile characteristics to inorganic oxide nanoparticles with a focus on their biomedical applications. The role of PEG as structure directing agent in synthesis of oxides is also captured in this short review.

  19. Measuring soil salinity.

    PubMed

    Hardie, Marcus; Doyle, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Soil salinity is a form of land degradation in which salts accumulate in the soil profile to an extent that plant growth or infrastructure are negatively affected. A range of both field and laboratory procedures exist for measuring soil salinity. In the field, soil salinity is usually inferred from apparent electrical conductivity (EC(a)) using a range of devices, depending on the required depth of analysis, or size of the survey area. Field measurements of EC(a) require calibration to the actual salt content by laboratory analysis. In the laboratory, soil salinity is usually assessed by determining either the total soluble salts by evaporation of a soil water extract (TSS), or by determining the electrical conductivity (EC) of either a 1:5 distilled water:soil dilution, or a saturated paste extract. Although procedures for measuring soil salinity appear relatively straightforward, differences in methodology have considerable influence on measured values and interpretation of results. PMID:22895776

  20. Characterization of the size-segregated water-soluble inorganic ions in the Jing-Jin-Ji urban agglomeration: Spatial/temporal variability, size distribution and sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingru; Wang, Lili; Ji, Dongsheng; Wen, Tianxue; Pan, Yuepeng; Sun, Ying; Wang, Yuesi

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the characteristics of aerosols in north China, the samples of water-soluble ions, including anions (F-, Cl-, NO2-, NO3-, SO42-) and cations (NH4+, K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+) in 8 size-segregated particle fractions, are collected using a sampler from Sep. 2009 to Aug. 2010 at four sites in urban areas (Beijing, Tianjin and Tangshan) and a background region (Xinglong) in the Jing-Jin-Ji urban agglomeration. High spatial variability is observed between the urban areas and the background region. The results of chemical composition analysis showed that secondary water soluble ions (SO42- + NO3- + NH4+) (SWSI) composed more than half the total ions, and are mainly found in fine particles (aerodynamic diameters less than 2.1 μm), while Mg2+ and Ca2+ contributed to a large fraction of the total water-soluble ions in coarse particles (aerodynamic diameters greater than 2.1 μm and less than 9.0 μm). The concentrations of SO42-, NO3- and NH4+ are higher in summer and winter and lower in spring and autumn. Mg2+ and Ca2+ are obviously abundant in winter in Beijing, Tianjin and Tangshan. In contrast, Mg2+ and Ca2+ are abundant in autumn in Xinglong. The SWSI showed a bimodal size distribution with the fine mode at 0.43-1.1 μm and the coarse mode at 4.7-5.8 μm, and had different seasonal variations and bimodal shapes. NH4+ played an important role in the size distributions and the formations of SO42- and NO3-. Heterogeneous reaction is the main formation mechanism of SO42- and NO3-, which tended to be enriched in the coarse mode of aerosol. The sulfur oxidation ratio (SOR) and nitrogen oxidation ratio (NOR) indicated high photochemical oxidation property over the whole Jing-Jin-Ji urban agglomeration.

  1. Surfactant mediated synthesis of poly(acrylic acid) grafted xanthan gum and its efficient role in adsorption of soluble inorganic mercury from water.

    PubMed

    Pal, Abhijit; Majumder, Kunal; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit

    2016-11-01

    Noble copolymers from xanthan gum (XG) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) were synthesised through surfactant mediated graft copolymerization. The copolymers were applied as a biosorbent for inorganic Hg(II) at higher concentration level (300ppm). The copolymers were characterized using different analytical techniques which showed, the grafting principally occurred across the amorphous region of XG. Measurement of zeta potential and hydrodynamic size indicated, the copolymers were strong polyanion and possessed greater hydrodynamic size (almost in all cases) than XG, despite a strong molecular degradation that took place simultaneously during grafting. In the dispersed form, all grades of the copolymer displayed higher adsorption capability than XG, however, the grade with maximum grafting produced the highest efficiency (68.03%). Manipulation produced further improvement in efficiency to 72.17% with the same copolymer after 75min at a pH of 5.0. The allowable biosorbent dose, however, was 1000ppm as determined from the experimental evidences. PMID:27516248

  2. In situ determination of salinity by PGNAA.

    PubMed

    Borsaru, M; Smith, C; Merritt, J; Aizawa, T; Rojc, A

    2006-05-01

    Salinity is a very important environmental issue all around the world. In many cases salinity was produced from human activities like farming and mining. Different soluble salts contribute to salinity, however, NaCl is the most common salt producing salinity. This work deals with the application of the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique for in situ determination of salinity. The technique is based on the measurement of chlorine, a component of the common salt, by PGNAA. PMID:16448819

  3. Reactive Transport Modeling of Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in Saline Aquifers: The Influence of Intra-Aquifer Shales and the Relative Effectiveness of Structural, Solubility, and Mineral Trapping During Prograde and Retrograde Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J W; Nitao, J J; Steefel, C I; Knauss, K G

    2001-04-24

    In this study, we address a series of fundamental questions regarding the processes and effectiveness of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration in saline aquifers. We begin with the broadest: what is the ultimate fate of CO{sub 2} injected into these environments? Once injected, it is immediately subject to two sets of competing processes: migration processes and sequestration processes. In terms of migration, the CO{sub 2} moves by volumetric displacement of formation waters, with which it is largely immiscible; by gravity segregation, which causes the immiscible CO{sub 2} plume to rise owing to its relatively low density; and by viscous fingering, owing to its relatively low viscosity. In terms of sequestration, some fraction of the rising plume will dissolve into formation waters (solubility trapping); some fraction may react with formation minerals to precipitate carbonates (mineral trapping); and the remaining portion eventually reaches the cap rock, where it migrates up-dip, potentially accumulating in local topographic highs (structural trapping). Although this concept of competing migration/sequestration processes is intuitively obvious, identifying those sub-processes that dominate the competition is by no means straightforward. Hence, at present there are large uncertainties associated with the ultimate fate of injected CO{sub 2} (Figure 1). Principal among these: can a typical shale cap rock provide a secure seal? Because gravity segregation will always keep the immiscible CO{sub 2} plume moving towards the surface, caprock integrity is the single most important variable influencing isolation security. An extremely thick shale cap rock exists at Sleipner (several 100 m); here, however, we examine the performance of a 25-m-thick cap, which is more representative of the general case. Although the cap rock represents the final barrier to vertical CO{sub 2} migration, what is the effect of intra-aquifer permeability structure? Because this structure directs the

  4. Salinization alters fluxes of bioreactive elements from stream ecosystems across land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, S.; Kaushal, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    There has been increased salinization of fresh water over decades due to the use of road salt deicers, wastewater discharges, saltwater intrusion, human-accelerated weathering, and groundwater irrigation. Salinization can mobilize bioreactive elements (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur) chemically via ion exchange and/or biologically via influencing of microbial activity. However, the effects of salinization on coupled biogeochemical cycles are still not well understood. We investigated potential impacts of increased salinization on fluxes of bioreactive elements from stream ecosystems (sediments and riparian soils) to overlying stream water and evaluated the implications of percent urban land use on salinization effects. Two-day incubations of sediments and soils with stream and deionized water across three salt levels were conducted at eight routine monitoring stations across a land-use gradient at the Baltimore Ecosystem Study Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Results indicated (1) salinization typically increased sediment releases of labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total dissolved Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) (ammonium + ammonia + dissolved organic nitrogen), and sediment transformations of nitrate; (2) salinization generally decreased DOC aromaticity and fluxes of soluble reactive phosphorus from both sediments and soils; (3) the effects of increased salinization on sediment releases of DOC and TKN and DOC quality increased with percentage watershed urbanization. Biogeochemical responses to salinization varied between sediments and riparian soils in releases of DOC and DIC, and nitrate transformations. The differential responses of riparian soils and sediments to increased salinization were likely due to differences in organic matter sources and composition. Our results suggest that short-term increases in salinization can cause releases of significant amounts of labile organic

  5. Efficiency of soil organic and inorganic amendments on the remediation of a contaminated mine soil: I. Effects on trace elements and nutrients solubility and leaching risk.

    PubMed

    Pardo, T; Bernal, M P; Clemente, R

    2014-07-01

    A mesocosm experiment, in columns, was conducted in a growth chamber to assess the viability of two organic materials (pig slurry and compost; in combination with hydrated lime) for the remediation of a highly acidic and trace elements (TEs) contaminated mine soil and the reduction of its associated leaching risks. Their influence on the evolution throughout the soil depth of the physicochemical properties (including TEs mobility) of the soil and soil solution (in situ periodic collection) and on Lolium perenne growth and foliar TEs accumulation was evaluated. Soluble and extractable concentrations of the different TEs were considerably high, although the organic amendments (with lime) and lime addition successfully decreased TEs mobility in the top soil layer, as a consequence of a rise in pH and changes in the redox conditions. Compost and pig slurry increased the soluble organic-C and dissolved N, K and P of the soil, producing a certain downwards displacement of N and K. The organic amendments allowed the growth of L. perenne in the soil, thus indicating improvement of soil conditions, but elevated TEs availability in the soil led to toxicity symptoms and abnormally high TEs concentrations in the plants. An evaluation of the functioning and ecotoxicological risks of the remediated soils is reported in part II: this allows verification of the viability of the amendments for remediation strategies. PMID:24875879

  6. Secondary Inorganic Soluble Aerosol in Hong Kong: Continuous Measurements, Formation Mechanism Discussion and Improvement of an Observation-Based Model to Study Control Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jian

    Work in this thesis focuses on half-hourly or hourly measurements of PM2.5 secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA) in two locations in Hong Kong (HK) using a continuous system, PILS (Particle-into-Liquid System) coupled to two ion chromatographs. The high-resolution data sets allow the examination of SIA temporal dynamics in the scale of hours that the filter-based approach is incapable of providing. (1) Impacts of local emissions, regional transports and their interactions on chemical composition and concentrations of PM2.5 SIA and other ionic species were investigated at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), a receptor site, under three synoptic conditions. (2) Chemical compositions and size characteristics of ionic species were investigated at Tung Chung, a new town area located in the Southwest part of HK. The sampling period was from 17 to 26 December 2009, covering both normal conditions and an aerosol episode. The three major secondary inorganic ions, SO42, NH4+ and NO 3-, accounted for 47 +/- 6% of PM2.5 mass. Further examination of size characteristics of NO3 - shows that fine mode NO3- is more likely to occur in environments when the fine particles are less acidic and the sea-salt aerosol contributions are low. (3) The ionic chemical composition of PM2.5 and meteorological parameters (e.g., temperature, RH) obtained at the HKUST site under all three different synoptic conditions are input into Aerosol Inorganic Model (AIM-III) for estimation of in situ pH through calculation of H+ amount and aerosol liquid water content (LWC). The second part of this thesis work is to improve an observation-based model (OBAMAP) for SIA, which was first developed by Dr. Zibing Yuan (2006) to evaluate the sensitivity of formation of nitrate ad sulfate to changes in the emissions of their precursors (i.e., NOx, SO2, and VOCs). The improvement work includes incorporating updated chemical mechanisms, thermodynamic equilibrium for gas-aerosol phase

  7. Water-soluble inorganic ions in airborne particulates from the nano to coarse mode: a case study of aerosol episodes in southern region of Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Peng; Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Chang, Kai-Lun; Lin, Jim Juimin

    2008-06-01

    In 2004, airborne particulate matter (PM) was collected for several aerosol episodes occurring in the southern region of Taiwan. The particulate samples were taken using both a MOUDI (Micro-orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor) and a nano-MOUDI sampler. These particulate samples were analyzed for major water-soluble ionic species with an emphasis to characterize the mass concentrations and distributions of these ions in the ambient ultrafine (PM0.1, diameter <0.1 microm) and nano mode (PMnano, diameter <0.056 microm) particles. Particles collected at the sampling site (the Da-Liao station) on the whole exhibited a typical tri-modal size distribution on mass concentration. The mass concentration ratios of PMnano/PM2.5, PM0.1/PM2.5, and PM1/PM2.5 on average were 1.8, 2.9, and 71.0%, respectively. The peak mass concentration appeared in the submicron particle mode (0.1 microm < diameter <1.0 microm). Mass fractions (percentages) of the three major water-soluble ions (nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium) as a group in PMnano, PM0.1, PM1, and PM2.5 were 18.4, 21.7, 50.0, and 50.7%, respectively. Overall, results from this study supported the notion that secondary aerosols played a significant role in the formation of ambient submicron particulates (PM0.1-1). Particles smaller than 0.1 microm were essentially basic, whereas those greater than 2.5 microm were neutral or slightly acidic. The neutralization ratio (NR) was close to unity for airborne particles with diameters ranging from 0.18 to 1 microm. The NRs of these airborne particles were found strongly correlated with their sizes, at least for samples taken during the aerosol episodes under study. Insofar as this study is exploratory in nature, as only a small number of particulate samples were used, there appears to be a need for further research into the chemical composition, source contribution, and formation of the nano and ultrafine mode airborne particulates. PMID:17874279

  8. Chemical coupling between acid gases and water-soluble inorganic ions in size-segregated aerosols during Arabian Dust in Beirut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, Najat; Dada, Lubna; Baalbaki, Rima

    2015-04-01

    In the proximity of the Eastern Mediterranean region, the combination of two large desert areas; Arabian and African, with heavy oil industry and high insolation during summer delineate a unique location of atmospheric processes in the region. Once emitted, dust particles can be transported over long distances and/or remain suspended in the atmosphere for several days. The so-called remnant dust episodes in Beirut originate from both African and Arabian deserts. In this study, the gas and particle transformations and gas-to-particle conversion during Arabian-dust (Ar-D) events are assessed. The increase in primary and secondary gas concentrations during Ar-D days is ascribed to three contributing factors; (i) the regional-long-range transport (LRT), (ii) the drop in the average solar radiation leading to a slow primary-to-secondary conversion and secondary gas photo-degradation, and (iii) the enhancement of the recirculation and accumulation of the main pollutants during dusty days. In parallel, a respective mass increase by 137, 149 and 13% in the coarse (CPM), accumulation (ACC) and ultrafine (UF) fractions was measured and an increase in particle volume distribution was mostly noticed for particles ranging in sizes between 2.25 and 5 μm. This lead to major changes in the inorganic chemical composition of all particle sizes. In particular, the enhanced presence of several types of nitrate and sulfate salts in the accumulation mode confirms that remnant dust episodes offer a favorable environment for gas-to-particle conversion and particle chemical transformations and growth.

  9. A 12 year observation of water-soluble inorganic ions in TSP aerosols collected at a remote marine location in the western North Pacific: an outflow region of Asian dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreddy, S. K. R.; Kawamura, K.

    2015-03-01

    In order to characterize the long term trend of remote marine aerosols, a 12 year observation was conducted for water-soluble inorganic ions in TSP aerosols collected from 2001-2012 in the Asian outflow region at a Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific. We found a clear difference in chemical composition between the continentally affected and marine background air masses over the observation site. Asian continental air masses are delivered from late autumn to spring, whereas marine air masses were dominated in summer. Concentrations of nss-SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, nss-K+ and nss-Ca2+ are high in winter and spring and low in summer. On the other hand, MSA- exhibits higher concentrations during spring and winter, probably due to springtime dust bloom or due to the direct continental transport of MSA- to the observation site. We could not find any clear decadal trend for Na+, Cl-, Mg2+ and nss-Ca2+ in all seasons, although there exists a clear seasonal trend. However, concentrations of nss-SO42- continuously decreased from 2007-2012, probably due to the decreased SO2 emissions in East Asia especially in China. In contrast, nss-K+ and MSA- concentrations continuously increased from 2001-2012 during winter and spring seasons, demonstrating that biomass burning and/or terrestrial biological emissions in East Asia are increasingly more transported from the Asian continent to the western North Pacific.

  10. In Nicotiana species, an artificial microRNA corresponding to the virulence modulating region of Potato spindle tuber viroid directs RNA silencing of a soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase gene and the development of abnormal phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Eamens, Andrew L; Smith, Neil A; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Wassenegger, Michael; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2014-02-01

    Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) is a small non-protein-coding RNA pathogen that can induce disease symptoms in a variety of plant species. How PSTVd induces disease symptoms is a long standing question. It has been suggested that PSTVd-derived small RNAs (sRNAs) could direct RNA silencing of a targeted host gene(s) resulting in symptom development. To test this, we expressed PSTVd sequences as artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) in Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana benthamiana. One amiRNA, amiR46 that corresponds to sequences within the PSTVd virulence modulating region (VMR), induced abnormal phenotypes in both Nicotiana species that closely resemble those displayed by PSTVd infected plants. In N. tabacum amiR46 plants, phenotype severity correlated with amiR46 accumulation and expression down-regulation of the bioinformatically-identified target gene, a Nicotiana soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase (siPPase). Taken together, our phenotypic and molecular analyses suggest that disease symptom development in Nicotiana species following PSTVd infection results from sRNA-directed RNA silencing of the host gene, siPPase. PMID:24503090

  11. Salinization Enhances Mobilization of Nutrients from Sediments to Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, S.; Kaushal, S.; Hohman, S.; Coplin, J.; Duan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Many regions of the U.S. and elsewhere are experiencing increased salinization of freshwater due to the widespread application of road salts. Increased salinization has the potential to release stored nutrients from sediments, decrease biodiversity, and perturb water quality. We conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the potential effects of road salt (NaCl) on nutrient mobilization from sediments to stream water. Sediments and stream water were incubated from 2 urbanizing watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay in the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan area. Stream sediment was incubated from 11 routinely monitored streams exhibiting a land use gradient within the Baltimore Ecosystem Study Long-Term Ecological Research (BES LTER) site and Anacostia River watershed. Our results indicate that salinization increased the release of soluble reactive phosphorus and total dissolved nitrogen at all sites. The release of dissolved organic carbon and dissolved inorganic carbon varied between sites, and these differential responses may be due to: stream sediment composition, organic matter content, and ambient water quality. The magnitude and frequency of road salt application may be amplified in the near future due to the interactive effects of climate variability and urbanization, and our research suggests this can have water quality and ecological implications for freshwater ecosystems. Further research is necessary to elucidate driving mechanisms of changes in sediment biogeochemical cycles in response to salinization and the temporal response of freshwater ecosystems.

  12. Characterization of saline dust emission resulted from Urmia Lake drying.

    PubMed

    Gholampour, Akbar; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Hassanvand, Mohammad Sadegh; Taghipour, Hasan; Nazmara, Shahrokh; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Compared with common dust storms, saline dust storms transport high concentrations of fine-grain saline and alkaline material. The saline dust storm differs from common dust storm, especially considering the sources of the suspended particulate matter (PM), chemical composition, grain size, and circulation processes. Atmospheric particulate matters (TSP, PM10, PM2.5, and PM1) and their water-soluble ions were concurrently measured at two sites located at north and southeast part of Urmia lake from January 2013 to September 2013. Particulate matters (PMs) were measured using high volume sampler and HAZ-DUST EPAM-5000 particulate air monitors. In both of the sampling sites, the highest concentration of PM was observed during the summer season (521.6, 329.1, 42.6, and 36.5 for TSP, PM10, PM2.5, and PM1, respectively). A total of 11 inorganic water-soluble ions in the TSP and PM10 were identified by ion chromatography (IC). No statistically significant difference was found between PM's ions concentrations of two sampling sites. The average of the total measured water-soluble ions in the sampling sites was 28.75 ± 12.9 μg/m(3) (11.9 ± 4.8% of total TSP mass) for TSP and 14.65 ± 7.1μg/m(3) (8.7 ± 4.4 of total PM10 mass) for PM10. Among all detected ions, sulfate was the dominant constituent followed by nitrate and sodium. This study showed that the water soluble salts compose 3-20% of the total mass of TSP and PM10. The PCA analysis showed that saline particulates formed from Urmia lake bed were the dominant source (57.6 %) of TSP. In addition, saline particulates together with crustal materials resulted from resuspension were the main source (59.9%) of PM10. PMID:26617986

  13. Sediment-water partitioning of inorganic mercury in estuaries.

    PubMed

    Turner, A; Millward, G E; Le Roux, S M

    2001-12-01

    The sediment-water partitioning and speciation of inorganic mercury have been studied under simulated estuarine conditions by monitoring the hydrophobicity and uptake of dissolved 203Hg(II) in samples from a variety of estuarine environments. A persistent increase in the distribution coefficientwith increasing salinity is inconsistent with inorganic speciation calculations, which predict an increase in the concentration of the soluble HgCl4(2-) complex (or reduction in sediment-water distribution coefficient) with increasing salinity. Partition data are, however, defined by an empirical equation relating to the salting out of nonelectrolytes via electrostriction and are characterized by salting constants between about 1.4 and 2.0 L mol(-1). Salting out of the neutral, covalent chloro-complex, HgCl2(0), is predicted but cannot account for the magnitude of salting out observed. Since Hg(II) strongly complexes with dissolved (and particulate) organic matter in natural environments, of more significance appears to be the salting out of Hg(II)-organic complexes. Operational measurements of the speciation of dissolved Hg(II) using Sep-Pak C18 columns indicate a reduction in the proportion of hydrophobic (C18-retained) dissolved Hg(II) complexes with increasing salinity, both in the presence and absence of suspended particles. Ratios of hydrophobic Hg(ll) before and after particle addition suggest a coupled salting out-sorption mechanism, with the precise nature of Hg(II) species salted out being determined bythe characteristics and concentrations of dissolved and sediment organic matter. PMID:11770766

  14. Seasonal variations and evidence for the effectiveness of pollution controls on water-soluble inorganic species in total suspended particulates and fine particulate matter from Xi'an, China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhenxing; Arimoto, Richard; Cao, Junji; Zhang, Renjian; Li, Xuxiang; Du, Na; Okuda, Tomoaki; Nakao, Shunsuke; Tanaka, Shigeru

    2008-12-01

    Total suspended particulate (TSP) and particulate matter less than 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) samples were collected over Xi'an for a 1-yr period to characterize the seasonal variations of water-soluble inorganic ions and to evaluate the effectiveness of the pollution policies and controls during the past 10 yr. Mass concentrations of five cations (sodium [Na+], potassium [K+], ammonium [NH4+], calcium [Ca2+], and magnesium [Mg2+]) and four anions (fluoride [F-], chloride [Cl-], nitrate [NO3-], and sulfate [SO4(2-)]) were determined by ion chromatography. The yearly arithmetic-mean mass concentrations of the total measured water-soluble ions in TSP and PM2.5 were 83.9 +/- 58.4 and 45 +/- 34.3 microg x m(-3). The most abundant ions in TSP were SO4(2-), NO3-, Ca2+, and NH4+; whereas in PM2.5 the dominant ions were SO4(2-), NH4 +, and NO3-. Most of the ions were more concentrated in the PM2.5 than in TSP, but two exceptions were Ca2+ and Mg2+. Comparisons of the molar ratios of Mg2+/Ca2+ in TSP indicated that fugitive dust was the main source for these two ions, and the influence of soil dust from outside of the city was most evident during dust storms. The mass concentrations of SO4(2-), NO3-, , NH4+, and K+ in TSP were highest in winter and lowest in spring, but Ca2+ was much higher in spring than other seasons because of suspended mineral dust. In PM2.5, NO3- and K+ also showed winter maxima, but SO4(2-) and NH4+ were highest in summer. Calculations of ion equivalents showed that TSP samples were more alkaline than PM2.5, the latter being weakly acidic in winter and autumn. High sulfur and nitrogen oxidation ratios occurred in summer and autumn, and there was evidence for the formation of ammonium bisulfate in TSP, ammonium sulfate in PM2.5, and ammonium nitrate in both fractions. Comparisons with the results of prior studies indicate that pollution controls in Xi'an have reduced the levels of air pollution over the past 10 yr. The SO4

  15. Salinity Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Walter R.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed are the costs of deriving energy from the earth's natural reserves of salt. Argues that, as fossil fuel supplies become more depleted in the future, the environmental advantages of salinity power may prove to warrant its exploitation. (TW)

  16. Arsenic, inorganic

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Arsenic , inorganic ; CASRN 7440 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  17. Characterization of Soluble Organics in Produced Water

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, D.T.

    2002-01-16

    Soluble organics in produced water and refinery effluents represent treatment problems for the petroleum industry. Neither the chemistry involved in the production of soluble organics nor the impact of these chemicals on total effluent toxicity is well understood. The U.S. Department of Energy provides funding for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support a collaborative project with Shell, Chevron, Phillips, and Statoil entitled ''Petroleum and Environmental Research Forum project (PERF 9844: Manage Water-Soluble Organics in Produced Water''). The goal of this project, which involves characterization and evaluation of these water-soluble compounds, is aimed at reducing the future production of such contaminants. To determine the effect that various drilling conditions might have on water-soluble organics (WSO) content in produced water, a simulated brine water containing the principal inorganic components normally found in Gulf of Mexico (GOM) brine sources was prepared. The GOM simulant was then contacted with as-received crude oil from a deep well site to study the effects of water cut, produced-water pH, salinity, pressure, temperature, and crude oil sources on the type and content of the WSO in produced water. The identities of individual semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) were determined in all as-received crude and actual produced water samples using standard USEPA Method (8270C) protocol. These analyses were supplemented with the more general measurements of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the gas (C{sub 6}-C{sub 10}), diesel (C{sub 10}-C{sub 20}), and oil (C{sub 20}-C{sub 28}) carbon ranges as determined by both gas chromatographic (GC) and infrared (IR) analyses. An open liquid chromatographic procedure was also used to differentiate the saturated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon, and polar components within the extractable TPH. Inorganic constituents in the produced water were analyzed by ion-selective electrodes and inductively

  18. The chemical control of soluble phosphorus in the Amazon estuary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, L. E.; Wofsy, S. C.; Sager, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    The role of sediments in controlling concentrations of soluble phosphorous in the Amazon estuary is examined. The efflux of phosphorous through the estuary is calculated using data collected on field excursions in December 1982 and May 1983, and laboratory mixing experiments. It is observed that soluble phosphorus was released from bottom sediments at a rate of 0.2 micro-M/day, when in seawater and deionizd water mixtures. The relation between release rates and salinity and sediment concentrations is studied. A one-dimensional dispersion model was developed to estimate phosphate inputs to the estuary. The model predicted total fluxes of soluble inorganic phosphorous of 15 x 10 to the 6th mole/day for December 1982 and 27 x 10 to the 6th mole/day for May 1983; the predictions correlate with field observations. It is noted that phosphorous removal is between 0 and 4 ppt at a rate of 0.044 + or - 0.01 micron-M/ppt per day and the annual mean input of phophorous from Amazon to outer-estuary is 23 x 10 to the 6th moles/day.

  19. Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe

    MedlinePlus

    ... Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe Share | Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe Saline sinus rinses can bring relief to patients ... at a fraction of the cost. Saline Rinse Recipe Ingredients 1. Pickling or canning salt-containing no ...

  20. Method for producing heat-resistant semi-inorganic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yajima, S.; Okamura, K.; Shishido, T.; Hasegawa, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The method for producing a heat resistant, semi-inorganic compound is discussed. Five examples in which various alcohols, phenols, and aromatic carbonic acids are used to test heat resistance and solubility are provided.

  1. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  2. Hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Constable, P D

    1999-11-01

    A key feature in the successful resuscitation of dehydrated or endotoxemic ruminants is the total amount of sodium administered. Administration of small volumes of HS and HSD offer major advantages over large volumes of isotonic saline because HS and HSD do not require intravenous catheterization or periodic monitoring, and are therefore suitable for use in the field. Hypertonic saline and HSD exert their beneficial effect by rapidly increasing preload and transiently decreasing afterload. Contrary to early reports, HS and HSD decrease cardiac contractility and do not activate a pulmonary reflex. The osmolality of HS and HSD should be 2400 mOsm/L (7.2% NaCl solution, 8 times normal plasma osmolality). Use of HS and HSD solutions of different osmolality to 2400 mOsm/L should be avoided at all costs, as too low a tonicity removes the main advantages of HS (low cost, decreased infusion time), whereas too high a tonicity may cause rapid vasodilation and decreased cardiac contractility, resulting in death. Rapid administration (> 1 mL/kg-1/min-1) of HS (2400 mOsm/L) should be avoided, as the induced hypotension may be fatal when coupled with a transient decrease in cardiac contractility. For treating dehydrated adult ruminants, HS (2400 mOsm/L, 4-5 mL/kg i.v. over 4-5 minutes) should be administered through the jugular vein and the cow allowed to drink water. This means that 2 L of HS should be administered to adult cattle. HSD should be administered in conjunction with isotonic oral electrolyte solutions to all calves 8% or more dehydrated (eyes recessed > or = 4 mm into the orbit, cervical skin tent duration > 6 seconds) or calves with reduced cardiac output (fetlock temperature < 29 degrees C when housed at 10-24 degrees C). For treating dehydrated calves, HSD (2400 mOsm/L NaCl in 6% dextran-70, 4-5 mL/kg i.v. over 4-5 minutes) should be administered through the jugular vein and the calf allowed to suckle an isotonic oral electrolyte solution. This means that 120

  3. Practically Saline

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Jonathan; O’Neal, Catherine; Jagneaux, Tonya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In December 2014, the Food and Drug Administration issued a recall of all Wallcur simulation products due to reports of their use in clinical practice. We present a case of septic shock and multiorgan failure after the accidental intravenous infusion of a nonsterile Wallcur simulation product. Case. The patient presented with symptoms of rigors and dyspnea occurring immediately after infusion of Wallcur Practi-0.9% saline. Initial laboratory evidence was consistent with severe septic shock and multiorgan dysfunction. His initial lactic acid level was 9 mmol/L (reference range = 0.5-2.2), and he had evidence of acute kidney injury and markers of disseminated intravascular coagulation. All 4 blood culture bottles isolated multidrug-resistant Empedobacter brevis. The patient recovered from his illness and was discharged with ciprofloxacin therapy per susceptibilities. Discussion. This patient represents the first described case of severe septic shock associated with the infusion of a Wallcur simulation product. Intravenous inoculation of a nonsterile fluid is rare and exposes the patient to unusual environmental organisms, toxins, or unsafe fluid characteristics such as tonicity. During course of treatment, we identified the possible culprit to be a multidrug-resistant isolate of Empedobacter brevis. We also discuss the systemic failures that led to this outbreak. PMID:26668812

  4. Practically Saline.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Jonathan; O'Neal, Catherine; Jagneaux, Tonya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In December 2014, the Food and Drug Administration issued a recall of all Wallcur simulation products due to reports of their use in clinical practice. We present a case of septic shock and multiorgan failure after the accidental intravenous infusion of a nonsterile Wallcur simulation product. Case. The patient presented with symptoms of rigors and dyspnea occurring immediately after infusion of Wallcur Practi-0.9% saline. Initial laboratory evidence was consistent with severe septic shock and multiorgan dysfunction. His initial lactic acid level was 9 mmol/L (reference range = 0.5-2.2), and he had evidence of acute kidney injury and markers of disseminated intravascular coagulation. All 4 blood culture bottles isolated multidrug-resistant Empedobacter brevis. The patient recovered from his illness and was discharged with ciprofloxacin therapy per susceptibilities. Discussion. This patient represents the first described case of severe septic shock associated with the infusion of a Wallcur simulation product. Intravenous inoculation of a nonsterile fluid is rare and exposes the patient to unusual environmental organisms, toxins, or unsafe fluid characteristics such as tonicity. During course of treatment, we identified the possible culprit to be a multidrug-resistant isolate of Empedobacter brevis. We also discuss the systemic failures that led to this outbreak. PMID:26668812

  5. Saline Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Figure 2

    These images of the Saline Valley area, California, were acquired March 30, 2000 and cover a full ASTER scene (60 by 60 km). Each image displays data from a different spectral region, and illustrates the complementary nature of surface compositional information available as a function of wavelength. This image displays visible and near infrared bands 3, 2, and 1 in red, green, and blue (RGB). Vegetation appears red, snow and dry salt lakes are white, and exposed rocks are brown, gray, yellow and blue. Rock colors mainly reflect the presence of iron minerals, and variations in albedo. Figure 1 displays short wavelength infrared bands 4, 6, and 8 as RGB. In this wavelength region, clay, carbonate, and sulfate minerals have diagnostic absorption features, resulting in distinct colors on the image. For example, limestones are yellow-green, and purple areas are kaolinite-rich. Figure 2 displays thermal infrared bands 13, 12 and 10 as RGB. In this wavelength region, variations in quartz content appear as more or less red; carbonate rocks are green, and mafic volcanic rocks are purple. The image is located at 36.8 degrees north latitude and 117.7 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  6. Remote Monitoring, Inorganic Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview of applicability, amenability, and operating parameter ranges for various inorganic parameters:this chapter will also provide a compilation of existing and new online technologies for determining inorganic compounds in water samples. A wide vari...

  7. Bioremediation of metals and inorganic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, B.C.; Leeson, A.

    1999-11-01

    Bioremediation has been a problematic alternative for remediation of metals and inorganic compound contamination. Unlike organic contaminants, which often can be broken down by biological processes into relatively harmless metabolites and byproducts, metals are elemental. Further, metals and their salts often have an inhibitory effect on biological activity. However, despite these potential pitfalls, there has been progress recently in applying bioremediation technologies to metals and inorganics. This volume encompasses topics such as lead solubility reduction, chromium reduction, denitrification, volatilization of selenium in soils, metals recovery from acid mine drainage, and even the possibility of applying artificial neural network technology to aid in bioremediation.

  8. Solubility of Structurally Complicated Materials: II. Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Ari L.

    2006-12-01

    Bone is a structurally complex material, formed of both organic and inorganic chemicals. The organic compounds constitute mostly collagen and other proteins. The inorganic or bone mineral components constitute predominantly calcium, phosphate, carbonate, and a host of minor ingredients. The mineralized bone is composed of crystals which are closely associated with a protein of which collagen is an acidic polysaccharide material. This association is very close and the protein integrates into the crystalline structure. The mineralization involves the deposition of relatively insoluble crystals on an organic framework. The solubility process takes place when the outermost ions in the crystal lattice breakaway from the surface and become separated from the crystal. This is characteristic for ions dissolving in water or aqueous solutions at the specified temperature. The magnitude of solubility is temperature and pH dependent. Bone is sparingly soluble in most solvents. Enamel is less soluble than bone and fluoroapatite is the least soluble of all apatites in acid buffers. Collagen is less soluble in neutral salt solution than in dilute acid solutions at ambient temperatures. The solubility of collagens in solvents gradually decreases with increasing age of the bone samples.

  9. The effect of biological activity, CaCO3 mineral dynamics, and CO2 degassing in the inorganic carbon cycle in sea ice in late winter-early spring in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, S.; Kennedy, H.; Norman, L.; Kennedy, D. P.; Dieckmann, G. S.; Thomas, D. N.

    A large-scale geographical study of the ice pack in the seasonal ice zone of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica, took place from September to October 2006. Sea ice brines with a salinity greater than 58 and temperature lower than -3.6°C were sampled from 22 ice stations. The brines had large deficits in total alkalinity and in the concentrations of the major dissolved macronutrients (total dissolved inorganic carbon, nitrate, and soluble reactive phosphorus) relative to their concentrations in the surface oceanic water and conservative behavior during seawater freezing. The concentration deficits were related to the dissolved inorganic carbon-consuming processes of photosynthesis, CaCO3 precipitation, and CO2 degassing. The largest concentration deficits in total dissolved inorganic carbon were found to be associated with CaCO3 precipitation and CO2 degassing, because the magnitude of the photosynthesis-induced concentration deficit in total dissolved inorganic carbon is controlled by the size of the inorganic nutrient pool, which can be limited in sea ice by its openness to exchange with the surrounding oceanic water.

  10. Measuring Salinity by Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapworth, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    Outlines procedures for constructing an instrument which uses an electrode and calibration methods to measure the salinity of waters in environments close to and affected by a saline estuary. (Author/DC)

  11. Distribution of algae in the San Joaquin River, California, in relation to nutrient supply, salinity and other environmental factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leland, H.V.; Brown, L.R.; Mueller, D.K.

    2001-01-01

    1. The taxonomic composition and biomass of the phytoplankton and the taxonomic composition of the phytobenthos of the San Joaquin River and its major tributaries were examined in relation to water chemistry, habitat and flow regime. Agricultural drainage and subsurface flow contribute to a complex gradient of salinity and nutrients in this eutrophic, 'lowland type' river. 2. Because of light-limiting conditions for growth, maintenance demands of the algae exceed production during summer and autumn in the San Joaquin River where there is no inflow from tributaries. In contrast to substantial gains in concentration of inorganic nitrogen and soluble reactive phosphorus during the summer of normal-flow years, net losses of algal biomass (2-4 ??g L-1 day-1 chlorophyll a) occurred in a mid-river segment with no significant tributary inflow. However, downstream of a large tributary draining the Sierra Nevada, a substantial net gain in algal biomass (6-11 ??g L-1 day-1) occurred in the summer, but not in the spring (loss of 1-6 ??g L-1 day-1) or autumn (loss of 2-5 ??g L-1 day-1). 3. The phytoplankton was dominated in summer by 'r-selected' centric diatoms (Thalassiosirales), species both tolerant of variable salinity and widely distributed in the San Joaquin River. Pennate diatoms were proportionally more abundant (in biomass) in the winter, spring and autumn. Abundant taxa included the diatoms Cyclotella meneghiniana, Skeletonema cf. potamos, Cyclostephanos invisitatus, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Nitzschia acicularis, N. palea and N. reversa, and the chlorophytes Chlamydomonas sp. and Scenesdesmus quadricauda. Patterns in the abundance of species indicated that assembly of the phytoplankton is limited more by light and flow regime than by nutrient supply. 4. The phytobenthos was dominated by larger, more slowly reproducing pennate diatoms. Few of the abundant species are euryhaline. The diatoms Navicula recens and Nitzschia inconspicua and cyanophytes, Oscillatoria spp

  12. Inorganic contents of peats

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Bish, D.L.; Cohen, A.D.

    1988-02-01

    Peat, the precursor of coal, is composed primarily of plant components and secondarily of inorganic matter derived from a variety of sources. The elemental, mineralogic, and petrographic composition of a peat is controlled by a combination of both its botanical and depositional environment. Inorganic contents of peats can vary greatly between geographically separated peat bogs as well as vertially and horizontally within an individual bog. Predicting the form and distribution of inorganic matter in a coal deposit requires understanding the distribution and preservation of inorganic matter in peat-forming environments and diagenetic alterations affecting such material during late-stage peatification and coalification processes. 43 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. SPOT5 imagery for soil salinity assessment in Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teggi, S.; Costanzini, S.; Despini, F.; Chiodi, P.; Immordino, F.

    2012-10-01

    Soil salinization is a form of topsoil degradation due to the formation of soluble salts at deleterious levels. This phenomenon can seriously compromise vegetation health and agricultural productivity, and represents a worldwide environmental problem. Remote sensing is a very useful tool for soil salinization monitoring and assessment. In this work we show some results of a study aimed to define a methodology for soil salinity assessment in Iraq based on SPOT 5 imagery. This methodology allows the identification of salinized soils primarily on bare soils. Subsequently some soil salinity assessment can be done on vegetated soils. On bare soil the identification of salt is based on spectral analysis, using the Minimum Noise Fraction transformation and several indexes found in literature. In case of densely vegetated soils the methodology for the discrimination of salinized soils has been integrated with the results obtained from the classification of vegetation coverage.

  14. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Piers; *Morse, John W.

    2010-11-15

    1. Objective The general objective of this research was to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2), and modest ranges of T and P. This would be done by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry. Also, nanoscale observations of calcite surface morphology and composition would be made to provide an understanding of rate controlling mechanisms.

  15. Soluble vs. insoluble fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... soluble and insoluble. Both are important for health, digestion, and preventing diseases. Soluble fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  16. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  17. Determination of microgram quantities of inorganic sulfate in atmospheric particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfson, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    This method makes it possible for a minimally equipped analytical laboratory to measure the microgram quantities of water soluble inorganic sulfate in respirable-sized ambient air particulates. It is particularly appropriate for indoor and personal dosimeter samples which often contain cigarette smoke.

  18. Salinity Management in Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Existing guidelines and standards for reclamation of saline soils and management to control salinity exist but have not been updated for over 25 years. In the past few years a looming water scarcity has resulted in questioning of the long term future of irrigation projects in arid and semi arid regi...

  19. Solubility of hydroxyapatite/mica composites.

    PubMed

    Nordström, E G; Hara, T; Herø, H

    1996-01-01

    The solubility of some inorganic materials was studied. It was found that Ca dissolution was high in calcium phosphates with Ca/P ratios 1.67-2.0. Dissolution of P was moderate compared with dissolution of Ca. The composites, HA content 70 wt-%, and HA showed to be corrosion resistant. Dissolution of alumina in the mineral muscovite, used as a filler material, was found to be neglectable and dependent on the density of the composite. PMID:8761517

  20. Saline infusion sonohysterography.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Saline infusion sonohysterography consists of ultrasonographic imaging of the uterus and uterocervical cavity, using real-time ultrasonography during injection of sterile saline into the uterus. When properly performed, saline infusion sonohysterography can provide information about the uterus and endometrium. The most common indication for sonohysterography is abnormal uterine bleeding. sonohysterography should not be performed in a woman who is pregnant or could be pregnant or in a woman with a pelvic infection or unexplained pelvic tenderness. Physicians who perform or supervise diagnostic saline infusion sonohysterograpy should have training, experience, and demonstrated competence in gynecologic ultrasonography and saline infusion sonohysterography. Portions of this document were developed jointly with the American College of Radiology and the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine. PMID:14968760

  1. Remote sensing of salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The complex dielectric constant of sea water is a function of salinity at 21 cm wavelength, and sea water salinity can be determined by a measurement of emissivity at 21 cm along with a measurement of thermodynamic temperature. Three aircraft and one helicopter experiments using two different 21 cm radiometers were conducted under different salinity and temperature conditions. Single or multiple ground truth measurements were used to calibrate the data in each experiment. It is inferred from these experiments that accuracies of 1 to 2%/OO are possible with a single surface calibration point necessary only every two hours if the following conditions are met--water temperatures above 20 C, salinities above 10%/OO, and level plane flight. More frequent calibration, constraint of the aircraft's orientation to the same as it was during calibration, and two point calibration (at a high and low salinity level) rather than single point calibration may give even better accuracies in some instances.

  2. Hurricane-induced failure of low salinity wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Howes, Nick C.; FitzGerald, Duncan M.; Hughes, Zoe J.; Georgiou, Ioannis Y.; Kulp, Mark A.; Miner, Michael D.; Smith, Jane M.; Barras, John A.

    2010-01-01

    During the 2005 hurricane season, the storm surge and wave field associated with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita eroded 527 km2 of wetlands within the Louisiana coastal plain. Low salinity wetlands were preferentially eroded, while higher salinity wetlands remained robust and largely unchanged. Here we highlight geotechnical differences between the soil profiles of high and low salinity regimes, which are controlled by vegetation and result in differential erosion. In low salinity wetlands, a weak zone (shear strength 500–1450 Pa) was observed ∼30 cm below the marsh surface, coinciding with the base of rooting. High salinity wetlands had no such zone (shear strengths > 4500 Pa) and contained deeper rooting. Storm waves during Hurricane Katrina produced shear stresses between 425–3600 Pa, sufficient to cause widespread erosion of the low salinity wetlands. Vegetation in low salinity marshes is subject to shallower rooting and is susceptible to erosion during large magnitude storms; these conditions may be exacerbated by low inorganic sediment content and high nutrient inputs. The dramatic difference in resiliency of fresh versus more saline marshes suggests that the introduction of freshwater to marshes as part of restoration efforts may therefore weaken existing wetlands rendering them vulnerable to hurricanes. PMID:20660777

  3. Inorganic separator technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smatko, J. S.; Weaver, R. D.; Kalhammer, F. R.

    1973-01-01

    Testing and failure analyses of silver zinc cells with largely inorganic separators were performed. The results showed that the wet stand and cycle life objective of the silver-zinc cell development program were essentially accomplished and led to recommendations for cell composition, design, and operation that should yield further improvement in wet and cycle life. A series of advanced inorganic materials was successfully developed and formulated into rigid and semiflexible separator samples. Suitable screening tests for evaluation of largely inorganic separators were selected and modified for application to the separator materials. The results showed that many of these formulations are potentially superior to previously used materials and permitted selection of three promising materials for further evaluation in silver-zinc cells.

  4. Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Video Gallery

    The heat of the sun also forces evaporation at the ocean's surface, which puts water vapor into the atmosphere but leaves minerals and salts behind, keeping the ocean salty. The salinity of the oce...

  5. Geological and Inorganic Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, L. L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents a review focusing on techniques and their application to the analysis of geological and inorganic materials that offer significant changes to research and routine work. Covers geostandards, spectroscopy, plasmas, microbeam techniques, synchrotron X-ray methods, nuclear activation methods, chromatography, and electroanalytical methods.…

  6. Lead and compounds (inorganic)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Lead and compounds ( inorganic ) ; CASRN 7439 - 92 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  7. Human Exposure and Health Effects of Inorganic and Elemental Mercury

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic and non-essential metal in the human body. Mercury is ubiquitously distributed in the environment, present in natural products, and exists extensively in items encountered in daily life. There are three forms of mercury, i.e., elemental (or metallic) mercury, inorganic mercury compounds, and organic mercury compounds. This review examines the toxicity of elemental mercury and inorganic mercury compounds. Inorganic mercury compounds are water soluble with a bioavailability of 7% to 15% after ingestion; they are also irritants and cause gastrointestinal symptoms. Upon entering the body, inorganic mercury compounds are accumulated mainly in the kidneys and produce kidney damage. In contrast, human exposure to elemental mercury is mainly by inhalation, followed by rapid absorption and distribution in all major organs. Elemental mercury from ingestion is poorly absorbed with a bioavailability of less than 0.01%. The primary target organs of elemental mercury are the brain and kidney. Elemental mercury is lipid soluble and can cross the blood-brain barrier, while inorganic mercury compounds are not lipid soluble, rendering them unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Elemental mercury may also enter the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory pathway. The blood mercury is a useful biomarker after short-term and high-level exposure, whereas the urine mercury is the ideal biomarker for long-term exposure to both elemental and inorganic mercury, and also as a good indicator of body burden. This review discusses the common sources of mercury exposure, skin lightening products containing mercury and mercury release from dental amalgam filling, two issues that happen in daily life, bear significant public health importance, and yet undergo extensive debate on their safety. PMID:23230464

  8. Soluble vs. insoluble fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases. Soluble fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in oat bran, barley, nuts, seeds, beans, lentils, peas, and some fruits and vegetables. It is also found in psyllium, ...

  9. RESPONSE OF LEAD SOLUBILITY TO DISSOLVED CARBONATE IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model is presented showing the detailed response of the theoretical solubility curves for lead to changes in dissolved inorganic carbonate concentration (TIC) and pH at 25 C. Aqueous Pb(II) ion, lead carbonate complexes, lead hydroxide monomers and polymers, and the solids lead...

  10. Controls on Calcite Solubility in Metamorphic and Magmatic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. E.; Eguchi, J.; Galvez, M.

    2015-12-01

    Calcite is an important hydrothermal alteration product in a wide range of environments. The role of calcite in hydrothermal alteration depends on its solubility in geologic fluids, especially H2O. At ambient T and P, calcite solubility is low and it exhibits well-known declining, or "reverse", solubility with rising T. However, experimental and theoretical studies show that increasing P yields higher solubility and restricts the region of reverse solubility behavior to higher temperature. At 0.2 GPa the reverse solubility region lies at T>600°C; at 0.5 GPa, >800°C. Thus, whereas calcite possesses relatively low solubility in pure H2O in shallow hydrothermal systems (typically <10 ppm C), it is substantially more soluble at conditions of middle and lower crustal metamorphism and magmatism, reaching concentrations ≥1000 ppm. At the higher P of subduction zones, aragonite solubility in H2O is even greater. Thus, neglecting other solubility controls, calcite precipitation is favored as crustal fluids cool and/or decompress. However, the solubility of calcite in H2O also depends strongly on other solutes, pH, and fO2. Sources of alkalinity decrease calcite solubility. In contrast, sources of acidity such as CO2 and Cl increase solubility. Crustal fluids can be enriched in alkali halides such as NaCl. Calcite solubility increases with increasing salt content at a given P and T. From approximately seawater salinity to salt saturation, the fluid behaves as a dilute molten salt and calcite solubility increases as the square of the salt mole fraction regardless of the alkali (Li, Na, K, Cs) or halogen (F, Cl, Br, I) considered. Similar behavior is seen in mixed salt solutions. At lower salinities, solubility behavior is as expected in dilute electrolyte solutions. The transition from dilute electrolyte to molten salt is fundamental to the properties of crustal fluids. Reduction of carbonate species or CO2 in the fluid to CH4, which is common during serpentinization of

  11. Supported inorganic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Sehgal, Rakesh; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    Supported inorganic membranes capable of molecular sieving, and methods for their production, are provided. The subject membranes exhibit high flux and high selectivity. The subject membranes are substantially defect free and less than about 100 nm thick. The pores of the subject membranes have an average critical pore radius of less than about 5 .ANG., and have a narrow pore size distribution. The subject membranes are prepared by coating a porous substrate with a polymeric sol, preferably under conditions of low relative pressure of the liquid constituents of the sol. The coated substrate is dried and calcined to produce the subject supported membrane. Also provided are methods of derivatizing the surface of supported inorganic membranes with metal alkoxides. The subject membranes find use in a variety of applications, such as the separation of constituents of gaseous streams, as catalysts and catalyst supports, and the like.

  12. Amyloid Fibril Solubility.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, L G; Auer, S

    2015-11-19

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain-side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding, and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove to be a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general. PMID:26496385

  13. Estimation of environmental properties for inorganic compounds using LSER

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, James P.

    1999-01-01

    The Great Lakes Science Center has devised values for inorganic species for use in the environmental property- predictive quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) Linear Solvation Energy Relationship (LSER). Property estimation has been difficult for inorganic species. In this presentation aqueous solubility, bioconcentration and acute aquatic toxicity are estimated for inorganic compounds using existing LSER equations. The best estimations arise from the most accurate description of predominant solution species, many within an order of magnitude. The toxicities also depend on an estimation of the bioactive amount and configuration. A number of anion/cation combinations (salts) still resist accurate property estimation, and the reasons currently are not understood. These new variable values will greatly extend the application and utility of LSER for the estimation of environmental properties.

  14. The effects of temperature and salinity on phosphate levels in two euryhaline crustacean species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaargaren, D. H.; Richard, P.; Ceccaldi, H. J.

    Total phoshate, inorganic phosphate and organic (phospholipid) phosphate concentrations were determined in the blood of Carcinus maenas and in whole-animal homogenates of Penaeus japonicus acclimatized to various salinities and a high or a low temperature. In the blood of Carcinus, total and inorganic P concentrations range between 1.0 and 4.5 mmol · l -1; the amount of phospholipids is negligeable. The higher values were found at more extreme salinities. Low temperature is associated with low phosphate concentrations, particularly at intermediate salinities. Total P concentrations in Penaeus homogenates range between 10 and 60 mmol · 1 -1; phospholipid concentrations range between zero and 50 mmol · 1 -1. The higher values are again found at the extreme salinities. Inorganic P concentrations are almost constant — ca 10 mmol · 1 -1. No apparent effect of temperature on phosphate concentrations was observed. The results show clearly that osmotic stress influences severely the phosphate metabolism of the two species studied. Both species are able to accumulate phosphate at all experimental temperature/salinity combinations used, even when deprived of food. At extreme salinities, large quantities of phosphate are accumulated and converted to organic P compounds, most likely as phospholipids associated with the cell membranes. These effects of osmotic conditions in phosphate metabolism may offer an explanation for the effect of Ca ++ on membrane permeability as the regulation of both ions may be strongly interrelated, often under hormonal control.

  15. Inorganic: the other mercury.

    PubMed

    Risher, John F; De Rosa, Christopher T

    2007-11-01

    There is a broad array of mercury species to which humans may be exposed. While exposure to methylmercury through fish consumption is widely recognized, the public is less aware of the sources and potential toxicity of inorganic forms of mercury. Some oral and laboratory thermometers, barometers, small batteries, thermostats, gas pressure regulators, light switches, dental amalgam fillings, cosmetic products, medications, cultural/religious practices, and gold mining all represent potential sources of exposure to inorganic forms of mercury. The route of exposure, the extent of absorption, the pharmacokinetics, and the effects all vary with the specific form of mercury and the magnitude and duration of exposure. If exposure is suspected, a number of tissue analyses can be conducted to confirm exposure or to determine whether an exposure might reasonably be expected to be biologically significant. By contrast with determination of exposure to methylmercury, for which hair and blood are credible indicators, urine is the preferred biological medium for the determination of exposure to inorganic mercury, including elemental mercury, with blood normally being of value only if exposure is ongoing. Although treatments are available to help rid the body of mercury in cases of extreme exposure, prevention of exposure will make such treatments unnecessary. Knowing the sources of mercury and avoiding unnecessary exposure are the prudent ways of preventing mercury intoxication. When exposure occurs, it should be kept in mind that not all unwanted exposures will result in adverse health consequences. In all cases, elimination of the source of exposure should be the first priority of public health officials. PMID:18044248

  16. Saline Systems highlights for 2006

    PubMed Central

    DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2007-01-01

    Saline Systems is a journal devoted to both basic and applied studies of saline and hypersaline environments and their biodiversity. Here, I review the reports and commentaries published in the journal in 2006, including some exploring the geochemistry of saline estuaries, lakes, and ponds, others on the ecology and molecular biology of the indigenous halophilic organisms, and still others addressing the environmental challenges facing saline environments. Several studies are relevant to applications in biotechnology and aquaculture. PMID:17244355

  17. Development and testing of spheroidal inorganic sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.L.; Anderson, K.K.

    1998-01-29

    The general objectives of this task are to develop, prepare, and test spheroidal inorganic ion exchangers made by the HMTA (hexamethylenetetramine) internal gelation process to remove radionuclides and heavy metals from waste streams occurring at the various DOE sites. Inorganic ion-exchange materials, such as sodium silicotitanate, sodium titanate, ammonium molybdeophosphate, phosphotungstic acid, hexacyanoferrates, titanium monohydrogen phosphate, hydrous titanium oxide, polyantimonic acid, magnesium oxide, etc. have high selectivities and efficiencies for separating and removing radionuclides (e.g., cesium, strontium, technetium, iodine, europium, cerium, ruthenium, and zirconium), actinides, and other elements (such as lead, mercury, silver, nickel, zinc, chromium, and fluoride) from aqueous waste streams. The development of cesium specific spherical sorbents for treatment of acidic, high-salt waste solutions was initiated in FY 1998. Acid-side treatment is important at INEEL and could become important if acidic sludge washing were to become a treatment option at Hanford, Savannah River, or Oak Ridge. Zirconium monohydrogen phosphates (ZrHP) embedded with ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) was the cesium selective inorganic sorbent chosen for making microspheres. AMP is known to be a very effective sorbent for removing cesium from waste streams over a wide range of acidity and salinity, and it has very rapid loading kinetics. The cesium can also be eluted from AMP with ammonium salt solutions. AMP cannot be used as a sorbent at pHs above 7 because it decomposes. In the pH range of 1 to 7, ZrHP is also a very effective sorbent for removing Cs, Sr, Th, U(VI), Pu(IV), AM(III), Hg, and Pb from streams of lower ionic concentrations.

  18. Inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus dynamics in the water column of the patuxent river. Final technical report, 1 July 1989-31 December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Capone, D.G.; Miller, V.; Love, J.; Duguay, L.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis was made of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) dynamics in the water column of the Patuxent River, Maryland, over a 2 year cycle. Specifically, inorganic N and P assimilation were determined by isotopic tracer methods at 3 stations along the salinity gradient of the river on a monthly basis. The authors determined the concentrations of particulate N and P and the major dissolved species. Among inorganic species, nitrate showed the greatest seasonal variation, particularly at the upstream stations. Nitrate, which increased going upstream, tended to dominate the inorganic N pools. Ammonium, nitrate and phosphate uptake varied over a wide range among and within sites. Values tended to increase moving upstream. Nitrate uptake dominated inorganic N assimilation upstream while ammonium uptake was of greater importance at the most saline station. With respect to indicies of nutrient limitation, except for the summer, dissolved inorganic N was in excess relative to inorganic P, suggestive of P limitation.

  19. Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 84 FIZ/NIST Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) (PC database for purchase)   The Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) is produced cooperatively by the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe(FIZ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The ICSD is a comprehensive collection of crystal structure data of inorganic compounds containing more than 140,000 entries and covering the literature from 1915 to the present.

  20. Soil salination indicators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salts are naturally present in soils, and many salt elements are essential nutrients for plants. The most common soluble salts in soil include major cations of sodium (Na+), magnesium (Mg2+), calcium (Ca2+), potassium (K+), and anions of chloride (Cl-), sulfate (SO42-), bicarbonate (HCO3-) and carbo...

  1. Applications of Solubility Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomkins, Reginald P. T.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes several applications of the use of solubility data. It is not meant to be exhaustive but rather to show that knowledge of solubility data is required in a variety of technical applications that assist in the design of chemical processes. (Contains 3 figures and 1 table.)

  2. What Variables Affect Solubility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Leyva, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    Helps middle school students understand the concept of solubility through hands-on experience with a variety of liquids and solids. As they explore factors that affect solubility and saturation, students gain content mastery and an understanding of the inquiry process. Also enables teachers to authentically assess student performance on several…

  3. Physiological and molecular changes in barley and wheat under salinity.

    PubMed

    Temel, Aslihan; Gozukirmizi, Nermin

    2015-03-01

    In this study, it was aimed to compare salinity-induced changes in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Bornova-92) and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Gerek-79). Seeds were germinated under saline conditions (0, 50, 100, 250, and 500 mM NaCl) for 2 days and recovered under non-saline conditions for 2 days. At the end of the salt treatment, germination, water content (WC), total soluble protein content, and catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) activity were affected in both species, while superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) activity was affected in barley. Salinity affected WC, protein content, and CAT activity in both species, while it affected germination in barley and affected fresh weight and SOD activity in wheat after recovery. Physiological responses of both species were correlated. Expression of α-tubulin, Atls1, and Lls1 genes was down-regulated in barley after 250 mM NaCl treatment. HVA1 gene was highly (more than 50-fold) stimulated by salinity in barley. However, α-tubulin and Atls1 genes were down-regulated, and Lls1 gene was up-regulated in wheat after recovery from 250-mM NaCl treatment. Increase in HVA1 expression was not significant in wheat. The expression profiles of barley and wheat under salinity are different, and barley tended to regulate gene expression faster than wheat. PMID:25578157

  4. Effects of salinity on leaf breakdown: Dryland salinity versus salinity from a coalmine.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Felix G; Bundschuh, Mirco; Zubrod, Jochen P; Schäfer, Ralf B; Thompson, Kristie; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-08-01

    Salinization of freshwater ecosystems as a result of human activities represents a global threat for ecosystems' integrity. Whether different sources of salinity with their differing ionic compositions lead to variable effects in ecosystem functioning is unknown. Therefore, the present study assessed the impact of dryland- (50μS/cm to 11,000μS/cm) and coalmine-induced (100μS/cm to 2400μS/cm) salinization on the leaf litter breakdown, with focus on microorganisms as main decomposer, in two catchments in New South Wales, Australia. The breakdown of Eucalyptus camaldulensis leaves decreased with increasing salinity by up to a factor of three. Coalmine salinity, which is characterised by a higher share of bicarbonates, had a slightly but consistently higher breakdown rate at a given salinity relative to dryland salinity, which is characterised by ionic proportions similar to sea water. Complementary laboratory experiments supported the stimulatory impact of sodium bicarbonates on leaf breakdown when compared to sodium chloride or artificial sea salt. Furthermore, microbial inoculum from a high salinity site (11,000μS/cm) yielded lower leaf breakdown at lower salinity relative to inoculum from a low salinity site (50μS/cm). Conversely, inoculum from the high salinity site was less sensitive towards increasing salinity levels relative to inoculum from the low salinity site. The effects of the different inoculum were the same regardless of salt source (sodium bicarbonate, sodium chloride and artificial sea salt). Finally, the microorganism-mediated leaf litter breakdown was most efficient at intermediate salinity levels (≈500μS/cm). The present study thus points to severe implications of increasing salinity intensities on the ecosystem function of leaf litter breakdown, while the underlying processes need further scrutiny. PMID:27393920

  5. Selective inorganic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Weisenbach, L.A.; Anderson, M.T.

    1995-05-01

    This project is developing inorganic thin films as membranes for gas separation applications, and as discriminating coatings for liquid-phase chemical sensors. Our goal is to synthesize these coatings with tailored porosity and surface chemistry on porous substrates and on acoustic and optical sensors. Molecular sieve films offer the possibility of performing separations involving hydrogen, air, and natural gas constituents at elevated temperatures with very high separation factors. We are focusing on improving permeability and molecular sieve properties of crystalline zeolitic membranes made by hydrothermally reacting layered multicomponent sol-gel films deposited on mesoporous substrates. We also used acoustic plate mode (APM) oscillator and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor elements as substrates for sol-gel films, and have both used these modified sensors to determine physical properties of the films and have determined the sensitivity and selectivity of these sensors to aqueous chemical species.

  6. Inorganic polymer engineering materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M.L.

    1993-06-01

    Phosphazene-based, inorganic-polymer composites have been produced and evaluated as potential engineering materials. The thermal, chemical, and mechanical properties of several different composites made from one polymer formulation have been measured. Measured properties are very good, and the composites show excellent promise for structural applications in harsh environments. Chopped fiberglass, mineral, cellulose, and woodflour filled composites were tested. Chopped fiberglass filled composites showed the best overall properties. The phosphazene composites are very hard and rigid. They have low dielectric constants and typical linear thermal expansion coefficients for polymers. In most cases, the phosphazene materials performed as well or better than analogous, commercially available, filled phenolic composites. After 3 to 5 weeks of exposure, both the phosphazene and phenolics were degraded to aqueous bases and acids. The glass filled phosphazene samples were least affected.

  7. Treatment with spermidine protects chrysanthemum seedlings against salinity stress damage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Naiyuan; Shi, Xiaomeng; Guan, Zhiyong; Zhao, Shuang; Zhang, Fei; Chen, Sumei; Fang, Weiming; Chen, Fadi

    2016-08-01

    Salinity-stressed plants of salinity sensitive ('Qx096') and tolerant ('Qx097') chrysanthemum cultivar were treated with a range of concentrations of spermidine (Spd). Plant performance, as indicated by various parameters associated with growth, was improved by the treatment, as was the tissue content of soluble protein and proline. The extent of both Na(+) accumulation and K(+) loss was reduced. Activity levels of the stress-related enzymes SOD, POD, APX and CAT were significantly increased and the production of malondialdehyde (MDA) decreased. The suggestion was that treatment with 1.5 mM Spd would be an effective means alleviating salinity-stress induced injury through its positive effect on photosynthetic efficiency, reactive oxygen species scavenging ability and the control of ionic balance and osmotic potential. Its protective capacity was more apparent in 'Qx096' than in 'Qx097'. PMID:27173095

  8. Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, David H.

    1986-01-01

    The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water.

  9. Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, D.H.

    1984-08-30

    The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water. 1 fig.

  10. Overview of SMOS Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, R.

    2014-12-01

    While it is well known that the ocean is one of the most important components of the climate system, with a heat capacity 1100 times greater than the atmosphere, the ocean is also the primary reservoir for freshwater transport to the atmosphere and largest component of the global water cycle. Two new satellite sensors, the ESA Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and the NASA Aquarius SAC-D missions are now providing the first space borne measurements of the sea surface salinity (SSS). In this talk, we will present examples demonstrating how SMOS-derived SSS data are being used to better characterize key land-ocean and atmosphere-ocean interaction processes that occur within the marine hydrological cycle. In particular, we shall illustrate how SMOS and its ocean mapping capability provides observations across the world's largest tropical ocean fresh pool regions and we will discuss intra-seasonal to interannual precipitation impacts as well as large-scale river runoff from the Amazon-Orinoco and Congo rivers and its offshore advection. Synergistic multi-satellite analyses of these new surface salinity data sets combined with sea surface temperature, dynamical height and currents from altimetry, surface wind, ocean color, rainfall estimates, and in situ observations will be shown to yield new freshwater budget and ocean circulation insight. Examples of SMOS capabilities of monitoring salt exchanges across the Gulf Stream through meso-scale eddies will be provided. SSS observations from the SMOS and Aquarius/SAC-D sensors are combined to examine the response of the upper ocean to tropical cyclone passage including the potential role that a freshwater-induced upper ocean barrier layer may play in modulating surface cooling and enthalpy flux in tropical cyclone track regions.

  11. [Solubility of 6 gases in blood and various liquid media].

    PubMed

    Guitart, R

    1993-09-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride, ethane, cyclopropane, enflurane, diethyl ether and acetone are six gases commonly used in the measurement of the distribution of ventilation-perfusion ratios. In order to obtain reference data, their liquid/gas partition coefficients (K) have been determined in water at three different temperatures and in several inorganic, organic and biologic media at 37 degrees C, by a headspace-gas chromatographic method. As expected, an increase in temperature and concentration of solutes in the liquid matrix reduces the solubility of the gases. All gases, except acetone, are more soluble in olive oil than in water. The solubility of SF6, ethane, cyclopropane and enflurane in human and rat blood is greater than in water, the solubility of ether remains practically unchanged, and that of acetone is lower in blood than in water. PMID:8310171

  12. The inorganic speciation of tin(II) in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigala, Rosalia Maria; Crea, Francesco; De Stefano, Concetta; Lando, Gabriele; Milea, Demetrio; Sammartano, Silvio

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports new voltammetric measurements on the interactions between tin(II) and the most important natural inorganic ligands, OH-, Cl-, F-, CO32-, SO42- and PO43-. For a better understanding of tin(II) speciation, an analysis is also given of prior data on the same systems from the literature. The formation constants were determined at t = 25 °C in different ionic media and at different ionic strengths, specifically the following: Sn(OH)q (0.1 ⩽ I/mol L-1 ⩽ 1.0 in NaNO3), SnClr and Sn(OH)Cl (0.1 ⩽ I/mol L-1 ⩽ 2.3 in Na(NO3, Cl)), Sn(SO4)r (0.1 ⩽ I/mol L-1 ⩽ 1.6 in Na(NO3, SO4)), SnHqCO3 and SnHqPO4 (0.15 ⩽ I/mol L-1 ⩽ 1.0 in NaNO3), where the subscripts r and q represent the stoichiometric coefficients. Concerning the SnFr species, reliable literature values were considered (0.15 ⩽ I/mol L-1 ⩽ 1.0 in NaClO4). Fifteen voltammetric measurements were performed in synthetic seawater; the total seawater binding ability was evaluated by a model in which synthetic seawater is expressed as a single salt, BA. The formation of species between tin(II) and the anion of the marine salt (A) was also proposed, and the corresponding stability constants at different salinities (5 ⩽ S ⩽ 50) were reported. In addition, studies on the solubility of Sn(OH)2(s) were carried out using voltammetry and light scattering measurements. The "extra-stability" of the mixed species with respect to the parent species was evaluated, in particular for Sn(OH)Cl and the corresponding species involving the anion of the marine salt (A). The dependence of the formation constants on ionic strength was analysed using extended Debye-Hückel and Specific ion Interaction Theory (SIT) type equations. Tin(II) speciation was also evaluated in different natural fluid conditions, where, in all cases, carbonate complexation was predominant, hampering the formation of hydrolytic species throughout the investigated pH range. Moreover, some formation enthalpy changes were calculated

  13. Biochemical and Anatomical Changes and Yield Reduction in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) under Varied Salinity Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, M. A.; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Hanafi, M. M.; Ismail, Mohd Razi; Selamat, Ahmad; Rafii, M. Y.; Latif, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Five Malaysian rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties, MR33, MR52, MR211, MR219, and MR232, were tested in pot culture under different salinity regimes for biochemical response, physiological activity, and grain yield. Three different levels of salt stresses, namely, 4, 8, and 12 dS m−1, were used in a randomized complete block design with four replications under glass house conditions. The results revealed that the chlorophyll content, proline, sugar content, soluble protein, free amino acid, and yield per plant of all the genotypes were influenced by different salinity levels. The chlorophyll content was observed to decrease with salinity level but the proline increased with salinity levels in all varieties. Reducing sugar and total sugar increased up to 8 dS m−1 and decreased up to 12 dS m−1. Nonreducing sugar decreased with increasing the salinity levels in all varieties. Soluble protein and free amino acid also decreased with increasing salinity levels. Cortical cells of MR211 and MR232 did not show cell collapse up to 8 dS m−1 salinity levels compared to susceptible checks (IR20 and BRRI dhan29). Therefore, considering all parameters, MR211 and MR232 showed better salinity tolerance among the tested varieties. Both cluster and principal component analyses depict the similar results. PMID:24579076

  14. Biochemical and anatomical changes and yield reduction in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under varied salinity regimes.

    PubMed

    Hakim, M A; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Hanafi, M M; Ismail, Mohd Razi; Selamat, Ahmad; Rafii, M Y; Latif, M A

    2014-01-01

    Five Malaysian rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties, MR33, MR52, MR211, MR219, and MR232, were tested in pot culture under different salinity regimes for biochemical response, physiological activity, and grain yield. Three different levels of salt stresses, namely, 4, 8, and 12 dS m(-1), were used in a randomized complete block design with four replications under glass house conditions. The results revealed that the chlorophyll content, proline, sugar content, soluble protein, free amino acid, and yield per plant of all the genotypes were influenced by different salinity levels. The chlorophyll content was observed to decrease with salinity level but the proline increased with salinity levels in all varieties. Reducing sugar and total sugar increased up to 8 dS m(-1) and decreased up to 12 dS m(-1). Nonreducing sugar decreased with increasing the salinity levels in all varieties. Soluble protein and free amino acid also decreased with increasing salinity levels. Cortical cells of MR211 and MR232 did not show cell collapse up to 8 dS m(-1) salinity levels compared to susceptible checks (IR20 and BRRI dhan29). Therefore, considering all parameters, MR211 and MR232 showed better salinity tolerance among the tested varieties. Both cluster and principal component analyses depict the similar results. PMID:24579076

  15. What Should We Teach Beginners about Solubility and Solubility Products?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkes, Stephen J.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that consideration should be given to whether teaching solubility product calculations is at all useful. Claims that experienced teachers seriously misunderstand and misuse solubility product calculations. (DDR)

  16. Solubility of Organic Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, K. C.

    1972-01-01

    Outlines factors to be considered in choosing suitable solvents for non-electrolytes and salts of weak acids and bases. Describes how, in some simple situation, the degree of solubility can be estimated. (Author/DF)

  17. Protein solubility modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, S. M.; Pusey, M. L.; Bogle, I. D.

    1999-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework (UNIQUAC model with temperature dependent parameters) is applied to model the salt-induced protein crystallization equilibrium, i.e., protein solubility. The framework introduces a term for the solubility product describing protein transfer between the liquid and solid phase and a term for the solution behavior describing deviation from ideal solution. Protein solubility is modeled as a function of salt concentration and temperature for a four-component system consisting of a protein, pseudo solvent (water and buffer), cation, and anion (salt). Two different systems, lysozyme with sodium chloride and concanavalin A with ammonium sulfate, are investigated. Comparison of the modeled and experimental protein solubility data results in an average root mean square deviation of 5.8%, demonstrating that the model closely follows the experimental behavior. Model calculations and model parameters are reviewed to examine the model and protein crystallization process. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Learning about Solubility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas, Dino G.; Reyes, Juan G.

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative questions are proposed to assess the understanding of solubility and some of its applications. To improve those results, a simple quantitative problem on the precipitation of proteins is proposed.

  19. Selective inorganic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Pohl, P.I.; Brinker, C.J.

    1997-04-01

    Separating light gases using membranes is a technology area for which there exists opportunities for significant energy savings. Examples of industrial needs for gas separation include hydrogen recovery, natural gas purification, and dehydration. A membrane capable of separating H{sub 2} from other gases at high temperatures could recover hydrogen from refinery waste streams, and facilitate catalytic dehydrogenation and the water gas shift (CO + H{sub 2}O {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) reaction. Natural gas purification requires separating CH{sub 4} from mixtures with CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}O, and higher alkanes. A dehydrating membrane would remove water vapor from gas streams in which water is a byproduct or a contaminant, such as refrigeration systems. Molecular sieve films offer the possibility of performing separations involving hydrogen, natural gas constituents, and water vapor at elevated temperatures with very high separation factors. It is in applications such as these that the authors expect inorganic molecular sieve membranes to compete most effectively with current gas separation technologies. Cryogenic separations are very energy intensive. Polymer membranes do not have the thermal stability appropriate for high temperature hydrogen recovery, and tend to swell in the presence of hydrocarbon natural gas constituents. The authors goal is to develop a family of microporous oxide films that offer permeability and selectivity exceeding those of polymer membranes, allowing gas membranes to compete with cryogenic and adsorption technologies for large-scale gas separation applications.

  20. Removal of high-salinity matrices through polymer-complexation-ultrafiltration for the detection of trace levels of REEs using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hualing; Lin, Jijun; Gong, Zhenbin; Huang, Jiahua; Yang, Shifeng

    2015-10-01

    The polymer-complexation-ultrafiltration (PCUF) technique was applied to separate trace levels of rare earth elements (REEs), including scandium, yttrium and the lanthanides, from high-salinity matrices prior to their determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The REEs were converted into REE-polymer complexes using the water-soluble polymer polyacrylic acid (PAA) at a specified pH, retained on the ultrafiltration membrane of centrifugal filter units, and finally eluted using diluted nitric acid to achieve separation from matrices with relatively high levels of various inorganic ions, such as sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and chlorine ions. Numerous factors affecting the PCUF efficiency were optimized. The optimal conditions included the addition of 30 mg L(-1) of PAA, a pH of 7.5, a reaction time of 40 min at room temperature, and 5.0 mL of 3% nitric acid (v/v) eluent. Under these conditions, the analytes were quantitatively separated and recovered, with a resulting relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 4.0% (0.05 µg L(-1), n=5) and standard addition recoveries between 89.2% (La) and 95.8% (Sm) for matrices of various salinities. The blank samples for the method ranged from 0.0003 µg L(-1) (Dy) to 0.0031 µg L(-1) (Sc), and the limits of quantification (LOQs, 10σ) were between 0.0006 µg L(-1) (Dy) and 0.0026 µg L(-1) (Sc). Furthermore, the salinity of the sample exhibited no effect on the REE-polymer complex formation process. Finally, the method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of dissolved Sc, Y, and lanthanides in coastal and estuarine seawater samples. PMID:26078161

  1. Solubility of inert gases in dog blood and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M; Tebbe, U; Piiper, J

    1980-03-01

    Solubility of H2, Ar, CH4 and SF6 was determined at 310 K (37 degrees C) in water, in saline (0.154 mol NaCl/l H2O), in plasma and whole blood of dogs, and in homogenates of the dog gastrocnemius muscle. The liquids were equilibrated with pure gases, and the dissolved gases were extracted and measured by gas chromatography as described previously (Meyer, M.: Pflügers Arch. 375, 161--165, 1978). In saline, the solubilities were 4% (SF6) to 15% (Ar) lower than in water. For dog blood the following mean values for the solubility coefficient (in mumol . 1(-1) . kPa-1) were found: for H2, 6.44; for Ar, 9.94; for CH4, 11.44; for SF6, 2.62. The red cell/plasma and the muscle/blood solubility ratios were near unity for H2, Ar and CH4 (ranging from 0.9 to 1.3); for SF6, however, they were much higher (about 2.1), apparently due to the high solubility of SF6 in hydrophobic substances (lipids). PMID:6247698

  2. Survival strategies of microorganisms in extreme saline environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, J. F.

    Halophilic representatives are found in all main lines of evolutionary descendence of microbes: in archaebacteria, Gram-negative and Gram-positive eubacteria, and also in eucaryotes. In principe all halophilic microorganisms have to adapt their surface and membrane structures to their highly ionic environments. Concerning their intracellular compartment two different strategies have been developed: Inorganic ions are largely excluded in some microorganisms while such ions are actively accumulated in others. In particular the second group of organisms has to adapt the whole metabolic machinery to the highly ionic conditions of several molar salts, whereas in the first group only the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane and the extracytoplasmic structures are in contact with high concentrations of inorganic ions. In this latter group, a variety of organic solutes is accumulated in response to increases of the salinity of the environment.

  3. Extracting inorganics from scrap tires

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, R.; Wertz, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    Scrap tires contain several inorganic moieties in abundances >0.5% which are impregnated into their carbonaceous matrix. These inorganic species are known to produce acid rain, toxic aerosols, and boiler scale and could produce unwanted catalytic effects as well. It is our position that the potential of recycling scrap tires would be considerably enhanced if the inorganics in question - S, Ca, and Zn - were removed prior to attempts to upgrade the carbonaceous matrix. Using non-mechanical methods, we are attempting to cleave the adherence between the co-polymer matrix and to extract the inorganics. The efficiency of our methods is being measured by wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometry and by other methods.

  4. A new family of anionic organic–inorganic hybrid doughnut-like nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhuxiu; Gao, Wen-Yang; Wojtas, Lukasz; Zhang, Zhenjie; Zaworotko, Michael J.

    2015-06-15

    A family of soluble organic–inorganic hybrid doughnut-like anions, hydoughnuts, has been prepared by the self-assembly of polyoxovanadate anions and 1,3-benzenedicarboxylate (bdc) linkers. Derivatives of the parent hydoughnut, [(V₄O₈Cl)₄(bdc)₈]⁴⁻, can be obtained by changing the counter-ion or by using a variant of bdc.

  5. Speciation and distribution of cadmium and lead in salinized horizons of antrosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgariu, D.; Bulgariu, L.; Astefanei, D.

    2009-04-01

    The utilization of intensive technologies for the vegetable cultivation in glass houses by the administration of high doses of organic fertilizes, the supra-dimensional irrigation and the maintaining of soil at high humidity state, in special in case of vicious drainage have as result the rapid degradation of morphological, chemical and physical characteristics of soils, concretized by: (i) decrease of structural aggregates stability; (ii) more dense packing of soil; (iii) accumulation of easy soluble salts (in special at superior horizons level); (iv) limitation of organic compounds and micro-elements biodisponibility. All these determined a significant reduction of productivity and of exploitation duration of soils from glass houses. These phenomena modified continuously the dynamic of speciation processes and inter-phases distribution, of heavy metals in soils from glass houses, and can determined a non-controlled accumulation of heavy metals, in special as mobile forms with high biodisponibility. Ours studied have been performed using soil profiles drawing from Copou-glass house, Iasi (Romania). Has been followed the modification of distribution for speciation forms of cadmium and lead (two heavy metals with high toxicity degree), between hortic antrosol horizons, and between chemical-mineralogical components of this, with the progressive salinization of superior horizons, in 2007-2008 period. The separation, differentiation and determination of cadmium and lead speciation forms was done by combined solid-liquid sequential extraction (SPE) and extraction in aqueous polymer-inorganic salt two-phase systems (ABS) procedure, presented in some of ours previous studies. After extraction, the total contents of the two heavy metals and fractions from these differential bonded by mineral and organic components of hortic antrosol have been determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The specific interaction mechanisms of Cd and Pb with organic-mineral components of

  6. Inorganic metal oxide/organic polymer nanocomposites and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Gash, Alexander E.; Satcher, Joe H.; Simpson, Randy

    2004-03-30

    A synthetic method for preparation of hybrid inorganic/organic energetic nanocomposites is disclosed herein. The method employs the use of stable metal inorganic salts and organic solvents as well as an organic polymer with good solubility in the solvent system to produce novel nanocomposite energetic materials. In addition, fuel metal powders (particularly those that are oxophillic) can be incorporated into composition. This material has been characterized by thermal methods, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), N.sub.2 adsoprtion/desorption methods, and Fourier-Transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy. According to these characterization methods the organic polymer phase fills the nanopores of the composite material, providing superb mixing of the component phases in the energetic nanocomposite.

  7. Silica Transport and Distribution in Saline, Immiscible Fluids: Application to Subseafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele-Macinnis, M.; Bodnar, R. J.; Lowell, R.; Rimstidt, J. D.

    2009-05-01

    Quartz is a nearly ubiquitous gangue mineral in hydrothermal mineral deposits, most often constituting the bulk of hydrothermal mineralization. The dissolution, transport and precipitation of quartz is controlled by the solubility of silica; in particular, in hot hydrothermal fluids in contact with quartz, silica saturation can generally be assumed, as rates of dissolution and precipitation are generally much faster than fluid flow rates. The solubility of silica in aqueous fluids can be used to understand the evolution of hydrothermal systems by tracing the silica distribution in these systems through time. The solubility of quartz in an aqueous fluid is dependent upon the pressure, temperature and composition (PTX) of the fluid. Silica solubility in pure water as a function of pressure and temperature is well understood. However, natural fluids contain variable amounts of dissolved ionic species, thus it is necessary to include the effects of salinity on silica solubility to accurately predict quartz distribution in hydrothermal systems. In particular, addition of NaCl results in enhanced quartz solubility over a wide range of PT conditions. Furthermore, if phase separation occurs in saline fluids, silica is preferentially partitioned into the higher salinity brine phase; if vapor is removed from the system, the bulk salinity in the system evolves towards the brine end member, and overall silica solubility is enhanced. There is abundant evidence from natural fluid inclusions for fluid immiscibility in hydrothermal ore deposits. Additionally, recent hydrothermal models that include fluid phase equilibria effects predict that phase separation may be an important control on the distribution of dissolved components in seafloor hydrothermal systems. An empirical equation describing the solubility of silica in salt-bearing hydrothermal solutions over a wide range of PTX conditions has been incorporated into a multiphase fluid flow model for seafloor hydrothermal

  8. Distribution of inorganic species in two Antarctic cryptoendolithic microbial communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, C. G.; Vestal, J. R.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    Chemical differences were noted between two Antarctic cryptoendolithic (hidden within rock) microenvironments colonized by different microbial communities. Microenvironments dominated by cyanobacteria (BPC) had a higher pH (pH 7-8) than those dominated by lichen (LTL) (pH 4.5-5.5). In order to understand the interactions between the microbiota and the inorganic environment, the inorganic environment was characterized. Water-soluble, carbonate-bound, metal-oxide, organically bound, and residual inorganic species were sequentially extracted from rock samples by chemical means. Each fraction was then quantified using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. BPC contained much more water-soluble and carbonate-bound Ca and Mg than LTL. Metal-oxide species of Al, Fe, and Mn were more abundant in LTL than BPC. Metal oxides appeared to be mobilized (in the order Mn > Fe > Al) from the LTL lichen zone but remained immobile in BPC sandstone. The distribution of K and P bound to metal oxide reflected the distribution of iron oxide in LTL, an indication of the importance of iron in controlling the availability of nutrients in this ecosystem. Metal oxides in turn were likely controlled or influenced by organic matter associated with the lichen community. Despite overall depletion of Fe, Al, and K in the lichen zone, SEM X-ray analysis showed that they were enriched in fungal hyphae. Water-soluble P was present despite the presence of metal oxides, which sequester phosphate. This has biological relevance since P is an essential nutrient.

  9. Thallium (I), soluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Thallium ( I ) , soluble salts ; CASRN Various Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarc

  10. Fluorine (soluble fluoride)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Fluorine ( soluble fluoride ) ; CASRN 7782 - 41 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for No

  11. Uranium, soluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Uranium , soluble salts ; no CASRN Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  12. Nickel, soluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nickel , soluble salts ; CASRN Various Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  13. Polymer coating for immobilizing soluble ions in a phosphate ceramic product

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Dileep; Wagh, Arun S.; Patel, Kartikey D.

    2000-01-01

    A polymer coating is applied to the surface of a phosphate ceramic composite to effectively immobilize soluble salt anions encapsulated within the phosphate ceramic composite. The polymer coating is made from ceramic materials, including at least one inorganic metal compound, that wet and adhere to the surface structure of the phosphate ceramic composite, thereby isolating the soluble salt anions from the environment and ensuring long-term integrity of the phosphate ceramic composite.

  14. Polymer Coating for Immobilizing Soluble Ions in a Phosphate Ceramic Product

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Dileep; Wagh, Arun S.; Patel, Kartikey D.

    1999-05-05

    A polymer coating is applied to the surface of a phosphate ceramic composite to effectively immobilize soluble salt anions encapsulated within the phosphate ceramic composite. The polymer coating is made from ceramic materials, including at least one inorganic metal compound, that wet and adhere to the surface structure of the phosphate ceramic composite, thereby isolating the soluble salt anions from the environment and ensuring long-term integrity of the phosphate ceramic composite.

  15. In vitro dynamic solubility test: influence of various parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Thélohan, S; de Meringo, A

    1994-01-01

    This article discusses the dissolution of mineral fibers in simulated physiological fluids (SPF), and the parameters that affect the solubility measurement in a dynamic test where an SPF runs through a cell containing fibers (Scholze and Conradt test). Solutions simulate either the extracellular fluid (pH 7.6) or the intracellular fluid (pH 4.5). The fibers have various chemical compositions and are either continuously drawn or processed as wool. The fiber solubility is determined by the amount of SiO2 (and occasionally other ions) released in the solution. Results are stated as percentage of the initial silica content released or as dissolution rate v in nm/day. The reproducibility of the test is higher with the less soluble fibers (10% solubility), than with highly soluble fibers (20% solubility). The influence of test parameters, including SPF, test duration, and surface area/volume (SA/V), has been studied. The pH and the inorganic buffer salts have a major influence: industrial glasswool composition is soluble at pH 7.6 but not at pH 4.5. The opposite is true for rock- (basalt) wool composition. For slightly soluble fibers, the dissolution rate v remains constant with time, whereas for highly soluble fibers, the dissolution rate decreases rapidly. The dissolution rates believed to occur are v1, initial dissolution rate, and v2, dissolution rate of the residual fibers. The SA of fibers varies with the mass of the fibers tested, or with the fiber diameter at equal mass. Volume, V, is the chosen flow rate. An increase in the SA/V ratio leads to a decrease in the dissolution rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7882964

  16. Solubilities of gases in simulated Tank 241-SY-101 wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, J.D.; Pederson, L.R.

    1995-09-01

    Oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, methane, and nitrous oxide solubilities were evaluated as a function of temperature in SYl-SIM-93B, a homogeneous simulated waste mixture containing sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate, sodium aluminate, and sodium carbonate, the principal inorganic constituents of the wastes in Tank 241-SY-101. Ammonia solubility data for this simulated waste was obtained as a function of temperature in an earlier study. The choice of a homogeneous waste mixture in this study has the advantage of eliminating complications associated with a changing electrolyte concentration as a function of temperature that would be encountered with a slurry simulant. Dissolution is one of the means by which gases may be retained in Hanford Site wastes. While models are available to estimate gas solubilities in electrolyte solutions, few data are in existence that pertain to highly concentrated, multicomponent electrolytes such as those stored in Hanford Site waste tanks.

  17. Concerning inorganic crystal structure types.

    PubMed

    Bergerhoff; Berndt; Brandenburg; Degen

    1999-04-01

    All representatives of an inorganic crystal structure type can be found systematically in the new database SICS (Standardized Inorganic Crystal Structures). It is derived from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) by selecting the best determination of each phase. In addition, each entry is given in a standardized description and complemented by searchable descriptors Delta, which give the difference between all structures of an isopointal set. Because of the large number of structures the full information on relationships present can only be found by means of the new database itself. Some examples are given here in printed form. The limitations and the possibilities of expansion of SICS in terms of the concept of 'structure types' are demonstrated. PMID:10927350

  18. Protein-inorganic hybrid nanoflowers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jun; Lei, Jiandu; Zare, Richard N.

    2012-07-01

    Flower-shaped inorganic nanocrystals have been used for applications in catalysis and analytical science, but so far there have been no reports of `nanoflowers' made of organic components. Here, we report a method for creating hybrid organic-inorganic nanoflowers using copper (II) ions as the inorganic component and various proteins as the organic component. The protein molecules form complexes with the copper ions, and these complexes become nucleation sites for primary crystals of copper phosphate. Interaction between the protein and copper ions then leads to the growth of micrometre-sized particles that have nanoscale features and that are shaped like flower petals. When an enzyme is used as the protein component of the hybrid nanoflower, it exhibits enhanced enzymatic activity and stability compared with the free enzyme. This is attributed to the high surface area and confinement of the enzymes in the nanoflowers.

  19. Inorganic composites for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malmendier, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The development of inorganic composite materials for space applications is reviewed. The composites do not contain any organic materials, and therefore, are not subject to degradation by ultraviolet radiation, volatilization of constituents, or embrittlement at low temperatures. The composites consist of glass, glass/ceramics or ceramic matrices, reinforced by refractory whiskers or fibers. Such composites have the low thermal expansion, refractories, chemical stability and other desirable properties usually associated with the matrix materials. The composites also have a degree of toughness which is extraordinary for refractory inorganic materials.

  20. Role of xylo-oligosaccharides in protection against salinity-induced adversities in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Guo, Chen; Hussain, Saddam; Zhu, Bingxin; Deng, Fang; Xue, Yan; Geng, Mingjian; Wu, Lishu

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a stringent abiotic constraint limiting crop growth and productivity. The present study was carried out to appraise the role of xylo-oligosaccharides (XOSs) in improving the salinity tolerance of Chinese cabbage. Salinity stress (0.5% NaCl solution) and four levels (0, 40, 80, 120 mg L(-1)) of XOSs were imposed on 20-day-old plants cultured under controlled conditions. Salinity stress decreased the aboveground fresh biomass, photosynthesis, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, internal CO2 concentration, water use efficiency, and chlorophyll contents but increased the stomatal limitation value of Chinese cabbage compared with control. Such physiological interferences, disturbances in plant water relations, and visually noticeable growth reductions in Chinese cabbage were significantly alleviated by the addition of XOSs under salinity stress. Under salinity stress, application of XOSs significantly enhanced the activities of enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, catalase) and non-enzymatic (ascorbate, carotene) antioxidants and reduced the malondialdehyde content in the leaves of Chinese cabbage. The XOS-applied plants under salinity stress also recorded higher soluble sugars, proline, and soluble protein content in their leaves. Exposure of salinity stress increased the ratio of Na(+)/K(+), Na(+)/Ca(2+), and Na(+)/Mg(2+) in shoot as well as root of Chinese cabbage, however, XOS application significantly reduced these ratios particularly in shoot. Lower levels of XOSs (40 or 80 mg L(-1)) were more effective for most of the studied attributes. The greater salinity tolerance and better growth in these treatments were related with enhanced antioxidative defense system, reduced lipid peroxidation, increased osmolyte accumulation, and maintenance of ionic balance. PMID:26358207

  1. Detection, identification and formation of new iodinated disinfection byproducts in chlorinated saline wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tingting; Zhang, Xiangru

    2015-01-01

    The use of seawater for toilet flushing introduces high levels of inorganic ions, including iodide ions, into a city's wastewater treatment systems, resulting in saline wastewater effluents. Chlorination is widely used in disinfecting wastewater effluents owing to its low cost and high efficiency. During chlorination of saline wastewater effluents, iodide may be oxidized to hypoiodous acid, which may further react with effluent organic matter to form iodinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Iodinated DBPs show significantly higher toxicity than their brominated and chlorinated analogues and thus have been drawing increasing concerns. In this study, polar iodinated DBPs were detected in chlorinated saline wastewater effluents using a novel precursor ion scan method. The major polar iodinated DBPs were identified and quantified, and their organic precursors and formation pathways were investigated. The formation of iodinated DBPs under different chlorine doses and contact times was also studied. The results indicated that a few polar iodinated DBPs were generated in the chlorinated saline primary effluent, but few were generated in the chlorinated saline secondary effluent. Several major polar iodinated DBPs in the chlorinated saline primary effluent were proposed with structures, among which a new group of polar iodinated DBPs, iodo-trihydroxybenzenesulfonic acids, were identified and quantified. The organic precursors of this new group of DBPs were found to be 4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid and 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene, and the formation pathways of these new DBPs were tentatively proposed. Both chlorine dose and contact time affected the formation of iodinated DBPs in the chlorinated saline wastewater effluents. PMID:25462718

  2. A Perspective on Solubility Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Manus; Abrams, Karl

    1984-01-01

    Presents four generalizations about solubilities. These generalizations (rules), are useful in introducing the dynamic topics of solubility and in helping high school and introductory college chemistry students make some order out of the tremendous number of facts available. (JN)

  3. Soluble and insoluble fiber (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary fiber is the part of food that is not affected by the digestive process in the body. ... of the stool. There are two types of dietary fiber, soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber retains water and ...

  4. Golden alga presence and abundance are inversely related to salinity in a high-salinity river ecosystem, Pecos River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Israël, Natascha M.D.; VanLandeghem, Matthew M.; Denny, Shawn; Ingle, John; Patino, Reynaldo

    2014-01-01

    Prymnesium parvum (golden alga, GA) is a toxigenic harmful alga native to marine ecosystems that has also affected brackish inland waters. The first toxic bloom of GA in the western hemisphere occurred in the Pecos River, one of the saltiest rivers in North America. Environmental factors (water quality) associated with GA occurrence in this basin, however, have not been examined. Water quality and GA presence and abundance were determined at eight sites in the Pecos River basin with or without prior history of toxic blooms. Sampling was conducted monthly from January 2012 to July 2013. Specific conductance (salinity) varied spatiotemporally between 4408 and 73,786 mS/cm. Results of graphical, principal component (PCA), and zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) regression analyses indicated that the incidence and abundance of GA are reduced as salinity increases spatiotemporally. LOWESS regression and correlation analyses of archived data for specific conductance and GA abundance at one of the study sites retrospectively confirmed the negative association between these variables. Results of PCA also suggested that at <15,000 mS/cm, GA was present at a relatively wide range of nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) concentrations whereas at higher salinity, GA was observed only at mid-to-high nutrient levels. Generally consistent with earlier studies, results of ZIP regression indicated that GA presence is positively associated with organic phosphorus and in samples where GA is present, GA abundance is positively associated with organic nitrogen and negatively associated with inorganic nitrogen. This is the first report of an inverse relation between salinity and GA presence and abundance in riverine waters and of interaction effects of salinity and nutrients in the field. These observations contribute to a more complete understanding of environmental conditions that influence GA distribution in inland waters.

  5. Alfalfa production using saline drainage water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three year study investigated the use of saline (< 6 dS/m) drainage water for irrigation of salt tolerant alfalfa in the presence of shallow saline groundwater. The irrigation treatments included; irrigating twice between cuttings with non-saline water, 2) irrigating with moderately saline water...

  6. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a collection of data on the mechanistic aspects of inorganic chemical reactions. Wherever possible includes procedures for classroom demonstration or student project work. The material covered includes gas phase reactions, reactions in solution, mechanisms of electron transfer, the reaction between iron III and iodine, and hydrolysis. (GS)

  7. Infrared Spectrometry of Inorganic Salts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackermann, Martin N.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a general chemistry experiment which uses infrared spectroscopy to analyze inorganic ions and thereby serves to introduce an important instrumental method of analysis. Presents a table of eight anions and the ammonium ion with the frequencies of their normal modes, as well as the spectra of three sulfate salts. (RR)

  8. Inorganic Fullerenes, Onions, and Tubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Andrew P. E.

    2004-01-01

    Buckminsterfullerene, which is in the shape of a soccer-ball was first discovered in 1985, has many applications as a good lubricant, or as a new superconductor. The synthesis of these inorganic fullerenes involves a great deal of interdisciplinary research between physicists, material scientists, engineers and chemists from various fields.

  9. Long Term Surface Salinity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Raymond W.; Brown, Neil L.

    2005-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to establish a reliable system for monitoring surface salinity around the global ocean. Salinity is a strong indicator of the freshwater cycle and has a great influence on upper ocean stratification. Global salinity measurements have potential to improve climate forecasts if an observation system can be developed. This project is developing a new internal field conductivity cell that can be protected from biological fouling for two years. Combined with a temperature sensor, this foul-proof cell can be deployed widely on surface drifters. A reliable in-situ network of surface salinity sensors will be an important adjunct to the salinity sensing satellite AQUARIUS to be deployed by NASA in 2009. A new internal-field conductivity cell has been developed by N Brown, along with new electronics. This sensor system has been combined with a temperature sensor to make a conductivity - temperature (UT) sensor suitable for deployment on drifters. The basic sensor concepts have been proven on a high resolution CTD. A simpler (lower cost) circuit has been built for this application. A protection mechanism for the conductivity cell that includes antifouling protection has also been designed and built. Mr. A.Walsh of our commercial partner E-Paint has designed and delivered time-release formulations of antifoulants for our application. Mr. G. Williams of partner Clearwater Instrumentation advised on power and communication issues and supplied surface drifters for testing.

  10. Net Subterranean Estuarine Export Fluxes of Dissolved Inorganic C, N, P, Si, and Total Alkalinity into the Jiulong River Estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Wang, Z.; Zhai, W. D.; Moore, W. S.; Li, Q.; Yan, X.; Qi, D.; Jiang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate geochemical impacts of the subterranean estuary (STE) on the Jiulong River estuary, China, we estimated seasonal fluxes of subterranean water discharge into the estuary based on the mass balance of radium isotopes and net subterranean export fluxes of dissolved inorganic C (DIC), N (DIN), Si (DSi), soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), and total alkalinity (TA). Based on 226Ra data, the subterranean discharge (in 107 m3 d-1) was estimated to be 0.24~0.51 in the spring, 0.56~1.16 in the summer, 0.38~0.79 in the fall, and 0.22~0.45 in the winter. This was equivalent to 6-16% of the concomitant river discharge. The net spatially integrated material fluxes from the STE into the estuary were equivalent up to 51-89% of the concomitant riverine fluxes for DIC and TA, around 10-25% for DSi and DIN, and negligible for SRP. Paradoxically, the mixing lines along the salinity gradient revealed no apparent additions of these species. These additions are not revealed because the STE is a relatively small spatially-averaged source that spreads throughout the estuary in contrast to the major point sources of the river and the ocean for the estuary. Thus, despite apparent conservative mixing of DIC, DIN, and DSi, subterranean exports of these species into estuaries must be taken into account in evaluating geochemical impacts of estuarine exports on shelf waters.

  11. Colloidal inorganic nanocrystals: Nucleation, growth and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Jared James

    nanocrystals can be realized. Finally, a novel phase transfer process is demonstrated using inorganic salts, such as sodium arsenite, to make water soluble metal oxide nanocrystals. The water soluble iron oxide nanocrystals are fully characterized by several complementary techniques and then used in cellular studies. The arsenite-coated iron oxide composite nanocrystals (AICN) are shown to be effective cancer therapy agents.

  12. Solubility and Solubility Product Determination of a Sparingly Soluble Salt: A First-Level Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonomo, Raffaele P.; Tabbi, Giovanni; Vagliasindi, Laura I.

    2012-01-01

    A simple experiment was devised to let students determine the solubility and solubility product, "K"[subscript sp], of calcium sulfate dihydrate in a first-level laboratory. The students experimentally work on an intriguing equilibrium law: the constancy of the product of the ion concentrations of a sparingly soluble salt. The determination of…

  13. Reconciling modeled and observed atmospheric deposition of soluble organic nitrogen at coastal locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Akinori; Lin, Guangxing; Penner, Joyce E.

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric deposition of reactive nitrogen (N) species from air pollutants is a significant source of exogenous nitrogen in marine ecosystems. Here we use an atmospheric chemical transport model to investigate the supply of soluble organic nitrogen (ON) from anthropogenic sources to the ocean. Comparisons of modeled deposition with observations at coastal and marine locations show good overall agreement for inorganic nitrogen and total soluble nitrogen. However, previous modeling approaches result in significant underestimates of the soluble ON deposition if the model only includes the primary soluble ON and the secondary oxidized ON in gases and aerosols. Our model results suggest that including the secondary reduced ON in aerosols as a source of soluble ON contributes to an improved prediction of the deposition rates (g N m-2 yr-1). The model results show a clear distinction in the vertical distribution of soluble ON in aerosols between different processes from the primary sources and the secondary formation. The model results (excluding the biomass burning and natural emission changes) suggest an increase in soluble ON outflow from atmospheric pollution, in particular from East Asia, to the oceans in the twentieth century. These results highlight the necessity of improving the process-based quantitative understanding of the chemical reactions of inorganic nitrogen species with organics in aerosol and cloud water.

  14. Soluble porphyrin polymers

    DOEpatents

    Gust, Jr., John Devens; Liddell, Paul Anthony

    2015-07-07

    Porphyrin polymers of Structure 1, where n is an integer (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or greater) ##STR00001## are synthesized by the method shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B. The porphyrin polymers of Structure 1 are soluble in organic solvents such as 2-MeTHF and the like, and can be synthesized in bulk (i.e., in processes other than electropolymerization). These porphyrin polymers have long excited state lifetimes, making the material suitable as an organic semiconductor for organic electronic devices including transistors and memories, as well as solar cells, sensors, light-emitting devices, and other opto-electronic devices.

  15. Mirabilite solubility in equilibrium sea ice brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Benjamin Miles; Papadimitriou, Stathys; Santoro, Anna; Kennedy, Hilary

    2016-06-01

    The sea ice microstructure is permeated by brine channels and pockets that contain concentrated seawater-derived brine. Cooling the sea ice results in further formation of pure ice within these pockets as thermal equilibrium is attained, resulting in a smaller volume of increasingly concentrated residual brine. The coupled changes in temperature and ionic composition result in supersaturation of the brine with respect to mirabilite (Na2SO4·10H2O) at temperatures below -6.38 °C, which consequently precipitates within the sea ice microstructure. Here, mirabilite solubility in natural and synthetic seawater derived brines, representative of sea ice at thermal equilibrium, has been measured in laboratory experiments between 0.2 and -20.6 °C, and hence we present a detailed examination of mirabilite dynamics within the sea ice system. Below -6.38 °C mirabilite displays particularly large changes in solubility as the temperature decreases, and by -20.6 °C its precipitation results in 12.90% and 91.97% reductions in the total dissolved Na+ and SO42- concentrations respectively, compared to that of conservative seawater concentration. Such large non-conservative changes in brine composition could potentially impact upon the measurement of sea ice brine salinity and pH, whilst the altered osmotic conditions may create additional challenges for the sympagic organisms that inhabit the sea ice system. At temperatures above -6.38 °C, mirabilite again displays large changes in solubility that likely aid in impeding its identification in field samples of sea ice. Our solubility measurements display excellent agreement with that of the FREZCHEM model, which was therefore used to supplement our measurements to colder temperatures. Measured and modelled solubility data were incorporated into a 1D model for the growth of first-year Arctic sea ice. Model results ultimately suggest that mirabilite has a near ubiquitous presence in much of the sea ice on Earth, and illustrate the

  16. Volumetrics of CO2 storage in deep saline formations.

    PubMed

    Steele-MacInnis, Matthew; Capobianco, Ryan M; Dilmore, Robert; Goodman, Angela; Guthrie, George; Rimstidt, J Donald; Bodnar, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Concern about the role of greenhouse gases in global climate change has generated interest in sequestering CO(2) from fossil-fuel combustion in deep saline formations. Pore space in these formations is initially filled with brine, and space to accommodate injected CO(2) must be generated by displacing brine, and to a lesser extent by compression of brine and rock. The formation volume required to store a given mass of CO(2) depends on the storage mechanism. We compare the equilibrium volumetric requirements of three end-member processes: CO(2) stored as a supercritical fluid (structural or stratigraphic trapping); CO(2) dissolved in pre-existing brine (solubility trapping); and CO(2) solubility enhanced by dissolution of calcite. For typical storage conditions, storing CO(2) by solubility trapping reduces the volume required to store the same amount of CO(2) by structural or stratigraphic trapping by about 50%. Accessibility of CO(2) to brine determines which storage mechanism (structural/stratigraphic versus solubility) dominates at a given time, which is a critical factor in evaluating CO(2) volumetric requirements and long-term storage security. PMID:22916959

  17. Spatial assessment of soil salinity in the Harran Plain using multiple kriging techniques.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, Ali V

    2013-01-01

    The Harran Plain is located in the southeastern part of Turkey and has recently been developed for irrigation agriculture. It already faces soil salinity problems causing major yield losses. Management of the problem is hindered by the lack of information on the extent and geography of the salinization problem. A survey was carried out to delineate the spatial distribution of salt-affected areas by randomly selecting 140 locations that were sampled at two depths (0 to 30 and 30 to 60 cm) and analyzed for soil salinity variables: soil electrical conductivity (EC), soluble cations (Ca(2+,) Mg(2+), Na(+), and K(+)), soluble anions (SO (4) (2-) , Cl(-)), exchangeable Na(+) (me 100 g(-1)) and exchangeable sodium percentage. Terrain attributes (slope, topographical wetness index) were extracted from the digital elevation model of the study area. Variogram analyses after log transformation and ordinary kriging (OK) were applied to map spatial patterns of soil salinity variables. Multivariate geostatistical methods-regression kriging (RK) and kriging with external drift (KED)-were used using elevation and soil electrical conductivity data as covariates. Performances of the three estimation methods (OK, RK, and KED) were compared using independent validation samples randomly selected from the main dataset. Soils were categorized into salinity classes using disjunctive kriging (DK) and ArcGIS, and classification accuracy was tested using the kappa statistic. Results showed that soil salinity variables all have skewed distribution and are poorly correlated with terrain indices but have strong correlations among each other. Up to 65 % improvement was obtained in the estimations of soil salinity variables using hybrid methods over OK with the best estimations obtained with RK using EC(0-30) as covariate. DK-ArcGIS successfully classified soil samples into different salinity groups with overall accuracy of 75 % and kappa of 0.55 (p < 0.001). PMID:22415846

  18. Ionic and Amino Acid Regulation in Hard Clam (Meretrix lusoria) in Response to Salinity Challenges.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hao; Yeh, Po-Ling; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Most marine mollusks are osmoconformers, in that, their body fluid osmolality changes in the direction of the change in environmental salinity. Marine mollusks exhibit a number of osmoregulatory mechanisms to cope with either hypo- or hyperosmotic stress. The effects of changes in salinity on the osmoregulatory mechanisms of the hard clam (Meretrix lusoria, an economically important species of marine bivalve for Taiwan) have not been determined. In this study, we examined the effect of exposure to hypo (10‰)- and hyper (35‰)-osmotic salinity on hard clams raised at their natural salinity (20‰). The osmolality, [Na(+)], and [Cl(-)] of the hard clam hemolymph were changed in the same direction as the surrounding salinity. Further, the contents of total free amino acids including taurine in the gills and mantles were significantly upregulated in hard clam with increasing salinity. The gill Na(+), K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity, the important enzyme regulating cellular inorganic ions, was not affected by the changed salinity. Mantle NKA activity, however, was stimulated in the 35‰ SW treatment. The taurine transporter (TAUT) is related to the regulation of intracellular contents of taurine, the dominant osmolyte. Herein, a TAUT gene of hard clam was cloned and a TAUT antibody was derived for the immunoblotting. The TAUT mRNA expression of the mantle in hard clam was significantly stimulated in 35‰ SW, but protein expression was not modulated by the changed salinity. In gills of the hard clam with 10‰ SW, both TAUT mRNA and protein expressions were significantly stimulated, and it may reflect a feedback regulation from the decreased gills taurine content under long-term hypoosmotic acclimation. These findings suggest that TAUT expression is regulated differently in gills and mantles following exposure to alterations in environmental salinity. Taken together, this study used the physiological, biochemical and molecular approaches to simultaneously explore the

  19. Ionic and Amino Acid Regulation in Hard Clam (Meretrix lusoria) in Response to Salinity Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hao; Yeh, Po-Ling; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Most marine mollusks are osmoconformers, in that, their body fluid osmolality changes in the direction of the change in environmental salinity. Marine mollusks exhibit a number of osmoregulatory mechanisms to cope with either hypo- or hyperosmotic stress. The effects of changes in salinity on the osmoregulatory mechanisms of the hard clam (Meretrix lusoria, an economically important species of marine bivalve for Taiwan) have not been determined. In this study, we examined the effect of exposure to hypo (10‰)- and hyper (35‰)-osmotic salinity on hard clams raised at their natural salinity (20‰). The osmolality, [Na+], and [Cl−] of the hard clam hemolymph were changed in the same direction as the surrounding salinity. Further, the contents of total free amino acids including taurine in the gills and mantles were significantly upregulated in hard clam with increasing salinity. The gill Na+, K+-ATPase (NKA) activity, the important enzyme regulating cellular inorganic ions, was not affected by the changed salinity. Mantle NKA activity, however, was stimulated in the 35‰ SW treatment. The taurine transporter (TAUT) is related to the regulation of intracellular contents of taurine, the dominant osmolyte. Herein, a TAUT gene of hard clam was cloned and a TAUT antibody was derived for the immunoblotting. The TAUT mRNA expression of the mantle in hard clam was significantly stimulated in 35‰ SW, but protein expression was not modulated by the changed salinity. In gills of the hard clam with 10‰ SW, both TAUT mRNA and protein expressions were significantly stimulated, and it may reflect a feedback regulation from the decreased gills taurine content under long-term hypoosmotic acclimation. These findings suggest that TAUT expression is regulated differently in gills and mantles following exposure to alterations in environmental salinity. Taken together, this study used the physiological, biochemical and molecular approaches to simultaneously explore the

  20. Average concentration of soluble salts in leached soils inferred from the convective-dispersive equation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The convective-dispersive, or advective-dispersive, or CDE, equation has long been the model of choice for solute transport in soils. Using the total mass of soluble salts in soil profile to evaluate changes in salinity due to irrigation can be beneficial when the spatial variability of soil salini...

  1. INORGANIC PYROPHOSPHATASE OF DESULFOVIBRIO DESULFURICANS.

    PubMed

    AKAGI, J M; CAMPBELL, L L

    1963-09-01

    Akagi, J. M. (University of Illinois, Urbana) and L. Leon Campbell. Inorganic pyrophosphatase of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. J. Bacteriol. 86:563-568. 1963.-The inorganic pyrophosphatase of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was purified 136-fold by (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and ethanol fractionation and diethylaminoethyl cellulose chromatography. Mg(++) or Mn(++) was required for optimal activity; Co(++) was only 65% as effective as Mg(++). The optimal ratio of Mg(++) to pyrophosphate was 1.0 at pH 8.0. The K(s) for the pyrophosphatase was found to be in the region of 1.9 x 10(-3)m. Sulfhydryl inhibitors and sodium fluoride had no effect on enzyme activity at a concentration of 10(-3)m. The purified enzyme did not hydrolyze adenosine triphosphate, glycerol phosphate, diphenyl phosphate, or p-nitrophenyl phosphate. Thermal stability studies showed that the enzyme is rapidly inactivated at temperatures above 40 C. PMID:14066437

  2. Gas separations using inorganic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, B.Z.; Singh, S.P.N.; Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E.; White, D.E.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the results from a research and development program to develop, fabricate, and evaluate inorganic membranes for separating gases at high temperatures and pressures in hostile process environments encountered in fossil energy conversion processes such as coal gasification. The primary emphasis of the research was on the separation and recovery of hydrogen from synthesis gas. Major aspects of the program included assessment of the worldwide research and development activity related to gas separations using inorganic membranes, identification and selection of candidate membrane materials, fabrication and characterization of membranes using porous membrane technology developed at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, and evaluation of the separations capability of the fabricated membranes in terms of permeabilities and fluxes of gases.

  3. Reactions of inorganic nitrogen species in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Dell`Orco, P.C.

    1994-12-31

    Redox reactions of nitrate salts with NH3 and methanol were studied in near-critical and supercritical water at 350 to 530 C and constant pressure of 302 bar. Sodium nitrate decomposition reactions were investigated at similar conditions. Reactions were conducted in isothermal tubular reactor under plug flow. For kinetic modeling, nitrate and nitrite reactants were lumped into an NO{sub x}{sup -} reactant; kinetic expressions were developed for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X and sodium nitrate decomposition reactions. The proposed elementary reaction mechanism for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X reaction indicated that NO{sub 2} was the primary oxidizing species and that N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O selectivities could be determined by the form of MNO{sub 3} used. This suggest a nitrogen control strategy for use in SCWO (supercritical water oxidation) processes; nitrate or NH3 could be used to remove the other, at reaction conditions far less severe than required by other methods. Reactions of nitrate with methanol indicated that nitrate was a better oxidant than oxygen in supercritical water. Nitrogen reaction products included NH3 and nitrite, while inorganic carbon was the major carbon reaction product. Analysis of excess experiments indicated that the reaction at 475 C was first order in methanol concentration and second order in NO{sub x}{sup -} concentration. In order to determine phase regimes for these reactions, solubility of sodium nitrate was determined for some 1:1 nitrate electrolytes. Solubilities were measured at 450 to 525 C, from 248 to 302 bar. A semi-empirical solvation model was shown to adequately describe the experimental sodium nitrate solubilities. Solubilities of Li, Na, and K nitrates revealed with cations with smaller ionic radii had greater solubilities with nitrate.

  4. Inorganic yellow-red pigments without toxic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, M.; Letschert, H. P.

    2000-04-01

    Inorganic pigments have been utilized by mankind since ancient times, and are still widely used to colour materials exposed to elevated temperatures during processing or application. Indeed, in the case of glasses, glazes and ceramics, there is no alternative to inorganic pigments for colouring. However, most inorganic pigments contain heavy metals or transition metals that can adversely effect the environment and human health if critical levels are exceeded. Cadmium-based pigments in particular are a cause of concern: although the pigments are not toxic due to their very low solubility in water and dilute mineral acids, cadmium itself is toxic and can enter the environment in a bioavailable form through waste-disposal sites and incineration plants. This has led to regulations, based on the precautionary principle, that strongly restrict the use of cadmium pigments. And even though recent assessments have concluded that the risk to humans or the environment might be not as significant as originally feared, a strong demand for inherently safer substitutes remains. Here we demonstrate that solid solutions of the perovskites CaTaO 2N and LaTaON2 constitute promising candidates for such substitutes: their brilliance, tinting strength, opacity, dispersability, light-fastness and heat stability rival that of the cadmium pigments, while their colour can be tuned through the desired range, from yellow through orange to deep red, by simple composition adjustments. Because all the constituent elements are harmless, this perovskite-based inorganic pigment system seems a promising replacement that could eliminate one of the sources for cadmium emissions to the environment and some of the remaining concerns about pigment safety.

  5. Determining Salinity by Simple Means.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This paper describes the construction and use of a simple salinometer. The salinometer is composed, mainly, of a milliammeter and a battery and uses the measurement of current flow to determine the salinity of water. A complete list of materials is given, as are details of construction and operation of the equipment. The use of the salinometer in…

  6. Mycelial bacteria of saline soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Zenova, G. M.; Oborotov, G. V.

    2008-10-01

    The actinomycetal complexes of saline soils comprise the representatives of the Streptomyces and Micromonospora genera, the number of which are hundreds and thousands of CFU/g soil. Complexes of mycelial bacteria in saline soils are poorer in terms of number (by 1-3 orders of magnitude) and taxonomic composition than the complexes of the zonal soil types. A specific feature of the actinomycetal complexes of saline soils is the predominance of halophilic, alkaliphilic, and haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes that well grow at pH 8-9 and concentrations of NaCl close to 5%. Actinomycetes in saline soils grow actively, and the length of their mycelium reaches 140 m in 1 gram of soil. The haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes grow fast and inhibit the formation of spores at pH 9 and high concentrations of salts (Na2SO4 and MgCl2, 5%) as compared to their behavior on a neutral medium with a salt concentration of 0.02%. They are characterized by the maximal radial growth rate of colonies on an alkaline medium with 5% NaCl.

  7. Saline-water bioleaching of chalcopyrite with thermophilic, iron(II)- and sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Watling, Helen R; Collinson, David M; Corbett, Melissa K; Shiers, Denis W; Kaksonen, Anna H; Watkin, Elizabeth L J

    2016-09-01

    The application of thermoacidophiles for chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) bioleaching in hot, acidic, saline solution was investigated as a possible process route for rapid Cu extraction. The study comprised a discussion of protective mechanisms employed for the survival and/or adaptation of thermoacidophiles to osmotic stress, a compilation of chloride tolerances for three genera of thermoacidophiles applied in bioleaching and an experimental study of the activities of three species in a saline bioleaching system. The data showed that the oxidation rates of iron(II) and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (tetrathionate) were reduced in the presence of chloride levels well below chloride concentrations in seawater, limiting the applicability of these microorganisms in the bioleaching of CuFeS2 in saline water. PMID:27212381

  8. The effects of estuarine processes on the fluxes of inorganic and organic carbon in the Yellow River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Dianjun; Zhang, Longjun; Jiang, Liqing

    2009-12-01

    Riverine carbon flux is an important component of the global carbon cycle. The spatial and temporal variations of organic and inorganic carbon were examined during both dry and wet seasons in the Yellow River estuary. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the Yellow River during dry seasons were higher than those during wet seasons. The effective concentrations of DOC (CDOC*) were higher than the observed DOC at zero salinity. This input of DOC in the Yellow River estuary was due to sediment desorption processes in low salinity regions. In contrast to DOC, the effective concentrations of DIC were 10% lower than the DIC measured at freshwater end, and the loss of DIC was caused by CaCO3 precipitation in low salinity region. Particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) contents of the particles stabilized to constant values (0.5%±0.05% and 1.8%±0.2%, respectively) within the turbidity maximum zone (TMZ) and showed no noticeable seasonal variations. A rapid drop of PIC and rise of POC occurred simultaneously outside the TMZ due to an intense dilution of riverine inorganic-rich particles being transported into a pool of aquatic organic-poor particles outside the TMZ. Annually, the Yellow River transported 6.95×105 t of DIC, 0.64×105 t of DOC, 78.58×105 t of PIC and 2.29×105 t of POC to the sea.

  9. Bulk Moisture and Salinity Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark; Monje, Oscar; Prenger, Jessica; Catechis, John

    2013-01-01

    Measurement and feedback control of nutrient solutions in plant root zones is critical to the development of healthy plants in both terrestrial and reduced-gravity environments. In addition to the water content, the amount of fertilizer in the nutrient solution is important to plant health. This typically requires a separate set of sensors to accomplish. A combination bulk moisture and salinity sensor has been designed, built, and tested with different nutrient solutions in several substrates. The substrates include glass beads, a clay-like substrate, and a nutrient-enriched substrate with the presence of plant roots. By measuring two key parameters, the sensor is able to monitor both the volumetric water content and salinity of the nutrient solution in bulk media. Many commercially available moisture sensors are point sensors, making localized measurements over a small volume at the point of insertion. Consequently, they are more prone to suffer from interferences with air bubbles, contact area of media, and root growth. This makes it difficult to get an accurate representation of true moisture content and distribution in the bulk media. Additionally, a network of point sensors is required, increasing the cabling, data acquisition, and calibration requirements. measure the dielectric properties of a material in the annular space of the vessel. Because the pore water in the media often has high salinity, a method to measure the media moisture content and salinity simultaneously was devised. Characterization of the frequency response for capacitance and conductance across the electrodes was completed for 2-mm glass bead media, 1- to 2-mm Turface (a clay like media), and 1- to 2-mm fertilized Turface with the presence of root mass. These measurements were then used to find empirical relationships among capacitance (C), the dissipation factor (D), the volumetric water content, and the pore water salinity.

  10. Water soluble laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, P.R.; Feeman, J.F.; Field, G.F.

    1998-08-11

    Novel water soluble dyes of the formula 1 are provided by the formula described in the paper wherein R{sup 1} and R{sup 4} are alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or hydrogen; or R{sup 1}--R{sup 2} or R{sup 2}--R{sup 4} form part of aliphatic heterocyclic rings; R{sup 2} is hydrogen or joined with R{sup 1} or R{sup 4} as described above; R{sup 3} is --(CH{sub 2}){sub m}--SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, where m is 1 to 6; X is N, CH or formula 2 given in paper where Y is 2 --SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ; Z is 3, 4, 5 or 6 --SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. The novel dyes are particularly useful as the active media in water solution dye lasers.

  11. Water soluble laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.; Feeman, James F.; Field, George F.

    1998-01-01

    Novel water soluble dyes of the formula I are provided ##STR1## wherein R.sup.1 and R.sup.4 are alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or hydrogen; or R.sup.1 -R.sup.2 or R.sup.2 -R.sup.4 form part of aliphatic heterocyclic rings; R.sup.2 is hydrogen or joined with R.sup.1 or R.sup.4 as described above; R.sup.3 is --(CH.sub.2).sub.m --SO.sub.3.sup.-, where m is 1 to 6; X is N, CH or ##STR2## where Y is 2 --SO.sub.3.sup.- ; Z is 3, 4, 5 or 6 --SO.sub.3.sup.-. The novel dyes are particularly useful as the active media in water solution dye lasers.

  12. The Aquarius Mission: Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koblinsky, Chester; Chao, Y.; deCharon, A.; Edelstein, W.; Hildebrand, P.; Lagerloef, G.; LeVine, D.; Pellerano, F.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Ruf, C.

    2001-01-01

    Aquarius is a new satellite mission concept to study the impact of the global water cycle on the ocean, including the response of the ocean to buoyancy forcing and the subsequent feedback of the ocean on the climate. The measurement objective of Aquarius is sea surface salinity, which reflects the concentration of freshwater at the ocean surface. Salinity affects the dielectric constant of sea water and, consequently, the radiometric emission of the sea surface to space. Rudimentary space observations with an L-band radiometer were first made from Skylab in the mid-70s and numerous aircraft missions of increasing quality and improved technology have been conducted since then. Technology is now available to carry out a global mission, which includes both an accurate L band (1.413 Ghz) radiometer and radar system in space and a global array of in situ observations for calibration and validation, in order to address key NASA Earth Science Enterprise questions about the global cycling of water and the response of the ocean circulation to climate change. The key scientific objectives of Aquarius examine the cycling of water at the ocean's surface, the response of the ocean circulation to buoyancy forcing, and the impact of buoyancy forcing on the ocean's thermal feedback to the climate. Global surface salinity will also improve our ability to model the surface solubility chemistry needed to estimate the air-sea exchange of CO2. In order to meet these science objectives, the NASA Salinity Sea Ice Working Group over the past three years has concluded that the mission measurement goals should be better than 0.2 practical salinity units (psu) accuracy, 100 km resolution, and weekly to revisits. The Aquarius mission proposes to meet these measurement requirements through a real aperture dual-polarized L band radiometer and radar system. This system can achieve the less than 0.1 K radiometric temperature measurement accuracy that is required. A 3 m antenna at approx. 600km

  13. Runoff quality impacts of dust suppression using saline water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch, Rob J.; Squires, Helen

    2010-05-01

    In mining and gas operations, dust generation from unsealed roads is a major problem. Commonly, road watering is used to suppress dust, with the lowest water quality available generally being selected for that purpose. Whilst minimising water usage for the site, that practice does create concerns with respect to potential environmental impacts if runoff from the treated roads has significantly elevated salinity. For coal seam gas operations, the water extracted concurrently with the gas contains predominantly sodium bicarbonate. Therefore, where coal seam gas water is sprayed onto roads, there is potential for elevated sodium in runoff to impact on soil adjoining the roads, but there is no information on the rates of dissolution and mobilisation of soluble salt from the surface of roads that have been sprayed with low quality water to reduce dust. Therefore a rainfall simulator study was carried out to investigate rates of mobilisation of sodium bicarbonate from compacted soil surfaces simulating an unsealed road. The study considered effects of the amount of precipitated sodium bicarbonate on the soil surface and variations in rainfall intensity. Because the soil surfaces were compacted, runoff commenced almost immediately following application of rain. For all treatments with applied surface salt, runoff quality data showed a peak in salt concentration in the first flush of runoff, and relatively rapid reduction through time in those initial concentrations. The magnitude and duration of peak concentrations depended on both rainfall rate and the quantity of salt present on the soil surface. The flush of salts in run-off from the roads occurred very early in the run-off event, when none of the surrounding area would have commenced to run off. Consequently, the relatively small volume of run-off produced directly by the road could be expected to predominantly infiltrate in the table drain adjoining the road. The initial flush of saline water would then be leached to

  14. Equilibrium phase diagrams and water absorption properties of aqueous mixtures of malonic acid and inorganic salts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo, D.; Salgado-Olea, G.

    2006-12-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are usually complex mixtures of inorganic and organic components. Although the thermodynamic properties of inorganic aerosols have been widely studied, the effect of organics on such properties is still under discussion. Solubility in water, water activity of aqueous solutions, deliquescence relative humidity (DRH), eutonic composition, and eutonic DRH were determined for bulk mixtures of malonic acid with ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, and ammonium nitrate at 25oC over the full range of composition (from 0 wt% to the solubility limit of the mixture components). The data was used to construct equilibrium phase diagrams, which show the phase of the mixtures as a function of total composition, dry mixture composition, water content, and ambient relative humidity. Measured water activity of liquid solutions was compared with an extended Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) expression, which then was used to predict water absorption of the mixtures.

  15. Effect of Salinity on Tomato Fruit Ripening 1

    PubMed Central

    Mizrahi, Yosef

    1982-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) plants from various cultivars growing on half-strength Hoagland solution were exposed at anthesis to 3 or 6 grams per liter NaCl. Salinity shortened the time of fruit development by 4 to 15%. Fruits of salt-treated plants were smaller and tasted better than did fruits of control plants. This result was obtained both for ripe fruits tested on the day of picking and for those picked at 100% development and allowed to ripen at room temperature for 9 days. Percentage of dry weight, total soluble solids, and titratable acidity; content of reducing sugars, Cl−, Na+, and various pericarp pigments; and electrical conductivity of the juice were higher in fruits of saline-treated plants than they were in those of control plants, while the pH was lower. Ethylene and CO2 evolution rates during ripening; as well as the activities of pectin methyl esterase, polymethylgalacturonase, and polygalacturonase; were also higher in fruits of the saline-treated plants. The treatment with 6 grams per liter NaCl shortened the fruit shelf life considerably. PMID:16662327

  16. INTEGRATING DESALINATION AND AGRICULTURAL SALINITY CONTROL ALTERNATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cost-effectiveness relationships for various agricultural and desalination alternatives for controlling salinity in irrigation return flows are developed. Selection of optimal salinity management strategies on a river basin scale is described as a problem of integrating optim...

  17. Bony fish and their contribution to marine inorganic carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, Michael; Perry, Chris; Wilson, Rod; Harborne, Alistair

    2016-04-01

    Conventional understanding of the marine inorganic carbon cycle holds that CaCO3 (mostly as low Mg-calcite and aragonite) precipitates in the upper reaches of the ocean and sinks to a point where it either dissolves or is deposited as sediment. Thus, it plays a key role controlling the distribution of DIC in the oceans and in regulating their capacity to absorb atmospheric CO2. However, several aspects of this cycle remain poorly understood and have long perplexed oceanographers, such as the positive alkalinity anomaly observed in the upper water column of many of the world's oceans, above the aragonite and calcite saturation horizons. This anomaly would be explained by extensive dissolution of a carbonate phase more soluble than low Mg-calcite or aragonite, but major sources for such phases remain elusive. Here we highlight marine bony fish as a potentially important primary source of this 'missing' high-solubility CaCO3. Precipitation of CaCO3 takes place within the intestines of all marine bony fish as part of their normal physiological functioning, and global production models suggest it could account for up to 45 % of total new marine CaCO3 production. Moreover, high Mg-calcite containing >25 % mol% MgCO3 - a more soluble phase than aragonite - is a major component of these precipitates. Thus, fish CaCO3 may at least partially explain the alkalinity anomaly in the upper water column. However, the issue is complicated by the fact that carbonate mineralogy actually varies among fish species, with high Mg-calcite (HMC), low Mg-calcite (LMC), aragonite, and amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) all being common products. Using data from 22 Caribbean fish species, we have generated a novel production model that resolves phase proportions. We evaluate the preservation/dissolution potential of these phases and consider potential implications for marine inorganic carbon cycling. In addition, we consider the dramatic changes in fish biomass structure that have resulted

  18. Inorganic Components of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wexler, Anthony Stein

    The inorganic components comprise 15% to 50% of the mass of atmospheric aerosols. For about the past 10 years the mass of these components was predicted assuming thermodynamic equilibrium between the volatile aerosol -phase inorganic species NH_4NO _3 and NH_4Cl and their gas-phase counterparts NH_3, HNO_3, and HCl. In this thesis I examine this assumption and prove that (1) the time scales for equilibration between the gas and aerosol phases are often too long for equilibrium to hold, and (2) even when equilibrium holds, transport considerations often govern the size distribution of these aerosol components. Water can comprise a significant portion of atmospheric aerosols under conditions of high relative humidity, whereas under conditions of sufficiently low relative humidity atmospheric aerosols tend to be dry. The deliquescence point is the relative humidity where the aerosol goes from a solid dry phase to an aqueous or mixed solid-aqueous phase. In this thesis I derive the temperature dependence of the deliquescence point and prove that in multicomponent solutions the deliquescence point is lower than for corresponding single component solutions. These theories of the transport, thermodynamic, and deliquescent properties of atmospheric aerosols are integrated into an aerosol inorganics model, AIM. The predictions of AIM compare well to fundamental thermodynamic measurements. Comparison of the prediction of AIM to those of other aerosol equilibrium models shows substantial disagreement in the predicted water content at lower relative humidities. The disagreement is due the improved treatment in AIM of the deliquescence properties of multicomponent solutions. In the summer and fall of 1987 the California Air Resources Board conducted the Southern California Air Quality Study, SCAQS, during which atmospheric aerosols were measured in Los Angeles. The size and composition of the aerosol and the concentrations of their gas phase counterparts were measured. When the

  19. Inorganic Nanoparticles in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sanjib; Kudgus, Rachel A.; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukherjee, Priyabrata

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an evolving field with enormous potential for biomedical applications. The growing interest to use inorganic nanoparticles in medicine is due to the unique size and shape-dependent optoelectronic properties. Herein, we will focus on gold, silver and platinum nanoparticles, discussing recent developments for therapeutic applications with regard to cancer in terms of nanoparticles being used as a delivery vehicle as well as therapeutic agents. We will also discuss some of the key challenges to be addressed in future studies. PMID:21104301

  20. Plasma chemistry for inorganic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, O.

    1980-01-01

    Practical application of plasma chemistry to the development of inorganic materials using both low temperature and warm plasmas are summarized. Topics cover: the surface nitrification and oxidation of metals; chemical vapor deposition; formation of minute oxide particles; the composition of oxides from chloride vapor; the composition of carbides and nitrides; freezing high temperature phases by plasma arc welding and plasma jet; use of plasma in the development of a substitute for petroleum; the production of silicon for use in solar cell batteries; and insulating the inner surface of nuclear fusion reactor walls.

  1. Salinity-mediated cyanogenesis in white clover (Trifolium repens) affects trophic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ballhorn, Daniel J.; Elias, Jacob D.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Increasing soil salinity poses a major plant stress in agro-ecosystems worldwide. Surprisingly little is known about the quantitative effect of elevated salinity on secondary metabolism in many agricultural crops. Such salt-mediated changes in defence-associated compounds may significantly alter the quality of food and forage plants as well as their resistance against pests. In the present study, the effects of soil salinity on cyanogenesis in white clover (Trifolium repens), a forage crop of international importance, are analysed. Methods Experimental clonal plants were exposed to five levels of soil salinity, and cyanogenic potential (HCNp, total amount of accumulated cyanide in a given plant tissue), β-glucosidase activity, soluble protein concentration and biomass production were quantified. The attractiveness of plant material grown under the different salt treatments was tested using cafeteria-style feeding trials with a generalist (grey garden slug, Deroceras reticulatum) and a specialist (clover leaf weevil, Hypera punctata) herbivore. Key Results Salt treatment resulted in an upregulation of HCNp, whereas β-glucosidase activity and soluble protein concentration showed no significant variation among treatments. Leaf area consumption of both herbivore species was negatively correlated with HCNp, indicating bottom-up effects of salinity-mediated changes in HCNp on plant consumers. Conclusions The results suggest that soil salinity leads to an upregulation of cyanogenesis in white clover, which results in enhanced resistance against two different natural herbivores. The potential implications for such salinity-mediated changes in plant defence for livestock grazing remain to be tested. PMID:25006176

  2. The Ksp-Solubility Conundrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Roy W.; Bonicamp, Judith M.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that there are only a few cases in which solubility and Ksp are related in a simple way. States that illustrations of the solubility product principle for one-to-one salts are adequate for students. Contains 23 references. (DDR)

  3. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  4. Water soluble conductive polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Aldissi, M.

    1989-11-14

    This patent describes polymers which are soluble in water and are electrically conductive. The monomer repeat unit is a thiophene or pyrrole molecule having an alkyl group substituted for the hydrogen atom located in the beta position of the thiophene or pyrrole ring and having a surfactant molecule at the end of the alkyl chain. Polymers of this class having 8 or more carbon atoms in the alkyl chain exhibit liquid crystalline behavior, resulting in high electrical anisotropy. The monomer-to-monomer bonds are located between the carbon atoms which are adjacent to the sulfur or nitrogen atoms. The number of carbon atoms in the alkyl group may vary from 1 to 20 carbon atoms. The surfactant molecule consists of a sulfonate group, or a sulfate group, or a carboxylate group, and hydrogen or an alkali metal. Negative ions from a supporting electrolyte which may be used in the electrochemical synthesis of a polymer may be incorporated into the polymer during the synthesis and serve as a dopant to increase the conductivity.

  5. The Aquarius Salinity Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank; Hilburn, Kyle; Lagerloef, Gary; Le Vine, David

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this presentation gives an overview over the Aquarius salinity retrieval algorithm. The instrument calibration [2] converts Aquarius radiometer counts into antenna temperatures (TA). The salinity retrieval algorithm converts those TA into brightness temperatures (TB) at a flat ocean surface. As a first step, contributions arising from the intrusion of solar, lunar and galactic radiation are subtracted. The antenna pattern correction (APC) removes the effects of cross-polarization contamination and spillover. The Aquarius radiometer measures the 3rd Stokes parameter in addition to vertical (v) and horizontal (h) polarizations, which allows for an easy removal of ionospheric Faraday rotation. The atmospheric absorption at L-band is almost entirely due to molecular oxygen, which can be calculated based on auxiliary input fields from numerical weather prediction models and then successively removed from the TB. The final step in the TA to TB conversion is the correction for the roughness of the sea surface due to wind, which is addressed in more detail in section 3. The TB of the flat ocean surface can now be matched to a salinity value using a surface emission model that is based on a model for the dielectric constant of sea water [3], [4] and an auxiliary field for the sea surface temperature. In the current processing only v-pol TB are used for this last step.

  6. Inorganic Phosphor Materials for Lighting.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan-Chih; Karlsson, Maths; Bettinelli, Marco

    2016-04-01

    This chapter addresses the development of inorganic phosphor materials capable of converting the near UV or blue radiation emitted by a light emitting diode to visible radiation that can be suitably combined to yield white light. These materials are at the core of the new generation of solid-state lighting devices that are emerging as a crucial clean and energy saving technology. The chapter introduces the problem of white light generation using inorganic phosphors and the structure-property relationships in the broad class of phosphor materials, normally containing lanthanide or transition metal ions as dopants. Radiative and non-radiative relaxation mechanisms are briefly described. Phosphors emitting light of different colors (yellow, blue, green, and red) are described and reviewed, classifying them in different chemical families of the host (silicates, phosphates, aluminates, borates, and non-oxide hosts). This research field has grown rapidly and is still growing, but the discovery of new phosphor materials with optimized properties (in terms of emission efficiency, chemical and thermal stability, color, purity, and cost of fabrication) would still be of the utmost importance. PMID:27573146

  7. Biodegradable and Renal Clearable Inorganic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ehlerding, Emily B.; Chen, Feng; Cai, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Personalized treatment plans for cancer therapy have been at the forefront of oncology research for many years. With the advent of many novel nanoplatforms, this goal is closer to realization today than ever before. Inorganic nanoparticles hold immense potential in the field of nano-oncology, but have considerable toxicity concerns that have limited their translation to date. In this review, an overview of emerging biologically safe inorganic nanoplatforms is provided, along with considerations of the challenges that need to be overcome for cancer theranostics with inorganic nanoparticles to become a reality. The clinical and preclinical studies of both biodegradable and renal clearable inorganic nanoparticles are discussed, along with their implications. PMID:27429897

  8. Infrared Spectra of Simple Inorganic Ion Pairs in Solid Solution: A Physical Inorganic Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Philip J.; Tong, William G.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a physical inorganic experiment in which large single crystals of the alkali halides doped with divalent ion impurities are prepared easily. Demonstrates the ion pairing of inorganic ions in solid solution. (CS)

  9. The solubility of quartz in aqueous sodium chloride solution at 350°C and 180 to 500 bars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, Robert O.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Bischoff, James L.

    1982-01-01

    The solubility of quartz in 2, 3, and 4 molal NaCl was measured at 350°C and pressures ranging from 180 to 500 bars. The molal solubility in each of the salt solutions is greater than that in pure water throughout the measured pressure range, with the ratio of solubility in NaCl solution to solubility in pure water decreasing as pressure is increased. The measured solubilities are significantly higher than solubilities calculated using a simple model in which the water activity in NaCl solutions decreases either in proportion to decreasing vapor pressure of the solution as salinity is increased or in proportion to decreasing mole fraction of water in the solvent.

  10. Contribution of fish to the marine inorganic carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R W; Millero, F J; Taylor, J R; Walsh, P J; Christensen, V; Jennings, S; Grosell, M

    2009-01-16

    Oceanic production of calcium carbonate is conventionally attributed to marine plankton (coccolithophores and foraminifera). Here we report that marine fish produce precipitated carbonates within their intestines and excrete these at high rates. When combined with estimates of global fish biomass, this suggests that marine fish contribute 3 to 15% of total oceanic carbonate production. Fish carbonates have a higher magnesium content and solubility than traditional sources, yielding faster dissolution with depth. This may explain up to a quarter of the increase in titratable alkalinity within 1000 meters of the ocean surface, a controversial phenomenon that has puzzled oceanographers for decades. We also predict that fish carbonate production may rise in response to future environmental changes in carbon dioxide, and thus become an increasingly important component of the inorganic carbon cycle. PMID:19150840

  11. Inorganic Metal Oxide/Organic Polymer Nanocomposites And Method Thereof

    DOEpatents

    Gash, Alexander E.; Satcher, Joe H.; Simpson, Randy

    2004-11-16

    A synthetic method for preparation of hybrid inorganic/organic energetic nanocomposites is disclosed herein. The method employs the use of stable metal in organic salts and organic solvents as well as an organic polymer with good solubility in the solvent system to produce novel nanocomposite energetic materials. In addition, fuel metal powders (particularly those that are oxophilic) can be incorporated into composition. This material has been characterized by thermal methods, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), N.sub.2 adsoprtion/desorption methods, and Fourier-Transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy. According to these characterization methods the organic polymer phase fills the nanopores of the material, providing superb mixing of the component phases in the energetic nanocomposite.

  12. The Role of Groundwater and Reservoir Interaction in Salinity Distribution in a Saline Area in the Northeastern Part of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeboonruang, U.

    2012-12-01

    Salinity is a process by which the concentration of soluble salt in soil and water increases. Human activities can, however, disrupt this natural equilibrium by changing the distribution of salt in the environment. Reservoirs have played a number of crucial roles in the development of human civilization. The main purposes of reservoirs are to prevent floods, to supply water for domestic consumption, to generate electricity, and to irrigate farmlands. Despite various benefits, reservoirs could bring about adverse environmental and social impacts. Infiltration or leakage from man-made reservoirs or dams could cause the change of the groundwater level, thus forcing the deposited salt onto the soil surface and/or waterways. Until now, it is nevertheless unclear as to how the operation and maintenance of reservoirs could impact in a saline soil area physically, environmentally, and/or socially. The purpose of this research is therefore to assess the impacts of reservoirs on groundwater and salinity levels in a saline soil area in the northeastern part of Thailand. Saline soil can be found in many regions of Thailand, particularly in the northeast of Thailand where the Maha Sarakham Foundation, which is composed of imbedded salt rock layers, is the main source of salinity in the region. The salinity accumulation on the surface soil is influenced by the brackish groundwater upward flow and evaporation processes. The study area is located in Nakhon Panom Province in the northeastern part of Thailand along the Great Mekong River and has a total area of approximately 1,300 km2. The yearly evaporation rate in this region is as high as the annual evaporation rate. A reservoir was constructed in the low-lying floodplain area of the Nam Kam basin and started operation since a few years ago. The reservoir is located right in the middle of the floodplain where flood always occurs every rainy season. Groundwater levels are measured and groundwater samples are collected for p

  13. Sources of dissolved inorganic carbon to the Canada Basin halocline: A multitracer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kristina A.; McLaughlin, Fiona; Tortell, Philippe D.; Yamamoto-Kawai, Michiyo; Francois, Roger

    2016-05-01

    We examine the dissolved inorganic carbon maximum in the Canada Basin halocline using a suite of geochemical tracers to gain insight into the factors that contribute to the persistence of this feature. Hydrographic and geochemical samples were collected in the upper 500 m of the southwestern Canada Basin water column in the summer of 2008 and fall of 2009. These observations were used to identify conservative and nonconservative processes that contribute dissolved inorganic carbon to halocline source waters, including shelf sediment organic matter remineralization, air-sea gas exchange, and sea-ice brine export. Our results indicate that the remineralization of organic matter that occurs along the Bering and Chukchi Sea shelves is the overwhelming contributor of dissolved inorganic carbon to Pacific Winter Water that occupies the middle halocline in the southwestern Canada Basin. Nonconservative contributions from air-sea exchange and sea-ice brine are not significant. The broad salinity range associated with the DIC maximum, compared to the narrow salinity range of the nutrient maximum, is due to mixing between Pacific and Atlantic water and not abiotic addition of DIC.

  14. Degradation of zinc in saline solutions, plasma, and whole blood.

    PubMed

    Törne, Karin; Larsson, Mariann; Norlin, Anna; Weissenrieder, Jonas

    2016-08-01

    The initial degradation of zinc has been investigated through exposures to simulated and real body fluids of increasing complexity: phosphate buffered saline (PBS), Ringer's saline solution, human plasma, and whole blood. Real body fluids were used to close the electrolyte gap between simulated and in vivo environment. Polarization of zinc in whole blood show a passive response not present in other electrolytes. The analysis shows a decrease in corrosion rate with time for plasma and whole blood and an increase for PBS and Ringer's. During exposure to plasma and whole blood a bi-layered corrosion product with poor adherence was formed over a uniformly corroding surface. The corrosion products comprise a mixture of inorganic material and biomolecules. Samples degrading in PBS were prone to localized corrosion and formed thick porous corrosion products of primarily zinc phosphates while in Ringer's solution a gel like layer of zinc carbonate was formed over an interface with shallow pits. The use of whole blood or plasma as electrolytes for short term in vitro evaluation of potential biodegradable metals may provide an improved understanding of the behavior in vivo, while Ringer's solution is preferred over PBS for long term degradation studies of zinc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1141-1151, 2016. PMID:26061136

  15. Preparation, cytotoxicity and in vivo bioimaging of highly luminescent water-soluble silicon quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jing-Wun; Vankayala, Raviraj; Chang, Chien-Liang; Chang, Chia-Hua; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Hwang, Kuo Chu

    2015-05-01

    Designing various inorganic nanomaterials that are cost effective, water soluble, optically photostable, highly fluorescent and biocompatible for bioimaging applications is a challenging task. Similar to semiconducting quantum dots (QDs), silicon QDs are another alternative and are highly fluorescent, but non-water soluble. Several surface modification strategies were adopted to make them water soluble. However, the photoluminescence of Si QDs was seriously quenched in the aqueous environment. In this report, highly luminescent, water-dispersible, blue- and green-emitting Si QDs were prepared with good photostability. In vitro studies in monocytes reveal that Si QDs exhibit good biocompatibility and excellent distribution throughout the cytoplasm region, along with the significant fraction translocated into the nucleus. The in vivo zebrafish studies also reveal that Si QDs can be evenly distributed in the yolk-sac region. Overall, our results demonstrate the applicability of water-soluble and highly fluorescent Si QDs as excellent in vitro and in vivo bioimaging probes.

  16. Geochemical processes controlling water salinization in an irrigated basin in Spain: identification of natural and anthropogenic influence.

    PubMed

    Merchán, D; Auqué, L F; Acero, P; Gimeno, M J; Causapé, J

    2015-01-01

    Salinization of water bodies represents a significant risk in water systems. The salinization of waters in a small irrigated hydrological basin is studied herein through an integrated hydrogeochemical study including multivariate statistical analyses and geochemical modeling. The study zone has two well differentiated geologic materials: (i) Quaternary sediments of low salinity and high permeability and (ii) Tertiary sediments of high salinity and very low permeability. In this work, soil samples were collected and leaching experiments conducted on them in the laboratory. In addition, water samples were collected from precipitation, irrigation, groundwater, spring and surface waters. The waters show an increase in salinity from precipitation and irrigation water to ground- and, finally, surface water. The enrichment in salinity is related to the dissolution of soluble mineral present mainly in the Tertiary materials. Cation exchange, precipitation of calcite and, probably, incongruent dissolution of dolomite, have been inferred from the hydrochemical data set. Multivariate statistical analysis provided information about the structure of the data, differentiating the group of surface waters from the groundwaters and the salinization from the nitrate pollution processes. The available information was included in geochemical models in which hypothesis of consistency and thermodynamic feasibility were checked. The assessment of the collected information pointed to a natural control on salinization processes in the Lerma Basin with minimal influence of anthropogenic factors. PMID:25262295

  17. Biomass Yield Efficiency of the Marine Anammox Bacterium, “Candidatus Scalindua sp.,” is Affected by Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Awata, Takanori; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Ozaki, Noriatsu; Ohashi, Akiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The growth rate and biomass yield efficiency of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria are markedly lower than those of most other autotrophic bacteria. Among the anammox bacterial genera, the growth rate and biomass yield of the marine anammox bacterium “Candidatus Scalindua sp.” is still lower than those of other anammox bacteria enriched from freshwater environments. The activity and growth of marine anammox bacteria are generally considered to be affected by the presence of salinity and organic compounds. Therefore, in the present study, the effects of salinity and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) on the anammox activity, inorganic carbon uptake, and biomass yield efficiency of “Ca. Scalindua sp.” enriched from the marine sediments of Hiroshima Bay, Japan, were investigated in batch experiments. Differences in VFA concentrations (0–10 mM) were observed under varying salinities (0.5%–4%). Anammox activity was high at 0.5%–3.5% salinity, but was 30% lower at 4% salinity. In addition, carbon uptake was higher at 1.5%–3.5% salinity. The results of the present study clearly demonstrated that the biomass yield efficiency of the marine anammox bacterium “Ca. Scalindua sp.” was significantly affected by salinity. On the other hand, the presence of VFAs up to 10 mM did not affect anammox activity, carbon uptake, or biomass yield efficiency. PMID:25740428

  18. Phenylated Polyimides With Greater Solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W.

    1991-01-01

    In experiments, 3,6-diphenylpyromellitic dianhydride monomer prepared and polymerized with several different diamines. Polyimides with pendent phenyl groups along polymer backbones considerably more soluble than PMDA-based materials. Increased solubility eases processing, providing increased potential use in variety of applications. Because most polymers soluble in organic solvents, usable in microelectronics applications. Excellent thermal stabilities and high transition temperatures make them ideally suited. Many polymers extremely rigid and useful as reinforcing polymers in molecular composites. More flexible compositions useful as matrix resins in carbon-reinforced composites.

  19. Water-soluble vitamins.

    PubMed

    Konings, Erik J M

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous Determination of Vitamins.--Klejdus et al. described a simultaneous determination of 10 water- and 10 fat-soluble vitamins in pharmaceutical preparations by liquid chromatography-diode-array detection (LC-DAD). A combined isocratic and linear gradient allowed separation of vitamins in 3 distinct groups: polar, low-polar, and nonpolar. The method was applied to pharmaceutical preparations, fortified powdered drinks, and food samples, for which results were in good agreement with values claimed. Heudi et al. described a separation of 9 water-soluble vitamins by LC-UV. The method was applied for the quantification of vitamins in polyvitaminated premixes used for the fortification of infant nutrition products. The repeatability of the method was evaluated at different concentration levels and coefficients of variation were <6.5%. The concentrations of vitamins found in premixes with the method were comparable to the values declared. A disadvantage of the methods mentioned above is that sample composition has to be known in advance. According to European legislation, for example, foods might be fortified with riboflavin phosphate or thiamin phosphate, vitamers which are not included in the simultaneous separations described. Vitamin B2.--Viñas et al. elaborated an LC analysis of riboflavin vitamers in foods. Vitamin B2 can be found in nature as the free riboflavin, but in most biological materials it occurs predominantly in the form of 2 coenzymes, flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Several methods usually involve the conversion of these coenzymes into free riboflavin before quantification of total riboflavin. According to the authors, there is growing interest to know flavin composition of foods. The described method separates the individual vitamers isocratically. Accuracy of the method is tested with 2 certified reference materials (CRMs). Vitamin B5.-Methods for the determination of vitamin B5 in foods are limited

  20. Inorganic nanotubes and fullerene-like materials.

    PubMed

    Tenne, Reshef

    2002-12-01

    Following the discovery of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, it was shown that nanoparticles of inorganic layered compounds, like MoS2, are unstable in the planar form and they form closed cage structures with polyhedral or nanotubular shapes. Various issues on the structure, synthesis, and properties of such inorganic fullerene-like structures are reviewed, together with some possible applications. PMID:12432497

  1. 29 CFR 1910.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1910.1018 Section 1910.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS (CONTINUED) Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1910.1018 Inorganic arsenic. (a) Scope...

  2. Inorganic dual-layer microporous supported membranes

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Tsai, Chung-Yi; Lu, Yungfeng

    2003-03-25

    The present invention provides for a dual-layer inorganic microporous membrane capable of molecular sieving, and methods for production of the membranes. The inorganic microporous supported membrane includes a porous substrate which supports a first inorganic porous membrane having an average pore size of less than about 25 .ANG. and a second inorganic porous membrane coating the first inorganic membrane having an average pore size of less than about 6 .ANG.. The dual-layered membrane is produced by contacting the porous substrate with a surfactant-template polymeric sol, resulting in a surfactant sol coated membrane support. The surfactant sol coated membrane support is dried, producing a surfactant-templated polymer-coated substrate which is calcined to produce an intermediate layer surfactant-templated membrane. The intermediate layer surfactant-templated membrane is then contacted with a second polymeric sol producing a polymeric sol coated substrate which is dried producing an inorganic polymeric coated substrate. The inorganic polymeric coated substrate is then calcined producing an inorganic dual-layered microporous supported membrane in accordance with the present invention.

  3. REMOVING DISSOLVED INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS FROM WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolved inorganic contaminants in water can be cationic, anionic, or neutral forms of ions, atoms, or molecules of any element in the periodic table. The article describes the physicochemical treatment processes typically used to remove the more common inorganic contaminants fr...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  5. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  6. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  7. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  8. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  9. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  10. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.1118 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1926.1118 Section 1926.1118 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are...

  14. 46 CFR 153.1045 - Inorganic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inorganic acids. 153.1045 Section 153.1045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... § 153.1045 Inorganic acids. When Table 1 refers to this section, the person in charge of cargo...

  15. 46 CFR 153.1045 - Inorganic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inorganic acids. 153.1045 Section 153.1045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... § 153.1045 Inorganic acids. When Table 1 refers to this section, the person in charge of cargo...

  16. 46 CFR 153.1045 - Inorganic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inorganic acids. 153.1045 Section 153.1045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... § 153.1045 Inorganic acids. When Table 1 refers to this section, the person in charge of cargo...

  17. 46 CFR 153.1045 - Inorganic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inorganic acids. 153.1045 Section 153.1045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... § 153.1045 Inorganic acids. When Table 1 refers to this section, the person in charge of cargo...

  18. 46 CFR 153.1045 - Inorganic acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inorganic acids. 153.1045 Section 153.1045 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING... § 153.1045 Inorganic acids. When Table 1 refers to this section, the person in charge of cargo...

  19. [Membrane surface fouling properties in MBRs for high-salinity wastewater treatment].

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Wang, Zhi-Wei; An, Ying; Wu, Zhi-Chao

    2014-02-01

    The properties of membrane foulants in MBR treating high-salinity wastewater were studied. Results showed that the removal efficiency of organics and NH4(+) -N was stable and high-quality effluent was obtained after the operation time of 121 d; the ratio of VSS/ SS decreased and SVI declined at the same time, indicating that the inorganic content of sludge increased which might lead to more compact flocs and higher settling ability; SMP and EPS of the sludge were largely changed with a lower proportion of protein and a higher proportion of humic acid. Scanning electron microscope-energy diffusive X-ray analyzer (SEM-EDX) demonstrated that Na, Al, Mg, Ca, K, Fe, Ti, Cr, W, Si and Cl were the major inorganic elements in membrane foulants; Gel filtration chromatography (GFC) illustrated that there were organic matters with high molecular weight trapped by membrane and formed the membrane foulants; Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluoresce spectroscopy discovered that carbohydrates, protein and humic acid were the main content of organics in membrane foulants.; quantitative analysis of membrane foulants showed that the amount of inorganic membrane foulants were significant when treating high-salinity wastewater. PMID:24812959

  20. Mineral oil soluble borate compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Dulat, J.

    1981-09-15

    Alkali metal borates are reacted with fatty acids or oils in the presence of a low hlb value surfactant to give a stable mineral oil-soluble product. Mineral oil containing the borate can be used as a cutting fluid.

  1. water-soluble fluorocarbon coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanelli, P.

    1979-01-01

    Water-soluble fluorocarbon proves durable nonpolluting coating for variety of substrates. Coatings can be used on metals, masonry, textiles, paper, and glass, and have superior hardness and flexibility, strong resistance to chemicals fire, and weather.

  2. Method for estimating solubility parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Ingham, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Semiempirical correlations have been developed between solubility parameters and refractive indices for series of model hydrocarbon compounds and organic polymers. Measurement of intermolecular forces is useful for assessment of material compatibility, glass-transition temperature, and transport properties.

  3. The effect of salinity on waste activated sludge alkaline fermentation and kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Baodan; Wang, Shuying; Xing, Liqun; Li, Baikun; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-05-01

    The effect of salinity on sludge alkaline fermentation at low temperature (20°C) was investigated, and a kinetic analysis was performed. Different doses of sodium chloride (NaCl, 0-25g/L) were added into the fermentation system. The batch-mode results showed that the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) increased with salinity. The hydrolysate (soluble protein, polysaccharide) and the acidification products (short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), NH4(+)-N, and PO4(3-)-P) increased with salinity initially, but slightly declined respectively at higher level salinity (20g/L or 20-25g/L). However, the hydrolytic acidification performance increased in the presence of salt compared to that without salt. Furthermore, the results of Haldane inhibition kinetics analysis showed that the salt enhanced the hydrolysis rate of particulate organic matter from sludge particulate and the specific utilization of hydrolysate, and decreased the specific utilization of SCFAs. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis indicated that the importance of polysaccharide on the accumulation of SCFAs was reduced with salt addition, but the importance of protein and NH4(+)-N on SCFA accumulation was increased. PMID:27155412

  4. Toxicity of inorganic nanomaterials in biomedical imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinxia; Chang, Xueling; Chen, Xiaoxia; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhao, Feng; Chai, Zhifang; Zhao, Yuliang

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles have shown promising potentials as novel biomedical imaging agents with high sensitivity, high spatial and temporal resolution. To translate the laboratory innovations into clinical applications, their potential toxicities are highly concerned and have to be evaluated comprehensively both in vitro and in vivo before their clinical applications. In this review, we first summarized the in vivo and in vitro toxicities of the representative inorganic nanoparticles used in biomedical imagings. Then we further discuss the origin of nanotoxicity of inorganic nanomaterials, including ROS generation and oxidative stress, chemical instability, chemical composition, the surface modification, dissolution of nanoparticles to release excess free ions of metals, metal redox state, and left-over chemicals from synthesis, etc. We intend to provide the readers a better understanding of the toxicology aspects of inorganic nanomaterials and knowledge for achieving optimized designs of safer inorganic nanomaterials for clinical applications. PMID:24389087

  5. Experimental measurements of the Solubility of CO2 in the brine of the Oriskany sandstone aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmore, R.M.; Allen, D.; Pique, P.; Jones, R.J.; Hedges, S.W.; Soong, Yee

    2006-09-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the solubility of CO2 in a natural brine solution of the Oriskany sandstone formation under elevated temperature and pressure conditions. These data were collected at pressures between 100 and 450 bars and at temperatures of 21 and 75 ºC. In addition, data on CO2 solubility in pure water were collected over the same pressure range as a means of verifying reliability of experimental technique. Experimentally determined data were compared with CO2 solubility predictions using a model developed by Duan and Sun (2003). Model results compare well with Oriskany brine CO2 solubility data collected experimentally, suggesting that the Duan and Sun model is a reliable tool for estimating solution CO2 capacity in high salinity aquifers in the temperature and pressure range evaluated.

  6. Solubility of cobalt in cement.

    PubMed

    Fregert, S; Gruvberger, B

    1978-02-01

    Unlike chromate, cobalt occurring as cobalt oxides in cement is not water-soluble in a detectable amount. Cobalt oxides are to some extent soluble in the presence of amino acids with which cobalt forms complexes. Such complexes can elicit patch test reactions. It is postulated that cobalt is more readily dissolved by forming complexes in eczematous skin than in normal skin. This may explain why cobalt sensitization in cement eczemas is secondary to chromate sensitivity. PMID:657784

  7. Tough, Soluble, Aromatic, Thermoplastic Copolyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides were prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride, 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydianiline. These copolyimides were found to be soluble in common amide solvents such as N,N'-dimethyl acetamide, N-methylpyrrolidinone, and dimethylformamide allowing them to be applied as the fully imidized copolymer and to be used to prepare a wide range of articles.

  8. Seawater temperature and salinity controls on Li/Ca ratios in Mytilus edulis (bivalvia) shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, L. J.; Wanamaker, A. D., Jr.; Kreutz, K. J.; Borns, H. W., Jr.; Introne, D. S.

    2009-04-01

    In this study we have investigated the effects of seawater temperature and salinity on Li/Ca ratios in newly precipitated shell calcite in Mytilus edulis shells, since this potential temperature proxy has not been widely applied beyond brachiopods and inorganic calcite. Juvenile specimens of M. edulis collected from western Greenland were cultured in laboratory aquaria using a four-by-three factorial design that consisted of four circulating temperature baths and three salinities. New shell growth precipitated during the constrained culturing experiment was identified carefully and subsequently dissected from the shells. Following acid dissolution, Li/Ca ratios were measured by ICP-MS, enabling an assessment of temperature and salinity controls on shell Li/Ca ratios. Furthermore, measurement of Li/Ca ratios in the aquaria seawaters has enabled calculation of Li/Ca ratio partition coefficients and direct comparison to Li/Ca ratio to temperature relationships observed for brachiopods and inorganic calcite. The results of this study suggest that bivalve shell Li/Ca ratios can be used as a new temperature proxy.

  9. Inorganic polymers: morphogenic inorganic biopolymers for rapid prototyping chain.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Shen, Zhijian; Feng, Qingling; Wang, Xiaohong

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, considerable progress has been achieved towards the development of customized scaffold materials, in particular for bone tissue engineering and repair, by the introduction of rapid prototyping or solid freeform fabrication techniques. These new fabrication techniques allow to overcome many problems associated with conventional bone implants, such as inadequate external morphology and internal architecture, porosity and interconnectivity, and low reproducibility. However, the applicability of these new techniques is still hampered by the fact that high processing temperature or a postsintering is often required to increase the mechanical stability of the generated scaffold, as well as a post-processing, i.e., surface modification/functionalization to enhance the biocompatibility of the scaffold or to bind some bioactive component. A solution might be provided by the introduction of novel inorganic biopolymers, biosilica and polyphosphate, which resist harsh conditions applied in the RP chain and are morphogenetically active and do not need supplementation by growth factors/cytokines to stimulate the growth and the differentiation of bone-forming cells. PMID:24420716

  10. Phosphorus in manure and sewage sludge more recyclable than in soluble inorganic fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Kahiluoto, H; Kuisma, M; Ketoja, E; Salo, T; Heikkinen, J

    2015-02-17

    Phosphorus (P) flow from deposits through agriculture to waterways leads to eutrophication and depletion of P reserves. Therefore, P must be recycled. Low and unpredictable plant availability of P in residues is considered to be a limiting factor for recycling. We identified the determinants for the plant-availability of P in agrifood residues. We quantified P in Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and in field soil fractions with different plant availabilities of P as a response to manure and sewage sludge with a range of P capture and hygienization treatments. P was more available in manure and in sludge, when it was captured biologically or with a moderate iron (Fe)/P (1.6), than in NPK. Increasing rate of sludge impaired P recovery and high Fe/P (9.8) prevented it. Anaerobic digestion (AD) reduced plant-availability at relevant rates. The recovery of P was increased in AD manure via composting and in AD sludge via combined acid and oxidizer. P was not available to plants in the sludge hygienized with a high calcium/P. Contrary to assumed knowledge, the recyclability of P in appropriately treated residues can be better than in NPK. The prevention of P sorption in soil by organic substances in fertilizers critically enhances the recyclability of P. PMID:25569114

  11. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    SciTech Connect

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-26

    The natural and engineered system at Yucca Mountain (YM) defines the site-specific conditions under which one must determine to what extent the engineered and the natural geochemical barriers will prevent the release of radioactive material from the repository. Most important mechanisms for retention or enhancement of radionuclide transport include precipitation or co-precipitation of radionuclide-bearing solid phases (solubility limits), complexation in solution, sorption onto surfaces, colloid formation, and diffusion. There may be many scenarios that could affect the near-field environment, creating chemical conditions more aggressive than the conditions presented by the unperturbed system (such as pH changes beyond the range of 6 to 9 or significant changes in the ionic strength of infiltrated waters). For an extended period of time, the near-field water composition may be quite different and more extreme in pH, ionic strength, and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (or carbonate concentration) than waters at some distance from the repository. Reducing conditions, high pH (up to 11), and low carbonate concentration may be present in the near-field after reaction of infiltrating groundwater with engineered barrier systems, such as cementitious materials. In the far-field, conditions are controlled by the rock-mass buffer providing a near-neutral, oxidizing, low-ionic-strength environment that controls radionuclide solubility limits and sorption capacities. There is the need for characterization of variable chemical conditions that affect solubility, speciation, and sorption reactions. Modeling of the groundwater chemistry is required and leads to an understanding of solubility and speciation of the important radionuclides. Because experimental studies cannot be performed under the numerous potential chemical conditions, solubility limitations must rely on geochemical modeling of the radionuclide's chemistry. Fundamental thermodynamic properties, such as solubility

  12. Estuarine turbidity, flushing, salinity, and circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of estuarine turbidity, flushing, salinity, and circulation on the ecology of the Chesapeake Bay are discussed. The sources of fresh water, the variations in salinity, and the circulation patterns created by temperature and salinity changes are analyzed. The application of remote sensors for long term observation of water temperatures is described. The sources of sediment and the biological effects resulting from increased sediments and siltation are identified.

  13. Salinity gradient power: utilizing vapor pressure differences.

    PubMed

    Olsson, M; Wick, G L; Isaacs, J D

    1979-10-26

    By utilizing the vapor pressure difference between high-salinity and lowsalinity wvater, one can obtain power from the gradients of salinity. This scheme eliminates the major problems associated with conversion methods in which membranes are used. The method we tested gave higher conversion efficiencies than membrane methods. Furthermore, hardware and techniques being developed for ocean thermal energy conversion may be applied to this approach to salinity gradient energy conversion. PMID:17809370

  14. PLUMBOSOLVENCY REDUCTION BY HIGH PH AND LOW CARBONATE-SOLUBILITY RELATIONSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were conducted to study the effect of a pH > or = 9.0 and a low total inorganic carbonate (TIC) concentration of 10 to 80 mg as CaCO3/L on lead solubility. The results were compared with those of earlier experiments in which the pH was 8.0 to 8.5. In the experiments t...

  15. Soil Salinity Mapping Using Multitemporal Landsat Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azabdaftari, A.; Sunar, F.

    2016-06-01

    Soil salinity is one of the most important problems affecting many areas of the world. Saline soils present in agricultural areas reduce the annual yields of most crops. This research deals with the soil salinity mapping of Seyhan plate of Adana district in Turkey from the years 2009 to 2010, using remote sensing technology. In the analysis, multitemporal data acquired from LANDSAT 7-ETM+ satellite in four different dates (19 April 2009, 12 October 2009, 21 March 2010, 31 October 2010) are used. As a first step, preprocessing of Landsat images is applied. Several salinity indices such as NDSI (Normalized Difference Salinity Index), BI (Brightness Index) and SI (Salinity Index) are used besides some vegetation indices such as NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), RVI (Ratio Vegetation Index), SAVI (Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index) and EVI (Enhamced Vegetation Index) for the soil salinity mapping of the study area. The field's electrical conductivity (EC) measurements done in 2009 and 2010, are used as a ground truth data for the correlation analysis with the original band values and different index image bands values. In the correlation analysis, two regression models, the simple linear regression (SLR) and multiple linear regression (MLR) are considered. According to the highest correlation obtained, the 21st March, 2010 dataset is chosen for production of the soil salinity map in the area. Finally, the efficiency of the remote sensing technology in the soil salinity mapping is outlined.

  16. Relating river discharges to salinity changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, X.; Liu, W. T.

    2014-12-01

    New river discharge data are brought together with spacebased sea surface salinity measurements by Aquarius and SMOS to demonstrate the role of river discharge in salinity changes near three river mouths: the Mississippi, the Ganges, and the Amazon. The characteristics of the seasonal cycle and the year-to-year changes of the river runoff are described. Various versions of the satellite salinity data are compared. The relative roles of river discharge, surface water flux, and horizontal advection in changing surface salinity in regions near the river mouths are examined. Satellite measurements of SSS clearly track movements of the fresh water from river discharges. Besides the river discharge, E-P plays an important role in the seasonal salinity variation near the Ganges and Irrawaddy River mouths. For the Mississippi and Amazon river mouths, central and eastern ITCZ, E-P contributes very little to the salinity seasonal change. In the central and eastern ITCZ, contribution of advection to the salinity tendency is clearly identified. Both salinity and salinity tendency are dominated by semi-annual cycle in the Atlantic ITCZ between 5ºN to 9ºN, whereas annual cycle dominates at other latitudes.

  17. Shape control of inorganic nanoparticles from solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhaohui; Yang, Shuanglei; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic materials with controllable shapes have been an intensely studied subject in nanoscience over the past decades. Control over novel and anisotropic shapes of inorganic nanomaterials differing from those of bulk materials leads to unique and tunable properties for widespread applications such as biomedicine, catalysis, fuels or solar cells and magnetic data storage. This review presents a comprehensive overview of shape-controlled inorganic nanomaterials via nucleation and growth theory and the control of experimental conditions (including supersaturation, temperature, surfactants and secondary nucleation), providing a brief account of the shape control of inorganic nanoparticles during wet-chemistry synthetic processes. Subsequently, typical mechanisms for shape-controlled inorganic nanoparticles and the general shape of the nanoparticles formed by each mechanism are also expounded. Furthermore, the differences between similar mechanisms for the shape control of inorganic nanoparticles are also clearly described. The authors envision that this review will provide valuable guidance on experimental conditions and process control for the synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles with tunable shapes in the solution state.

  18. Inorganic membranes and solid state sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cot, Louis; Ayral, André; Durand, Jean; Guizard, Christian; Hovnanian, Nadine; Julbe, Anne; Larbot, André

    2000-05-01

    The latest developments in inorganic membranes are closely related to recent advances in solid state science. Sol-gel processing, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and hydrothermal synthesis are methods that can be used for inorganic membrane preparation. Innovative concepts from material science (templating effect, nanophase materials, growing of continuous zeolite layers, hybrid organic-inorganic materials) have been applied by our group to the preparation of inorganic membrane materials. Sol-gel-derived nanophase ceramic membranes are presented with current applications in nanofiltration and catalytic membrane reactors. Silica membranes with an ordered porosity, due to liquid crystal phase templating effect, are described with potential application in pervaporation. Defect-free and thermally stable zeolite membranes can be obtained through an original synthesis method, in which zeolite crystals are grown inside the pores of a support. Hybrid organic-inorganic materials with permselective properties for gas separation and facilitated transport of solutes in liquid media, have been successfully adapted to membrane applications. Potential membrane developments offered by CVD deposition techniques are also illustrated through several examples related to the preparation of purely inorganic and hybrid organic-inorganic membrane materials.

  19. Soil salinity detection from satellite image analysis: an integrated approach of salinity indices and field data.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Md Manjur; Islam, Md Tazmul; Jamil, Raihan

    2016-02-01

    This paper attempts to detect soil salinity from satellite image analysis using remote sensing and geographic information system. Salinity intrusion is a common problem for the coastal regions of the world. Traditional salinity detection techniques by field survey and sampling are time-consuming and expensive. Remote sensing and geographic information system offer economic and efficient salinity detection, monitoring, and mapping. To predict soil salinity, an integrated approach of salinity indices and field data was used to develop a multiple regression equation. The correlations between different indices and field data of soil salinity were calculated to find out the highly correlated indices. The best regression model was selected considering the high R (2) value, low P value, and low Akaike's Information Criterion. About 20% variation was observed between the field data and predicted EC from the satellite image analysis. The precision of this salinity detection technique depends on the accuracy and uniform distribution of field data. PMID:26815557

  20. Compositional Analysis of Water-Soluble Materials in Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. F.; Mowery, R. A.; Scarlata, C. J.; Chambliss, C. K.

    2007-01-01

    Corn stover is one of the leading feedstock candidates for commodity-scale biomass-to-ethanol processing. The composition of water-soluble materials in corn stover has been determined with greater than 90% mass closure in four of five representative samples. The mass percentage of water-soluble materials in tested stover samples varied from 14 to 27% on a dry weight basis. Over 30 previously unknown constituents of aqueous extracts were identified and quantified using a variety of chromatographic techniques. Monomeric sugars (primarily glucose and fructose) were found to be the predominant water-soluble components of corn stover, accounting for 30-46% of the dry weight of extractives (4-12% of the dry weight of feedstocks). Additional constituents contributing to the mass balance for extractives included various alditols (3-7%), aliphatic acids (7-21%), inorganic ions (10-18%), oligomeric sugars (4-12%), and a distribution of oligomers tentatively identified as being derived from phenolic glycosides (10-18%).

  1. The quest for inorganic fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Pietsch, Susanne; Dollinger, Andreas; Strobel, Christoph H.; Ganteför, Gerd E-mail: ydkim91@skku.edu; Park, Eun Ji; Kim, Young Dok E-mail: ydkim91@skku.edu; Seo, Hyun Ook; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2015-10-07

    Experimental results of the search for inorganic fullerenes are presented. Mo{sub n}S{sub m}{sup −} and W{sub n}S{sub m}{sup −} clusters are generated with a pulsed arc cluster ion source equipped with an annealing stage. This is known to enhance fullerene formation in the case of carbon. Analogous to carbon, the mass spectra of the metal chalcogenide clusters produced in this way exhibit a bimodal structure. The species in the first maximum at low mass are known to be platelets. Here, the structure of the species in the second maximum is studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and scanning tunneling microcopy. All experimental results indicate a two-dimensional structure of these species and disagree with a three-dimensional fullerene-like geometry. A possible explanation for this preference of two-dimensional structures is the ability of a two-element material to saturate the dangling bonds at the edges of a platelet by excess atoms of one element. A platelet consisting of a single element only cannot do this. Accordingly, graphite and boron might be the only materials forming nano-spheres because they are the only single element materials assuming two-dimensional structures.

  2. The quest for inorganic fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Pietsch, Susanne; Dollinger, Andreas; Strobel, Christoph H.; Park, Eun Ji; Ganteför, Gerd; Seo, Hyun Ook; Kim, Young Dok; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2015-10-02

    Experimental results of the search for inorganic fullerenes are presented. Mo nSm - and WnSm - clusters are generated with a pulsed arc cluster ion source equipped with an annealing stage. This is known to enhance fullerene formation in the case of carbon. Analogous to carbon, the mass spectra of the metal chalcogenide clusters produced in this way exhibit a bimodal structure. Moreover, the species in the first maximum at low mass are known to be platelets. The structure of the species in the second maximum is studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and scanning tunneling microcopy. All experimental results indicate a two-dimensional structure of these species and disagree with a three-dimensional fullerene-like geometry. A possible explanation for this preference of two-dimensional structures is the ability of a two-element material to saturate the dangling bonds at the edges of a platelet by excess atoms of one element. A platelet consisting of a single element only cannot do this. Likewise, graphite and boron might be the only materials forming nano-spheres because they are the only single element materials assuming two-dimensional structures.

  3. The quest for inorganic fullerenes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pietsch, Susanne; Dollinger, Andreas; Strobel, Christoph H.; Park, Eun Ji; Ganteför, Gerd; Seo, Hyun Ook; Kim, Young Dok; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2015-10-02

    Experimental results of the search for inorganic fullerenes are presented. Mo nSm - and WnSm - clusters are generated with a pulsed arc cluster ion source equipped with an annealing stage. This is known to enhance fullerene formation in the case of carbon. Analogous to carbon, the mass spectra of the metal chalcogenide clusters produced in this way exhibit a bimodal structure. Moreover, the species in the first maximum at low mass are known to be platelets. The structure of the species in the second maximum is studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and scanning tunneling microcopy.more » All experimental results indicate a two-dimensional structure of these species and disagree with a three-dimensional fullerene-like geometry. A possible explanation for this preference of two-dimensional structures is the ability of a two-element material to saturate the dangling bonds at the edges of a platelet by excess atoms of one element. A platelet consisting of a single element only cannot do this. Likewise, graphite and boron might be the only materials forming nano-spheres because they are the only single element materials assuming two-dimensional structures.« less

  4. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M.R.; Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  5. Combined effects of cadmium and salinity on juvenile Takifugu obscurus: cadmium moderates salinity tolerance; salinity decreases the toxicity of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Zhu, Xuexia; Huang, Xin; Gu, Lei; Chen, Yafen; Yang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Obscure puffer Takifugu obscurus, a species of anadromous fish, experiences several salinity changes in its lifetime. Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal that can potentially induce oxidative stress in fish. The present study aimed to detect the combined effects of Cd (0, 5, 10, 20 and 50 mg L(-1)) and salinity (0, 15 and 30 ppt) on juvenile T. obscurus. Results showed the juveniles could survive well under different salinities; however, with Cd exposure, the survival rates significantly decreased at 0 and 30 ppt. At 15 ppt, tolerance to Cd increased. Cd exposure clearly induced oxidative stress, and the responses among different tissues were qualitatively similar. Salinity acted as a protective factor which could reduce the reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde levels. In addition, salinity could enhance the antioxidant defense system, including superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity significantly decreased under Cd exposure in gill, kidney and intestine. These findings indicated that Cd could moderate the adaptability of juvenile T. obscurus to high salinity and low salinity played a protective role upon Cd exposure. Thus, the role of salinity should be considered when evaluating the effect of heavy metals on anadromous and estuarine fishes. PMID:27487764

  6. Combined effects of cadmium and salinity on juvenile Takifugu obscurus: cadmium moderates salinity tolerance; salinity decreases the toxicity of cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Zhu, Xuexia; Huang, Xin; Gu, Lei; Chen, Yafen; Yang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Obscure puffer Takifugu obscurus, a species of anadromous fish, experiences several salinity changes in its lifetime. Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal that can potentially induce oxidative stress in fish. The present study aimed to detect the combined effects of Cd (0, 5, 10, 20 and 50 mg L−1) and salinity (0, 15 and 30 ppt) on juvenile T. obscurus. Results showed the juveniles could survive well under different salinities; however, with Cd exposure, the survival rates significantly decreased at 0 and 30 ppt. At 15 ppt, tolerance to Cd increased. Cd exposure clearly induced oxidative stress, and the responses among different tissues were qualitatively similar. Salinity acted as a protective factor which could reduce the reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde levels. In addition, salinity could enhance the antioxidant defense system, including superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione. Na+/K+–ATPase activity significantly decreased under Cd exposure in gill, kidney and intestine. These findings indicated that Cd could moderate the adaptability of juvenile T. obscurus to high salinity and low salinity played a protective role upon Cd exposure. Thus, the role of salinity should be considered when evaluating the effect of heavy metals on anadromous and estuarine fishes. PMID:27487764

  7. Aquarius Instrument and Salinity Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    Aquarius has been designed to map the surface salinity field of the global ocean from space a parameter important for understanding ocean circulation and its relationship to climate and the global water cycle. Salinity is measured remotely from space by measuring the thermal emission from the ocean surface. This is done at the low frequency end of the microwave spectrum (e.g. 1.4 GHz) where the emission is sufficiently sensitive to changes in salinity to be detected with sophisticated radiometers. The goal is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean by providing maps on a monthly basis with a spatial resolution of 150 km and an accuracy of 0.2 psu. These are challenging requirements that have led to some unique features of the instrument. These include: a) The addition of a co-located scatterometer to help provide a correction for roughness; b) The addition of a polarimetric channel (third Stokes parameter) to the radiometer to help correct for Faraday rotation; c) Asun-synchronous orbit with a 6 pm ascending equatorial crossing to minimize Faraday rotation and with the antennas looking away from the sun toward the nighttime side to minimize contamination by radiation from the sun; and d) An antenna designed to limit side lobes in the direction of rays from the sun. In addition, achieving the accuracy goal of 0.2 psu requires averaging over one month and to do this requires a highly stable radiometer. Aquarius has three separate radiometers that image in pushbroom fashion with the three antenna beams looking across track. The antenna is a 2.5-m diameter, offset parabolic reflector with three feed horns and the three beams are arranged to image with the boresight aligned to look across track, roughly perpendicular to the spacecraft heading and pointing away from the Sun. The three beams point at angles of theta = 25.8 deg., 33.8 deg. and 40.3 deg. with respect to the spacecraft

  8. Synergistic effects of inorganic salt and surfactant on phenanthrene removal from aqueous solution by sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Yaoguo; Hu, Sihai; Lu, Cong

    2014-01-01

    The economic and effective application of surfactant enhanced remediation (SER) technology in a sediment-freshwater/saline water system was investigated by batch method using the combined effects of inorganic salt (sodium chloride, NaCl) and anionic surfactant (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS)) on phenanthrene (PHE) removal via sorption by sediment. In all cases, PHE sorption followed a linear equation and partition as the main mechanism for PHE removal from aqueous solution. Separate addition of SDBS (2 mmol L(-1)) and NaCl (2-100 mmol L(-1)) moderately enhanced PHE removal, while with their combined addition the enhancement was substantial, and the removal efficiency achieved a peak of 92.8%. The combined effect expressed a synergy, and the sorption enhancement increased by factors of 2.7, 3.2 and 3.4 when compared with the sum of the separate entities at elevated salinity. This was because the sorbed SDBS, with increasing amount and a high packing conformation at elevated salinity, outcompeted aqueous SDBS for PHE partition. Moreover, a combination of 2 mmol L(-1) SDBS and 2 mmol L(-1) NaCl was optimal for PHE removal. Therefore, SER technology appears more effective for PHE removal in saline water than in freshwater, and preliminary water quality monitoring is essential for economic and efficient SER application. PMID:25353936

  9. Salinity effects on photosynthesis and growth in Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart. ) Griseb

    SciTech Connect

    Longstreth, D.J.; Bolanos, J.A.; Smith, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    Alternanthera philoxeroides, alligator weed, was grown at five different NaCl concentrations to determine the effect of salinity on factors related to the net rate of CO/sub 2/ uptake (P/sub n/). Over the range of 0 to 400 millimolar NaCl, P/sub n/ declined 51%. Stomatal conductance declined in parallel with P/sub n/ and as a result there was no reduction in intercellular CO/sub 2/ concentrations and therefore no reduction in the amount of CO/sub 2/ available for photosynthesis. The CO/sub 2/ compensation point did not change with salt stress. Increases in leaf thickness tended to compensate slightly for the negative effects of salinity on leaf cell metabolism, at least in relation to P/sub n/. On a mesophyll cell area basis, soluble protein was relatively constant in leaves developed at 100 to 400 millimolar NaCl while total chlorophyll decreased at all salinities. Dry weight production and P/sub n/ were closely correlated in alligator weed grown at different salinities. Plants produced less leaf area per unit dry weight as salinity increased, which may aid in water conservation. 26 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Salinity Effects on Photosynthesis and Growth in Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart.) Griseb. 1

    PubMed Central

    Longstreth, David J.; Bolaños, Jorge A.; Smith, James E.

    1984-01-01

    Alternanthera philoxeroides, alligator weed, was grown at five different NaCl concentrations to determine the effect of salinity on factors related to the net rate of CO2 uptake (Pn). Over the range of 0 to 400 millimolar NaCl, Pn declined 51%. Stomatal conductance declined in parallel with Pn and as a result there was no reduction in intercellular CO2 concentration and therefore no reduction in the amount of CO2 available for photosynthesis. The CO2 compensation point did not change with salt stress. Increases in leaf thickness tended to compensate slightly for the negative effects of salinity on leaf cell metabolism, at least in relation to Pn. On a mesophyll cell area basis, soluble protein was relatively constant in leaves developed at 100 to 400 millimolar NaCl while total chlorophyll decreased at all salinities. Dry weight production and Pn were closely correlated in alligator weed grown at different salinities. Plants produced less leaf area per unit dry weight as salinity increased, which may aid in water conservation. PMID:16663731