Sample records for salmonid sexual development

  1. Pediatric sexuality: promoting normal sexual development in children.

    PubMed

    Smith, M

    1993-08-01

    Since the sexual revolution of the 1960s there has been an openness regarding sexual exploration that has resulted in an increase of sexually transmitted diseases and teenage pregnancies. Clinicians can mitigate the unhealthy results of such exploration through a therapeutic relationship with their patients. This article provides practical ways to approach and educate the pediatric patient and parent regarding normal sexual growth and development and the promotion of healthy, responsible sexual behavior. Using developmental theories as a foundation, sexuality is examined from birth through the adolescent years. PMID:8233152

  2. Development of infectious cDNA clones of Salmonid alphavirus subtype 3

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marius Karlsen; Stephane Villoing; Karl F Ottem; Espen Rimstad; Are Nylund

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) is a widespread pathogen in European aquaculture of salmonid fish. Distinct viral subtypes have been suggested based on sequence comparisons and some of these have different geographical distributions. In Norway, only SAV subtype 3 have so far been identified. Little is known about viral mechanisms important for pathogenesis and transmission. Tools for detailed exploration of SAV

  3. Sexual scripts and sexual risk behaviors among Black heterosexual men: development of the Sexual Scripts Scale.

    PubMed

    Bowleg, Lisa; Burkholder, Gary J; Noar, Seth M; Teti, Michelle; Malebranche, David J; Tschann, Jeanne M

    2015-04-01

    Sexual scripts are widely shared gender and culture-specific guides for sexual behavior with important implications for HIV prevention. Although several qualitative studies document how sexual scripts may influence sexual risk behaviors, quantitative investigations of sexual scripts in the context of sexual risk are rare. This mixed methods study involved the qualitative development and quantitative testing of the Sexual Scripts Scale (SSS). Study 1 included qualitative semi-structured interviews with 30 Black heterosexual men about sexual experiences with main and casual sex partners to develop the SSS. Study 2 included a quantitative test of the SSS with 526 predominantly low-income Black heterosexual men. A factor analysis of the SSS resulted in a 34-item, seven-factor solution that explained 68% of the variance. The subscales and coefficient alphas were: Romantic Intimacy Scripts (? = .86), Condom Scripts (? = .82), Alcohol Scripts (? = .83), Sexual Initiation Scripts (? = .79), Media Sexual Socialization Scripts (? = .84), Marijuana Scripts (? = .85), and Sexual Experimentation Scripts (? = .84). Among men who reported a main partner (n = 401), higher Alcohol Scripts, Media Sexual Socialization Scripts, and Marijuana Scripts scores, and lower Condom Scripts scores were related to more sexual risk behavior. Among men who reported at least one casual partner (n = 238), higher Romantic Intimacy Scripts, Sexual Initiation Scripts, and Media Sexual Socialization Scripts, and lower Condom Scripts scores were related to higher sexual risk. The SSS may have considerable utility for future research on Black heterosexual men's HIV risk. PMID:24311105

  4. Development of an Index to Bird Predation of Juvenile Salmonids within the Yakima River, 2001 Annual Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian E. Grue; Kristen E. Ryding

    2002-01-01

    Avian predation of fish is suspected to contribute to the loss of out-migrating juvenile salmonids in the Yakima Basin, potentially constraining natural and artificial production. In 1997 and 1998, the Yakima\\/ Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP)--whose goal is increasing natural production within the Yakima River--initiated investigations to assess the feasibility of developing an index to avian predation of juvenile salmon within

  5. Cognitive development and aspects of adolescent sexuality.

    PubMed

    Pestrak, V A; Martin, D

    1985-01-01

    Difficulty with adjustment to sexuality by adolescents has been of increasing concern to both educators and human service professionals in recent years. The cognitive development and behavior of adolescents as it pertains to sexuality and the implications for helping them overcome maladaptive sexual behavior is discussed. PMID:4083149

  6. Development and corroboration of a bioenergetics model for northern pikeminnow feeding on juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, J.H.; Ward, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    A bioenergetics model was developed and corroborated for northern pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis, an important predator on juvenile salmonids in the Pacific Northwest. Predictions of modeled predation rate on salmonids were compared with field data from three areas of John Day Reservoir (Columbia River). To make bioenergetics model estimates of predation rate, three methods were used to approximate the change in mass of average predators during 30-d growth periods: observed change in mass between the first and the second month, predicted change in mass calculated with seasonal growth rates, and predicted change in mass based on an annual growth model. For all reservoir areas combined, bioenergetics model predictions of predation on salmon were 19% lower than field estimates based on observed masses, 45% lower than estimates based on seasonal growth rates, and 15% lower than estimates based on the annual growth model. For each growth approach, the largest differences in field-versus-model predation occurred at the midreservoir area (-84% to -67% difference). Model predictions of the rate of predation on salmonids were examined for sensitivity to parameter variation, swimming speed, sampling bias caused by gear selectivity, and asymmetric size distributions of predators. The specific daily growth rate of northern pikeminnow predicted by the model was highest in July and October and decreased during August. The bioenergetics model for northern pikeminnow performed well compared with models for other fish species that have been tested with field data. This model should be a useful tool for evaluating management actions such as predator removal, examining the influence of temperature on predation rates, and exploring interactions between predators in the Columbia River basin.

  7. A Prospective Investigation of the Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse on the Development of Sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Jennie G.; Trickett, Penelope K.; Putnam, Frank W.

    2010-01-01

    The sexual attitudes and activities of 77 sexually abused and 89 comparison women (mean age = 20.41, SD = 3.38) were assessed 10 years after disclosure in a longitudinal, prospective study of the long-term effects of childhood sexual abuse. Abused participants were more preoccupied with sex, younger at first voluntary intercourse, more likely to have been teen mothers, and endorsed lower birth control efficacy than comparison participants. When psychological functioning earlier in development was examined, sexual preoccupation was predicted by anxiety, sexual aversion was predicted by childhood sexual behavior problems, and sexual ambivalence (simultaneous sexual preoccupation and sexual aversion) was predicted by pathological dissociation. Findings also indicate that biological father abuse may be associated with greater sexual aversion and sexual ambivalence. PMID:12795580

  8. Vaccination against salmonid bacterial kidney disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonid fishes, caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, has presented challenges for development of effective vaccines, despite several decades of research. The only vaccine against BKD that is commercially licensed is an injectable preparation containing live cells ...

  9. Improving Sexuality Education: The Development of Teacher-Preparation Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Elissa M.; Goldfarb, Eva S.; Russell, Susan; Seabert, Denise; Wallen, Michele; Wilson, Kelly L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Teaching sexuality education to support young people's sexual development and overall sexual health is both needed and supported. Data continue to highlight the high rates of teen pregnancy, sexually transmitted disease, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, among young people in the United States as well as the…

  10. Measuring Rates of Sexual Development in Female

    E-print Network

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    , we have shown that age at vaginal introitus predicts adult patterns of reproductive, maternal the relationship in gerbils between age at vaginal patency and three other indices of rate of female sexual development: ovarian weight, occurrence of vaginal estrus, and onset of attractiveness to males. We found

  11. SALMONID PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pharmacology and toxicology of Salmonids are described. Authors also document territorial behavior of salmonids and their response to effects of drugs, chemicals or pollutants. Current literature is cited as the best source of information regarding the use of drugs and chemicals ...

  12. Inhabiting the sexual landscape: toward an interpretive theory of the development of sexual orientation and identity.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Liahna E; Silva, Tony J

    2015-01-01

    Building on Paula Rust's (1996) concept of a sexual landscape, we propose an interpretive theory of the development of both sexual orientation and sexual identity. We seek to reconcile human agency with active and shifting influences in social context and to recognize the inherent complexity of environmental factors while acknowledging the role that biological potential plays. We ground our model in the insights of three compatible and related theoretical perspectives: social constructionism, symbolic interactionism, and scripting theory. Within this framework, we explain how sexual orientation and sexual identities develop and potentially change. PMID:25397814

  13. Development of Sexual Orientation among Adolescent and Young Adult Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Lisa M.

    1998-01-01

    Interviewed 16- to 23-year-old non-heterosexual women regarding development of their sexual orientation. Found that a majority failed to report at least one of following: childhood sexual orientation indicators, stability in same-sex attractions, or awareness of same-sex attractions prior to conscious sexual questioning. Lesbians reported greater…

  14. The Internet, Sex, and Youths: Implications for Sexual Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SYLVAIN C. BOIES; GAIL KNUDSON; JULIAN YOUNG

    2004-01-01

    This article summarizes the research to date on youths' online sexual activities pertaining to socialization, education, and entertainment. It presents how these activities relate to the overall sexuality and mental health of adolescents and young adults, while situating the findings within a perspective of psychosocial and sexual development. It also provides information relevant to the prevention and treatment of problematic

  15. Identity Development Among Sexual-Minority Youth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ritch C. Savin-Williams

    \\u000a \\u000a Sexual identity is the name and meaning individuals assign to themselves based on the most salient sexual aspects of their life – such as\\u000a sexual attractions, fantasies, desires, and behaviors. Sexual identities usually fall within existing social categories, such\\u000a as straight, bisexual, or lesbian\\/gay, and are historically and culturally specific. Youth in today’s cohort have expanded\\u000a the list of sexual

  16. Peripuberal sexual development of Pantaneiro stallions.

    PubMed

    Melo, M I; Sereno, J R; Henry, M; Cassali, G D

    1998-10-01

    Pantaneiro horses are a breed native to flood plains of Brazil, where they thrive with little human interference. The aims of this study were to characterize age-associated changes in testicular size, serum testosterone and sexual behavior and to determine age at puberty as well as to evaluate daily sperm production in the Pantaneiro stallion. After weaning the males were kept in bachelor groups away from the females, in a separated area in the natural environment of flood plains. Infantile period ended at approximately 14.4 m.o. of age. Sexual interest and breeding capability first appeared between the ages of 15.6 to 27.5 m.o. The transition from prepuberal to postpuberal histological stage, occurred at approximately 27.8 m.o. of age. All animals were in the postpuberal period at 38.5 m.o. of age. Daily sperm production estimated with testicle homogenate, at 38.5 m.o. of age was low (1.4603 +/- 0.48 x 10(9) sperm) and serum testosterone levels were similar to adult levels by 27.8 m.o. In conclusion the 2 y old Pantaneiro stallions showed full sexual behavior and had adult testosterone levels, but at this age, the stage of development of the seminiferous epithelium was variable and the efficiency of sperm production was still low. PMID:10734447

  17. The development of a measure of correlates of child sexual abuse: the Traumatic Sexualization Survey.

    PubMed

    Matorin, A I; Lynn, S J

    1998-04-01

    The present research developed an instrument which assesses cognitive and behavioral factors purportedly associated with child sexual abuse histories. Finkelhor and Browne's construct of traumatic sexualization served as a guide for item selection. The study resulted in a 38-item reliable measure consisting of four subscales: Avoidance and Fear of Sexual and Physical Intimacy, Thoughts About Sex, Role of Sex in Relationships, and Attraction/Interest and Sexuality. Construct validity was established using a variety of self-report instruments associated with the dimensions of traumatic sexualization. Sexually abused women scored higher than nonabused women on three TSS factors. Physically abused women differed from nonabused women on only one factor. Sexually abused women did not score significantly higher than physically abused women on any factors. PMID:9565915

  18. From Best to Pest: changing perspectives on the impact of exotic salmonids in the southern hemisphere

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. GARCIA DE LEANIZ; G. GAJARDO; S. CONSUEGRA

    2010-01-01

    Exotic salmonids were deliberately introduced to the southern hemisphere during the last part of the 20th century, initially to boost sport fishing and later to develop an aquaculture industry. Early introductions were justified by governments on purely utilitarian arguments as it was felt that translocated salmonids would capitalize on otherwise ‘underutilized’ aquatic niches. A century later, exotic salmonids are established

  19. Gender development and sexuality in disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Berenbaum, S A; Meyer-Bahlburg, H F L

    2015-05-01

    Understanding psychological development in individuals with disorders of sex development (DSD) is important for optimizing their clinical care and for identifying paths to competence and health in all individuals. In this paper, we focus on psychological outcomes likely to be influenced by processes of physical sexual differentiation that may be atypical in DSD, particularly characteristics related to being male or female (those that show sex differences in the general population, gender identity, and sexuality). We review evidence suggesting that (a) early androgens facilitate several aspects of male-typed behavior, with large effects on activity interests, and moderate effects on some social and personal behaviors (including sexual orientation) and spatial ability; (b) gender dysphoria and gender change occur more frequently in individuals with DSD than in the general population, with rates varying in relation to syndrome, initial gender assignment, and medical treatment; and (c) sexual behavior may be affected by DSD through several paths related to the condition and treatment, including reduced fertility, physical problems associated with genital ambiguity, social stigmatization, and hormonal variations. We also consider limitations to current work and challenges to studying gender and sexuality in DSD. We conclude with suggestions for a research agenda and a proposed research framework. PMID:25853895

  20. Water temperatures within spawning beds in two chalk streams and implications for salmonid egg development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acornley, R. M.

    1999-02-01

    Water temperatures within brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) spawning gravels were measured in two Hampshire chalk streams from October 1995 to April 1996 inclusive. During the winter, mean intra-gravel water temperatures were higher than those in the stream, and increased with depth in the gravel bed. The amplitude of diel fluctuations in water temperature decreased with depth in the gravel bed, although diel fluctuations were still evident at a depth of 30 cm. Differences in intra-gravel temperature gradients between the two study sites were attributed to differences in the amplitude of stream water temperature fluctuations and there was no evidence that either of the study sites were located in zones of upwelling groundwater. Published equations are used to predict, from temperature, the timing of important stages in the development of brown trout embryos (eyeing, hatching and emergence) for eggs spawned in the autumn and winter and buried at different depths in the gravel bed.

  1. Transcriptional evolution underlying vertebrate sexual development.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Nicole; Neuwald, Jennifer L; Literman, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Explaining the diversity of vertebrate sex-determining mechanisms ranging from genotypic (GSD) to temperature-dependent (TSD) remains a developmental and evolutionary conundrum. Using a phylogenetic framework, we explore the transcriptional evolution during gonadogenesis of several genes involved in sexual development, combining novel data from Chrysemys picta turtles (TSD) and published data from other TSD and GSD vertebrates. Our novel C. picta dataset underscores Sf1 and Wt1 as potential activators of the thermosensitive period and uncovered the first evidence of Dax1 involvement in male development in a TSD vertebrate. Contrasting transcriptional profiles revealed male-biased Wt1 expression in fish while monomorphic expression is found in tetrapods but absent in turtles. Sf1 expression appears highly labile with transitions among testicular, ovarian, and non-sex-specific gonadal formation patterns among and within lineages. Dax1's dual role in ovarian and testicular formation is found in fish and mammals but is dosage-sensitive exclusively in eutherian mammals due to its X-linkage in this group. Contrastingly, Sox9 male-biased and Aromatase female-biased expression appear ancestral and virtually conserved throughout vertebrates despite significant heterochronic changes in expression as other elements likely replaced their function in early gonadogenesis. Finally, research avenues are highlighted to further study the evolution of the regulatory network of sexual development. PMID:23108853

  2. Sexual Self-Concept and Sexually Abused Males: Early Data on the Development of a Scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jozef Wawrzyniec Spychala Spiegel

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the early development and psychometric piloting of the Sexual Self-Concept Scale for Sexually Abused Males, a one-dimensional measure assessing the gender-based self-perceptions of males with histories of childhood sexual abuse (CSA). A sample of 459 males with histories of CSA completed a demographic survey and responded to a pool of items using a Likert-type scale. Strong and

  3. Understanding normal development of adolescent sexuality: A bumpy ride

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Sujita Kumar; Choudhury, Ananya; Singh, Abhishek Pratap

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence, derived from the Latin word “adolescere” meaning “to grow up” is a critical developmental period. During adolescence, major biological as well as psychological developments take place. Development of sexuality is an important bio-psycho-social development, which takes an adult shape during this period. During adolescence, an individual's thought, perception as well as response gets colored sexually. Puberty is an important landmark of sexuality development that occurs in the adolescence. The myriad of changes that occurs in adolescents puts them under enormous stress, which may have adverse physical, as well as psychological consequences. Understanding adolescent sexuality has important clinical, legal, social, cultural, as well as educational implications. PMID:26157296

  4. Development of an Index to Bird Predation of Juvenile Salmonids within the Yakima River, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Major, III, Walter; Grue, Christian E.; Ryding, Kristen E. (University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Seattle, WA)

    2002-08-01

    Avian predation of fish is suspected to contribute to the loss of out-migrating juvenile salmonids in the Yakima Basin, potentially constraining natural and artificial production. In 1997 and 1998, the Yakima/ Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP)--whose goal is increasing natural production within the Yakima River--initiated investigations to assess the feasibility of developing an index to avian predation of juvenile salmon within the river. This research confirmed that Ring-billed Gulls and Common Mergansers were the primary avian predators of juvenile salmon (Phinney et al. 1998), and that under certain conditions could significantly impact migrating smolt populations. Beginning in 1999, the Washington Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit (WACFWRU) was asked by the YKFP to continue development of avian consumption indices. Monitoring methods developed by Phinney et al. (1998) were adopted (with modifications) and monitoring of impacts to juvenile salmon along river reaches and at areas of high predator/prey concentrations (colloquially referred to as ''hotspots'') has continued each year through 2001. In 2001, piscivorous birds were counted from river banks at hotspots and from a raft or drift boat along river reaches. Consumption by gulls at hotspots was based on direct observations of foraging success and modeled abundance; consumption by all other piscivorous birds was estimated using published dietary requirements and modeled abundance. Seasonal patterns of avian piscivore abundance were identified, diurnal patterns of gull abundance at hotspots were identified, and predation indices were calculated for hotspots and river reaches (for both spring and summer). Changes in survey methods in 2001 included the addition of surveys in the ''Canyon'' reach during spring and altering the method of directly measuring gull feeding rates at hotspots. Primary avian predators in 2001 were ''gulls'' (California and Ring-billed) at hotspots and Common Mergansers within upper river reaches. Consumption on the lower reaches was distributed among a number of species, with slightly more then half of all fish consumption being attributed to American White Pelicans. Estimated consumption by gulls at both hotspots combined (8 Apr-30 Jun) was 169,883 fish. Assuming a worst case scenario (all fish taken were smolts) this represented approximately 4.9% of all smolts estimated passing or being released from the Prosser Dam area during the 2001 smolt migration season. Total gull abundances and estimates of consumption between the two hotspot sites were opposite that seen in 2000. Foraging gulls at Horn Rapids Dam were regressed against flow for the 3 years and found to be significant (alpha = 0.1, P=0.081, r{sup 2} = .2589). A similar 3-year regression vs fish passage through the Chandler Juvenile Fish Facility, however, did not show a significant relationship (alpha = 0.1, P = 0.396, r{sup 2} = .3708). Total estimated take by Common Mergansers across all strata surveyed was 14,777 kg between 8 Apr and 31 Aug, 2001. Approximately 66 percent of that consumption was within the upper river reaches (Stratum 1) where there is a known breeding population of mergansers. Graphical comparisons of merganser abundances over the three years (1999-2001) in the upper reaches of the Yakima River suggest an increase in 2001 from the previous 2 years in both the spring and summer survey periods, but overlapping confidence intervals prevent assumptions regarding upward or downward trends in abundance.

  5. Sexuality and Student Development: Sexual Anxiety As It Relates to Chickering's Vectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouse, Roy H.; Doebbeling, Brad

    Psychological stress has been identified as a main variable related to adjustment in college and to college attrition. Five of Chickering's seven areas of development for college students have been related directly to sexuality. Although a major concern of college students is the anxiety associated with sexual issues, little research has been…

  6. Alcohol and Sexual Consent Scale: Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Rose Marie; Matthews, Molly R.; Weiner, Judith; Hogan, Kathryn M.; Popson, Halle C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To establish a short measure of attitudes toward sexual consent in the context of alcohol consumption. Methods: Using a multistage and systematic measurement development process, the investigators developed the Alcohol and Sexual Consent Scale using a sample of college students. Results: The resulting 12-item scale, the Alcohol and…

  7. Kin discrimination in salmonids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grant E. Brown; Joseph A. Brown

    1996-01-01

    Summary The data presented here suggest that significant selection pressures towards kin discrimination behaviour patterns result from kin-biased territorial defence behaviour patterns. Salmonids employ a phenotype matching recognition mechanism allowing individuals to discriminate unfamiliar kin. Kin discrimination abilities allow individuals to reduce the levels of aggression associated with territorial defence towards related conspecifics and to defend smaller territories near kin

  8. Tetraploid production in salmonids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tetraploid induction is of interest to aquaculture and fisheries as part of a more efficient means of producing triploid fish by mating a tetraploid parent with a diploid parent (tetraploid-derived triploids). Tetraploid induction has previously been reported in salmonids including rainbow trout a...

  9. Development and familiality of sexual orientation in females

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angela M. L. Pattatucci; Dean H. Hamer

    1995-01-01

    The development and familial clustering of sexual orientation were studied in 358 heterosexual, bisexual, and homosexual women.\\u000a Sexual orientation, as measured by the Kinsey scales, was diverse yet showed statistical congruity and stability over a 1-\\u000a to 1.5-year time span. Developmental patterns, as measured by retrospective reports on the ages of first sexual or romantic\\u000a attraction and of self-acknowledgment of

  10. The Development of the Sexual Assertiveness Questionnaire (SAQ): A Comprehensive Measure of Sexual Assertiveness for Women.

    PubMed

    Loshek, Eevett; Terrell, Heather K

    2014-09-11

    Sexual assertiveness has been defined in a number of ways by many researchers, with different aspects of sexual assertiveness emphasized in different measures. Most previous measures have included condom insistence as an important aspect of sexual assertiveness, but this may not translate well to women at all life stages or in varied types of relationships. The goal of the current study was to develop a comprehensive measure of sexual assertiveness that encompasses the aspects of sexual assertiveness that have been emphasized by previous researchers, with the exception of condom insistence. Items were generated based on previous measures and definitions, and an exploratory factor analysis was conducted (Study 1) to better understand the dimensions of sexual assertiveness. The proposed scale was revised and further refined using both exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis in Study 2. The final scale consisted of 18 items that seem to capture three dimensions of sexual assertiveness: the ability to initiate and communicate about desired sex, the ability to refuse unwanted sex, and the ability to communicate about sexual history and risk. Model fit indices indicate that this three-factor solution fits the data well. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:25211014

  11. Development of sexuality in female children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, M

    1989-12-01

    Female sexuality (meaning sexual desire, excitement and orgasm) has been of considerable interest in psychiatry. Women's efforts to define and legitimize their own experience of their sexuality have increased in the past 25 years. However, the integration of these new views into the body of psychiatric (especially psychoanalytic) theory has not occurred very actively or successfully. Very little is known about the development of sexuality in childhood and adolescence. This paper looks at various behaviours, interests and events in women's lives that might reveal something about the development of their sexuality. The literature on female masturbation is reviewed and some sex differences high-lighted. The literature on interest in babies, the wish to have babies, and menarche is explored for possible associations with sexuality. Rather than sexuality being a central organizer of experience, it seems quite possible that experience is an organizer of sexuality. Therefore, to better understand female sexuality we need to consider the impact of experiences during childhood and adolescence. PMID:2692806

  12. Reproductive strategy, sexual development and attraction to facial characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Cornwell, R. Elisabeth; Law Smith, Miriam J; Boothroyd, Lynda G; Moore, Fhionna R; Davis, Hasker P; Stirrat, Michael; Tiddeman, Bernard; Perrett, David I

    2006-01-01

    Sexual reproduction strategies vary both between and within species in the level of investment in offspring. Life-history theories suggest that the rate of sexual maturation is critically linked to reproductive strategy, with high investment being associated with few offspring and delayed maturation. For humans, age of puberty and age of first sex are two developmental milestones that have been associated with reproductive strategies. Stress during early development can retard or accelerate sexual maturation and reproduction. Early age of menarche is associated with absence of younger siblings, absence of a father figure during early life and increased weight. Father absence during early life is also associated with early marriage, pregnancy and divorce. Choice of partner characteristics is critical to successful implementation of sexual strategies. It has been suggested that sexually dimorphic traits (including those evident in the face) signal high-quality immune function and reproductive status. Masculinity in males has also been associated with low investment in mate and offspring. Thus, women's reproductive strategy should be matched to the probability of male investment, hence to male masculinity. Our review leads us to predict associations between the rate of sexual maturation and adult preferences for facial characteristics (enhanced sexual dimorphism and attractiveness). We find for men, engaging in sex at an early age is related to an increased preference for feminized female faces. Similarly, for women, the earlier the age of first sex the greater the preference for masculinity in opposite-sex faces. When we controlled sexual dimorphism in male faces, the speed of sexual development in women was not associated with differences in preference for male facial attractiveness. These developmental influences on partner choice were not mediated by self-rated attractiveness or parental relationships. We conclude that individuals assort in preferences based on the rapidity of their sexual development. Fast developing individuals prefer opposite-sex partners with an increased level of sexually dimorphic facial characteristics. PMID:17118929

  13. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Interpersonal Sexual Objectification Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozee, Holly B.; Tylka, Tracy L.; Augustus-Horvath, Casey L.; Denchik, Angela

    2007-01-01

    This study reports on the development and psychometric evaluation of the Interpersonal Sexual Objectification Scale (ISOS). Data from 576 college women were collected in three studies. Exploratory factor analysis uncovered two factors: Body Evaluation and Unwanted Explicit Sexual Advances; confirmatory factor analysis supported this factor…

  14. Developing a Sexual Harassment Policy for Sheldon Jackson College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craddick, Jan

    A practicum to determine the need for a sexual harassment policy and to develop an appropriate policy for Sheldon Jackson College, Alaska, is described. The objective of the practicum was to determine the impact of equal opportunity legislation, specifically as it relates to sexual harassment of students, on the private college campus. The…

  15. Sexual Development and Meiotic Silencing in Neurospora crassa 

    E-print Network

    Suescú n Torres, Ana Victoria

    2014-07-29

    machinery and determine the proteome of sexual development. I identified new protein interactions during meiotic silencing in N. crassa, and established protein-binding partners for the suppressor of meiotic silencing SMS-5. These interacting partners, PAF...

  16. Complications in the Development of a Female Sexual Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magagna, Jeanne; Pepper Goldsmith, Tara

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the struggle to develop a female sexual identity and the importance of the roles of the father and mother in this struggle. The clinical illustration is taken from the psychotherapy of an anorectic adolescent.

  17. The role of sexually explicit material in the sexual development of same-sex-attracted Black adolescent males.

    PubMed

    Arrington-Sanders, Renata; Harper, Gary W; Morgan, Anthony; Ogunbajo, Adedotun; Trent, Maria; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2015-04-01

    Sexually explicit material (SEM) (including Internet, video, and print) may play a key role in the lives of Black same-sex sexually active youth by providing the only information to learn about sexual development. There is limited school- and/or family-based sex education to serve as models for sexual behaviors for Black youth. We describe the role SEM plays in the sexual development of a sample of Black same-sex attracted (SSA) young adolescent males ages 15-19. Adolescents recruited from clinics, social networking sites, and through snowball sampling were invited to participate in a 90-min, semi-structured qualitative interview. Most participants described using SEM prior to their first same-sex sexual experience. Participants described using SEM primarily for sexual development, including learning about sexual organs and function, the mechanics of same-gender sex, and to negotiate one's sexual identity. Secondary functions were to determine readiness for sex; to learn about sexual performance, including understanding sexual roles and responsibilities (e.g., "top" or "bottom"); to introduce sexual performance scripts; and to develop models for how sex should feel (e.g., pleasure and pain). Youth also described engaging in sexual behaviors (including condom non-use and/or swallowing ejaculate) that were modeled on SEM. Comprehensive sexuality education programs should be designed to address the unmet needs of young, Black SSA men, with explicit focus on sexual roles and behaviors that may be inaccurately portrayed and/or involve sexual risk-taking (such as unprotected anal intercourse and swallowing ejaculate) in SEM. This work also calls for development of Internet-based HIV/STI prevention strategies targeting young Black SSA men who may be accessing SEM. PMID:25677334

  18. The Role of Sexually Explicit Material (SEM) in the Sexual Development of Black Young Same-Sex-Attracted Men

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Anthony; Ogunbajo, Adedotun; Trent, Maria; Harper, Gary W.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Sexually explicit material (SEM) (including Internet, video, and print) may play a key role in the lives of Black same-sex sexually active youth by providing the only information to learn about sexual development. There is limited school-and/or family-based sex education to serve as models for sexual behaviors for Black youth. We describe the role SEM plays in the sexual development of a sample of Black same-sex attracted (SSA) young adolescent men ages 15–19. Adolescents recruited from clinics, social networking sites, and through snowball sampling were invited to participate in a 90-min, semi-structured qualitative interview. Most participants described using SEM prior to their first same-sex sexual experience. Participants described using SEM primarily for sexual development, including learning about sexual organs and function, the mechanics of same-gender sex, and to negotiate one’s sexual identity. Secondary functions were to determine readiness for sex; to learn about sexual performance, including understanding sexual roles and responsibilities (e.g., “top” or “bottom”); to introduce sexual performance scripts; and to develop models for how sex should feel (e.g., pleasure and pain). Youth also described engaging in sexual behaviors (including condom non-use and/or swallowing ejaculate) that were modeled on SEM. Comprehensive sexuality education programs should be designed to address the unmet needs of young, Black SSA young men, with explicit focus on sexual roles and behaviors that may be inaccurately portrayed and/or involve sexual risk-taking (such as unprotected anal intercourse and swallowing ejaculate) in SEM. This work also calls for development of Internet-based HIV/STI prevention strategies targeting young Black SSA men who maybe accessing SEM. PMID:25677334

  19. [Development of sexuality and motivational aspects of sexual behavior in men with obsessive-compulsive disorders].

    PubMed

    2014-09-01

    Sexual behavior and formation of sexuality in men with obsessive-compulsive disorder is one of the pressing issues in contemporary medicine. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is characterized by the development of intrusive thoughts, memories, movements and actions, as well as a variety of pathological fears (phobias). Increase in the number of patients with this pathology in modern clinical practice of neurotic disorders, the young age of the patients and as a result violation of interpersonal, communicational and sexual nature is quite apparent. The study involved 35 men aged 23 to 47 years with clinical signs of OCD. We determined the severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms using the Yale-Brown scale. We established the presence of a mild degree of disorder in 34,3% of cases; in 48,6% of cases disorder of moderate severity was diagnosed; remaining 17.1% were assessed subclinical condition of OCD at the applicable scale. The system of motivational maintenance of sexual behavior in men with obsessive-compulsive disorders is investigated. Motives of sexual behavior of the investigated men with the pathology are determined. The presented research in men with OCD have established multidimensionality and complexity of motivational ensuring of sexual behavior. PMID:25341245

  20. Sexual Deception as a Social-Exchange Process: Development of a Behavior-Based Sexual Deception Scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William D. Marelich; Jessica Lundquist; Kimberly Painter; Mindy B. Mechanic

    2008-01-01

    The use of deception in association with sexual encounters may take many forms, ranging from outright lies to more subtle, evasive manipulations. To address such deceptions, a behavior-based sexual deception scale was developed utilizing social exchange theory. Participants were 267 individuals associated with two large universities who were surveyed regarding different aspects of their sexual deceptive behaviors. In addition, items

  1. VelC Positively Controls Sexual Development in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee-Soo; Nam, Tae-Young; Han, Kap-Hoon; Kim, Sun Chang; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Fungal development and secondary metabolism is intimately associated via activities of the fungi-specific velvet family proteins including VeA, VosA, VelB and VelC. Among these, VelC has not been characterized in Aspergillus nidulans. In this study, we characterize the role of VelC in asexual and sexual development in A. nidulans. The velC mRNA specifically accumulates during the early phase of sexual development. The deletion of velC leads to increased number of conidia and reduced production of sexual fruiting bodies (cleistothecia). In the velC deletion mutant, mRNA levels of the brlA, abaA, wetA and vosA genes that control sequential activation of asexual sporulation increase. Overexpression of velC causes increased formation of cleistothecia. These results suggest that VelC functions as a positive regulator of sexual development. VelC is one of the five proteins that physically interact with VosA in yeast two-hybrid and GST pull down analyses. The ?velC ?vosA double mutant produced fewer cleistothecia and behaved similar to the ?vosA mutant, suggesting that VosA is epistatic to VelC in sexual development, and that VelC might mediate control of sex through interacting with VosA at specific life stages for sexual fruiting. PMID:24587098

  2. Understanding Early Sexual Development (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this age giggling over "dirty" jokes about sex, body parts, sexual orientation, etc., but do they really understand them? And do they realize that some of those jokes can hurt people? As with bad language, kids often tell these jokes without understanding them. ...

  3. Development and application of a real-time quantitative PCR assay for determining CYP1A transcripts in three genera of salmonids.

    PubMed

    Rees, Christopher B; Li, Weiming

    2004-03-10

    The expression of CYP1A (cytochrome P4501A) can be induced by a large array of aromatic and organic compounds in teleost fishes. We developed a real-time quantitative PCR assay useful for measuring beta-naphthoflavone (BNF) induction of liver CYP1A mRNA in four salmonid species. First, to obtain necessary information for the design of a cRNA standard, full-length CYP1A cDNA sequences were determined for two Salvelinus species, lake trout (S. namaycush) and brook trout (S. fontinalis). Each cDNA was found to share the same characteristics with known CYP1A sequences of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): a start codon, conserved heme-binding region, putative poly-adenylation signal, stop codon, relatively long 3'-untranslated region (UTR; >1 kb), and a protein length of 523 amino acid residues. The brook trout and lake trout CYP1A cDNA's were 2636 and 2672 base pairs (bp) in length and shared greater than 97% coding region sequence identity with Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout CYP1A's. Next, using the generated sequence information, we developed a CYP1A-specific real-time quantitative PCR assay. Primers and a fluorescent-labeled probe were designed from a 68 bp region that was found to be conserved among salmonid CYP1A genes. The assay was designed to allow for simultaneous comparison of CYP1A expression among each experimental group. Finally, groups (n = 4-8) of hatchery-raised Atlantic salmon, brook trout, lake trout, and rainbow trout were given an intraperitoneal injection of a corn oil control, 25 mg kg(-1) BNF, or 50 mg kg(-1) BNF and sacrificed after 48 h. Liver tissue was collected and CYP1A mRNA levels were estimated. In all species, BNF treated fish showed 1.8-3.0 orders of magnitude higher CYP1A than control fish. The CYP1A induction levels were not different in fish treated with both dosages. Mean base levels of CYP1A expression ranged from 7.24 x 10(6) (rainbow trout) to 1.05 x 10(7) (brook trout) transcripts microg(-1) total RNA. Mean induced levels of CYP1A expression ranged from 1.07 x 10(8) (lake trout) to 1.05 x 10(9) (brook trout) trancripts microg(-1) total RNA. PMID:15168944

  4. A framework to develop a sexual abuse prevention program.

    PubMed

    Saberton, S

    1995-08-01

    In 1993, the Province of Ontario proclaimed the Regulated Health Professions Act (RHPA) and 21 health profession acts, including the Medical Radiation Technology Act. Under the RHPA, 21 health care regulatory colleges were created to ensure that Ontario patients receive safe, competent and quality care. Programs administered by the colleges ensure that all patients are treated with dignity and respect, and include measures for preventing or dealing with the sexual abuse of patients. This article sets out a framework and discusses issues related to the development and implementation of a sexual abuse prevention program. Key components include: establishing a patient-relations committee, preparing a statement of philosophy, defining sexual abuse, setting guidelines for professional behaviour, and educating members, staff and the public. Other aspects of such programs include procedures for complaints and discipline, mandatory reporting and penalties, and funding for therapy and counselling for patients who have been sexually abused by members. PMID:10145069

  5. Effects of feeding level and sexual maturation on fatty acid metabolism gene expression in muscle, liver, and visceral adipose tissue of diploid and triploid rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In many cultured fish species, such as salmonids, gonadal development occurs at the expense of stored energy and nutrients, including lipids. However, mechanisms regulating nutrient repartitioning during sexual maturation are not well understood. This study investigated effects of ration level and s...

  6. Physiological levels of testosterone kill salmonid leukocytes in vitro

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slater, C.H.; Schreck, C.B.

    1997-01-01

    Adult spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) elaborate high plasma concentrations of testosterone during sexual maturation, and these levels of testosterone have been shown to reduce the salmonid immune response in vitro. Our search for the mechanism of testosterone's immunosuppressive action has led to the characterization of an androgen receptor in salmonid leukocytes. In the present study we examined the specific effects that testosterone had on salmonid leukocytes. Direct counts of viable leukocytes after incubation with and without physiological levels of testosterone demonstrate a significant loss of leukocytes in cultures exposed to testosterone. At least 5 days of contact with testosterone was required to produce significant immunosuppression and addition of a 'conditioned media' (supernatant from proliferating lymphocytes not exposed to testosterone) did not reverse the immunosuppressive effects of testosterone. These data lead us to conclude that testosterone may exert its immunosuppressive effects by direct action on salmonid leukocytes, through the androgen receptor described, and that this action leads to the death of a significant number of these leukocytes.

  7. Introduction: New Developments in the Area of Sexual Dysfunction(s)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Balon

    2008-01-01

    New developments in the area of sexual dysfunction, e.g. epidemiology and pharmacological treatment, are reviewed. Areas where new developments\\/changes are needed, such as diagnosis of sexual dysfunction and research methodology, are also briefly discussed.

  8. Girls' Sexual Development in the Inner City: From Compelled Childhood Sexual Contact to Sex-for-Things Exchanges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Eloise; Golub, Andrew; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2003-01-01

    Child Sexual Abuse (CSA) has been linked to a wide variety of adverse psychological and behavioral outcomes. This paper describes girls' sexual development in the inner city based on qualitative material from a long-term ethnographic (observational) study. For many inner-city girls, early and then continued experiences of being compelled to have…

  9. Hormones and History: The Evolution and Development of Primate Female Sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Wallen, Kim; Zehr, Julia L.

    2005-01-01

    Sexual behavior is required for reproduction in internally fertilizing species but poses significant social and physical risks. Females in many nonprimate species have evolved physical and behavioral mechanisms restricting sexual behavior to when females are fertile. The same hormones producing female fertility also control these mechanisms, assuring that sex only occurs when reproduction is possible. In contrast to nonprimate mammals, hormones do not regulate the capacity to engage in sex in female anthropoid primates, uncoupling fertility and the physical capacity to mate. Instead, in primates, sexual motivation has become the primary coordinator between sexual behavior and fertility. This dependence upon psychological mechanisms to coordinate physiology with behavior is possibly unique to primates, including humans, and allows a variety of nonphysiological influences, particularly social context, to regulate sexual behavior. The independence between hormonal state and sexual behavior allows sex to be used for social purposes. This complex regulation of primate sexuality develops during adolescence, where female monkeys show both hormonally influenced sexual motivation and socially modulated sexual behavior. We present findings from rhesus monkeys illustrating how social context and hormonal state interact to modulate adolescent and adult sexuality. It is argued that this flexibility in sexual behavior, combined with a tight regulation of sexual motivational systems by reproductive hormones, allows sexual behavior to be used for nonreproductive purposes while still assuring its occurrence during periods of female fertility. The evolutionary pressures that produced such flexibility in sexual behavior remain puzzling, but may reflect the importance of sexuality to primate social attraction and cohesion. PMID:15216429

  10. Measures of Growth, Development, and Sexual

    E-print Network

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    commonly used indices of rate of development, age at eye-opening and age at vaginal introitus. We then enquired as to the interrelationships among body weight, eye-opening, and vaginal introitus to illumination during ontogeny. We found that (I) age at vaginal introitus was significantly, but weakly

  11. The adrenal cortex and sexual differentiation during early human development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J. Asby; Wiebke Arlt; Neil A. Hanley

    2009-01-01

    Human sexual differentiation is a critical process whereby a strict dimorphism is established that enables future reproductive\\u000a success as phenotypic males and females. Significant components of this differentiation pathway unfold during the first three\\u000a months of gestation when they are sensitive to disruption by abnormal hormonal influences. Excessive exposure of female development\\u000a to androgens in conditions such as congenital adrenal

  12. Sex-biased gene expression and sexual conflict throughout development.

    PubMed

    Ingleby, Fiona C; Flis, Ilona; Morrow, Edward H

    2015-01-01

    Sex-biased gene expression is likely to account for most sexually dimorphic traits because males and females share much of their genome. When fitness optima differ between sexes for a shared trait, sexual dimorphism can allow each sex to express their optimum trait phenotype, and in this way, the evolution of sex-biased gene expression is one mechanism that could help to resolve intralocus sexual conflict. Genome-wide patterns of sex-biased gene expression have been identified in a number of studies, which we review here. However, very little is known about how sex-biased gene expression relates to sex-specific fitness and about how sex-biased gene expression and conflict vary throughout development or across different genotypes, populations, and environments. We discuss the importance of these neglected areas of research and use data from a small-scale experiment on sex-specific expression of genes throughout development to highlight potentially interesting avenues for future research. PMID:25376837

  13. Genetics of Sexual Development: An Evolutionary Playground for Fish

    PubMed Central

    Heule, Corina; Salzburger, Walter; Böhne, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Teleost fishes are the most species-rich clade of vertebrates and feature an overwhelming diversity of sex-determining mechanisms, classically grouped into environmental and genetic systems. Here, we review the recent findings in the field of sex determination in fish. In the past few years, several new master regulators of sex determination and other factors involved in sexual development have been discovered in teleosts. These data point toward a greater genetic plasticity in generating the male and female sex than previously appreciated and implicate novel gene pathways in the initial regulation of the sexual fate. Overall, it seems that sex determination in fish does not resort to a single genetic cascade but is rather regulated along a continuum of environmental and heritable factors. PMID:24653206

  14. Current Concepts in Disorders of Sexual Development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) with or without ambiguous genitalia require medical attention to reach a definite diagnosis. Advances in identification of molecular causes of abnormal sex, heightened awareness of ethical issues and this necessitated a re-evaluation of nomenclature. The term DSD was proposed for congenital conditions in which chromosomal, gonadal or anatomical sex is atypical. In general, factors influencing sex determination are transcriptional regulators, whereas factors important for sex differentiation are secreted hormones and their receptors.The current intense debate on the management of patients with intersexuality and related conditions focus on four major issues: 1) aetiological diagnosis, 2) assignment of gender, 3) indication for and timing of genital surgery, 4) the disclosure of medical information to the patient and his/her parents. The psychological and social implications of gender assignment require a multidisciplinary approach and a team which includes ageneticist, neonatologist, endocrinologist, gynaecologist, psychiatrist, surgeon and a social worker. Each patient should be evaluated individually by multidisciplinary approach. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21911322

  15. Retrospective Recall of Sexual Orientation Identity Development among Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calzo, Jerel P.; Antonucci, Toni C.; Mays, Vickie M.; Cochran, Susan D.

    2011-01-01

    Although recent attention has focused on the likelihood that contemporary sexual minority youth (i.e., gay, lesbian, bisexual [GLB]) are "coming out" at younger ages, few studies have examined whether early sexual orientation identity development is also present in older GLB cohorts. We analyzed retrospective data on the timing of sexual

  16. Normative Sexuality Development in Adolescence: A Decade in Review, 2000-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolman, Deborah L.; McClelland, Sara I.

    2011-01-01

    This review details a key innovation across the field of adolescent sexuality research over the last decade--conceptualizing sexuality as a normative aspect of adolescent development. Anchored in a growing articulation of adolescent sexuality as having positive qualities and consequences, we provide an organizing framework for understanding…

  17. Immunological and Therapeutic Strategies against Salmonid Cryptobiosis

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Patrick T. K.

    2010-01-01

    Salmonid cryptobiosis is caused by the haemoflagellate, Cryptobia salmositica. Clinical signs of the disease in salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) include exophthalmia, general oedema, abdominal distension with ascites, anaemia, and anorexia. The disease-causing factor is a metalloprotease and the monoclonal antibody (mAb-001) against it is therapeutic. MAb-001 does not fix complement but agglutinates the parasite. Some brook charr, Salvelinus fontinalis cannot be infected (Cryptobia-resistant); this resistance is controlled by a dominant Mendelian locus and is inherited. In Cryptobia-resistant charr the pathogen is lysed via the Alternative Pathway of Complement Activation. However, some charr can be infected and they have high parasitaemias with no disease (Cryptobia-tolerant). In infected Cryptobia-tolerant charr the metalloprotease is neutralized by a natural antiprotease, ?2 macroglobulin. Two vaccines have been developed. A single dose of the attenuated vaccine protects 100% of salmonids (juveniles and adults) for at least 24 months. Complement fixing antibody production and cell-mediated response in vaccinated fish rise significantly after challenge. Fish injected with the DNA vaccine initially have slight anaemias but they recover and have agglutinating antibodies. On challenge, DNA-vaccinated fish have lower parasitaemias, delayed peak parasitaemias and faster recoveries. Isometamidium chloride is therapeutic against the pathogen and its effectiveness is increased after conjugation to antibodies. PMID:20052385

  18. Developing Respondent Based Multi-Media Measures of Exposure to Sexual Content

    PubMed Central

    Bleakley, Amy; Fishbein, Martin; Hennessy, Michal; Jordan, Amy; Chernin, Ariel; Stevens, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Despite the interest in the effects of the media on sexual behavior, there is no single method for assessing exposure to a particular type of media content (e.g., sex). This paper discusses the development of six sexual content exposure measures based on adolescents’ own subjective ratings of the sexual content in titles in 4 media (i.e., television, music, magazines, videogames). We assessed the construct and criterion validity of these measures by examining the associations among each of these measures of exposure to sexual content as well as their associations with adolescents’ sexual activity. Data were collected in summer 2005 through a web-based survey using a quota sample of 547 youth aged 14–16 from the Philadelphia area. Adolescents rated how often they were exposed to specific television shows, magazine titles, etc. on 4-point never to often scales. They also rated the sexual content of those titles on 4-point no sexual content to a lot of sexual content scales. Sexual behavior was measured using an ordered index of lifetime pre-coital and coital sexual activity. The strength of association between exposure to sexual content and sexual activity varied by medium and measure. Based on our findings, we recommend the use of a multiple media weighted sum measure. This measure produces findings that are consistent with those of similar studies. PMID:20411048

  19. Development of Sexual Orientation Among Adolescent and Young Adult Women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa M. Diamond

    1998-01-01

    Although some research suggests that sexual orientation is a stable, early appearing trait, interviews with 89 young sexual-minority women revealed that a majority of women failed to report at least one of the following: childhood indicators of sexual orientation, stability in same-sex attractions, or awareness of same-sex attractions prior to the conscious process of sexual questioning. Lesbians were not more

  20. Perceptions of Childhood Sexual Abuse Survivors: Development and Initial Validation of a New Scale to Measure Stereotypes of Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zafar, Sadia; Ross, Erin C.

    2013-01-01

    The Childhood Sexual Abuse Stereotypes Scale was developed to assess stereotypes of adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Scale items were derived from two studies that elicited cultural and personal beliefs about, and emotions experienced towards adult childhood sexual abuse survivors among university undergraduates. Two scales, Emotions and…

  1. Development of Sexual Expectancies among Adolescents: Contributions by Parents, Peers and the Media

    PubMed Central

    Ragsdale, Kathleen; Bersamin, Melina; Schwartz, Seth J.; Zamboanga, Byron L.; Kerrick, R.; Grube, Joel W.

    2013-01-01

    In order to expand the scant research on sexual expectancies development among non-sexually active adolescents, we examined the relationship between adolescents’ exposure to four socializing agents—mother/female guardian, father/male guardian, peers, and television programs with high sexual content—and their endorsement of four sexual expectancies: Social Benefit, Pleasure, Social Risk, and Health Risk. Data are from Waves 2–3 of a three-wave annual longitudinal study conducted among California adolescents, the majority of whom were non-sexually active (N=914, 84%). Structural equation models were conducted to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between the socializing agents and the sexual expectancies. Cross-sectional results indicate associations between peer sexual communication and Social Benefit, Pleasure and Social Risk expectancies. A positive association was found between exposure to music videos and Social Benefit expectancies and a negative association was found between exposure to music videos and Health Risk expectancies. Longitudinal results suggest that communication with peers positively predicted Pleasure expectancies and negatively predicted Social Risk expectancies. No other socializing agents were associated with any sexual expectancies. An invariance test found that significant correlations were similar across the different age groups. Results suggest that efforts to support positive sexual decision-making among non-sexually active adolescents should target peer sexual communication. PMID:23631710

  2. Development of sexual expectancies among adolescents: contributions by parents, peers and the media.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, Kathleen; Bersamin, Melina M; Schwartz, Seth J; Zamboanga, Byron L; Kerrick, Madeleine R; Grube, Joel W

    2014-01-01

    To expand the scant research on sexual expectancies development among non-sexually active adolescents, we examined the relationship between adolescents' exposure to four socializing agents--mother/female guardian, father/male guardian, peers, and television programs with high sexual content--and their endorsement of four sexual expectancies: social benefit, pleasure, social risk, and health risk. Data are from Waves 2 and 3 of a three-wave annual longitudinal study conducted among California adolescents, the majority of whom were not sexually active (N = 914, 84%). Structural equation models were conducted to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between the socializing agents and the sexual expectancies. Cross-sectional results indicate associations between peer sexual communication and social benefit, pleasure, and social risk expectancies. A positive association was found between exposure to music videos and social benefit expectancies, and a negative association was found between exposure to music videos and health risk expectancies. Longitudinal results suggest that communication with peers positively predicted pleasure expectancies and negatively predicted social risk expectancies. No other socializing agents were associated with any sexual expectancies. An invariance test found that significant correlations were similar across the different age groups. Results suggest that efforts to support positive sexual decision making among non-sexually active adolescents should target peer sexual communication. PMID:23631710

  3. The Role of Beliefs in Sexual Behavior of Adolescents: Development and Validation of an Adolescent Sexual Expectancies Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourdeau, Beth; Grube, Joel W.; Bersamin, Melina M.; Fisher, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the development and psychometric properties of the Adolescent Sexual Expectancies Scale (ASEXS). Data were obtained from three annual longitudinal surveys of youth aged 10-17 at the first administration (N = 932 at Wave 3). Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that 4 correlated factors corresponding to Social Risk, Social…

  4. Reproductive strategy, sexual development and attraction to facial characteristics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Elisabeth Cornwell; Miriam J. Law Smith; Lynda G. Boothroyd; Fhionna R. Moore; Hasker P. Davis; Michael Stirrat; Bernard Tiddeman; David I. Perrett

    2006-01-01

    Sexual reproduction strategies vary both between and within species in the level of investment in offspring. Life-history theories suggest that the rate of sexual maturation is critically linked to reproductive strategy, with high investment being associated with few offspring and delayed maturation. For humans, age of puberty and age of first sex are two developmental milestones that have been associated

  5. Sexual Harassment: Development of a University's Policy and Educational Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longstreth, Catherine; And Others

    In late 1988 the University of Florida began the process of revising and updating its policy and educational programs on sexual harassment. At that time a task force was formed which reviewed the current policy and procedures and drafted a revised brochure on sexual harassment. This brochure was reviewed and redrafted and distributed to every…

  6. Working with Parents to Promote Healthy Adolescent Sexual Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Bouris, Alida

    2009-01-01

    Although parents play a vital role in fostering healthy sexuality-related attitudes and behaviors among adolescents, many parents struggle with how to address sexuality-related topics with their adolescent child. This article provides practitioners with evidence-based frameworks and guidelines on how to work with parents in order to improve their…

  7. Effects of feeding level and sexual maturation on carcass and fillet characteristics and indices of protein degradation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sexual maturation in many species of fish including salmonids requires mobilization of energy and nutrient resources to support gonad growth. During sexual maturation, particularly vitellogenesis, proteins are mobilized from muscle tissue, which is evidenced by increased expression of proteolytic g...

  8. Adolescent Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpe, Thomasina H.

    2003-01-01

    This article offers a medical and psychosocial perspective of adolescent sexual development. Sub-types of sexual development are discussed as well as treatment implications for allied health providers. (Contains 38 references.) (Author)

  9. Development of the renal sexual segment in immature snakes: effect of sex steroid hormones

    E-print Network

    Mason, Robert T.

    snakes, kidney mass was not a reliable indicator of hormone treatment, whereas tubule diameter, epithelial height and number of sexual granules responded to hormone treatment. In male water snakes, either diameter. Garter snakes initiated sexual granule development in response to hormone treatment with males

  10. Anticipation of the sexual and gender development of children adopted by same-sex couples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jorge Gato; Anne Marie Fontaine

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to characterize beliefs surrounding the sexual and gender development of children adopted by lesbian and gay couples. Participants were 768 Portuguese university students. Using a quasiexperimental design, participants were presented with identical descriptions of a couple interested in adopting a child, manipulating couple sexual orientation and child gender. Participants were then asked to anticipate three aspects

  11. Developing and Establishing School-Based Sexual Health Services: Issues for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayter, Mark; Owen, Jenny; Cooke, Jo

    2012-01-01

    School-based sexual health clinics are emerging as one of the key ways to promote sexual health among young people, and school nurses play an important role in developing and delivering these services. This study used a qualitative design to explore the experiences of health professionals and policy makers involved in setting up such services in…

  12. Development, Reliability, and Validity of the Measure of Sexual Identity Exploration and Commitment (MoSIEC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthington, Roger L.; Navarro, Rachel L.; Savoy, Holly Bielstein; Hampton, Dustin

    2008-01-01

    Four studies were conducted on the development and validation of the Measure of Sexual Identity Exploration and Commitment (MoSIEC). Exploratory factor analysis of an initial item pool yielded a 22-item measure with 4 distinct factors assessing commitment, exploration, sexual orientation identity uncertainty, and synthesis/integration. Exploratory…

  13. Varieties of male-sexual-identity development in clinical practice: a neuropsychoanalytic model.

    PubMed

    Stortelder, Frans

    2014-01-01

    Variations of sexual identity development are present in all cultures, as well as in many animal species. Freud - founding father of psychoanalysis - believed that all men have an inherited, bisexual disposition, and that many varieties of love and desire are experienced as alternative pathways to intimacy. In the neuropsychoanalytic model, psychic development starts with the constitutional self. The constitutional self is comprised of the neurobiological factors which contribute to sexual identity development. These neurobiological factors are focused on biphasic sexual organization in the prenatal phase, based on variations in genes, sex hormones, and brain circuits. This psychosocial construction of sexual identity is determined through contingent mirroring by the parents and peers of the constitutional self. The development of the self-or personal identity-is linked with the development of sexual identity, gender-role identity, and procreative identity. Incongruent mirroring of the constitutional self causes alienation in the development of the self. Such alienation can be treated within the psychoanalytic relationship. This article presents a contemporary, neuropsychoanalytic, developmental theory of male-sexual identity relating to varieties in male-sexual-identity development, with implications for psychoanalytic treatment, and is illustrated with three vignettes from clinical practice. PMID:25566168

  14. Varieties of male-sexual-identity development in clinical practice: a neuropsychoanalytic model

    PubMed Central

    Stortelder, Frans

    2014-01-01

    Variations of sexual identity development are present in all cultures, as well as in many animal species. Freud – founding father of psychoanalysis – believed that all men have an inherited, bisexual disposition, and that many varieties of love and desire are experienced as alternative pathways to intimacy. In the neuropsychoanalytic model, psychic development starts with the constitutional self. The constitutional self is comprised of the neurobiological factors which contribute to sexual identity development. These neurobiological factors are focused on biphasic sexual organization in the prenatal phase, based on variations in genes, sex hormones, and brain circuits. This psychosocial construction of sexual identity is determined through contingent mirroring by the parents and peers of the constitutional self. The development of the self—or personal identity—is linked with the development of sexual identity, gender-role identity, and procreative identity. Incongruent mirroring of the constitutional self causes alienation in the development of the self. Such alienation can be treated within the psychoanalytic relationship. This article presents a contemporary, neuropsychoanalytic, developmental theory of male-sexual identity relating to varieties in male-sexual-identity development, with implications for psychoanalytic treatment, and is illustrated with three vignettes from clinical practice. PMID:25566168

  15. The development of reproductive strategy in females: early maternal harshness --> earlier menarche --> increased sexual risk taking.

    PubMed

    Belsky, Jay; Steinberg, Laurence; Houts, Renate M; Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie L

    2010-01-01

    To test a proposition central to J. Belsky, L. Steinberg, and P. Draper's (1991) evolutionary theory of socialization-that pubertal maturation plays a role in linking early rearing experience with adolescent sexual risk taking (i.e., frequency of sexual behavior) and, perhaps, other risk taking (e.g., alcohol, drugs, delinquency)-the authors subjected longitudinal data on 433 White, 62 Black, and 31 Hispanic females to path analysis. Results showed (a) that greater maternal harshness at 54 months predicted earlier age of menarche; (b) that earlier age of menarche predicted greater sexual (but not other) risk taking; and (c) that maternal harshness exerted a significant indirect effect, via earlier menarche, on sexual risk taking (i.e., greater harshness --> earlier menarche --> greater sexual risk taking) but only a direct effect on other risk taking. Results are discussed in terms of evolutionary perspectives on human development and reproductive strategy, and future directions for research are outlined. PMID:20053011

  16. Postnatal Growth, Feeding Behavior and Sexual Development of Prenatally Stressed Brahman Bulls 

    E-print Network

    Roberts, Meghan C

    2014-12-15

    of yeast cell wall supplementation during late gestation and early lactation on cow performance and calf growth and white blood cells. Additionally, the effect of prenatal stress and postnatal temperament on feeding behavior and sexual development at first...

  17. Apomictic and sexual germline development differ with respect to cell cycle, transcriptional, hormonal and epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anja; Schmid, Marc W; Klostermeier, Ulrich C; Qi, Weihong; Guthörl, Daniela; Sailer, Christian; Waller, Manuel; Rosenstiel, Philip; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2014-07-01

    Seeds of flowering plants can be formed sexually or asexually through apomixis. Apomixis occurs in about 400 species and is of great interest for agriculture as it produces clonal offspring. It differs from sexual reproduction in three major aspects: (1) While the sexual megaspore mother cell (MMC) undergoes meiosis, the apomictic initial cell (AIC) omits or aborts meiosis (apomeiosis); (2) the unreduced egg cell of apomicts forms an embryo without fertilization (parthenogenesis); and (3) the formation of functional endosperm requires specific developmental adaptations. Currently, our knowledge about the gene regulatory programs underlying apomixis is scarce. We used the apomict Boechera gunnisoniana, a close relative of Arabidopsis thaliana, to investigate the transcriptional basis underlying apomeiosis and parthenogenesis. Here, we present the first comprehensive reference transcriptome for reproductive development in an apomict. To compare sexual and apomictic development at the cellular level, we used laser-assisted microdissection combined with microarray and RNA-Seq analyses. Conservation of enriched gene ontologies between the AIC and the MMC likely reflects functions of importance to germline initiation, illustrating the close developmental relationship of sexuality and apomixis. However, several regulatory pathways differ between sexual and apomictic germlines, including cell cycle control, hormonal pathways, epigenetic and transcriptional regulation. Enrichment of specific signal transduction pathways are a feature of the apomictic germline, as is spermidine metabolism, which is associated with somatic embryogenesis in various plants. Our study provides a comprehensive reference dataset for apomictic development and yields important new insights into the transcriptional basis underlying apomixis in relation to sexual reproduction. PMID:25010342

  18. The Plasmodium falciparum sexual development transcriptome: A microarray analysis using ontology-based pattern identification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason A. Young; Quinton L. Fivelman; Peter L. Blair; Patricia de la Vega; Karine G. Le Roch; Yingyao Zhou; Daniel J. Carucci; David A. Baker; Elizabeth A. Winzeler

    2005-01-01

    The sexual stages of malarial parasites are essential for the mosquito transmission of the disease and therefore are the focus of transmission-blocking drug and vaccine development. In order to better understand genes important to the sexual development process, the transcriptomes of high-purity stage I–V Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes were comprehensively profiled using a full-genome high-density oligonucleotide microarray. The interpretation of this

  19. The Development of a Sexual Abuse Severity Score: Characteristics of Childhood Sexual Abuse Associated with Trauma Symptomatology, Somatization, and Alcohol Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zink, Therese; Klesges, Lisa; Stevens, Susanna; Decker, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is common and is associated with both mental and physical health problems in adulthood. Using data from an age- and sex-stratified population survey of 600 Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents, a Sexual Abuse Severity Score was developed. The abuse characteristics of 156 CSA respondents were associated with…

  20. Taking ICPD beyond 2015: negotiating sexual and reproductive rights in the next development agenda.

    PubMed

    Girard, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    On the twentieth anniversary of the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), activists, governments and diplomats engaged in the fight for sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) are anxious to ensure that these issues are fully reflected in the development agenda to succeed the Millennium Development Goals after 2015. In inter-governmental negotiations since 1994 and particularly in the period 2012-2014, governments have shown that they have significantly expanded their understanding of a number of so-called 'controversial' issues in the ICPD agenda, whether safe abortion, adolescent sexual and reproductive health services, comprehensive sexuality education or sexual rights. As in the past and in spite of an increasingly complex and difficult multilateral environment, countering the highly organised conservative opposition to SRHR has required a well-planned and determined mobilisation by progressive forces from North and South. PMID:24889877

  1. What Young People Want From a Sexual Health Website: Design and Development of Sexunzipped

    PubMed Central

    Carswell, Kenneth; Murray, Elizabeth; Free, Caroline; Stevenson, Fiona; Bailey, Julia V

    2012-01-01

    Background Sexual health education in the United Kingdom is of variable quality, typically focusing on the biological aspects of sex rather than on communication, relationships, and sexual pleasure. The Internet offers a unique opportunity to provide sexual health education to young people, since they can be difficult to engage but frequently use the Internet as a health information resource. Objectives To explore through qualitative research young people’s views on what elements of a sexual health website would be appealing and engaging, and their views on the content, design, and interactive features of the Sexunzipped intervention website. Methods We recruited 67 young people aged 16–22 years in London, UK. We held 21 focus groups and 6 one-to-one interviews to establish sexual health priorities, views on website look and feel, and what features of a sexual heath website would attract and engage them. Two researchers facilitated the focus groups, using a semistructured topic guide to lead the discussions and asking open questions to elicit a range of views. The discussions and interviews were audio recorded and detailed notes were made on key topics from the audio recording. Young people’s views influenced design templates for the content and interactive features of Sexunzipped. Results Young people particularly wanted straightforward information on sexual pleasure, sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy, how to communicate with partners, how to develop skills in giving pleasure, and emotions involved in sex and relationships. Focus group participants wanted social interaction with other young people online and wanted to see themselves reflected in some way such as through images or videos. Conclusions While it is challenging to meet all of young people’s technological and design requirements, consultation with the target audience is valuable and necessary in developing an online sexual health intervention. Young people are willing to talk about sensitive issues, enjoy the discussions, and can offer key insights that influence intervention development. PMID:23060424

  2. Retrospective Recall of Sexual Orientation Identity Development Among Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Adults

    PubMed Central

    Calzo, Jerel P.; Antonucci, Toni C.; Mays, Vickie M.; Cochran, Susan D.

    2011-01-01

    Although recent attention has focused on the likelihood that contemporary sexual minority youth (i.e., gay, lesbian, bisexual [GLB]) are “coming out” at younger ages, few studies have examined if early sexual orientation identity development is also present in older GLB cohorts. We analyze retrospective data on the timing of sexual orientation milestones in a sample of sexual minorities drawn from the California Quality of Life Surveys. Latent profile analysis of 1,260 GLB adults, ages 18-84 years identified three trajectories of development: Early (n = 951, milestones spanning ages 12 to 20), Middle (n = 239, milestones spanning ages 18 to 31), and Late (n = 70, milestones spanning ages 32 to 43). Motivated by previous research on variability in adolescent developmental trajectories, post-hoc analyses of the Early Profile group identified two sub-groups: Child-Onset (n = 284, milestones spanning ages 8 to 18), and Teen-Onset (n = 667, milestones spanning ages 14 to 22). Nearly all patterns of development were identity-centered, with average age of self-identification as GLB preceding average age of first same-sex sexual activity. Overall, younger participants and the majority of older participants were classified to the Early Profile, suggesting that early development is common regardless of age cohort. The additional gender differences observed in the onset and pace of sexual orientation identity development warrant future research. PMID:21942662

  3. Sexual Orientation as a Factor in Career Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belz, Jeanette Richardson

    1993-01-01

    Responds to previous article describing homosexual male college student and his need for career counseling. Discusses impressions of the client and his sexual orientation, considers missing information that would be helpful to have, and presents career counseling techniques and issues pertinent to the case. (NB)

  4. Structure, Agency, and Sexual Development of Latino Gay Men

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sonya G. Arreola; George Ayala; Rafael M. Díaz; Alex H. Kral

    2012-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of childhood sexual abuse and HIV among Latino gay men, with limited proven HIV prevention interventions. This study used qualitative methods to explicate earlier findings showing differential health outcomes among Latino gay men who had no sex, voluntary, or forced sex before age 16. Analyses of in-depth interviews with 27 Latino gay men revealed that

  5. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Among Adolescents in Developed Countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine Panchaud; Susheela Singh; Dina Feivelson; Jacqueline E. Darroch

    Context: Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are responsible for a variety of health problems, and can have especially serious consequences for adolescents and young adults. An interna- tional comparison of levels and trends in STDs would be useful to identify countries that are rel- atively successful in controlling the incidence of STDs, as a first step toward improving policies and programs

  6. Perceived “Out of Control” Sexual Behavior in a Cohort of Young Adults from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keren Skegg; Shyamala Nada-Raja; Nigel Dickson; Charlotte Paul

    2010-01-01

    Out of control sexual behavior, also known as compulsive sexual behavior or sexual addiction, has not been studied in a representative\\u000a sample of the general population. At age 32 years, 940 (93%) of 1,015 members of the birth cohort of the Dunedin Multidisciplinary\\u000a Health and Development Study responded to a series of questions about sexual behavior, administered by computer. We enquired

  7. Perceptions of childhood sexual abuse survivors: development and initial validation of a new scale to measure stereotypes of adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Sadia; Ross, Erin C

    2013-01-01

    The Childhood Sexual Abuse Stereotypes Scale was developed to assess stereotypes of adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Scale items were derived from two studies that elicited cultural and personal beliefs about, and emotions experienced towards adult childhood sexual abuse survivors among university undergraduates. Two scales, Emotions and Characteristics, were developed and administered online to 182 participants. Exploratory factor analysis produced 7 factors, 4 for the Emotions Scale and 3 for the Characteristics Scale. Study 2 replicated this factor structure using confirmatory factor analysis (N?=?457). Reliability and validity analyses suggest that the Childhood Sexual Abuse Stereotypes Scale has satisfactory psychometric properties. The Childhood Sexual Abuse Stereotypes Scale can be used to examine stereotypes of legal and health care professionals likely to work with survivors as well as in stereotyping research. PMID:23590355

  8. Evolution of the salmonid mitochondrial control region.

    PubMed

    Shedlock, A M; Parker, J D; Crispin, D A; Pietsch, T W; Burmer, G C

    1992-09-01

    To explore the evolutionary nature of the salmonid mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (D-loop) and its utility for inferring phylogenies, the entire region was sequenced from all eight species of anadromous Pacific salmon, genus Oncorhynchus; the Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar; and the Arctic grayling, Thymallus arcticus. A comparison of aligned sequences demonstrates that the generally conserved sequence elements that have been previously reported for other vertebrates are maintained in these primitive teleost fishes. Results reveal a significantly nonrandom distribution of nucleotide substitutions, insertions, and deletions that suggests that portions of the salmonid D-loop may be under differential selective constraints and that most of the control region of these fishes may evolve at a rate similar to that of the remainder of their mtDNA genomes. Maximum likelihood and Fitch parsimony analyses of 9 kb of aligned salmonid sequence data give evolutionary trees of identical topology. These results are consistent with previous molecular studies of a limited number of salmonid taxa and with more comprehensive, classical analyses of salmonid evolution. Predictions from these data, based on a molecular clock assumption for the mtDNA control region, are also consistent with fossil evidence that suggests that species of Oncorhynchus could be as old as the Middle Pliocene and would have thus given rise to the extant Pacific salmon prior to about 5 or 6 million years ago. PMID:1342934

  9. Culvert Testing Program for Juvenile Salmonid Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Walter H. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Richmond, Marshall C. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Schafer, Jim (Washington State Department of Transportation)

    2002-01-01

    In partnership with the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has undertaken a phased program conducted by an interdisciplinary team of experts to address the hydraulic and behavioral issues associated with juvenile salmonid fish passage through culvert systems. Juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) is the initial test subject. This program addresses the testing and assessment of culvert designs, along with associated measurements of hydraulic conditions and fish behavior, occurring in full-scale physical models of culvert systems deployed in an experimental test bed. The proposed approach includes the use of three kinds of models. First, a conceptual model of fish passage is developed to guide the design of hydraulic and behavioral testing and to interpret the results. Second, mathematical models of culvert hydraulics provide information to design the full-scale test facility and to guide design of the hydraulic a nd behavioral testing program. Third, full-scale physical models of culverts in a test bed are used to evaluate fish passage quantitatively. Using the knowledge and data from previous studies, this program will encompass the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a full-scale, controlled culvert test bed. Experiments in the testing apparatus will measure the hydraulic conditions (mean velocity, turbulence, and water depth) associated with various culvert designs under various slopes and flow regimes and then relate these measures to repeatable, quantitative measures of fish passage success. After construction in late spring, 2001, preliminary trials will be conducted in summer 2001.

  10. Salmonid redd dewatering: What do we know

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, C D; Neitzel, D A

    1983-11-01

    Dewatering of salmonid spawning areas causes abrupt changes in the intergravel environment that may lead to extensive losses of development phases while intergravel in redds. Information on tolerance to dewatering and the extent of physicochemical changes in the gravel during dewatering can be used to assess potential impacts and to design and implement effective mitigation methods. Studies with fall chinook salmon are summarized, and the comparisons are made with results from available literature. Potentially useful methods of mitigation are mentioned. We found that prehatch phases (cleavage eggs and embryos) can be dewatered for several successive days and survive, but posthatch phases (eleutheroembryos and alevins) usually die within 24 hours. Survival of prehatch phases during extended dewatering requires maintenance of favorable intergravel temperature and moisture levels. Elevated temperatures (up to 22/sup 0/C) can be tolerated for up to 8 hours without direct adverse effects, but freezing temperatures (/sup -/1.0/sup 0/C or below) are lethal. Dewatered gravels must remain sufficient moisture to provide near 100% humidity for egg and embryo survival. In field situations, physicochemical conditions that limit survival in dewatered gravels include residual flow, temperature, gravel size and composition, and dissolved oxygen. Biological variables such as alevin behavior and certain species characteristics also influence survival. 29 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Histology of salmonid testes during maturation.

    PubMed

    Dziewulska, Katarzyna; Domaga?a, Józef

    2003-03-01

    The commonly applied classification systems of fish gonad maturity divide the maturation process into certain stages. However, the scales do not entirely reflect the continuity of the maturation process. Based on light microscope observations, the paper describes a comprehensive pattern of testicular transformations during maturation. The study was carried out on precocious underyearling and 1-year-old males of sea trout (Salmo trutta m. trutta L.), 1-year-old males of salmon (Salmo salar L.), and males of brown trout (Salmo trutta m. fario L.) aged from 7 months to 4 years. A total of 821 gonads collected during all seasons of the year were examined. The fish were fixed in Bouin's fluid. Histological slides of the mid-part of the gonad were made using the standard paraffin technique. The 3-6 microm sections were stained with Heidenhain haematoxylin. Histological changes of testes during maturation were similar in the three species studied. Immature and resting gonads contained type A spermatogonia in lobules only. The appearance of cystic structures containing type B spermatogonia in the lobules signalled the beginning of the sexual cycle in male gonads. Type B spermatogonia underwent synchronous mitotic divisions resulting in an increase in the total number of spermatogonia. As the spermatogenesis continued, the gonads showed a gradual increase in the number of cysts containing cells at all the spermatogenetic stages: type B spermatogonia, primary and secondary spermatocytes, spermatids, and spermatozoa. The well-formed spermatozoa were released to the lobule lumen once the Sertoli cells and spermatozoa connections broke up and the cyst disappeared. This was a continuous process observed throughout the spawning season. The spermatozoa were moved to the efferent duct. While some of the germ cells were completing spermatogenesis, the lobules contained less and less cysts with type B spermatogonia, primary and secondary spermatocytes, and spermatids; eventually all the cells completed spermatogenesis. At the end of maturation, vacuoles, up to 18.9 microm in final diameter (brown trout), appeared in the Sertoli cells. The vacuoles were visible in the lobule wall epithelium for a prolonged period of time. In most salmonid individuals examined, the reproductive cycles were observed to overlap. In some fish, the preparation for another cycle began very early, i.e., at the and of preceding spermatogenesis, which had not been observed before. Gonad maturation in some males was incomplete. PMID:14666143

  12. Promoting the successful development of sexual and gender minority youths.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Kenneth H; Garofalo, Robert; Makadon, Harvey J

    2014-06-01

    Because of societal discomfort with atypical expressions of sexual orientation and gender identity, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youths have experienced enhanced developmental challenges compared with their heterosexual peers. A recent special issue of the American Journal of Public Health delineated how social stigma affecting LGBT youths has resulted in a wide range of health disparities, ranging from increased prevalence of depression and substance use to downstream effects, such as an increased risk for cancer and cardiovascular disease when older. We review the clinical significance of these findings for health care professionals, who need to become informed about these associations to provide better care for their sexual and gender minority youth patients, and to be able to educate their parents and other caregivers. PMID:24825194

  13. Changing patterns of adolescent sexual behavior: consequences for health and development.

    PubMed

    Friedman, H L

    1992-07-01

    Sexuality is a fundamental quality of human life, important for health, happiness, individual development, and indeed for the preservation of the human race. During the dynamic period of adolescence in which the passage from childhood to maturity takes place, sexuality takes on new dimensions; feelings become more intense, relationships become more complex, and the consequences of sexual behavior are radically altered. This not only affects the behavior of young people but also of those who interact with them, their families and peers, and those who work in the health, education, youth, social welfare, and other sectors. In the contemporary world the conditions of life for many young people have also changed, and with it patterns of sexual behavior. In general, earlier puberty, later marriage, a decline in the family leading to less control and more autonomy, and intense exposure to sexual stimuli via the mass media and travel across cultural boundaries have made pre-marital adolescent sexual activity more common. This has added to traditional problems of early marriage, newer problems of early pregnancy, childbirth, and induced abortion outside of marriage, sexually transmitted diseases, and human immunodeficiency syndrome infection leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. But the work of the World Health Organization (WHO), along with many others in the field, strongly suggests that given appropriate information and services, trust and equity between the sexes, young people will behave responsibly and well. In this paper some of the findings from methods developed by WHO for research, training, advocacy, and evaluation, and findings in relation to patterns and determinants of sexual and reproductive health and development will be described, and future directions suggested. PMID:1390784

  14. Freshwater aspects of anadromous salmonid enhancement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gould, Rowan W.

    1982-01-01

    Freshwater enhancement of anadromous salmonid populations has been practiced in the United States and Canada since the late 1800's. Reduction of natural spawning habitat and increasing fishing pressure make artificial enhancement a possible alternative to declining populations. Enhancement of anadromous salmonids involved improvement of the natural environment and reducing natural mortality. Methods of enhancement include fishways, spawning and rearing channels, stream rehabilitation, lake fertilization, environmental management, and artificial propagation techniques. Five Pacific salmon species and steelhead trout are commonly enhanced, primarily in watershed entering the Pacific Ocean and Great Lakes. Enhancement efforts contribute heavily to a commercial and sport industry realizing over $1.5 billion.

  15. Teachers' Attitudes toward Reporting Child Sexual Abuse: Problems with Existing Research Leading to New Scale Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kerryann Walsh; Mehdi Rassafiani; Ben Mathews; Ann Farrell; Des Butler

    2010-01-01

    This paper details a systematic literature review identifying problems in extant research relating to teachers' attitudes toward reporting child sexual abuse and offers a model for new attitude scale development and testing. Scale development comprised a five-phase process grounded in contemporary attitude theories, including (a) developing the initial item pool, (b) conducting a panel review, (c) refining the scale via

  16. Introduced northern pike consumption of salmonids in Southcentral Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, Adam J.; Rutz, David S.; Dupuis, Aaron W; Shields, Patrick A; Dunker, Kristine J.

    2014-01-01

    The impacts of introduced northern pike (Esox lucius) on salmonid populations have attracted much attention because salmonids are popular subsistence, sport and commercial fish. Concern over the predatory effects of introduced pike on salmonids is especially high in Southcentral Alaska, where pike were illegally introduced to the Susitna River basin in the 1950s. We used pike abundance, growth, and diet estimates and bioenergetics models to characterise the realised and potential consumptive impacts that introduced pike (age 2 and older) have on salmonids in Alexander Creek, a tributary to the Susitna River. We found that juvenile salmonids were the dominant prey item in pike diets and that pike could consume up to 1.10 metric tons (realised consumption) and 1.66 metric tons (potential consumption) of juvenile salmonids in a summer. Age 3–4 pike had the highest per capita consumption of juvenile salmonids, and age 2 and age 3–4 pike had the highest overall consumption of juvenile salmonid biomass. Using historical data on Chinook salmon and pike potential consumption of juvenile salmonids, we found that pike consumption of juvenile salmonids may lead to collapsed salmon stocks in Alexander Creek. Taken together, our results indicate that pike consume a substantial biomass of juvenile salmonids in Alexander Creek and that coexistence of pike and salmon is unlikely without management actions to reduce or eliminate introduced pike.

  17. The role of parent-child bonding, attachment, and interpersonal problems in the development of deviant sexual fantasies in sexual offenders.

    PubMed

    Maniglio, Roberto

    2012-04-01

    To understand the origin, development, and functions of deviant sexual fantasy in sexual offenders, the present article investigates three areas of the literature on sexual offenders (i.e., parent-child relationships, attachment, and interpersonal problems), hypothesizing a possible path through which dysfunctional parent-child relationships might lead to deviant sexual fantasies. The review of the literature provides indirect evidence that an insecure attachment style developed in response to dysfunctional parenting practices may generate feelings of inadequacy and inferiority to others and a lack of the self-confidence and social skills to initiate or maintain consensual intimate relationships with appropriate others. It is hypothesized that such problems, in turn, might promote low levels of intimacy and satisfaction in romantic relationships and serious and chronic emotional loneliness, withdrawal, and negative attitudes (such as anger and hostility) toward potential partners, leading to a progressive retirement from the real world and refuge in an internal world of deviant sexual fantasies in order to satisfy attachment-related needs for intimacy, emotional closeness, or power. Such a combination of insecure attachment, interpersonal problems, and use of deviant sexual fantasies as a means to achieve the intimacy, power, or control absent from reality might predispose to sexual offending. PMID:22467644

  18. COMPARATIVE MAPS OF SALMONID GENOMES: AN UPDATE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The construction of detailed comparative maps for salmonid fishes is an important goal that will help transfer genetic information between species, study chromosome evolution, and compare the genetic architecture of complex traits across taxa. In this poster, we report on consolidating comparative m...

  19. Cryptobia (Trypanoplasma) salmositica and salmonid cryptobiosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P T K Woo

    2003-01-01

    Salmonid cryptobiosis is caused by Cryptobia (Trypanoplasma) salmositica. The haemoflagellate has been reported from all species of Pacific Onc- orhynchus spp. on the west coast of North America. It is normally transmitted by the freshwater leech, Piscicola salmositica, in streams and rivers, and sculpins, Cottus spp., are considered important reservoir hosts. The pathogen can also survive on the body surface

  20. Sudden infant death syndrome, child sexual abuse, and child development.

    PubMed

    Blatt, S D; Meguid, V; Church, C C; Botash, A S; Jean-Louis, F; Siripornsawan, M P; Weinberger, H L

    1999-04-01

    Since the introduction of the Back to Sleep Campaigns, there has been a dramatic reduction in sudden infant death syndrome in this country. Steven Blatt and Victoria Meguid review the literature surrounding sleep position. Investigators have continued efforts to find other modifiable risk factors of sudden infant death syndrome. A prospective study of more than 33,000 neonates found a link between a prolonged QT electrocardiogram interval and sudden infant death syndrome. Also discussed are investigations seeking to explain the relationship between smoking and sudden infant death syndrome. Ann Botash, Florence Jean-Louis and Mongkae Ploy Siripornsawan review the latest thinking on genital warts and their relation to specific viral etiologies and child sexual abuse. Other symptoms and signs of sexual abuse are the focus of a number of articles that can help the practitioner care for these unfortunate children. Catherine Church reviews medication options for children diagnosed with pervasive developmental disorders or autism spectrum disorders. Finally, in this article, risperidone, fluoxetine and naltrexone are reviewed. PMID:10202629

  1. Identification of De Novo Copy Number Variants Associated with Human Disorders of Sexual Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mounia Tannour-Louet; Shuo Han; Sean T. Corbett; Jean-Francois Louet; Svetlana Yatsenko; Lindsay Meyers; Chad A. Shaw; Sung-Hae L. Kang; Sau Wai Cheung; Dolores J. Lamb; Syed A. Aziz

    2010-01-01

    Disorders of sexual development (DSD), ranging in severity from genital abnormalities to complete sex reversal, are among the most common human birth defects with incidence rates reaching almost 3%. Although causative alterations in key genes controlling gonad development have been identified, the majority of DSD cases remain unexplained. To improve the diagnosis, we screened 116 children born with idiopathic DSD

  2. The Effect of Cognitive Moral Development Upon the Selection of Premarital Sexual Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurich, Anthony P.; Jurich, Julie A.

    1974-01-01

    Subjects with low levels of cognitive moral development chose either traditional morality, the double standard, or permissiveness without affection standard. Those with a moderate degree of cognitive moral development chose permissiveness with affection. The formulation of premarital sexual standards was discussed and theoretical implications were…

  3. The makings of maleness: towards an integrated view of male sexual development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dagmar Wilhelm; Peter Koopman

    2006-01-01

    As the mammalian embryo develops, it must engage one of the two distinct programmes of gene activity, morphogenesis and organogenesis that characterize males and females. In males, sexual development hinges on testis determination and differentiation, but also involves many coordinated transcriptional, signalling and endocrine networks that underpin the masculinization of other organs and tissues, including the brain. Here we bring

  4. Developing, Implementing, and Evaluating a Condom Promotion Program Targeting Sexually Active Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alstead, Mark; Campsmith, Michael; Halley, Carolyn Swope; Hartfield, Karen; Goldblum, Gary; Wood, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of an HIV prevention program promoting condom use among sexually active adolescents. It mobilized target communities to guide program development and implementation; created a mass media campaign to promote correct condom use; and recruited public agencies and organizations to distribute…

  5. Natural born killers?: the development of the sexually sadistic serial killer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B R; Becker, J V

    1997-01-01

    Today's society seems enthralled with serial killers in the news and the media. Forensic psychiatrists often interview serial killers after they have been caught. There are retrospective studies and case reports of individuals who have committed sexually sadistic serial murders. However, there exists a dearth of case reports on adolescents who have expressed serious fantasies about becoming serial killer prior to actualizing their fantasy. This article presents nine clinical cases of 14- to 18-year-olds who have clinically significant fantasies of becoming a serial killer. Similarities exist in these adolescent cases when compared with retrospective studies and case reports of serial killers on the role of sexually sadistic fantasies and actual killings. Since it has been established that sexual paraphilias may develop at a young age, one can surmise that sadistic paraphilias may also develop in some adolescents. The question is posed, can we predict which of these adolescents may go on to actually become serial killers? This article focuses on how the sexually sadistic fantasy can eventually be acted out and possible motives for the act to be repeated multiple times. Finally, recommendations are made about assessing and treating a youngster who expresses violent sexually sadistic killing fantasies so that attempts can be made to interrupt the progression to actual killing. PMID:9323659

  6. Identifying Adolescent Patients at Risk for Sexually Transmitted Infections: Development of a Brief Sexual Health Screening Survey.

    PubMed

    Victor, Elizabeth C; Chung, Richard; Thompson, Robert J

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the association between survey responses to health behaviors, personality/psychosocial factors, and self-reported sexually transmitted infections (STIs) to create a brief survey to identify youth at risk for contracting STIs. Participants included 200 racially diverse 14- to 18-year-old patients from a pediatric primary care clinic. Two sexual behavior variables and one peer norm variable were used to differentiate subgroups of individuals at risk of contracting a STI based on reported history of STIs using probability (decision tree) analyses. These items, as well as sexual orientation and having ever had oral sex, were used to create a brief sexual health screening (BSHS) survey. Each point increase in total BSHS score was associated with exponential growth in the percentage of sexually active adolescents reporting STIs. Findings suggest that the BSHS could serve as a useful tool for clinicians to quickly and accurately detect sexual risk among adolescent patients. PMID:25527529

  7. Salmon lice--impact on wild salmonids and salmon aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Torrissen, O; Jones, S; Asche, F; Guttormsen, A; Skilbrei, O T; Nilsen, F; Horsberg, T E; Jackson, D

    2013-03-01

    Salmon lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis, are naturally occurring parasites of salmon in sea water. Intensive salmon farming provides better conditions for parasite growth and transmission compared with natural conditions, creating problems for both the salmon farming industry and, under certain conditions, wild salmonids. Salmon lice originating from farms negatively impact wild stocks of salmonids, although the extent of the impact is a matter of debate. Estimates from Ireland and Norway indicate an odds ratio of 1.1:1-1.2:1 for sea lice treated Atlantic salmon smolt to survive sea migration compared to untreated smolts. This is considered to have a moderate population regulatory effect. The development of resistance against drugs most commonly used to treat salmon lice is a serious concern for both wild and farmed fish. Several large initiatives have been taken to encourage the development of new strategies, such as vaccines and novel drugs, for the treatment or removal of salmon lice from farmed fish. The newly sequenced salmon louse genome will be an important tool in this work. The use of cleaner fish has emerged as a robust method for controlling salmon lice, and aquaculture production of wrasse is important towards this aim. Salmon lice have large economic consequences for the salmon industry, both as direct costs for the prevention and treatment, but also indirectly through negative public opinion. PMID:23311858

  8. Development of Muscularity and Weight Concerns in Heterosexual and Sexual Minority Males

    PubMed Central

    Calzo, Jerel P.; Corliss, Heather L.; Blood, Emily A.; Field, Alison E.; Austin, S. Bryn

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the development of muscularity and weight concerns among heterosexual and sexual minority males in adolescence. Method Participants were 5,868 males from the Growing Up Today Study, a US prospective cohort spanning ages 9–25 years. Generalized estimating equations were used to test sexual orientation differences in the development of muscularity concerns, weight gain attempts, and weight and shape concern. Results Desire for bigger muscles increased slightly each year across adolescence (? =.10, 95% C.I.= .09, .11) regardless of sexual orientation, but gay and bisexual participants reported greater desire for toned muscles than completely and mostly heterosexual males (?=.39, 95% C.I.=.21, .57). Desire for toned muscles did not change with age. Attempts to gain weight increased three-fold across adolescence, with up to 30% reporting weight gain attempts by age 16. Although underweight males (the smallest weight status class) were most likely to attempt to gain weight, most of the observed weight gain attempts were by healthy (69%) and overweight/obese (27%) males, suggesting that most attempts were medically unnecessary and could lead to overweight. Sexual minority participants were 20% less likely to report weight gain attempts than completely heterosexual participants. Weight and shape concern increased with age, with gay and bisexual participants experiencing a significantly greater increase than heterosexual males. Conclusions Sexual orientation modifies the development and expression of male weight and muscularity concerns. The findings have implications for early interventions for the prevention of obesity and eating disorder risk in heterosexual and sexual minority males. PMID:23316852

  9. Let's Talk about Sex: Development of a Sexual Health Program for Nepali Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Michelle R.; Harman, Jennifer J.; Shrestha, Deepti Khati

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test the feasibility of conducting a sexual health intervention for women in Nepal, a country with high political and economic instability and strong patriarchal systems. Of the 88 women enrolled, 100% retention was obtained over three sessions, and 85% completed a 1-month follow-up. Recruitment was so…

  10. Development and Validation of a Gender Expression Measure among Sexual Minority Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehavot, Keren; King, Kevin M.; Simoni, Jane M.

    2011-01-01

    Gender expression varies considerably among lesbian and bisexual women and may be related to various stressors and health outcomes. However, no current measure adequately assesses gender expression in this community. Thus, the authors conducted three studies to develop and validate the Gender Expression Measure among Sexual Minority Women…

  11. A Transformative Learning Perspective of Continuing Sexual Identity Development in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kathleen P.; Biro, Susan C.

    2006-01-01

    This chapter provides a framework to facilitate self-awareness, self-knowledge, diversity training, and cultural awareness and appreciation for all adults, based on understanding the development of sexual identity and workplace issues for LGBTQ adults. (Contains 1 table and 1 figure.)

  12. SEXUAL MATURATION IN GIRLS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF ESTROGEN-INDUCED

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SEXUAL MATURATION IN GIRLS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF ESTROGEN-INDUCED GONADOTROPIC HORMONE RELEASE J (measured by radioimmunoassay). Only in the group of girls in an advanced stage of puberty (premenarche P4 in two of the five girls at this advanced stage of puberty (P4) the maximum of plasma LH approached

  13. Discovering Sexual Health Conversations between Adolescents and Youth Development Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Niodita; Chandak, Aastha; Gilson, Glen; Pelster, Aja Kneip; Schober, Daniel J.; Goldsworthy, Richard; Baldwin, Kathleen; Fortenberry, J. Dennis; Fisher, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Youth development professionals (YDPs) working at community-based organizations are in a unique position to interact with the adolescents because they are neither parents/guardians nor teachers. The objectives of this study were to explore qualitatively what sexual health issues adolescents discuss with YDPs and to describe those issues using the…

  14. Research on Adolescent Sexual Orientation: Development, Health Disparities, Stigma, and Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saewyc, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    The decade between 1998 and 2008 saw rapid increases in research on adolescent sexual orientation development and related health issues, both in the quantity and in the quality of studies. While much of the research originated in North America, studies from other countries also contributed to emerging understanding of developmental trajectories…

  15. Development and use of self-report techniques for assessing sexual functioning: A review and critique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hope R. Conte

    1983-01-01

    This is a review and chronological perspective on the development of self-report measures designed to describe an individual's sexual functioning. It includes scales that provide data on both heterosexual and homosexual behavior. Attitude scales are also included, but only those that reflect an individual's attitudes toward his own or his partner's behavior. Two classes of self-report measures are evaluated: (1)

  16. Sexual differences in cold acclimation and freezing tolerance development in sea buckthorn ( Hippophae rhamnoides L.) ecotypes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chunyang Li; Yongqing Yang; Olavi Junttila; E. Tapio Palva

    2005-01-01

    Sexual differences in cold acclimation and freezing tolerance development of two contrasting sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) ecotypes from northern and southern regions in China were recorded after exposure to short day photoperiod (SD) and low temperature (LT). The results demonstrated that cold acclimation could be triggered by exposing the plants to SD or LT alone, and that a combination

  17. Influence of cadmium, copper, and pentachlorophenol on growth and sexual development of Eisenia andrei (Oligochaeta; Annelida)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. A. M. Gestel; W. A. Dis; E. M. Dirven-van Breemen; P. M. Sparenburg; R. Baerselman

    1991-01-01

    In the existing guidelines for earthworm toxicity testing, mortality is the only test criterion. Mortality is, however, not a very sensitive parameter, and from an ecological point of view growth and reproduction are more important for a proper risk assessment of chemicals in soil. In this study the growth and sexual development of juvenile earthworms were considered as test criteria

  18. Late-stage clinical development in lower urogenital targets: sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Usman

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, late-stage clinical drug development that primarily focuses on urogenital targets has centered around four areas of medical need (both unmet need and aiming to improve on existing therapies). These include male sexual dysfunction (MSD), female sexual dysfunction (FSD), prostatic pathology (neoplastic, pre-neoplasitic, and non-neoplastic), and improvement in lower urinary tract symptoms. Despite the regulatory approval of compounds to treat erectile dysfunction (ED), benign prostatic hyperplasia, a number of treatments for overactive bladder, and stress urinary incontinence, there remains a deficiency in addressing a number of conditions that arise out of pathophysiological dysfunction resulting in lower urogenital tract sexual conditions. In terms of late-stage clinical development, significant progress has most recently been made in MSD development, especially in understanding further a common and complex sexual dysfunction – that of premature ejaculation. The search also continues for compounds that improve ED in terms of better efficacy and superior safety profile compared to the currently marketed phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors. Whilst there are no approved medications to treat the subtypes of FSD, there has been significant progress in attempting to better understand how to appropriately assess treatment benefit in clinical trial settings for this difficult to diagnose and treat condition. This review will focus on late-stage human clinical development pertaining to MSD and FSD. PMID:16465180

  19. "InFection Four": Development of a Youth-Informed Sexual Health Card Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Melissa; Jagoda, Patrick; Heathcock, Stephen; Sutherland, Ainsley

    2014-01-01

    Games may be useful tools for learning and communicating about sexual and reproductive health. This article discusses the collaborative design and subsequent evaluation of a narrative-based card game. This game was created in a workshop based on positive youth development, which allowed youth to be involved as game designers and game players.…

  20. The influence of brain abnormalities on psychosocial development, criminal history and paraphilias in sexual murderers.

    PubMed

    Briken, Peer; Habermann, Niels; Berner, Wolfgang; Hill, Andreas

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the number and type of brain abnormalities and their influence on psychosocial development, criminal history and paraphilias in sexual murderers. We analyzed psychiatric court reports of 166 sexual murderers and compared a group with notable signs of brain abnormalities (N = 50) with those without any signs (N = 116). Sexual murderers with brain abnormalities suffered more from early behavior problems. They were less likely to cohabitate with the victim at the time of the homicide and had more victims at the age of six years or younger. Psychiatric diagnoses revealed a higher total number of paraphilias: Transvestic fetishism and paraphilias not otherwise specified were more frequent in offenders with brain abnormalities. A binary logistic regression identified five predictors that accounted for 46.8% of the variance explaining the presence of brain abnormalities. Our results suggest the importance of a comprehensive neurological and psychological examination of this special offender group. PMID:16225232

  1. Development of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area and the influence of estrogen-like compounds.

    PubMed

    He, Zhen; Ferguson, Sherry Ann; Cui, Li; Greenfield, Lazar John; Paule, Merle Gale

    2013-10-15

    One of the well-defined sexually dimorphic structures in the brain is the sexually dimorphic nucleus, a cluster of cells located in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus. The rodent sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area can be delineated histologically using conventional Nissl staining or immunohistochemically using calbindin D28K immunoreactivity. There is increasing use of the bindin D28K-delineated neural cluster to define the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area in rodents. Several mechanisms are proposed to underlie the processes that contribute to the sexual dimorphism (size difference) of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area. Recent evidence indicates that stem cell activity, including proliferation and migration presumably from the 3(rd) ventricle stem cell niche, may play a critical role in the postnatal development of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area and its distinguishing sexually dimorphic feature: a signifi-cantly larger volume in males. Sex hormones and estrogen-like compounds can affect the size of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area. Despite considerable research, it remains un-clear whether estrogen-like compounds and/or sex hormones increase size of the sexually dimor-phic nucleus of the preoptic area via an increase in stem cell activity originating from the 3(rd) ventricle stem cell niche. PMID:25206587

  2. Pilot study in the development of an interactive multimedia learning environment for sexual health interventions: a focus group approach.

    PubMed

    Goold, P C; Bustard, S; Ferguson, E; Carlin, E M; Neal, K; Bowman, C A

    2006-02-01

    In the UK there are high rates of sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancies amongst young people. There is limited and contradictory evidence that current sexual health education interventions are effective or that they improve access to appropriate sexual health services. This paper describes the outcome of focus group work with young people that was undertaken to inform the design of an Interactive Multimedia Learning Environment that incorporates message framing, intended for use in sexual health promotion. The focus group work addressed sexual attitudes, behaviour, risk perception, and knowledge of sexual health and sexual health services in Nottingham. The results provided new insights into young peoples' sexual behaviour, and their diversity of knowledge and beliefs. Common themes expressed regarding sexual health services included concerns about confidentiality, lack of confidence to access services and fear of the unknown. The results showed that while the adolescents are reasonably knowledgeable about infection, they do not know as much about the relevant services to treat it. This work emphasizes the need for user involvement throughout the design and development of a sexual health intervention, and will form the basis of the next part of the project. PMID:15972303

  3. The sedimentation of salmonid spawning gravels in the Hampshire Avon catchment, UK: implications for the dissolved oxygen content of intragravel water and embryo survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heywood, M. J. T.; Walling, D. E.

    2007-03-01

    The accumulation of sediment within salmonid redd gravels can have a detrimental impact on the development of salmonid embryos; therefore, redd sedimentation represents a potential limiting factor for salmonid reproduction. The links between redd sedimentation, the dissolved oxygen content of intragravel water and salmonid embryo survival within the upper and middle parts of the Hampshire Avon catchment in southern England are explored. Measurements of surface and intragravel water quality and redd properties were undertaken for artificial redds constructed at known spawning sites. Salmonid embryos were also planted into artificial redds adjacent to the monitoring equipment. The rate of sedimentation of the newly cleaned redd gravels demonstrated a non-linear decrease over time, which is attributed to a particle-size-selective depositional process. The results of the study confirm that low embryo survival and low dissolved oxygen concentrations in intragravel water can be attributed to the accumulation of sediment within the redd gravels. This was found to produce a reduction in redd permeability, which limited the interchange of surface and intragravel water and, therefore, the supply of dissolved oxygen to the intragravel environment. In view of the diminished status of salmonids within many of the UK's chalk rivers and streams, the results highlight the need for management initiatives aimed at reducing redd sedimentation and thereby optimizing salmonid embryo incubation success. Copyright

  4. Sexually Dimorphic MicroRNA Expression During Chicken Embryonic Gonadal Development1

    PubMed Central

    Bannister, Stephanie C.; Tizard, Mark L.V.; Doran, Timothy J.; Sinclair, Andrew H.; Smith, Craig A.

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a highly conserved class of small RNAs that function in a sequence-specific manner to posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression. Tissue-specific miRNA expression studies have discovered numerous functions for miRNAs in various aspects of embryogenesis, but a role for miRNAs in gonadal development and sex differentiation has not yet been reported. Using the chicken embryo as a model, microarrays were used to profile the expression of chicken miRNAs prior to, during, and after the time of gonadal sex differentiation (Embryonic Day 5.5 [E5.5], E6.5, and E9.5). Sexually dimorphic miRNAs were identified, and the expression patterns of several were subjected to further validation by in situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis. Expression of one chicken miRNA, MIR202*, was observed to be sexually dimorphic, with upregulation in the developing testis from the onset of sexual differentiation. Additional data from deep sequencing of male and female embryonic gonad RNA samples also indicated upregulation of MIR202* in male gonads. These findings provide the first evidence of sexually dimorphic miRNA expression during vertebrate gonadal sex differentiation and suggest that MIR202* may function in regulating testicular development. PMID:19357368

  5. The impact of sexual abuse on female development: lessons from a multigenerational, longitudinal research study.

    PubMed

    Trickett, Penelope K; Noll, Jennie G; Putnam, Frank W

    2011-05-01

    This is a report on the research design and findings of a 23-year longitudinal study of the impact of intrafamilial sexual abuse on female development. The conceptual framework integrated concepts of psychological adjustment with theory regarding how psychobiological factors might impact development. Participants included 6- to 16-year-old females with substantiated sexual abuse and a demographically similar comparison group. A cross-sequential design was used and six assessments have taken place, with participants at median age 11 at the first assessment and median age 25 at the sixth assessment. Mothers of participants took part in the early assessments and offspring took part at the sixth assessment. Results of many analyses, both within circumscribed developmental stages and across development, indicated that sexually abused females (on average) showed deleterious sequelae across a host of biopsychosocial domains including: earlier onsets of puberty, cognitive deficits, depression, dissociative symptoms, maladaptive sexual development, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal attenuation, asymmetrical stress responses, high rates of obesity, more major illnesses and healthcare utilization, dropping out of high school, persistent posttraumatic stress disorder, self-mutilation, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders diagnoses, physical and sexual revictimization, premature deliveries, teen motherhood, drug and alcohol abuse, and domestic violence. Offspring born to abused mothers were at increased risk for child maltreatment and overall maldevelopment. There was also a pattern of considerable within group variability. Based on this complex network of findings, implications for optimal treatments are elucidated. Translational aspects of extending observational research into clinical practice are discussed in terms that will likely have a sustained impact on several major public health initiatives. PMID:23786689

  6. The impact of sexual abuse on female development: Lessons from a multigenerational, longitudinal research study

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Jennie G.; Putnam, Frank W.

    2013-01-01

    This is a report on the research design and findings of a 23-year longitudinal study of the impact of intrafamilial sexual abuse on female development. The conceptual framework integrated concepts of psychological adjustment with theory regarding how psychobiological factors might impact development. Participants included 6- to 16-year-old females with substantiated sexual abuse and a demographically similar comparison group. A cross-sequential design was used and six assessments have taken place, with participants at median age 11 at the first assessment and median age 25 at the sixth assessment. Mothers of participants took part in the early assessments and offspring took part at the sixth assessment. Results of many analyses, both within circumscribed developmental stages and across development, indicated that sexually abused females (on average) showed deleterious sequelae across a host of biopsychosocial domains including: earlier onsets of puberty, cognitive deficits, depression, dissociative symptoms, maladaptive sexual development, hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal attenuation, asymmetrical stress responses, high rates of obesity, more major illnesses and healthcare utilization, dropping out of high school, persistent psottraumatic stress disorder, self-mutilation, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders diagnoses, physical and sexual revictimization, premature deliveries, teen motherhood, drug and alcohol abuse, and domestic violence. Offspring born to abused mothers were at increased risk for child maltreatment and overall maldevelopment. There was also a pattern of considerable within group variability. Based on this complex network of findings, implications for optimal treatments are elucidated. Translational aspects of extending observational research into clinical practice are discussed in terms that will likely have a sustained impact on several major public health initiatives. PMID:23786689

  7. Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River: 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Roby, Daniel D.; Craig, David P.; Collis, Ken; Adamany, Stephanie L.

    1998-09-01

    The authors initiated a field study in 1997 to assess the impacts of fish-eating colonial waterbirds (i.e., terns, cormorants, and gulls) on the survival of juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River. Here the authors present results from the 1998 breeding season, the second field season of work on this project. The research objectives in 1998 were to: (1) determine the location, size, nesting chronology, nesting success, and population trajectories of breeding colonies of fish-eating birds in the lower Columbia River; (2) determine diet composition of fish-eating birds, including taxonomic composition and energy content of various prey types; (3) estimate forage fish consumption rates, with special emphasis on juvenile salmonids, by breeding adults and their young; (4) determine the relative vulnerabilit2048 different groups of juvenile salmonids to bird predation; (5) identify foraging range, foraging strategies, and habitat utilization by piscivorous waterbirds; and (6) test the feasibility of various alternative methods for managing avian predation on juvenile salmonids and develop recommendations to reduce avian predation, if warranted by the results.

  8. Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River: 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Collis, Ken; Adamany, Stephanie; Roby, Daniel D.; Craig, David P.; Lyons, Donald E.

    2000-04-01

    The authors initiated a field study in 1997 to assess the impacts of fish-eating colonial waterbirds (i.e., terns, cormorants, and gulls) on the survival of juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River. Here the authors present results from the 1998 breeding season, the second field season of work on this project. The research objectives in 1998 were to: (1) determine the location, size, nesting chronology, nesting success, and population trajectories of breeding colonies of fish-eating birds in the lower Columbia River; (2) determine diet composition of fish-eating birds, including taxonomic composition and energy content of various prey types; (3) estimate forage fish consumption rates, with special emphasis on juvenile salmonids, by breeding adults and their young; (4) determine the relative vulnerability of different groups of juvenile salmonids to bird predation; (5) identify foraging range, foraging strategies, and habitat utilization by piscivorous waterbirds; and (6) test the feasibility of various alternative methods for managing avian predation on juvenile salmonids and develop recommendations to reduce avian predation, if warranted by the results.

  9. Beyond Cairo: sexual and reproductive rights of young people in the new development agenda.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    At the 1994 United Nations International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), women's rights advocates fundamentally shifted the way the global development community views poverty, gender equality and reproductive rights. While the ICPD's call to action led to a marked improvement in reproductive health, more remains to be done to secure the sexual and reproductive rights and health of all, particularly for young people. As we approach the 20-year anniversary of Cairo, several global processes are happening concurrently that have implications for the future of the sexual and reproductive health and rights agenda, including the 20-year review of progress towards achieving the Cairo Programme of Action, the review of the Millennium Development Goals, and the open group discussions about the sustainable development goals and the new development agenda post-2015. There are five key areas of action where significant investment is needed moving forward to ensure young people's access and safeguard their rights: repeal outdated laws and create new policies that safeguard young people's health and rights; provide youth-friendly sexual and reproductive health services; guarantee young people's access to information and education; end gender discrimination and ensure government accountability. PMID:24922347

  10. Housing sexuality: domestic space and the development of female sexuality in the fiction of Angela Carter and Jeanette Winterson 

    E-print Network

    Cantrell, Samantha E.

    2005-08-29

    A repeated theme in the fiction of Angela Carter and Jeanette Winterson is the use of domestic space as a tool for defining socially acceptable versions of female sexuality. Four novels that crystallize this theme are the ...

  11. Salmonid Abundance and Distribution in the middle Green River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karrigan S. Börk

    Salmonid abundance and distribution in the Green River between Flaming Gorge Dam the Split Mountain Boat Ramp (middle Green River, Figure 1) are governed by recruitment, habitat requirements and interspecific competition, played out on the framework of the Green river hydrology and geomorphology. Although salmonids historically did not inhabit the middle Green River after the end of the last glaciation,

  12. GENOMIC RESOURCES FOR STUDYING EARLY LIFE STAGE SALMONID HEALTH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic approaches are being used to study pathological and normal processes in early life stage salmonids. Early Mortality Syndrome (EMS), a disease associated with low egg thiamine levels, causes early life stage mortality and low recruitment of Great Lakes salmonids including lake trout. We use...

  13. A Global Assessment of Salmon Aquaculture Impacts on Wild Salmonids

    E-print Network

    Myers, Ransom A.

    A Global Assessment of Salmon Aquaculture Impacts on Wild Salmonids Jennifer S. Ford* , Ransom A, wild salmon catch and abundance have declined dramatically in the North Atlantic and in much of farmed salmon. Previous studies have shown negative impacts on wild salmonids, but these results have

  14. Compulsory sexuality.

    PubMed

    Emens, Elizabeth F

    2014-02-01

    Asexuality is an emerging identity category that challenges the common assumption that everyone is defined by some type of sexual attraction. Asexuals--those who report feeling no sexual attraction to others--constitute one percent of the population, according to one prominent study. In recent years, some individuals have begun to identify as asexual and to connect around their experiences interacting with a sexual society. Asexuality has also become a protected classification under the antidiscrimination law of one state and several localities, but legal scholarship has thus far neglected the subject. This Article introduces asexuality to the legal literature as a category of analysis, an object of empirical study, and a phenomenon of medical science. It then offers a close examination of the growing community of self-identified asexuals. Asexual identity has revealing intersections with the more familiar categories of gender, sexual orientation, and disability, and inspires new models for understanding sexuality. Thinking about asexuality also sheds light on our legal system. Ours is arguably a sexual law, predicated on the assumption that sex is important. This Article uses asexuality to develop a framework for identifying the ways that law privileges sexuality. Across various fields, these interactions include legal requirements of sexual activity, special carve-outs to shield sexuality from law, legal protections from others' sexuality, and legal protections for sexual identity. Applying this framework, the Article traces several ways that our sexual law burdens, and occasionally benefits, asexuals. This Article concludes by closely examining asexuality's prospects for broader inclusion into federal, state, and local antidiscrimination laws. PMID:24654293

  15. Stalk-eyed flies (Diopsidae): modelling the evolution and development of an exaggerated sexual trait.

    PubMed

    Warren, Ian; Smith, Hazel

    2007-03-01

    Stalk-eyed flies of the family Diopsidae exhibit a unique form of hypercephaly, which has evolved under both natural and sexual selection. Male hypercephaly is used by female diopsids as an indicator of male quality. By choosing to mate with males expressing the most-exaggerated hypercephaly, females can benefit both from the enhanced fertility of these males and the transmission of other heritable advantages to their offspring. Stalk-eyed flies are close relatives of the model organism, Drosophila melanogaster. We have shown that similar genetic and cellular mechanisms regulate the initial development of the head capsule in fruitflies and diopsids. The great diversity of stalk-eyed fly species, exhibiting varying degrees of hypercephaly and sexual dimorphism, constitutes a major advantage for comparative studies of their development and evolution. PMID:17295307

  16. Effects of perfluorooctanesulfonate and perfluorobutanesulfonate on the growth and sexual development of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Lou, Qin-Qin; Zhang, Yin-Feng; Zhou, Zhen; Shi, Ya-Li; Ge, Ya-Nan; Ren, Dong-Kai; Xu, Hai-Ming; Zhao, Ya-Xian; Wei, Wu-Ji; Qin, Zhan-Fen

    2013-09-01

    Perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), as a substitute for perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), is widespread in the environment and biotic samples as well as PFOS. To investigate effects of PFOS and PFBS on the growth and sexual development of amphibians, we exposed Xenopus laevis tadpoles at a series of concentrations of PFOS and PFBS (0.1; 1; 100; 1,000 ?g/l) as well as 17-beta-estradiol (E2, 100 ng/l) and 5 alpha-androstan-17-beta-ol-3-one (DHT, 100 ng/l) from stage 46/47 to 2 months postmetamorphosis. We found that neither PFOS nor PFBS had a significant effect on the survival and growth. However, they caused hepatohistological impairment at higher concentrations (100; 1,000 ?g/l). Unlike E2, PFOS at all concentrations did not alter the sex ratio and induce intersex, but caused degeneration of spermatogonia in testes except for the lowest concentration. PFBS had no effect on the sex ratio and gonadal histology. PFOS and PFBS promoted expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR), but not affected aromatase expression in the brain. The increase in expression of ER and AR suggests an increase in the responsiveness to the corresponding sex hormone and potential effects on sexual development. Our results show that PFBS as well as PFOS have adverse effects on hepato-histology and sexual development on X. laevis. Also, PFOS- and PFBS-induced increase in ER and AR expression highlights the need to further study effects of PFOS and PFBS on subsequently gonadal development, sexual dimorphism, and secondary sex characteristics in X. laevis. It is debatable that PFBS is widely used as a substitute of PFOS. PMID:23907449

  17. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers in the sexual-apomictic complex Taraxacum officinale (dandelion)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Falque; J. J. B. Keurentjes; J. M. T. Bakx-Schotman; P. J. van Dijk

    1998-01-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed in Taraxacum officinale to study gene flow between sexual and apomictic plants and to identify clones. Twenty five thousand genomic DNA clones were\\u000a hybridized with a (CT)12D probe. The density of (GA\\/CT)\\u000a n\\u000a repeats was estimated at one every 61?kb in the T. officinale genome, which translates to 13?500 repeats per haploid genome. Ninety two percent

  18. The Role of Sexual Orientation in Youth Development Theory 

    E-print Network

    Theriault, Daniel

    2013-05-08

    about the transition to adulthood among young people that identify as Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay, Transgender, and Queer (LBGTQ: cf. Torkelson, 2012). Existing research has focused on the causes and incidence of problem behaviors among LBGTQ youth... heterosexuality may introduce differences in development for those who identify as Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay Transgender, and Queer (LBGTQ) versus those who identify as heterosexual. In particular, young people that identify as LBGTQ negotiate compulsory...

  19. A cascade of DNA binding proteins for sexual commitment and development in Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Thomas D.; Pfander, Claudia; Dickens, Nicholas J.; Religa, Agnieszka A.; Bushell, Ellen; Graham, Anne L.; Cameron, Rachael; Kafsack, Bjorn F.C.; Williams, April E.; Llinas, Manuel; Berriman, Matthew; Billker, Oliver; Waters, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Commitment to and completion of sexual development are essential for malaria parasites (protists of the genus Plasmodium) to be transmitted through mosquitoes1. The molecular mechanism(s) responsible for commitment have been hitherto unknown. Here we show that PBAP2-G, a conserved member of the ApiAP2 family of transcription factors, is essential for the commitment of asexually replicating forms to sexual development in P. berghei, a malaria parasite of rodents. PBAP2-G was identified from mutations in its encoding gene, PBANKA_143750, which account for the loss of sexual development frequently observed in parasites transmitted artificially by blood passage. Systematic gene deletion of conserved ApiAP2 genes in Plasmodium confirmed the role of PBAP2-G and revealed a second ApiAP2 member (PBANKA_103430, termed PBAP2-G2) that significantly modulates but does not abolish gametocytogenesis indicating that a cascade of ApiAP2 proteins are involved in commitment to the production and maturation of gametocytes. The data suggest a mechanism of commitment to gametocytogenesis in Plasmodium consistent with a positive feedback loop involving PBAP2G which might be exploited to prevent the transmission of this pernicious parasite. PMID:24572359

  20. Visual method for evaluating the state of sexual development in male grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis).

    PubMed

    Ferryman, Mark; Mayle, Brenda A; Morgan, Geoff W

    2006-01-01

    Stages of sexual development in grey squirrels were classified by scoring the presence of periscrotal hair and staining, as well as the position, size and colour of testes, to develop a visual breeding score (VBS). The VBS was a highly significant predictor of the presence and concentration of epididymal spermatozoa, which were produced from 12 months of age. Two classes of producers were identified: 'high' with spermatozoa levels > 10 x 10(6) mL(-1) and 'low' with spermatozoa levels < 10 x 10(6) mL(-1). Sperm motility was variable across all levels of productive males but was generally higher in the 'high' group, indicating that these were 'functional' males. Sexual regression was observed in two autumn periods. The VBS was less effective in determining states of regression and redevelopment; the confidence of classification improved when age class (adult or prepubertal) and date of capture was known. The use of the VBS to classify stages of sexual development in grey squirrels will improve selection of animals for studies of population biology and fertility control, and has potential application in captive breeding studies of rare Sciuridae species. PMID:16554014

  1. The footprint of salmonids on river morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M. A.; Tonina, D.

    2012-12-01

    Female salmonids dig a pit in the streambed where they lay their eggs, which then cover with sediment from a second pit forming an egg nest call redd. This formation results in a shape resembling a dune with an amplitude, which is the vertical difference between bottom of the pit and crest of the hump, varying from few centimetres (for small fish, chum or sockeye salmon) to tenths of a meter (for large fish, Chinook salmon). During redd construction, salmonids alter streambed topography, winnow away fine sediment and mix streambed material within a layer as thick as 50 cm, for the large chinook salmon. The spawning activities may result in additional roughness at the local scale due to redds. However, redd construction may smooth large-scale topography reducing roughness due the macro-bedform. These topographical changes vary streambed roughness, which in turn may affect shear stress distribution. Redds have been suggested to increase the overall flow resistance due to form drag resulting in lower grain shear stress and less particle mobility. However, the mixing of the sediment could prevent armouring of the streambed surface allowing higher than with armouring sediment transport. Here, we use detailed pre- and post-spawning bathymetries coupled with accurate 2-dimensional hydraulic numerical modelling to test which of these two effects has potentially more impact on sediment transport. Our results show that topographical roughness added by sockeye salmons, which build small redds with 15cm amplitude and 1 meter wavelength (longitudinal length of a redd), has negligible effect on shear stress at the reach-scale and limited at the local scale. Conversely, sediment mixing has an important effect on reducing armouring, increasing sediment mobility, which results in potentially more sediment transport in reaches with than without redds. Consequently, salmonid bioturbation due to mass-spawning fish can be a dominant element for sediment transport in mountain drainage basins

  2. Gill diseases of cultured salmonids in Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    Daoust, P Y; Ferguson, H W

    1983-01-01

    Between 1977 and 1981, the Fish Pathology Laboratory of the Ontario Veterinary College received 239 cases from trout farms of southern Ontario, 51 (21.3%) of which had diseased gills. Branchial lesions in 86.3% of these 51 cases were characterized by marked lamellar epithelial hyperplasia with epithelial hypertrophy and lamellar fusion. Filamentous bacteria were seen on the surface of the branchial filaments and lamellae in 68.6% of the cases. Our observations highlight the importance of gill diseases as a production problem of farmed salmonids in southern Ontario. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:6416657

  3. Sex-biased gene expression during head development in a sexually dimorphic stalk-eyed fly.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Gerald S; Johns, Philip M; Metheny, Jackie D; Baker, Richard H

    2013-01-01

    Stalk-eyed flies (family Diopsidae) are a model system for studying sexual selection due to the elongated and sexually dimorphic eye-stalks found in many species. These flies are of additional interest because their X chromosome is derived largely from an autosomal arm in other flies. To identify candidate genes required for development of dimorphic eyestalks and investigate how sex-biased expression arose on the novel X, we compared gene expression between males and females using oligonucleotide microarrays and RNA from developing eyestalk tissue or adult heads in the dimorphic diopsid, Teleopsis dalmanni. Microarray analysis revealed sex-biased expression for 26% of 3,748 genes expressed in eye-antennal imaginal discs and concordant sex-biased expression for 86 genes in adult heads. Overall, 415 female-biased and 482 male-biased genes were associated with dimorphic eyestalk development but not differential expression in the adult head. Functional analysis revealed that male-biased genes are disproportionately associated with growth and mitochondrial function while female-biased genes are associated with cell differentiation and patterning or are novel transcripts. With regard to chromosomal effects, dosage compensation occurs by elevated expression of X-linked genes in males. Genes with female-biased expression were more common on the X and less common on autosomes than expected, while male-biased genes exhibited no chromosomal pattern. Rates of protein evolution were lower for female-biased genes but higher for genes that moved on or off the novel X chromosome. These findings cannot be due to meiotic sex chromosome inactivation or by constraints associated with dosage compensation. Instead, they could be consistent with sexual conflict in which female-biased genes on the novel X act primarily to reduce eyespan in females while other genes increase eyespan in both sexes. Additional information on sex-biased gene expression in other tissues and related sexually monomorphic species could confirm this interpretation. PMID:23527273

  4. Development of an attachment-informed measure of sexual behavior in late adolescence.

    PubMed

    Szielasko, Alicia L; Symons, Douglas K; Lisa Price, E

    2013-04-01

    There is considerable interest in relations between sexual behavior and romantic attachment styles in adolescence as attachment needs are increasingly met through intimate partners rather than parents. The objectives of this research were to organize a measure of sexual behavior within an attachment theory framework, and then show that this new measure uniquely predicted sexual approach styles and invasive sexual experiences. 190 18- and 19-year-old university students in late adolescence completed sexual behavior items that were provided ambivalent (anxious) and avoidant dimensions. These were systematically related to the romantic attachment dimensions of the Experiences in Close Relationships - Revised. However, even after romantic relationship style, gender, and social desirability were controlled, avoidance in sexual relationships predicted lifetime sexual partner number and negatively predicted positive sexual strategies, and ambivalence in sexual relationships predicted invasive and coercive sexual behaviors. A measure specific to sexual relationships informs the attachment and romantic context of sex in late adolescence. PMID:23414943

  5. bZIP transcription factors affecting secondary metabolism, sexual development and stress responses in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wen-Bing; Reinke, Aaron W.; Szilágyi, Melinda; Emri, Tamás; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Keating, Amy E.; Pócsi, István; Wang, Clay C. C.

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors play critical roles in the organismal response to the environment. Recently, a novel YAP-like bZIP, restorer of secondary metabolism A (RsmA), was found in a suppressor screen of an Aspergillus nidulans secondary metabolism (SM) mutant in which overexpression of rsmA was found to partially remediate loss of SM in Velvet Complex mutants. The Velvet Complex is a conserved fungal transcriptional heteromer that couples SM with sexual development in fungi. Here we characterized and contrasted SM in mutants of RsmA and four other A. nidulans bZIP proteins (NapA, ZipA, ZipB and ZipC) with predicted DNA binding motifs similar to RsmA. Only two overexpression mutants exhibited both SM and sexual abnormalities that were noteworthy: OE?:?:?rsmA resulted in a 100-fold increase in sterigmatocystin and a near loss of meiotic spore production. OE?:?:?napA displayed decreased production of sterigmatocystin, emericellin, asperthecin, shamixanthone and epishamixanthone, coupled with a shift from sexual to asexual development. Quantification of bZIP homodimer and heterodimer formation using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) suggested that these proteins preferentially self-associate. PMID:23154967

  6. Structure of a gametocyte protein essential for sexual development in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amit; Sharma, Indu; Kogkasuriyachai, Darin; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2003-03-01

    Malaria transmission is dependent on the development of sexual forms of Plasmodium falciparum, called gametocytes, in the vertebrate host. Pfg27 is an abundantly expressed sexual stage-specific protein that is essential for gametocytogenesis in P. falciparum. We describe the crystal structure of Pfg27, which reveals a novel fold composed of two pseudo dyad-related repeats of the helix-turn-helix motif. Structurally equivalent helices of each repeat either form a dimer interface or interact with RNA in vitro. One side of the dimer presents an unprecedented juxtaposition of four polyproline (PXXP) motifs. Preliminary binding data indicate that these sites are capable of binding Src homology-3 (SH3) modules. Molecular modeling suggests that the dimer can accommodate two SH3 modules simultaneously, potentially enabling molecular crosstalk between SH3-containing proteins. The structural and initial biochemical evidence suggests that Pfg27 may serve as a platform for RNA and SH3 binding. PMID:12577051

  7. Sexual Assault

    MedlinePLUS

    ... assault fact sheet Sexual assault fact sheet ePublications Sexual assault fact sheet Print this fact sheet Sexual assault ... assaulted? More information on sexual assault What is sexual assault? Sexual assault and abuse is any type of ...

  8. REPORT OF THE INTERNATIONAL CONSENSUS DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE ON FEMALE SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION: DEFINITIONS AND CLASSIFICATIONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ROSEMARY BASSON; JENNIFER BERMAN; ARTHUR BURNETT; LEONARD DEROGATIS; DAVID FERGUSON; JEAN FOURCROY; IRWIN GOLDSTEIN; ALESSANDRA GRAZIOTTIN; JULIA HEIMAN; ELLEN LAAN; SANDRA LEIBLUM; HARIN PADMA-NATHAN; RAYMOND ROSEN; KATHLEEN SEGRAVES; R. TAYLOR SEGRAVES; RIDWAN SHABSIGH; MARCALEE SIPSKI; GORM WAGNER; BEVERLY WHIPPLE

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Female sexual dysfunction is highly prevalent but not well defined or understood. We evaluated and revised existing definitions and classifications of female sexual dysfunction. Materials and Methods: An interdisciplinary consensus conference panel consisting of 19 experts in female sexual dysfunction selected from 5 countries was convened by the Sexual Function Health Council of the American Foundation for Urologic Disease.

  9. Modification of a salmonid alphavirus replicon vector for enhanced expression of heterologous antigens.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tz-Chun; Johansson, Daniel X; Liljeström, Peter; Evensen, Øystein; Haugland, Øyvind

    2015-03-01

    A salmonid alphavirus (SAV) replicon has been developed to express heterologous antigens but protein production was low to modest compared with terrestrial alphavirus replicons. In this study, we have compared several modifications to a SAV replicon construct and analysed their influence on foreign gene expression. We found that an insertion of a translational enhancer consisting of the N-terminal 102 nt of the capsid gene, together with a nucleotide sequence encoding the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A peptide, caused a significant increase in EGFP reporter gene expression. The importance of fusing a hammerhead (HH) ribozyme sequence at the 5' end of the viral genome was also demonstrated. In contrast, a hepatitis D virus ribozyme (HDV-RZ) sequence placed at the 3' end did not augment expression of inserted genes. Taken together, we have developed a platform for optimized antigen production, which can be applied for immunization of salmonid fish in the future. PMID:25395591

  10. Descriptive Links between Childhood Sexual Abuse during the First Five Eriksonian Stages and the Development of the Last Four Stages: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berendt, Elizabeth Ann

    The empirical literature regarding the descriptive links between childhood sexual abuse and adult development is reviewed from an Eriksonian perspective. The problems with studying the developmental effects of childhood sexual abuse are discussed. These include the following problems: the lack of differentiation between sexual abuse cases,…

  11. Sexual function, sexual abuse and sexually transmitted diseases in adolescence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margaret J. Blythe

    2003-01-01

    As adolescents progress through puberty, many biological changes occur and, for young women, this includes the onset of menses and the capability for reproduction. During this time, sexual identity is developed and expressions of sexuality become more frequent. Adolescent women engage in a variety of sexual behaviours, both non-coital and coital. As teens begin dating relationships, they are at risk

  12. Evaluating the Need for Sex Education in Developing Countries: Sexual Behaviour, Knowledge of Preventing Sexually Transmitted Infections/HIV and Unplanned Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Susheela; Bankole, Akinrinola; Woog, Vanessa

    2005-01-01

    Young people's need for sex education is evidenced by their typically early initiation of sexual activity, the often involuntary context within which they have sexual intercourse, high-risk sexual behaviours and the inadequate levels of knowledge of means of protecting their sexual health. The earliness of initiation of sexual intercourse has…

  13. Estimating the Daily Passage of Juvenile Salmonids at McNary Dam on the Columbia River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert E. Giorgi; Carl W. Sims

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service, under contract to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, monitored the seaward migration of juvenile salmonids through the Snake-Columbia river system from 1973 to 1983. We developed a procedure for estimating the numbers of steelhead Salmo gairdneri and yearling chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha smolts passing McNary Dam each day in 1982-1983. The method utilized

  14. Regulation of sexual development in the basal termite Cryptotermes secundus: mutilation, pheromonal manipulation or honest signal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korb, Judith

    2005-01-01

    Social insect colonies are not the harmonious entities they were once considered. Considerable conflicts exist between colony members, as has been shown for Hymenoptera. For termites, similar studies are lacking, but aggressive manipulations have been claimed to regulate sexual development, and even to account for the evolution of workers. This study on a basal termite, Cryptotermes secundus (Kalotermitidae), suggests that the importance of aggressive manipulations in termites has been overemphasized. Wing-bud mutilations, a means proposed to regulate the development of dispersing sexuals (alates), seem to be artifacts of handling conditions that cause disturbance. Aggressive behaviors never occurred unless colonies were disturbed. Theoretical considerations further showed that the potential for intense conflict among termite nestmates is low compared to hymenopteran societies. Strong conflicts are only expected to occur over the replacement of natal reproductives that died, while less intense conflicts should exist over the development into alates when food in the colony becomes limiting. Accordingly, intracolonial aggressive interactions over replacement are common, whereas nestmates seem to manipulate alate development via proctodeal feeding when food resources decline. However, the latter is rather an honest signal than a manipulation because only the most competent prospective dispersers can impede the development of nestmates.

  15. Expression of Dmrt1 in the Genital Ridge of Mouse and Chicken Embryos Suggests a Role in Vertebrate Sexual Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher S. Raymond; Jae R. Kettlewell; Betsy Hirsch; Vivian J. Bardwell; David Zarkower

    1999-01-01

    Sex-determining mechanisms are highly variable between phyla. Only one example has been found in which structurally and functionally related genes control sex determination in different phyla: the sexual regulators mab-3 of Caenorhabditis elegans and doublesex of Drosophila both encode proteins containing the DM domain, a novel DNA-binding motif. These two genes control similar aspects of sexual development, and the male

  16. The Evolution of Sexual Pleasure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Felicia De la Garza-Mercer

    2007-01-01

    Sexual pleasure is an innate component of human sexuality. Although disdained throughout history by religious groups and variably explained by theories, philosophers, and societies, sexual pleasure permeates human experience. Traditional evolutionists explain this preoccupation via the development of sexual mating strategies and the human desire to propagate one's genes; however, here I will argue that the saturation of sexual pleasure

  17. Disorder of Sexual Development and Congenital Heart Defect in 47XYY: Clinical Disorder or Coincidence?

    PubMed Central

    Latrech, Hanane; Skikar, Imane; Gharbi, Mohammed El Hassan; Chraïbi, Abdelmjid; Gaouzi, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background. 47XYY syndrome is a rare sex chromosome variation characterized by an additional Y chromosome. Most patients with 47XYY karyotype have normal phenotype. This disorder seems associated with a higher risk of developing behavioral and cognitive problems, tall stature, and infertility in adulthood. Sexual development disorder is a rare finding. We report a first case with an abnormal left coronary artery originating from the pulmonary artery in a 47XYY patient. Case. A one-month-old child was referred for ectopic testis and micropenis. Physical examination revealed facial dysmorphia, micropenis, and curvature of the penis with nonpalpable testis. Laboratory tests showed decreased total testosterone and anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) levels. Blood karyotyping revealed a 47XYY chromosomal formula. At the age of 3 months, the patient developed dyspnea and tachycardia. Echocardiography revealed an anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery with left ventricular dysfunction requiring surgical revascularization by direct reimplantation of the left coronary artery system. Our second case was a 3-year-old child referred for hypospadias with nonpalpable left testicle. Physical examination showed hypertelorism. Blood karyotyping revealed a 47XYY chromosomal formula. Conclusion. To our knowledge, this is the first case of 47XYY syndrome associated with this congenital heart malformation and a sexual development disorder. PMID:26175918

  18. Housing sexuality: domestic space and the development of female sexuality in the fiction of Angela Carter and Jeanette Winterson

    E-print Network

    Cantrell, Samantha E.

    2005-08-29

    .............................................303 VITA ....................................................312 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Sexuality . . . is never expressed in a vacuum. (Angela Carter, The Sadeian Woman 11) In Art and Lies, Jeanette Winterson?s protagonist Picasso is a young woman... of the attic and then called it a suicide attempt, and her mother manipulates her by expressing her disappointment in Picasso?s unfeminine ways. As Picasso begins the emotional work of recovering from this abuse, Winterson describes her as climbing stairs: ?She...

  19. Testing Geomorphic Controls on Salmonid Spawning Habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, A.; Finnegan, N. J.

    2014-12-01

    The physical architecture of a landscape, as recorded in topography, is a major factor driving the spatial distribution of river habitat within a catchment. For this reason, predictive geomorphic models for fluvial characteristics, particularly grain size, have been suggested as possible contributors to salmonid habitat identification efforts. However, to our knowledge, no work has been done to both implement geomorphic predictions of reach-scale grain size and then test those predictions with salmonid habitat use data. We present a physically-based, empirically calibrated approach to predicting grain size distributions from high resolution LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging)-derived topographic data. This approach builds on previous efforts in that it predicts the full grain size distribution, rather than just median grain size, and incorporates an empirically calibrated shear stress partitioning factor. We use the predicted grain size distributions to calculate the fraction of the bed area movable by salmon of a given size, which we then compare to 7 years of steelhead trout and coho salmon spawning survey data for a 77 km2 watershed along the central California Coast. We find that grain size explains the paucity of spawning in the upper reaches of the drainage, but does not explain variation within the mainstem. In order to explain the residuals in spawning within the mainstem, we turn to the spacing of riffle bedforms. Field surveys of riffle spacing explain 64% of the variation in spawning in these reaches, suggesting that spawning is ultimately limited by the availability of riffles. Because riffle spacing varies systematically with channel width, we show that predicting riffle spacing is feasible with LiDAR data. Taken together, these findings highlight both the value and limitations of a grain-size focused approach to habitat prediction, and suggest that such approaches should be used in concert with predictions of channel bed morphology.

  20. Testosterone is protective in the sexually dimorphic development of arthritis and lung disease in SKG mice

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Rebecca C.; Sokolove, Jeremy; Edelman, Benjamin L.; Lahey, Lauren; Redente, Elizabeth F.; Holers, V. Michael; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Robinson, William H.; Riches, David W.H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis is a sexually dimorphic inflammatory autoimmune disease with both articular and extra-articular disease manifestations including rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD). Low levels of testosterone have been linked to disease severity in men with rheumatoid arthritis and supplemental testosterone has been shown to improve symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis in both postmenopausal women and men with low testosterone. The mechanisms by which sex and sex steroids affect the immune system and autoimmunity are poorly understood. In this study we examined the protective effect of testicular-derived sex hormones on both joint and lung disease development in an autoimmune mouse model. Methods Arthritis prevalence and severity were assessed in female, orchiectomized, sham orchiectomized, and intact male SKG mice over a 12 week period after intraperitoneal injection of zymosan. Lung tissues were evaluated by quantifying: cellular accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage, collagen levels, and histology. An antigen microarray was used to evaluate autoantibody generation in each condition. Results Female SKG mice developed arthritis and lung disease with increased prevalence and severity when compared to intact male mice. The absence of testosterone after orchiectomy led to increased arthritis, lung disease and autoantibody generation in orchiectomized male mice compared to intact male mice. Conclusions SKG mice represent an authentic sexually dimorphic mouse model of both the joint and lung disease seen in rheumatoid arthritis. Testosterone protects against the development of joint and lung disease in male SKG mice. PMID:23529475

  1. sexual Assault sexual Assault

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    sexual Assault sexual Assault if You Are a Victim of a sexual Assault 1. Get to a safe place. 2. Call out for help. 3. DiAl 6111 or ask someone to ring for you and state "sEXUAl AssAUlT" giving exact. if You Witness a sexual Assault 1. Everyone is asked to assist in making the campus a safe place by being

  2. Sexual orientation and consistency of sexual identity.

    PubMed

    McConaghy, N; Armstrong, M S

    1983-08-01

    The semantic confusion in the use of the terms sexual and gender identity and role is discussed. Theories concerning the development of the sense of sexual identity in normals have been based largely on the sense of sexual identity in sexually deviant subjects. It is suggested that such subjects may have a stronger and more consistent sense of sexual identity than subjects unaware of sexually deviant impulses. Male medical students in two consecutive years anonymously completed a questionnaire concerning their sexual orientation, preference, role, and identity. In both years, students aware of a homosexual component answered the items investigating their sexual identity with greater consistency than did the students unaware of a homosexual component. PMID:6639327

  3. Sexual Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Parents can help their adolescent make healthy choices Sexual Health News & Information Understanding Sexual Health Public Health Reports ... infectious diseases, reproductive health and sexual violence prevention. Sexual Health Topics Sexually Transmitted Diseases Up-to-date information ...

  4. Sexual Assault

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sexual Assault Share This Page: Sexual Assault Resources Sexual Assault Sexual assault is a significant problem affecting American ... National Network at 1-800-656-HOPE (4673). Sexual Assault Examinations It is important to know that a ...

  5. Differential invasion success of salmonids in southern Chile: patterns and hypotheses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arismendi, Ivan; Penaluna, Brooke E.; Dunham, Jason B.; García de Leaniz, Carlos; Soto, Doris; Fleming, Ian A.; Gomez-Uchidam, Daniel; Gajardo, Gonzalo; Vargas, Pamela V.; León-Muñoz, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Biological invasions create complex ecological and societal issues worldwide. Most of the knowledge about invasions comes only from successful invaders, but less is known about which processes determine the differential success of invasions. In this review, we develop a framework to identify the main dimensions driving the success and failure of invaders, including human influences, characteristics of the invader, and biotic interactions. We apply this framework by contrasting hypotheses and available evidence to explain variability in invasion success for 12 salmonids introduced to Chile. The success of Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salmo trutta seems to be influenced by a context-specific combination of their phenotypic plasticity, low ecosystem resistance, and propagule pressure. These well-established invaders may limit the success of subsequently introduced salmonids, with the possible exception of O. tshawytscha, which has a short freshwater residency and limited spatial overlap with trout. Although propagule pressure is high for O. kisutch and S. salar due to their intensive use in aquaculture, their lack of success in Chile may be explained by environmental resistance, including earlier spawning times than in their native ranges, and interactions with previously established and resident Rainbow Trout. Other salmonids have also failed to establish, and they exhibit a suite of ecological traits, environmental resistance, and limited propagule pressure that are variably associated with their lack of success. Collectively, understanding how the various drivers of invasion success interact may explain the differential success of invaders and provide key guidance for managing both positive and negative outcomes associated with their presence.

  6. Child Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... noncontact abuse, such as exposure, voyeurism, and child pornography. Sexually abused children may also develop the following: ... in drawings, games, fantasies unusual aggressiveness, or suicidal behavior Child sexual abusers can make the child very ...

  7. Reproductive and sexual behaviour development of dam or artificially reared male lambs.

    PubMed

    Damián, Juan Pablo; Beracochea, Florencia; Hötzel, Maria José; Banchero, Georgget; Ungerfeld, Rodolfo

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if artificially reared male lambs differ from those reared by their mothers in their reproductive development and sexual behaviour during the first breeding season and in their serum testosterone to a GnRH challenge at the end of the first breeding season. Lambs were assigned to two experimental groups: 1) artificially reared lambs, separated from their dams 24-36h after birth (Week 0) and fed sheep milk until 10weeks of age (group AR, n=14); and 2) lambs reared by their dams until 10weeks of age (group DR, n=13). Reproductive parameters and sexual behaviour were recorded from Weeks 9 to 39. The GnRH challenge was performed on Week 40. Body weight, scrotal circumference, gonado-somatic index, testosterone concentration and sperm parameters were unaffected by group, but increased with age (P<0.0001). Lambs reared by their mothers had greater values of gonado-somatic index on Weeks 9, 16 and 19 (P<0.05), and tended to reach puberty earlier than AR (22.9±0.7 vs. 25.1±1.1weeks, respectively, P=0.087). Lambs reared by their mothers presented more lateral approaches and mount attempts than AR (P<0.05), and DR lambs presented more mounts on Weeks 32 and 39 than AR (P<0.05). Blood testosterone concentrations 3.5 and 4h after the GnRH challenge were higher in AR than in DR lambs (P<0.05). In conclusion mother rearing promoted sexual behaviour and reproductive performance of male lambs. PMID:25846838

  8. Language choice and sexual communication among Xhosa speakers in Cape Town, South Africa: implications for HIV prevention message development

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Demetria; Schensul, Stephen; Mlobeli, Regina

    2011-01-01

    Communicating about sex is a vital component of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention and influences how HIV educators convey messages to communities and how couples negotiate safer sex practices. However, sexual communication inevitably confronts culturally based behavioral guidelines and linguistic taboos unique to diverse social contexts. The HIV interventionist needs to identify the appropriate language for sexual communication given the participants and the message. Ethnographic research can help facilitate the exploration of how sex terminology is chosen. A theoretical framework, developed to guide HIV interventionists, suggests that an individual's language choice for sexual communication is influenced by gender roles and power differentials. In-depth interviews, free listing and triadic comparisons were conducted with Xhosa men and women in Cape Town, South Africa, to determine the terms for male genitalia, female genitalia and sexual intercourse that are most appropriate for sexual communication. Results showed that sexual terms express cultural norms and role expectations where men should be powerful and resilient and women should be passive and virginal. For HIV prevention education, non-mother tongue (English and Zulu) terms were recommended as most appropriate because they are descriptive, but allow the speaker to communicate outside the restrictive limits of their mother tongue by reducing emotive cultural connotations. PMID:21059802

  9. Sexual development of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is induced by zinc or iron limitation through Ecl1 family genes.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Hokuto; Ishida, Maiko; Naito, Chikako; Murakami, Hiroshi; Aiba, Hirofumi

    2015-02-01

    Ecl1 family genes (ecl1 (+), ecl2 (+), and ecl3 (+)) have been identified as extenders of the chronological lifespan in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we found that the triple-deletion mutant (?ecl1/2/3) had a defect in sexual development after entry into the stationary phase, although the mutant essentially showed normal mating and sporulation under nitrogen starvation or carbon limitation. In this study, we showed that limitation of zinc or iron can be a signal for sexual development of S. pombe cells grown in Edinburgh minimal medium until the stationary phase and that Ecl1 family genes are important for this process. Because the ?ecl1/2/3 mutant diminishes the zinc depletion-dependent gene expression, Ecl1 family proteins may function as zinc sensors in the process of sexual development. PMID:25204792

  10. Abnormalities of Sexual Development in Male Rats with in Utero and Lactational Exposure to the Antiandrogenic Plasticizer Di(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert W. Moore; Thomas A. Rudy; Tien-Min Lin; Kinarm Ko; Richard E. Peterson

    Several members of the phthalate ester family have antiandrogenic properties, yet little is known about how exposure to these ubiquitous environmental contaminants early in development may affect sexual development. We conducted experiments to determine effects of in utero and lacta- tional exposure to the most prevalent phthalate ester, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), on male reproductive system development and sexual behavior. Sprague-Dawley

  11. Sexually dimorphic expression of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) in developing gonads of the American bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Loretta P. Mayer; Stefanie L. Overstreet; Cheryl A. Dyer; Catherine R. Propper

    2002-01-01

    Genetic sex determination leads to gonadal differentiation and ultimately the differences between the sexes in steroid hormone secretion. Gonadal steroidogenesis is critical for the development of a sexually dimorphic phenotype and adult reproductive function. Control of gonadal development and steroidogenesis is under the regulation, at least in part, of steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1). We have begun to characterize SF-1 expression in

  12. Resilience in community: a social ecological development model for young adult sexual minority women.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Lindsey; Darnell, Doyanne A; Rhew, Isaac C; Lee, Christine M; Kaysen, Debra

    2015-03-01

    Family support and rejection are associated with health outcomes among sexual minority women (SMW). We examined a social ecological development model among young adult SMW, testing whether identity risk factors or outness to family interacted with family rejection to predict community connectedness and collective self-esteem. Lesbian and bisexual women (N = 843; 57% bisexual) between the ages of 18-25 (M = 21.4; SD = 2.1) completed baseline and 12-month online surveys. The sample identified as White (54.2%), multiple racial backgrounds (16.6%), African American (9.6%) and Asian/Asian American (3.1%); 10.2% endorsed a Hispanic/Latina ethnicity. Rejection ranged from 18 to 41% across family relationships. Longitudinal regression indicated that when outness to family increased, SMW in highly rejecting families demonstrated resilience by finding connections and esteem in sexual minority communities to a greater extent than did non-rejected peers. But, when stigma concerns, concealment motivation, and other identity risk factors increased over the year, high family rejection did not impact community connectedness and SMW reported lower collective self-esteem. Racial minority SMW reported lower community connectedness, but not lower collective self-esteem. Families likely buffer or exacerbate societal risks for ill health. Findings highlight the protective role of LGBTQ communities and normative resilience among SMW and their families. PMID:25572956

  13. ‘Popping the Clutch’: Novel Mechanisms Regulating Sexual Development in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon-Dong; Williamson, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in fungal pathogens such as Cryptococcus provides natural selection and adaptation of the organisms to environmental conditions by allowing beneficial mutations to spread. However, successful mating in these fungi requires a time-critical induction of signaling pheromones when appropriate partners become available. Recently, it has been shown that the fungus uses the transcriptional equivalent of the racing technique: ‘popping the clutch’-- pushing in the clutch pedal, putting the car in gear, revving with the gas pedal and then dropping the clutch pedal to accelerate rapidly. In the same way, Cryptococcus during vegetative growth constitutively matches a high rate of pheromone synthesis with a high rate of degradation to produce repressed levels of transcript. Then, when mating is required, the fungus drops the degradative machinery, resulting in a rapid induction of the pheromone. Pairing with this novel regulatory cycle are a host of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades, cyclic AMP (cAMP) dependent, and calcium-calcineurin signaling pathways that maintain these high rates of pheromone synthesis and prime downstream pathways for an effective mating response. The intersection of a number of virulence-associated traits with sexual development such as the synthesis of an immune-disruptive laccase as well as a protective polysaccharide capsule makes these rapid regulatory strategies a formidable foe in the battle against human disease. PMID:21912854

  14. Resilience in Community: A Social Ecological Development Model for Young Adult Sexual Minority Women

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Lindsey; Darnell, Doyanne A.; Rhew, Isaac C.; Lee, Christine M.; Kaysen, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Family support and rejection are associated with health outcomes among sexual minority women (SMW). We examined a social ecological development model among young adult SMW, testing whether identity risk factors or outness to family interacted with family rejection to predict community connectedness and collective self-esteem. Lesbian and bisexual women (N = 843; 57% bisexual) between the ages of 18–25 (M = 21.4; SD = 2.1) completed baseline and 12-month online surveys. The sample identified as White (54.2%), multiple racial backgrounds (16.6%), African American (9.6%) and Asian/Asian American (3.1%); 10.2% endorsed a Hispanic/Latina ethnicity. Rejection ranged from 18–41% across family relationships. Longitudinal regression indicated that when outness to family increased, SMW in highly rejecting families demonstrated resilience by finding connections and esteem in sexual minority communities to a greater extent than did non-rejected peers. But, when stigma concerns, concealment motivation, and other identity risk factors increased over the year, high family rejection did not impact community connectedness and SMW reported lower collective self-esteem. Racial minority SMW reported lower community connectedness, but not lower collective self-esteem. Families likely buffer or exacerbate societal risks for ill health. Findings highlight the protective role of LGBTQ communities and normative resilience among SMW and their families. PMID:25572956

  15. 'Popping the clutch': novel mechanisms regulating sexual development in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoon-Dong; Williamson, Peter R

    2012-06-01

    Sexual reproduction in fungal pathogens such as Cryptococcus provides natural selection and adaptation of the organisms to environmental conditions by allowing beneficial mutations to spread. However, successful mating in these fungi requires a time-critical induction of signaling pheromones when appropriate partners become available. Recently, it has been shown that the fungus uses the transcriptional equivalent of the racing technique: 'popping the clutch'-pushing in the clutch pedal, putting the car in gear, revving with the gas pedal, and then dropping the clutch pedal to accelerate rapidly. In the same way, Cryptococcus during vegetative growth constitutively matches a high rate of pheromone synthesis with a high rate of degradation to produce repressed levels of transcript. Then, when mating is required, the fungus drops the degradative machinery, resulting in a rapid induction of the pheromone. Pairing with this novel regulatory cycle is a host of mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades, cyclic AMP-dependent, and calcium-calcineurin signaling pathways that maintain these high rates of pheromone synthesis and prime downstream pathways for an effective mating response. The intersection of a number of virulence-associated traits with sexual development such as the synthesis of an immune-disruptive laccase as well as a protective polysaccharide capsule makes these rapid regulatory strategies a formidable foe in the battle against human disease. PMID:21912854

  16. Influences of Stocking Salmon Carcass Analogs on Salmonids in Yakima River Tributaries, 2001-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-04-01

    The benefits that marine derived nutrients from adult salmon carcasses provide to juvenile salmonids are increasingly being recognized. Current estimates suggest that only 6-7% of marine-derived nitrogen and phosphorus that were historically available to salmonids in the Pacific Northwest are currently available. Food limitation may be a major constraint limiting the restoration of salmonids. A variety of methods have been proposed to offset this nutrient deficit including: allowing greater salmon spawning escapement, stocking hatchery salmon carcasses, and stocking inorganic nutrients. Unfortunately, each of these methods has some ecological or socio-economic shortcoming. We intend to overcome many of these shortcomings by making and evaluating a pathogen free product that simulates a salmon carcass (analog). Abundant sources of marine derived nutrients are available such as fish offal from commercial fishing and salmon carcasses from hatcheries. However, a method for recycling these nutrients into a pathogen free analog that degrades at a similar rate as a natural salmon carcass has never been developed. We endeavored to (1) develop a salmon carcass analog that will increase the food available to salmonids, (2) determine the pathways that salmonids use to acquire food from analogs, and (3) determine the benefits to salmonids and the potential for application to salmonid restoration. We used a before-after-control-impact-paired design in six tributaries of the upper Yakima basin to determine the utility of stocking carcass analogs. Our preliminary results suggest that the introduction of carcass analogs into food-limited streams can be used to restore food pathways previously provided by anadromous salmon. The analogs probably reproduced both of the major food pathways that salmon carcasses produce: direct consumption and food chain enhancement. Trout and salmon fed directly on the carcass analogs during the late summer and presumably benefited from the increased invertebrate biomass later in the year. Future reports will analyze whether any benefits are statistically detectable. The risks of using carcass analogs also appear to be low. Pathogens appear to be killed in the manufacturing process of the analogs. In addition, preliminary results suggest that fish exposed to the analogs did not have higher incidences of pathogens. The water quality was also not degraded by the analog additions with the exception of a temporary surface film. Finally, our anecdotal observations, suggested that there was not an increase in the number of predators during the first year of analog distribution. In summary, the risks of analog placement appear to be low but the benefits appear to be high. All results should be considered preliminary until further analyses and field work are conducted.

  17. Human Sexuality: Responsible Life Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, Verdene; Smith, Peggy B.

    This book provides a complete course in human sexuality. It can also be used to supplement a family living course. Text content provides current information for teaching high school students about sexuality issues. The text offers basic information on growth and development, sexual development, pregnancy, and birth. It explains the sexual decision…

  18. Preliminary development of a scale to measure stigma relating to sexually transmitted infections among women in a high risk neighbourhood

    PubMed Central

    Rusch, Melanie LA; Shoveller, Jean A; Burgess, Susan; Stancer, Karen; Patrick, David M; Tyndall, Mark W

    2008-01-01

    Background As stigma is a socially constructed concept, it would follow that stigma related to sexual behaviours and sexually transmitted infections would carry with it many of the gender-based morals that are entrenched in social constructs of sexuality. In many societies, women tend to be judged more harshly with respect to sexual morals, and would therefore have a different experience of stigma related to sexual behaviours as compared to men. While a variety of stigma scales exist for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in general; none incorporate these female-specific aspects. The objective of this study was to develop a scale to measure the unique experience of STI-related stigma among women. Methods A pool of items was identified from qualitative and quantitative literature on sexual behaviour and STIs among women. Women attending a social evening program at a local community health clinic in a low-income neighbourhood with high prevalence of substance use were passively recruited to take part in a cross-sectional structured interview, including questions on sexual behaviour, sexual health and STI-related stigma. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify stigma scales, and descriptive statistics were used to assess the associations of demographics, sexual and drug-related risk behaviours with the emerging scales. Results Three scales emerged from exploratory factor analysis – female-specific moral stigma, social stigma (judgement by others) and internal stigma (self-judgement) – with alpha co-efficients of 0.737, 0.705 and 0.729, respectively. In this population of women, internal stigma and social stigma carried higher scores than female-specific moral stigma. Aboriginal ethnicity was associated with higher internal and female-specific moral stigma scores, while older age (>30 years) was associated with higher female-specific moral stigma scores. Conclusion Descriptive statistics indicated an important influence of culture and age on specific types of stigma. Quantitative researchers examining STI-stigma should consider incorporating these female-specific factors in order to tailor scales for women. PMID:19021915

  19. Identification of de novo copy number variants associated with human disorders of sexual development.

    PubMed

    Tannour-Louet, Mounia; Han, Shuo; Corbett, Sean T; Louet, Jean-Francois; Yatsenko, Svetlana; Meyers, Lindsay; Shaw, Chad A; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lamb, Dolores J

    2010-01-01

    Disorders of sexual development (DSD), ranging in severity from genital abnormalities to complete sex reversal, are among the most common human birth defects with incidence rates reaching almost 3%. Although causative alterations in key genes controlling gonad development have been identified, the majority of DSD cases remain unexplained. To improve the diagnosis, we screened 116 children born with idiopathic DSD using a clinically validated array-based comparative genomic hybridization platform. 8951 controls without urogenital defects were used to compare with our cohort of affected patients. Clinically relevant imbalances were found in 21.5% of the analyzed patients. Most anomalies (74.2%) evaded detection by the routinely ordered karyotype and were scattered across the genome in gene-enriched subtelomeric loci. Among these defects, confirmed de novo duplication and deletion events were noted on 1p36.33, 9p24.3 and 19q12-q13.11 for ambiguous genitalia, 10p14 and Xq28 for cryptorchidism and 12p13 and 16p11.2 for hypospadias. These variants were significantly associated with genitourinary defects (P?=?6.08×10(-12)). The causality of defects observed in 5p15.3, 9p24.3, 22q12.1 and Xq28 was supported by the presence of overlapping chromosomal rearrangements in several unrelated patients. In addition to known gonad determining genes including SRY and DMRT1, novel candidate genes such as FGFR2, KANK1, ADCY2 and ZEB2 were encompassed. The identification of risk germline rearrangements for urogenital birth defects may impact diagnosis and genetic counseling and contribute to the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of human sexual development. PMID:21048976

  20. The sexual consent scale-revised: development, reliability, and preliminary validity.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Terry P; Brousseau, Mélanie M

    2010-09-01

    The Sexual Consent Scale-Revised (SCS-R) measures an individual's beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors with respect to how sexual consent should be and is negotiated between sexual partners. This study extends previous research on sexual consent by revising a scale using the Theory of Planned Behavior (Ajzen, 1991, 2001, 2005) as its theoretical foundation. The psychometric properties of the SCS-R were established using factor analysis, construct validity tests, as well as internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Five factors emerged: perceived behavioral control, positive attitude toward establishing consent, sexual consent norms, indirect consent behaviors, and awareness of consent. Results indicated that the SCS-R can be useful for examining a variety of research questions relating to sexual consent. PMID:19685367

  1. Interspecies Synchrony in Salmonid Densities Associated with Large-Scale Bioclimatic Conditions in Central Idaho

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy Copeland; Kevin A. Meyer

    2011-01-01

    The abundance of lotic salmonids varies substantially through time, but the extent to which several sympatric species respond coherently to large-scale bioclimatic conditions has rarely been investigated for freshwater fishes. We compared correlations in salmonid density in central Idaho and examined the relationships between changes in salmonid density and the variation in large-scale bioclimatic conditions as indexed by stream flow,

  2. Sexual development and reproductive demography of the green humphead parrotfish ( Bolbometopon muricatum) in the Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, R. J.; Adams, S.; Choat, J. H.

    2008-03-01

    An investigation of the reproductive biology of the green humphead parrotfish ( Bolbometopon muricatum) from three areas in the Western Province of the Solomon Islands revealed that B. muricatum exhibits several features that differ from the pattern of reproductive development observed in most parrotfishes. Unlike most parrotfishes, histological evidence suggests that the sexual pattern of B. muricatum is essentially gonochoristic with high incidences of anatomical but non-functional hermaphroditism. B. muricatum also differs from other parrotfishes in that all males pass through an immature female (or bisexual) phase as demonstrated by all adult testis retaining the ex-ovarian lumen and peripheral sperm sinuses in the gonad wall. However, a protogynous diandric reproductive strategy cannot be excluded given that sampling may have missed transitional individuals. Marked variation in the demography of male B. muricatum between the three locations examined is considered to reflect variation in historical fishing effort.

  3. Partial urorectal septum malformation sequence in a kitten with disorder of sexual development.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Brice S; Pain, Amélie; Meynaud-Collard, Patricia; Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; Szczerbal, Izabela; Switonski, Marek; Chastant-Maillard, Sylvie

    2014-12-01

    A 2-month-old kitten exhibited simultaneously an imperforate anus, hypospadias, rectourethral fistula and genital dysgenesis (penis restricted to the glans, absence of prepuce and bifid scrotum). Surgical correction consisted of separation of the urinary and digestive tracts, perineal urethrostomy and connection of the rectum to the newly made anal opening. Pathological examination of the testes, conventionally removed at 9 months of age, showed no mature spermatozoa and underdevelopment of germ and Leydig cells. In humans, the absence of an anal opening in association with abnormal sexual development defines the urorectal septum malformation sequence. Here, we describe the first case of this syndrome in a kitten with a normal male karyotype (38,XY) and a normal coding sequence for the SRY gene. Both the rectourethral fistula and observed genital abnormalities might have been induced by a disturbance in the hedgehog signalling pathway. However, although four polymorphic sites were identified by DHH gene sequencing, none cosegregated with the malformation. PMID:24718294

  4. Role of Tec1 in the development, architecture, and integrity of sexual biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Karla J; Srikantha, Thyagarajan; Pujol, Claude; Park, Yang-Nim; Soll, David R

    2015-03-01

    MTL-homozygous ( A: / A: or ?/?) white cells form a complex sexual biofilm that exhibits the same architecture as that of MTL-heterozygous ( A: /?) pathogenic biofilms. However, the former is regulated by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway, while the latter is regulated by the Ras1/cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway. We previously demonstrated that in the formation of an MTL-homozygous, mature (48 h) sexual biofilm in RPMI 1640 medium, the MAP kinase pathway targets Tec1 rather than Cph1, the latter of which is the target of the same pathway, but for the opaque cell mating response. Here we continued our analysis of the role of Tec1 by comparing the effects of deleting TEC1 on initial adhesion to silicone elastomer, high-resolution confocal microscopy assessments of the stages and cellular phenotypes during the 48 h of biofilm development, human white cell penetration, and biofilm fragility. We show that although Tec1 plays only a minor role in initial adhesion to the silicone elastomer, it does play a major role in the growth of the basal yeast cell polylayer, vertical extension of hyphae and matrix deposition in the upper portion of the biofilm, final biofilm thickness, penetrability of human white blood cells, and final biofilm integrity (i.e., resistance to fluid flow). These results provide a more detailed description of normal biofilm development and architecture and confirm the central role played by the transcription factor Tec1 in the biofilm model employed here. PMID:25556183

  5. Salmonid gill bacteria and their relationship to amoebic gill disease.

    PubMed

    Bowman, J P; Nowak, B

    2004-08-01

    16S ribosomal RNA gene analysis was used to assess the bacterial community associated with Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., gills which were either affected by amoebic gill disease (AGD) or were AGD-negative, in order to determine the role that bacteria may play in the development of AGD. AGD-positive specimens were either infected in the laboratory with Neoparamoeba pemaquidensis, the causative agent of AGD, or were obtained from commercial salmon cages. Samples from laboratory fish maintained in sea water possessed a marine-type community while field samples which had been treated by a series of freshwater baths possessed a more diverse community which included variable proportions of different bacterial ecotypes, including groups typically associated with soil, skin surfaces and faeces. Samples from fish infected with AGD in the laboratory and a sample from one of two salmon cage fish specimens were dominated by a phylotype belonging to the strictly marine bacterial genus Psychroserpens (family Flavobacteriaceae, phylum Bacteroidetes). The phylotype was not detected in any of the AGD-negative samples or in one of two AGD-positive samples obtained from fish subjected to temporary freshwater immersion. The possibility of certain Psychroserpens species as potential opportunistic pathogens associated with salmonid AGD is proposed. PMID:15291790

  6. Safe-sex belief and sexual risk behaviours among adolescents from three developing countries: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Alfonso; Lopez-del Burgo, Cristina; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Carlos, Silvia; de Irala, Jokin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study intends to evaluate whether the belief that condoms are 100% effective in protecting against HIV infection is associated with sexual risk behaviours among youth. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in representative samples of high-school students in the Philippines, El Salvador and Peru. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire. Students were asked about the risk of HIV transmission if one has sex using condoms. They were also asked to indicate whether they had ever had sexual relations and whether they used a condom in their first sexual relation. The sample was composed of 8994 students, aged 13–18. Results One out of seven adolescents believed condoms are 100% effective (safe-sex believers). Those adolescents were 82% more likely to have had sex than those without such belief, after adjusting for confounders (OR=1.82; 95% CI 1.51 to 2.21). On the contrary, no association was found between risk perception and condom use. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses produced similar results. Conclusions This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study conducted specifically to evaluate this phenomenon and that has used the same questionnaire and the same data collection protocol in three different developing countries from Asia, Central and South America. These results reasonably suggest that there could be an association between safe sex beliefs and sexual initiation. Longitudinal studies are needed to better understand this possible association as it could influence how to better promote sexual health. PMID:25916489

  7. Power through Choices: The Development of a Sexuality Education Curriculum for Youths in Out-of-Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Marla G.; Barth, Richard P.

    2000-01-01

    Profiles the development and characteristics of the Power Through Choices curriculum designed to prevent adolescent pregnancy, HIV infection, and sexually transmitted diseases among out-of-home care adolescents. Highlights a 1997 evaluation of the curriculum's implementation, which found that students in the program responded positively to the…

  8. ISBE Newsletter, Vol. 21(1) May 2009 Workshop review of: Gender perspectives on the development of sexual

    E-print Network

    Lindenfors, Patrik

    ISBE Newsletter, Vol. 21(1) May 2009 11 Workshop review of: Gender perspectives on the development skepticism towards gender-issues, I found the workshop extremely fruitful. I feel that my view of sexual the workshop." (Feedback from a workshop participant) What is a gender perspective? Our colleagues have asked

  9. Different Patterns of Sexual Identity Development over Time: Implications for the Psychological Adjustment of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youths

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margaret Rosario; Eric W. Schrimshaw; Joyce Hunter

    2010-01-01

    Despite research documenting variability in the sexual identity development of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youths, it remains unclear whether different developmental patterns have implications for the psychological adjustment of LGB youths. This report longitudinally examines whether different patterns of LGB identity formation and integration are associated with indicators of psychological adjustment among an ethnically diverse sample of 156 LGB

  10. Uncommonly Good: Exploring How Mass Media May Be a Positive Influence on Young Women's Sexual Health and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, L. Monique; Day, Kyla M.; Epstein, Marina

    2006-01-01

    This chapter discusses several ways in which the media may serve as a positive force in young women's sexual health and development through the information and models they provide and the opportunities they offer for validation and self-expression. (Contains 1 table.)

  11. Relationships of Pubertal Development among Early Adolescents to Sexual and Nonsexual Risk Behaviors and Caregivers' Parenting Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koo, Helen P.; Rose, Allison; Bhaskar, Brinda; Walker, Leslie R.

    2012-01-01

    Using a school-based sample of fifth graders (mean age = 10.38, SD = 0.66) and their parents (N = 408) from Washington, D.C., the authors examine associations of pubertal development with early adolescents' sexual and nonsexual risk behaviors and their caregivers' parenting behaviors and of these risk behaviors with parenting behaviors. Results…

  12. Collaborating with Academic Affairs: The Development of a Sexual Assault Prevention and Counseling Program within an Academic Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeater, Elizabeth A.; Miltenberger, Patricia; Laden, Rita M.; Ellis, Shannon; O'Donohue, William

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the history of a collaboration between an academic department and student affairs on a university campus. Provides details regarding the development and evaluation of a sexual assault prevention and counseling program. Highlights the advantages to this collaboration for both the psychology department and student affairs. Discusses…

  13. Sexual Identity as a Universal Process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank R. Dillon; Roger L. Worthington; Bonnie Moradi

    \\u000a This chapter summarizes advances in current theoretical and empirical literature on sexual identity development. It proposes\\u000a a model of sexual identity that offers a more global (i.e., non-sexual identity group specific) perspective in comparison\\u000a to existing sexual identity group-specific sexual identity models. Attention to commonalities in sexual identity development\\u000a across sexual identity subgroups can offer a more global perspective that

  14. Sexual Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The Most Common Types of Sexual Problems in Older Adults For women, age-related changes due to menopause ... sexual intercourse. How Common are Sexual Problems in Older Adults? Researchers have found that about half of sexually ...

  15. Drug resistance in sea lice: a threat to salmonid aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Aaen, Stian Mørch; Helgesen, Kari Olli; Bakke, Marit Jørgensen; Kaur, Kiranpreet; Horsberg, Tor Einar

    2015-02-01

    Sea lice are copepod ectoparasites with vast reproductive potential and affect a wide variety of fish species. The number of parasites causing morbidity is proportional to fish size. Natural low host density restricts massive parasite dispersal. However, expanded salmon farming has shifted the conditions in favor of the parasite. Salmon farms are often situated near wild salmonid migrating routes, with smolts being particularly vulnerable to sea lice infestation. In order to protect both farmed and wild salmonids passing or residing in the proximity of the farms, several measures are taken. Medicinal treatment of farmed fish has been the most predictable and efficacious, leading to extensive use of the available compounds. This has resulted in drug-resistant parasites occurring on farmed and possibly wild salmonids. PMID:25639521

  16. Heterochronic expression of sexual reproductive programs during apomictic development in Tripsacum.

    PubMed Central

    Grimanelli, Daniel; García, Marcelina; Kaszas, Etienne; Perotti, Enrico; Leblanc, Olivier

    2003-01-01

    Some angiosperms reproduce by apomixis, a natural way of cloning through seeds. Apomictic plants bypass both meiosis and egg cell fertilization, producing progeny that are genetic replicas of the mother plant. In this report, we analyze reproductive development in Tripsacum dactyloides, an apomictic relative of maize, and in experimental apomictic hybrids between maize and Tripsacum. We show that apomictic reproduction is characterized by an alteration of developmental timing of both sporogenesis and early embryo development. The absence of female meiosis in apomictic Tripsacum results from an early termination of female meiosis. Similarly, parthenogenetic development of a maternal embryo in apomicts results from precocious induction of early embryogenesis events. We also show that male meiosis in apomicts is characterized by comparable asynchronous expression of developmental stages. Apomixis thus results in an array of possible phenotypes, including wild-type sexual development. Overall, our observations suggest that apomixis in Tripsacum is a heterochronic phenotype; i.e., it relies on a deregulation of the timing of reproductive events, rather than on the alteration of a specific component of the reproductive pathway. PMID:14668399

  17. A salmonid EST genomic study: genes, duplications, phylogeny and microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Koop, Ben F; von Schalburg, Kristian R; Leong, Jong; Walker, Neil; Lieph, Ryan; Cooper, Glenn A; Robb, Adrienne; Beetz-Sargent, Marianne; Holt, Robert A; Moore, Richard; Brahmbhatt, Sonal; Rosner, Jamie; Rexroad, Caird E; McGowan, Colin R; Davidson, William S

    2008-01-01

    Background Salmonids are of interest because of their relatively recent genome duplication, and their extensive use in wild fisheries and aquaculture. A comprehensive gene list and a comparison of genes in some of the different species provide valuable genomic information for one of the most widely studied groups of fish. Results 298,304 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from Atlantic salmon (69% of the total), 11,664 chinook, 10,813 sockeye, 10,051 brook trout, 10,975 grayling, 8,630 lake whitefish, and 3,624 northern pike ESTs were obtained in this study and have been deposited into the public databases. Contigs were built and putative full-length Atlantic salmon clones have been identified. A database containing ESTs, assemblies, consensus sequences, open reading frames, gene predictions and putative annotation is available. The overall similarity between Atlantic salmon ESTs and those of rainbow trout, chinook, sockeye, brook trout, grayling, lake whitefish, northern pike and rainbow smelt is 93.4, 94.2, 94.6, 94.4, 92.5, 91.7, 89.6, and 86.2% respectively. An analysis of 78 transcript sets show Salmo as a sister group to Oncorhynchus and Salvelinus within Salmoninae, and Thymallinae as a sister group to Salmoninae and Coregoninae within Salmonidae. Extensive gene duplication is consistent with a genome duplication in the common ancestor of salmonids. Using all of the available EST data, a new expanded salmonid cDNA microarray of 32,000 features was created. Cross-species hybridizations to this cDNA microarray indicate that this resource will be useful for studies of all 68 salmonid species. Conclusion An extensive collection and analysis of salmonid RNA putative transcripts indicate that Pacific salmon, Atlantic salmon and charr are 94–96% similar while the more distant whitefish, grayling, pike and smelt are 93, 92, 89 and 86% similar to salmon. The salmonid transcriptome reveals a complex history of gene duplication that is consistent with an ancestral salmonid genome duplication hypothesis. Genome resources, including a new 32 K microarray, provide valuable new tools to study salmonids. PMID:19014685

  18. Development of the Sexual Sensation-Seeking Scale for African American Adolescent Women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ralph DiClemente; Robin R. Milhausen; Laura F. Salazar; Joshua Spitalnick; Jessica McDermott Sales; Richard A. Crosby; Sinead N. Younge; Gina M. Wingood

    2010-01-01

    We used data derived from two independent studies to examine the psychometric properties of a new scale to measure adolescents’ willingness to engage in sexual sensation-seeking behavior. In Study 1, the Sexual Sensation-Seeking Scale for Adolescents (SSSA) was administered to a sample of 715 African American adolescents ranging in age from 15 to 21 years. The SSSA demonstrated strong internal

  19. SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT AND BEHAVIOUR ISSUES IN POLISH TEENAGE MAGAzINES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Kopacz

    SummaRy Introduction: Adolescents often look to mass media for information regarding issues of sexuality. As one form of media, teenage magazines have long constituted a pervasive and effective element of adolescent media exposure. Teenage magazines discuss a number of aspects concerning adolescent sexuality. Considering their potential impact on health related behaviors, the information they provide and the message(s) they send

  20. Development of the renal sexual segment in immature snakes: effect of sex steroid hormones

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Randolph W. Krohmer; Dora Martinez; Robert T. Mason

    2004-01-01

    The renal sexual segment (RSS) of immature Northern and Diamondback Water Snakes and Red-Sided Garter Snakes exhibited varying responses to testosterone or 17?-estradiol. In both male and female water snakes, kidney mass was not a reliable indicator of hormone treatment, whereas tubule diameter, epithelial height and number of sexual granules responded to hormone treatment. In male water snakes, either hormone

  1. Development of sexual behavior over several serving capacity tests in male goats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Bradley Imwalle; Larry S. Katz

    2004-01-01

    Results from previous research suggest that male goats, cattle and swine do not require prior sexual experience as juveniles to exhibit their full potential in serving capacity tests as adults. Preliminary data in our laboratory indicate that juvenile goats exhibit profound separation stress from pen mates when acclimating to a novel space, such as during a sexual performance test. Performance

  2. Development of a Clinical Instrument to Record Sexual Aggression in an Inpatient Psychiatric Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Nicole Tuomi; Sheitman, Brian; Hazelrigg, Mark; Carmel, Harold; Williams, Jim; Paesler, Betty

    2007-01-01

    While there are a number of instruments that assess historical factors related to sexual aggression for the purposes of risk assessment, there is a notable absence of measures that assess change in ongoing, sexually aggressive behaviours engaged in by people who reside in psychiatric hospitals. The purpose of this report is to describe the…

  3. Sexual identity development among gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths: consistency and change over time.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W; Hunter, Joyce; Braun, Lisa

    2006-02-01

    A longitudinal report of 156 gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths examined changes in sexual identity over time. Fifty-seven percent of the youths remained consistently self-identified as gay/lesbian, 18% transited from bisexual to gay/lesbian, and 15% consistently identified as bisexual over time. Although youths who consistently identified as gay/lesbian did not differ from other youths on time since experiencing sexual developmental milestones, they reported current sexual orientation and sexual behaviors that were more same-sex centered and they scored higher on aspects of the identity integration process (e.g., more certain, comfortable, and accepting of their same-sex sexuality, more involved in gay-related social activities, more possessing of positive attitudes toward homosexuality, and more comfortable with others knowing about their sexuality) than youths who transited to a gay/lesbian identity and youths who consistently identified as bisexual. Contrary to the hypothesis that females are more sexually fluid than males, female youths were less likely to change identities than male youths. The finding that youths who transited to a gay/lesbian identity differed from consistently gay/lesbian youths suggests that identity integration continues after the adoption of a gay/lesbian sexual identity. PMID:16817067

  4. The Psychological Measurement of Childhood Sexual Development in Western Societies: Methodological Challenges

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hanneke de Graaf; Jany Rademakers

    2011-01-01

    Children can display sexual behavior or have sexual experiences. Different psychological research methods are available for studying these kinds of behaviors and feelings, such as interviewing or observing children (direct methods), asking adolescents or adults to retrospectively report their childhood memories or using intermediaries to observe children (indirect methods). Each of these methods has its own advantages and limitations. Based

  5. Ethical Parenting of Sexually Active Youth: Ensuring Safety While Enabling Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay-Cheng, Laina Y.

    2013-01-01

    The protection of children from harm is commonly accepted as the cardinal duty of parents. In the USA, where young people's sexuality is often regarded with anxiety, attempts to restrict adolescent sexual behaviour are seen as ethically justified and even required of "good" parents. Running counter to popular anxiety surrounding…

  6. Gender, Pubertal Development, and Peer Sexual Harassment Predict Objectified Body Consciousness in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindberg, Sara M.; Grabe, Shelly; Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2007-01-01

    Objectified body consciousness (OBC)--the tendency to view one's body as an object for others to look at and evaluate--is theorized to emerge during sexual maturation as adolescents, particularly adolescent girls, experience sexual objectification. Although OBC generally is discussed in developmental terms, research so far has examined primarily…

  7. The Development of Conventional Sexual Partner Trajectories among African American Male Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Steven M.; Yu, Tianyi; Brody, Gene H.; Allen, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    African American male youth disproportionately report involvement with multiple sexual partners, which increases their risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and initiation of unplanned pregnancies. Little is known about the developmental precursors of sexual partner trajectories among African American male youth. Moreover, few studies focus on the many African American youth who evince highly conventional sexual partner trajectories, i.e., youth who have only one partner or abstain from sexual activity across time. Using four waves of data from a longitudinal study, we hypothesized that an accumulation of social and economic disadvantages in early adolescence would negatively influence youths’ conventional sexual partner trajectories in late adolescence. We expected these disadvantages to affect youths’ receipt of protective family processes and their reports of a set of intrapersonal processes (self-regulation, hope, and low levels of anger) linked to generally conventional behavior. Hypotheses were tested with data from 315 African American male youth from 11 to 18.5 years of age and their primary caregivers. Our results supported the hypotheses. Socioeconomic disadvantages during preadolescence predicted less involvement in conventional sexual partner trajectories from ages 16 to 18.5 years. This association was mediated by protective family processes and a set of interrelated intrapersonal protective processes. Preventive interventions designed to promote protective parenting and intrapersonal processes can be expected to promote sexual behavior trajectories characterized by abstinence or relations with very few partners. PMID:23150103

  8. Treatment of sexual offenders with psychopathic traits: recent research developments and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Abracen, Jeffrey; Looman, Jan; Langton, Calvin M

    2008-07-01

    This article provides a review of recent literature related to the treatment of psychopathy in forensic settings, with particular focus on studies with sexual offenders. The lack of empirical support for the position that psychopaths are untreatable is noted, and data suggesting optimism is discussed. Research demonstrating an interaction between psychopathy and substance abuse and between psychopathy and sexual deviance is also presented. Both substance abuse disorders and inappropriate arousal are frequently encountered in high-risk groups of sexual offenders. These topics are of relevance, in that the question of whether treatment is beneficial with high-risk sexual offenders, including those who are psychopathic, cannot be answered unless groups presenting with typical concurrent disorders (paraphilias, substance abuse, dependence) are discussed. It is argued that, although the evidence is still preliminary, there is reason for optimism with reference to whether psychopathic sexual offenders are responsive to treatment, including offenders presenting with concurrent disorders. PMID:18495937

  9. Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bulllying

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Harassment and Sexual Bullying Print A A A Text Size What's in this article? What Are Sexual ... technology to harass someone sexually (like sending inappropriate text messages, pictures, or videos). Sometimes sexual harassment can ...

  10. Puberty and early sexual development in Libyan fat-tailed ram lambs.

    PubMed

    Madani, M O; Rahal, M S; Zawia, M T; Eluwhaishi, B A

    1989-01-01

    Puberty and early sexual development were studied in 143 Libyan fat-tailed ram lambs, equally representing Brownhead and Blackhead strains of this breed. The two strains did not differ in any of the measured parameters in a consistent way, yet the Brownhead lambs tended to be slightly heavier and to have a slightly larger testis diameter than Blackheads. At the commencement of the observations when the lambs were 69 days old, 25.2% had fully descended testes at a significantly higher (P less than 0.01) mean (SD) body weight (24.1 +/- 4.1 kg) than those with partly descended (69.2%, 15.7 +/- 6.3 kg) or with non-descended testes (5.6%, 19.5 +/- 3.2 kg). Testes development followed a triphasic pattern with an initial and a final phase of slow growth and a middle phase of fast growth, commencing at a weight of 24.5 kg and an age of 85 days and lasting until the weight of 36-43 kg and age of 180-200 days in both strains. The separation of penile adhesions commenced at a mean body weight and age of 33.6 +/- 3.7 kg and 125.5 +/- 27.4 days respectively and was completed at a mean weight and age of 38.3 +/- 4.2 kg and 153.4 +/- 29.9 days. Only four lambs failed to show complete penile separation. Age had little influence on testis descent or on penile development. Puberty was assessed in 71 lambs using sperm recovery following electroejaculation as an end point. Most of these lambs (92.9%) reached puberty at a mean (SD) age of 171.5 (39.9) days, mean body weight of 39.9 (9.3) kg, mean testis diameter of 4.1 (0.4) cm and mean horn length of 21.4 (3.7) cm. Puberal lambs were significantly superior to non-puberal lambs (P less than 0.01) in all these counts except for age which was similar in both categories. Direct testicular observation showed a strong correlation between testis diameter, testis weight, body weight, sperm concentration/g testis weight and to testis histology. Age was poorly correlated to testis weight, histology or sperm concentration. It is concluded that the body weight is a major determinant of puberty in this breed. It is also considered that the two strains of the breed are remarkably similar in the studied aspects of puberty and sexual development. PMID:2736384

  11. Transition from pediatric to adult surgery care for patients with disorders of sexual development.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Kate A; Fallat, Mary E

    2015-04-01

    Disorders of sexual development (DSDs) are relatively rare congenital conditions in which the development of the chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomic sex is atypical. Some conditions may not manifest until puberty or adulthood. The examination and workup of either an infant or an older patient with suspected DSD should be directed and performed systematically by a multidisciplinary team. Ideally, the team will include those with not only an interest in DSD but also experience with this group of patients. This article will briefly orient the reader to the conditions and decisions that may have been made during infancy, childhood, and adolescence and then focus on the challenges that may accompany transitioning the care of DSD patients from pediatric to adult surgeons and specialists to enable appropriate decisions and care. The actual transition will optimally involve a well-developed action plan that will take place gradually over a number of years as the person becomes educated about their condition and empowered to participate knowingly and actively in their own care. PMID:25770370

  12. Predicting Different Patterns of Sexual Identity Development Over Time Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youths: A Cluster Analytic Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margaret Rosario; Eric W. Schrimshaw; Joyce Hunter

    2008-01-01

    Recent research has suggested that the sexual identity development of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youths may not follow\\u000a a single pattern, but may follow a variety of pathways. Although some research documenting variability in identity development\\u000a exists, unclear are the potential individual and social contexts that predict these different patterns, as well as the contexts\\u000a that predict changes in

  13. F-actin distribution and function during sexual development in Eimeria maxima.

    PubMed

    Frölich, Sonja; Wallach, Michael

    2015-06-01

    To determine the involvement of the actin cytoskeleton in macrogametocyte growth and oocyst wall formation, freshly purified macrogametocytes and oocysts were stained with Oregon Green 514 conjugated phalloidin to visualize F-actin microfilaments, while Evans blue staining was used to detect type 1 wall forming bodies (WFB1s) and the outer oocyst wall. The double-labelled parasites were then analysed at various stages of sexual development using three-dimensional confocal microscopy. The results showed F-actin filaments were distributed throughout the entire cytoplasm of mature Eimeria maxima macrogametocytes forming a web-like meshwork of actin filaments linking the type 1 WFBs together into structures resembling 'beads on a string'. At the early stages of oocyst wall formation, F-actin localization changed in alignment with the egg-shaped morphology of the forming oocysts with F-actin microfilaments making direct contact with the WFB1s. In tissue oocysts, the labelled actin cytoskeleton was situated underneath the forming outer layer of the oocyst wall. Treatment of macrogametocytes in vitro with the actin depolymerizing agents, Cytochalasin D and Latrunculin, led to a reduction in the numbers of mature WFB1s in the cytoplasm of the developing macrogametocytes, indicating that the actin plays an important role in WFB1 transport and oocyst wall formation in E. maxima. PMID:25800683

  14. Original article Composition of the ovarian fluid in 4 salmonid

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Composition of the ovarian fluid in 4 salmonid species: Oncorhynchus mykiss, Salmo ― The ovarian fluid of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), charr (Salvelinus alpinus), lake trout-phosphate dehydrogenase and a-glucosidases activities. ovarian fluid composition / Oncorhynchus mykiss

  15. Detection of Myxobolus (Myxosoma) cerebralis in Salmonid Fishes in Oregon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. V. Lorz; A. Amandi; C. R. Banner; J. S. Rohovec

    1989-01-01

    Myxobolus (Myxosoma) cerebralis, the etiological agent of whirling disease, was detected in salmonid fish populations in northeastern Oregon. This is the first record of M. cerebralis in the Pacific Northwest of the USA. During an epizootiological survey for the parasite, two methods for spore detection were compared, and an efficient procedure for determining M. cerebralis infection in adult fish was

  16. FURUNCULOSIS OF SALMONIDS : VACCINATION ATTEMPTS IN RAINBOW TROUT

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    FURUNCULOSIS OF SALMONIDS : VACCINATION ATTEMPTS IN RAINBOW TROUT (SALMO GAIRDNERI) BY FORMALIN early days. We give an account of two immunisation assays #12;carried out in 1976 and 1977 on rainbow of the Seine-Maritime with no previous history of Furunculosis, was carried out on 200 g rainbow trout. Six

  17. Rainmap Database: Mapping the Salmonids (Rainbow Trout) Genome

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Institut National de Recherche Agronomique (France) provides online databases of genomes for several organisms, including Salmonids (Rainbow Trout). The database is updated as more data becomes available, and provide records on loci, genes, microsatellites, polymorphisms, probes, enzymes, homologue loci, alleles, primers, references, and links to external databases. Instructions for submitting data to the databases are provided on-site.

  18. A salmonid EST genomic study: genes, duplications, phylogeny and microarrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Salmonids are of interest because of their relatively recent genome duplication, and their extensive use in wild fisheries and aquaculture. A comprehensive gene list and a comparison of genes in some of the different species provide valuable genomic information for one of the most wide...

  19. Defects in androgen biosynthesis causing 46,XY disorders of sexual development.

    PubMed

    Auchus, Richard J; Miller, Walter L

    2012-10-01

    At least one genetic defect in each reaction of the classical androgen biosynthesis pathway has been described. For some steps, such as the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone and the 17,20-lyase reaction, two or three genetic defects cause similar disorders with overlapping phenotypes and biochemical profiles. The elucidation of the molecular basis for these diseases has helped to define the pathways, essential genes, and enzymatic steps required to make androgens, and this knowledge is being exploited to develop better treatments of androgen-dependent diseases. Furthermore the description of nonclassical lipoid CAH and the protean manifestations of P450 oxidoreductase (POR) deficiencies has expanded the spectrum of human disease caused by disordered steroidogenesis. Finally, the recognition of the backdoor pathway to DHT has added a new dimension to our understanding of how steroid flux is maintained in normal and pathologic states. The traditional view of male external genital development has been that fetal testicular testosterone is converted to DHT by 5?-reductase Type 2 in genital skin, which then acts in a paracrine fashion to stimulate fusion of the labio-scrotal folds and phallic growth. This view is consistent with the incomplete external genital development in persons with severe deficiencies of 5?-reductase type 2. The new observations concerning AKR1C2/4 and the backdoor pathway indicate that DHT produced in the testis via the backdoor pathway also acts as a hormone to induce labio-scrotal fusion. Thus, both the classic and backdoor pathways are needed, and DHT acts in male genital development as both a paracrine factor and as a hormone. These surprising findings are revising our understanding of the mechanisms by which male sexual differentiation occurs, and illustrate the importance of detailed studies of rare patients with 46,XY DSD. PMID:23044879

  20. Developing an Assessment of Sexual Identity Management for Lesbian and Gay Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mary Z.; Croteau, James M.; DiStefano, Teresa M.; Chung, Y. Barry

    2001-01-01

    Psychometric properties of the Workplace Sexual Identity Management Measure were tested with 172 professionals. Results suggest it successfully assesses a continuum of lesbian and gay identity management strategies (passing, covering, implicitly out, explicitly out). (Contains 27 references.) (SK)

  1. Influences of Stocking Salmon Carcass Analogs on Salmonids in Klickitat River Tributaries, 2001-2005 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Zendt, Joe; Sharp, Bill (Yakama Nation Fisheries, Toppenish, WA)

    2006-09-01

    This report describes the work completed by the Yakama Nation Fisheries Program (YNFP) in the Klickitat subbasin in south-central Washington under BPA innovative project No.200105500--Influences of stocking salmon carcass analogs on salmonids in Columbia River Tributaries. Salmon carcasses historically provided a significant source of marine-derived nutrients to many stream systems in the Columbia basin, and decreased run sizes have led to a loss of this nutrient source in many streams. Partners in this project developed a pathogen-free carcass analog and stocked the analogs in streams with the following objectives: restoring food availability to streams with reduced anadromous salmon returns; mimicking the natural pathways and timing of food acquisition by salmonids; minimizing unintended negative ecological effects; and increasing the growth and survival of salmonids. In the Klickitat subbasin, carcass analogs were stocked in two streams in 2002 and 2003; a third stream was used as a control. Salmonid fish abundance, growth, and stomach contents were monitored in all three streams before and after carcass analog placement. Fish, invertebrate, and periphyton samples were also collected for stable isotope analysis (to determine if nutrients from carcass analogs were incorporated into the stream food web). Water quality samples were also collected to determine if nutrient overloading occurred in streams. Significant differences in growth were found between fish in treated and untreated stream reaches. Fish in treatment reaches exhibited higher instantaneous growth rates approximately one month after the first carcass analog stocking. Stomach contents sampling indicated that salmonid fish routinely consumed the carcass analog material directly, and that stomach fullness of fish in treatment reaches was higher than in untreated reaches in the first few weeks following carcass analog stockings. No significant differences were detected in fish abundance between treatment and control streams after carcass analog stocking. Stable isotope analysis provided some evidence that nutrients (primarily nitrogen) were incorporated into periphyton and invertebrates, although this evidence is not strong. No significant differences in water quality were observed between treatment and control streams after analog stocking. Although no significant changes were observed in fish abundance, this study does provide evidence that carcass analogs provide a viable and potentially useful alternative to stocking salmon carcasses. The analogs provide a direct food source to salmonids, and show some potential for providing nutrients for stream food webs. They can also increase stomach fullness and growth rates of individual fish. This nutrient source may very well improve individual fish condition sufficiently to improve overwintering or smolt survival. Further refinement of stocking densities and timing, treatment duration, and tailoring analog placement to individual stream characteristics (such as channel confinement and flow) will further improve the usefulness of carcass analogs.

  2. A Meta-Analysis of Risky Sexual Behaviour among Male Youth in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Berhan, Asres

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to assess the association between risky sexual behaviour and level of education and economic status in male youth. Previous tests of the association of risky sexual behaviour with levels of education and economic status have yielded inconsistent results. Using data from 26 countries, from both within and outside Africa, we performed a meta-analysis with a specific focus on male youths' risky sexual behaviour. We applied a random effects analytic model and calculated a pooled odds ratio. Out of 19,148 males aged 15–24 years who reported having sexual intercourse in the 12 months preceding the survey, 75% engaged in higher-risk sex. The proportion of higher-risk sex among male youth aged 15–19 years was nearly 90% in 21 of the 26 countries. The pooled odds ratio showed a statistically significant association of higher-risk sex with male youth younger than 20 years, living in urban centers, well educated, and of a high economic status. The overall proportion of condom use during youths' most recent higher-risk sexual encounter was 40% and 51% among 15–19-year-olds and 20–24-year-olds, respectively. Our findings suggest that male youth's socioeconomic status is directly related to the likelihood that they practice higher-risk sex. The relationship between income and sexual behaviour should be explored further. PMID:25709840

  3. Hormonally-mediated Epigenetic Changes to Steroid Receptors in the Developing Brain: Implications for Sexual Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Nugent, Bridget M.; Schwarz, Jaclyn M.; McCarthy, Margaret M.

    2010-01-01

    The establishment of sex-specific neural morphology, which underlies sex-specific behaviors, occurs during a perinatal sensitive window in which brief exposure to gonadal steroid hormones produces permanent masculinization of the brain. In the rodent, estradiol derived from testicular androgens is a principle organizational hormone. The mechanism by which transient estradiol exposure induces permanent differences in neuronal anatomy has been widely investigated, but remains elusive. Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation, allow environmental influences to alter long-term gene expression patterns and therefore may be a potential mediator of estradiol-induced organization of the neonatal brain. Here we review data that demonstrate sex and estradiol-induced differences in DNA methylation on the estrogen receptor ? (ER?), estrogen receptor ? (ER?), and progesterone receptor (PR) promoters in sexually dimorphic brain regions across development. Contrary to the overarching view of DNA methylation as a permanent modification directly tied to gene expression, these data demonstrate that methylation patterns on steroid hormone receptors change across the life span and do not necessarily predict expression. Although further exploration into the mechanism and significance of estradiol-induced alterations in DNA methylation patterns in the neonatal brain is necessary, these results provide preliminary evidence that epigenetic alterations can occur in response to early hormone exposure and may mediate estradiol-induced organization of sex differences in the neonatal brain. PMID:20800064

  4. Proteomic approaches to sexual development mediated by antheridiogen in the fern Blechnum spicant L.

    PubMed

    Valledor, Luis; Menéndez, Virginia; Canal, María Jesús; Revilla, Angeles; Fernández, Helena

    2014-09-01

    This report is intended to compare proteomic profiles between female and male gametophytes of Blechnum spicant L. For this purpose, female gametophytes were obtained from spores germinated on Murashige and Skoog medium (1962), and the male ones by culturing 30-day-old gametophytes on the same medium supplemented with extract derived from mature gametophytes, which exhibits anteridiogen effect. Proteins were extracted using the phenolic method, and after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, 581 spots were detected in Coomassie stained gels within the 3-11 pH range and 10-100 kDa Mr ranges. Quantitative and qualitative differences in spot intensity between both types of gametophytes were found. The induction of male gametophytes by antheridiogens was correlated to a global increase in stress and defence-related pathways, which affect flavonoid signaling and cell division, while reducing protein biosynthesis, photosynthesis, and other energy-related pathways, reflecting how stressed are the gametophytes during the induction process. This is the first proteomic study that examines proteins associated to sexual development in the gametophyte of the fern B. spìcant. PMID:25044718

  5. Maintaining sexuality in menopause.

    PubMed

    Nappi, Rossella E; Martini, Ellis; Martella, Silvia; Capuano, Francesca; Bosoni, David; Giacomini, Sonia; Beraghi, Matteo; Spinillo, Arsenio

    2014-03-13

    Sexual health in the menopause is a medical challenge because the progressive decline of sexual hormones interacts with the aging process and many psychosocial stressors modulate vulnerability for sexual symptoms (low sexual desire, poor arousal and lubrication, dyspareunia, orgasmic dysfunction and lack of satisfaction). In clinical practice, a coordinated approach is needed to optimally manage the risk for developing female sexual dysfunction (FSD), especially when chronic conditions are present. Biomedical and psychosocial interventions include general education, recognition of signs and symptoms, promotion of health, attention to the partner and individualization of treatment. Counselling to overcome personal and relational difficulties should be always combined with hormonal and non-hormonal strategies to maximize biological signals driving the sexual response. By enhancing women's abilities to cope with sexual changes at midlife, health care providers may significantly optimize healthy aging and partnership. PMID:24879777

  6. Does Atrazine Influence Larval Development and Sexual Differentiation in Xenopus laevis?

    PubMed Central

    Kloas, Werner; Lutz, Ilka; Springer, Timothy; Krueger, Henry; Wolf, Jeff; Holden, Larry; Hosmer, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Debate and controversy exists concerning the potential for the herbicide atrazine to cause gonadal malformations in developing Xenopus laevis. Following review of the existing literature the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency required a rigorous investigation conducted under standardized procedures. X. laevis tadpoles were exposed to atrazine at concentrations of 0.01, 0.1, 1, 25, or 100 ?g/l from day 8 postfertilization (dpf) until completion of metamorphosis or dpf 83, whichever came first. Nearly identical experiments were performed in two independent laboratories: experiment 1 at Wildlife International, Ltd. and experiment 2 at the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB). Both experiments employed optimized animal husbandry procedures and environmental conditions in validated flow-through exposure systems. The two experiments demonstrated consistent survival, growth, and development of X. laevis tadpoles, and all measured parameters were within the expected ranges and were comparable in negative control and atrazine-treated groups. Atrazine, at concentrations up to 100 ?g/l, had no effect in either experiment on the percentage of males or the incidence of mixed sex as determined by histological evaluation. In contrast, exposure of larval X. laevis to 0.2 ?g 17?-estradiol/l as the positive control resulted in gonadal feminization. Instead of an even distribution of male and female phenotypes, percentages of males:females:mixed sex were 19:75:6 and 22:60:18 in experiments 1 and 2, respectively. These studies demonstrate that long-term exposure of larval X. laevis to atrazine at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100 ?g/l does not affect growth, larval development, or sexual differentiation. PMID:19008211

  7. Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathryn Sobocinski; Gary Johnson; Nichole Sather

    2008-01-01

    This document is the first annual report for the study titled 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River'. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the

  8. Impact of the Potholes Reservoir Caspian Tern Breeding Colony on Out-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids in the Mid-Columbia River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christina J. Maranto; Thomas P. Good; Francis K. Wiese; Julia K. Parrish

    2010-01-01

    We examined the foraging behavior and diet of Caspian terns Hydroprogne caspia breeding at Potholes Reservoir, Washington, in 2003, 2005, and 2006, and we developed a bioenergetics model to estimate impacts on juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. from Columbia River stocks. Potholes Reservoir Caspian terns mostly foraged on local fish (68–97% of tern bill loads) rather than traveling to the Columbia

  9. Colonial Waterbird Predation on Juvenile Salmonids Tagged with Passive Integrated Transponders in the Columbia River Estuary: Vulnerability of Different Salmonid Species, Stocks, and Rearing Types

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ken Collis; Daniel D. Roby; David P. Craig; Brad A. Ryan; Richard D. Ledgerwood

    2001-01-01

    Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags implanted in Columbia River basin juvenile salmonids Oncorhyncusspp. were recovered from breeding colonies of Caspian terns Sterna caspia and double-crested cormorants Phalacrocorax aurituson Rice Island, a dredge spoil island in the Columbia River estuary. Tags were recovered to assess the relative vulnerability of different salmonid species, stocks, and rearing types to avian predators. We detected

  10. Colonial Waterbird Predation on Juvenile Salmonids Tagged with Passive Integrated Transponders in the Columbia River Estuary: Vulnerability of Different Salmonid Species, Stocks, and Rearing Types

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ken Collis; Daniel D. Roby; David P. Craig; Brad A. Ryan; Richard D. Ledgerwood

    2001-01-01

    Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags implanted in Columbia River basin juvenile salmonids Oncorhyncus spp. were recovered from breeding colonies of Caspian terns Sterna caspia and double-crested cormorants Phalacrocorax auritus on Rice Island, a dredge spoil island in the Columbia River estuary. Tags were recovered to assess the relative vulnerability of different salmonid species, stocks, and rearing types to avian predators.

  11. Cryptobia (Trypanoplasma) salmositica and salmonid cryptobiosis.

    PubMed

    Woo, P T K

    2003-01-01

    Salmonid cryptobiosis is caused by Cryptobia (Trypanoplasma) salmositica. The haemoflagellate has been reported from all species of Pacific Oncorhynchus spp. on the west coast of North America. It is normally transmitted by the freshwater leech, Piscicola salmositica, in streams and rivers, and sculpins, Cottus spp., are considered important reservoir hosts. The pathogen can also survive on the body surface of fish because it has a contractile vacuole to osmoregulate when the fish is in fresh water. This allows for direct transmission between fish, especially in aquaculture facilities. The parasite divides rapidly by binary fission in the blood to cause disease, the severity of which is directly related to parasitaemia. Cryptobia salmositica has a mitochondrium and it normally undergoes aerobic respiration; however, if its mitochondrium is damaged it will switch to glycolysis. Its glycolytic enzymes and catalase are contained in glycosomes. Cysteine protease is a metabolic enzyme, and its neutralization inhibits oxygen consumption and multiplication of the parasite. An important virulent factor in cryptobiosis is a secretory metalloprotease. The protective mechanism involves production of complement fixing antibodies, phagocytosis by macrophages, and cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Recovered fish are protected, probably for life as the immunity is non-sterile. Clinical signs of the disease include anaemia, anorexia, splenomegaly, general oedema and abdominal distension with ascites. The metabolism and swimming performance of infected fish are significantly reduced and the bioenergetic cost of the disease is very considerable. Fish are susceptible to hypoxia and their immune system is depressed during acute cryptobiosis. Severity of the disease and mortality rates vary significantly between species and stocks of salmon. Protective strategies include selective breeding of Cryptobia-resistant fish. This is innate resistance to infection and it is controlled by a dominant Mendelian locus. In these fish the parasite is lysed via the alternative pathway of complement activation. In Cryptobia-tolerant fish (infected with the pathogen but which do not suffer from disease) the metalloprotease secreted by the parasite is neutralized by alpha2 macroglobulin. Hence, the production of a transgenic Cryptobia-tolerant salmon is an option. This strategy has the advantage in that human intervention (e.g. vaccination, chemotherapy) is not required once the transgenic fish is produced. Acquired immunity is another option; a single dose of the attenuated live vaccine protects fish for at least 2 years. The protective mechanism in vaccinated fish is similar to that in recovered fish. The trypanocidal drug, isometamidium chloride, is an effective therapeutic and prophylactic agent. It accumulates in the mitochondrium of the parasite and significantly disrupts aerobic respiration by causing lesions in the organelle. Efficacy of the drug is significantly increased after its conjugation to antibodies. This immuno-chemotherapeutic strategy has the advantage in that it will lower the drug dosage and hence side-effects of chemotherapy. It will probably reduce the accumulation of the drug in fish, an important consideration in food fish. PMID:14710756

  12. Sexual Assault

    MedlinePLUS

    Sexual assault is any sexual activity to which you haven't freely given your consent. This includes completed ... trust, a friend, an acquaintance, or a stranger. Sexual assault can affect your health in many ways. It ...

  13. Pathways from parental AIDS to child psychological, educational and sexual risk: developing an empirically-based interactive theoretical model.

    PubMed

    Cluver, Lucie; Orkin, Mark; Boyes, Mark E; Sherr, Lorraine; Makasi, Daphne; Nikelo, Joy

    2013-06-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates negative psychological, health, and developmental outcomes for children associated with parental HIV/AIDS illness and death. However, little is known about how parental AIDS leads to negative child outcomes. This study used a structural equation modelling approach to develop an empirically-based theoretical model of interactive relationships between parental or primary caregiver AIDS-illness, AIDS-orphanhood and predicted intervening factors associated with children's psychological distress, educational access and sexual health. Cross-sectional data were collected in 2009-2011, from 6002 children aged 10-17 years in three provinces of South Africa using stratified random sampling. Comparison groups included children orphaned by AIDS, orphaned by other causes and non-orphans, and children whose parents or primary caregivers were unwell with AIDS, unwell with other causes or healthy. Participants reported on psychological symptoms, educational access, and sexual health risks, as well as hypothesized sociodemographic and intervening factors. In order to build an interactive theoretical model of multiple child outcomes, multivariate regression and structural equation models were developed for each individual outcome, and then combined into an overall model. Neither AIDS-orphanhood nor parental AIDS-illness were directly associated with psychological distress, educational access, or sexual health. Instead, significant indirect effects of AIDS-orphanhood and parental AIDS-illness were obtained on all measured outcomes. Child psychological, educational and sexual health risks share a common set of intervening variables including parental disability, poverty, community violence, stigma, and child abuse that together comprise chain effects. In all models, parental AIDS-illness had stronger effects and more risk pathways than AIDS-orphanhood, especially via poverty and parental disability. AIDS-orphanhood and parental AIDS-illness impact child outcomes through multiple, interlinked pathways. The interactive model developed in this study suggests key areas of focus for interventions with AIDS-affected children. PMID:23631794

  14. Expression and sequence evolution of aromatase cyp19a1 and other sexual development genes in East African cichlid fishes.

    PubMed

    Böhne, Astrid; Heule, Corina; Boileau, Nicolas; Salzburger, Walter

    2013-10-01

    Sex determination mechanisms are highly variable across teleost fishes and sexual development is often plastic. Nevertheless, downstream factors establishing the two sexes are presumably conserved. Here, we study sequence evolution and gene expression of core genes of sexual development in a prime model system in evolutionary biology, the East African cichlid fishes. Using the available five cichlid genomes, we test for signs of positive selection in 28 genes including duplicates from the teleost whole-genome duplication, and examine the expression of these candidate genes in three cichlid species. We then focus on a particularly striking case, the A- and B-copies of the aromatase cyp19a1, and detect different evolutionary trajectories: cyp19a1A evolved under strong positive selection, whereas cyp19a1B remained conserved at the protein level, yet is subject to regulatory changes at its transcription start sites. Importantly, we find shifts in gene expression in both copies. Cyp19a1 is considered the most conserved ovary-factor in vertebrates, and in all teleosts investigated so far, cyp19a1A and cyp19a1B are expressed in ovaries and the brain, respectively. This is not the case in cichlids, where we find new expression patterns in two derived lineages: the A-copy gained a novel testis-function in the Ectodine lineage, whereas the B-copy is overexpressed in the testis of the speciest-richest cichlid group, the Haplochromini. This suggests that even key factors of sexual development, including the sex steroid pathway, are not conserved in fish, supporting the idea that flexibility in sexual determination and differentiation may be a driving force of speciation. PMID:23883521

  15. The Predicted G-Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR1 Is Required for Female Sexual Development in the Multicellular Fungus Neurospora crassa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Svetlana Krystofova; Katherine A. Borkovich

    2006-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) control important aspects of asexual and sexual development in eukaryotic organisms. We have identified a predicted GPCR in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa with similarity to cyclic AMP-receptor like GPCRs from Dictyostelium discoideum and GCR1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression of gpr-1 is highest in female reproductive structures, and deletion of gpr-1 leads to defects during sexual development.

  16. Polyphasic characterization of Aeromonas salmonicida isolates recovered from salmonid and non-salmonid fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diamanka, A.; Loch, T.P.; Cipriano, R.C.; Faisal, M.

    2013-01-01

    Michigan's fisheries rely primarily upon the hatchery propagation of salmonid fish for release in public waters. One limitation on the success of these efforts is the presence of bacterial pathogens, including Aeromonas salmonicida, the causative agent of furunculosis. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of A. salmonicida in Michigan fish, as well as to determine whether biochemical or gene sequence variability exists among Michigan isolates. A total of 2202 wild, feral and hatchery-propagated fish from Michigan were examined for the presence of A. salmonicida. The examined fish included Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), coho salmon, O. kisutcha (Walbaum), steelhead trout, O. mykiss (Walbaum), Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis (Mitchill), and yellow perch, Perca flavescens (Mitchill). Among these, 234 fish yielded a brown pigment-producing bacterium that was presumptively identified as A. salmonicida. Further phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses identified representative isolates as Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida and revealed some genetic and biochemical variability. Logistic regression analyses showed that infection prevalence varied according to fish species/strain, year and gender, whereby Chinook salmon and females had the highest infection prevalence. Moreover, this pathogen was found in six fish species from eight sites, demonstrating its widespread nature within Michigan.

  17. Polyphasic characterization of Aeromonas salmonicida isolates recovered from salmonid and non-salmonid fish.

    PubMed

    Diamanka, A; Loch, T P; Cipriano, R C; Faisal, M

    2013-11-01

    Michigan's fisheries rely primarily upon the hatchery propagation of salmonid fish for release in public waters. One limitation on the success of these efforts is the presence of bacterial pathogens, including Aeromonas salmonicida, the causative agent of furunculosis. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of A. salmonicida in Michigan fish, as well as to determine whether biochemical or gene sequence variability exists among Michigan isolates. A total of 2202 wild, feral and hatchery-propagated fish from Michigan were examined for the presence of A. salmonicida. The examined fish included Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), coho salmon, O. kisutcha (Walbaum), steelhead trout, O. mykiss (Walbaum), Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis (Mitchill), and yellow perch, Perca flavescens (Mitchill). Among these, 234 fish yielded a brown pigment-producing bacterium that was presumptively identified as A. salmonicida. Further phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses identified representative isolates as Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida and revealed some genetic and biochemical variability. Logistic regression analyses showed that infection prevalence varied according to fish species/strain, year and gender, whereby Chinook salmon and females had the highest infection prevalence. Moreover, this pathogen was found in six fish species from eight sites, demonstrating its widespread nature within Michigan. PMID:23444966

  18. The relationship between productivities of salmonids and forest stands in northern California watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frazey, S.L.; Wilzbach, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Productivities of resident salmonids and upland and riporian forests in 22 small watersheds of coastal northern California were estimated and compared to determine whether: 1) upland site productivity predicted riparian site productivity; 2) either upland or riparian site productivity predicted salmonid productivity; and 3) other parameters explained more of the variance in salmonid productivity. Upland and riparian site productivities were estimated using Site Index values for redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) and red alder (Alnus rubra), respectively. Salmonid productivity was indexed by back-calculated length at age 1 of the largest individuals sampled and by total biomass. Upland and riparian site indices were correlated, but neither factor contributed to the best approximating models of salmonid productivity. Total salmonid biomass was best described by a positive relationship with drainage area. Length of dominant fish was best described by a positive relationship with percentage of hardwoods within riparian areas, which may result from nutrient and/or litter subsidies provided by red older. The inability of forest productivity to predict salmon productivity may reflect insufficient variation in independent variables, limitations of the indices, and the operation of other factors affecting salmonid production. The lack of an apparent relationship between upland conifer and salmonid productivity suggests that management of land for timber productivity and component streams for salmonid production in these sites will require separate, albeit integrated, management strategies.

  19. Male Adolescents' View on Sexual Activity as Basis for the Development of Aids-Prevention Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steyn, Hester; Myburgh, Chris P.H.; Poggenpoel, Marie

    2005-01-01

    The world regards AIDS as the most disastrous health threat in the world. HIV/AIDS- related issues amongst adolescents were initially neglected due to the visible impact of this pandemic on babies and adults. Adolescents' behavior is however regarded as high-risk because of their involvement in sexual activities from a young age. The purpose of…

  20. Identification of genes differentially expressed during apomictic and sexual development in buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apomixis, an asexual method of reproduction through seeds with the absence of meiosis and fertilization holds great potential for plant breeding and hybrid seed production. Buffelgrass, an apomictic forage grass, has well characterized apomictic, facultative and sexual accessions to study apomictic...

  1. Sexually Harassing Behavior against Adolescent Girls in Rural Bangladesh: Implications for Achieving Millennium Development Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alam, Nurul; Roy, Swapan K.; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the extent and type of sexually harassing behavior or intimidations unmarried adolescent girls experienced on their way to school, college or social visits and type of perpetrators in victims' view in rural Bangladesh using data of the 2004 National Nutrition Programme baseline survey. The survey collected self-reported data on…

  2. Sexual dimorphic floral development in dioecious plants revealed by transcriptome, phytohormone, and DNA methylation analysis in Populus tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuepeng; Ma, Kaifeng; Ci, Dong; Chen, Qingqing; Tian, Jiaxing; Zhang, Deqiang

    2013-12-01

    Dioecious plants have evolved sex-specific floral development mechanisms. However, the precise gene expression patterns in dioecious plant flower development remain unclear. Here, we used andromonoecious poplar, an exceptional model system, to eliminate the confounding effects of genetic background of dioecious plants. Comparative transcriptome and physiological analysis allowed us to characterize sex-specific development of female and male flowers. Transcriptome analysis identified genes significantly differentially expressed between the sexes, including genes related to floral development, phytohormone synthesis and metabolism, and DNA methylation. Correlation analysis revealed a significant correlation between phytohormone signaling and gene expression, identifying specific phytohormone-responsive genes and their cis-regulatory elements. Two genes related to DNA methylation, METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (MET1) and DECREASED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DDM1), which are located in the sex determination region of Chromosome XIX, have differential expression between female and male flowers. A time-course analysis revealed that MET1 and DDM1 expression may produce different DNA methylation levels in female and male flowers. Understanding the interactions of phytohormone signaling, DNA methylation and target gene expression should lead to a better understanding of sexual differences in floral development. Thus, this study identifies a set of candidate genes for further studies of poplar sexual dimorphism and relates sex-specific floral development to physiological and epigenetic changes. PMID:23860796

  3. Lesbian Sexuality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pat Califia

    1979-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine what physical sexual activities lesbians engage in and what attitudes lesbians have toward various aspects of their sexuality. The sample consisted of 286 homosexual women. This article reports results in the following areas: first orgasm, first sexual experience with another women, sexual fantasies, number of sex partners, faking orgasm, sex toys, initiating sex, techniques

  4. Internet Sexualities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicola Döring

    2010-01-01

    \\u000a The term “internet sexuality” (or OSA, online sexual activities) refers to sexual-related content and activities observable\\u000a on the internet (cf. Adams, Oye, & Parker, 2003; Cooper, McLoughlin, & Campbell, 2000; Leiblum & Döring, 2002). It designates\\u000a a variety of sexual phenomena (e.g., pornography, sex education, sexual contacts) related to a wide spectrum of online services\\u000a and applications (e.g., websites, online

  5. Experimental perturbation of the development of sexual size dimorphism in the mouse skeleton.

    PubMed

    Gordon, K R; Levy, C; Perl, M; Weeks, O I

    1994-01-01

    BALB/c mice were raised for 30 days under nine treatment regimens to determine their effects on sexual dimorphism for size of the femur and of the body. Treatment groups were divided into three experiments: 1) burrowing in a high litter cage; eight times normal gravity for a total of one hour per day; a voluntary exercise control. 2) Unilateral femoral and sciatic nerve ablation; the opposite unoperated leg. 3) Swimming exercise; anabolic steroid; swimming and anabolic steroid; normal exercise control. Traits measured were body weight gain and thirteen femoral characters: moment at failure, length, cross-sectional area, anteroposterior and lateromedial diameters of the cross section, wall thickness for all four quadrants of the shaft, moments of inertia of the cross section in the anteroposterior and lateromedial directions, deflection of the shaft before failure, and total mineral content. Sexual dimorphism of the traits studied varied significantly with treatment. The greatest dimorphism was seen in the controls and the burrowing group. The least dimorphism was seen in the eight times gravity, the steroid, and the exercise and anabolic steroid groups. Reduction in the extent of sexual dimorphism was not correlated with a reduction in the loading regimen but rather seemed mediated by systemic changes in physiology brought on by several factors. Change in the amount of sexual dimorphism for size from the control reflects change in growth rates for males and females in response to different treatments. Change in growth rates of juvenile males and females will likely result in changes in the size of femoral characters and body weight in the adult. Change in the size of femoral characters affects the strength of the femur. In natural populations, a change in the body size of adult males and females could adversely affect reproductive success in groups that normally exhibit strong dimorphism, and hence, select against any conditions that reduce sexual dimorphism. Ordinarily, a significant change in sexual dimorphism--of the magnitude seen here--through natural selection, would take several generations. PMID:7928024

  6. What is clinical sexuality?

    PubMed

    Levine, S B

    1995-03-01

    A collage of eight overlapping themes for the definition of sexuality is presented prior to undertaking a historical overview of the rapid development of the field that began in 1970 as "sex therapy." The limitations of theory, behavioral science, and the art of medicine as they apply to helping people with their sexual concerns are highlighted. PMID:7761299

  7. Genome-wide identification of target genes of a mating-type ?-domain transcription factor reveals functions beyond sexual development.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kordula; Beer, Christina; Freitag, Michael; Kück, Ulrich

    2015-06-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum is the main industrial producer of the ?-lactam antibiotic penicillin, the most commonly used drug in the treatment of bacterial infections. Recently, a functional MAT1-1 locus encoding the ?-box transcription factor MAT1-1-1 was discovered to control sexual development in P.?chrysogenum. As only little was known from any organism about the regulatory functions mediated by MAT1-1-1, we applied chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) to gain new insights into the factors that influence MAT1-1-1 functions on a molecular level and its role in genome-wide transcriptional regulatory networks. Most importantly, our data provide evidence for mating-type transcription factor functions that reach far beyond their previously understood role in sexual development. These new roles include regulation of hyphal morphology, asexual development, as well as amino acid, iron, and secondary metabolism. Furthermore, in vitro?DNA-protein binding studies and downstream analysis in yeast and P.?chrysogenum enabled the identification of a MAT1-1-1 DNA-binding motif, which is highly conserved among euascomycetes. Our studies pave the way to a more general understanding of these master switches for development and metabolism in all fungi, and open up new options for optimization of fungal high production strains. PMID:25728030

  8. Sexual assault in the military.

    PubMed

    Castro, Carl Andrew; Kintzle, Sara; Schuyler, Ashley C; Lucas, Carrie L; Warner, Christopher H

    2015-07-01

    Military sexual assault is a pervasive problem throughout the military services, despite numerous initiatives to end it. No doubt the military's lack of progress stems from the complexity of sexual assaults, yet in order to develop effective strategies and programs to end sexual assault, deep understanding and appreciation of these complexities are needed. In this paper, we describe the root causes and numerous myths surrounding sexual assault, the military cultural factors that may unintentionally contribute to sexual assault, and the uncomfortable issues surrounding sexual assault that are often ignored (such as the prevalence of male sexual assault within the military). We conclude by offering a broad, yet comprehensive set of recommendations that considers all of these factors for developing effective strategies and programs for ending sexual assault within in the military. PMID:25980511

  9. Highly recombinant VGII Cryptococcus gattii population develops clonal outbreak clusters through both sexual macroevolution and asexual microevolution.

    PubMed

    Billmyre, R Blake; Croll, Daniel; Li, Wenjun; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Carter, Dee A; Cuomo, Christina A; Kronstad, James W; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    An outbreak of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus gattii began in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) in the late 1990s. This outbreak consists of three clonal subpopulations: VGIIa/major, VGIIb/minor, and VGIIc/novel. Both VGIIa and VGIIc are unique to the PNW and exhibit increased virulence. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of isolates from these three groups, as well as global isolates, and analyzed a total of 53 isolates. We found that VGIIa/b/c populations show evidence of clonal expansion in the PNW. Whole-genome sequencing provided evidence that VGIIb originated in Australia, while VGIIa may have originated in South America, and these were likely independently introduced. Additionally, the VGIIa outbreak lineage may have arisen from a less virulent clade that contained a mutation in the MSH2 ortholog, but this appears to have reverted in the VGIIa outbreak strains, suggesting that a transient mutator phenotype may have contributed to adaptation and evolution of virulence in the PNW outbreak. PNW outbreak isolates share genomic islands, both between the clonal lineages and with global isolates, indicative of sexual recombination. This suggests that VGII C. gattii has undergone sexual reproduction, either bisexual or unisexual, in multiple locales contributing to the production of novel, virulent subtypes. We also found that the genomes of two basal VGII isolates from HIV(+) patients contain an introgression tract spanning three genes. Introgression substantially contributed to intra-VGII polymorphism and likely occurred through sexual reproduction with VGI. More broadly, these findings illustrate how both microevolution and sexual reproduction play central roles in the development of infectious outbreaks from avirulent or less virulent progenitors. Importance: Cryptococcus gattii is the causative agent responsible for ongoing infections in the Pacific Northwest of the United States and western Canada. The incidence of these infections increased dramatically in the 1990s and remains elevated. These infections are attributable to three clonal lineages of C. gattii, VGIIa, VGIIb, and VGIIc, with only VGIIa identified once previously in the Pacific Northwest prior to the start of the outbreak, albeit in a less virulent form. This study addresses the origin and emergence of this outbreak, using whole-genome sequencing and comparison of both outbreak and global isolates. We show that VGIIa arose mitotically from a less virulent clonal group, possibly via the action of a mutator phenotype, while VGIIb was likely introduced from Australia, and VGIIc appears to have emerged in the United States or in an undersampled locale via sexual reproduction. This work shows that multiple processes can contribute to the emergence of an outbreak. PMID:25073643

  10. Beating fantasies in a latency girl: their role in female sexual development.

    PubMed

    Friedman, L H

    1985-10-01

    Detailed clinical material is presented from the analysis of a latency girl whose inner life revolved around a series of beating fantasies. The clinical data support Freud's 1925 formulation that the perception of sexual differences initiates the oedipus complex in the girl. Whether a girl experiences vaginal sensations before puberty has been a controversial issue; in this girl vaginal sensations and contractions appeared prior to puberty. PMID:3840904

  11. Plasmodium male development gene-1 (mdv-1) is important for female sexual development and identifies a polarised plasma membrane during zygote development.

    PubMed

    Lal, Kalpana; Delves, Michael J; Bromley, Elizabeth; Wastling, Jonathan M; Tomley, Fiona M; Sinden, Robert E

    2009-06-01

    Successful development of Plasmodium sexual stages is essential for parasite survival, but the genes involved are poorly understood. We 'knocked out' the male development gene-1 (mdv-1) locus in Plasmodium berghei and found it to be important in female gametocyte activation. Indirect immunofluorescence assays show MDV-1 has a punctate cytoplasmic distribution in gametocytes. After activation of both females and males, MDV-1 is more peripherally located but in males exclusively it becomes concentrated in a few large foci. In vitro ookinete conversion assays that test the ability of activated female gametocytes to develop into retort stage ookinetes, suggests a complicit role for MDV-1, with the knock-out parasite producing 86% reduction in ookinetes. The retort stage ookinete develops from the zygote by increasing growth of an apical protrusion and MDV-1 locates at the 'leading' extracellular apical pole of this protrusion. In the fully developed ookinete MDV-1 is localised to the posterior pole. In vivo, the knock-out parasites demonstrate a phenotype in which there is a 90% reduction of parasite transmission to oocysts in mosquitoes. PMID:19136003

  12. Sexuality Education as a Ministry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Melanie J.

    2011-01-01

    The author describes her development from being her religious congregation's sexuality educator to completing doctoral studies and finding her place in the professional sexuality education community. She equates sexuality education to a ministry that reaches out to those in need of knowledge.

  13. The "Right" Sexuality for Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    Feminist researchers in psychology and education have been theorizing about the kind of sexuality girls ought to have. They are not afraid to investigate morality and what makes a good life. While they explore the meaning and cultural context of girls' sexual development, the good sexual life they describe may be an elusive ideal that, in the end,…

  14. An in vivo model fish system to test chemical effects on sexual differentiation and development: exposure to ethinyl estradiol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Papoulias, D.M.; Noltie, D.B.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    A model system was characterized which may be used as an in vivo screen for effects of chemicals or environmental mixtures on sexual differentiation and development of reproductive organs and gametes. We evaluated the effects of a model environmental estrogen, ethinyl estradiol (EE2), on the d-rR strain of medaka, Oryzias latipes, using a nano-injection exposure. Gonad histopathology indicated that a single injection of 0.5-2.5 ng EE2/egg can cause phenotypic sex-reversal of genetic males to females. Sex-reversals could be detected as early as 7 days post-hatch. Sex-reversed males had female-typical duct development and the secondary sex characteristics we measured were generally consistent with phenotype, with the exception of a few EE2-exposed XX and XY females which possessed ambiguous anal fins. Using discriminant analysis, we determined that the presence or absence of the secondary sex characteristic, a dorsal fin notch, was a very reliable indicator of gonadal sex. No instances of gonadal intersexes were observed. Ethinyl estradiol also appeared to reduce growth but not condition (weight-at-length) and exposed XX females appeared to have a higher incidence of atretic follicles relative to controls. Our results suggest that estrogenic chemicals may influence sexual differentiation and development and that the medaka model is well suited to assessing these effects. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  15. Caspian Tern Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Mid-Columbia River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle Antolos; Daniel D. Roby; Donald E. Lyons; Ken Collis; Allen F. Evans; Mike Hawbecker; Brad A. Ryan

    2005-01-01

    We used a bioenergetics approach to determine the magnitude of predation by Caspian terns Sterna caspia on juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. in the mid-Columbia River during 2000 and 2001. Caspian terns nesting on Crescent Island, Washington, located below the confluence of the Snake and Columbia rivers, consumed several hundred thousand juvenile salmonids each year of the study. Tern consumption of

  16. RAPID COMMUNICATION \\/ COMMUNICATION RAPIDE A new method to identify the fluvial regimes used by spawning salmonids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hamish J. Moir; Christopher N. Gibbins; John M. Buffington; John H. Webb; Chris Soulsby; Mark J. Brewer

    Basin physiography and fluvial processes structure the availability of salmonid spawning habitat in river net- works. However, methods that allow us to explicitly link hydrologic and geomorphic processes to spatial patterns of spawning at scales relevant to management are limited. Here we present a method that can be used to link the abundance of spawning salmonids to fluvial processes at

  17. Detection of Regional Trends in Salmonid Habitat in Coastal Streams, Oregon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kara J. Anlauf; William Gaeuman; Kim K. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater habitat quality is broadly recognized as fundamental to the viability of salmonid populations. Temporal trends in freshwater habitat have rarely been quantified, however, perhaps owing to a lack of methodical and rigorous time series data sets. We present an approach for evaluating change in freshwater habitat using data from a long-term program to monitor salmonid populations and their habitats

  18. Assessment of Native Salmonids Above Hells Canyon Dam, Idaho; 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Kevin A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    1999-03-01

    Native resident salmonids in the western United States are in decline throughout much of their range. The purpose of the multi-phased project is to restore native salmonids in the upper Snake River basin to self-sustaining, harvestable levels.

  19. A LARGE-SCALE, MULTISPECIES STATUS ASSESSMENT: ANADROMOUS SALMONIDS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle M. McClure; Elizabeth E. Holmes; Beth L. Sanderson; Chris E. Jordan

    2003-01-01

    Twelve salmonid evolutionarily significant units (ESUs) throughout the Co­ lumbia River Basin are currently listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act; these ESUs are affected differentially by a variety of human activities. We present a standardized quantitative status and risk assessment for 152 listed salmonid stocks in these ESUs and 24 nonlisted stocks. Using data from 1980-2000,

  20. Functional Roles of FgLaeA in Controlling Secondary Metabolism, Sexual Development, and Virulence in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Seong-Mi; McCormick, Susan P.; Butchko, Robert A. E.; Proctor, Robert H.; Yun, Sung-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum, the causal agent of Fusarium head blight in cereal crops, produces mycotoxins such as trichothecenes and zearalenone in infected plants. Here, we focused on the function of FgLaeA in F. graminearum, a homolog of Aspergillus nidulans LaeA encoding the global regulator for both secondary metabolism and sexual development. Prior to gene analysis, we constructed a novel luciferase reporter system consisting of a transgenic F. graminearum strain expressing a firefly luciferase gene under control of the promoter for either TRI6 or ZEB2 controlling the biosynthesis of these mycotoxins. Targeted deletion of FgLaeA led to a dramatic reduction of luminescence in reporter strains, indicating that FgLaeA controls the expression of these transcription factors in F. graminearum; reduced toxin accumulation was further confirmed by GC-MS analysis. Overexpression of FgLaeA caused the increased production of trichothecenes and additional metabolites. RNA seq-analysis revealed that gene member(s) belonging to ?70% of total tentative gene clusters, which were previously proposed, were differentially expressed in the ?FgLaeA strain. In addition, ?FgLaeA strains exhibited an earlier induction of sexual fruiting body (perithecia) formation and drastically reduced disease symptoms in wheat, indicating that FgLaeA seems to negatively control perithecial induction, but positively control virulence toward the host plant. FgLaeA was constitutively expressed under both mycotoxin production and sexual development conditions. Overexpression of a GFP-FgLaeA fusion construct in the ?FgLaeA strain restored all phenotypic changes to wild-type levels and led to constitutive expression of GFP in both nuclei and cytoplasm at different developmental stages. A split luciferase assay demonstrated that FgLaeA was able to interact with FgVeA, a homolog of A. nidulans veA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that FgLaeA, a member of putative FgVeA complex, controls secondary metabolism, sexual development, and virulence in F. graminearum, although the specific regulation pattern differs from that of LaeA in A. nidulans. PMID:23874628

  1. Internet Sexualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Nicola

    The term “internet sexuality” (or OSA, online sexual activities) refers to sexual-related content and activities observable on the internet (cf. Adams, Oye, & Parker, 2003; Cooper, McLoughlin, & Campbell, 2000; Leiblum & Döring, 2002). It designates a variety of sexual phenomena (e.g., pornography, sex education, sexual contacts) related to a wide spectrum of online services and applications (e.g., websites, online chat rooms, peer-to-peer networks). If an even broader range of computer networks - such as the Usenet or bulletin board systems - is included in this extensional definition, one speaks of “online sexuality” or “cybersexuality.”

  2. Sea lice as a density-dependent constraint to salmonid farming

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Peder A.; Kristoffersen, Anja B.; Viljugrein, Hildegunn; Jimenez, Daniel; Aldrin, Magne; Stien, Audun

    2012-01-01

    Fisheries catches worldwide have shown no increase over the last two decades, while aquaculture has been booming. To cover the demand for fish in the growing human population, continued high growth rates in aquaculture are needed. A potential constraint to such growth is infectious diseases, as disease transmission rates are expected to increase with increasing densities of farmed fish. Using an extensive dataset from all farms growing salmonids along the Norwegian coast, we document that densities of farmed salmonids surrounding individual farms have a strong effect on farm levels of parasitic sea lice and efforts to control sea lice infections. Furthermore, increased intervention efforts have been unsuccessful in controlling elevated infection levels in high salmonid density areas in 2009–2010. Our results emphasize host density effects of farmed salmonids on the population dynamics of sea lice and suggest that parasitic sea lice represent a potent negative feedback mechanism that may limit sustainable spatial densities of farmed salmonids. PMID:22319130

  3. Isospora suis in an Epithelial Cell Culture System – An In Vitro Model for Sexual Development in Coccidia

    PubMed Central

    Worliczek, Hanna Lucia; Ruttkowski, Bärbel; Schwarz, Lukas; Witter, Kirsti; Tschulenk, Waltraud; Joachim, Anja

    2013-01-01

    Coccidian parasites are of major importance in animal production, public health and food safety. The most frequently used representative in basic research on this group is Toxoplasma gondii. Although this parasite is well investigated there is no adequate in vitro model for its sexual development available and knowledge on this important life cycle phase is therefore scarce. The use of Isosporasuis, a sister taxon to T. gondii and the causative agent of piglet coccidiosis, could provide a solution for this. In the present study an in vitro model for neonatal porcine coccidiosis in cells representative for the in vivo situation in the piglet gut was developed and evaluated. The parasite development was investigated by light and transmission electron microscopy and optimum culture conditions were evaluated. Intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) adequately representing the natural host cells supported the development of all endogenous life cycle stages of I. suis, including gametocytes and oocysts. A concentration of 5% fetal calf serum in the culture medium led to highest gametocyte densities on day 12 post infection. Low infection doses (?1 sporozoite for 100 host cells) were best for oocyst and gametocyte development. The presented system can also be used for immunostaining with established antibodies developed against T. gondii (in our case, anti-TgIMC3 antibodies directed against the inner membrane complex 3). The complete life cycle of I. suis in a cell line representing the natural host cell type and species provides a unique model among coccidian parasites and can be used to address a wide range of topics, especially with regard to the sexual development of coccidia. PMID:23861983

  4. The contribution of molecular epidemiology to the understanding and control of viral diseases of salmonid aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology is a science which utilizes molecular biology to define the distribution of disease in a population (descriptive epidemiology) and relies heavily on integration of traditional (or analytical) epidemiological approaches to identify the etiological determinants of this distribution. The study of viral pathogens of aquaculture has provided many exciting opportunities to apply such tools. This review considers the extent to which molecular epidemiological studies have contributed to better understanding and control of disease in aquaculture, drawing on examples of viral diseases of salmonid fish of commercial significance including viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), salmonid alphavirus (SAV) and infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV). Significant outcomes of molecular epidemiological studies include: Improved taxonomic classification of viruses A better understanding of the natural distribution of viruses An improved understanding of the origins of viral pathogens in aquaculture An improved understanding of the risks of translocation of pathogens outwith their natural host range An increased ability to trace the source of new disease outbreaks Development of a basis for ensuring development of appropriate diagnostic tools An ability to classify isolates and thus target future research aimed at better understanding biological function While molecular epidemiological studies have no doubt already made a significant contribution in these areas, the advent of new technologies such as pyrosequencing heralds a quantum leap in the ability to generate descriptive molecular sequence data. The ability of molecular epidemiology to fulfil its potential to translate complex disease pathways into relevant fish health policy is thus unlikely to be limited by the generation of descriptive molecular markers. More likely, full realisation of the potential to better explain viral transmission pathways will be dependent on the ability to assimilate and analyse knowledge from a range of more traditional information sources. The development of methods to systematically record and share such epidemiologically important information thus represents a major challenge for fish health professionals in making the best future use of molecular data in supporting fish health policy and disease control. PMID:21466673

  5. Pilot Study in the Development of an Interactive Multimedia Learning Environment for Sexual Health Interventions: A Focus Group Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goold, P. C.; Bustard, S.; Ferguson, E.; Carlin, E. M.; Neal, K.; Bowman, C. A.

    2006-01-01

    In the UK there are high rates of sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancies amongst young people. There is limited and contradictory evidence that current sexual health education interventions are effective or that they improve access to appropriate sexual health services. This paper describes the outcome of focus group work with…

  6. PSY 388 Human Sexuality Fall 2011 CRN 17247 (4 cred) 146 Straub Hall MW 8:30-10a

    E-print Network

    Lockery, Shawn

    research. We will cover sexual biology ­ anatomy and physiology of human individuals and the arousal process. Then we will discuss personal issues in sexuality including orientation, sexual behaviors; hormonal, instinctual, and learned factors in sexuality; psychosexual development; sexual orientation

  7. More Than a Repair Enzyme: Aspergillus nidulans Photolyase-like CryA Is a Regulator of Sexual Development

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, Özgür; Biesemann, Christoph; Krappmann, Sven; Galland, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Cryptochromes are blue-light receptors that have presumably evolved from the DNA photolyase protein family, and the genomes of many organisms contain genes for both types of molecules. Both protein structures resemble each other, which suggests that light control and light protection share a common ancient origin. In the genome of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, however, only one cryptochrome/photolyase-encoding gene, termed cryA, was identified. Deletion of the cryA gene triggers sexual differentiation under inappropriate culture conditions and results in up-regulation of transcripts encoding regulators of fruiting body formation. CryA is a protein whose N- and C-terminal synthetic green fluorescent protein fusions localize to the nucleus. CryA represses sexual development under UVA350-370 nm light both on plates and in submerged culture. Strikingly, CryA exhibits photorepair activity as demonstrated by heterologous complementation of a DNA repair-deficient Escherichia coli strain as well as overexpression in an A. nidulans uvsB? genetic background. This is in contrast to the single deletion cryA? strain, which does not show increased sensitivity toward UV-induced damage. In A. nidulans, cryA encodes a novel type of cryptochrome/photolyase that exhibits a regulatory function during light-dependent development and DNA repair activity. This represents a paradigm for the evolutionary transition between photolyases and cryptochromes. PMID:18495868

  8. Associations between youth homelessness, sexual offenses, sexual victimization, and sexual risk behaviors: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Heerde, Jessica A; Scholes-Balog, Kirsty E; Hemphill, Sheryl A

    2015-01-01

    Homeless youth commonly report engaging in sexual risk behaviors. These vulnerable young people also frequently report being sexually victimized. This systematic review collates, summarizes, and appraises published studies of youth investigating relationships between homelessness, perpetration of sexual offenses, experience of sexual victimization, and engagement in sexual risk behavior. A systematic search of seventeen psychology, health, and social science electronic databases was conducted. Search terms included "homeless*," "youth," "offend*," "victimization," "crime," "rape," "victim*," and "sex crimes." Thirty-eight studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. Findings showed homeless youth commonly report being raped and sexually assaulted, fear being sexually victimized, and engage in street prostitution and survival sex. Rates of victimization and sexual risk behavior were generally higher for females. Given the paucity of longitudinal studies and limitations of current studies, it is unclear whether homelessness is prospectively associated with sexual victimization or engagement in sexual risk behavior, and whether such associations vary cross nationally and as a function of time and place. Future prospective research examining the influence of the situational context of homelessness is necessary to develop a better understanding of how homelessness influences the perpetration of sexual offenses, experience of sexual victimization, and engagement in sexual risk behavior among homeless youth. PMID:25411128

  9. Sexual Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & ... to Defensive Driving Volunteering Learn the facts about sexual health with articles about puberty, menstruation, infections, and just ...

  10. Sexual Intimacy After Sexual Assault or Sexual Abuse1

    E-print Network

    Machel, Hans

    Sexual Intimacy After Sexual Assault or Sexual Abuse1 Many survivors find that their sexual attitudes and reactions are impacted after a sexual assault or sexual abuse. While these effects are not permanent, they can be very frustrating as they can decrease the enjoyment of one's sexual life and intimacy

  11. Effect of three larval diets on larval development and male sexual performance of Anopheles gambiae s.s.

    PubMed

    Yahouédo, Gildas A; Djogbénou, Luc; Saïzonou, Jacques; Assogba, Bénoît S; Makoutodé, Michel; Gilles, Jeremie R L; Maïga, Hamidou; Mouline, Karine; Soukou, Bhonna K; Simard, Frédéric

    2014-04-01

    Population replacement/elimination strategies based on mass-release of sterile or otherwise genetically modified (male) mosquitoes are being considered in order to expand the malaria vector control arsenal on the way to eradication. A challenge in this context, is to produce male mosquitoes that will be able to compete and mate with wild females more efficiently than their wild counterparts, i.e. high fitness males. This study explored the effect of three larval food diets developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency on the overall fitness and mating performance of male Anopheles gambiae s.s. mosquitoes (Kisumu strain). Larval development (pupation and emergence rate, development time) was monitored, and adult wing length and energy reserves at emergence (i.e. lipids, sugars, glycogen and proteins) were measured. Male sexual performance was assessed through an insemination test whereby one male and 10 virgin females were maintained together in the same cage in order to record the number of inseminated females per 24h. Our results show that males reared on Diets 2 and 3 performed best during larval development. Males provided with treatment 2.2 had a shorter development time and performed best in insemination tests. However, these males had the lowest overall lifespan, suggesting a trade-off between longevity and sexual performances which needs to be taken into consideration when planning release. The results from this work were discussed in the context of sterile insect techniques or genetic control methods which is today one of the strategy in the overall mosquito control and elimination efforts. PMID:24291460

  12. Sexual conflict

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracey Chapman; Göran Arnqvist; Jenny Bangham; Locke Rowe

    2003-01-01

    Sexual conflict occurs when the genetic interests of males and females diverge. Recent evidence supporting the view that male and female genomes are in conflict has now revolutionized the way in which we interpret interactions between the sexes, and suggests that sexual conflict is a potent force in male–female coevolution. Here, we consider the nature of sexual conflict and what

  13. Treating sexual dysfunction associated with prior sexual trauma.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, B W

    1990-01-01

    Negative, confusing, guilt-inducing, or traumatic sexual experiences are almost universal for both females and males. Guidelines are presented for assessing sexual trauma using the medium of the detailed sexual history. The cognitive-behavioral treatment strategy considers past trauma in the context of the present sexual dysfunction rather than an issue to be dealt with first or separately. The guiding principles are to teach the person to be a "survivor" rather than a "victim" and to help the couple develop a functional and satisfying sexual style because "living well is the best revenge." PMID:2246791

  14. Sexual Health and Reproduction

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ingrid Waldron

    This activity provides questions and Web sites to guide student investigation of birth control methods, fetal development, risks of alcohol and smoking during pregnancy, changes during puberty, and HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases.

  15. Development of a theory-based sexual and reproductive health promotion and HIV prevention program for Chinese early adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jingfang; Fongkaew, Warunee; Senaratana, Wilawan; Tonmukayakul, Ouyporn

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a theory-based program for Chinese early adolescents in order to promote their sexual and reproductive health and to prevent HIV infection. The program was designed based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioral skills model and a needs assessment among the stakeholders. A technical collaborative action research approach was applied. The study's participants were 102 early adolescents in a public middle school in mainland China, with the involvement of other key stakeholders, including 15 teachers and 12 parents. The results revealed a statistically significant improvement in the scores of sexual and reproductive health promotion and HIV prevention information, motivation, and behavioral skills after the program's implementation. Meanwhile, qualitative data from the early adolescents' reflection indicated that the content was useful and comprehensive, the trainers were friendly and knowledgeable, and participatory learning with an "edutainment" style was especially impressive. Additionally, the early adolescents expressed that they could apply the knowledge and skills in their daily life, which would benefit themselves and their family and peers. The Information-Motivation-Behavioral skills model could be explored in a non-Western context and the program was shown to be acceptable for use in a Chinese middle school setting. PMID:20727088

  16. Examining key design decisions involved in developing a serious game for child sexual abuse prevention.

    PubMed

    Stieler-Hunt, Colleen; Jones, Christian M; Rolfe, Ben; Pozzebon, Kay

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the key decisions made in the design of Orbit, a child sexual abuse prevention computer game targeted at school students between 8 and 10 years of age. Key decisions include providing supported delivery for the target age group, featuring adults in the program, not over-sanitizing game content, having a focus on building healthy self-concept of players, making the game engaging and relatable for all players and evaluating the program. This case study has implications for the design of Serious Games more generally, including that research should underpin game design decisions, game designers should consider ways of bridging the game to real life, the learning that arises from the game should go beyond rote-learning, designers should consider how the player can make the game-world their own and comprehensive evaluations of Serious Games should be undertaken. PMID:24550880

  17. Sexual Health

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Lisa; Mann, Janice; McMahon, Sharon; Wong, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Health Issue Much attention is devoted to women's reproductive health, but the formative and mature stages of women's sexual lives are often overlooked. We have analyzed cross-sectional data from the Sexual Behaviour module of the 2000/2001 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), and reviewed the literature and available indicators of the sexual health of Canadian women. Key Findings Contemporary Canadian adolescents are becoming sexually active at younger ages than in previous generations. The gender gap between young males and females in age at first intercourse has virtually disappeared. The mean age at first intercourse for CCHS respondents aged 15–24 years was between 16 and 17. Canadian-born respondents are significantly younger at first intercourse than those who were born outside of Canada. Few adolescents recognize important risks to their sexual health. Older Canadians are sexually active, and continue to find emotional and physical satisfaction in their sexual relationships. Data Gaps and Recommendations Both health surveys and targeted research must employ a broader understanding of sexuality to measure changes in and determinants of the sexual health of Canadians. There is reluctance to direct questions about sexual issues to younger Canadians, even though increased knowledge of sexual health topics is associated with delayed onset of sexual intercourse. Among adults, sex-positive resources are needed to address aspects of aging, rather than medicalizing age-related sexual dysfunction. Age and gender-appropriate sexual health care, education, and knowledge are important not only for women of reproductive age, but for Canadians at all stages of life. PMID:15345087

  18. SEXUAL ASSAULT AND SEXUAL HARASSMENT QUICK REFERENCE

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    SEXUAL ASSAULT AND SEXUAL HARASSMENT QUICK REFERENCE Sexual Assault Definition ­ any form of sexual contact without both parties' voluntary consent. Contrary to what most people think, sexual assault. ­ Zvulony & Company ­ The Law of Sexual Assault in Canada. Sexual Harassment Definition ­ is comment

  19. Operationalizing the concept of sexuality comfort: applications for sexuality educators.

    PubMed

    Graham, C A; Smith, M M

    1984-12-01

    Thirty-two high school and college educators participated in a study designed to operationalize the concept of sexuality comfort. Research questions asked were: "What is the nature of sexuality comfort?" and "Can the concept, of sexuality comfort be defined operationally?" An interview guide developed with input from an expert panel of health/sexuality educators and semanticists facilitated data collection. Data were categorized and tabulated through a systematic process. This coding process, performed by independent coders, yielded 97.2% reliability. Based on the results, an operational definition of sexuality comfort was delineated. Because an operational definition is one which tells what to do to experience the thing defined, the operational definition of sexuality comfort has immediate practical applications to preparation programs for prospective sexuality educators as well as those currently working in the field. PMID:6569283

  20. Bringing sexual and reproductive health in the urban contexts to the forefront of the development agenda: the case for prioritizing the urban poor.

    PubMed

    Mberu, Blessing; Mumah, Joyce; Kabiru, Caroline; Brinton, Jessica

    2014-09-01

    Estimates suggest that over 90 % of population increase in the least developed countries over the next four decades will occur in urban areas. These increases will be driven both by natural population growth and rural-urban migration. Moreover, despite its status as the world's least urbanized region, the urban population in the sub-Saharan Africa region is projected to increase from under 40 % currently to over 60 % by 2050. Currently, approximately 70 % of all urban residents in the region live in slums or slum-like conditions. Sexual and reproductive health (SRH) risks for the urban poor are severe and include high rates of unwanted pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections, and poor maternal and child health outcomes. However, the links between poverty, urbanization, and reproductive health priorities are still not a major focus in the broader development agenda. Building on theoretical and empirical data, we show that SRH in urban contexts is critical to the development of healthy productive urban populations and, ultimately, the improvement of quality of life. We posit that a strategic focus on the sexual and reproductive health of urban residents will enable developing country governments achieve international goals and national targets by reducing health risks among a large and rapidly growing segment of the population. To that end, we identify key research, policy and program recommendations and strategies required for bringing sexual and reproductive health in urban contexts to the forefront of the development agenda. PMID:24352624

  1. Comparative evaluation of molecular diagnostic tests for Nucleospora salmonis and prevalence in migrating juvenile salmonids from the Snake River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Badil, Samantha; Elliott, Diane G.; Kurobe, Tomofumi; Hedrick, Ronald P.; Clemens, Kathy; Blair, Marilyn; Purcell, Maureen K.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleospora salmonis is an intranuclear microsporidian that primarily infects lymphoblast cells and contributes to chronic lymphoblastosis and a leukemia-like condition in a range of salmonid species. The primary goal of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of N. salmonis in out-migrating juvenile hatchery and wild Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss from the Snake River in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. To achieve this goal, we first addressed the following concerns about current molecular diagnostic tests for N. salmonis: (1) nonspecific amplification patterns by the published nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) test, (2) incomplete validation of the published quantitative PCR (qPCR) test, and (3) whether N. salmonis can be detected reliably from nonlethal samples. Here, we present an optimized nPCR protocol that eliminates nonspecific amplification. During validation of the published qPCR test, our laboratory developed a second qPCR test that targeted a different gene sequence and used different probe chemistry for comparison purposes. We simultaneously evaluated the two different qPCR tests for N. salmonis and found that both assays were highly specific, sensitive, and repeatable. The nPCR and qPCR tests had good overall concordance when DNA samples derived from both apparently healthy and clinically diseased hatchery rainbow trout were tested. Finally, we demonstrated that gill snips were a suitable tissue for nonlethal detection of N. salmonis DNA in juvenile salmonids. Monitoring of juvenile salmonid fish in the Snake River over a 3-year period revealed low prevalence of N. salmonis in hatchery and wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead but significantly higher prevalence in hatchery-derived steelhead. Routine monitoring of N. salmonis is not performed for all hatchery steelhead populations. At present, the possible contribution of this pathogen to delayed mortality of steelhead has not been determined.

  2. Male adolescent sexual and reproductive health care.

    PubMed

    Marcell, Arik V; Wibbelsman, Charles; Seigel, Warren M

    2011-12-01

    Male adolescents' sexual and reproductive health needs often go unmet in the primary care setting. This report discusses specific issues related to male adolescents' sexual and reproductive health care in the context of primary care, including pubertal and sexual development, sexual behavior, consequences of sexual behavior, and methods of preventing sexually transmitted infections (including HIV) and pregnancy. Pediatricians are encouraged to address male adolescent sexual and reproductive health on a regular basis, including taking a sexual history, performing an appropriate examination, providing patient-centered and age-appropriate anticipatory guidance, and delivering appropriate vaccinations. Pediatricians should provide these services to male adolescent patients in a confidential and culturally appropriate manner, promote healthy sexual relationships and responsibility, and involve parents in age-appropriate discussions about sexual health with their sons. PMID:22123881

  3. The Use of Sexually Explicit Material in Clinical, Educational and Research Settings in the United Kingdom and Its Relation to the Development of Psychosexual Therapy and Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Marnie; Wylie, Kevan R.

    2008-01-01

    The present review describes the development and use of sexually explicit material in sex education within UK psychosexual therapy clinics, medical schools and also in state-maintained secondary schools with reference to interests that have shaped the provision of sex education since the early twentieth century. A short summary of published books…

  4. Rape Myth Acceptance, Hypermasculinity, and SAT Scores as Correlates of Moral Development: Understanding Sexually Aggressive Attitudes in First-Year College Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatum, Jerry L.; Foubert, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Male perpetrated sexual aggression has long been recognized as a serious problem on college campuses. The purpose of this multiple regression correlation study was to assess the relationship between levels of moral development (measured by the Defining Issues Test) and the degree to which first-year college men (N = 161) ascribed to rape…

  5. Influence of land use on fine sediment in salmonid spawning gravels within the Russian

    E-print Network

    Kelly, Maggi

    (Oncorhynchus keta), and steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and sea-run coastal cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus watersheds once supported prodi- gious runs of six species of anadromous salmonids: coho (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Chinook (Oncorhynchus tsha- wytscha), pink (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha), and chum salmon

  6. Sexual Development, Age, and Dating: A Comparison of Biological and Social Influences upon One Set of Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dornbusch, Sanford M.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    National Health Survey data of 12- to 17-year-olds were used to determine links between dating behavior and level of sexual maturation as well as age. Analyses indicated that individual levels of sexual maturation add very little to the explained variance in dating after age has been taken into account. (Author/DB)

  7. The Development of Reproductive Strategy in Females: Early Maternal Harshness [right arrow] Earlier Menarche [right arrow] Increased Sexual Risk Taking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsky, Jay; Steinberg, Laurence; Houts, Renate M.; Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie L.

    2010-01-01

    To test a proposition central to J. Belsky, L. Steinberg, and P. Draper's (1991) evolutionary theory of socialization--that pubertal maturation plays a role in linking early rearing experience with adolescent sexual risk taking (i.e., frequency of sexual behavior) and, perhaps, other risk taking (e.g., alcohol, drugs, delinquency)--the authors…

  8. SEXUAL MISCONDUCT = Sexual harassment, gender discrimination or bias, sexual assault, rape, stalking or

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    SEXUAL MISCONDUCT = Sexual harassment, gender discrimination or bias, sexual assault, rape. SEXUAL MISCONDUCT = Sexual harassment, gender discrimination or bias, sexual assault, rape, stalking inappropriate sexual materials in a location where others can view them. Sexual assault, rape, or attempted

  9. The amino terminus of the salmonid alphavirus capsid protein determines subcellular localization and inhibits cellular proliferation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marius KarlsenMuhammed; Muhammed Naveed Yousaf; Stephane Villoing; Are Nylund; Espen Rimstad

    2010-01-01

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) is the most divergent member of the family Togaviridae and constitutes a threat to farming of salmonid fish in Europe. Here, we report cloning, expression and preliminary functional\\u000a analysis of the capsid protein of SAV, confirming it to be expressed as an approximately 31-kDa protein in infected cells.\\u000a The protein localizes strictly to the cytoplasm in Chinook

  10. Extent and scale of local adaptation in salmonid fishes: review and meta-analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D J Fraser; L K Weir; L Bernatchez; M M Hansen; E B Taylor

    2011-01-01

    What is the extent and scale of local adaptation (LA)? How quickly does LA arise? And what is its underlying molecular basis? Our review and meta-analysis on salmonid fishes estimates the frequency of LA to be ?55–70%, with local populations having a 1.2 times average fitness advantage relative to foreign populations or to their performance in new environments. Salmonid LA

  11. PRÁCTICAS SEXUALES DE GESTANTES BRASILEÑAS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cinara Sacomori; Fernando Luiz Cardoso

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Background: The sexual practices are influenced by aspects from nature and from culture and with the development of the gestation they suffer considered modifications. Objective: Evaluate the impact of the gestation development on pregnant women' sexual practices in Florianópolis (SC) - Brazil. Method: This is a retrospective and non probabilistic research that had 138 women participants in the immediate

  12. The roots of sexual arousal and sexual orientation.

    PubMed

    Salu, Yehuda

    2011-03-01

    Unlike members of other species that are genetically wired to be attracted to their sexual partners, humans learn the cues that guide them in choosing their sexual partners and that trigger sexual arousal. Genetically wired mechanisms must be directing the acquisition of those cues and organizing them in information structures that underlie human sexual behavior. Individual sexuality is a combination of the genetic mechanisms and information learned through personal experiences. This article focuses on the roots of human sexuality - on genetically embedded mechanisms, common to all humans, around which the wide variety of sexual behaviors is built. It proposes a model that defines the basic mechanisms and their role in developing individual sexuality. It is suggested that three brain areas host the roots of human sexuality: the auditory area, which provides stimuli that serve as cues for the identification of a mate; an emotional area, which provides cues for emotional arousal; and a corporal area, which controls the physiological expressions of arousal. The amygdala is a main candidate for the emotional area, and the hypothalamus for the corporal area, but other areas may also provide those inputs. Experimental observations that support this model are discussed, and an outline of additional experiments for validating the model is proposed. If validated, the model would provide knowledge that fills a gap in the understanding of human sexuality - knowledge that would benefit individuals, the medical profession, and society as a whole. PMID:21095066

  13. Men's sexual self-schema

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara L. Andersen; Jill M. Cyranowski; Derek Espindle

    1999-01-01

    Sexual self-schemas are cognitive generalizations about sexual aspects of oneself. In Part 1, a measure of men's sexual self-schema is developed. Studies of test—retest and internal consistency reliability and validity studies of factor analysis, internal structure, convergent and discriminant validity, process, group difference, and change are provided. The construct consists of 3 dimensions: passionate—loving, powerful-aggressive, and open-minded-liberal traits. In Part

  14. Biology and Sexual Minority Status

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William Byne

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide clinicians with an overview of current knowledge pertaining to the biology of sexual\\u000a minority status. Under the umbrella of sexual minority are included homosexuals, bisexuals, transgenders and intersexes. The\\u000a most developed biologic theory pertaining to sexual minority status is the prenatal hormonal\\u000a hypothesis. According to this hypothesis, prenatal hormones act (primarily during

  15. Sexual selection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Malte Andersson; Yoh Iwasa

    1996-01-01

    Competition over mates takes many forms and has far-reaching consequences for many organisms. Recent work suggests that relative reproductive rates of males and females, sperm competition and quality variation among mates affect the strength of sexual selection. Song, other display, body size, visual ornaments and material resource offerings are often sexually selected. There is much empirical evidence of mate choice,

  16. Detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum DNA in salmonid tissues by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chase, D.M.; Elliott, D.G.; Pascho, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is an important salmonid pathogen that is difficult to culture. We developed and assessed a real-time, quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for the detection and enumeration of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR is based on TaqMan technology and amplifies a 69-base pair (bp) region of the gene encoding the major soluble antigen (MSA) of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR assay consistently detected as few as 5 R. salmoninarum cells per reaction in kidney tissue. The specificity of the qPCR was confirmed by testing the DNA extracts from a panel of microorganisms that were either common fish pathogens or reported to cause false-positive reactions in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Kidney samples from 38 juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in a naturally infected population were examined by real-time qPCR, a nested PCR, and ELISA, and prevalences of R. salmoninarum detected were 71, 66, and 71%, respectively. The qPCR should be a valuable tool for evaluating the R. salmoninarum infection status of salmonids.

  17. Somatosensory conditioning of sexual arousal and copulatory behavior in the male rat: a model of fetish development.

    PubMed

    Pfaus, James G; Erickson, Kirsten A; Talianakis, Stella

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have established that neutral olfactory cues associated with sexual reward or inhibition become conditioned stimuli that direct male or female rats toward or away from potential sex partners bearing the cue. Here we examined the ability of a somatosensory cue to exert stimulus control over sexual arousal and copulation in male rats. In the first experiment, two groups of sexually naïve male rats had their first copulatory experiences with receptive females in bilevel chambers with or without a rodent jacket. On a final copulatory test, half of the rats in each group were tested with the jacket on or off. Rats trained and tested without the jacket copulated normally, as did rats trained and tested with the jacket on, and rats trained without the jacket but tested with the jacket on. However, significantly fewer rats trained with the jacket on but tested with the jacket off copulated to ejaculation, and those that did made significantly fewer anticipatory level changes and had fewer significantly longer mount, intromission, and ejaculatory latencies, and fewer ejaculations. In the second experiment, one group of sexually naïve males was given differential conditioning trials in bilevel chambers to associate the jacket on with sexual reward (copulation to ejaculation with a sexually receptive female) and the jacket off with sexual inhibition (thwarted copulatory attempts with a sexually nonreceptive female). A second group had the opposite order of association. A final test with receptive females was made for all males with the jacket on. Males trained to associate the jacket with excitation displayed normal copulation whereas males trained to associate the jacket with inhibition displayed significantly fewer anticipatory level changes and ejaculations, and had significantly longer ejaculation latencies. Thus, somatosensory cues can signal sexual excitation or inhibition in male rats depending on the conditioning history. PMID:23954746

  18. Genomic and transcriptomic analyses of the medicinal fungus Antrodia cinnamomea for its metabolite biosynthesis and sexual development

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mei-Yeh Jade; Fan, Wen-Lang; Wang, Woei-Fuh; Chen, Tingchun; Tang, Yi-Ching; Chu, Fang-Hua; Chang, Tun-Tschu; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Li, Meng-yun; Chen, Yi-Hua; Lin, Ze-Shiang; Yang, Kai-Jung; Chen, Shih-May; Teng, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Yan-Liang; Shaw, Jei-Fu; Wang, Ting-Fang; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    Antrodia cinnamomea, a polyporus mushroom of Taiwan, has long been used as a remedy for cancer, hypertension, and hangover, with an annual market of over $100 million (US) in Taiwan. We obtained a 32.15-Mb genome draft containing 9,254 genes. Genome ontology enrichment and pathway analyses shed light on sexual development and the biosynthesis of sesquiterpenoids, triterpenoids, ergostanes, antroquinonol, and antrocamphin. We identified genes differentially expressed between mycelium and fruiting body and 242 proteins in the mevalonate pathway, terpenoid pathways, cytochrome P450s, and polyketide synthases, which may contribute to the production of medicinal secondary metabolites. Genes of secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways showed expression enrichment for tissue-specific compounds, including 14-?-demethylase (CYP51F1) in fruiting body for converting lanostane to ergostane triterpenoids, coenzymes Q (COQ) for antroquinonol biosynthesis in mycelium, and polyketide synthase for antrocamphin biosynthesis in fruiting body. Our data will be useful for developing a strategy to increase the production of useful metabolites. PMID:25336756

  19. Fugu (Takifugu rubripes) Sexual Differentiation: CYP19 Regulation and Aromatase Inhibitor Induced Testicular Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Rashid; H. Kitano; K. Hoon Lee; S. Nii; T. Shigematsu; K. Kadomura; A. Yamaguchi; M. Matsuyama

    2007-01-01

    In order to assess the involvement of aromatase CYP19 isoforms and endogenous sex steroids in gonadal sex differentiation and development of the Japanese fugu (Takifugu rubripes), an aromatase inhibitor (AI, fadrozole) was administered to developing fishes from the ‘first feeding’ till the 100th day after hatching. It was observed that ovarian cavity formation was inhibited by fadrozole at doses of

  20. Career Development of Lesbian and Gay Youth: Effects of Sexual Orientation, Coming Out, and Homophobia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Susan L.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the factors that impinge on the identity and career development of lesbian and gay adolescents, especially the process of coming out to self and dealing with homophobia. Theorizes about the impacts of coming out and homophobia on career development and choice, and makes recommendations for school practice. (SLD)

  1. From violence exposure to development of sexual risk in low-income urban girls: the role of psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Helen W; Pettineo, Laura; Edmonds, Alexus; Goodman, Elizabeth A; Emerson, Erin; Donenberg, Geri R

    2015-04-01

    This longitudinal study examined psychopathology as an explanatory mechanism linking childhood violence exposure (CVE) to sexual risk in 177 African American girls recruited from mental health clinics serving low-income communities in Chicago. Beginning at average age 14, girls completed five interviews over 2 years and a sixth assessment including trauma history. CVE reflected sexual, physical, or witnessed violence before age 12. Latent growth modeling accounted for developmental change across the six time points. Externalizing, but not internalizing, symptoms mediated the pathway from CVE to number of partners (indirect effect = .16, 95 % CIBCBS = .04-.29) and inconsistent condom use (indirect effect = .11, CIBCBS = .004-.21). Externalizing problems associated with CVE may help to explain its relationship with sexual risk in low-income, treatment-seeking African American girls. Behavioral interventions addressing aggression, impulsivity, and general risk-taking may be most effective in reducing sexual risk in this population. PMID:24801477

  2. Involvement of stat3 in mouse brain development and sexual dimorphism: A proteomics approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fabio Di Domenico; Gabriella Casalena; Rukhsana Sultana; Jian Cai; William M. Pierce; Marzia Perluigi; Chiara Cini; Alessandra Baracca; Giancarlo Solaini; Giorgio Lenaz; Jia Jia; Suzan Dziennis; Stephanie J. Murphy; Nabil J. Alkayed; D. Allan Butterfield

    Although the role of STAT3 in cell physiology and tissue development has been largely investigated, its involvement in the development and maintenance of nervous tissue and in the mechanisms of neuroprotection is not yet known. The potentially wide range of STAT3 activities raises the question of tissue- and gender-specificity as putative mechanisms of regulation. To explore the function of STAT3

  3. Disposition of diiosononyl phthalate and its effects on sexual development of the male fetus following repeated dosing in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Clewell, Rebecca A; Sochaski, Mark; Edwards, Kendra; Creasy, Dianne M; Willson, Gabrielle; Andersen, Melvin E

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received 50, 250, and 500 mg/kg/day diisononyl phthalate (DiNP) from GD 12 to 19 via corn oil gavage to study the dose response for effects on fetal male rat sexual development as well as metabolite disposition in the dam and fetus. Monoisononyl phthalate (MiNP), mono(carboxy-isooctyl) phthalate (MCiOP), mono(hydroxyl-isononyl) phthalate (MHiNP), mono(oxo-isononyl) phthalate (MOiNP), and monoisononyl phthalate glucuronide (MiNP-G) were found in all measured tissues. MCiOP was the major metabolite, followed in decreasing order by MiNP, MHiNP, MOiNP, and MiNP-G. Percentage of dose absorbed decreased at 750 mg/kg/day. Testosterone concentration in the fetal testes was reduced at 250 and 750 mg/kg/day. Multinucleated germ cells were increased in the testes of rats at 250 and 750 mg/kg/day. The no observed effect level (NOEL) for this study was 50 mg/kg/day based on increased MNGs and reduced testes testosterone concentration in the fetal rat. PMID:22813627

  4. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam Sluiceway, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

    2006-06-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate fish passage at The Dalles Dam powerhouse in 2005. The goal of the study was to provide information on smolt passage that will inform decisions on long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. The study addressed one of the main programs dedicated to improving juvenile salmonid survival at The Dalles Dam: Surface Flow Bypass. The study objectives (see below) were met using a combination of hydroacoustic and hydraulic data. The study incorporated fixed-location hydroacoustic methods across the entire powerhouse, with especially intense sampling using multiple split-beam transducers at all sluiceway portals. We did not sample fish passage at the spillway in 2005. In the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish movements. The fish data were interpreted with hydraulic data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Fish passage data were collected in the framework of an “experiment” using a randomized block design (3-day treatments; two treatments) to compare two sluiceway operational configurations: Sluice 2+5 and Sluice 2+19 (six gates open for each configuration). Total project outflow was 76% of the 10-year average for spring and 71% of the 10-year average for summer. Based on these findings, we make the following recommendations: 1) The sluice should be operated 24 h/d from April until November. 2) Open six rather than three sluice gates to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. 3) Open the three gates above the western-most operating main turbine unit and the three gates at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high. 4) Operate the turbine units below open sluice gates as a standard fish operations procedure. 5) Develop hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway to tap the potential of The Dalles Dam sluiceway to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. 6) Consider the following elements for surface flow bypasses during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: Form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than ~7% of total project discharge) at both west and east ends of the dam; Create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration < 1 m/s per meter); Make water velocities at an entrance high enough (> 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, e.g., 10,000 cfs or so; Adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, i.e., test a Removable Sluiceway Weir. 7)The Dalles Dam sluiceway has potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. We recommend tapping this potential with enhancements to the sluiceway.

  5. An online database for IHN virus in Pacific Salmonid fish: MEAP-IHNV

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, Gael

    2012-01-01

    The MEAP-IHNV database provides access to detailed data for anyone interested in IHNV molecular epidemiology, such as fish health professionals, fish culture facility managers, and academic researchers. The flexible search capabilities enable the user to generate various output formats, including tables and maps, which should assist users in developing and testing hypotheses about how IHNV moves across landscapes and changes over time. The MEAP-IHNV database is available online at http://gis.nacse.org/ihnv/ (fig. 1). The database contains records that provide background information and genetic sequencing data for more than 1,000 individual field isolates of the fish virus Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), and is updated approximately annually. It focuses on IHNV isolates collected throughout western North America from 1966 to the present. The database also includes a small number of IHNV isolates from Eastern Russia. By engaging the expertise of the broader community of colleagues interested in IHNV, our goal is to enhance the overall understanding of IHNV epidemiology, including defining sources of disease outbreaks and viral emergence events, identifying virus traffic patterns and potential reservoirs, and understanding how human management of salmonid fish culture affects disease. Ultimately, this knowledge can be used to develop new strategies to reduce the effect of IHN disease in cultured and wild fish.

  6. Sexual Orientation and Professional Dance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Michael Bailey; Michael Oberschneider

    1997-01-01

    The stereotypical professional male dancer is a gay man. However, little if any systematic research has investigated the validity of this stereotype, much less the reasons why male sexual orientation would be associated with interest in dance. We interviewed 136 professional dancers about the prevalence of homosexuality among dancers, the dancers' own sexual development, and relationships between dancers of different

  7. Exposure to monocrotophos pesticide during sexual development causes the feminization/demasculinization of the reproductive traits and a reduction in the reproductive success of male guppies (Poecilia reticulata)

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hua; Li, Yun; Wang, Wei; Wu, Peng; Ru, Shaoguo, E-mail: rusg@ouc.edu.cn

    2012-09-01

    Monocrotophos is a highly toxic organophosphorus pesticide that has been confirmed to be an endocrine?disrupting chemical. To evaluate the influence of this pollutant on the reproductive system of male fish, we studied the sex steroid levels, reproductive traits, sex ratio, and reproductive success in male guppies (Poecilia reticulata) exposed to 40% monocrotophos pesticide at the nominal concentrations of 0.01, 0.10, and 1.00 mg/L for 90 days from birth to adulthood in a semi?static exposure system. Radioimmunoassay and western blot analyses demonstrated that the long?term exposure to monocrotophos pesticide during the sexual development of male guppies caused a significant increase in 17??estradiol levels and consequently induced vitellogenin synthesis, suggesting the feminization of the males. Monocrotophos pesticide also caused a significant decrease in testosterone levels, which consequently inhibited testis growth and reduced the sperm count and the area and intensity of their sexually attractive orange spots, which collectively indicated the significant demasculinization of the male sexual characteristics. Furthermore, these changes in the sexual characteristics at the cellular and organ levels translated into ecologically important effects on the reproductive success at the individual level, as measured by a decrease in offspring production and survival rate. The present study provides the first evidence that monocrotophos pesticide can cause severe reproductive abnormalities in fish due to its endocrine?disrupting action. -- Highlights: ? Monocrotophos pesticide caused an increase in 17??estradiol levels of male guppies. ? Monocrotophos pesticide induced vitellogenin synthesis of male guppies. ? Monocrotophos pesticide caused a decrease in testosterone levels of male guppies. ? Monocrotophos pesticide caused demasculinization of male sexual characteristics. ? Monocrotophos pesticide caused a reduction in reproductive success of male guppies.

  8. Sexual arousal in women: The development of a measurement device for vaginal blood volume

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James H. Geer; Patricia Morokoff; Pamela Greenwood

    1974-01-01

    Undergraauate women were shown erotic and nonerotic films. A vaginal photoplethysmograph was developed and used to measure pressure pulse and vaginal blood volume during film presentations. All subjects yielded a visible increase in pressure pulse amplitude during the presentation of the erotic films. Statistical analyses of the pressure pulse data strongly confirmed (p 0.001) the visual impressions. In addition, total

  9. Revisiting Cass' Theory of Sexual Identity Formation: A Study of Lesbian Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degges-White, Suzanne; Rice, Barbara; Myers, Jane E.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of 12 structured clinical interviews with lesbians ranging in age from 22 to 46 reveals limited support for Cass' stage theory. Implications for theory development, counseling, and counselor training, are presented, along with suggestions for future research. (Author/JDM)

  10. Comparative Performance of Acoustic-tagged and PIT-tagged Juvenile Salmonids

    SciTech Connect

    Hockersmith, Eric E.; Brown, Richard S.; Liedtke, Theresa L.

    2008-02-01

    Numerous research tools and technologies are currently being used to evaluate fish passage and survival to determine the impacts of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) on endangered and threatened juvenile salmonids, including PIT tags, balloon tags, hydroacoustic evaluations, radio telemetry, and acoustic telemetry. Each has advantages and disadvantages, but options are restricted in some situations because of limited capabilities of a specific technology, lack of detection capability downstream, or availability of adequate numbers of fish. However, there remains concern about the comparative effects of the tag or the tagging procedure on fish performance. The recently developed Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic transmitter is the smallest active acoustic tag currently available. The goal of this study was to determine whether fish tagged with the JSATS acoustic-telemetry tag can provide unbiased estimates of passage behavior and survival within the performance life of the tag. We conducted both field and laboratory studies to assess tag effects. For the field evaluation we released a total of 996 acoustic-tagged fish in conjunction with 21,026 PIT-tagged fish into the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam on 6 and 13 May. Travel times between release and downstream dams were not significantly different for the majority of the reaches between acoustic-tagged and PIT-tagged fish. In addition to the field evaluation, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted to determine if growth and survival of juvenile Chinook salmon surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters is different than untagged or PIT tagged juvenile Chinook salmon. Only yearling fish with integrated and non-integrated transmitters experienced mortalities, and these were low (<4.5%). Mortality among sub-yearling control and PIT-tag treatments ranged up to 7.7% while integrated and non-integrated treatments had slightly higher rates (up to 8.3% and 7.9% respectively). No acoustic transmitters were shed by yearling fish during the course of the 90 day study. Up to 7.8% of subyearling fish expelled transmitters. Tags were expelled from 5 to 63 days post-surgery. The average time to expulsion was 27 days; few fish expelled transmitters within 14 days of implantation or less. Histological results suggest that inflammation associated with implantation of an acoustic transmitter can produce fibrous tissue which can invade and possibly damage internal organs soon after implantation. Reactions severe enough to damage organs however, were limited to only ~20% of subyearling Chinook salmon, all of which were under 101mm and 12g at tagging. The infiltration of the fibrous tissue into organs was observed most often in fish held for 21 days and appeared to decrease in subsequent holding times.

  11. Treatment of sexually compulsive adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gerber, James

    2008-12-01

    We clarified the nature of sexual compulsivity in adolescence, addressed who is labeled as "sexually compulsive youth," conceptualized the underlying factors of sexual compulsivity, and outlined a treatment format. We focused on trauma, dissociation, attachment, and self-concept. We questioned the conventional perceptions of who is included in this group. We reiterated that the belief that sexually compulsive adolescents are abusive males is no longer considered accurate. The evolution and accessibility of the Internet only raises greater concerns about compulsive sexual behavior, as more adolescents are brought into therapy because of Internet use to seek sexual interaction or stimulation. The sexually compulsive youth is as likely to be the clean-cut, high-achieving, intelligent student as is the economically deprived, juvenile delinquent on the street. This article began with the observation that adolescents rarely receive any direct, accurate information about sexuality and intimacy. The messages taken in through music, television, movies, politicians, popular press, clergy, and school are polarizing and contradictory. Beyond this are the implications as to how we, as a society, treat the youths that do present with sexual behavior problems. We have tended to treat these youth (as well as adults) with disdain and to designate sexually abusive youth the same as adult offenders with harsher, more punitive treatment interventions. Research and clinical experience now strongly question this type of response. This article is consistent with this leaning. Early psychological injury, from sexual abuse, physical abuse, exposure to violence, attachment trauma, or early sexualization, is at the root of sexually compulsive behavior. While it is necessary to reign in out-of-control and destructive behaviors, if we acknowledge that the source of the behavior is psychological injury, then it is cruel and inconsistent to treat the individual with disdain or as a pariah. The same dilemma is present with adult sexual addicts and offenders. Our society must develop a response to sexually compulsive or offensive behavior that can protect those who need protection, while implementing a rational legal response and providing treatment options for the underlying injury. Perhaps even more importantly, our society must learn how to educate adolescents about sexuality with clear, accurate information that includes not only reproduction but sexual response and intimacy as well. PMID:18996305

  12. THE ECONOMICS OF SEXUALITY: THE EFFECT OF HIV\\/AIDS ON SEXUAL BEHAVIOR, DESIRE, AND IDENTITY IN THE UNITED STATES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew M. Francis

    In this paper, I develop and test a simple economic model of sexuality. The key idea is that— taking the biological determinants of sexual preferences as given—social, cultural, and economic variables play a crucial role in the development and expression of sexual behavior, desire, and identity, which together characterize sexual orientation. I apply the theory to make predictions about the

  13. Sexual Problems

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... include hormone therapy, antidepressants, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, which are drugs often used for erectile dysfunction, and other medications. ... may improve sexual function. A group of antidepressant drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, often ...

  14. Sexual Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sexual intimacy all play a role in healthy relationships. They also contribute to your sense of well-being. A number of disorders can affect the ability to have or enjoy sex in both men and women. Factors that can ...

  15. Developing the interview protocol for video-recorded child sexual abuse investigations: A training experience with police officers, social workers, and clinical psychologists in Hong Kong

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kam-fong Monit Cheung

    1997-01-01

    A series of training programs which focused on culturally relevant questioning skills and video-recorded interviews in child sexual abuse cases were designed for social workers, police officers, and clinical psychologists in Hong Kong. An interview protocol was developed with four stages: rapport building, free narrative of account, questioning, and closure. The content analysis of 74 role-played interviews of video-recorded investigation

  16. Genomic Resources for Immunology and Disease of Salmonid and Non-Salmonid Fish

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Dios; B. Novoa; F. Buonocore; G. Scapigliati; A. Figueras

    2008-01-01

    The development of aquaculture has increased interest in infectious diseases of fish due to the economic losses in fish farms. Although there are successful vaccines against bacteria, therapeutic treatments for viral diseases have yet to be established. The innate immune system is the first line of defense and therefore an important protection against pathogens in fish. The reason is the

  17. Adolescent Sexual Education: Designing Curriculum That Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quincy, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this review paper, "Adolescent Sexual Education: Designing Curriculum That Works", is to present some basic curriculum necessities for developing an in-school sexual education program that results in decreasing the number of teenagers initiating sex, thus reducing the number of teen pregnancies and cases of sexually transmitted…

  18. Evaluating Sexual Behavior from Writing Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Leslie W.

    In discussing sexual behavior as part of and as a result of the total personality, it is appropriate to examine all aspects of a person's handwriting rather than examining only lower looped components in evaluating sexual disturbances. The development of sexual mores and sex roles in our culture from the early Greeks, Romans, and Hebrews through…

  19. Assessment of harbor seal predation on adult salmonids in a Pacific Northwest estuary.

    PubMed

    Wright, Bryan E; Riemer, Susan D; Brown, Robin F; Ougzin, Aicha M; Bucklin, Katherine A

    2007-03-01

    The populations of many native species have increased or expanded in distribution in recent decades, sometimes with negative consequences to sympatric native species that are rarer or less adaptable to anthropogenic changes to the environment. An example of this phenomenon from the Pacific Northwest is predation by locally abundant pinnipeds (seals and sea lions) on threatened, endangered, or otherwise depleted salmonid (Oncorhynchus spp.) populations. We used survey sampling methodology, acoustic telemetry, and molecular genetics to quantify the amount of harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) predation on a depressed run of coho salmon (O. kisutch) and to determine whether some seals consumed a disproportionately higher number of salmonids than others. Based on a probability sample totaling 759.5 h of observation, we estimated that seals consumed 1161 adult salmonids (95% CI = 503-1818 salmonids) during daylight hours over an 18.9-km estuarine study area in Oregon during an 84-d period in fall 2002. Simultaneous tracking of 56 seals via an acoustic telemetry array indicated that a small proportion of marked seals (12.5%) exhibited behavior that was consistent with specialization on salmonids. These seals spent the majority of their time in the riverine portion of the study area and did so disproportionately more at night than day. Genetic analysis of 116 salmonid structures recovered from 11 seal fecal samples suggested that coho salmon accounted for approximately one-half of total salmonid consumption. Though subject to considerable uncertainty, the combined results lead us to infer that seals consumed 21% (range = 3-63%) of the estimated prespawning population of coho salmon. We speculate that the majority of the predation occurred upriver, at night, and was done by a relatively small proportion of the local seal population. Understanding the extent and nature of pinniped predation can provide important inputs into risk assessments and other modeling efforts designed to aid the conservation and recovery of salmonids in the Pacific Northwest. Such understanding may also help inform management actions designed to reduce the impact of pinniped predation on salmonids, which potentially range from short-term lethal removal programs to long-term ecosystem restoration and protection efforts. PMID:17489243

  20. Sexual orientation and boyhood gender conformity: Development of the Boyhood Gender Conformity Scale (BGCS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stewart L. Hockenberry; Robert E. Billingham

    1987-01-01

    Two hundred twenty-eight respondents (110 heterosexuals and 118 homosexuals) completed a survey containing a 20-item Boyhood Gender Conformity Scale (BGCS). This scale was largely composed of edited and abridged gender items from Part A of Freund et al.'s Feminine Gender Identity Scale (FGISA) and Whitam's “childhood indicators.” The combined scale was developed in an attempt to obtain a reliable, valid,

  1. Sexual sadism in sexual offenders and sexually motivated homicide.

    PubMed

    Briken, Peer; Bourget, Dominique; Dufour, Mathieu

    2014-06-01

    This article gives a clinically oriented overview of forensically relevant forms of sexual sadism disorder and its specific relationship to sexual homicide. In sexual homicide perpetrators, peculiar patterns of sexual sadism may be a motivational pathway to kill. Sexual sadism increases the risk for reoffending in sexual offenders. Through psychotherapy and pharmacological interventions, treatment of sadistic sex offenders has to consider special characteristics that may be different from those of nonsadistic sex offenders. Many of these offenders share a combination of sexual sadistic motives and an intact self-regulation, sometimes combined with a high level of sexual preoccupation. PMID:24877708

  2. SEXUAL MISCONDUCT/SEXUAL ASSAULT POLICY

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    SEXUAL MISCONDUCT/SEXUAL ASSAULT POLICY Office of Equal Opportunity Purpose: To establish a work and educational environment at Tufts University that is free from Sexual Misconduct, which includes sexual harassment, sex/gender discrimination, sexual assault, rape and other gender-based misconduct, through

  3. Detecting sexual conflict and sexually antagonistic coevolution

    E-print Network

    Day, Troy

    Detecting sexual conflict and sexually antagonistic coevolution Locke Rowe1,2,* and Troy Day3,4 1 by providing an operational definition of sexual conflict that applies to both inter- and intralocus conflict approaches for detecting interlocus sexual conflict and resultant sexually antagonistic coevolution. We

  4. Tributyltin and the obesogen metabolic syndrome in a salmonid.

    PubMed

    Meador, James P; Sommers, Frank C; Cooper, Kathleen A; Yanagida, Gladys

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a dietary feeding study with juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) to assess the potential for tributyltin (TBT) to elicit the obesogen response that has been described for mammals. The results show increases in whole-body lipid content, which is consistent with the obesogen response; however, we also observed associated parameters that were dissimilar. We found increases in body mass and alterations to several physiological parameters at doses between 0.4 and 3.5 ng/g fish/day (1.4-12 pmol/g fish/day) and reduced body mass at the highest dose after 55 days of exposure. Lipid related plasma parameters (plasma triacylglycerols, cholesterol, and lipase) exhibited monotonic increases over all doses while other values (glucose and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)) exhibited increases only for the low-dose treatments. The increases noted for several parameters in fish were opposite to those reported for the obesogen metabolic syndrome, which is characterized by a reduction in serum glucose, free fatty acids, and triglycerides. This is the first report of growth stimulation resulting from low-dose exposure to this pesticide, which is an unusual response for any animal exposed to an organic or organometallic xenobiotic. Because a number of environmental contaminants act as metabolic disruptors at very low doses, these results are noteworthy for a variety of species. Intuitively, enhanced growth and lipid storage may appear beneficial; however, for salmonids there are numerous potentially negative consequences for populations. PMID:21167482

  5. [Child sexual abuse].

    PubMed

    Fegert, Jörg M

    2007-01-01

    The present paper gives an overview on the development of professional discourse on sexual abuse over the last 20 years in the field of child protection. After the introduction, definitions from different professional perspectives (civil law, criminal law, psychotherapy, counseling, etc.) are given. Based on these definitions an epidemiological range of prevalence figures is described. In the literature, rates ranging from 6 to 25 % in girls and 2 to 8 % in boy as victims of sexual abuse can be observed. Psychiatric consequences of sexual abuse are described based on an overview of the literature. Diagnostic approaches to posttraumatic problems are discussed and distinguished from obsolete measures. Some neurobiological findings are presented. Finally the foundations of counseling, psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy of behavioral of symptoms and PTSD are discussed on the bases of a literature review of controlled clinical trials. In conclusion, further developments in psychotherapy and research are discussed for the German practical child protection field. PMID:17177097

  6. Role of Seminiferous Tubular Development in Determining the FSH versus LH Responsiveness to GnRH in Early Sexual Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Pitteloud, Nelly; Thambundit, Apisadaporn; Dwyer, Andrew A.; Falardeau, John L.; Plummer, Lacey; Caronia, Lisa M.; Hayes, Frances J.; Lee, Hang; Boepple, Paul A.; Crowley, William F.

    2009-01-01

    Background The onset of sexual maturation at puberty is a unique developmental period from a neuroendocrine perspective in that it is characterized by enhanced FSH secretion and FSH responsiveness to exogenous GnRH (vs. LH) from the gonadotrope, yet the mechanism of these dynamics remains unclear. This study aimed to elucidate this phenomenon using a human disease model of GnRH deficiency (idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, IHH) in which GnRH input can be experimentally controlled. Methods 25 GnRH-deficient men were selected for study based upon their baseline testicular volumes (TV) and serum inhibin B (IB) levels to represent a spectrum of pubertal/testicular development. Subjects underwent: (i) a 12-hour overnight neuroendocrine evaluation for hormonal profiling and determination of endogenous LH secretion pattern, and (ii) a 7-day exposure to a physiologic regimen of exogenous pulsatile GnRH (25 ng/kg every 2 h). Daily measurements of serum testosterone (T) and IB levels were made and a 2-hour window of frequent blood sampling was monitored to measure LH and FSH following a single i.v. GnRH bolus (25 ng/kg). All subjects were screened for known loci underlying GnRH deficiency and the response to GnRH was tracked according to genotype. Results Among the entire cohort, no changes were noted in serum T or IB during the 7 days, thus keeping gonadal feedback relatively constant. However, serum LH and FSH levels increased significantly (p < 0.0001) in the entire cohort. When analyzed by degree of pubertal/testicular development, men with no evidence of prior spontaneous pubertal development (TV ?3 ml, Group I) showed sharp increases in serum FSH compared to men with some prior evidence of partial puberty (TV >3 ml, Group II, p < 0.0001). Group I exhibited a decreased LH response to GnRH on day 2 compared to day 1 (p < 0.01), which did not recover until day 5 (1–4 vs. 5–7 days, p < 0.0001). Group II displayed robust and equivalent LH responses to GnRH throughout the 7-day study. Genetic studies identified 8 mutations in 4 different loci (DAX1, KAL1, GNRHR, and FGFR1) in this cohort. Conclusions GnRH-deficient men undergoing GnRH-induced sexual maturation display an inverse relationship between FSH responsiveness to GnRH and baseline testicular size and IB levels. This observation implies that increasing seminiferous tubule maturity represents the major constraint on FSH responsiveness to GnRH in early puberty. In contrast, LH responsiveness to GnRH correlates directly with duration of GnRH exposure. Attenuated pituitary gonadotropin responses were noted in subjects harboring DAX1 mutations, consistent with known pituitary defects. PMID:19829004

  7. A Bias Caused by Ectopic Development Produces Sexually Dimorphic Sperm In Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, Christopher; Viviano, Jeffrey; Ellis, Ronald E

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Self-fertile hermaphrodites have evolved independently several times in the genus Caenorhabditis [1, 2]. These XX hermaphrodites make smaller sperm than males [3, 4], which they use to fertilize their own oocytes. Since larger sperm outcompete smaller sperm in nematodes [3–5], it had been assumed that this dimorphism evolved in response to sperm competition. However, we show that it was instead caused by a developmental bias. When we transformed females of the species C. remanei into hermaphrodites [6], their sperm were significantly smaller than those of males. Because this species never makes hermaphrodites in the wild, this dimorphism cannot be due to selection. Instead, analyses of the related nematode C. elegans suggest that this dimorphism might reflect the development of sperm within the distinct physiological environment of the hermaphrodite gonad. These results reveal a new mechanism for some types of developmental bias — the effects of a novel physical location alter the development of ectopic cells in predictable ways. PMID:21835620

  8. Choline incorporation by Schistosoma mansoni: distribution of choline metabolites during development and after sexual differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ancelin, M.L.; Torpier, G.; Vial, H.J.; Capron, A.

    1987-06-01

    Choline metabolism was investigated in Schistosoma mansoni during the main phases of its development, namely, schistosomula, 11- and 15-day-old worms, and adults. At the physiological choline concentration used in the assay (20 microM), betaine was, along with phosphatidylcholine, one of the most abundant choline metabolites, revealing considerable choline oxidation activity. Very little radioactivity was associated with CDP-choline, whereas a sustained incorporation into phosphocholine occurred. These results provide good evidence that CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase plays a regulatory role in the de novo pathway of phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. During development, the incorporation of choline into its various metabolites was maximal in 11-day-old worms. At this stage, the oxidative pathway predominated over the Kennedy pathway, whereas at all other stages the de novo phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis was predominant. Furthermore, choline incorporation into betaine was much more important in the adult female worm than in the male, indicating a major difference in choline incorporation and distribution between the 2 sexes of the adult worms.

  9. Developing a Valid and Reliable Instrument to Predict the Protective Sexual Behaviors in Women at Risk of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Razieh; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Yaghmaei, Farideh; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background: One much needed tool to assist with the monitoring and evaluation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) prevention programs is to provide a valid instrument to measure protective sexual behavior and related factors. Objectives: The current study aimed to design a valid and reliable instrument to predict the protective sexual behaviors of women at risk of HIV in Iran. Patients and Methods: The current study was a sequential mixed cross-sectional and methodological research. Initially, via a qualitative research, constructs and factors associated with sexual protective behavior of women at risk were identified through 25 in-depth interviews. The questionnaire on predictors of protective sexual behaviors in women at risk of HIV (PSPB) was designed based on a qualitative study, and then its qualitative validity, content, and construct validity were evaluated. Exploratory factor analysis was performed and 200 women at risk participated. Results: Seven concepts emerged after exploratory factor analysis of the 48 items. The content validity ratio (CVR) of the questionnaire constructs were 0.55 to 0.76, and content validity index (CVI) structure was 0.86 to 0.95. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the entire questionnaire was 0.78, and correlation coefficient of the test-retest reliability for the constructs was from 0.73 to 0.89. Conclusions: The current study proved the capability of the predictors of sexual protective behavior in women at risk for HIV questionnaire as a valid and reliable instrument for the Iranian community. PMID:25593717

  10. Advancing Sexuality Studies: A Short Course on Sexuality Theory and Research Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Gillian; Dowsett, Gary W.; Duncan, Duane; Slavin, Sean; Corboz, Julienne

    2013-01-01

    Critical Sexuality Studies is an emerging field of academic enquiry linked to an international network of advocacy agencies, activists, and political issues. This paper reports on the development of an advanced short course in sexuality theory and research, drawing on Critical Sexuality Studies and aiming directly at academics in developing

  11. A DNA-based Identification Key to Pacific Northwest Freshwater Mussel Glochidia: Importance to Salmonid and Mussel Conservation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard G. Gustafson; Eric M. Iwamoto

    2005-01-01

    Glochidia larvae of unionacean mussels native to Pacific coast drainages are temporary obligate parasites on the gills or fins of fish, including juvenile Pacific salmonids. This parasitic condition in fishes has been termed glochidiosis, and may have a detrimental impact on both long- and short-term survival and growth in juvenile salmonids, particularly in hatcheries. Here we report diagnostic differences in

  12. Assessment of Salmonids and Their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, Annual Report 2002-2003

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Glen Mendel; Jeremy Trump; Mike Gembala

    2003-01-01

    This study began in 1998 to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. Stream flows in the Walla Walla Basin continue to show a general trend that begins with a sharp decline in discharge in late June, followed by low summer flows and then an increase in discharge in

  13. Are Block Nets Necessary?: Movement of Stream-Dwelling Salmonids in Response to Three Common Survey Methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James T. Peterson; Nolan P. Banish; Russell F. Thurow

    2005-01-01

    Fish movement during sampling may negatively bias sample data and population estimates. We evaluated the short-term movements of stream-dwelling salmonids by recapture of marked individuals during day and night snorkeling and backpack electrofishing. Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were captured in sufficient numbers to evaluate instream movements and the influence of stream habitat on movement. Salmonids

  14. Historical Changes in River Discharge in the Lower Columbia River: Impacts on River Stage, Tidal Range and Salmonid Habitat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Kukulka; D. A. Jay

    2001-01-01

    Juvenile salmonid access to favorable shallow water habitat in a tidal river and estuary is a function of river stage, tidal range, and the system's distribution of bed elevation. In this study, we investigate how historical changes in Columbia River discharge, due to climatic variability and flow regulation, affect river stage, tidal range, and salmonid access to shallow-water habitat in

  15. Proceedings : Workshop on Viral Diseases of Salmonid Fishes in the Columbia River Basin, Portland, Oregon, Oct. 7-8, 1982

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JoAnn Ching Leong; Theresa Y. Barila

    1983-01-01

    The objective of the Workshop on Viral Diseases of Salmonid Fishes in the Columbia River Basin was to summarize the status of current research activity, and to discuss and define research needs concerning fish viruses affecting salmonids within Columbia River Basin. Separate analytics were done for each paper.

  16. Enumeration of Salmonids in the Okanogan Basin Using Underwater Video, Performance Period: October 2005 (Project Inception) - 31 December 2006

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter N. Johnson; Michael D. Rayton; Bryan L. Nass; John E. Arterburn

    2007-01-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Tribes) identified the need for collecting baseline census data on the timing and abundance of adult salmonids in the Okanogan River Basin in order to determine basin and tributary-specific spawner distributions, evaluate the status and trends of natural salmonid production in the basin, document local fish populations, and augment existing fishery data.

  17. Vertical transmission of Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae (Myxozoa), the causative agent of salmonid proliferative kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elfattah, Ahmed; Fontes, Inês; Kumar, Gokhlesh; Soliman, Hatem; Hartikainen, Hanna; Okamura, Beth; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2014-04-01

    The freshwater bryozoan, Fredericella sultana, is the main primary host of the myxozoan endoparasite, Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae which causes proliferative kidney disease (PKD) of salmonid fish. Because spores that develop in bryozoan colonies are infectious to fish, bryozoans represent the ultimate source of PKD. Bryozoans produce numerous seed-like dormant stages called statoblasts that enable persistence during unfavourable conditions and achieve long-distance dispersal. The possibility that T. bryosalmonae may undergo vertical transmission via infection of statoblasts has been the subject of much speculation since this is observed in close relatives. This study provides the first evidence that such vertical transmission of T. bryosalmonae is extensive by examining the proportions of infected statoblasts in populations of F. sultana on two different rivers systems and confirms its effectiveness by demonstrating transmission from material derived from infected statoblasts to fish hosts. Vertical transmission in statoblasts is likely to play an important role in the infection dynamics of both bryozoan and fish hosts and may substantially contribute to the widespread distribution of PKD. PMID:24229733

  18. SALMOD: a population model for salmonids: user's manual. Version W3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholow, John; Heasley, John; Laake, Jeff; Sandelin, Jeff; Coughlan, Beth A.K.; Moos, Alan

    2002-01-01

    SALMOD is a computer model that simulates the dynamics of freshwater salmonid populations, both anadromous and resident. The conceptual model was developed in a workshop setting (Williamson et al. 1993) using fish experts concerned with Trinity River chinook restoration. The model builds on the foundation laid by similar models (see Cheslak and Jacobson 1990). The model’s premise that that egg and fish mortality are directly related to spatially and temporally variable micro- and macrohabitat limitations, which themselves are related to the timing and amount of streamflow and other meteorological variables. Habitat quality and capacity are characterized by the hydraulic and thermal properties of individual mesohabitats, which we use as spatial “computation units” in the model. The model tracks a population of spatially distinct cohorts that originate as gees and grow from one life stage to another as a function of local water temperature. Individual cohorts either remain in the computational unit in which they emerged or move, in whole or in part, to nearby units (see McCormick et al. 1998). Model processes include spawning (with red superimposition and incubation losses), growth (including egg maturation), mortality, and movement (freshet-induced, habitat-induced, and seasonal). Model processes are implemented such that the user (modeler) has the ability to more-or-less program the model on the fly to create the dynamics thought to animate the population. SALMOD then tabulates the various causes of mortality and the whereabouts of fish.

  19. Sexual arousal patterns: normal and deviant.

    PubMed

    Abel, Gene G; Coffey, Latricia; Osborn, Candice A

    2008-12-01

    The fetish objects in these case histories were unique enough, and the attraction to the objects strong enough, that the individuals could clearly track their interest from early childhood through adulthood. It is much easier to retrieve remote, explicit memories, such as events (eg, a party where balloons popped) or playing with objects, than to recall the process of sexual development with no distinct markers in the individual's history. Because these distinct experiences predated identified sexuality, became a focus of attention for the individual, and then were incorporated into the individual's sexual interests and masturbatory fantasies, it was possible to accurately track the patterns of sexual arousal. We were also able to clearly identify how these men attempted to blend their deviant interests into sexual relationships with partners and the consequences of their efforts. If we are to understand how sexual interests develop, a number of obstacles need to be overcome. Sexual interest has to be openly discussed. Parents need to appreciate how the early sexual interests of their children can go awry, contaminate their adult relationships, and lead to problematic lives. Researchers need a means of understanding how to communicate with children about their earliest interests, sexual interests, and sexual behaviors in a nonjudgmental manner. Until then, tracking unusual interests that lead to erotic interests is the first step in the overall process of understanding how sexual interest develops and is assimilated, either successfully or unsuccessfully, into an individual's adult sexual life. PMID:18996304

  20. Healthy Aging -- Sexual Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Healthy Aging This information in Spanish ( en español ) Sexual health More information on sexual health Many older women ... Protecting yourself Return to top More information on Sexual health Read more from womenshealth.gov Sexually Transmitted Infections ...

  1. Diverting victims of commercial sexual exploitation from juvenile detention: development of the InterCSECt screening protocol.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Emily J; Dabney, Jonathan D; Russell, Kelli

    2015-04-01

    Identifying victims of commercial sexual exploitation in the juvenile justice system is a challenging complexity requiring concerted organizational commitment. Using a three-tiered, trauma-informed screening process, a 3½-month pilot intervention was implemented in Clark County Juvenile Court (Washington) to identify victims in an effort to connect them to community youth advocates and sexual assault resources. A total of 535 boys and girls ages 9 to 19 were screened during intake; 47 of these youth reported risk factors associated with commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) and were subsequently referred to community advocates. Six youth (all girls) were confirmed CSEC victims and were successfully diverted from juvenile detention. Study results suggest that despite the lack of reliable data surrounding the prevalence of CSEC, juvenile justice agencies need to become educated on the risk factors to triage victims to services. PMID:25038222

  2. Using Experimental Paradigms to Examine Alcohol's Role in Men's Sexual Aggression: Opportunities and Challenges in Proxy Development.

    PubMed

    Abbey, Antonia; Wegner, Rhiana

    2015-08-01

    The goals of this article are to review the major findings from alcohol administration studies that use sexual aggression proxies and to encourage additional experimental research that evaluates hypotheses about the role of alcohol in the etiology of men's sexual aggression. Experiments allow participants to be randomly assigned to drink conditions, therefore ensuring that any differences between drinkers and nondrinkers can be attributed to their alcohol consumption. One of the biggest challenges faced by experimental researchers is the identification of valid operationalizations of key constructs. The tension between internal and external validity is particularly problematic for violence researchers because they cannot allow participants to engage in the target behavior in the laboratory. The strengths and limitations associated with written vignettes, audiotapes, videotapes, and confederate proxies for sexual aggression are described. Suggestions are made for future research to broaden the generalizability of the findings from experimental research. PMID:26048214

  3. Developing the interview protocol for video-recorded child sexual abuse investigations: a training experience with police officers, social workers, and clinical psychologists in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Cheung, K M

    1997-03-01

    A series of training programs which focused on culturally relevant questioning skills and video-recorded interviews in child sexual abuse cases were designed for social workers, police officers, and clinical psychologists in Hong Kong. An interview protocol was developed with four stages: rapport building, free narrative of account, questioning, and closure. The content analysis of 74 role-played interviews of video-recorded investigation revealed 119 questions and statements that were rated by these professionals and their instructor as helpful techniques in interviewing children suspected of having been sexually abused. Although each professional interviewed child victims with a unique style, they all found that maintaining a balanced perspective to play their roles in protecting the child, assessing the child, and collecting evidence was the most important aspect in an investigative process. PMID:9134258

  4. Genital Appearance Dissatisfaction: Implications for Women’s Genital Image Self-Consciousness, Sexual Esteem, Sexual Satisfaction, and Sexual Risk

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Vanessa R.; Calabrese, Sarah K.; Rima, Brandi N.; Zucker, Alyssa N.

    2010-01-01

    Findings regarding the link between body image and sexuality have been equivocal, possibly because of the insensitivity of many of body image measures to potential variability across sensory aspects of the body (e.g., appearance versus odor), individual body parts (e.g., genitalia versus thighs), and social settings (e.g., public versus intimate). The current study refined existing methods of evaluating women’s body image in the context of sexuality by focusing upon two highly specified dimensions: satisfaction with the visual appearance of the genitalia and self-consciousness about the genitalia during a sexual encounter. Genital appearance dissatisfaction, genital image self-consciousness, and multiple facets of sexuality were examined with a sample of 217 undergraduate women using an online survey. Path analysis revealed that greater dissatisfaction with genital appearance was associated with higher genital image self-consciousness during physical intimacy, which, in turn, was associated with lower sexual esteem, sexual satisfaction, and motivation to avoid risky sexual behavior. These findings underscore the detrimental impact of negative genital perceptions on young women’s sexual wellbeing, which is of particular concern given their vulnerability at this stage of sexual development as well as the high rates of sexually transmitted infections within this age group. Interventions that enhance satisfaction with the natural appearance of their genitalia could facilitate the development of a healthy sexual self-concept and provide long-term benefits in terms of sexual safety and satisfaction. PMID:20824180

  5. The evolutionary dynamics of major regulators for sexual development among Hymenoptera species.

    PubMed

    Biewer, Matthias; Schlesinger, Francisca; Hasselmann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    All hymenopteran species, such as bees, wasps and ants, are characterized by the common principle of haplodiploid sex determination in which haploid males arise from unfertilized eggs and females from fertilized eggs. The underlying molecular mechanism has been studied in detail in the western honey bee Apis mellifera, in which the gene complementary sex determiner (csd) acts as primary signal of the sex determining pathway, initiating female development by csd-heterozygotes. Csd arose from gene duplication of the feminizer (fem) gene, a transformer (tra) ortholog, and mediates in conjunction with transformer2 (tra2) sex-specific splicing of fem. Comparative molecular analyses identified fem/tra and its downstream target doublesex (dsx) as conserved unit within the sex determining pathway of holometabolous insects. In this study, we aim to examine evolutionary differences among these key regulators. Our main hypothesis is that sex determining key regulators in Hymenoptera species show signs of coevolution within single phylogenetic lineages. We take advantage of several newly sequenced genomes of bee species to test this hypothesis using bioinformatic approaches. We found evidences that duplications of fem are restricted to certain bee lineages and notable amino acid differences of tra2 between Apis and non-Apis species propose structural changes in Tra2 protein affecting co-regulatory function on target genes. These findings may help to gain deeper insights into the ancestral mode of hymenopteran sex determination and support the common view of the remarkable evolutionary flexibility in this regulatory pathway. PMID:25914717

  6. The evolutionary dynamics of major regulators for sexual development among Hymenoptera species

    PubMed Central

    Biewer, Matthias; Schlesinger, Francisca; Hasselmann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    All hymenopteran species, such as bees, wasps and ants, are characterized by the common principle of haplodiploid sex determination in which haploid males arise from unfertilized eggs and females from fertilized eggs. The underlying molecular mechanism has been studied in detail in the western honey bee Apis mellifera, in which the gene complementary sex determiner (csd) acts as primary signal of the sex determining pathway, initiating female development by csd-heterozygotes. Csd arose from gene duplication of the feminizer (fem) gene, a transformer (tra) ortholog, and mediates in conjunction with transformer2 (tra2) sex-specific splicing of fem. Comparative molecular analyses identified fem/tra and its downstream target doublesex (dsx) as conserved unit within the sex determining pathway of holometabolous insects. In this study, we aim to examine evolutionary differences among these key regulators. Our main hypothesis is that sex determining key regulators in Hymenoptera species show signs of coevolution within single phylogenetic lineages. We take advantage of several newly sequenced genomes of bee species to test this hypothesis using bioinformatic approaches. We found evidences that duplications of fem are restricted to certain bee lineages and notable amino acid differences of tra2 between Apis and non-Apis species propose structural changes in Tra2 protein affecting co-regulatory function on target genes. These findings may help to gain deeper insights into the ancestral mode of hymenopteran sex determination and support the common view of the remarkable evolutionary flexibility in this regulatory pathway. PMID:25914717

  7. Review of recent outcome data of disorders of sex development (DSD): emphasis on surgical and sexual outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Peter; Schober, Justine; Nordenström, Anna; Hoebeke, Piet; Houk, Christopher; Looijenga, Leendert; Manzoni, Gianantonio; Reiner, William; Woodhouse, Christopher

    2012-12-01

    This paper is a review of some of the recent publications regarding outcome of DSD patients, with an emphasis upon surgical and sexual outcomes. Currently available outcome studies of patients with DSDs have limitations because of multiple factors, including lack of representative patient sampling, and lack of adequate information concerning both medical and surgical care, and psychological, social and family support. The most frequent reports involve females with 21-?-hydroxylase deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). This most common form of DSD, if one excludes hypospadias and cryptorchidism, is an excellent example of a form of DSD in which all aspects of outcome, regarding surgery, sexual functionality and sensitivity, psychological input and endocrine hormonal therapy, carry a major role. The goals of therapy include a surgical outcome with a good cosmetic appearance and functionality with potential for sexual intercourse with sufficient sensitivity for satisfactory responsiveness. Endocrine replacement therapy should provide a normal adrenal hormonal milieu, while sex steroid therapy may be indicated. Psychological care should be provided from birth with gradual transition primarily to the patient, including basic counseling with full disclosure, although adjustment depends upon the patient's personality and parents' abilities and acceptance. Among forms of DSD involving gonadal insufficiency, hormonal replacement therapy should provide physiologic levels. Among females, estrogen therapy enhances healing after feminizing surgery and is required from puberty throughout adult life to maintain femininity, sexual organs and bone health, and enhance gender and sexuality. Among males, appropriate testosterone therapy maintains stamina, muscle tone, bone health, libido, sexual potency and general well-being, while benefit for healing after genital surgery is unclear. Further, outcome is clearly related to predominant cultural factors. Outcome studies should include evaluation of all of these factors. PMID:23158651

  8. The brief sexual attitudes scale.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, Clyde; Hendrick, Susan S; Reich, Darcy A

    2006-02-01

    The measurement of sexual attitudes is important, and ease of scale usability is one key aspect of measurement. This paper details three studies conducted to develop a briefer and thus more efficient version of the multidimensional Sexual Attitudes Scale (43 items). The first two studies (I and II) employed existing data sets to develop a 23-item version of the Sexual Attitudes Scale, using exploratory factor analysis in Study I and confirmatory factor analysis in Study II. The same four subscales of Permissiveness, Birth Control (formerly called Sexual Practices), Communion, and Instrumentality were retained in the 23-item measure, called the Brief Sexual Attitudes Scale. Study III was a prospective data collection using only the 23 items composing the Brief Sexual Attitudes Scale. The four subscales were hypothesized to correlate with a number of relationship measures in predictable ways. Results indicated that the Brief Sexual Attitudes Scale is a reliable and valid measure of the four sexual attitudes, and has strong psychometric properties. It should be effective and efficient for both research and clinical uses. PMID:16817070

  9. Student Sexual Misconduct Policy

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jianyu

    Student Sexual Misconduct Policy 2014-2015 #12;1 BOSTON COLLEGE STUDENT SEXUAL MISCONDUCT POLICY INDEX I. INTRODUCTION II. BUILDING AN EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT FREE FROM SEXUAL MISCONDUCT III. PROHIBITED BEHAVIOR a. Definitions i. Sexual Misconduct ii. Sexual Harassment iii. Sexual Assault iv. Consent

  10. Sexual Education and Morality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiecker, Ben

    1992-01-01

    Distinguishes five interpretations of sexual education including factual knowledge; self-control; stressing love; sexual training; and sexual morality. Suggests that sexual education should be understood as teaching children the moral tendencies relevant to sexual conduct. Argues that infantile sexual desire is based on a contradiction in terms…

  11. The prevalence of sexual aggression and victimization among homosexual men

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara Krahé; Stephan Schütze; Immo Fritsche; Eva Waizenhöfer

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of unwanted sexual contacts among a sample of 310 homosexual men with an average age of 21.8 years recruited in Berlin, Germany. A modified version of the Sexual Experiences Survey was developed to record unwanted contacts involving different means of coercion, sexual acts, and victim?perpetrator relationships. Reports were elicited about (a) sexual victimization and (b)

  12. Hypoactive sexual desire disorder caused by antiepileptic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M.; Bathla, Manish; Martin, A.; Aneja, J.

    2015-01-01

    Female sexual dysfunction is common but poorly understood sexual problem in women. Sexual dysfunction in female is multi-factorial in origin and also observed with intake of drug acting on central nervous system. This case report describes a female epileptic patient who developed sexual dysfunction with intake of antiepileptic drugs.

  13. Healing from Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Theoretical Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draucker, Claire Burke; Martsolf, Donna S.; Roller, Cynthia; Knapik, Gregory; Ross, Ratchneewan; Stidham, Andrea Warner

    2011-01-01

    Childhood sexual abuse is a prevalent social and health care problem. The processes by which individuals heal from childhood sexual abuse are not clearly understood. The purpose of this study was to develop a theoretical model to describe how adults heal from childhood sexual abuse. Community recruitment for an ongoing broader project on sexual

  14. Topographic and lithologic controls on occurrence of cobble-boulder channel beds: implications for salmonid over-wintering habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, E. T.; Sklar, L. S.; Marshall, J. A.; Ligon, F. K.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2009-12-01

    Channel beds dominated by cobble- and boulder-sized particles provide over-wintering habitat to Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and other salmonids because the fish use the interstitial space as refuge from high flows, particularly where large woody debris and off-channel habitat are not present. Methods for predicting the occurrence and quality of cobble-boulder (CoBo) substrate are needed to guide population modeling and landuse management to support salmonid restoration efforts. Here we report results of an ongoing study of the controls on CoBo occurrence in Pescadero Creek, a forested coastal watershed draining the north-western side of the Santa Cruz mountains in central California. Our operational definition of CoBo is a bed material median grain size of 120 mm, with a thickness of at least 150 mm, open interstitial matrix, and low recurrence interval of mobilization (e.g 50 years). CoBo habitat is typically found at channel slopes of 2% and greater, and where drainage area is sufficient to provide perennial flow, however many channels with these slope-area characteristics are too fine-grained to serve as CoBo habitat. We hypothesize that the occurrence of Cobo habitat is controlled by hillslope sediment supply conditions. In particular, production of a sufficient supply of cobbles and boulders requires a durable bedrock lithology and either steep topography capable of producing debris flow-generating landslides or bedrock-walled inner gorges. In larger-drainage-area, lower-slope mainstem channels, coarse sediment plumes associated with tributary junctions may also be common sites of CoBo occurrence. We are using a combination of field reconnaissance and surveying, geologic mapping, and DEM analysis of channel network and hillslope topography to assess sediment supply conditions associated with occurrence of CoBo substrates. We are also assessing the habitat quality of reaches with CoBo substrates, which can be degraded by high supply of gravel and finer-grained sediments. Our goal is to develop and test a predictive model of CoBo occurrence that can be applied in other watersheds where availability of over-wintering habitat may be a limiting factor for salmonid populations.

  15. Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin; 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Suzanne M.; Kern, J. Chris; Carmichael, Richard W. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

    1997-01-01

    This is the second year report of a multi-year project that monitors the outmigration and survival of hatchery and naturally-produced juvenile salmonids in the lower Umatilla River. This project supplements and complements ongoing or completed fisheries projects in the Umatilla River basin. Knowledge gained on outmigration and survival will assist researchers and managers in adapting hatchery practices, flow enhancement strategies, canal operations, and supplementation and enhancement efforts for natural and restored fish populations. The authors also report on tasks related to evaluating juvenile salmonid passage at Three Mile Falls Dam and West Extension Canal.

  16. Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin; 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Suzanne M.; Cameron, William A.; Shapleigh, Stacey L. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, La Grande, OR)

    1995-12-01

    This is the first year report of a multi-year project that monitors the outmigration and survival of hatchery and naturally produced juvenile salmonids in the lower Umatilla River. This project supplements and complements ongoing or completed fisheries projects in the Umatilla river basin. Knowledge gained on outmigration and survival will assist researchers and managers in adapting hatchery practices, flow enhancement strategies, canal operations, and supplementation and enhancement efforts for natural fish populations. This project also completed tasks related to evaluating juvenile salmonid passage at Three Mile Falls Dam and West Extension Canal.

  17. Early hormonal influences on childhood sex-typed activity and playmate preferences: Implications for the development of sexual orientation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sheri A. Berenbaum; Elizabeth Snyder

    1995-01-01

    Early hormones have been hypothesized to influence both sexual orientation and related childhood sex-typed behaviors. This study examined hormonal influences on activity and playmate preferences in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) age 2.5 to 12 years (24 girls, 19 boys) and their relatives (16 girls, 25 boys). CAH girls preferred boys' toys and activities. They also had greater preference

  18. Involving the Hard to Reach: Developing and Evaluating a Sexual Health Programme for Early School Leavers in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, William C. W.; Holroyd, Eleanor A.; Lee, Albert; Wong, Jonathan C. P.; Leung, Phil W. S.

    2011-01-01

    Early school leavers cannot access school-based sex education programmes, increasing their vulnerability to sexual health issues. This study evaluated a culturally-sensitive and target-orientated sex education programme involving this group. Early school leavers were recruited from two branches of the Chinese Young Men's Christian Association in…

  19. Early Hormonal Influences on Childhood Sex-Typed Activity and Playmate Preferences: Implications for the Development of Sexual Orientation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sheri A. Berenbaum; Elizabeth Snyder

    1995-01-01

    Early hormones have been hypothesized to influence both sexual orientation and related childhood sex-typed behaviors. This study examined hormonal influences on activity and playmate preferences in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) age 2.5 to 12 years (24 girls, 19 boys) and their relatives (16 girls, 25 boys). CAH girls preferred boys' toys and activities. They also had greater preference

  20. Sex As a Coping Strategy and Its Relationship to Juvenile Sexual History and Intimacy in Sexual Offenders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franca Cortoni; William L. Marshall

    2001-01-01

    The current research examined the hypothesis that sexual activity functions as a coping strategy for sexual offenders. A 16-item scale, the Coping Using Sex Inventory (CUSI), was developed to assess the presence of and the degree to which sex was used to deal with problematic situations. Sexual offenders consistently reported, using sexual activities, both consenting and nonconsenting, as a coping

  1. Measurement and Design Issues in the Study of Adolescent Sexual Behavior and the Evaluation of Adolescent Sexual Health Behavior Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Michael; Palacios, Rebecca; Penhollow, Tina M.

    2012-01-01

    To improve the quality of research and commentary concerning adolescent sexuality and evaluation of both comprehensive sexuality education and abstinence education programs, this article aims to help readers (1) select appropriate measures to study adolescent sexual behavior, (2) develop appropriate study designs to evaluate adolescent sexual

  2. Development of male gender identity/role and a sexual orientation towards women in a 46,XY subject with an incomplete form of the androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gooren, L; Cohen-Kettenis, P T

    1991-10-01

    Transsexualism and homosexuality have been theorized to originate in the male from insufficient androgenization of the brain. For verification of this hypothesis clinical science must rely on subjects with an abnormal prenatal/perinatal endocrine history. A case of a 33-year-old 46,XY subject with an incomplete form of androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is presented. In adulthood the only genital sign of masculinization is a clitoris of 4 cm; the vagina is normal size. The diagnosis AIS was verified by androgen receptor studies. At birth there was confusion as to the sex of the newborn. Originally, the subject was assigned to the male sex, but this decision was reversed 5 days after birth and the subject was reared as a girl. At age 30 the subject applied for gender reassignment treatment to the male sex. Upon psychological evaluation the gender identity was unambiguously male and the sexual orientation was exclusively towards women. The estrogen feedback effect on LH, regarded by some as a marker of the sexual differentiation of the neuroendocrinium was negative before orchiectomy but positive after orchiectomy. Our observation demonstrates that in 46,XY subjects a male gender identity and a sexual orientation towards women can develop with a strikingly lower-than-normal level of biological action of androgens. PMID:1747041

  3. Sexuality education: Finnish and Chilean experiences.

    PubMed

    Apter, Dan; Molina Cartes, Ramiro

    2012-01-01

    All children and young people have the right to age-appropriate sexuality education regardless of gender, sexual orientation, ability or faith. Sexuality education provides knowledge, skills and positive values to determine and enjoy their sexuality, have safe, fulfilling relationships if one so wishes and decides, and to take responsibility for their own and for a possible partner's sexual health and well-being. Several international programs have been developed and recently published by the Population Council, IPPF and other coworkers, by UNICEF, and by WHO Europe. This chapter will briefly describe recent global development in sexuality education, and then, as examples, experience from two countries, Finland and Chile. The experiences from these school based programs suggest an important role of sexuality education. PMID:22846538

  4. Ensuring youth's right to participation and promotion of youth leadership in the development of sexual and reproductive health policies and programs.

    PubMed

    Villa-Torres, Laura; Svanemyr, Joar

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to reflect on the concepts of adolescence and youth, summarize models and frameworks developed to conceptualize youth participation, and assess research that has attempted to evaluate the implementation and impact of youth participation in the field of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). We searched and critically reviewed relevant published reports and "gray literature" from the period 2000-2013. "Young people" are commonly defined as those between the ages of 10 and 24 years, but what it means to be a young person varies largely across cultures and depends on a range of socioeconomic factors. Several conceptual frameworks have been developed to better understand youth participation, and some frameworks are designed to monitor youth development programs that have youth participation as a key component. Although none of them are SRHR specific, they have the potential to be adapted and applied also for adolescents' SRHR programs. The most monitored and evaluated intervention type is peer education programs, but the effectiveness of the approach is questioned. There are few attempts to systematically evaluate youth participation, and clear indicators and better methodologies still need to be developed. More research and documentation as well as the adoption of innovative practices for involving youth in sexual and reproductive health programs are needed. Participation is a right and should not only be evaluated in terms of effectiveness and impact. Youth participation in program and policy development should still be a priority. PMID:25528979

  5. Gone but not forgotten: virginity loss and current sexual satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Smith, C Veronica; Shaffer, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Although loss of virginity remains a salient experience throughout a person's lifetime, little is known about whether this experience has implications for later sexual functioning (e.g., sexual satisfaction). Previous research tends to ask participants about their first time and their current sexual functioning concurrently, which may lead to spillover effects. The authors investigated the relation between first-time sexual intercourse and current sexual satisfaction using an event-sampling methodology. Participants were 331 undergraduate students who answered questions about their first-time sexual encounter and their current sexual functioning (e.g., sexual satisfaction, sexual depression). Participants then described and rated each of their sexual interactions for 2 weeks. Results show that participants who had more positive first-time sexual experiences (e.g., intimacy, respect) report greater feelings of sexual satisfaction and esteem and less sexual depression. A series of multilevel random coefficient modeling analyses revealed that positive first-time experiences were predictive of physical and emotional satisfaction in their current sexual interactions, even when controlling for global sexual satisfaction. These results suggest that one's first-time sexual experience is more than just a milestone in development. Rather, it appears to have implications for their sexual well-being years later. PMID:23252636

  6. Healthy Sex and Sexual Health: New Directions for Studying Outcomes of Sexual Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefkowitz, Eva S.; Vasilenko, Sara A.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual behavior is an important aspect of adolescent development with implications for well-being. These chapters highlight important perspectives on studying sexual health from a normative, developmental perspective, such as viewing a range of sexual behaviors as life events; considering potentially positive physical health, mental health, social…

  7. Investigating the Geomorphic and Ecologic Functions of Wood in Relationship to Habitat Type and Salmonid Redds on a Regulated California River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senter, A. E.; Pasternack, G. B.

    2006-12-01

    Most river rehabilitation projects incorporate little to no wood in current designs, and those that do have little science to guide them. The overall goal of this research is to investigate the role of wood in a regulated, mid- sized (where river width is greater than most tree heights), Mediterranean-climate (where smaller, softer-wood trees dominate the landscape) river in order to provide a scientific foundation for the potential use of wood in rehabilitation projects within such systems. Wood structures in the active salmonid spawning reach of the Lower Mokelumne River in Central California were measured, mapped, and described during summer and fall 2006. Digital photos and GPS coordinates were used to establish wood location within the stream channel. Structural morphology was determined by measuring physical properties such as individual diameter and length, orientation to stream flow, and jam dimensions. In addition, qualitative attributes were recorded such as decay class and leaf, limb, bark, and root characteristics. A GIS wood layer will be created and added to a database of existing Mokelumne River GIS layers containing salmonid redd (salmon egg nests) densities, hydraulic conditions associated with individual redds, and sub-reach habitat types. An analysis of wood properties, redd locations and conditions, and habitat types will be used to develop a conceptual model of wood dynamics in relation to salmonid habitat on the Lower Mokelumne River. The primary products of this study will be (1) a scientific conceptual model of the role of wood in regulated gravel reaches of mid-size rivers in Mediterranean California and (2) a decision-making framework that will enable river managers to include scientifically based wood structures into rehabilitation designs, thereby enhancing spawning habitat, stream complexity, and biological diversity. These tools will be developed in collaboration with East Bay Municipal Utilities District to aid in the continuing rehabilitation of the Lower Mokelumne River.

  8. Teenage Sexuality

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be ready to have sexual intercourse? Will having sex help my relationship? If I am attracted to a same-sex ... parents about your family's values. Waiting to have sex until you are older, in a serious relationship, and able to accept the responsibilities that come ...

  9. An epidemic model for the interactions between thermal regime of rivers and transmission of Proliferative Kidney Disease in salmonid fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, Luca; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Mari, Lorenzo; Gatto, Marino; Strepparava, Nicole; Hartikainen, Hanna; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Proliferative kidney disease (PKD) affects salmonid populations in European and North-American rivers. It is caused by the endoparasitic myxozoan Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae, which exploits freshwater bryozoans (Fredericella sultana) and salmonids as primary and secondary hosts, respectively. Incidence and mortality, which can reach up to 90-100%, are known to be strongly related to water temperature. PKD has been present in brown trout population for a long time but has recently increased rapidly in incidence and severity causing a decline in fish catches in many countries. In addition, environmental changes are feared to cause PKD outbreaks at higher latitude and altitude regions as warmer temperatures promote disease development. This calls for a better comprehension of the interactions between disease dynamics and the thermal regime of rivers, in order to possibly devise strategies for disease management. In this perspective, a spatially explicit model of PKD epidemiology in riverine host metacommunities is proposed. The model aims at summarizing the knowledge on the modes of transmission of the disease and the life-cycle of the parasite, making the connection between temperature and epidemiological parameters explicit. The model accounts for both local population and disease dynamics of bryozoans and fish and hydrodynamic dispersion of the parasite spores and hosts along the river network. The model is time-hybrid, coupling inter-seasonal and intra-seasonal dynamics, the former being described in a continuous time domain, the latter seen as time steps of a discrete time domain. In order to test the model, a case study is conducted in river Wigger (Cantons of Aargau and Lucerne, Switzerland), where data about water temperature, brown trout and bryozoan populations and PKD prevalence are being collected.

  10. Sexuality I. Sexual Orienta0on

    E-print Network

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    1 Sexuality I. Sexual Orienta0on II. Hormones & cogni0on III. The Female sexual Behavior of the Human Female (1953) by A. Kinsey #12;2 II. Hormones, Cogni0on & Learning A and female-typical sexual behaviors in vertebrates 1. Testosterone ­ Posi0ve rela0onship

  11. Comparison of growth and metabolic regulation between wild, domesticated and transgenic salmonids.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain a better understanding of the aspects underlying normal and growth hormone enhanced growth in salmonids, quantitative expression analysis was performed for a number of genes related to muscle growth, metabolism, immunology and energy regulation. This analysis was performed in liver and musc...

  12. The current status and future focus of probiotic and prebiotic applications for salmonids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel L. Merrifield; Arkadios Dimitroglou; Andrew Foey; Simon J. Davies; Remi T. M. Baker; Jarl Bøgwald; Mathieu Castex; Einar Ringø

    2010-01-01

    Salmonids are an important contributor to fish production in many countries. Concerted research efforts have concentrated on optimising production with eco-friendly alternatives to the therapeutic use of antimicrobials. Probiotics and prebiotics offer potential alternatives by providing benefits to the host primarily via the direct or indirect modulation of the gut microbiota. Suggested modes of action resulting from increased favourable bacteria

  13. Problems affecting nitrification in commercial RAS with fixed-bed biofilters for salmonids in Chile

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Esteban J. M. Emparanza

    2009-01-01

    The present case study focused on the problems that affect the nitrification process at three commercial recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) for salmonids with fixed-bed biofilters operating in Chile, where the main factors were found to be management problems: (1) large variations in daily feeding, which results in unstable nitrogenous compounds (TAN, NO2?, NO3?) concentration; (2) variable daily water exchange, producing

  14. Introduced Salmonids: Where are They Going in Quebec Watersheds of the Saint-Laurent River?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pierre Dumont; Jacques F. Bergeron; Pierre Dulude; Yves Mailhot; Aubin Rouleau; Grégoire Ouellet; Jean-Pierre Lebel

    1988-01-01

    Salmonid fish (Salmonidae) are among the most important sport and commercial species in North America. Numerous attempts to extend their range have been made over the past 100 years. In Canada, Québec was among the first provinces to be involved in such attempts. Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), brown trout (S. trutta), cutthroat trout (S. clarki), kokanee (Oncorhyncus nerka), Arctic grayling

  15. Predation by seals on salmonids in two Scottish T . J . C A R T E R

    E-print Network

    Pierce, Graham

    Predation by seals on salmonids in two Scottish estuaries T . J . C A R T E R Department of Life of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK Abstract Detailed observations of the behaviour of harbour seals, Phoca vitulina L years between 1993 and 1996. Small numbers of grey seals, Halichoerus grypus Fab., were also present

  16. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Lookout Point Dam, 2010

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fenton Khan; Gary E. Johnson; Ida M. Royer; James S. Hughes; Eric S. Fischer; Donna M. Trott; Gene R. Ploskey

    2012-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) on the Middle Fork Willamette River for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE), to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at LOP and others dams in USACE's Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response

  17. Potential for Dissemination of the Nonnative Salmonid Parasite Myxobolus cerebralis in Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Leyla Arsan; Jerri L. Bartholomew

    2008-01-01

    Myxobolus cerebralis, the myxozoan parasite responsible for whirling disease in salmonids, was first introduced into the United States in 1958 and has since spread across the country, causing severe declines in wild trout populations in the intermountain western United States. The recent detection of the parasite in Alaska is further evidence of the species' capability to invade and colonize new

  18. An Assessment of Lower Snake River Hydrosystem Alternatives on Survival and Recovery of Snake River Salmonids

    E-print Network

    REFERENCES Websites An Assessment of Lower Snake River Hydrosystem Alternatives on Survival and Recovery of Snake River Salmonids http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/afis/ Columbia River article http://www.umatilla.nsn.us/main.html Economics of Snake River Salmon Recovery http://www.columbiaconversations.org/pages/Economics/Economics_Snake

  19. Influence of Fire on Native and Nonnative Salmonid Populations and Habitat in a Western Montana Basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clint M. Sestrich; Thomas E. McMahon; Michael K. Young

    2011-01-01

    Anticipated increases in the frequency and severity of wildfire may threaten the persistence of native salmonid populations in headwater streams in western North America. This study used extensive pre- and postfire data to assess whether wildfire leads to hypothesized declines in native westslope cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi and bull trout Salvelinus confluentus populations along with increases in the prevalence

  20. Consumption of Migrating Juvenile Salmonids by Gulls Foraging below a Columbia River Dam

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregory T. Ruggerone

    1986-01-01

    Consumption of migrating juvenile Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead Salmo gairdneri by gulls was estimated below the turbine area of Wanapum Dam on the Columbia River in 1982. Foraging success of the gulls, chiefly ring-billed gulls Larus delawarensis, averaged 65% during bright light conditions and 51% during the evening. The number of salmonids consumed by gulls ranged from 50

  1. Influence of streamside vegetation on inputs of terrestrial invertebrates to salmonid food webs

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Diane

    Influence of streamside vegetation on inputs of terrestrial invertebrates to salmonid food webs J, and spawning migrations. We examined the contribution of terrestrially derived invertebrates (TI) to juvenile of invertebrate mass averaged across all sites; no significant differences associated with location (plant

  2. A conserved haplotype controls parallel adaptation in geographically distant salmonid populations

    E-print Network

    Doe, Chris

    A conserved haplotype controls parallel adaptation in geographically distant salmonid populations, CHRIS Q. DOE* and GARY H. THORGAARD *Institute of Molecular Biology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA, School of Biological Sciences and Center for Reproductive

  3. 4-Genetic studies in saLmonids GENETIC VARIATION IN PRODUCTION TRAITS OF ATLANTIC SALMON

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    4- Genetic studies in saLmonids GENETIC VARIATION IN PRODUCTION TRAITS OF ATLANTIC SALMON K. GUNNES of genetic variation in production traits of wild Atlantic salmon strains has been carried out at five fish. It is concluded that this interaction can be neglected in a selection program for farmed salmon. Highly

  4. Stream-bed scour, egg burial depths, and the influence of salmonid spawning on bed surface

    E-print Network

    Montgomery, David R.

    Stream-bed scour, egg burial depths, and the influence of salmonid spawning on bed surface mobility-Hames, and Thomas P. Quinn Abstract: Bed scour, egg pocket depths, and alteration of stream-bed surfaces by spawning correspondence between egg burial depths and scour depths during the incubation period suggests an adaptation

  5. Seasonal Juvenile Salmonid Presence and Migratory Behavior in the Lower Columbia River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jessica A. Carter; Geoffrey A. McMichael; Ian D. Welch; Ryan A. Harnish; Brian J. Bellgraph

    2009-01-01

    To facilitate preparing Biological Assessments of proposed channel maintenance projects, the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to consolidate and synthesize available information about the use of the lower Columbia River and estuary by juvenile anadromous salmonids. The information to be synthesized included existing published documents as well as data from

  6. Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin, 1983 Annual Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John L

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Microbiology at Oregon State University with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration conducted a study relating to the epidemiology and control of three fish diseases of salmonids in the Columbia River Basin. These three diseases were ceratomyxosis which is caused by the myxosporidan parasite Ceratomyxa shasta, bacterial kidney disease, the etiological agent of which is Renibacterium salmoninarum,

  7. Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin, 1987 Annual Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John L

    1989-01-01

    The Department of Microbiology at Oregon State University with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration has been conducting a study concerning the epidemiology and control of three fish pathogens which cause major disease problems in salmonids of the Columbia River basin. The pathogens studied include Cera to myxa Shasta, the myxosporean parasite which causes ceratomyxosis; Renibacterium salmoninarum, the bacterium which

  8. Juvenile Salmonid Use of Reconnected Tidal Freshwater Wetlands in Grays River, Lower Columbia River Basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Curtis Roegner; Earl W. Dawley; Micah Russell; Allan Whiting; David J. Teel

    2010-01-01

    Degraded wetland systems with impaired hydraulic connections have resulted in diminished habitat opportunity for salmonid fishes and other native flora and fauna in the Pacific Northwest. Many of these lost habitats were once intertidal freshwater marshes and swamps. Restoration of these systems is effected in part by reestablishing tidal processes that promote connectivity, with a central goal of restoring rearing

  9. Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin, 1984 Annual Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John L

    1985-01-01

    The Department of Microbiology at Oregon State University with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration has conducted a study since 1983 relating to the epidemiology and control of three diseases of salmonids in the Columbia River Basin. These diseases are ceratomyxosis, caused by the protozoan parasite Ceratomyxa Shasta, bacterial kidney disease, the etiological agent of which is Renibacterium salmoninarum and

  10. Genetic Characterization of Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus of Coastal Salmonid Stocks in Washington State

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eveline J. Emmenegger; Gael Kurath

    2002-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a pathogen that infects many Pacific salmonid stocks from the watersheds of North America. Previous studies have thoroughly characterized the genetic diversity of IHNV isolates from Alaska and the Hagerman Valley in Idaho. To enhance understanding of the evolution and viral transmission patterns of IHNV within the Pacific Northwest geographic range, we analyzed the

  11. Characterizing the distribution of an endangered salmonid using environmental DNA analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laramie, Matthew; Pilliod, David S.; Goldberg, Caren S.

    2015-01-01

    Determining species distributions accurately is crucial to developing conservation and management strategies for imperiled species, but a challenging task for small populations. We evaluated the efficacy of environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis for improving detection and thus potentially refining the known distribution of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Methow and Okanogan Subbasins of the Upper Columbia River, which span the border between Washington, USA and British Columbia, Canada. We developed an assay to target a 90 base pair sequence of Chinook DNA and used quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to quantify the amount of Chinook eDNA in triplicate 1-L water samples collected at 48 stream locations in June and again in August 2012. The overall probability of detecting Chinook with our eDNA method in areas within the known distribution was 0.77 (±0.05 SE). Detection probability was lower in June (0.62, ±0.08 SE) during high flows and at the beginning of spring Chinook migration than during base flows in August (0.93, ±0.04 SE). In the Methow subbasin, mean eDNA concentration was higher in August compared to June, especially in smaller tributaries, probably resulting from the arrival of spring Chinook adults, reduced discharge, or both. Chinook eDNA concentrations did not appear to change in the Okanogan subbasin from June to August. Contrary to our expectations about downstream eDNA accumulation, Chinook eDNA did not decrease in concentration in upstream reaches (0–120 km). Further examination of factors influencing spatial distribution of eDNA in lotic systems may allow for greater inference of local population densities along stream networks or watersheds. These results demonstrate the potential effectiveness of eDNA detection methods for determining landscape-level distribution of anadromous salmonids in large river systems.

  12. Young Women’s Social and Occupational Development and Mental Health in the Aftermath of Child Sexual Abuse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth A. Schilling; Robert H. Aseltine Jr; Susan Gore

    2007-01-01

    We examined social role functioning and depressive symptoms of young adults who were abused as children in data from a longitudinal\\u000a community sample. Sexually abused women and men were more depressed during their senior year of high school, and this difference\\u000a was more pronounced 2 years later. We then examined a mediational model to determine whether social functioning explained\\u000a the course

  13. Influence of intermittent stream connectivity on water quality and salmonid survivorship.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, J.; Woelfle-Erskine, C. A.; Larsen, L.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic stress and climate change are causing an increasing number of California streams to become intermittent and are driving earlier and more severe summertime drying. The extent to which emerging water conservation alternatives impact flows or habitat quality (e.g. temperature, DO) for salmonids remains poorly understood. Here, we investigate the proximal drivers of salmonid mortality over a range of connectivity conditions during summertime intermittency in Salmon Creek watershed, Sonoma County, CA. Through extensive sampling in paired subwatersheds over a period of two years, we tested the hypothesis that accumulation of readily bioavailable DOC in poorly flushed pools drives DO decline associated with loss of salmonids. We then traced the origin and flow pathways of DOC throughout the watershed using Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC). We obtained samples for DOC and stable isotope analyses at monthly intervals from 20 piezometers and surface water in the study reaches and from private wells and springs distributed throughout the watersheds. We also obtained in situ DO, conductivity and pH readings within stream study reaches. We determined DOC quality by SUVA (specific UV absorbance) and fluorescence index. We calculated stream metabolism rates using the single station method. In pools instrumented with DO sensors, we compared changing DOC quality during the summer months to changes in DO concentrations and stream metabolism. Our results show that the duration of complete disconnection of pools during the summer months and stream metabolic rates are positively correlated with salmonid mortality. Furthermore, our results indicate that salmonid mortality is greatest in disconnected pools with low DOC fluorescence indices and high SUVA values, indicative of terrestrially derived DOC and little or no groundwater inflow. Conversely low salmonid mortality was found in disconnected pools with high fluorescence index and low SUVA, indicative of microbially derived DOC. These pools showed clear signs of hyporheic inflow during summertime drying despite complete surficial disconnection. PARAFAC analysis pinpointed groundwater sources of hyporheic flow in the watershed, suggesting that targeted aquifer recharge may contribute to salmonid recovery by augmenting flow in summer refugia.

  14. Recycling parental sexual messages.

    PubMed

    Darling, C A; Hicks, M W

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore parent-child sexual communication by investigating the impact of direct and indirect parental messages on the sexual attitudes and sexual satisfaction of young adults. A survey research design was used to obtain data from undergraduate students attending a large Southern university. The findings indicate that both direct and indirect parental sexual messages are negative and restrictive and have a differential impact on sexual satisfaction and sexual attitudes. While sexual satisfaction was positive, sexual attitudes were found to be problematic, especially among females. Suggestions are given for approaches that family life educators and parents may use in order to recycle previous sexual messages. PMID:6631981

  15. The sexual cascade and the rise of pre-ejaculatory (Darwinian) sexual selection, sex roles, and sexual conflict.

    PubMed

    Parker, Geoff A

    2014-10-01

    After brief historic overviews of sexual selection and sexual conflict, I argue that pre-ejaculatory sexual selection (the form of sexual selection discussed by Darwin) arose at a late stage in an inevitable succession of transitions flowing from the early evolution of syngamy to the evolution of copulation and sex roles. If certain conditions were met, this "sexual cascade" progressed inevitably, if not, sexual strategy remained fixed at a given stage. Prolonged evolutionary history of intense sperm competition/selection under external fertilization preceded the rise of advanced mobility, which generated pre-ejaculatory sexual selection, followed on land by internal fertilization and reduced sperm competition in the form of postcopulatory sexual selection. I develop a prospective model of the early evolution of mobility, which, as Darwin realized, was the catalyst for pre-ejaculatory sexual selection. Stages in the cascade should be regarded as consequential rather than separate phenomena and, as such, invalidate much current opposition to Darwin-Bateman sex roles. Potential for sexual conflict occurs throughout, greatly increasing later in the cascade, reaching its peak under precopulatory sexual selection when sex roles become highly differentiated. PMID:25147177

  16. The social context of adolescent sexuality: safe sex implications.

    PubMed

    Moore, S; Rosenthal, D

    1992-12-01

    This study was an examination of the sexual worlds of 153 adolescents aged 15 to 18 years through the content analysis of interviews on the topics of love, romance, relationships between the sexes, sexual values and sexual behaviors. The aim was to develop more detailed descriptions of the dimension of adolescent sexuality and relate these dimensions to sexual risk, that is, the tendency to engage in unprotected intercourse, an activity which increases vulnerability to AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. To this end, seven themes were isolated from the interview scripts, these being permissiveness, double standards, belief about sexual control (the Id Factor), romance, regrets about permissiveness, sexual aggression, and questioning. Measures of four of these themes were constructed, and sex and sub-group differences explored, as were the relationships between themes and sexual risk. The implications of different "pathways" to sexual risk-taking were discussed. PMID:1487577

  17. Sexual assault.

    PubMed

    1997-11-01

    This document provides information on issues related to sexual assault in the US. The specific topics briefly discussed are incidence, psychological impact, assault assessment kits, medical evaluation, legal concerns, counseling, follow-up, and special circumstances. It is stated that a woman who is sexually assaulted would experience intense anxiety, anger or fear, and rape-trauma syndrome. The physician evaluating the victim should be aware of the state statutory requirements, which may involve the use of kits for gathering evidence. Informed consent from the victim and meticulous physical examination of the entire body should be performed with photographs and drawings made in the injured areas. In counseling, the physician should talk with the patient concerning the degree of the injury and the probability of infection or pregnancy. There is a need for patients to be reevaluated concerning her medical and psychological status. PMID:12295376

  18. Phenotypic and genotypic analysis of Flavobacterium psychrophilum isolates from Ontario salmonids with bacterial coldwater disease.

    PubMed

    Hesami, Shohreh; Allen, Katie J; Metcalf, Devon; Ostland, Vaughn E; MacInnes, Janet I; Lumsden, John S

    2008-08-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the causative agent of bacterial coldwater disease (BCWD) and rainbow trout fry syndrome. BCWD has a considerable economic impact on aquaculture operations in Ontario, Canada, and our limited understanding of the population structure and epidemiology of F. psychrophilum isolates is an impediment to the development of improved management strategies. Seventy-five 16S rRNA gene and gyr polymerase chain reaction positive isolates of F. psychrophilum that had been collected over a 16-year period from farmed salmonids with tail rot, necrotic myositis, and osteochondrosis were characterized morphologically, biochemically, and genotypically. Although the isolates were homogeneous by preliminary biochemical and phenotypic characterization, two distinct biovars were found by API ZYM testing. As well, four restriction pattern types were detected by 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction -- restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and there was a significant (P < 0.001) correlation between biovar I and digestion with MaeIII and between biovar II and digestion with MnlI or no site (P < 0.05). Further heterogenity was detected by sequence analysis of a 194 bp stem loop 3 region of rRNA. Nine sequence types were identified; 40/46 biovar I isolates were sequence type "a", while 21/32 biovar II isolates belonged to either sequence type "c" or "d". More than one biovar and genotype was identified among the strains recovered from separate fish sampled from three groups of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) experiencing BCWD mortality events. No association was found between genotype or biovar and type of disease. Taken together, these data suggest that F. psychrophilum from Ontario can be grouped into two major lineages based on biovar and 16S rRNA polymorphisms, and although three major strain types were most frequently isolated in this study, it appears that the population of F. psychrophilum with pathogenic potential is quite heterogeneous. PMID:18772924

  19. A rapid solid-phase extraction fluorometric method for thiamine and riboflavin in salmonid eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zajicek, J.L.; Tillitt, D.E.; Brown, S.B.; Brown, L.R.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Fitzsimons, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    A new method has been developed and successfully applied to the selective measurement of thiamine (nonphosphorylated), total thiamine (sum of thiamine, thiamine monophosphate [TMP], thiamine diphosphate [TDP], and thiamine triphosphate [TTP]), and potentially interfering riboflavin in acidic (2% trichloroacetic acid) extracts of selected salmonid and walleye egg samples. Acidic extracts of eggs were applied directly to end-capped C18, reversed-phase solid-phase extraction (SPE) columns and separated into three fractions by elution with mixtures of PO4 buffer (pH 2), methanol (10%), and acetonitrile (20%). All thiamine compounds recovered in the first two fractions were oxidized to their corresponding thiochromes with alkaline potassium hexacyanoferrate, and we measured the thiochrome fluorescence (excitation at 360 nm, emission at 460 nm) in a 96-well microplate reader. Riboflavin, recovered in third fraction (eluted with pH 2, 20% acetonitrile), was analyzed directly by measuring the fluorescence of this fraction (excitation at 450 nm, emission at 530 nm). Significant portions of the phosphate esters of thiamine (TMP, TDP, and presumably TTP), when present at low concentrations (< 10 nmol of total -thiamine per gram of egg), were not retained by the 100-mg SPE column, and were collected directly during sample loading and in a subsequent phosphoric acid rinse as fraction 1. Free thiamine (nonphosphorylated) and remaining portions of the TDP and TMP were then eluted in the second fraction with 10% methanol/PO4 buffer, whereas the un-ionized, relatively nonpolar riboflavin was eluted in the third fraction with 20% acetonitrile. This new method uses a traditional sample homogenization of egg tissue to extract thiamine compounds into 2% trichlororacetic acid solution; an inexpensive, commercially available SPE column; small amounts of sample (0.5-1 g); microliter volumes of solvents per sample; a traditional, relatively nonhazardous, oxidation of thiamine compounds to fluorescent thiochromes; and an ultraviolet-visible-wavelength-filter fluorometer for the measurements. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  20. Sexual Esteem in Emerging Adulthood: Associations with Sexual Behavior, Contraception Use, and Romantic Relationships.

    PubMed

    Maas, Megan K; Lefkowitz, Eva S

    2014-09-11

    Sexual esteem is an integral psychological aspect of sexual health (Snell & Papini, 1989 ), yet it is unclear whether sexual esteem is associated with sexual health behavior among heterosexual men and women. The current analysis used a normative framework for sexual development (Lefkowitz & Gillen, 2006 ; Tolman & McClelland, 2011 ) by examining the association of sexual esteem with sexual behavior, contraception use, and romantic relationship characteristics. Participants (N = 518; 56.0% female; mean age = 20.43 years; 26.8% identified as Hispanic/Latino; among non-Hispanic/Latinos, 27.2% of the full sample identified as European American, 22.4% Asian American, 14.9% African American, and 8.7% multiracial) completed Web-based surveys at a large Northeastern university. Participants who had oral sex more frequently, recently had more oral and penetrative sex partners (particularly for male participants), and spent more college semesters in romantic relationships tended to have higher sexual esteem than those who had sex less frequently, with fewer partners, or spent more semesters without romantic partners. Sexually active male emerging adults who never used contraception during recent penetrative sex tended to have higher sexual esteem than those who did use it, whereas female emerging adults who never used contraception tended to have lower sexual esteem than those who did use it. Implications of these results for the development of a healthy sexual self-concept in emerging adulthood are discussed. PMID:25210789

  1. Sexual networks: measuring sexual selection in structured, polyandrous populations

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Grant C.; James, Richard; Krause, Jens; Pizzari, Tommaso

    2013-01-01

    Sexual selection is traditionally measured at the population level, assuming that populations lack structure. However, increasing evidence undermines this approach, indicating that intrasexual competition in natural populations often displays complex patterns of spatial and temporal structure. This complexity is due in part to the degree and mechanisms of polyandry within a population, which can influence the intensity and scale of both pre- and post-copulatory sexual competition. Attempts to measure selection at the local and global scale have been made through multi-level selection approaches. However, definitions of local scale are often based on physical proximity, providing a rather coarse measure of local competition, particularly in polyandrous populations where the local scale of pre- and post-copulatory competition may differ drastically from each other. These limitations can be solved by social network analysis, which allows us to define a unique sexual environment for each member of a population: ‘local scale’ competition, therefore, becomes an emergent property of a sexual network. Here, we first propose a novel quantitative approach to measure pre- and post-copulatory sexual selection, which integrates multi-level selection with information on local scale competition derived as an emergent property of networks of sexual interactions. We then use simple simulations to illustrate the ways in which polyandry can impact estimates of sexual selection. We show that for intermediate levels of polyandry, the proposed network-based approach provides substantially more accurate measures of sexual selection than the more traditional population-level approach. We argue that the increasing availability of fine-grained behavioural datasets provides exciting new opportunities to develop network approaches to study sexual selection in complex societies. PMID:23339246

  2. A standard operating procedure for the surgical implantation of transmitters in juvenile salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liedtke, T.L.; Beeman, J.W.; Gee, L.P.

    2012-01-01

    Biotelemetry is a useful tool to monitor the movements of animals and is widely applied in fisheries research. Radio or acoustic technology can be used, depending on the study design and the environmental conditions in the study area. A broad definition of telemetry also includes the use of Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags, either separately or with a radio or acoustic transmitter. To use telemetry, fish must be equipped with a transmitter. Although there are several attachment procedures available, surgical implantation of transmitters in the abdominal cavity is recognized as the best technique for long-term telemetry studies in general (Stasko and Pincock, 1977; Winter, 1996; Jepsen, 2003), and specifically for juvenile salmonids, Oncorhynchus spp. (Adams and others, 1998a, 1998b; Martinelli and others, 1998; Hall and others, 2009). Studies that use telemetry assume that the processes by which the animals are captured, handled, and tagged, as well as the act of carrying the transmitter, will have minimal effect on their behavior and performance. This assumption, commonly stated as a lack of transmitter effects, must be valid if telemetry studies are to describe accurately the movements and behavior of an entire population of interest, rather than the subset of that population that carries transmitters. This document describes a standard operating procedure (SOP) for surgical implantation of radio or acoustic transmitters in juvenile salmonids. The procedures were developed from a broad base of published information, laboratory experiments, and practical experience in tagging thousands of fish for numerous studies of juvenile salmon movements near Columbia River and Snake River hydroelectric dams. Staff from the Western Fisheries Research Center's Columbia River Research Laboratory (CRRL) frequently have used telemetry studies to evaluate new structures or operations at hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin, and these evaluations typically require large numbers of tagged fish. For example, a study conducted at the dams on the Columbia River and funded by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers required tagging and monitoring of 40,000 juvenile salmon during a 3-month migration period (Counihan and others, 2006a, 2006b; Perry and others, 2006). To meet the demands of such a large study, the authors and CRRL staff refined the SOP to increase efficiency in the tagging process while maintaining high standards of fish care. The SOP has been used in laboratory and field settings for more than 15 years, and consistently has produced low mortality rates (<1 percent) and transmitter loss rates (<0.01 percent) in the 24-36 hours after tagging. In addition to describing the detailed surgical procedures required for transmitter implantation, this document provides guidance on fish collection, handling and holding, and the release of tagged fish. Although often overlooked, or at least underemphasized, these processes can have a large impact on the outcome of the tagging procedure. Stress associated with the individual steps in handling and tagging can be cumulative and lethal (Maule and others, 1988; Wedemeyer and others, 1990; Portz and others, 2006), so the goal is to provide the best possible fish care at every step in order to manage the overall effect on study fish.

  3. Selection of Film Clips and Development of a Video for the Investigation of Sexual Decision Making among Men Who Have Sex with Men

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah E. Woolf-King; Stephen Maisto; Michael Carey; Peter Vanable

    2010-01-01

    Experimental research on sexual decision making is limited, despite the public health importance of such work. We describe formative work conducted in advance of an experimental study designed to evaluate the effects of alcohol intoxication and sexual arousal on risky sexual decision making among men who have sex with men. In Study 1, we describe the procedures for selecting and

  4. A Gender-Specific Retinoblastoma-Related Protein in Volvox carteri Implies a Role for the Retinoblastoma Protein Family in Sexual Development[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kianianmomeni, Arash; Nematollahi, Ghazaleh; Hallmann, Armin

    2008-01-01

    Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED PROTEIN1 (RBR1) from the green alga Volvox carteri. RBR1 expression increases substantially during embryogenesis and in response to the sex-inducer glycoprotein, but it decreases significantly under heat stress. While RBR1 is expressed in gonidia (asexual reproductive cells) and embryos, the largest proportion of RBR1 mRNA is found in parental somatic cells. The presence of 4 splice variants and 15 potential cyclin-dependent kinase phosphorylation sites suggests that RBR1 is subject to control at the posttranscriptional and posttranslational levels. Surprisingly, RBR1 is a gender-specific gene, mapping exclusively to the female mating-type locus. A procedure for stable nuclear transformation of males was established to generate RBR1-expressing males. These transformants exhibit enlarged reproductive cells, altered growth characteristics, and a prolonged embryogenesis. The results suggest that a functionally related analog of RBR1 exists in males. The reason for the divergent evolution of RBRs in females and males appears to be based on sexual development: males and females respond to the same sex-inducer with different cleavage programs and substantial differences in cellular differentiation. Thus, the gender-specific presence of RBR1 provides evidence for an additional, novel role for retinoblastoma family proteins in sexual development. PMID:18790828

  5. Mitochondrial Carnitine-Dependent Acetyl Coenzyme A Transport Is Required for Normal Sexual and Asexual Development of the Ascomycete Gibberella zeae

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hokyoung; Min, Kyunghun; Lee, Jungkwan; Choi, Gyung Ja; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Fungi have evolved efficient metabolic mechanisms for the exact temporal (developmental stages) and spatial (organelles) production of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). We previously demonstrated mechanistic roles of several acetyl-CoA synthetic enzymes, namely, ATP citrate lyase and acetyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs), in the plant-pathogenic fungus Gibberella zeae. In this study, we characterized two carnitine acetyltransferases (CATs; CAT1 and CAT2) to obtain a better understanding of the metabolic processes occurring in G. zeae. We found that CAT1 functioned as an alternative source of acetyl-CoA required for lipid accumulation in an ACS1 deletion mutant. Moreover, deletion of CAT1 and/or CAT2 resulted in various defects, including changes to vegetative growth, asexual/sexual development, trichothecene production, and virulence. Although CAT1 is associated primarily with peroxisomal CAT function, mislocalization experiments showed that the role of CAT1 in acetyl-CoA transport between the mitochondria and cytosol is important for sexual and asexual development in G. zeae. Taking these data together, we concluded that G. zeae CATs are responsible for facilitating the exchange of acetyl-CoA across intracellular membranes, particularly between the mitochondria and the cytosol, during various developmental stages. PMID:22798392

  6. Your Sexual Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... during treatment of a sexual problem? • Glossary Your Sexual Health 4. Sexual pain disorder What are desire problems? ... by women. A lack of desire before having sex is normal for some women. They may not ...

  7. Men and Sexual Trauma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in women. Who are the perpetrators of male sexual assault? Those who sexually assault men or boys differ ... male gender socialization affect the recognition of male sexual assault? Men who have not dealt with the symptoms ...

  8. Military Sexual Trauma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... used by VA to refer to experiences of sexual assault or repeated, threatening sexual harassment that a Veteran ... make an estimate of the actual rates of sexual assault and harassment experiences among all individuals serving in ...

  9. Changes in Gas Bubble Disease Signs for Migrating Juvenile Salmonids Experimentally Exposed to Supersaturated Gasses, 1996-1997 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Absolon, Randall F.

    1999-03-01

    This study was designed to answer the question of whether gas bubble disease (GBD) signs change as a result of the hydrostatic conditions juvenile salmonids encounter when they enter the turbine intake of hydroelectric projects during their downstream migration.

  10. Clinicians' perspective of the relational processes for family and individual development during the mediation of religious and sexual identity disclosure.

    PubMed

    Etengoff, Chana; Daiute, Colette

    2015-01-01

    Although the psychological literature regarding gay men from religious families is continually expanding, it is also limited in that few studies focus on the use of therapy in the negotiation of the interrelated systems of religion, sexuality, and family. Utilizing a cultural historical activity theory-based process of analysis, this study focuses on the narratives of 12 clinicians discussing 230 conflicts and how those conflicts are mediated in both productive (e.g., seeking secular support) and unproductive ways (e.g., bringing one's son to an exorcist) by gay men and their religious families independent of and at the advice of their therapists. PMID:25364980

  11. Relating Sexual Sadism and Psychopathy to One Another, Non-Sexual Violence, and Sexual Crime Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Carrie A.; Knight, Raymond A.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual sadism and psychopathy have been theoretically, clinically, and empirically linked to violence. Although both constructs are linked to predatory violence, few studies have sought to explore the covariation of the two constructs, and even fewer have sought to conceptualize the similarities of violence prediction in each. The current study considered all four Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) facets and employed well-defined, validated measures of sadism to elucidate the relation between sadism and psychopathy, as well as to determine the role of each in the prediction of non-sexual violence and sexual crime behaviors. Study 1 assessed 314 adult, male sex offenders using archival ratings, as well as the self-report Multidimensional Inventory of Development, Sex, and Aggression (the MIDSA). Study 2 used archival ratings to assess 599 adult, male sex offenders. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of crime scene descriptions yielded four sexual crime behavior factors: Violence, Physical Control, Sexual Behavior, and Paraphilic. Sadism and psychopathy covaried, but were not coextensive; sadism correlated with Total PCL-R, Facet 1, and Facet 4 scores. The constructs predicted all non-sexual violence measures, but predicted different sexual crime behavior factors. The PCL-R facets collectively predicted the Violence and Paraphilic factors, whereas sadism only predicted the Violence factor. PMID:24019144

  12. Relating sexual sadism and psychopathy to one another, non-sexual violence, and sexual crime behaviors.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Carrie A; Knight, Raymond A

    2014-01-01

    Sexual sadism and psychopathy have been theoretically, clinically, and empirically linked to violence. Although both constructs are linked to predatory violence, few studies have sought to explore the covariation of the two constructs, and even fewer have sought to conceptualize the similarities of violence prediction in each. The current study considered all four Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) facets and employed well-defined, validated measures of sadism to elucidate the relation between sadism and psychopathy, as well as to determine the role of each in the prediction of non-sexual violence and sexual crime behaviors. Study 1 assessed 314 adult, male sex offenders using archival ratings, as well as the self-report Multidimensional Inventory of Development, Sex, and Aggression (the MIDSA). Study 2 used archival ratings to assess 599 adult, male sex offenders. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of crime scene descriptions yielded four sexual crime behavior factors: Violence, Physical Control, Sexual Behavior, and Paraphilic. Sadism and psychopathy covaried, but were not coextensive; sadism correlated with Total PCL-R, Facet 1, and Facet 4 scores. The constructs predicted all non-sexual violence measures, but predicted different sexual crime behavior factors. The PCL-R facets collectively predicted the Violence and Paraphilic factors, whereas sadism only predicted the Violence factor. PMID:24019144

  13. The Developmental Association of Sexual Self-Concept with Sexual Behavior among Adolescent Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensel, Devon J.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis; O'Sullivan, Lucia F.; Orr, Donald P.

    2011-01-01

    Developing a sexual self-concept is an important developmental task of adolescence; however, little empirical evidence describes this development, nor how these changes are related to development in sexual behavior. Using longitudinal cohort data from adolescent women, we invoked latent growth curve analysis to: (1) examine reciprocal development

  14. Narrative Sexual Identity Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark A. Yarhouse

    2008-01-01

    Sexual identity therapy is an alternative to the two polarized positions of sexual reorientation therapy and gay-integrative therapy for clients who present with sexual identity concerns. This alternative model focuses on sexual identity—the private and public acts of identifying and communicating one's sexual preferences—and how the decision to do so is informed by dominant stories about what sexual attractions mean

  15. Sexual health for people living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Kathy; Ray, Sunanda

    2007-05-01

    Sexual health is defined in terms of well-being, but is challenged by the social, cultural and economic realities faced by women and men with HIV. A sexual rights approach puts women and men with HIV in charge of their sexual health. Accurate, accessible information to make informed choices and safe, pleasurable sexual relationships possible is best delivered through peer education and health professionals trained in empathetic approaches to sensitive issues. Young people with HIV especially need appropriate sex education and support for dealing with sexuality and self-identity with HIV. Women and men with HIV need condoms, appropriate services for sexually transmitted infections, sexual dysfunction and management of cervical and anogenital cancers. Interventions based on positive prevention, that combine protection of personal health with avoiding HIV/STI transmission to partners, are recommended. HIV counselling following a positive test has increased condom use and decreased coercive sex and outside sexual contacts among discordant couples. HIV treatment and care have reduced stigma and increased uptake of HIV testing and disclosure of positive status to partners. High adherence to antiretroviral therapy and safer sexual behaviour must go hand-in-hand. Sexual health services have worked with peer educators and volunteer groups to reach those at higher risk, such as sex workers. Technological advances in diagnosis of STIs, microbicide development and screening and vaccination for human papillomavirus must be available in developing countries and for those with the highest need globally. PMID:17531749

  16. Systemwide Evaluation of Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids from the Columbia River Based on Recoveries of Passive Integrated Transponder Tags

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Allen F. Evans; Nathan J. Hostetter; Daniel D. Roby; Ken Collis; Donald E. Lyons; Benjamin P. Sandford; Richard D. Ledgerwood; Scott Sebring

    2012-01-01

    We recovered passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags from nine piscivorous waterbird colonies in the Columbia River basin to evaluate avian predation on Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed salmonid Oncorhynchus spp. populations during 2007–2010. Avian predation rates were calculated based on the percentage of PIT-tagged juvenile salmonids that were detected as passing hydroelectric dams and subsequently were consumed and deposited by birds

  17. Brain-pituitary-gonadal axis during early development and sexual differentiation in the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Feist, G; Schreck, C B

    1996-06-01

    Profiles of testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone, androstenedione, and estradiol were determined by RIA, and immunocytochemical techniques were employed to identify gonadotropin (GTH) I and II and gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) in monosex and mixed sex populations of rainbow trout from 1 to 126 days postfertilization (dpf). Steroid levels were relatively high at 1 dpf and declined until 25 dpf. At 30 and 48 dpf (hatching) steroid levels increased slightly before they fell by 78 dpf and remained relatively constant thereafter. Trends toward differences in steroid content between males and females became evident around the time gonadal differentiation was histologically discernible (78 and 90 dpf). GTH I was present in the proximal pars distalis at all dates (48-126 dpf), whereas GTH II was not detectable. GnRH was found at all dates (48-126 dpf) and was distributed in several areas of the brain including the nucleus preopticus periventricularis, nucleus lateralis tuberis, and the pituitary in the region where GTH I was found. No differences were seen between males and females in the timing of appearance, localization, or intensity of staining of these peptide hormones. Given that the brain-pituitary-gonadal axis seems to be intact during the process of sexual differentiation and the fluctuations of steroid levels during this process, sex steroids may play the driving role for sexual differentiation of rainbow trout. PMID:8804570

  18. SEXUAL MISCONDUCT = Sexual harassment, gender discrimination or bias, sexual assault, rape, stalking or

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    SEXUAL MISCONDUCT = Sexual harassment, gender discrimination or bias, sexual assault, rape. SEXUAL MISCONDUCT = Sexual harassment, gender discrimination or bias, sexual assault, rape, stalking materials in a location where others can view them. Sexual assault, rape, or attempted rape. 3 #12;4 Sexual

  19. Tolerance of Sexual Harassment: A Laboratory Paradigm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J. Angelone; Damon Mitchell; Kara Carola

    2009-01-01

    The present study attempted to develop a laboratory analogue for the study of tolerance for sexual harassment by using an\\u000a online speed-dating paradigm. In that context, the relation between participants’ sexual harassment attitudes, perpetrator\\u000a attractiveness, perpetrator status, and perceived dating potential of the perpetrator were examined as factors influencing\\u000a participants’ tolerance of sexually harassing behavior. Participants were 128 female college

  20. Multivariate expression analysis of the gene network underlying sexual development in turtle embryos with temperature-dependent and genotypic sex determination.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, N

    2010-01-01

    Sexual development has long been the target of study and despite great advances in our understanding of the composition and regulation of the gene network underlying gonadogenesis, our knowledge remains incomplete. Of particular interest is the relative role that the environment and the genome play in directing gonadal formation, especially the effect of environmental temperature in directing this process in vertebrates. Comparative analyses in closely related taxa with contrasting sex-determining mechanisms should help fill this gap. Here I present a multivariate study of the regulation of the gene network underlying sexual development in turtles with temperature-dependent (TSD; Chrysemys picta) and genotypic sex determination (GSD; Apalone mutica). I combine novel data on SOX9 and DMRT1 from these species with contrasting sex-determining mechanisms for the first time with previously reported data on DAX1, SF-1 (NR5A1), WT1, and aromatase (CYP19A1) from these same taxa. Comparative expression analyses of SOX9 and DMRT1 from these and other species indicate additional elements whose expression has diverged among TSD taxa, further supporting the notion that significant evolutionary changes have accrued in the regulation of the TSD gene network in reptiles. A non-parametric MANOVA revealed that temperature had a significant effect in multivariate gene expression in C. picta that varied during embryonic development, whereas the covariation of gene expression in A. mutica was insensitive to temperature. A phenotypic trajectory analysis (PTA) of gene expression comparing both species directly indicated that the relative covariation in gene expression varied between temperatures in C. picta. Furthermore, the 25 degrees C trajectory of C. picta differed from that of A. mutica in the magnitude of gene expression change. Additional analyses revealed a stronger covariation in gene expression and a more interconnected regulatory network in A. mutica, consistent with the hypothesis that sexual development is a more canalized process in A. mutica, as would be expected if GSD evolved in this lineage through directional selection from its TSD ancestor. PMID:20110645

  1. The application of Intervention Mapping in developing and implementing school-based sexuality and HIV\\/AIDS education in a developing country context: The case of Tanzania

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KITILA MKUMBO; HERMAN SCHAALMA; SYLVIA KAAYA; JOANNE LEERLOOIJER; JESSIE MBWAMBO; GAD KILONZO

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Effective sexuality and HIV\\/AIDS education programmes are needed to protect young people against HIV\\/AIDS and teenage pregnancy in Tanzania and other Sub-Saharan African countries. Using a theory- and evidence-based approach and adapting the programmes to local contexts, increases the effectiveness of these programmes. This paper describes and discusses the challenges and opportunities concerning the application of Intervention Mapping (IM)

  2. The Problem... ! Sexual Assault & Sexual Harassment are

    E-print Network

    VandeVord, Pamela

    of rape or attempted rape between the age of 14 and 25 ! 9 out of 10 date rapes are not reported ! Women the Terms Sexual Assault #Sexual activity, including but not limited to rape, attempted rape or oral sex, guilt) $ Date rape, a form of sexual assault, is rape by someone the victim is dating. $ Acquaintance

  3. Detecting sexual conflict and sexually antagonistic coevolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Locke Rowe; Troy Day

    2006-01-01

    We begin by providing an operational definition of sexual conflict that applies to both inter- and intralocus conflict. Using this definition, we examine a series of simple coevolutionary models to elucidate fruitful approaches for detecting interlocus sexual conflict and resultant sexually antagonistic coevolution. We then use published empirical examples to illustrate the utility of these approaches. Three relevant attributes emerge.

  4. Tolerance of sexual harassment: a laboratory paradigm.

    PubMed

    Angelone, David J; Mitchell, Damon; Carola, Kara

    2009-12-01

    The present study attempted to develop a laboratory analogue for the study of tolerance for sexual harassment by using an online speed-dating paradigm. In that context, the relation between participants' sexual harassment attitudes, perpetrator attractiveness, perpetrator status, and perceived dating potential of the perpetrator were examined as factors influencing participants' tolerance of sexually harassing behavior. Participants were 128 female college students from a small northeastern public university. Results indicated that attractiveness, high social status, and attitudinal beliefs about sexual harassment were all predictive of tolerance for sexual harassment, providing preliminary support for the validity of this paradigm. In addition, participants' self reported likelihood to date a bogus male dating candidate was also predictive of tolerance for sexual harassment, over and above the aforementioned variables, suggesting that dating potential can play a role in perceptions of sexual harassment. Further, this experiment demonstrated that perceptions of sexual harassment can be assessed using the in vivo measurement of behavior. In addition, using an online environment not only provides a contemporary spin and adds a greater degree of external validity compared to other sexual harassment analogues, it also reduces any risk of potential physical sexual contact for participants. PMID:19030980

  5. Effect of Multiple Turbine Passage on Juvenile Snake River Salmonid Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Kenneth D.; Anderson, James J.; Vucelick, Jessica A.

    2005-10-14

    This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to identify populations of migrating juvenile salmonids with a potential to be impacted by repeated exposure to turbine passage conditions. This study is part of a research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind/Hydropower Program. The program's goal is to increase hydropower generation and capacity while enhancing environmental performance. Our study objective is to determine whether the incremental effects of turbine passage during downstream migration impact populations of salmonids. When such a potential is found to exist, a secondary objective is to determine what level of effect of passing multiple turbines is required to decrease the number of successful migrants by 10%. This information will help identify whether future laboratory or field studies are feasible and design those studies to address conditions that present the greatest potential to improve dam survival and thus benefit fish and power generation.

  6. A simple method for in situ monitoring of water temperature in substrates used by spawning salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, Christian E.; Finn, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial water temperature within spawning habitats of salmonids may differ from surface-water temperature depending on intragravel flow paths, geomorphic setting, or presence of groundwater. Because survival and developmental timing of salmon are partly controlled by temperature, monitoring temperature within gravels used by spawning salmonids is required to adequately describe the environment experienced by incubating eggs and embryos. Here we describe a simple method of deploying electronic data loggers within gravel substrates with minimal alteration of the natural gravel structure and composition. Using data collected in spawning sites used by summer and fall chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta from two streams within the Yukon River watershed, we compare contrasting thermal regimes to demonstrate the utility of this method.

  7. Sexual Differences in Cell Loss during the Post-Hatch Development of Song Control Nuclei in the Bengalese Finch

    PubMed Central

    Lu, XiaoHua; Zuo, MingXue; Zhang, XinWen; Zeng, ShaoJu

    2015-01-01

    Birdsongs and the regions of their brain that control song exhibit obvious sexual differences. However, the mechanisms underlying these sexual dimorphisms remain unknown. To address this issue, we first examined apoptotic cells labeled with caspase-3 or TUNEL in Bengalese finch song control nuclei - the robust nucleus of the archopallium (RA), the lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (LMAN), the high vocal center (HVC) and Area X from post-hatch day (P) 15 to 120. Next, we investigated the expression dynamics of pro-apoptotic (Bid, Bad and Bax) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL) genes in the aforementioned nuclei. Our results revealed that the female RA at P45 exhibited marked cell apoptosis, confirmed by low densities of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2. Both the male and female LMAN exhibited apoptotic peaks at P35 and P45, respectively, and the observed cell loss was more extensive in males. A corresponding sharp decrease in the density of Bcl-2 after P35 was observed in both sexes, and a greater density of Bid was noted at P45 in males. In addition, we observed that RA volume and the total number of BDNF-expressing cells decreased significantly after unilateral lesion of the LMAN or HVC (two areas that innervate the RA) and that greater numbers of RA-projecting cells were immunoreactive for BDNF in the LMAN than in the HVC. We reasoned that a decrease in the amount of BDNF transported via HVC afferent fibers might result in an increase in cell apoptosis in the female RA. Our data indicate that cell apoptosis resulting from different pro- and anti-apoptotic agents is involved in generating the differences between male and female song control nuclei. PMID:25938674

  8. Sexual coercion and the misperception of sexual intent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Coreen Farris; Teresa A. Treat; Richard J. Viken; Richard M. McFall

    2008-01-01

    Misperceiving a woman's platonic interest as sexual interest has been implicated in a sexual bargaining process that leads to sexual coercion. This paper provides a comprehensive review of sexual misperception, including gender differences in perception of women's sexual intent, the relationship between sexual coercion and misperception, and situational factors that increase the risk that sexual misperception will occur. Compared to

  9. Smallmouth bass and largemouth bass predation on juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonids in the Lake Washington basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tabor, R.A.; Footen, B.A.; Fresh, K.L.; Celedonia, M.T.; Mejia, F.; Low, D.L.; Park, L.

    2007-01-01

    We assessed the impact of predation by smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu and largemouth bass M. salmoides on juveniles of federally listed Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and other anadromous salmonid populations in the Lake Washington system. Bass were collected with boat electrofishing equipment in the south end of Lake Washington (February-June) and the Lake Washington Ship Canal (LWSC; April-July), a narrow waterway that smolts must migrate through to reach the marine environment. Genetic analysis was used to identify ingested salmonids to obtain a more precise species-specific consumption estimate. Overall, we examined the stomachs of 783 smallmouth bass and 310 largemouth bass greater than 100 mm fork length (FL). Rates of predation on salmonids in the south end of Lake Washington were generally low for both black bass species. In the LWSC, juvenile salmonids made up a substantial part of bass diets; consumption of salmonids was lower for largemouth bass than for smallmouth bass. Smallmouth bass predation on juvenile salmonids was greatest in June, when salmonids made up approximately 50% of their diet. In the LWSC, overall black bass consumption of salmonids was approximately 36,000 (bioenergetics model) to 46,000 (meal turnover consumption model) juveniles, of which about one-third was juvenile Chinook salmon, one-third was coho salmon O. kisutch, and one-third was sockeye salmon O. nerka. We estimated that about 2,460,000 juvenile Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild sources combined) were produced in the Lake Washington basin in 1999; thus, the mortality estimates in the LWSC range from 0.5% (bioenergetics) to 0.6% (meal turnover). Black bass prey mostly on subyearlings of each salmonid species. The vulnerability of subyearlings to predation can be attributed to their relatively small size; their tendency to migrate when water temperatures exceed 15??C, coinciding with greater black bass activity; and their use of nearshore areas, where overlap with black bass is greatest. We conclude that under current conditions, predation by smallmouth bass and largemouth bass has a minor impact on Chinook salmon and other salmonid populations in the Lake Washington system. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  10. Effects of Catch-and-Release Angling on Salmonids at Elevated Water Temperatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James W. Boyd; Christopher S. Guy; Travis B. Horton; Stephen A. Leathe

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have assessed catch-and-release mortality of salmonids at water temperatures of 23°C or above, despite predictions of warming stream temperatures due to climate change. The primary objective of this study was to measure the catch-and-release mortality of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, brown trout Salmo trutta, and mountain whitefish Prosopium williamsoni in three water temperature treatments, namely, when daily maximum

  11. Stress responses and disease resistance in salmonid fish: Effects of chronic elevation of plasma cortisol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. D. Pickering; T. G. Pottinger

    1989-01-01

    Basal levels of plasma cortisol in unstressed salmonid fish are normally in the range 0–5 ng ml?1. An acute stress such as handling or 1 h confinement caused a temporary elevation of the plasma cortisol levels of both brown\\u000a trout,Salmo trutta L., and rainbow trout,Salmo gairdneri Richardson, in the range 40–200 ng ml?1 with a return to basal levels within

  12. Inactivation of bacteria using ultraviolet irradiation in a recirculating salmonid culture system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark J. Sharrer; Steven T. Summerfelt; Graham L. Bullock; Lauren E. Gleason; Jessica Taeuber

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation dosages required to inactivate bacteria in a commercial-scale recirculating salmonid culture system. Research was conducted in the commercial-scale recirculating system used for Arctic char growout at the Conservation Fund Freshwater Institute (Shepherdstown, West Virginia). This recirculating system uses a UV channel unit to treat 100% of the 4750L\\/min

  13. Grayling (Thymallinae) phylogeny within salmonids: complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of Thymallus arcticus and Thymallus thymallus.

    PubMed

    Yasuike, M; Jantzen, S; Cooper, G A; Leder, E; Davidson, W S; Koop, B F

    2010-02-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among the three subfamilies (Salmoninae, Coregoninae and Thymallinae) in the Salmonidae have not been addressed extensively at the molecular level. In this study, the whole mitochondrial genomes of two Thymallinae species, Thymallus arcticus and Thymallus thymallus were sequenced, and the published mitochondrial genome sequences of other salmonids were used for Bayesian and maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analyses. These results support an ancestral Coregoninae, branching within the Salmonidae, with Thymallinae as the sister group to Salmoninae. PMID:20738715

  14. Reanalysis and Interpretation of 25 Years of Snake–Columbia River Juvenile Salmonid Survival Studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shane A. Bickford; John R. Skalski

    2000-01-01

    Tagging studies to estimate salmonid smolt survival during out-migration have been an integral component of hydroproject mitigation programs for decades in the Snake–Columbia River basin. Fifty-three smolt survival investigations from 1971 to 1996 were reexamined to identify general patterns for survival of smolts through turbines, spillbays, and river reaches. Average survival that measured both direct and indirect effects from turbine

  15. Growth, nitrogen and energy utilization of juveniles from four salmonid species: diet, species and size effects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. A. Azevedo; S. Leeson; C. Y. Cho; D. P. Bureau

    2004-01-01

    The effect of dietary digestible protein\\/digestible energy (DP\\/DE) ratio on growth, feed efficiency (FE), digestibility, nitrogen (N) and energy utilization, and body composition of juveniles from four salmonid species reared in freshwater was investigated in a series of trials. Another objective of this study was to investigate how the FE, and N and energy utilization changed as fish grew.Four diets

  16. Channelization and Livestock Impacts on Salmonid Habitat and Biomass in Western Washington

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. W. Chapman; Eric Knudsen

    1980-01-01

    We examined salmonid habitat and biomasses in 50–70-m pairs of altered and control sections of small (discharges less than 0.3 msecond) streams around Puget Sound in western Washington in 1978–1979. Altered sections had been channelized or used by livestock. Channelization significantly reduced overhead cover, sinuosity, wetted area, and woody bank cover while increasing bank grasses. Total habitat area declined in

  17. Estimating Winter Salmonid Abundance in Small Western Washington Streams: A Comparison of Three Techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip Roni; Andrew Fayram

    2000-01-01

    We compared the relative efficiency of day snorkeling, night snorkeling, and multiple-removal electrofishing at estimating abundance of juvenile coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch and trout Oncorhynchus spp. during winter in four small western Washington streams. Salmonid abundance was estimated within 32 individual habitats at low to moderate winter flows and low water temperatures (<7.0°C). Day snorkel counts were significantly less than

  18. Predator Avoidance of Transgenic Channel Catfish Containing Salmonid Growth Hormone Genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rex A. Dunham; Chanagun Chitmanat; Amy Nichols; Brad Argue; Dennis A. Powers; Thomas T. Chen

    1999-01-01

    :   Transgenic channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) containing salmonid growth hormone genes can grow 33% faster than normal channel catfish under aquaculture conditions. However,\\u000a before transgenic catfish are released and utilized by the private sector, their genetic impact on the natural environment\\u000a must be examined. Predator avoidance is one of the major fitness traits determining potential environmental risk. To determine\\u000a the

  19. A Synthesis of Tagging Studies Examining the Behaviour and Survival of Anadromous Salmonids in Marine Environments

    PubMed Central

    Drenner, S. Matthew; Clark, Timothy D.; Whitney, Charlotte K.; Martins, Eduardo G.; Cooke, Steven J.; Hinch, Scott G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper synthesizes tagging studies to highlight the current state of knowledge concerning the behaviour and survival of anadromous salmonids in the marine environment. Scientific literature was reviewed to quantify the number and type of studies that have investigated behaviour and survival of anadromous forms of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), brown trout (Salmo trutta), steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii). We examined three categories of tags including electronic (e.g. acoustic, radio, archival), passive (e.g. external marks, Carlin, coded wire, passive integrated transponder [PIT]), and biological (e.g. otolith, genetic, scale, parasites). Based on 207 papers, survival rates and behaviour in marine environments were found to be extremely variable spatially and temporally, with some of the most influential factors being temperature, population, physiological state, and fish size. Salmonids at all life stages were consistently found to swim at an average speed of approximately one body length per second, which likely corresponds with the speed at which transport costs are minimal. We found that there is relatively little research conducted on open-ocean migrating salmonids, and some species (e.g. masu [O. masou] and amago [O. rhodurus]) are underrepresented in the literature. The most common forms of tagging used across life stages were various forms of external tags, coded wire tags, and acoustic tags, however, the majority of studies did not measure tagging/handling effects on the fish, tag loss/failure, or tag detection probabilities when estimating survival. Through the interdisciplinary application of existing and novel technologies, future research examining the behaviour and survival of anadromous salmonids could incorporate important drivers such as oceanography, tagging/handling effects, predation, and physiology. PMID:22431962

  20. Developmental Trajectories of Substance Use among Sexual Minority Girls: Associations with Sexual Victimization and Sexual Health Risk

    PubMed Central

    Oshri, Assaf; Handley, Elizabeth D.; Sutton, Tara E.; Wortel, Sanne; Burnette, Mandi L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to examine mechanisms underlying the development of sexual health risk behaviors in sexual minority girls (SMGs) and the relation of these mechanisms and sexual risk behaviors to sexual victimization. Methods Data were drawn from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods cohorts aged 15 and 18 (N = 391; 54 SMGs). Results SMGs reported more sexual victimization and steeper positive trajectories of substance misuse over time than heterosexual girls. Growth in alcohol use during adolescence mediated the link between SMG status and past year number of partners, whereas growth in marijuana use mediated the link between SMG status and self-reported sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Adding unwanted sexual experiences (UWSE) to the models resulted in reduction of significance in the direct or indirect effects from SMG status on the outcomes. UWSE emerged as a robust predictor, directly and indirectly related to past year number of partners via growth in alcohol use. UWSE also directly predicted STD history. Conclusions The increased risk of SMGs for alcohol and marijuana during adolescence, higher rates of sexual partners, and STD diagnosis may also be linked to their significant risk for sexual victimization. Findings highlight the importance of preventive interventions targeting victimization of SMGs. PMID:24534358

  1. Sexuality and sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Côbo, Viviane de Almeida; Chapadeiro, Cibele Alves; Ribeiro, João Batista; Moraes-Souza, Helio; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano

    2013-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease, the most common hereditary blood disease in the world, is the result of an atypical hemoglobin called S (Hb S) which, when homozygous (Hb SS) is the cause of sickle cell anemia. Changes of puberty, correlated with a delayed growth spurt, begin late in both male and female sickle cell anemia individuals with repercussions on sexuality and reproduction. The objectives of this exploratory and descriptive study were to characterize the development of sexuality in adults with sickle cell anemia by investigating the patient's perception of their sex life, as well as the information they had and needed on this subject. Methods Twenty male and female sickle cell anemia patients treated at the Hemocentro Regional de Uberaba (UFTM) with ages between 19 and 47 years old were enrolled. A socioeconomic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview on sexuality, reproduction and genetic counseling were applied. Results This study shows that the sickle cell anemia patients lacked information on sexuality especially about the risks of pregnancy and the possible inheritance of the disease by their children. Moreover, the sexual life of the patients was impaired due to pain as well as discrimination and negative feelings experienced in close relationships. Conclusion The health care of sickle cell anemia patients should take into account not only the clinical aspects of the disease, but also psychosocial aspects by providing counseling on sexuality, reproduction and genetics, in order to give this population the possibility of a better quality of life. PMID:23741184

  2. Alcohol and Sexual Assault

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonia Abbey; Tina Zawacki; Philip O. Buck; A. Monique Clinton; Pam McAuslan

    2001-01-01

    Conservative estimates of sexual assault prevalence suggest that 25 percent of American women have experienced sexual assault, including rape. Approximately one-half of those cases involve alcohol consumption by the perpetrator, victim, or both. Alcohol contributes to sexual assault through multiple pathways, often exacerbating existing risk factors. Beliefs about alcohol's effects on sexual and aggressive behavior, stereotypes about drinking women, and

  3. SEXUALITY AND GENDER IDENTITY

    E-print Network

    Viglas, Anastasios

    LEARN TO UNDERSTAND SEXUALITY AND GENDER IDENTITY COUNSELLING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES CAPS #12;CONTENTS 01 Questioning your sexuality or gender identity 02 Coming out 04 Sexual health 05 Harassment and discrimination 06 Types of support and information available 08 Useful resources Sexual orientation is about who

  4. Temporal and spatial variation of early mortality syndrome in salmonids from Lakes Michigan and Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolgamood, M.; Hnath, J.G.; Brown, S.B.; Moore, K.; Marcquenski, S.V.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Hinterkopf, J.P.; Fitzsimons, J.D.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    To assess the extent that early mortality syndrome (EMS) impacts different Pacific salmonid stocks and the association of EMS with thiamine, we collected eggs of coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch from three Lake Michigan tributaries (Platte River, Thompson Creek, and Root River) in 1996-2001. We also obtained eggs of Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha from Lake Michigan (Little Manistee River) and Lake Huron (Swan River) in 1998-2001. Unfertilized eggs from individual females were frozen for thiamine analysis, and the remainder were fertilized and reared until first feeding. We observed a high incidence of EMS in offspring when total egg thiamine levels were less than 1.7 nmol/g in both coho and Chinook salmon. In Lake Michigan strain coho salmon from the Platte River, EMS occurred in more than 70% of monitored families in 1996, 1999, 2000, and 2001, while 1997 and 1998 were years when EMS was low (70%) in 1999, 2000, and 2001. Chinook salmon from Lake Huron exhibited high (>70%) EMS in 2001, moderate (40-60%) EMS in 1999, and low (<25%) EMS in 1998. Our data suggest that the incidence of EMS in salmonids varies by species, location, and year. The data support the general contention that EMS in salmonids is associated with low egg thiamine content. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  5. Lake Michigan: effects of exploitation, introductions, and eutrophication on the salmonid community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, LaRue; McLain, Alberton L.

    1972-01-01

    Lake Michigan surface area is 22,400 square miles and its main depth is 276 ft. Its fauna is generally typical of North American oligotrophic lakes. The original fish populations included 10 coregonines and one salmonine. The lake whitefish, the lake herring, and the lake trout were most abundant. Man's activities have caused great changes in the lake in the past 120 years. Although changes in water chemistry and in the lower biota have been generally modest (except locally), those in salmonid communities have been vast. Exploitation, exotic fish species (especially the sea lamprey and alewife), and accelerated eutrophication and other pollution, all have played a role in bringing about the modifications (mostly marked declines in abundance) in salmonid communities. Commercial exploitation was largely responsible for the changes in the salmonid communities before the invasion of the lamprey (1936), although eutrophication and other pollution, and alterations of spawning streams, also were important. The lamprey and alewife (first reported in 1949), however, have exerted a greater impact than the other factors in recent decades.

  6. Sluiceway Operations to Pass Juvenile Salmonids at The Dalles Dam, Columbia River, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Skalski, J. R.; Klatte, Bernard A.

    2013-11-20

    Existing ice and trash sluiceways are commonly used to pass juvenile salmonids downstream at hydropower dams through a benign, non-turbine route. At The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River, managers undertook optimizing operations of sluiceway weirs to maximize survival of juvenile salmonids at the powerhouse. We applied fixed-location hydroacoustic methods to compare fish passage rates and sluiceway efficiencies for two weir configurations during 2004 and 2005: three weirs versus six weirs, located at the mid- versus east powerhouse, respectively. We also analyzed horizontal distributions of passage at the sluiceway and turbines and the effects of operating turbines beneath open sluiceway gates to provide supporting data relevant to operations optimization. Based on the findings, we recommend the following for long-term operations for the sluiceway at The Dalles Dam: open six rather than three sluiceway weirs to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway; open the three weirs above the western-most operating main turbine unit (MU) and the three weirs at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high; operate the turbine units below open sluiceway weirs as a standard procedure; operate the sluiceway 24 h/d year-round to maximize its benefits to juvenile salmonids; and use the same operations for spring and summer emigrants. These operational concepts are transferable to dams where sluiceway surface flow outlets are used protect downstream migrating fishes.

  7. Piscine reovirus in wild and farmed salmonids in British Columbia, Canada: 1974-2013.

    PubMed

    Marty, G D; Morrison, D B; Bidulka, J; Joseph, T; Siah, A

    2015-08-01

    Piscine reovirus (PRV) was common among wild and farmed salmonids in British Columbia, western Canada, from 1987 to 2013. Salmonid tissues tested for PRV by real-time rRT-PCR included sections from archived paraffin blocks from 1974 to 2008 (n = 363) and fresh-frozen hearts from 2013 (n = 916). The earliest PRV-positive sample was from a wild-source steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), from 1977. By histopathology (n = 404), no fish had lesions diagnostic for heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI). In some groups, lymphohistiocytic endocarditis affected a greater proportion of fish with PRV than fish without PRV, but the range of Ct values among affected fish was within the range of Ct values among unaffected fish. Also, fish with the lowest PRV Ct values (18.4-21.7) lacked endocarditis or any other consistent lesion. From 1987 to 1994, the proportion of PRV positives was not significantly different between farmed Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L. (44% of 48), and wild-source salmonids (31% of 45). In 2013, the proportion of PRV positives was not significantly different between wild coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch (Walbaum), sampled from British Columbia (5.0% of 60) or the reference region, Alaska, USA (10% of 58). PMID:25048977

  8. Downstream migrant juvenile salmonid protection systems for low- to medium-head hydroelectric dams

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Past studies have estimated the juvenile salmonid loss rate at mainstem Columbia River dams in the range of 6 to 32%. Causes of this direct loss are mechanical striking, sudden pressure changes, cavitation, and velocity shear. A field comparison of surface spill attraction and partial-intake screening conducted at Bonneville Dam south powerhouse, located near Cascade Locks, Oregon, was conducted in May, 1981. This study indicated that 73 to 82% of the juvenile migrants of the four salmonid species studied were guided away from hydroelectric turbines by partial-intake screens. This was a substantially higher proportion than was attracted by surface spill at the powerhouse ice and trash sluiceway during the same period. Partial-turbine intake screening is estimated to cost $300,000 to $450,000 per turbine unit at large-hydraulic-capacity, medium-head hydroelectric dams. Complete bypass-system installation may fall in the range of six to thirty million dollars per project depending on powerhouse size and construction difficulties. Annual operation and maintenance costs are estimated at $25,000 to $47,000 per turbine unit. Partial turbine intake screen installation is recommended at 12 of the 13 mainstem Columbia and lower Snake run-of-the-river dams. This is estimated to have the potential to increase juvenile salmonid survival in the Columbia River system by 50%.

  9. [The Christian ethic and sexuality].

    PubMed

    Hourton, J

    1991-03-01

    The Catholic Church and the Christian faith in general have been accused of a history of sexual repression and denunciation of the dangers of all expressions of sexuality as well as of neglecting sex education within religious education. This work seeks to analyze the apparent conflict between Christian ethics and the experience of modern sexuality, and discusses the response of Christian ethics to the conflict. Beginning at the Renaissance and for the entire modern epoch, a moral system that might be called secularized has confronted that of the Church; it has been more liberal, utilitarian, and hedonistic in sexual matters. In the course of becoming more permissive, human sexuality like so many other aspects of modern culture has lost most of its sacred character. The sexual sphere in modern cultural and moral development is 1 of the aspects in which morals and customs are most distanced from religious influence. Despite the great sexual permissiveness of the mass media and the culture at large, adolescents and youth of today do not appear to have advanced any closer to a general state of happiness. Sexuality today--despite whatever sex education is available--is still enveloped in the same ignorance, feat, complexes, and conflicts as ever. The youth of today should have access to better sex education, they should be liberated from both religious taboos that impede health sexual adjustment and from the sexual permissiveness celebrated in much of the mass media. Teachers and moralists should engage in a dialogue in which the problem of sex education is examined in its complexity in order to identify elements of an improved process that would lead to a true humanization. An ethics that goes beyond the permissiveness of the present is needed, but it should not be based on fear of AIDS, fear of pregnancy, or any other fears or threats. A positive secular ethics moved by natural motivations and a Christian ethics motivated by faith in the love of God should appear more frequently and clearly in social commentaries, instead of the usual advice to shed all inhibitions. Human sexuality should be examined in the context of the other elements of the interior life, including affectivity, liberty, and religiosity. PMID:12343308

  10. Sexual anxiety and female sexual arousal: A comparison of arousal during sexual anxiety stimuli and sexual pleasure stimuli

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vicki E. Beggs; Karen S. Calhoun; Sharlene A. Wolchik

    1987-01-01

    Sexual arousal occurring during sexual anxiety stimuli was compared to sexual arousal occurring during sexual pleasure stimuli in 19 sexually functional women. Stimuli were individualized narratives based on descriptions given by each subject. Sexual arousal was measured by monitoring vaginal blood flow with a vaginal photoplethysmograph. Results showed significant increases in vaginal blood flow in response to both sexual anxiety

  11. The Predicted G-Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR-1 Is Required for Female Sexual Development in the Multicellular Fungus Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Krystofova, Svetlana; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2006-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) control important aspects of asexual and sexual development in eukaryotic organisms. We have identified a predicted GPCR in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa with similarity to cyclic AMP-receptor like GPCRs from Dictyostelium discoideum and GCR1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression of gpr-1 is highest in female reproductive structures, and deletion of gpr-1 leads to defects during sexual development. Unfertilized female structures (protoperithecia) from ?gpr-1 strains are weakly pigmented, small, and submerged in the agar. The perithecia produced after fertilization have deformed beaks that lack ostioles, the openings through which ascospores are discharged. Localization studies using a GPR-1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein showed that GPR-1 is targeted to female reproductive structures. Genetic epistasis experiments with the three G? genes were inconclusive due to the early block in mating exhibited by ?gna-1 strains. Phenotypic analysis of mutants from a high-throughput N. crassa knockout project allowed identification of BEK-1, a homeodomain transcription factor that is a potential target of GPR-1. The perithecial defects of ?bek-1 strains are similar to those of the ?gpr-1 strain, and epistasis analysis indicates that bek-1 could function downstream of gpr-1 during postfertilization events. The effect must be posttranscriptional, as bek-1 transcript levels are not affected in ?gpr-1 strains. The lack of ostioles in ?gpr-1 and ?bek-1 mutants has an undesirable effect on the ability to spread progeny (ascospores) by the normal ejection mechanism and would severely compromise the fitness of these strains in nature. PMID:16963633

  12. Sexual Attitudes and Behaviours: A Review of the Literature. Bibliography Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Bruce, Comp.

    This bibliography and review of the literature on sexual behaviors and attitudes toward sexual behavior was developed to contribute to an understanding of changes in attitudes toward sexual behaviors and in community patterns of sexual behaviors, and to assist in the development of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education programs. It…

  13. Female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Murray A

    2002-01-01

    Happiness is an attitude, not an event! The glass is either half-full or half-empty; it simply depends on the viewer. Some rich people are miserable...some poor people are ecstatic. You cannot change the world but you can change yourself. You, and you alone, control your destiny. With very little practice, you can learn to think positively. Postmenopausal estrogen deficiency leads to urogenital atrophy. Sexual dysfunction and urinary dysfunction are the most inevitable but least publicized consequences of estrogen deficiency, and these represent important quality-of-life issues that patients and health care providers are often reluctant to discuss. In addition to estrogen deficiency, oophorectomized women may be subject to androgen deficiency and problems with libido. While the relationship with one's partner is the quintessential factor in female sexuality, hormone deficiency remains important, especially in reference to genital atrophy. Humans are the products of learned behavior. We literally become what we think. "I am sick and tired" becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. Self-esteem represents learned behavior just as ego does...but there is a world of difference between the two. Sexuality is enhanced by good self-esteem and hindered by ego: two partners working together can reach far greater heights than either alone ever imagined...one and one can equal three! There are good data to substantiate that happy people have more sex and that people who have more sex are happier. Partners need to learn to honor one another, communicate in a positive manner, develop touching salutations, be a spouse at home, and make their bedroom a sacred sanctuary. With a little behavior modification and hormone therapy, sexuality can remain a priority ad infinitum. PMID:11900270

  14. Sexuality education in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Suplicy, M

    1994-01-01

    The development of a comprehensive program of sex education in Brazilian schools is described in the context of Brazil's culture and traditions such as the Carnival. The influence of Catholicism is explored as is the effect of the behavioral restrictions called for by scientists concerned about sexually transmitted diseases. The Brazilian response to homosexuality is described, and the emergence of a public discussion of sexuality in the media is traced. It is noted that improvements in the status of women have been held in check by a public ridicule of feminism and by the strength of the traditional patriarchal structures which dominate the culture. With this picture given of how the issue of sexuality fits into Brazilian life, the 1980s initiative on the part of the Work and Research Group for Sex Education is described. Opposition to this effort has largely taken the form of passive resistance; even the Catholic Church has not officially protested the sex education program. Details are provided about 1) the selection of teachers, teacher training, and weekly supervisory teacher meetings; 2) the way in which parental permission for student participation was gained; 3) the implementation of the program; 4) the successes achieved; and 5) the difficulties encountered. Finally, it is noted that plans were made to expand the sex education project from the Sao Paulo area to 6 additional large cities in 1994. Also planned is the publication of the Brazilian Guidelines for Comprehensive Sexuality which will explain the sex education methodology and be extremely valuable in the establishment of new projects. PMID:12287356

  15. Sexuality and Islam.

    PubMed

    Dialmy, Abdessamad

    2010-06-01

    This paper deals with three major questions: (1) What are the sexual norms defined by the sacred texts (Koran and Sunna)? (2) What are the sexual practices currently observed among Moslems? (3) To which extent are current sexual practices of Moslems dissociated from Islamic sexual norms? Sexual standards in Islam are paradoxical: on the one hand, they allow and actually are an enticement to the exercise of sexuality but, on the other hand, they discriminate between male and female sexuality, between marital and pre- or extramarital sexuality, and between heterosexuality and homosexuality. Men are given more rights with regard to the expression of their sexuality; women are forbidden to have extramarital sex (with their slaves) and both genders to have homosexual relationships. The combination of these paradoxical standards with modernisation leads to the current back and forth swing of sexual practices between repression and openness. Partial modernisation leads to greater sexual tolerance. But restrictive sexual standards have gathered strength and have become idealised as a result of the current radicalisation of Islam. This swing of the pendulum between repression and openness is illustrated by phenomena such as public harassment, premarital sexuality, female pleasure, prostitution, and homosexuality. Currently, Islam is not any more the only reference which provides guidance concerning sexual practices but secularisation of sexual laws is still politically unthinkable today. So the only solution is to achieve reform in the name of Islam, through the reinterpretation of repressive holy texts. PMID:20441406

  16. Sexual compatibility and the sexual desire-motivation relation in females with hypoactive sexual desire disorder.

    PubMed

    Hurlbert, D F; Apt, C; Hurlbert, M K; Pierce, A P

    2000-07-01

    Fifty-four female participants with hypoactive sexual desire disorder supplied daily reports of their sexual desire and motivation. The relation between desire and motivation remained statistically significant when controlling for sexual compatibility, sexual stress, sexual fantasy, and marital and sexual satisfaction. Findings suggest that (a) women higher in sexual compatibility experience greater sexual motivation regardless of their marital and sexual satisfaction, their sexual desire intensity, and depressive symptomatology; and (b) the relation between sexual compatibility and sexual desire is mediated by the propensity of those women high in sexual compatibility to have greater marital and sexual satisfaction. Within-subject analyses that controlled for autocorrelation and linear trends in the time series revealed that 40% of the women experienced significantly higher sexual motivation on greater sexual desire days. A discussion of these findings and evidence for the addition of sexual motivation as a distinct phase in the human sexual response cycle are explored. PMID:10881380

  17. Defining and Measuring Sexual Orientation: A Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Randall L. Sell

    1997-01-01

    How to define and identify sexual orientations for the purpose of constructing representative samples of homosexuals, bisexuals, and heterosexuals is unclear and confusing to researchers. Different definitions and measures have been proposed and used to develop samples since the 1860s when sexual orientations first gained widespread research interest. Unfortunately, the definitions and measurement tools used since men result in the

  18. Sport and the Sexually Abused Male Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartill, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Through feminist research in the study of sport, the issue of child sexual abuse has been driven onto the agenda of sports organisations, resulting in considerable practical reform (Brackenridge, 2001). However, the flip-side to this development is that the experience of sexually abused males has been largely ignored. In 1990, Struve claimed, "a…

  19. Predictors of Sexual Intercourse among Korean Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryu, Eunjung; Kim, Kyunghee; Kwon, Hyejin

    2007-01-01

    Background: The proportion of adolescents experiencing unwanted pregnancy and abortion caused by the premature initiation of sexual intercourse is increasing at an alarming rate in Korea. This study aimed at developing a theoretical model for identifying individual and environmental risk factors affecting the initiation of sexual intercourse by…

  20. Characterisation of fast, slow and cardiac muscle tropomyosins from salmonid fish.

    PubMed

    Heeley, D H; Bieger, T; Waddleton, D M; Hong, C; Jackman, D M; McGowan, C; Davidson, W S; Beavis, R C

    1995-08-15

    Tropomyosin (TM) has been isolated from the cardiac muscle, and fast and slow trunk (myotomal) muscles of the mature salmonid fish Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri). When examined electrophoretically, isoforms of TM were detected which were specific, and exclusive, to each type of muscle. Cardiac and fast muscles contained single and distinct isoforms, while slow muscle contained two distinct isoforms, closely related in terms of apparent M(r), and pI. There was no detectable difference between the same TM type from either salmon or trout. On a variety of gel systems, the cardiac and slow isoforms migrated in close proximity to each other and to rabbit alpha-TM. The fast isoform comigrated with rabbit beta-TM. In developing salmon fry, a more acidic (unphosphorylated) variant of TM was present in addition to, and of similar M(r) to, the fast adult isoform. This TM declined in steady-state level during maturation and was virtually undetected in adult muscle. All of the isolated TMs contained little or no covalently bound phosphate and were blocked at the N-terminus. The amino acids released by carboxypeptidase A, when ordered to give maximal similarity to other muscle TMs, were consistent with the following sequences: fast (LDNALNDMTSI) and cardiac (LDHALNDMTSL). The C-terminal region of the slow TM contained His but was heterogeneous. In viscosity measurements, performed as a function of increasing protein concentration, at low ionic strength (t = 5 degrees C, pH 7.00), fast TM exhibited the highest relative viscosity values. Lower and equivalent levels of polymerisation occurred with the cardiac and slow TMs. Polymerisation of all three isoforms was temperature-dependent, with cardiac TM being least sensitive and fast TM being most sensitive. Determination of the complete coding sequence of adult fast TM confirmed the findings of the carboxypeptidase analysis, but the remainder of the sequence more closely resembled alpha-type TMs than beta-type TMs. Overall, salmon fast TM contains 20 (mostly conservative) substitutions compared to rabbit striated muscle alpha-TM and 40 (mostly conservative) substitutions compared to rabbit striated muscle beta-TM. This demonstrates that electrophoretic mobility is not, in all instances, a suitable method to assess the isomorphic nature of striated muscle TMs. PMID:7556155

  1. Sexual genetic and simple sequence repeat (SSR) analysis for molecular marker development on the all hermaphrodite papaya.

    PubMed

    Chiu, C T; Wang, C W; Chen, F C; Chin, S W; Liu, C C; Lee, M J; Chung, W C; Chien, Y W; Chang, H J; Lee, C Y

    2015-01-01

    The papaya (Carica papaya L.) is one of the most important economic tropical fruits in the world, and the hermaphrodite is the preferred type in field cultures. We analyzed the sexual ratio of offspring from the cultivar 'Taiwan Seed Station No. 7' (T7) by a self-cross and its cross with Taichung Sunrise (TS). Female progeny from the T7 self-crossing were not observed. This finding may be caused by a lethal gene that is linked to females. In this study, we selected 192 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) to analyze the polymorphism between T7 and TS. A total of 37 SSRs were identified for T7 and TS. In addition, 14 SSRs served as the molecular makers for identification of T7, TS and their hybrid offsprings. Thus, the results show that the genetic similarity between T7 and TS is rather high. This suggests that T7 may be a mutant of TS. Phylogenetic analysis from the SSR polymorphisms of the above parent strains and 15 F1 offspring revealed the genetic distance of the F1 offspring located between T7 and TS. The results of this study may provide an opportunity for elucidating the genetic characteristics of all hermaphrodites via identification of molecular makers. PMID:25867396

  2. Social Network Influences on Adolescent Sexual Attitudes and Behaviors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dominique Treboux; Nancy A. Busch-Rossnagel

    1990-01-01

    Within a socialization paradigm, a model was developed and tested to examine social network influences on adolescent sexual behavior and contraceptive use. It was hypothesized that the social network influences of parents and peers would affect the contraceptive knowledge and premarital sexual attitudes of adolescents. In turn, knowledge and attitudes were expected to influence sexual behavior and contraceptive use. The

  3. Prevalence of childhood and adolescent sexual abuse among sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Pope, V T

    2001-10-01

    A simple nonstandardized questionnaire was developed and administered to 150 men convicted of various sexual offenses currently on probation or parole, living in the community, admitting their offenses and attending treatment. The hypothesis that men who engaged in sexual activity as adolescents with women would be at a higher risk of committing statutory rape-type sexual offenses was not substantiated. PMID:11783562

  4. Adolescent Sexual Behavior: Examining Data from Texas and the US

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine Markham; Melissa Peskin; Belinda F Hernandez; Kimberly Johnson; Robert C. Addy; Paula Cuccaro; Ross Shegog; Susan Tortolero

    2011-01-01

    Background: The US has higher rates of teen births and sexually transmitted infections (STI) than other developed countries. Texas youth are disproportionately impacted. Purpose: To review local, state, and national data on teens’ engagement in sexual risk behaviors to inform policy and practice related to teen sexual health. Methods: 2009 middle school and high school Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS)

  5. Relational frame theory and the experimental analysis of human sexuality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bryan Roche

    1997-01-01

    Behavior analysts have not been particularly active in the experimental analysis of human sexual behavior. This may be because the complexity of human sexuality suggests that it defies a molecular empirical analysis. Recent developments in the experimental analysis of complex behavior and language, however, have opened the way for a modern behavior-analytic research program into human sexual conduct. The present

  6. Teaching Human Sexuality: A Guide for Parents and Other Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyprian, Judy

    Youth in foster care are at particular risk for engaging in early sexual behavior due to frequent moves that have disrupted trusting relationships and schooling, and sometimes because of histories of sexual abuse. This manual was developed by experts in the field of sexuality education for use primarily by foster parents with children in their…

  7. A Sexual Assault Primary Prevention Model with Diverse Urban Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smothers, Melissa Kraemer; Smothers, D. Brian

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a nonprofit community mental health clinic developed a socioecological model of sexual abuse prevention that was implemented in a public school. The goal of the program was to promote and create community change within individuals and the school community by reducing tolerance of sexual violence and sexual harassment. Participants…

  8. Sexually transmitted infections and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Ljubojevi?, Suzana; Lipozen?i?, Jasna

    2010-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) remain a public health problem of major significance in most of the world. Adolescents make up about 20% of the world population, of whom 85% live in developing countries. They are at a greater risk of STIs because they frequently have unprotected intercourse, biologically may be more susceptible to infection, often are engaged in multiple monogamous relationships of limited duration, and face multiple obstacles in accessing confidential health care services. Young people who begin to have sexual intercourse in early or middle adolescence are more likely to develop an STI than those who postpone intercourse until later adolescence or adulthood. The most common STIs among adolescents are chlamydia, gonorrhea, human papillomavirus infection, and trichomoniasis. Unfortunately, lately the incidence of HIV/AIDS and syphilis among adolescents is growing. Comprehensive sex education programs in schools can increase STI knowledge and prevent risky sexual behaviors. Health care providers can promote STI prevention methods, including counseling about safe sex. PMID:21251451

  9. Pharmacotherapy of Sexual Dysfunctions : Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Ajith; Biswas, Parthasarathy

    2004-01-01

    The sexual dysfunctions are one of the most prevalent conditions. Sexual dysfunctions can have profound effect on the psychological well-being of an individual and the psychosexual relationship of a couple. Management of the sexual dysfunction should be preceded by an accurate diagnosis reached after a complete medical and sexual history and physical examination. Current focus of researchers has been on understanding the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation and other sexual dysfunctions that can help in developing newer pharmacological cures for these conditions. Recently, a number of clinical trials have studied the potential effectiveness of the phosphodiesterase (PDE)-5 inhibitor sildenafil in the treatment of Erectile Dysfunction (ED) and Premature Ejaculation (PME). The introduction of PDE-5 inhibitors like sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil has revolutionized the treatment of sexual dysfunctions. This review focuses on the recent pharmacological advances in the treatment of common sexual dysfunctions like ED and PME with special focus on the role of PDE-5 inhibitors. Also discussed is the pharmacological treatment of other less prevalent and recognized disorders like female sexual dysfunction, drug induced sexual dysfunction etc. PMID:21224902

  10. Minireview: Hormones and human sexual orientation.

    PubMed

    Balthazart, Jacques

    2011-08-01

    Many people believe that sexual orientation (homosexuality vs. heterosexuality) is determined by education and social constraints. There are, however, a large number of studies indicating that prenatal factors have an important influence on this critical feature of human sexuality. Sexual orientation is a sexually differentiated trait (over 90% of men are attracted to women and vice versa). In animals and men, many sexually differentiated characteristics are organized during early life by sex steroids, and one can wonder whether the same mechanism also affects human sexual orientation. Two types of evidence support this notion. First, multiple sexually differentiated behavioral, physiological, or even morphological traits are significantly different in homosexual and heterosexual populations. Because some of these traits are known to be organized by prenatal steroids, including testosterone, these differences suggest that homosexual subjects were, on average, exposed to atypical endocrine conditions during development. Second, clinical conditions associated with significant endocrine changes during embryonic life often result in an increased incidence of homosexuality. It seems therefore that the prenatal endocrine environment has a significant influence on human sexual orientation but a large fraction of the variance in this behavioral characteristic remains unexplained to date. Genetic differences affecting behavior either in a direct manner or by changing embryonic hormone secretion or action may also be involved. How these biological prenatal factors interact with postnatal social factors to determine life-long sexual orientation remains to be determined. PMID:21693676

  11. Diversity of Flavobacterium psychrophilum and the potential use of its phages for protection against bacterial cold water disease in salmonids.

    PubMed

    Castillo, D; Higuera, G; Villa, M; Middelboe, M; Dalsgaard, I; Madsen, L; Espejo, R T

    2012-03-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum causes rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS) and cold water disease (CWD) in salmonid aquaculture. We report characterization of F. psychrophilum strains and their bacteriophages isolated in Chilean salmonid aquaculture. Results suggest that under laboratory conditions phages can decrease mortality of salmonids from infection by their F. psychrophilum host strain. Twelve F. psychrophilum isolates were characterized, with DNA restriction patterns showing low diversity between strains despite their being obtained from different salmonid production sites and from different tissues. We isolated 15 bacteriophages able to infect some of the F. psychrophilum isolates and characterized six of them in detail. DNA genome sizes were close to 50 Kbp and corresponded to the Siphoviridae and Podoviridae families. One isolate, 6H, probably contains lipids as an essential virion component, based on its chloroform sensitivity and low buoyant density in CsCl. Each phage isolate rarely infected F. psychrophilum strains other than the strain used for its enrichment and isolation. Some bacteriophages could decrease mortality from intraperitoneal injection of its host strain when added together with the bacteria in a ratio of 10 plaque-forming units per colony-forming unit. While we recognize the artificial laboratory conditions used for these protection assays, this work is the first to demonstrate that phages might be able protect salmonids from RTFS or CWD. PMID:22324343

  12. Androgen regulates development of the sexually dimorphic gastrin-releasing peptide neuron system in the lumbar spinal cord: evidence from a mouse line lacking androgen receptor in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Hirotaka; Saito, Kazuhiro; Marie-Luce, Clarisse; Raskin, Kalina; Oti, Takumi; Satoh, Keita; Tamura, Kei; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina

    2014-01-13

    Androgens including testosterone, organize the nervous system as well as masculine external and internal genitalia during the perinatal period. Androgen organization involves promotion of masculine body features, usually by acting through androgen receptors (ARs). We have recently demonstrated that the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) system in the lumbar spinal cord also mediates spinal centers promoting penile reflexes during male sexual behavior in rats. Testosterone may induce sexual differentiation of this spinal GRP system during development and maintain its activation in adulthood. In the present study, we examined the role of ARs in the nervous system regulating the development of the sexually dimorphic GRP system. For this purpose, we used a conditional mouse line selectively lacking the AR gene in the nervous system. AR floxed males carrying (mutants) or not (controls) the nestin-Cre transgene were castrated in adulthood and supplemented with physiological amounts of testosterone. Loss of AR expression in the nervous system resulted in a significant decrease in the number of GRP neurons compared to control littermates. Consequently, the intensity of GRP axonal projections onto the lower lumbar and upper sacral spinal cord was greater in control males than in mutant males. These results suggest that ARs expressed in the nervous system play a significant role in the development of the GRP system in the male lumbar spinal cord. The AR-deletion mutation may attenuate sexual behavior and activity of mutant males via spinal GRP system-mediated neural mechanisms. PMID:24211692

  13. Evaluation of juvenile salmonid behavior near a prototype weir box at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kock, Tobias J.; Liedtke, Theresa L.; Ekstrom, Brian K.; Tomka, Ryan G.; Rondorf, Dennis W.

    2014-01-01

    Collection of juvenile salmonids at Cowlitz Falls Dam is a critical part of the effort to restore salmon in the upper Cowlitz River because the majority of fish that are not collected at the dam pass downstream and enter a large reservoir where they become landlocked and lost to the anadromous fish population. However, the juvenile fish collection system at Cowlitz Falls Dam has failed to achieve annual collection goals since it first began operating in 1996. Since that time, numerous modifications to the fish collection system have been made and several prototype collection structures have been developed and tested, but these efforts have not substantially increased juvenile fish collection. Studies have shown that juvenile steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), and Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) tend to locate the collection entrances effectively, but many of these fish are not collected and eventually pass the dam through turbines or spillways. Tacoma Power developed a prototype weir box in 2009 to increase capture rates of juvenile salmonids at the collection entrances, and this device proved to be successful at retaining those fish that entered the weir. However, because of safety concerns at the dam, the weir box could not be deployed near a spillway gate where the prototype was tested, so the device was altered and re-deployed at a different location, where it was evaluated during 2013. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted an evaluation using radiotelemetry to monitor fish behavior near the weir box and collection flumes. The evaluation was conducted during April–June 2013. Juvenile steelhead and coho salmon (45 per species) were tagged with a radio transmitter and passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag, and released upstream of the dam. All tagged fish moved downstream and entered the forebay of Cowlitz Falls Dam. Median travel times from the release site to the forebay were 0.8 d for steelhead and 1.2 d for coho salmon. Most fish spent several days in the dam forebay; median forebay residence times were 4.4 d for juvenile steelhead and 5.7 d for juvenile coho salmon. A new radio transmitter model was used during the study period. The transmitter had low detection probabilities on underwater antennas located within the collection system, which prevented us from reporting performance metrics (discovery efficiency, entrance efficiency, retention efficiency) that are traditionally used to evaluate fish collection systems. Most tagged steelhead (98 percent) and coho salmon (84 percent) were detected near the weir box or collection flume entrances during the study period; 39 percent of tagged steelhead and 55 percent of tagged coho salmon were detected at both entrances. Sixty-three percent of the tagged steelhead that were detected at both entrances were first detected at the weir box, compared to 52 percent of the coho salmon. Twelve steelhead and 15 coho salmon detected inside the weir box eventually left the device and were collected in collection flumes or passed the dam. Overall, collection rates were relatively high during the study period. Sixty-five percent of the steelhead and 80 percent of the coho salmon were collected during the study, and most of the remaining fish passed the dam and entered the tailrace (24 percent of steelhead; 13 percent of coho salmon). The remaining 11 percent of steelhead and 7 percent of coho salmon did not pass the dam while their transmitters were operating. We were able to confirm collection of tagged fish at the fish facility using three approaches: (1) detection of radio transmitters in study fish; (2) detection of PIT-tags in study fish; (3) observation of study fish by staff at the fish facility. Data from all three methods were used to develop a multistate mark-recapture model that estimated detection probabilities for the various monitoring methods. These estimates then were used to describe the percent of tagged fish that were collected through the weir box and collection flumes. Detection probabilities of PIT-tag antennas in

  14. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation of Avian Predation on Salmonid Smolts in the Lower and Mid-Columbia River, 2006 Final Season Summary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel D. Roby; Ken Collis; Donald E. Lyons

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates predation by piscivorous waterbirds on juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) from throughout the Columbia River Basin. During 2006, study objectives in the Columbia River estuary, work funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, were to (1) monitor and evaluate previous management initiatives to reduce Caspian tern (Hydroprogne caspia) predation on juvenile salmonids (smolts); (2) measure the impact of double-crested

  15. Recovery of Coded Wire Tags at a Caspian Tern Colony in San Francisco Bay: A Technique to Evaluate Impacts of Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Allen F. Evans; Daniel D. Roby; Ken Collis; Bradley M. Cramer; John A. Sheggeby; Lindsay J. Adrean; Daniel S. Battaglia; Donald E. Lyons

    2011-01-01

    We recovered coded wire tags (CWTs) from a colony of Caspian terns Hydroprogne caspia on Brooks Island in San Francisco Bay, California, to evaluate predation on juvenile salmonids originating from the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. Subsamples of colony substrate representing 11.7% of the nesting habitat used by the terns yielded 2,079 salmonid CWTs from fish released and subsequently consumed

  16. Quantifying the effect of predators on endangered species using a bioenergetics approach: Caspian terns and juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River estuary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel D. Roby; Donald E. Lyons; David P. Craig; Ken Collis; G. Henk Visser

    2003-01-01

    We estimated the consumption of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) and other forage fishes by Caspian terns (Sterna caspia) nesting on Rice Island in the Columbia River estuary in 1997 and 1998 using a bioenergetics modeling approach. The study was prompted by concern that Caspian tern predation might be a substantial source of mortality to out-migrating juvenile salmonids from throughout the

  17. Indian concepts on sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Thakurata, Rajarshi Guha

    2013-01-01

    India is a vast country depicting wide social, cultural and sexual variations. Indian concept of sexuality has evolved over time and has been immensely influenced by various rulers and religions. Indian sexuality is manifested in our attire, behavior, recreation, literature, sculptures, scriptures, religion and sports. It has influenced the way we perceive our health, disease and device remedies for the same. In modern era, with rapid globalization the unique Indian sexuality is getting diffused. The time has come to rediscover ourselves in terms of sexuality to attain individual freedom and to reinvest our energy to social issues related to sexuality. PMID:23858263

  18. Alcohol and Sexual Assault

    PubMed Central

    Abbey, Antonia; Zawacki, Tina; Buck, Philip O.; Clinton, A. Monique; McAuslan, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Conservative estimates of sexual assault prevalence suggest that 25 percent of American women have experienced sexual assault, including rape. Approximately one-half of those cases involve alcohol consumption by the perpetrator, victim, or both. Alcohol contributes to sexual assault through multiple pathways, often exacerbating existing risk factors. Beliefs about alcohol’s effects on sexual and aggressive behavior, stereotypes about drinking women, and alcohol’s effects on cognitive and motor skills contribute to alcohol-involved sexual assault. Despite advances in researchers’ understanding of the relationships between alcohol consumption and sexual assault, many questions still need to be addressed in future studies. PMID:11496965

  19. Alcohol and sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Abbey, A; Zawacki, T; Buck, P O; Clinton, A M; McAuslan, P

    2001-01-01

    Conservative estimates of sexual assault prevalence suggest that 25 percent of American women have experienced sexual assault, including rape. Approximately one-half of those cases involve alcohol consumption by the perpetrator, victim, or both. Alcohol contributes to sexual assault through multiple pathways, often exacerbating existing risk factors. Beliefs about alcohol's effects on sexual and aggressive behavior, stereotypes about drinking women, and alcohol's effects on cognitive and motor skills contribute to alcohol-involved sexual assault. Despite advances in researchers' understanding of the relationships between alcohol consumption and sexual assault, many questions still need to be addressed in future studies. PMID:11496965

  20. Molecular and morphological analysis of Myxobolus spp. of salmonid fishes with the description of a new Myxobolus species.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Jayde A; Atkinson, Stephen D; Whipps, Christopher M; Kent, Michael L

    2008-12-01

    While investigating the parasite fauna of wild coho salmon. Oncorhynchus kisutch (Walbaum, 1792), histological examination provided evidence of a new species of Myxobolus (Myxozoa: Myxosporea) infecting nerves of skeletal muscle. Spores were morphologically similar to those of the intramuscular Myxobolus insidiosus Wyatt and Pratt, 1963, both having pyriform spores with clavate polar capsules. However, the former developed exclusively in the nerves of skeletal muscle rather than in myocytes. We examined both species of Myxobolus derived from coho salmon; Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum, 1792); cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarkii (Richardson, 1836); and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum, 1792) from freshwater in Oregon. Spore morphology, small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) sequences, and site of infection were compared. Myxobolus arcticus Pugachev and Khokhlov, 1979 has pyriform spores, infects the central nervous system of many salmonids, and is found in the Pacific Northwest. It was therefore included in the analyses to rule out conspecificity with the new species. Together, these data show that the Myxobolus sp. from peripheral nerves in the skeletal musculature of coho salmon, rainbow trout, and cutthroat trout is a new species, described herein as Myxobolus fryeri n. sp. PMID:19127969

  1. Species of Proteocephalus Weinland, 1858 (Cestoda: Proteocephalidae), parasites of coregonid and salmonid fishes from North America: taxonomic reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Hanzelová, V; Scholz, T

    1999-02-01

    A taxonomic study of species of Proteocephalus Weinland, 1858 (Cestoda: Proteocephalidae), from coregonid and salmonid fishes in North America, based largely on their type specimens, was carried out. None of the taxa studied possesses obvious autapomorphies that would justify its validity. On the contrary, all species share the following diagnostic features typical of Proteocephalus longicollis (Zeder, 1800) (syn. Proteocephalus exiguus La Rue, 1911), a polymorphic and widely distributed parasite in the Holarctic: (1) a spherical or club-shaped scolex, with sublaterally situated suckers and a vestigial but distinct and relatively large apical sucker; (2) the vagina possessing a well-developed vaginal sphincter and crossing mostly ventrally the proximal part of the cirrus sac; and (3) a long, thick-walled cirrus sac, overlapping vitelline follicles medially by more than its proximal half. Accordingly, Proteocephalus pusillus Ward, 1910; P. laruei Faust, 1920; "P. obtundus" La Rue, 1920 (nomen nudum); P. arcticus Cooper, 1921; P. wickliffi Hunter and Bangham, 1933; P. parallacticus MacLulich, 1943; P. californicus Haderlie, 1950; P. salmonidicola Alexander, 1951; and P. primaverus Neiland, 1952 are considered junior synonyms of P. longicollis. PMID:10207371

  2. Rearing unit-level factors associated with bacterial gill disease treatment in two Ontario, Canada government salmonid hatcheries.

    PubMed

    Good, Christopher M; Thorburn, Margaret A; Ribble, Carl S; Stevenson, Roselynn M W

    2009-10-01

    Early-rearing salmonids in Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR) fish hatcheries have been consistently affected by bacterial gill disease (BGD) (causative agent: Flavobacterium branchiophilum) for many years. Separate retrospective epidemiological investigations of BGD treatments at two OMNR fish hatcheries (Hatcheries A and B) for the 1999 production year were conducted using on-site hatchery records. Both investigations were carried out at the rearing unit-level, with early-rearing (<9 months of age) "tank-lot" as the unit of analysis to identify unique fish populations over time. Multivariable repeated measures logistic regression models were created for both hatchery datasets, controlling for lot-level and species effects. For Hatchery A, the species brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) were significantly associated with BGD treatment, as well as lower water exchange rate, and higher feeding and mortality percentages during the 2 weeks previous to BGD treatment. At Hatchery B, the species brook trout (S. fontinalis) and splake (Salvelinus namaycush x S. fontinalis) were significantly associated with BGD treatment, as well as lower individual fish weights and treatment for BGD during the previous week. These results emphasize the importance of water quality, feeding rate, fish size and prior mortality on the development of BGD. Significant hatchery and species effects were evident, and future observational research on BGD must account for these factors in their design and analysis. PMID:19560833

  3. Causes of sexual dysfunction (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Female sexual dysfunction describes women who are indifferent or hostile to sexual intercourse, who have no response to sexual advances or stimulation, or who are unable to have an orgasm during sexual intercourse.

  4. Physiologic Measures of Sexual Function in Women: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Woodard, Terri L.; Diamond, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To review and describe physiologic measures of assessing sexual function in women Design Literature review Setting Studies that utilize instruments designed to measure female sexual function Patients Women participating in studies of female sexual function Interventions Various instruments that measure physiologic features of female sexual function Main Outcome Measures Appraisal of the various instruments, including their advantages and disadvantages. Results Many unique physiologic methods of evaluating female sexual function have been developed over the last four decades. Each method has its benefits and limitations. Conclusions Many physiologic methods exist, but most are not well-validated. Additionally, there has been an inability to correlate most physiologic measures with subjective measures of sexual arousal. Furthermore, given the complex nature of the sexual response in women, physiologic measures should be considered in context of other data, including the history, physical exam, and validated questionnaires. Nonetheless, the existence of appropriate physiologic measures is vital to our understanding of female sexual function and dysfunction. PMID:19046582

  5. Considering the role of conditioning in sexual orientation.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Heather

    2012-02-01

    The effects of learning on sexual orientation are rarely addressed in the literature. At the very least, such processes provide a means of elaborating upon orientation predispositions. Some aspects of our mates may inherently elicit a sexual response, but other attributes do so only after sexual experience with them. Animal research shows robust, direct effects of conditioning processes on partner preference with a few studies showing plasticity in preference for sex of partner. Descriptive research in humans suggests effects of experience on partner preference and, although experimental demonstrations of human sexual conditioning are neither numerous nor robust, sexual arousal is conditionable in women and men. With modern developments in learning theory (e.g., expectancy learning and evaluative conditioning), it seems appropriate to renew the investigation of contributions and limitations of conditioning processes to explaining how cues acquire erotic value and to attempt some integration between the sexual conditioning literature and research on sexual orientation or more generally sexual partner preference. PMID:22311512

  6. Mediators of sexual revictimization risk in adult sexual assault victims.

    PubMed

    Ullman, Sarah E; Vasquez, Amanda L

    2015-04-01

    This study examined sexual risk behaviors and sexual refusal assertiveness in relationship to child sexual abuse, emotion dysregulation, and adult sexual revictimization. Path analyses of 1,094 survivors who had sex in the past year were done to examine sexual risk behavior and sexual refusal assertiveness mediational pathways by which child sexual abuse severity and emotion dysregulation may affect revictimization over one year in adult female sexual assault survivors. Exchanging sex for money and sexual refusal assertiveness were significantly associated with emotion dysregulation, whereas exchanging sex for money, and not sexual refusal assertiveness, was only significantly related to child sexual abuse severity. Both exchanging sex for money and sex refusal assertiveness mediated the relationship between emotion dysregulation and adult sexual revictimization. Exchanging sex for money mediated the child sexual abuse severity-revictimization relationship. These findings demonstrate the importance of considering both risky and protective sexual behaviors in research and prevention programming that address sexual revictimization in women. PMID:25942287

  7. "Children are sexually innocent": Iranian parents' understanding of children's sexuality.

    PubMed

    Merghati-Khoei, Effat; Abolghasemi, Naria; Smith, Thomas G

    2014-04-01

    Sexuality education (SE) is hotly contested in the West and there is much abstinence-only education; however, it remains controversial in a variety of contexts, including in Iran. The lack of consensus about children's SE in Muslim societies obliges us to explore different aspects of this topic systematically. The qualitative research presented here was about how Iranian parents perceived children's sexuality. Data from parents of 26 children were collected during four focus group sessions. Informants were selected from Area 5 in West Tehran. This area included 72 primary schools for girls and 82 for boys. The sessions were facilitated by using a semi-structured focus group guide. Content analysis was adopted using combined free and analytical coding to reduce data, to extract meanings, and to categorize domains. One of the three main domains identified, family management of child sexuality, is comprised of the following: (1) understanding of child sexuality, (2) family rules, (3) parent-child interactions, and (4) opposite sex interactions. Parental misinformation, accumulated myths, and ignorance about children's sexual development were evident. Strict family rules and a lack of consistent policy and instruction for SE were also identified. Parents said they were neither well-prepared nor competent to educate their children about sexuality. In fact, a majority of mothers raised "incompetence" as an important determinant in their own parent-child interactions. Societal changes as well as children's socialization patterns have forced parents to accept their children's opposite sex friendships as a reality. Results suggest a community need for developing comprehensive and culturally sensitive SE for schools and parental use. PMID:24343162

  8. Sexual sensation seeking in spanish young men and women with different sexual orientations.

    PubMed

    Gil-Llario, María Dolores; Morell-Mengual, Vicente; Ballester-Arnal, Rafael; Giménez-García, Cristina; Castro-Calvo, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the relation of sexual orientation and gender to sexual sensation seeking. Participants were 382 individuals (200 men, 182 women) between 17 and 29 years old who completed the Sexual Sensation Seeking Scale. Of the 382 participants, 52.46% self-reported heterosexual orientation, and 47.64% self-reported homosexual orientation. The results showed differences with Sexual Sensation Seeking being more frequent among heterosexuals and men. There were no differences between heterosexual and homosexual men. Heterosexual women had higher sexual sensation seeking scores than did homosexual women. These results and their possible implications for the effective development of prevention and intervention programs in affective-sexual education are discussed. PMID:24918266

  9. Health professionals' responses to disclosure of child sexual abuse history: female child sexual abuse survivors' experiences.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Kim; Jülich, Shirley; Glover, Marewa; Gautam, Jeny

    2010-05-01

    This study reports on a postal questionnaire, conducted in 2004, with female survivors of historic child sexual abuse. The questionnaire explored their experiences of health professionals' responsiveness to disclosure of child sexual abuse history. Of 61 participants, aged between 22 and 65, 69% had disclosed to health professionals. Those who had not disclosed reported that they would have liked to but were not asked about child sexual abuse. Thirty-five percent of participants suggested routine questioning about child sexual abuse. Most participants related a fear of common medical examination procedures to their experience of child sexual abuse, and 64% said this stopped them from attending regular health checks. The current study suggests the development of guidelines for dealing with possible child sexual abuse survivors would be useful for health professionals. PMID:20509075

  10. Therapeutic approach to sexual abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Furniss, T; Bingley-Miller, L; Bentovim, A

    1984-01-01

    An account is given of the development of a treatment project for sexually abused children and their families. We review incidence data which indicate that sexual abuse of children is likely to be a far more frequent problem than has been recognised and cause an appreciable degree of psychological damage. Professional responses to this are confused and treatment facilities limited. Sexual abuse is seen as an expression of severe relationship problems in the family and therapeutic provision is made, therefore, not only for the abused child but for other members of the family (including both parents). The method adopted is to offer group therapy to the child, mother, and father and regular family meetings with professionals in the community, concerned with care and protection of children. Clinical data on the first 56 children treated are discussed and our approach to treatment is evaluated. PMID:6486864

  11. Getting to the Good Stuff: Adopting a Pleasure Framework for Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deFur, Kirsten M.

    2012-01-01

    Sexuality professionals have consistently identified the need to incorporate the topics of pleasure and desire into sexuality education programs; however, that has yet to be realized in most settings. Sexuality education has traditionally been rooted in preventing disease and pregnancy rather than promoting healthy sexual development. There is a…

  12. Tree of Sex: A database of sexual The Tree of Sex Consortium1

    E-print Network

    Hahn, Matthew

    Tree of Sex: A database of sexual systems The Tree of Sex Consortium1 The vast majority. Here, we describe a database developed to facilitate access to sexual system and sex chromosome of eukaryotic organisms reproduce sexually, yet the nature of the sexual system and the mechanism of sex

  13. Human Sexuality (Psy 388) Spring Term 2013, CRN: 25566; University of Oregon

    E-print Network

    Lockery, Shawn

    and sexual orientation, and the effect of culture on these developments. Finally, we will cover the major on human sexuality. Thus we will be talking candidly about sexual anatomy, physiology and relationshipsHuman Sexuality (Psy 388) Spring Term 2013, CRN: 25566; University of Oregon The Meeting Time

  14. Sexual Objectification in Music Videos: A Content Analysis Comparing Gender and Genre

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer Stevens Aubrey; Cynthia M. Frisby

    2011-01-01

    Although sexual objectification is commonplace in media culture, music videos provide the most potent examples of it. In the current study, we developed a coding system to measure sexual objectification and its correlates in music videos. Our analysis compared sexual objectification across artists' gender and musical genres (R&B\\/hip-hop, pop, and country). Compared to male artists, female artists were more sexually

  15. Developing and validating a risk scoring tool for chlamydia infection among sexual health clinic attendees in Australia: a simple algorithm to identify those at high risk of chlamydia infection

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Rebecca; Donovan, Basil; McNulty, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a risk scoring tool to identify those who are at increased risk of chlamydia infection. Methods We used demographic data, sexual behaviour information and chlamydia positivity results from more than 45?000 individuals who attended Sydney Sexual Health Centre between 1998 and 2009. Participants were randomly allocated to either the development or internal validation data set. Using logistic regression, we created a prediction model and weighted scoring system using the development data set and calculated the odds ratio of chlamydia positivity for participants in successively higher quintiles of score. The internal validation data set was used to evaluate the performance characteristics of the model for five quintiles of risk scores including population attributable risk, sensitivity and specificity. Results In the prediction model, inconsistent condom use, increased number of sexual partners in last 3?months, genital or anal symptoms and presenting to the clinic for sexually transmitted infections screening or being a contact of a sexually transmitted infection case were consistently associated with increased risk of chlamydia positivity in all groups. High scores (upper quintiles) were significantly associated with increased risk of chlamydia infection. A cut-point score of 20 or higher distinguished a increased risk group with a sensitivity of 95%, 67% and 79% among heterosexual men, women and men who have sex with men (MSM), respectively. Conclusion The scoring tool may be included as part of a health promotion and/or clinic website to prompt those who are at increased risk of chlamydia infection, which may potentially lead to increased uptake and frequency of testing. PMID:22021721

  16. Responding to Sexual Assault

    E-print Network

    Ravikumar, B.

    University will not tolerate sexual assault in any form, including acquaintance rape. Where there is probable assault, we think of rape. However, rape is not the only type of sexual assault. These words can be used

  17. Rape (sexual assault) - overview

    MedlinePLUS

    Sex and rape; Date rape; Sexual assault ... Most estimates say that 80 - 90% of rapes are not reported to police. Current trends project that 1 in 3 American women will be sexually assaulted at some point during their ...

  18. Notes on sexuality & space

    E-print Network

    Jacobson, Samuel Ray

    2013-01-01

    Very little has been written on sexuality in architectural scholarship. Sexuality & Space (Princeton Architectural Press, 1992) contains the proceedings of an eponymous 1990 conference at Princeton University, and was both ...

  19. Synthesis of Juvenile Salmonid Passage Studies at The Dalles Dam, Volume II, 2001-05

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Beeman, John W.; Duran, Ian; Puls, Andrew

    2007-08-15

    The overall goal of juvenile salmonid research at The Dalles Dam is to provide data to inform decisions on strategies to improve smolt survival rates at the project. Survival improvement strategies address the three primary passage routes at The Dalles Dam -- spillway, sluiceway, and turbines – with the general intent to increase spill and sluice passage and decrease turbine passage. Since the review by Ploskey et al. (2001a) of research during 1982-2000 at The Dalles Dam, the Corps funded over $20M of research in at least 39 studies during 2001-2006. The purpose of the current review is to synthesize juvenile salmonid passage data at The Dalles Dam (TDA) collected from 2001 through 2006. The data we synthesize comes from numerous research techniques employed to address particular study objectives at The Dalles Dam. The suite of techniques includes acoustic and radio telemetry, acoustic cameras, acoustic Doppler current profilers, balloon tags, computational fluid dynamics models, drogues, fixed and mobile hydroacoustics, fyke nets, physical scale models, PIT-tags, sensor fish, sonar trackers, and underwater video. Hydraulic data involves flow patterns and water velocities. Biological data involve forebay approach paths and residence times, horizontal and diel distributions, passage efficiencies and effectiveness, fish behaviors, tailrace egress and predation rates, and route-specific and total project survival rates. Data for 2001-2006 are synthesized in this report to provide, in conjunction with Ploskey et al. (2001a), resources for engineers, biologists, and dam operators to use when making decisions about fish protection measures for juvenile salmonids at The Dalles Dam. This review covers the major fish passage research efforts during 2001-2006 and includes sections on the Environmental Setting, Forebay and Project Passage Studies, Spill Studies, Sluiceway Studies, Turbine Studies, Smolt Survival Studies, and a Discussion.

  20. Effects of Catch-and-Release Angling on Salmonids at Elevated Water Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, James W.; Guy, Christopher S.; Horton, Travis; Leathe, Steven A.

    2010-08-01

    Few studies have assessed catch and release mortality of salmonids at water temperatures ?23°C, despite predictions of warming stream temperatures due to climate change. In addition, the effects of diel temperature fluctuations on salmonid mortality have largely been ignored in catch and release angling studies. The primary objective of this study was to measure catch and release mortality of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, brown trout Salmo trutta, and mountain whitefish Prosopium williamsoni in three water temperature treatments; when daily maximum water temperatures were cool (<20°C), warm (20 to 22.9°C), and hot ( 23°C). A secondary objective was to assess catch and release mortality of salmonids angled in morning and evening within water-temperature treatments. These objectives were related to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ Drought Fishing Closure Policy (DFCP). Angling (fly-fishing only) occurred in the Gallatin and Smith rivers. All angled fish were confined to in-stream holding cages and monitored for mortality for 72 h. Mortality of rainbow trout peaked at 16% in the Gallatin River and 9% in the Smith River during the hot treatment. Mortality of brown trout was less than 5% in all water-temperature treatments in both rivers. Mountain whitefish mortality peaked at 28% in the hot treatment in the Smith River. No mortality for any species occurred in either river when daily maximum water temperatures were <20°C. Mortality of rainbow trout peaked at 16% in the evening hot treatment in the Smith River. Mortality of brown trout and mountain whitefish was not related to time of day. The catch and release mortality values presented here likely represent fishing mortality given that most anglers in southwest Montana practice catch and release angling. The mortality values we observed were lower than predicted (< 30%), given reports in the literature. The difference is likely related to the in situ nature of the study and periods of cooler water temperatures between peaks facilitating recovery from thermal stress.